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Sample records for non-equilibrium air plasma

  1. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  2. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  3. Modeling of non-equilibrium and non-thermal plasma discharge in air: Three temperature modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahamud, Rajib; Farouk, Tanvir

    2014-10-01

    The rapid progress in atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma discharge has made air to be a preferable choice for feed gas. Despite the ease of operation of such discharges in air, the preference of air provides added complexity to modeling and simulations in terms of kinetics and different temperature modes. The diatomic nature of both N2 and O2 contributes to this complexity. In this work we report simulation results from a one-dimensional multi-physics model. A dc driven air plasma discharge operating at atmospheric and higher pressure is simulated. The model considers 50 species and 200 elementary reactions. The reaction scheme considers electron introduced and heavy particle reactions for N2 and O2 as well as interactions between nitrogen and oxygen. In addition to the species conservation equations, poisson's equation three different temperature's are resolved - electron, vibrational and translational. A special focus has been the coupling between the different temperatures to accurately resolve the energy cascade. The predictions from the model are found to be in good qualitative agreement against experimental measurements available in the literature. Work was supported by DARPA under Army Research Office (ARO) Grant No. W911NF1210007.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2015-March 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas...Mar 2015. PA#15120 14. ABSTRACT This paper discusses the modeling of non-equilibrium effects in inductively coupled plasma facilities. The model...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 NON-EQUILIBRIUMMODELING OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED RF PLASMAS Alessandro Munafò1, Jean-Luc Cambier2, and Marco

  5. Large Volume Non-Equilibrium Air Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure: A Novel Method with Low Power Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-28

    or dental gums. Unlike other known plasma "jet" devices, which generate very short plumes in the millimeter range, and at temperatures that can reach...of magnitude in size. Also unlike corona -like devices such as the plasma needle, which generates 2-3 mm long plasma at the tip of a sharp wire...delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation. Various bacteria were inactivated by the

  6. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes. PMID:27739459

  7. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-10-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes.

  8. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-10-14

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes.

  9. Non-equilibrium in low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    The wide range of applications of cold plasmas originates from their special characteristic of being a physical system out of thermodynamic equilibrium. This property enhances its reactivity at low gas temperature and allows to obtain macroscopic effects with a moderate energy consumption. In this review, the basic concepts of non-equilibrium in ionized gases are treated by showing why and how non-equilibrium functions of the degrees of freedom are formed in a variety of natural and man-made plasmas with particular emphasis on the progress made in the last decade. The modern point of view of a molecular basis of non-equilibrium and of a state-to-state kinetic approach is adopted. Computational and diagnostic techniques used to investigate the non-equilibrium conditions are also surveyed.

  10. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  11. Plasma diagnostics of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, Alexey; Scott, David; Keidar, Michael; Shneider, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Intensive development and biomedical application of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jet (NEAPJ) facilitates rapid growth of the plasma medicine field. The NEAPJ facility utilized at the George Washington University (GWU) demonstrated efficacy for treatment of various cancer types (lung, bladder, breast, head, neck, brain and skin). In this work we review recent advances of the research conducted at GWU concerned with the development of NEAPJ diagnostics including Rayleigh Microwave Scattering setup, method of streamer scattering on DC potential, Rogowski coils, ICCD camera and optical emission spectroscopy. These tools allow conducting temporally-resolved measurements of plasma density, electrical potential, charge and size of the streamer head, electrical currents flowing though the jet, ionization front propagation speed etc. Transient dynamics of plasma and discharge parameters will be considered and physical processes involved in the discharge will be analyzed including streamer breakdown, electrical coupling of the streamer tip with discharge electrodes, factors determining NEAPJ length, cross-sectional shape and propagation path etc.

  12. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  13. Non-equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenting

    As a promising method to enhance combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has drawn considerable attention. Due to the fast electron impact excitation and dissociation of molecules at low temperatures, plasma introduces new reaction pathways, changes fuel oxidation timescales, and can dramatically modify the combustion processes. In this dissertation, the radical generation from the plasma and its effect on flame extinction and ignition were investigated experimentally together with detailed numerical simulation on a counterflow CH4 diffusion flame. It was found that the atomic oxygen production played a dominant role in enhancing the chain-branching reaction pathways and accelerating fuel oxidation at near limit flame conditions. To understand the direct coupling effect between plasma and flame, a novel plasma-assisted combustion system with in situ discharge in a counterflow diffusion flame was developed. The ignition and extinction characteristics of CH4/O 2/He diffusion flames were investigated. For the first time, it was demonstrated that the strong plasma-flame coupling in in situ discharge could significantly modify the ignition/extinction characteristics and create a new fully stretched ignition S-curve. To understand low temperature kinetics of combustion, it is critical to measure the formation and decomposition of H2O2. A molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) system was developed and integrated with a laminar flow reactor. H2O2 measurements were directly calibrated, and compared to kinetic models. The results confirmed that low and intermediate temperature DME oxidation produced significant amounts of H2O2. The experimental characterizations of important intermediate species including H2O2, CH2O and CH3OCHO provided new capabilities to investigate and improve the chemical kinetics especially at low temperatures. A numerical scheme for model reduction was developed to improve the computational efficiency in the simulation of combustion with detailed

  14. Tailoring non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas for healthcare technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas operated at ambient atmospheric pressure are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. This includes the unique opportunity to deliver short-lived highly reactive species such as atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can initiate a wide range of reactions in biochemical systems, both therapeutic and toxic. The toxicological implications are not clear, e.g. potential risks through DNA damage. It is anticipated that interactions with biological systems will be governed through synergies between two or more species. Suitable optimized plasma sources are improbable through empirical investigations. Quantifying the power dissipation and energy transport mechanisms through the different interfaces from the plasma regime to ambient air, towards the liquid interface and associated impact on the biological system through a new regime of liquid chemistry initiated by the synergy of delivering multiple energy carrying species, is crucial. The major challenge to overcome the obstacles of quantifying energy transport and controlling power dissipation has been the severe lack of suitable plasma sources and diagnostic techniques. Diagnostics and simulations of this plasma regime are very challenging; the highly pronounced collision dominated plasma dynamics at very small dimensions requires extraordinary high resolution - simultaneously in space (microns) and time (picoseconds). Numerical simulations are equally challenging due to the inherent multi-scale character with very rapid electron collisions on the one extreme and the transport of chemically stable species characterizing completely different domains. This presentation will discuss our recent progress actively combining both advance optical diagnostics and multi-scale computer simulations.

  15. Interaction of non-equilibrium oxygen plasma with sintered graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvelbar, Uroš

    2013-03-01

    Samples made from sintered graphite with grain size of about 10 μm were exposed to highly non-equilibrium oxygen plasma created in a borosilicate glass tube by an electrodeless RF discharge. The density of charged particles was about 7 × 1015 m-3 and the neutral oxygen atom density 6 × 1021 m-3. The sample temperature was determined by a calibrated IR detector while the surface modifications were quantified by XPS and water drop techniques. The sample surface was rapidly saturated with carbonyl groups. Prolonged treatment of samples caused a decrease in concentration of the groups what was explained by thermal destruction. Therefore, the created functional groups were temperature dependent. The heating of samples resulted in extensive chemical interaction between the O atoms and samples what was best monitored by decreasing of the O atom density with increasing sample temperature. The saturation with functional groups could be restored only after cooling down of the samples and repeated short plasma treatment at low temperature.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Plasma Discharge for High Speed Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Anandhanarayanan, Karupannasamy; Krishnamurthy, Rajah; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of hypersonic flow control using plasma discharge technique is carried out using an in-house developed code CERANS-TCNEQ. The study is aimed at demonstrating a proof of concept futuristic aerodynamic flow control device. The Kashiwa Hypersonic and High Temperature wind tunnel study of plasma discharge over a flat plate had been considered for numerical investigation. The 7-species, 18-reaction thermo-chemical non-equilibrium, two-temperature air-chemistry model due Park is used to model the weakly ionized flow. Plasma discharge is modeled as Joule heating source terms in both the translation-rotational and vibrational energy equations. Comparison of results for plasma discharge at Mach 7 over a flat plate with the reference data reveals that the present study is able to mimic the exact physics of complex flow such as formation of oblique shock wave ahead of the plasma discharge region with a resultant rise in surface pressure and vibrational temperature up to 7000 K demonstrating the use of non-equilibrium plasma discharge for flow control at hypersonic speeds.

  17. Multiscale Numerical Methods for Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    the electron energy is usually required, resulting in the so- called two- temperature (2T) plasma model. In the case of a molecular plasma, due to...1)−1 (4.26) In the low temperature limit (ehν/kT ≫ 1), Planck’s distribution is replaced with the so- called Wien approximation: IWν (T ) = 2hν3 c2 e... temperature   2T    two  temperature   ADER    advection‐diffusion‐reaction  AFRL    Air Force Research Laboratory  AR    area ratio  ASDF    atomic state

  18. Non-Equilibrium Radiation from Shock-Heated Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    v- n 260nm LTER" vkT 4e_-. W 4 e IW- l watts (1) 2 (Q r)u cm3 sr cm - I r 0 I I .l I 1 I I I j 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 where CALCULATED ...Measurements, 210 nm 293 6 Radiation Measurements, 2 0 nm 30 7 Infrared Radiation Matrix, Experiment and Calculation 31 8 Three Temporal Parameters...Characterizing Non-equilibrium 32 I Infrared Radiation 9 Infrared Incubation Time, Experiment and Calculation 33 1 1 0 Infrared Time-To-Half-Peak

  19. Synthesis of Silane and Silicon in a Non-equilibrium Plasma Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The original objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of high volume, low-cost production of high purity silane or solar cell grade silicon using a non equilibrium plasma jet. The emphasis was changed near the end of the program to determine the feasibility of preparing photovoltaic amorphous silicon films directly using this method. The non equilibrium plasma jet should be further evaluated as a technique for producing high efficiency photovoltaic amorphous silicon films.

  20. Classical molecular dynamics simulations for non-equilibrium correlated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2017-03-01

    A classical molecular dynamics model was recently extended to simulate neutral multi-component plasmas where various charge states of the same atom and electrons coexist. It is used to investigate the plasma effects on the ion charge and on the ionization potential in dense plasmas. Different simulated statistical properties will show that the concept of isolated particles is lost in such correlated plasmas. The charge equilibration is discussed for a carbon plasma at solid density and investigation on the charge distribution and on the ionization potential depression (IPD) for aluminum plasmas is discussed with reference to existing experiments.

  1. Emission properties of non-equilibrium krypton plasma in the water-window region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Vassily S.

    2017-01-01

    The line emission properties of non-equilibrium krypton plasma are examined and the optimal emission temperature conditions for soft x-ray emission output in the water-window region are explored. The kinetic parameters for non-equilibrium plasma including major inelastic ion interaction processes, radiation and emission data are obtained with an approach based on the Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) quantum-statistical model and a distorted wave approximation. A nonmaxwellian electron distribution is used as well for calculating collisional rates. At a temperature of 70 eV the emission spectral efficiency for Kr equilibrium plasma is about 10%, and it jumps to a value greater than 70% at 100 eV. A similar spectral efficiency is achieved at a lower temperature e.g. 80 eV in non-equilibrium plasma with 7.5 keV fast electron average energy.

  2. Effect of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on non-equilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Ankush; Roy, Subrata; Gosse, Ryan

    2014-10-01

    A numerical study employing discontinuous Galerkin method demonstrating net surface heat reduction for a cylindrical body in Mach 17 hypersonic flow is presented. This application focuses on using sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators to inject momentum near the stagnation point. A 5 species finite rate air chemistry model completes the picture by analyzing the effect of the actuator on the flow chemistry. With low velocity near the stagnation point, the plasma actuator sufficiently modifies the fluid momentum. This results in redistribution of the integrated surface heating load on the body. Specifically, a particular configuration of normally pinching plasma actuation is predicted to reduce the surface heat flux at the stagnation point. An average reduction of 0.246% for the integrated and a maximum reduction of 7.68% are reported for the surface heat flux. The temperature contours in the fluid flow (with maximum temperature over 12 000 K) are pinched away from the stagnation point, thus resulting in reduced thermal load. Plasma actuation in this configuration also affects the species concentration distribution near the wall, in addition to the temperature gradient. The combined effect of both, thus results in an average reduction of 0.0986% and a maximum reduction of 4.04% for non-equilibrium calculations. Thus, this study successfully demonstrates the impact of sinusoidal dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuation on the reduction of thermal load on a hypersonic body.

  3. Carbon Dioxide reduction by non-equilibrium electrocatalysis plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouroux, J.; Cavadias, S.; Doubla, A.

    2011-03-01

    A possible strategy to increase the added value from CCS, is to consider it as a raw material for the production of liquid fuels, or chemical products. The most studied ways related to CO2 reduction, with formation of molecules such as CH3OH or syngas, is the reaction with H2 (exothermic reaction needing catalytic activation), or CH4 (endothermic reaction taking place at high temperature) with the use of a catalyst. The synthesis of CH3OH is performed on Lewis acid type sites (default of electrons) Cu/Zn/Al2O3. However the products of the reaction i.e. the water and methanol molecules, are very polar, resulting in a very low desorption rate. So in this reaction the key step is water desorption (Lewis basis). The increase of temperature in order to increase this desorption rate, leads to a cracking and the deposition of carbon in the catalyst, limiting its lifetime. Plasma driven catalysis allows firstly, a vibrational activation of CO2, H2 or CH4 through electron-molecule collisions, making easier their dissociation at low temperature and secondly expels water from the catalyst sites by supplying electrons (electropolarisation). The results show an increase of the yield in CH3OH with plasma and catalyst, confirming the action of the plasma. However energy consumption remains relatively high.

  4. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  5. Non-linear optical diagnostic studies of high pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempert, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Picosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) is used for study of vibrational energy loading and relaxation kinetics in high pressure nitrogen and air nsec pulsed non-equilibrium plasmas in a pin-to-pin geometry. It is found that ˜33% of total discharge energy in a single pulse in air at 100 torr couples directly to nitrogen vibration by electron impact, in good agreement with master equation modeling predictions. However in the afterglow the total quanta in vibrational levels 0 -- 9 is found to increase by a factor of approximately 2 and 4 in nitrogen and air, respectively, a result in direct contrast to modeling results which predict the total number of quanta to be essentially constant. More detailed comparison between experiment and model show that the VDF predicted by the model during, and directly after, the discharge pulse is in good agreement with that determined experimentally, however for time delays exceeding ˜10 μsec the experimental and predicted VDFs diverge rapidly, particularly for levels v = 2 and greater. Specifically modeling predicts a rapid drop in population of high levels due to net downward V-V energy transfer whereas the experiment shows an increase in population in levels 2 and 3 and approximately constant population for higher levels. It is concluded that a collisional process is feeding high vibrational levels at a rate which is comparable to the rate at which population of the high levels is lost due to net downward V-V. A likely candidate for the source of additional vibrational quanta is the quenching of metastable electronic states of nitrogen to highly excited vibrational levels of the ground electronic state. Recent progress in the development and application of psec coherent Raman electric field and spontaneous Thomson scattering diagnostics for study of high pressure nsec pulsed plasmas will also be presented.

  6. A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. II. Governing equations

    SciTech Connect

    Li HePing; Zhang XiaoNing; Xia Weidong

    2013-03-15

    Governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas are both prerequisites for studying the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system numerically. In this paper, a kinetic derivation of the governing equations used for describing the complicated thermo-electro-magneto-hydrodynamic-chemical coupling effects in non-equilibrium thermal plasmas is presented. This derivation, which is achieved using the Chapman-Enskog method, is completely consistent with the theory of the transport properties reported in the previous paper by the same authors. It is shown, based on this self-consistent theory, that the definitions of the specific heat at constant pressure and the reactive thermal conductivity of two-temperature plasmas are not necessary. The governing equations can be reduced to their counterparts under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and local chemical equilibrium (LCE) conditions. The general method for the determination of the boundary conditions of the solved variables is also discussed briefly. The two papers establish a self-consistent physical-mathematical model that describes the complicated physical and chemical processes in a thermal plasma system for the cases both in LTE or LCE conditions and under non-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Lani, A.; Panesi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) A Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.

  8. Search for a non-equilibrium plasma in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-06-01

    Abell 754 is a galaxy cluster in which an ongoing merger is evident on the plane of the sky, from the southeast to the northwest. We study the spatial variation of the X-ray spectra observed with Suzaku along the merging direction, centering on the Fe Ly α/Fe He α line ratio to search for possible deviation from ionization equilibrium. Fitting with a single-temperature collisional non-equilibrium plasma model shows that the electron temperature increases from the southeast to the northwest. The ionization parameter is consistent with that in equilibrium (net > 1013 s cm-3) except for the specific region with the highest temperature (kT=13.3_{-1.1}^{+1.4}keV) where n_et=10^{11.6_{-1.7}^{+0.6}}s cm-3. The elapsed time from the plasma heating estimated from the ionization parameter is 0.36-76 Myr at the 90% confidence level. This timescale is quite short but consistent with the traveling time of a shock to pass through that region. We thus interpret that the non-equilibrium ionization plasma in Abell 754 observed is a remnant of the shock heating in the merger process. However, we note that the X-ray spectrum of the specific region where the non-equilibrium is found can also be fitted with a collisional ionization plasma model with two temperatures, low kT=4.2^{+4.2}_{-1.5}keV and very high kT >19.3 keV. The very high temperature component is alternatively fitted with a power-law model. Either of these spectral models is interpreted as a consequence of the ongoing merger process as in the case of the non-equilibrium ionization plasma.

  9. Multi-Modality Pulsed AC Source for Medical Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, Daniel; Gilbert, James

    2014-10-01

    A burgeoning field has developed around the use of non-equilibrium (``cold'') plasmas for various medical applications, including wound treatment, surface sterilization, non-thermal hemostasis, and selective cell destruction. Proposed devices typically utilize pulsed DC power sources, which have no other therapeutic utility, and may encounter significant regulatory restrictions regarding their safety for use in patient care. Additionally, dedicated capital equipment is difficult for healthcare facilities to justify. In this work, we have demonstrated for the first time the generation of non-equilibrium plasma using pulsed AC output from a specially-designed electrosurgical generator. The ability to power novel non-equilibrium plasma devices from a piece of equipment already ubiquitous in operating theatres should significantly reduce the barriers to adoption of plasma devices. We demonstrate the ability of a prototype device, coupled to this source, to reduce bacterial growth in vitro. Such a system could allow a single surgical instrument to provide both non-thermal sterilization and thermal tissue dissection.

  10. Gas-Liquid Interfacial Non-Equilibrium Plasmas for Structure Controlled Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas generated in liquid or in contact with liquid have attracted much attention as a novel reactive field in the nano-bio material creation because the brand-new chemical and biological reactions are yielded at the gas-liquid interface, which are induced by the physical actions of the non-equilibrium plasmas. In this study, first, size- and structure-controlled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) covered with DNA are synthesized using a pulse-driven gas-liquid interfacial discharge plasma (GLIDP) for the application to next-generation drug delivery systems. The size and assembly of the AuNPs are found to be easily controlled by changing the plasma parameters and DNA concentration in the liquid. On the other hand, the mono-dispersed, small-sized, and interval-controlled AuNPs are synthesized by using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a template, where the CNTs are functionalized by the ion and radical irradiation in non-equilibrium plasmas. These new materials are now widely applied to the solar cell, optical devices, and so on. Second, highly-ordered periodic structures of the AuNPs are formed by transcribing the periodic plasma structure to the surface of the liquid, where the spatially selective synthesis of the AuNPs is realized. This phenomenon is well explained by the reduction and oxidation effects of the radicals which are generated by the non-equilibrium plasma irradiation to the liquid and resultant dissociation of the liquid. In addition, it is attempted to form nano- or micro-scale periodic structures of the AuNPs based on the self-organizing behavior of turbulent plasmas generated by the nonlinear development of plasma fluctuations at the gas-liquid interface.

  11. Influence of dielectric materials on radial uniformity in non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akinori; Komori, Kyohei

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma has been utilized for various technological applications such as surface treatment, materials processing, bio-medical and bio-logical applications. For optimum control of the plasma for the above applications, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations on the plasma have been reported. Especially, controlling radial uniformity of the plasma are very important for utilizing materials processing. In this paper, an axially-symmetric three-dimensional fluid model, which is composed of the continuity equation for charged and neutral species, the Poisson equation, and the energy conservation equation for electrons, of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure helium plasma has been developed. Then, influence of dielectric properties (e.g. relative permittivity, secondary electron emission coefficient, etc.) of dielectric materials on radial plasma uniformity (i.e. radial distributions of electron density, ion density, electric field in the plasma) was examined. This work was partly supported by KAKENHI (No. 26420247), and a ``Grant for Advanced Industrial Technology Development (No. 11B06004d)'' in 2011 from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  12. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  13. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355 nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma as a Green Tool to Crosslink Gelatin Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Anna; Bigi, Adriana; Colombo, Vittorio; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Gherardi, Matteo; Gualandi, Chiara; Oleari, Maria Chiara; Panzavolta, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun gelatin nanofibers attract great interest as a natural biomaterial for cartilage and tendon repair despite their high solubility in aqueous solution, which makes them also difficult to crosslink by means of chemical agents. In this work, we explore the efficiency of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in stabilizing gelatin nanofibers. We demonstrate that plasma represents an innovative, easy and environmentally friendly approach to successfully crosslink gelatin electrospun mats directly in the solid state. Plasma treated gelatin mats display increased structural stability and excellent retention of fibrous morphology after immersion in aqueous solution. This method can be successfully applied to induce crosslinking both in pure gelatin and genipin-containing gelatin electrospun nanofibers, the latter requiring an even shorter plasma exposure time. A complete characterization of the crosslinked nanofibres, including mechanical properties, morphological observations, stability in physiological solution and structural modifications, has been carried out in order to get insights on the occurring reactions triggered by plasma. PMID:27924840

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma as a Green Tool to Crosslink Gelatin Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Anna; Bigi, Adriana; Colombo, Vittorio; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Gherardi, Matteo; Gualandi, Chiara; Oleari, Maria Chiara; Panzavolta, Silvia

    2016-12-07

    Electrospun gelatin nanofibers attract great interest as a natural biomaterial for cartilage and tendon repair despite their high solubility in aqueous solution, which makes them also difficult to crosslink by means of chemical agents. In this work, we explore the efficiency of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in stabilizing gelatin nanofibers. We demonstrate that plasma represents an innovative, easy and environmentally friendly approach to successfully crosslink gelatin electrospun mats directly in the solid state. Plasma treated gelatin mats display increased structural stability and excellent retention of fibrous morphology after immersion in aqueous solution. This method can be successfully applied to induce crosslinking both in pure gelatin and genipin-containing gelatin electrospun nanofibers, the latter requiring an even shorter plasma exposure time. A complete characterization of the crosslinked nanofibres, including mechanical properties, morphological observations, stability in physiological solution and structural modifications, has been carried out in order to get insights on the occurring reactions triggered by plasma.

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Non-Equilibrium Plasma as a Green Tool to Crosslink Gelatin Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Anna; Bigi, Adriana; Colombo, Vittorio; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Gherardi, Matteo; Gualandi, Chiara; Oleari, Maria Chiara; Panzavolta, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Electrospun gelatin nanofibers attract great interest as a natural biomaterial for cartilage and tendon repair despite their high solubility in aqueous solution, which makes them also difficult to crosslink by means of chemical agents. In this work, we explore the efficiency of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in stabilizing gelatin nanofibers. We demonstrate that plasma represents an innovative, easy and environmentally friendly approach to successfully crosslink gelatin electrospun mats directly in the solid state. Plasma treated gelatin mats display increased structural stability and excellent retention of fibrous morphology after immersion in aqueous solution. This method can be successfully applied to induce crosslinking both in pure gelatin and genipin-containing gelatin electrospun nanofibers, the latter requiring an even shorter plasma exposure time. A complete characterization of the crosslinked nanofibres, including mechanical properties, morphological observations, stability in physiological solution and structural modifications, has been carried out in order to get insights on the occurring reactions triggered by plasma.

  17. Synthesis of silane and silicon in a non-equilibrium plasma jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.; Felder, W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a non-equilibrium hydrogen plasma jet as a chemical synthesis tool was investigated. Four possible processes were identified for further study: (1) production of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic surfaces, (2) production of SiHCl3 from SiCl4, (3) production of SiH4 from SiHCl3, and (4) purification of SiCl4 by metal impurity nucleation. The most striking result was the recognition that the strongly adhering silicon films, amorphous or polycrystalline, produced in our studies could be the basis for preparing a photovoltaic surface directly; this process has potential advantages over other vapor deposition processes.

  18. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Processes: Space Plasmas and the Inner Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an "iso-q" process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal (~1,000,000 K) and iso-q (κ ~ 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the "Ribbon," P ≈ 3.2 pdyn cm-2, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P ≈ 2 pdyn cm-2.

  19. Application of extremely non-equilibrium plasmas in the processing of nano and biomedical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozetič, Miran; Primc, Gregor; Vesel, Alenka; Zaplotnik, Rok; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Recek, Nina; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Guhy, Lukus; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Assensio, Maria C.; Milošević, Slobodan; Lehocky, Marian; Sedlarik, Vladimir; Gorjanc, Marija; Kutasi, Kinga; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin

    2015-02-01

    Some applications of extremely non-equilibrium oxygen plasma for tailoring the surface properties of organic as well as inorganic materials are presented. Plasma of low or moderate ionization fraction and very high dissociation fraction is created by high frequency electrodeless discharges created in chambers made from a material of low recombination coefficient. The O atom density often exceeds 1021 m-3 which allows for rapid functionalization of carbon-containing materials. Surface saturation with polar oxygen-rich groups is achieved in a fraction of a second and further exposure leads to etching. The etching is often non-uniform and results in nano-structuring of surface morphology. A combination of rich morphology and saturation with polar functional groups allows for a super-hydrophilic character of originally hydrophobic materials. Polymer composites are etched selectively so the polymer component is removed from the sample surface, leading to modified surface properties. Furthermore, such a treatment allows for distinguishing the distribution and orientation of fillers inside the polymer matrix. The exposure of inorganic materials to non-equilibrium oxygen plasma causes one-dimensional growth of metal oxide nanoparticles, thus representing a unique technique for the rapid catalyser-free growth of nanowires.

  20. On non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets and plasma bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinpei

    2012-10-01

    Because of the enhanced plasma chemistry, atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas (APNPs) have been widely studied for several emerging applications such as biomedical applications. For the biomedical applications, plasma jet devices, which generate plasma in open space (surrounding air) rather than in confined discharge gaps only, have lots of advantages over the traditional dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices. For example, it can be used for root canal disinfection, which can't be realized by the traditional plasma device. On the other hand, currently, the working gases of most of the plasma jet devices are noble gases or the mixtures of the noble gases with small amount of O2, or air. If ambient air is used as the working gas, several serious difficulties are encountered in the plasma generation process. Amongst these are high gas temperatures and disrupting instabilities. In this presentation, firstly, a brief review of the different cold plasma jets developed to date is presented. Secondly, several different plasma jet devices developed in our lab are reported. The effects of various parameters on the plasma jets are discussed. Finally, one of the most interesting phenomena of APNP-Js, the plasma bullet is discussed and its behavior is described. References: [1] X. Lu, M. Laroussi, V. Puech, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 034005 (2012); [2] Y. Xian, X. Lu, S. Wu, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 123702 (2012); [3] X. Pei, X. Lu, J. Liu, D. Liu, Y. Yang, K. Ostrikov, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, J. Phys. D 45, 165205 (2012).

  1. Application of non-equilibrium plasmas in treatment of wool fibers and seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran

    2003-10-01

    While large effort is under way to achieve stable, large area, non-equilibrium plasma reactors operating at atmospheric pressure we should still consider application of low pressure reactors, which provide well defined, easily controlled reactive plasmas. Therefore, the application of low pressure rf plasmas for the treatment of wool and seed was investigated. The studies were aimed at establishing optimal procedure to achieve better wettability, dyeability and printability of wool. Plasma treatment led to a modification of wool fiber topography and formation of new polar functional groups inducing the increase of wool hydrophylicity. Plasma activation of fiber surface was also used to achieve better binding of biopolymer chitosan to wool in order to increase the content of favorable functional groups and thus improving sorption properties of recycled wool fibers for heavy metal ions and acid dyes. In another study, the increase of germination percentage of seeds induced by plasmas was investigated. We have selected dry (unimbibed) Empress tree seeds (Paulownia tomentosa Steud.). Empress tree seed has been studied extensively and its mechanism of germination is well documented. Germination of these seeds is triggered by light in a limited range of wavelengths. Interaction between activated plasma particles and seed, inside the plasma reactor, leads to changes in its surface topography, modifies the surface layer and increases the active surface area. Consequently, some bioactive nitrogeneous compounds could be bound to the activated surface layer causing the increment of germination percentage.

  2. Collision integrals for charged-charged interaction in two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2013-09-15

    Choice of an appropriate form of shielding distance in the estimation of collision integrals under screened coulomb potential for two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma is addressed. Simple expressions for collision integrals for charged-charged interactions are derived. It is shown that while some of the formalisms used earlier completely ignore the presence of ions, the others incorporating it may result in negative collision integrals for the interactions involving particles at higher charged states. The parametric regimes of concern and impact of different formalisms on the computed transport properties are investigated with specific reference to nitrogen plasma. A revised definition of the shielding distance is proposed, which incorporates both electrons and ions, avoids the problem of negative collision integrals in all practical regimes of interest and results in calculated property values in close agreement with experimentally observed results.

  3. Effects of ROS and RNS in non-equilibrium plasma enhanced oxidizing and nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsyuk, Vitaly; Izmailov, Igor; Naumov, Vadym; Khomich, Vladimir; Tsiolko, Vyacheslav

    2016-09-01

    Plasma enhanced oxidizing and nitriding processes are of great interest for physics and applications. However, despite all advances in plasma technology, mechanisms of non-equilibrium plasma chemistry are not quite clear, particularly concerning reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in metastable states. We tried to study this matter more detail. Experiments were done in a low temperature magnetron with a non-self-sustained glow discharge in oxygen/nitrogen/argon mixtures, employing electrical and optical diagnostics. Measurements showed that plasma processing is accompanied by the formation of electronically excited particles ROS/RNS. Computer modeling by using 0D-kinetic and 1D-fluid models including ionization, excitation, dissociation-recombination, vibrational relaxation, collisional quenching and radiation revealed the most probable mechanisms of plasma-chemical transformations. Effects of metastables of singlet oxygen O2*(a,b)and nitrogen N2*(A)as well as small but important radicals O*(1 D), N*(2 D) were also examined. Our study confirms the role of ROS/RNS in plasma kinetics and indicates the way toward more efficient oxygen and nitrogen plasma processing.

  4. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A. Alfuhaid, S. A. Panesi, M.; Cambier, J.-L.

    2015-10-07

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  5. NON-EQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES: SPACE PLASMAS AND THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-04-10

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an 'iso-q' process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal ({approx}1,000,000 K) and iso-q ({kappa} {approx} 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the 'Ribbon', P Almost-Equal-To 3.2 pdyn cm{sup -2}, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P Almost-Equal-To 2 pdyn cm{sup -2}.

  6. Inactivation Process of Penicillium digitatum Spores Treated with Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Mori, Takumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores treated with a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma, the spores were observed using a fluorescent microscope and compared with those treated with ultraviolet (UV) light or moist heat. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as cell membranes in the spores treated with the plasma were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes, while the organelles were never stained in the spores treated with UV light or moist heat. Moreover, DPPP staining revealed that organelles were oxidized by plasma treatment unlike UV light or moist heat treatments. These results suggest that only plasma treatment induces a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles without a major deformation of the membranes through the penetration of reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma into the cell.

  7. Effect of ozone on sterilization of Penicillium digitatum using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Iseki, Sachiko; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    Methyl bromide has been sprayed to the crops for protecting from insects and virus, but has high ozone depletion potential. Thus, the development of substitute-technology has been strongly required. We have investigated a plasma sterilization for spores of Penicillium digitatum, which causes green mold disease of the crops, using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. The sterilization was caused by UV light, ozone, O and OH radicals. In this study, ozone density was measured and the effect to sterilization was discussed. The plasma was generated at an alternative current of 6kV and Ar gas flow rate of 3L/min. In order to investigate the sterilization mechanism of ozone, the absolute density of ozone was measured using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and was from 2 to 8 ppm. The sterilization by this plasma was larger than that by the ozonizer (03:600ppm). It is confirmed that the effect of ozone to the sterilization of Penicillium digitatum would be small.

  8. Influence of Penning effect on the plasma features in a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhengshi; Zhang, Guanjun; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Zexian

    2014-03-14

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is a cold plasma source that promises various innovative applications. The influence of Penning effect on the formation, propagation, and other physical properties of the plasma bullets in APPJ remains a debatable topic. By using a 10 cm wide active electrode and a frequency of applied voltage down to 0.5 Hz, the Penning effect caused by preceding discharges can be excluded. It was found that the Penning effect originating in a preceding discharge helps build a conductive channel in the gas flow and provide seed electrons, thus the discharge can be maintained at a low voltage which in turn leads to a smaller propagation speed for the plasma bullet. Photographs from an intensified charge coupled device reveal that the annular structure of the plasma plume for He is irrelevant to the Penning ionization process arising from preceding discharges. By adding NH{sub 3} into Ar to introduce Penning effect, the originally filamentous discharge of Ar can display a rather extensive plasma plume in ambient as He. These results are helpful for the understanding of the behaviors of non-equilibrium APPJs generated under distinct conditions and for the design of plasma jet features, especially the spatial distribution and propagation speed, which are essential for application.

  9. State-to-state modeling of non equilibrium low-temperature atomic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultel, Arnaud; Morel, Vincent; Annaloro, Julien; Druguet, Marie-Claude

    2017-03-01

    The most relevant approach leading to a thorough understanding of the behavior of non equilibrium atomic plasmas is to elaborate state-to-state models in which the mass conservation equation is applied directly to atoms or ions on their excited states. The present communication reports the elaboration of such models and the results obtained. Two situations close to each other are considered. First, the plasmas produced behind shock fronts obtained in ground test facilities (shock tubes) or during planetary atmospheric entries of spacecrafts are discussed. We focused our attention on the nitrogen case for which a complete implementation of the CoRaM-N2 collisional-radiative model has been performed in a steady one-dimensional computation code based on the Rankine-Hugoniot assumptions. Second, the plasmas produced by the interaction between an ultra short laser pulse and a tungsten sample are discussed in the framework of the elaboration of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In the present case, tungsten has been chosen in the purpose of validating an in situ experimental method able to provide the elemental composition of the divertor wall of a tokamak like WEST or ITER undergoing high energetic deuterium and tritium nuclei fluxes.

  10. The stationary non-equilibrium plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The statistical properties of the two-component plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons measured by the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station and the HESS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are analyzed. Stationary non-equilibrium distributions defining the relativistic electron-positron plasma are derived semi-empirically by performing spectral fits to the flux data and reconstructing the spectral number densities of the electronic and positronic components in phase space. These distributions are relativistic power-law densities with exponential cutoff, admitting an extensive entropy variable and converging to the Maxwell-Boltzmann or Fermi-Dirac distributions in the non-relativistic limit. Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons constitute a classical (low-density high-temperature) plasma due to the low fugacity in the quantized partition function. The positron fraction is assembled from the flux densities inferred from least-squares fits to the electron and positron spectra and is subjected to test by comparing with the AMS-02 flux ratio measured in the GeV interval. The calculated positron fraction extends to TeV energies, predicting a broad spectral peak at about 1 TeV followed by exponential decay.

  11. Developments in Power efficient dissociation of CO2 using non-equilibrium plasma activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sanden, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Sustainable energy generation by means of, either photovoltaic conversion, concentrated solar power or wind, will certainly form a significant part of the energy mix in 2025. The intermittency as well as the temporal variation and the regional spread of this energy source, however, requires a means to store and transport energy on a large scale. In this presentation the means of storage will be addressed of sustainable energy transformed into fuels and the prominent role plasma science and technology can play in this great challenge. The storage of sustainable energy in these so called solar fuels, e.g. hydrocarbons and alcohols, by means of artificial photosynthesis from the feedstock CO2 and H2O, will enable a CO2 neutral power generation infrastructure, which is close to the present infrastructure based on fossil fuels. The challenge will be to achieve power efficient dissociation of CO2 or H2O or both, after which traditional chemical conversion (Fisher-Tropsch, Sabatier, etc.) towards fuels can take place. A promising route is the dissociation or activation of CO2 by means of plasma, possible combined with catalysis. Taking advantage of non-equilibrium plasma conditions to reach optimal energy efficiency we have started a solar fuels program at the beginning of 2012 focusing on CO2 plasma dissociation into CO and O2. The plasma is generated in a low loss microwave cavity with microwave powers up to 10 kW using a supersonic expansion to quench the plasma and prevent vibrational-translational relaxation losses. New ideas on the design of the facility and results on power efficient conversion (more then 50%) of large CO2 flows (up to 75 standard liter per minute with 11% conversion) at low gas temperatures will be presented.

  12. A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. I. Transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang XiaoNing; Xia WeiDong; Li HePing; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-03-15

    A self-consistent and complete numerical model for investigating the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system consists of the governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas. In this paper, a new kinetic theory of the transport properties of two-temperature (2-T) plasmas, based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation using a modified Chapman-Enskog method, is presented. This work is motivated by the large discrepancies between the theories for the calculation of the transport properties of 2-T plasmas proposed by different authors in previous publications. In the present paper, the coupling between electrons and heavy species is taken into account, but reasonable simplifications are adopted, based on the physical fact that m{sub e}/m{sub h} Much-Less-Than 1, where m{sub e} and m{sub h} are, respectively, the masses of electrons and heavy species. A new set of formulas for the transport coefficients of 2-T plasmas is obtained. The new theory has important physical and practical advantages over previous approaches. In particular, the diffusion coefficients are complete and satisfy the mass conversation law due to the consideration of the coupling between electrons and heavy species. Moreover, this essential requirement is satisfied without increasing the complexity of the transport coefficient formulas. Expressions for the 2-T combined diffusion coefficients are obtained. The expressions for the transport coefficients can be reduced to the corresponding well-established expressions for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium for the case in which the electron and heavy-species temperatures are equal.

  13. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems.

  14. Silicon surface modifications produced by non-equilibrium He, Ne and Kr plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Max; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this publication the interaction of non-equilibrium plasma jets (N-APPJs) with silicon surfaces is studied. The N-APPJs are operated with He, Ne and Kr gas flows under atmospheric pressure conditions. Plasma bullets are produced by the He and Ne N-APPJs, while a filamentary discharge is ignited in the Kr flow. All these N-APPJs produce remarkable traces on silicon wafer surfaces treated in their effluents. Different types of etching tracks, blisters and crystals are observed on the treated surfaces. The observed traces and surface modifications of silicon wafers are analyzed with optical, atomic-force, scanning electron and Raman microscopes. Based on the material composition within the etching tracks and the position and dimension of blisters and crystals, the traces observed on the silicon wafer surfaces are interpreted as traces of micro-plasmoids. Amorphous silicon is found in the etching tracks. Blisters are produced through the formation of cracks inside the silicon crystal by the interaction with micro-plasmoids. The reason for these modifications is not clear now. The density of micro-plasmoids traces on the treated silicon surface and the depth and length of the etching tracks depends strongly on the type of the used carrier gas of the N-APPJ.

  15. Analyses on the Ionization Instability of Non-Equilibrium Seeded Plasma in an MHD Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chi Kien

    2016-06-01

    Recently, closed cycle magnetohydrodynamic power generation system research has been focused on improving the isentropic efficiency and the enthalpy extraction ratio. By reducing the cross-section area ratio of the disk magnetohydrodynamic generator, it is believed that a high isentropic efficiency can be achieved with the same enthalpy extraction. In this study, the result relating to a plasma state which takes into account the ionization instability of non-equilibrium seeded plasma is added to the theoretical prediction of the relationship between enthalpy extraction and isentropic efficiency. As a result, the electron temperature which reaches the seed complete ionization state without the growth of ionization instability can be realized at a relatively high seed fraction condition. However, the upper limit of the power generation performance is suggested to remain lower than the value expected in the low seed fraction condition. It is also suggested that a higher power generation performance may be obtained by implementing the electron temperature range which reaches the seed complete ionization state at a low seed fraction.

  16. Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran; Mason, Nigel; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2007-06-01

    Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts and Institute of Physics, Belgrade. Each Symposium has sought to highlight a key topic of plasma research and the 5th EU - Japan symposium explored the role of Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas since these are key elements of plasma processing. Other aspects of technologies for manufacturing integrated circuits were also considered. Unlike bio-medicine and perhaps politics, in plasma processing free radicals are `good radicals' but their kinetics are difficult to understand since there remains little data on their collisions with electrons and ions. One of the goals of the symposium was to facilitate communication between experimentalists and theorists in binary collision physics with plasma modellers and practitioners of plasma processing in order to optimize efforts to provide much needed data for both molecules and radicals of practical importance. The non-equilibrium nature of plasmas is critical in the efficient manufacturing of high resolution structures by anisotropic plasma etching on Si wafers since they allow separate control of the directionality and energy of ions and provide a high level of separation between the mean energies of electrons and ions. As nanotechnologies become practical, plasma processing may play a key role, not only in manufacturing of integrated circuits, but also for self-organization of massively parallel manufacturing of nanostructures. In this Symposium the key issues that are hindering the development of such new, higher resolution technologies were discussed and some possible solutions were proposed. In particular, damage control, fast neutral etching, processes at surface and modeling of profiles were addressed in several of the lectures. A wide range of topics are covered in this book including atomic and molecular collision physics - primarily focused towards formation and analysis of radicals, basic swarm data and breakdown kinetics, basic kinetics of RF and DC

  17. Practical and theoretical considerations on the use of ICCD imaging for the characterization of non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherardi, Matteo; Puač, Nevena; Marić, Dragana; Stancampiano, Augusto; Malović, Gordana; Colombo, Vittorio; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade the use of ICCD cameras as a means for characterizing non-equilibrium plasmas has been steadily increasing. Due to their high sensitivity and high speed gateability, ICCD cameras enable time-resolved studies of the anatomy and, when adopted in conjunction with filters, monochromators, spectrometers or laser systems, time-resolved investigation of physical and chemical properties of non-equilibrium plasma discharges. This paper is meant as an introduction to ICCD technology and its use as a plasma diagnostic technique, discussing the experimental problems typically associated with its use and providing the readers with practical examples and suggestions on how to address them. In particular, the issues of ICCD camera synchronization with the voltage pulse driving the plasma discharge and of investigating small volume discharges are addressed, focusing mainly on the case of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets. Finally, a possible way to achieve absolute calibration of plasma discharge emission is presented and discussed. A wide range of data, mostly unpublished, is provided here to illustrate the points.

  18. Bacterial-killing effect of atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma jet and oral mucosa response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dexi; Xiong, Zilan; Du, Tianfeng; Zhou, Xincai; Cao, Yingguang; Lu, Xinpei

    2011-12-01

    Recently, plasma sterilization has attracted increasing attention in dental community for the atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma jet (APNPs), which is driven by a kilohertz pulsed DC power, may be applied to the dental and oral diseases. However, it is still in doubt whether APNPs can effectively kill pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity and produce no harmful effects on normal oral tissues, especially on normal mucosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial-killing effect of APNPs in the biofilms containing a single breed of bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, P.g.), and the pathological changes of the oral mucosa after treatment by APNPs. P.g. was incubated to form the biofilms in vitro, and the samples were divided into three groups randomly: group A (blank control); group B in which the biofilms were treated by APNPs (the setting of the equipment: 10 kHz, 1600 ns and 8 kV); group C in which the biofilms were exposed only to a gas jet without ignition of the plasma. Each group had three samples and each sample was processed for up to 5 min. The biofilms were then fluorescently stained, observed and photographed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. In the animal experiment, six male Japanese white rabbits were divided into two groups randomly (n=3 in each group) in terms of the different post-treatment time (1-day group and 5-day group). The buccal mucosa of the left side and the mucosa of the ventral surface of the tongue were treated by APNPs for 10 min in the same way as the bacterial biofilm experiment in each rabbit, and the corresponding mucosa of the other sides served as normal control. The clinical manifestations of the oral mucosa were observed and recorded every day. The rabbits were sacrificed one or five day(s) after APNPs treatment. The oral mucosa were harvested and prepared to haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Clinical observation and histopathological scores were used to assess mucosal changes. The results

  19. Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators on Non-equilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    AC pulse of high potential difference across the exposed and grounded electrodes causes a high electric field near the surface, which causes the air...the first configuration with the plasma ac - tuator placed at the stagnation point, with body force in the þy-direction. For the second and third...density,” J. Appl. Phys. 106, 013310 (2009). 22C. C. Wang and S. Roy, “Numerical simulation of a gas turbine combustor using nanosecond pulsed actuators

  20. Enhancement of Combustion and Flame Stabilization Using Transient Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    were several possible outcomes: a.) successful ignition kernel evolution to a large flame; b.) extinction of the ignition kernel ; and c.) a self...extinguishing outward propagating flame. The successful transition from an ignition kernel to a propagating flame was strongly dependent on the transport...properties of the fuel-air mixture (Lewis number) and the radiation Fig. 56 Ignition kernel heat loss from the hot ignition kernel (by the plasma

  1. A Tightly Coupled Non-Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model for Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Journal article published in the Journal of Applied Physics , Vol. #118, Issue #13...effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State (StS) approach. A multi- temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium...allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature . The governing equations

  2. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma on Partially Premixed Flame Extinction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    dissociative attachment processes. The Boltzmann equation calculates the rate coefficients of the electron impact elementary reactions by averaging the...ion-ion neutralization processes, ion-molecule reactions, and electron attachment and detachment processes. Note that the present model does not solve...partially premixed methane flames was studied at 60 Torr by blending 2% CH4 into the oxidizer stream. The non-equilibrium discharge accelerated

  3. Measurement of Radiative Non-Equilibrium for Air Shocks Between 7-9 Km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a recent characterization of non-equilibrium radiation for shock speeds between 7 and 9 km/s in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) Facility. Data is spectrally resolved from 190- 1450 nm and spatially resolved behind the shock front. Comparisons are made to DPLR/NEQAIR simulations using different modeling options and recommendations for future study are made based on these comparisons.

  4. Non-equilibrium solid-to-plasma transition dynamics using XANES diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Recoules, V.

    2016-10-01

    The advent of femtosecond lasers has shed new light on non-equilibrium high energy density physics. The ultrafast energy absorption by electrons and the finite rate of their energy transfer to the lattice creates non-equilibrium states of matter, triggering a new class of non-thermal processes from the ambient solid up to extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, referred as the warm dense matter regime. The dynamical interplay between electron and atomic structures is the key issue that drives the ultrafast phase transitions dynamics. Bond weakening or bond hardening are predicted, but strongly depends on the material considered. Many studies have been conducted but this physics is still poorly understood. The experimental tools used up-to-now have provided an incomplete insight. Pure optical techniques measure only indirectly atomic motion through changes in the dielectric function whereas X-ray or electron diffraction only probes the average long-range order. This review is dedicated to recent developments in time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, which is expected to give a more complete picture by probing simultaneously the modifications of the near-continuum electron and local atomic structures. Results are reported for three different types of metals (simple, transition and noble metals) in which a confrontation has been carried out between measurements and ab initio simulations.

  5. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  6. Non-Equilibrium Plasma Applications for Water Purification Supporting Human Spaceflight and Terrestrial Point-of-Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.; Foster, John E.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    2016 NASA Glenn Technology Day Panel Presentation on May 24, 2016. The panel description is: Environmental Impact: NASA Glenn Water Capabilities Both global water scarcity and water treatment concerns are two of the most predominant environmental issues of our time. Glenn researchers share insights on a snow sensing technique, hyper spectral imaging of Lake Erie algal blooms, and a discussion on non-equilibrium plasma applications for water purification supporting human spaceflight and terrestrial point-of-use. The panel moderator will be Bryan Stubbs, Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance.

  7. Heating effects of a non-equilibrium RF corona discharge in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzas, F.; Tardiveau, P.; Puech, V.; Makarov, M.; Agneray, A.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical and thermal properties of a single electrode configuration corona discharge generated under radiofrequency high voltage inside an open air gap at pressures above 1 bar is investigated. Time-resolved imaging of the discharge shows a four-step development of the discharge at atmospheric pressure starting by streamers' inception and propagation, evolving in heating waves and stabilizing in a stationary regime until the power supply is switched off. The mean gas temperature reaches about 1700 K in tens of microseconds with electrical energy release around tens of millijoules. Heating has been attributed to ion collisions and excited species relaxation, promoted by the successive time periods of the power supply. At higher pressures, beyond 3 bar, this behaviour changes and heating occurs at the same time as the discharge propagates. It leads to hot channels which constrict near the electrode as long as the voltage pulse is applied. Temperature gets higher and saturates at 2600 K whatever the voltage and the pressure. Considering the change in the electrical energy density released within the plasma channels with pressure and voltage, temperature saturation seems to be an effect of heat confining within the channels due to pressure. The large and non-thermal plasma generated by the RF corona discharge is a very good candidate for car engine lean mixtures ignition issues.

  8. Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-03-13

    Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted on one end of a large vacuum chamber while the astrophysical jet experiment is mounted on the other end. Diagnostics are shared between the two experiments. The solar experiment produces arched plasma loops that behave very much like solar corona loops. The astrophysical jet experiment produces plasma jets that are very much like astrophysical jets. We have also done work on plasma waves, including general wave dispersions, and specific properties of kinetic Alfven waves and of whistler waves.

  9. Thomson scattering on non-equilibrium low density plasmas: principles, practice and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Emile; Nijdam, Sander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review the main challenges related to laser Thomson scattering on low temperature plasmas. The main features of the triple grating spectrometer used to discriminate Thomson and Raman scattering signals from Rayleigh scattering and stray light are presented. The main parameters influencing the detection limit of Thomson scattering are reviewed. Laser stray light and plasma emission are two limiting factors, but Raman scattering from molecules inside the plasma will further decrease it. In the case of non-thermal plasmas at high pressure, Thomson scattering is the only technique which allows us to obtain the electron density without any prior knowledge of the plasma properties. Moreover, very high 3D spatial and temporal resolutions can easily be achieved. However, special care still needs to be taken to verify that Thomson scattering is non intrusive. The mechanisms that will lead to possible measurement errors are discussed. The wavelength-resolved scattering signal also allows us to get direct information about the electron energy distribution function in the case of incoherent light scattering. Finally, we discuss some recent applications of Thomson scattering on atmospheric pressure plasma jets, but also in the field of electron collision kinetics. Thomson scattering can be applied on atomic but also molecular plasmas. In the latter case, one needs to take into account the possible contribution of rotational Raman scattering.

  10. Non-equilibrium effects in the processing of materials using plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2016-06-02

    We have provided experimental evidence that nanoparticles in plasma are heated to temperatures that are significantly higher than that of the background gas. This result gives experimental confirmation to a number of theoretical/computational studies that predicted this behavior. Moreover, this study has provided with the first measurement of the temperature of nanoparticles in a processing dusty plasma, i.e. under conditions that are relevant for the growth and modification of nanopowders.

  11. Non-equilibrium magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.

    2011-04-20

    Colloidal dispersions of interacting particles subjected to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial self-assembled patterns and complex collective behavior. A fundamental issue is how collective ordering in such non-equilibrium systems arises from the dynamics of discrete interacting components. In addition, from a practical viewpoint, by working in regimes far from equilibrium new self-organized structures which are generally not available through equilibrium thermodynamics can be created. In this review spontaneous self-assembly phenomena in magnetic colloidal dispersions suspended at liquid-air interfaces and driven out of equilibrium by an alternating magnetic field are presented. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered self-assembled structures emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex unconventional magnetic ordering. Nontrivial self-induced hydrodynamic fields accompany each out-of-equilibrium pattern. Spontaneous symmetry breaking of the self-induced surface flows leading to a formation of self-propelled microstructures has been discovered. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of the amplitude equation (Ginzburg-Landau type equation) for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows. To understand the fundamental microscopic mechanisms governing self-assembly processes in magnetic colloidal dispersions at liquid-air interfaces a first-principle model for a non-equilibrium self-assembly is presented. The latter model allows us to capture in detail the entire process of out-of-equilibrium self-assembly in the system and reproduces most of the observed phenomenology.

  12. Generalized x-ray scattering cross section from non-equilibrium solids and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L

    2006-02-07

    We propose a modified x-ray form factor that describes the scattering cross section in warm dense matter valid for both the plasma and the solid (crystalline) state. Our model accounts for the effect of lattice correlations on the electron-electron dynamic structure, as well as provides a smooth transition between the solid and the plasma scattering cross sections. In addition, we generalize the expression of the dynamic structure in the case of a two-temperature system (with different electron and ion temperatures). This work provides a unified description of the x-ray scattering processes in warm and dense matter, as the one encountered in inertial confinement fusion, laboratory astrophysics, material science, and high-energy density physics and it can be used to verify temperature relaxation mechanisms in such environments.

  13. Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massot, Marc; Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry E.

    2011-05-01

    We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

  14. Development of a Hybrid Model for Non-Equilibrium High-Energy Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    performance electric propulsion systems , high-power conditioning, novel diagnostics methods, material fabrication, etc. The plasma conditions in these new...velocity distribution function (DF) that describes the system and its dynamics, i.e. solving the Boltzmann equation: )’,( ffCRfaff t vx =∇⋅+∇⋅+ ∂ ∂ ρρρρ...effects. However, a complete knowledge of the system DF is not possible given the current and even foreseeable computing capabilities, due to the

  15. Non-equilibrium radiation during SiC-CO2 plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémare, Noémie; Jouen, Samuel; Boubert, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The radiation of a pure CO2 inductive plasma was recorded between 190 and 920 nm during its interaction with a SiC sample under a pressure equal to 6 kPa and an estimated global specific enthalpy close to 12 MJ kg-1. The plasma electronic excitation was found to be out of equilibrium. The main radiators were found to be O, C, C2 and, mainly, CO. The radiation is especially significant where the plasma chemically interacts with the material revealing a stronger electronic excitation close to the surface. Excitation temperatures were also found to increase in the chemical boundary layer, which is four times smaller than the thermal boundary layer. This raises questions about the energy exchange processes of the excited states and about chemical behaviour independent of their respective ground states. The surface is found to be covered by an inhomogeneous silica layer revealing a passive oxidation, but also by bubble structures, indicative of the transition towards active oxidation. The surface temperature is estimated to be 1800-1900 K. Raman spectroscopy measurements on the surface and optical spectroscopy measurements in the boundary layer provide proof of carbon production coming from the SiC.

  16. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Oxidation on Diffusion Flame Extinction Limits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    reactions (1)-(6)). The formed CH3, CH2 and CH were oxidized further to CH2O, HCO, CO and finally CO2 as shown in Fig. 7a. Among those reaction paths, a...pulsed discharge Plasma flame chemistry reactions Path flux analysis Counterflow extinction Partially premixed flames a b s t r a c t The kinetic...the kinetic model over-predicted the CO, H2O and H2 concentrations and under-predicted CO2 concentration. A path flux analysis showed that O generated

  17. Computation of non-equilibrium flow downstream of a plasma torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harle, Christophe; Varghese, Philip L.; Carey, Graham F.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible reacting flow in an axisymmetric geometry are presented for a nitrogen plasma torch with both thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new axisymmetric finite element/finite volume formulation in which the convective flux is treated by an extension of the approximate Riemann solver due to Osher. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with a previous solution of the same problem using a different computational scheme. Results obtained using two different models of nonthermal dissociation rates are compared to experimental data.

  18. Thermophysical properties of nitrogen plasmas under thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weizong; Rong Mingzhe; Yan, J. D.; Spencer, Joseph W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-11-15

    Calculated thermophysical properties of nitrogen plasmas in and out of thermal equilibrium are presented. The cut-off of the partition functions due to the lowering of the ionization potential has been taken into account, together with the contributions from different core excited electronic states. The species composition and thermodynamic properties are determined numerically using the Newton-Raphson iterative method, taking into account the corrections due to Coulomb interactions. The transport properties including diffusion coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity are calculated using the most recent collision interaction potentials by adopting Devoto's electron and heavy particle decoupling approach, expanded to the third-order approximation (second-order for viscosity) in the framework of Chapman-Enskog method. Results are presented in the pressure range of 0.1 atm-10 atm and in electron temperature range from 300 to 40 000 K, with the ratio of electron temperature to heavy-particle temperature varied from 1 to 20. Results are compared with those from previous works, and the influences of different definitions of the Debye length are discussed.

  19. Electric Field Measurements in Non-Equilibrium Electric Discharge Plasmas Using Picosecond Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.

    This dissertation presents the results of development of a picosecond four wave mixing technique and its use for electric field measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. This technique is similar to coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and is well suited for electric field measurements in high pressure plasmas with high spatial and temporal resolution. The results show that the signal intensity scales proportionally to the square of the electric field, the signal is emitted as a coherent beam, and is polarized parallel to the electric field vector, making possible electric field vector component measurements. The signal is generated when a collinear pair of pump and Stokes beams, which are generated in a stimulated Raman shifting cell (SRS), generate coherent excitation of molecules into a higher energy level, hydrogen for the present work. The coherent excitation mixes with a dipole moment induced by an external electric field. The mixing of these three "waves'" allows the molecules to radiate at their Raman frequency, producing a fourth, signal, wave which is proportional to the square of the electric field. The time resolution of this technique is limited by the coherence decay time of the molecules, which is a few hundred picoseconds.

  20. Direct exposure of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma confers simultaneous oxidative and ultraviolet modifications in biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Wang, Yue; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Koji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers are used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, little research has been done into the use of this technique for conventional free radical biology. Recently, we developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping revealed •OH as a major product. To obtain evidence of NEAPP-induced oxidative modifications in biomolecules and standardize them, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and α-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also observed after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in saline produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. PMID:25411528

  1. Enhanced nonlinear iterative techniques applied to a non-equilibrium plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, D.A.; McHugh, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    We study the application of enhanced nonlinear iterative methods to the steady-state solution of a system of two-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equations that describe the partially-ionized plasma flow in the boundary layer of a tokamak fusion reactor. This system of equations is characterized by multiple time and spatial scales, and contains highly anisotropic transport coefficients due to a strong imposed magnetic field. We use Newton`s method to linearize the nonlinear system of equations resulting from an implicit, finite volume discretization of the governing partial differential equations, on a staggered Cartesian mesh. The resulting linear systems are neither symmetric nor positive definite, and are poorly conditioned. Preconditioned Krylov iterative techniques are employed to solve these linear systems. We investigate both a modified and a matrix-free Newton-Krylov implementation, with the goal of reducing CPU cost associated with the numerical formation of the Jacobian. A combination of a damped iteration, one-way multigrid and a pseudo-transient continuation technique are used to enhance global nonlinear convergence and CPU efficiency. GMRES is employed as the Krylov method with Incomplete Lower-Upper(ILU) factorization preconditioning. The goal is to construct a combination of nonlinear and linear iterative techniques for this complex physical problem that optimizes trade-offs between robustness, CPU time, memory requirements, and code complexity. It is shown that a one-way multigrid implementation provides significant CPU savings for fine grid calculations. Performance comparisons of the modified Newton-Krylov and matrix-free Newton-Krylov algorithms will be presented.

  2. Effect of oxygen atoms dissociated by non-equilibrium plasma on flame of methane oxygen and argon pre-mixture gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    For more efficient way of combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has been investigated by many researchers. But it is very difficult to clarify the effect of plasma even on the flame of methane. Because there are many complex chemical reactions in combustion system. Sasaki et al. has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power. They also measured emission from Second Positive Band System of nitrogen during the irradiation. The emission indicates existence of high energy electrons which are accelerated by the microwave. The high energy electrons also dissociate oxygen molecules easily and oxygen atom would have some effects on the flame. But the dissociation ratio of oxygen molecules by the non-equilibrium plasma is significantly low, compared to that in the combustion reaction. To clarify the effect of dissociated oxygen atoms on the flame, dependence of dissociation ratio of oxygen on the flame has been examined using CHEMKIN. It is found that in the case of low dissociation ratio of 10-6, the ignition of the flame becomes slightly earlier. It is also found that in the case of high dissociation ratio of 10-3, the ignition time becomes significantly earlier by almost half. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  3. Antibody immobilization on poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers advantageously carried out by means of a non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, L. S.; Liguori, A.; Merlettini, A.; Calzà, L.; Castellucci, M.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Focarete, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the comparison between a conventional wet-chemical method and a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma process for the conjugation of biomolecules on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers is reported. Physico-chemical and morphological characteristics of chemically and plasma functionalized mats are studied and compared with those of pristine mats. The efficiency in biomolecules immobilization is assessed by the covalent conjugation of an antibody (anti-CD10) on the functionalized PLLA fibers. The achieved results highlight that the proposed plasma process enables antibodies to be successfully immobilized on the surface of PLLA fibers, demonstrating that non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma can be an effective, highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternative to the still widely employed wet-chemical methods for the conjugation of biomolecules onto biomaterials.

  4. Kinetics of plasma-assisted combustion: effect of non-equilibrium excitation on the ignition and oxidation of combustible mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    A review of experimental and theoretical investigations of the effect of atomic particles, and electronically and vibrationally excited molecules on the induction delay time and on the shift in the ignition temperature threshold of combustible mixtures is presented. The addition of oxygen and hydrogen atoms to combustible mixtures may cause a significant reduction in the ignition delay time. However, at relatively low initial temperatures, the non-equilibrium effect of the addition of atomic particles in ground electronic states is not pronounced. At the same time, the effect of excited O(1D) atoms on the oxidation and reforming of combustible mixtures is quite significant due to the high rates of reactions of O(1D) atoms with hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules. In fuel-air mixtures, collisions with O(1D) atoms determine, under certain conditions, the dissociation of hydrocarbon molecules. Singlet oxygen molecules, O2(a1Δ g ), participate both in chain initiation and chain branching reactions, but the effect of O2(a1Δ g ) on the ignition processes is generally less important compared to oxygen atoms. The reactions of vibrationally excited molecules and the processes of VT-relaxation in combustible mixtures are discussed. The production of vibrationally excited N 2(v) molecules in fuel-air mixtures at relatively low electric field is very important. However, at the moment, the effect of the reactions of N 2(v) molecules on the oxidation and ignition of combustible mixtures is not completely clear, and requires further investigation. Therefore, with present knowledge, to reduce the ignition delay time and decrease the temperature threshold of combustive mixtures, the use of gas discharge systems with relatively high E/N values is recommended. In this case the reactions of electronically excited {{\\text{N}}2}≤ft(\\text{A}{}3Σu+,\\text{B}{}3{{\\Pi}g},\\text{C}{}3{{\\Pi}u},\\text{a}{}\\prime 1Σu-\\right) molecules, and atomic particles in ground and

  5. Basic Studies on High Pressure Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-30

    33, 2268 (2000). [3] Non- Equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure, K.H. Becker, U. Kogelschatz, K.H. Schoenbach, and R.J. Barker, eds., IOP...10). Note that LIFBASE assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium . 120 100 oExperimentalm Siuation 80 60 20- 0 -J ~ LkXi 3060 3070 3080 3090 3100...Dual laser interferometer for plasma density measurements on large tokamaks >>, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 49 p.919 (1978) [5] C.W. Gowers, C. Lamb, « A

  6. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  7. NON-EQUILIBRIUM MODELING OF THE FE XVII 3C/3D LINE RATIO IN AN INTENSE X-RAY FREE-ELECTRON LASER EXCITED PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Li, Y.; Fogle, M.; Fontes, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurements using an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and an Electron Beam Ion Trap at the Linac Coherent Light Source facility highlighted large discrepancies between the observed and theoretical values for the Fe xvii 3C/3D line intensity ratio. This result raised the question of whether the theoretical oscillator strengths may be significantly in error, due to insufficiencies in the atomic structure calculations. We present time-dependent spectral modeling of this experiment and show that non-equilibrium effects can dramatically reduce the predicted 3C/3D line intensity ratio, compared with that obtained by simply taking the ratio of oscillator strengths. Once these non-equilibrium effects are accounted for, the measured line intensity ratio can be used to determine a revised value for the 3C/3D oscillator strength ratio, giving a range from 3.0 to 3.5. We also provide a framework to narrow this range further, if more precise information about the pulse parameters can be determined. We discuss the implications of the new results for the use of Fe xvii spectral features as astrophysical diagnostics and investigate the importance of time-dependent effects in interpreting XFEL-excited plasmas.

  8. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav; Kennedy, Eric; Mackie, John; Holdsworth, Clovia; Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael; Dlugogorski, Bogdan

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process.

  9. Evaluation of Penicillium digitatum sterilization using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Ebizuka, Noboru; Takeda, Keigo; Ohta, Takayuki; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kawase, Kodo; Ito, Masafumi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the plasma sterilization has attracted much attention as a new sterilization technique that takes the place of spraying agricultural chemicals. The conventional methods for sterilization evaluation, was demanded to culture the samples for several days after plasma treatment. Then, we focused on Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). At the THz region, vibrational modes of biological molecules and fingerprint spectra of biologically-relevant molecules were also observed. In this study, our purpose was measurement of the fingerprint spectrum of the Penicillium digitatum (PD) spore and establishment of sterilization method by THz-TDS. The sample was 40mg/ml PD spore suspensions which dropped on cover glass. The atmospheric pressure plasma generated under the conditions which Ar gas flow was 3slm, and alternating voltage of 6kV was applied. The samples were exposed the plasma from 10mm distance for 10 minutes. We could obtain the fingerprint spectrum of the PD spore from 0.5 to 0.9THz. This result indicated the possibility of in-situ evaluation for PD sterilization using THz-TDS.

  10. Non-equilibrium of charged particles in swarms and plasmas—from binary collisions to plasma effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Simonović, I.; Marjanović, S.; Bošnjaković, D.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Dujko, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we show three quite different examples of low-temperature plasmas, where one can follow the connection of the elementary binary processes (occurring at the nanoscopic scale) to the macroscopic discharge behavior and to its application. The first example is on the nature of the higher-order transport coefficient (second-order diffusion or skewness); how it may be used to improve the modelling of plasmas and also on how it may be used to discern details of the relevant cross sections. A prerequisite for such modeling and use of transport data is that the hydrodynamic approximation is applicable. In the second example, we show the actual development of avalanches in a resistive plate chamber particle detector by conducting kinetic modelling (although it may also be achieved by using swarm data). The current and deposited charge waveforms may be predicted accurately showing temporal resolution, which allows us to optimize detectors by adjusting the gas mixture composition and external fields. Here kinetic modeling is necessary to establish high accuracy and the details of the physics that supports fluid models that allows us to follow the transition to streamers. Finally, we show an example of positron traps filled with gas that, for all practical purposes, are a weakly ionized gas akin to swarms, and may be modelled in that fashion. However, low pressures dictate the need to apply full kinetic modelling and use the energy distribution function to explain the kinetics of the system. In this way, it is possible to confirm a well established phenomenology, but in a manner that allows precise quantitative comparisons and description, and thus open doors to a possible optimization.

  11. Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption, laser-induced-fluorescence (fs-TALIF) imaging of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Roy, Sukesh; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.; Gord, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond, two-photon-absorption laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TALIF) is employed to measure space- and time-resolved distributions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen in moderate-pressure, non-equilibrium, nanosecond-duration pulsed-discharge plasmas. Temporally and spatially resolved hydrogen and oxygen TALIF images are obtained over a range of low-temperature plasmas in mixtures of helium and argon at 100 Torr total pressure. The high-peak-intensity, low-average-energy fs pulses combined with the increased spectral bandwidth compared to traditional ns-duration laser pulses provide a large number of photon pairs that are responsible for the two-photon excitation, which results in an enhanced TALIF signal. Krypton and xenon TALIF are used for quantitative calibration of the hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, respectively, with similar excitation schemes being employed. This enables 2D collection of atomic-hydrogen and -oxygen TALIF signals with absolute number densities ranging from 2  ×  1012 cm-3 to 6  ×  1015 cm-3 and 1  ×  1013 cm-3 to 3  ×  1016 cm-3, respectively. These 2D images are the first application of TALIF imaging in moderate-pressure plasma discharges. 1D self-consistent modeling predictions show agreement with experimental results within the estimated experimental error of 25%. The present results can be used to further the development of higher fidelity kinetic models while quantifying plasma-source characteristics.

  12. Non-equilibrium nanosecond-pulsed plasma generation in the liquid phase (water, PDMS) without bubbles: fast imaging, spectroscopy and leader-type model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Danil; Seepersad, Yohan; Pekker, Mikhail; Shneider, Mikhail; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we report the results on study of the non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge generation in liquid media. Here we studied the discharge in both water and silicon transformer oil, and present our findings on discharge behaviour depending on global (applied) electric, discharge emission spectrum and shadow imaging of the discharge. We also discuss possible scenarios of non-equilibrium nanosecond discharge development and suggest that the discharge operates in a leader-type regime supported by the electrostriction effect—creation of nano-sized pores in liquid due to high local electric field.

  13. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  14. Pulse-Periodic Regimes of Kinetic Instabilities in the Non-Equilibrium Plasma of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharge Maintained by Continuous-Wave Radiation of a 24 GHz Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfeld, D. A.; Viktorov, M. E.; Vodopyanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally discovered an instability, which manifests itself as precipitations of hot electrons occurring synchronously with generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation, in the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance discharge maintained by a high-power, continuous-wave radiation of a 24 GHz gyrotron, for the first time. The observed instability has the kinetic nature and is determined by the formation of the non-equilibrium velocity distribution of hot particles. Two possible explanations are proposed for the mechanism of wave excitation in a two-component plasma with a stationary source of non-equilibrium particles. The results of the studies performed are of interest for modeling of the dynamics of magnetospheric cyclotron masers.

  15. Supersonic Jet Mixing with Vibrational Non-Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Heath H.; Kc, Utsav; Varghese, Philip L.; Clemens, Noel T.

    2013-11-01

    A new study has been initiated to study the effect of vibrational non-equilibrium on turbulent mixing and combustion. This work is relevant to high-speed, high-temperature environments, such as scramjet combustors, where shocks and mixing can lead to high degrees of vibrational non-equilibrium. In this experimental study, a new facility has been developed that consists of a perfectly-expanded axisymmetric Mach 1.5 turbulent air jet issuing into an electrically heated co-flow of air for precise control of the temperature and thus vibrationally-active population. This hot flow can be brought into non-equilibrium when the co-flow fluid is rapidly mixed with the colder supersonic jet fluid. Effects of the non-equilibrium can be isolated by replacing the nitrogen in the flow with argon. The degree of non-equilibrium in the jet shear layers is quantified by using high-spectral resolution time-averaged spontaneous Raman scattering centered on the Stokes-shifted Q branch line of N2 at 607 nm. In this first phase of the study, the effect of non-equilibrium on the mixing field will be investigated, but future work will focus on H2-air combustion. Planar Rayleigh thermometry is utilized to investigate the effects of vibrational non-equilibrium on the turbulent structures and thermal dissipation field. This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under BRI grant FA9550-12-0460.

  16. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  17. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  18. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  19. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  20. Simulation of a non-equilibrium helium plasma bullet emerging into oxygen at high pressure (250-760 Torr) and interacting with a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Economou, Demetre J.

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional computational study of a plasma bullet emanating from a helium gas jet in oxygen ambient at high pressure (250-760 Torr) was performed, with emphasis on the bullet interaction with a substrate. Power was applied in the form of a trapezoidal +5 kV pulse lasting 150 ns. A neutral gas transport model was employed to predict the concentration distributions of helium and oxygen in the system. These were then used in a plasma dynamics model to investigate the characteristics of the plasma bullet during its propagation and interaction with a substrate. Upon ignition, the discharge first propagated as a surface wave along the inner wall of the containing tube, and then exited the tube with a well-defined ionization front (streamer or plasma bullet). The plasma bullet evolved from a hollow (donut-shaped) feature to one where the maximum of ionization was on axis. The bullet propagated in the gap between the tube exit and the substrate with an average speed of ˜2 × 105 m/s. Upon encountering a metal substrate, the bullet formed a conductive channel to the substrate. Upon encountering a dielectric substrate, the bullet turned into an ionization wave propagating radially along the substrate surface. For a conductive substrate, the radial species fluxes to the surface peaked on the symmetry axis. For a dielectric substrate, a ring-shaped flux distribution was observed. The "footprint" of plasma-surface interaction increased either by decreasing the gap between tube exit and substrate, decreasing the relative permittivity of an insulating substrate, or decreasing pressure. As the system pressure was lowered from 760 to 250 Torr, the discharge was initiated earlier, and the plasma bullet propagation speed increased. A reverse electric field developed during the late stages of the ramp-down of the pulse, which accelerated electrons forming a brief backward discharge.

  1. Relativistic Doppler reflection as a probe for the initial relaxation of a non-equilibrium electron-hole plasma in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Mark D.; Meng, Fanqi; Sernelius, Bo E.; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the status of investigations of the relativistic Doppler reflection of a broadband terahertz pulse at a counter-propagating plasma front of photo-excited charge carriers in undoped silicon. When a THz pulse with 20-THz bandwidth impinges onto a moving plasma front with a carrier density in the range of 1019 per cm3, one observes a spectral up-shift, which is, however, much less pronounced than expected from simulations assuming a Drude plasma characterized by a single carrier relaxation time τ of the order of 15-100 fs. Qualitative agreement between simulations and experiments can be achieved if τ is chosen to be less than 5 fs. In order to explore carrier relaxation in more detail, optical-pump/THz-probe experiments in the conventional co-propagation geometry were performed. If the pump-probe delay is long enough for monitoring of the equilibrium value of the scattering time, τ ranges from 200 fs at low carrier density to 20 fs in the 1019-cm-3 density range. For small (sub-picosecond) pump-probe delay, the data reveal a significantly faster scattering, which slows down during energy relaxation of the charge carriers.

  2. Kinetic modelling of NH3 production in N2–H2 non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jungmi; Pancheshnyi, Sergey; Tam, Eugene; Lowke, John J.; Prawer, Steven; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-04-01

    Detailed plasma kinetics modelling is presented of a low electron energy N2–H2 atmospheric-pressure discharge for ammonia synthesis. The model considers both electron and vibrational kinetics, including excited N2(X, ν) and H2(X, ν) species, and surface reactions such as those occurring by the Eley–Rideal and Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanisms and dissociative adsorption of molecules. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured NH3 concentration produced in a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge reactor as a function of process parameters such as input gas composition and applied voltage. Unlike typical low-pressure plasma processes, under the plasma conditions considered here (reduced electric field E/N in the range 30–50 Td, electron density of the order 108 cm‑3), the influence of ions is not significant. Instead, the reactions between radicals and vibrationally-excited molecules are more important. The active species in surface reactions, such as surface-adsorbed atomic nitrogen N(s) or hydrogen H(s), are found to be predominantly generated through the dissociative adsorption of molecules, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms for plasma catalysis under low-pressure, high-E/N conditions. It is found that NH radicals play an important role at the early stages of the NH3-generation process, NH in turn is produced from N and H2(ν). Electron kinetics is shown to play a critical role in the molecular dissociation and vibrational excitation reactions that produce these precursors. It is further found that surface-adsorbed atomic hydrogen H(s) takes a leading role in the formation of NH3, which is another significant difference from the mechanisms in conventional thermo-chemical processes and low-pressure plasmas. The applied voltage, the gas temperature, the N2:H2 ratio in the input gas mixture and the reactivity of the surface material are all found to influence the ammonia production. The calculated results reproduce the observed

  3. Modeling of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium in a laser-induced aluminum plasma by means of a Collisional-Radiative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, V.; Bultel, A.; Chéron, B. G.

    2010-09-01

    A 0D numerical approach including a Collisional-Radiative model is elaborated in the purpose of describing the behavior of the nascent plasma resulting from the interaction between a 4 ns/65 mJ/532 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulse and an aluminum sample in vacuum. The heavy species considered are Al, Al +, Al 2+ and Al 3+ on their different excited states and free electrons. The translation temperatures of free electrons and heavy species are assumed different ( T e and TA respectively). Numerous elementary processes are accounted for as electron impact induced excitation and ionization, elastic collisions, multiphoton ionization and inverse Bremsstrahlung. Atoms passing from the sample to gas phase are described by using classical vaporization theory so that the surface temperature is arbitrarily limited to values less than the critical point one at 6700 K. The laser flux density considered in the study is therefore moderate with a fluence lower than 7 J cm - 2 . This model puts forward the major influence of multiphoton ionization in the plasma formation, whereas inverse Bremsstrahlung turns out to be quasi negligible. The increase of electron temperature is mainly due to multiphoton ionization and Te does not exceed 10,000 K. The electron induced collisions play an important role during the subsequent phase which corresponds to the relaxation of the excited states toward Boltzmann equilibrium. The electron density reaches its maximum during the laser pulse with a value ≈ 10 22, 10 23 m - 3 depending highly on the sample temperature. The ionization degree is of some percents in our conditions.

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Plasma Bullet and Its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure, air plasma, plasma bullet, non -equilibrium 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...be ignited. Introduction One of the attractive features of non -thermal atmospheric pressure...Plasma jets or plumes fill exactly such a niche. Background The Plasma Pencil The electron energy distribution in non -equilibrium discharges

  5. Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1986-04-25

    Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Characterization of non equilibrium effects on high quality critical flows

    SciTech Connect

    Camelo, E.; Lemonnier, H.; Ochterbeck, J.

    1995-09-01

    The appropriate design of various pieces of safety equipment such as relief systems, relies on the accurate description of critical flow phenomena. Most of the systems of industrial interest are willing to be described by one-dimensional area-averaged models and a large fraction of them involves multi-component high gas quality flows. Within these circumstances, the flow is very likely to be of an annular dispersed nature and its description by two-fluid models requires various closure relations. Among the most sensitive closures, there is the interfacial area and the liquid entrained fraction. The critical flowrate depends tremendously on the accurate description of the non equilibrium which results from the correctness of the closure equations. In this study, two-component flows are emphasized and non equilibrium results mainly form the differences in the phase velocities. It is therefore of the utmost importance to have reliable data to characterize non equilibrium phenomena and to assess the validity of the closure models. A comprehensive description of air-water nozzle flows, with emphasis on the effect of the nozzle geometry, has been undertaken and some of the results are presented here which helps understanding the overall flow dynamics. Besides the critical flowrate, the presented material includes pressure profiles, droplet size and velocity, liquid film flowrate and liquid film thickness.

  7. Mathematical simulation for non-equilibrium droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dushin, V. R.; Kulchitskiy, A. V.; Nerchenko, V. A.; Nikitin, V. F.; Osadchaya, E. S.; Phylippov, Yu. G.; Smirnov, N. N.

    2008-12-01

    Investigations of acute problems of phase transitions in continua mechanics need adequate modeling of evaporation, which is extremely important for the curved surfaces in the presence of strong heat and mass diffusion fluxes. Working cycle of heat pipes is governed by the active fluid evaporation rate. Combustion of most widely spread hydrocarbon fuels takes place in a gas-phase regime. Thus, evaporation of fuel from the surface of droplets turns to be one of the limiting factors of the process as well. In the present paper processes of non-equilibrium evaporation of small droplets in a quiescent air and in streaming gas flows were investigated theoretically. The rate of droplet evaporation is characterized by a dimensionless Peclet number ( Pe). A new dimensionless parameter I characterizing the deviation of phase transition from the equilibrium was introduced, which made it possible to investigate its influence on variations of the Peclet number and to determine the range of applicability for the quasi-equilibrium model. As it follows from the present investigations accounting for non-equilibrium effects in evaporation for many types of widely used liquids is crucial for droplets diameters less than 100μm, while the surface tension effects essentially manifest only for droplets below 0.1μm. The effects of velocity non-equilibrium and droplet atomization were taken into account.

  8. Non-equilibrium spatial dynamics of ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Frederic; Gouhier, Tarik C

    2014-09-01

    Ecological systems show tremendous variability across temporal and spatial scales. It is this variability that ecologists try to predict and that managers attempt to harness in order to mitigate risk. However, the foundations of ecological science and its mainstream agenda focus on equilibrium dynamics to describe the balance of nature. Despite a rich body of literature on non-equilibrium ecological dynamics, we lack a well-developed set of predictions that can relate the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of natural systems to their underlying ecological processes. We argue that ecology needs to expand its current toolbox for the study of non-equilibrium ecosystems in order to both understand and manage their spatiotemporal variability. We review current approaches and outstanding questions related to the study of spatial dynamics and its application to natural ecosystems, including the design of reserves networks. We close by emphasizing the importance of ecosystem function as a key component of a non-equilibrium ecological theory, and of spatial synchrony as a central phenomenon for its inference in natural systems.

  9. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  10. Optical Properties in Non-equilibrium Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Price, D F; Lee, E; Tam, H; Springer, P T; Ng, A

    2006-01-05

    An open question about the dynamical behavior of materials is how phase transition occurs in highly non-equilibrium systems. One important class of study is the excitation of a solid by an ultrafast, intense laser. The preferential heating of electrons by the laser field gives rise to initial states dominated by hot electrons in a cold lattice. Using a femtosecond laser pump-probe approach, we have followed the temporal evolution of the optical properties of such a system. The results show interesting correlation to non-thermal melting and lattice disordering processes. They also reveal a liquid-plasma transition when the lattice energy density reaches a critical value.

  11. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    Can the fundamental processes that underlie molecular biology be understood and simulated by DNA nanotechnology? The early development of DNA nanotechnology by Ned Seeman was driven by the desire to find a solution to the protein crystallization problem. Much of the later development of the field was also driven by envisioned applications in computing and nanofabrication. While the DNA nanotechnology community has assembled a versatile tool kit with which DNA nanostructures of considerable complexity can be assembled, the application of this tool kit to other areas of science and technology is still in its infancy. This dissertation reports on the construction of non-equilibrium DNA nanotube dynamic to probe molecular processes in the areas of hydrodynamics and cytoskeletal behavior. As the first example, we used DNA nanotubes as a molecular probe for elongational flow measurement in different micro-scale flow settings. The hydrodynamic flow in the vicinity of simple geometrical objects, such as a rigid DNA nanotube, is amenable to rigorous theoretical investigation. We measured the distribution of elongational flows produced in progressively more complex settings, ranging from the vicinity of an orifice in a microfluidic chamber to within a bursting bubble of Pacific ocean water. This information can be used to constrain theories on the origin of life in which replication involves a hydrodynamically driven fission process, such as the coacervate fission proposed by Oparin. A second theme of this dissertation is the bottom-up construction of a de novo artificial cytoskeleton with DNA nanotubes. The work reported here encompasses structural, locomotion, and control aspects of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal behavior. We first measured the kinetic parameters of DNA nanotube assembly and tested the accuracy of the existing polymerization models in the literature. Toward recapitulation of non-equilibrium cytoskeletal dynamics, we coupled the polymerization of DNA

  12. Non-Equilibrium Ionization Modeling of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimple, Remington; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Shen, Chengcai

    2017-01-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections, or CMEs, are solar events that eject plasma and magnetic flux into interplanetary space. Contemporary sources have noted that the onset of CMEs are caused by some instability of the coronal magnetic field, and further allows heating of plasma upon expansion. Additionally, plasma that leaves the lower solar corona does not remain in ionization equilibrium due to the rapid expansion of plasma. We investigate the evolution of charge states of CME plasma using non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) modeling. These NEI models include radiative cooling and serve as baseline studies for special cases where no heat is being added to the plasma. Each of the simulated CMEs have initial conditions characteristic of active regions. Various function inputs, such as initial temperature, density and final velocity, allow us to examine the influence of certain parameters on the charge state evolution. The results of our project show that plasma originating from active regions display charge state evolutions substantially dependent on initial density and temperature. The CMEs starting with higher plasma density often show an abundance of lower charge states above the freeze-in height. Simulations starting from higher temperatures often show abundance peaks at charge states with closed electron shells.

  13. In command of non-equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Roduner, Emil; Radhakrishnan, Shankara Gayathri

    2016-05-21

    The second law of thermodynamics is well known for determining the direction of spontaneous processes in the laboratory, life and the universe. It is therefore often called the arrow of time. Less often discussed but just as important is the effect of kinetic barriers which intercept equilibration and preserve highly ordered, high energy non-equilibrium states. Examples of such states are many modern materials produced intentionally for technological applications. Furthermore, all living organisms fuelled directly by photosynthesis and those fuelled indirectly by living on high energy nutrition represent preserved non-equilibrium states. The formation of these states represents the local reversal of the arrow of time which only seemingly violates the second law. It has been known since the seminal work of Prigogine that the stabilisation of these states inevitably requires the dissipation of energy in the form of waste heat. It is this feature of waste heat dissipation following the input of energy that drives all processes occurring at a non-zero rate. Photosynthesis, replication of living organisms, self-assembly, crystal shape engineering and distillation have this principle in common with the well-known Carnot cycle in the heat engine. Drawing on this analogy, we subsume these essential and often sophisticated driven processes under the term machinery of life.

  14. Turbulence modeling for non-equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    The work performed during this year has involved further assessment and extension of the k-epsilon-v(exp 2) model, and initiation of work on scalar transport. The latter is introduced by the contribution of Y. Shabany to this volume. Flexible, computationally tractable models are needed for engineering CFD. As computational technology has progressed, the ability and need to use elaborate turbulence closure models has increased. The objective of our work is to explore and develop new analytical frameworks that might extend the applicability of the modeling techniques. In past years the development of a method for near-wall modeling was described. The method has been implemented into a CFD code and its viability has been demonstrated by various test cases. Further tests are reported herein. Non-equilibrium near-wall models are needed for some heat transfer applications. Scalar transport seems generally to be more sensitive to non-equilibrium effects than is momentum transport. For some applications turbulence anisotropy plays a role and an estimate of the full Reynolds stress tensor is needed. We have begun work on scalar transport per se, but in this brief I will only report on an extension of the k-epsilon-v(exp 2) model to predict the Reynolds stress tensor.

  15. NON-EQUILIBRIUM ELECTRONS IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Avestruz, Camille; Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.; Nelson, Kaylea E-mail: camille.avestruz@yale.edu

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich measurements of the intracluster medium (ICM) assumes that electrons are in thermal equilibrium with ions in the plasma. However, in the outskirts of galaxy clusters, the electron–ion equilibration timescale can become comparable to the Hubble time, leading to systematic biases in cluster mass estimates and mass-observable scaling relations. To quantify an upper limit of the impact of non-equilibrium electrons, we use a mass-limited sample of simulated galaxy clusters taken from a cosmological simulation with a two-temperature model that assumes the Spitzer equilibration time for the electrons and ions. We show that the temperature bias is more pronounced in more massive and rapidly accreting clusters. For the most extreme case, we find that the bias is of the order of 10% at half of the cluster virial radius and increases to 40% at the edge of the cluster. Gas in filaments is less susceptible to the non-equilibrium effect, leading to azimuthal variations in the temperature bias at large cluster-centric radii. Using mock Chandra observations of simulated clusters, we show that the bias manifests in ultra-deep X-ray observations of cluster outskirts and quantify the resulting biases in hydrostatic mass and cluster temperature derived from these observations. We provide a mass-dependent fitting function for the temperature bias profile, which can be useful for modeling the effect of electron-ion equilibration in galaxy clusters.

  16. High-Fidelity Real Gas Model for RF Excited Plasma Flow Control - A Three Dimensional Analysis With Air Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-31

    code for mitigating inert gas flow separation using rf-driven dielectric barrier discharge. In this effort we: (l) develop multi-dimensional first...such detailed plasma kinetics based effort has not been reported before. During the development of this project we have worked in close collaboration... develop multi-dimensional first principles based N2/GŖair chemistry models for the non-equilibrium real gas discharge, and (2) implement it in a finite

  17. A numerical study of high-pressure non-equilibrium streamers for combustion ignition application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breden, Douglas; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Idicheria, Cherian A.; Najt, Paul M.; Mahadevan, Shankar

    2013-08-01

    We present a computational simulation study of non-equilibrium streamer discharges in a coaxial electrode and a corona geometry for automotive combustion ignition applications. The streamers propagate in combustible fuel-air mixtures at high pressures representative of internal combustion engine conditions. The study was performed using a self-consistent, two-temperature plasma model with finite-rate plasma chemical kinetics. Positive high voltage pulses of order tens of kV and duration of tens of nanoseconds were applied to the powered inner cylindrical electrode which resulted in the formation and propagation of a cathode-directed streamer. The resulting spatial and temporal production of active radical species such as O, H, and singlet delta oxygen is quantified and compared for lean and stoichiometric fuel-air mixtures. For the coaxial electrode geometry, the discharge is characterized by a primary streamer that bridges the inter-electrode gap and a secondary streamer that develops in the wake of the primary streamer. Most of the radicals are produced in the secondary streamer. For the corona geometry, only the primary streamer is observed and the radicals are produced throughout the length of the primary streamer column. The stoichiometry of the mixture was observed to have a relatively small effect on both the plasma discharge structure and the resulting yield of radical species.

  18. Screening in humid air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Anatoly; Derbenev, Ivan; Dyatko, Nikolay; Kurkin, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Low temperature air plasmas containing H2O molecules are of high importance for atmospheric phenomena, climate control, biomedical applications, surface processing, and purification of air and water. Humid air plasma created by an external ionization source is a good model of the troposphere where ions are produced by the galactic cosmic rays and decay products of air and soil radioactive elements such as Rn222. The present paper is devoted to study the ionic composition and the screening in an ionized humid air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The ionization rate is varied in the range of 101 -1018 cm-3s-1. The humid air with 0 - 1 . 5 % water admixture that corresponds to the relative humidity of 0 - 67 % at the air temperature equal to 20°C is considered. The ionic composition is determined on the analysis of more than a hundred processes. The system of 41 non-steady state particle number balance equations is solved using the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The screening of dust particle charge in the ionized humid air are studied within the diffusion-drift approach. The screening constants are well approximated by the inverse Debye length and characteristic lengths of recombination and attachment processes. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, Project No. 16-12-10424.

  19. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Shruti, K. S.; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) has been studied here as a non-equilibrium thermodynamics problem. Air masses with temperature difference of 70K, initially with heavier air resting on lighter air isolated by a partition, are allowed to mix by impulsively removing the partition. This results in interface instabilities, which are traced here by solving two dimensional (2D) compressible Navier-Stokes equation (NSE), without using Boussinesq approximation (BA henceforth). The non-periodic isolated system is studied by solving NSE by high accuracy, dispersion relation preserving (DRP) numerical methods described in Sengupta T.K.: High Accuracy Computing Method (Camb. Univ. Press, USA, 2013). The instability onset is due to misaligned pressure and density gradients and is evident via creation and evolution of spikes and bubbles (when lighter fluid penetrates heavier fluid and vice versa, associated with pressure waves). Assumptions inherent in compressible formulation are: (i) Stokes' hypothesis that uses zero bulk viscosity assumption and (ii) the equation of state for perfect gas which is a consequence of equilibrium thermodynamics. Present computations for a non-equilibrium thermodynamic process do not show monotonic rise of entropy with time, as one expects from equilibrium thermodynamics. This is investigated with respect to the thought-experiment. First, we replace Stokes' hypothesis, with another approach where non-zero bulk viscosity of air is taken from an experiment. Entropy of the isolated system is traced, with and without the use of Stokes' hypothesis. Without Stokes' hypothesis, one notes the rate of increase in entropy to be higher as compared to results with Stokes' hypothesis. We show this using the total entropy production for the thermodynamically isolated system. The entropy increase from the zero datum is due to mixing in general; punctuated by fluctuating entropy due to creation of compression and rarefaction fronts originating at the interface

  20. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  1. Dissipation in non-equilibrium turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Wouter; Rubinstein, Robert

    2016-11-01

    For about a decade, experimental and numerical studies have reported on the existence of an anomalous behaviour of the viscous dissipation rate in unsteady turbulence (see for instance Vassilicos, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 2015). It appears that the short-time transient dynamics can be described by a universal power law, incompatible with Taylor's 1935 dissipation rate estimate. We show that these results can be explained using a non-equilibrium energy distribution, obtained from a low-frequency perturbative expansion of simple spectral closure. The resulting description is fairly simple. In particular, during the transient, according to the predictions, the normalized dissipation rate Cɛ evolves as a function of the Taylor-scale Reynolds number Rλ following the relation Cɛ Rλ- 15 / 14 , in close agreement with experimental and numerical observations.

  2. Non-equilibrium phenomena in disordered colloidal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter

    Colloidal particles are a convenient tool for studying a variety of non-equilibrium phenomena. I will discuss experiments that investigate the aging and non-equilibrium growth of disordered solids. In the first set of experiments, colloidal glasses are rapidly formed to study aging in jammed packings. A colloidal fluid, composed of micron-sized temperature-sensitive pNIPAM particles, is rapidly quenched into a colloidal glass. After the glass is formed, collective rearrangements occur as the glass ages. Particles that undergo irreversible rearrangements, which break nearest-neighbor pairings and allow the glass to relax, are identified. These irreversible rearrangements are accompanied by large clusters of fast moving particles; the number of particles involved in these clusters increases as the glass ages, leading to the slowing of dynamics that is characteristic of aging. In the second set of experiments, we study the role particle shape, and thus, interparticle interaction, plays in the formation of disordered solids with different structural and mechanical properties. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles with different shapes evaporate on glass slides. Convective flows during evaporation carry particles from drop center to drop edge, where they accumulate. The resulting particle deposits grow heterogeneously from the edge on the air-water interface. Three distinct growth processes were discovered in the evaporating colloidal suspensions by tuning particle shape-dependent capillary interactions and thus varying the microscopic rules of deposition. Mechanical testing of these particulate deposits reveals that the deposit bending rigidity increases as particles become more anisotropic in shape.

  3. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Yokokura, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen behaves like a viscous bubble with a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations take the same forms as non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations for a viscous bubble. We provide a consistent dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamic variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations that characterize a bubble dynamics: these are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: in the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, this approach shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss black-hole thermodynamics.

  4. Tomographic optical emission spectroscopy of a high enthalpy air plasma flow.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Tobias; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Andrianatos, Andreas

    2016-12-20

    A method is presented allowing for locally resolved emission spectroscopy using a tomographic setup. The approach presented in this work is applied to a high enthalpy air plasma flow. The resulting data sets allow for a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the non-symmetric flow field using photographs of the test section and 2D representation of the spectrally resolved radiance of the flow field. An analysis of different exposure times shows that transient fluctuations of the plasma can result in substantial asymmetry that approaches symmetry only for longer exposure times when the temporal averaging of the emission is significant. The spectral data allows the analysis of species selective excitation and emission. A non-equilibrium between atomic and molecular excitation temperatures is concluded for the investigated air plasma flow field. The spatial distribution of atomic electronic excitation temperatures are close to rotational symmetry while molecular rotational and vibrational temperatures exhibit asymmetric behavior.

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Plasma agents in bio-decontamination by dc discharges in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machala, Zdenko; Chládeková, Lenka; Pelach, Michal

    2010-06-01

    Bio-decontamination of water and surfaces contaminated by bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium) was investigated in two types of positive dc discharges in atmospheric pressure air, in needle-to-plane geometry: the streamer corona and its transition to a novel regime called transient spark with short high current pulses of limited energy. Both generate a cold non-equilibrium plasma. Electro-spraying of treated water through a needle electrode was applied for the first time and resulted in fast bio-decontamination. Experiments providing separation of various biocidal plasma agents, along with the emission spectra and coupled with oxidation stress measurements in the cell membranes helped to better understand the mechanisms of microbial inactivation. The indirect exposure of contaminated surfaces to neutral active species was almost as efficient as the direct exposure to the plasma, whereas applying only UV radiation from the plasma had no biocidal effects. Radicals and reactive oxygen species were identified as dominant biocidal agents.

  6. Measurements of Vibrational Non-equilibrium in Supersonic Jet Mixing and Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Heath; Haller, Timothy; Clemens, Noel; Varghese, Philip

    2014-11-01

    A new experimental facility has been constructed to study the effects of thermal non-equilibrium on supersonic mixing and combustion. The facility consists of a Mach 1.5 turbulent jet issuing into an electrically heated coflow. The degree of non-equilibrium in the jet shear layer is quantified using high spectral resolution time-averaged spontaneous Raman scattering. Since the Raman spectra are time-averaged, they are susceptible to non-linear weighting effects induced by temperature fluctuations. The effect of local turbulent temperature fluctuations on the Raman fitting procedure is quantified by using spectral simulations that use the actual temperature fluctuations present in the flow measured by instantaneous Rayleigh scattering thermometry. It is shown that the temperature fluctuations are not large enough to induce significant errors in the vibrational temperature fitting results. Vibrational non-equilibrium is shown to occur in the jet shear layer, and its magnitude and trend are shown to be similar to recent large-eddy-simulation results. Since CO2 is known to cause faster vibrational relaxation of N2, a series of experiments were conducted to verify that the non-equilibrium effects could be controlled by CO2 addition. This work is being extended to reacting flows, to assess the impact of non-equilibrium on supersonic shear-layer combustion. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  7. Influence of metallic vapours on thermodynamic and transport properties of two-temperature air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua; Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-09-01

    The metallic vapours (i.e., copper, iron, and silver in this paper) resulting from walls and/or electrode surfaces can significantly affect the characteristics of air plasma. Different from the previous works assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, this paper investigates the influence of metallic vapours on two-temperature (2 T) air plasma. The 2 T compositions of air contaminated by Cu, Fe, and Ag are first determined based on Saha's and Guldberg-Waage's laws. The thermodynamic properties (including mass density, specific enthalpy, and specific heat) are then calculated according to their definitions. After determining the collision integrals for each pair of species in air-metal mixtures using the newly published methods and source data, the transport coefficients (including electrical conductivity, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) are calculated for air-Cu, air-Fe, and air-Ag plasmas with different non-equilibrium degree θ (Te/Th). The influences of metallic contamination as well as non-equilibrium degree are discussed. It is found that copper, iron, and silver exist mainly in the form of Cu2, FeO, and AgO at low temperatures. Generally, the metallic vapours increase mass density at most temperatures, reduce the specific enthalpy and specific heat in the whole temperature range, and affect the transport properties remarkably from 5000 K to 20 000 K. The effect arising from the type of metals is little except for silver at certain temperatures. Besides, the departure from thermal equilibrium results in the delay of dissociation and ionization reactions, leading to the shift of thermodynamic and transport properties towards a higher temperature.

  8. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function. PMID:28071644

  9. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function.

  10. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-10

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function.

  11. Non-equilibrium modelling of transferred arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1999-02-01

    A two-temperature, variable-density, arc model has been developed for description of high-current free-burning arcs, including departures from thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium in the plasma. The treatment includes the arc, the anode and the cathode and considers the separate energy balance of the electrons and the heavy particles, together with the continuity equations for these species throughout the plasma. The output includes a two-dimensional distribution for the temperatures and densities both of the electrons and of the heavy particles, plasma velocity, current density and electrical potential throughout the arc. For a 200 A arc in pure argon at 1 atm, we calculate large differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles in the plasma region near the cathode tip, together with large departures from local chemical plasma equilibrium. In the main body of the arc at high plasma temperatures, we predict minor differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles, which are inconsistent with recent measurements using laser-scattering techniques showing differences of up to several thousand degrees. However, we find that, for the region in front of the cathode tip, the ground-state level of the neutral atoms is overpopulated relative to the corresponding populations under conditions of LTE, in agreement with experimental observations. These departures from LTE are caused by the injection of a large mass flow of cold gas into the arc core due to arc constriction at the tip of the cathode.

  12. Non-equilibrium Ionization Modeling of Simulated Pseudostreamers in a Solar Corona Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon; Reeves, Katharine K.; Murphy, Nicholas A.

    2015-04-01

    Time-dependent ionization is important for diagnostics of coronal streamers, where the thermodynamic time scale could be shorter than the ionization or recombination time scales, and ions are therefor in non-equilibrium ionization states. In this work, we perform post-processing time-dependent ionization calculations for a three dimensional solar corona and inner heliosphere model from Predictive Sciences Inc. (Mikić & Linker 1999) to analyze the influence of non-equilibrium ionization on emission from coronal streamers. Using the plasma temperature, density, velocity and magnetic field distributions provided by the 3D MHD simulation covering the Whole Sun Month (Carrington rotation CR1913, 1996 August 22 to September 18), we calculate non-equilibrium ionization states in the region around a pseudostreamer. We then obtain the synthetic emissivities with the non-equilibrium ion populations. Under the assumption that the corona is optically thin, we also obtain intensity profiles of several emission lines. We compare our calculations with intensities of Lyman-alpha lines and OVI lines from SOHO/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations at 14 different heights. The results show that intensity profiles of both Lyman-alpha and OVI lines match well UVCS observations at low heights. At large heights, OVI intensites are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than equilibrium ionization inside this pseudostreamer. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a underestimate of the OVI intensity by about ten percent at a height of 2 solar radii, and the difference between these two ionization cases increases with height. The intensity ratio of OVI 1032 line to OVI 1037 lines is also obtained for non-equilibrium ionization modeling.

  13. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vanderborght, Jan; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is, the water content and pressure head are not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state behind the front. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macropores. Since flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the porous medium, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be directly linked to structural properties of the material. A critical question is how to define averaged state variables at the larger scale. We propose a novel approach based on flux-weighted averaging of pressure head, and compare its performance to alternative methods for averaging. Further, we suggest some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be related to morphological characteristics of infiltration fronts in quantitative terms. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We demonstrate our approach using numerical case studies for infiltration into two-dimensional heterogeneous media using three different structure models with distinct differences in connectivity. Our results indicate that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic structures that are elongated in the direction of flow enforce it. We observe a good agreement between front morphology and effective hydraulic non-equilibrium. A detailed comparison of averaged state variables with results from an upscaled model that includes hydraulic non-equilibrium outlines potential improvements in the description of non-equilibrium dynamics

  14. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that

  15. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flowpaths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that this

  16. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  17. Portable nanosecond pulsed air plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2011-08-22

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas are of great importance in many emerging biomedical and materials processing applications. The redundancy of a vacuum system opens the gateway for highly portable plasma systems, for which air ideally becomes the plasma-forming gas and remote plasma processing is preferred to ensure electrical safety. Typically, the gas temperature observed in air plasma greatly exceeds that suitable for the processing of thermally liable materials; a large plasma-sample distance offers a potential solution but suffers from a diluted downstream plasma chemistry. This Letter reports a highly portable air plasma jet system which delivers enhanced downstream chemistry without compromising the low temperature nature of the discharge, thus forming the basis of a powerful tool for emerging mobile plasma applications.

  18. Electrolytes: transport properties and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents a review on the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to transport in electrolyte solutions, and some recent experimental work and results for mutual diffusion in electrolyte solutions.

  19. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(4)) and O(t(1)), respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(5)) and O(t(2)), respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  20. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t4) and O (t1) , respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t5) and O (t2) , respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  1. Microwave Probing of Air-Plasma and Plasma Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Katherine; Rock, Ben; Helle, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Plasma metamaterials are of recent interest due to their unique ability to be engineered with specific electromagnetic responses. One potential metamaterial architecture is based on a `forest' of plasma rods that can be produced using intense laser plasma filaments. In our work, we use a continuous microwave source at 26.5 GHz to measure a single air plasma filament characteristics generated from a 5 mJ laser pulse within a cylindrical hole in a Ka-band waveguide. Preliminary results show the air plasma produces a strong shock and acts to reflect microwave radiation. A computational comparison using 3D EM modeling is performed to examine the reflection and transmission properties of a single plasma rod, and further, to investigate an array of plasma rods as a potential plasma based metamaterial.

  2. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  3. Antimicrobial Applications of Ambient--Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew John

    The emerging field of plasma biotechology studies the applications of the plasma phase of matter to biological systems. "Ambient-condition" plasmas created at or near room temperature and atmospheric pressure are especially promising for biomedical applications because of their convenience, safety to patients, and compatibility with existing medical technology. Plasmas can be created from many different gases; plasma made from air contains a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or RONS, involved in various biological processes, including immune activity, signaling, and gene expression. Therefore, ambient-condition air plasma is of particular interest for biological applications. To understand and predict the effects of treating biological systems with ambient-air plasma, it is necessary to characterize and measure the chemical species that these plasmas produce. Understanding both gaseous chemistry and the chemistry in plasma-treated aqueous solution is important because many biological systems exist in aqueous media. Existing literature about ambient-air plasma hypothesizes the critical role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; a major aim of this dissertation is to better quantify RONS by produced ambient-air plasma and understand how RONS chemistry changes in response to different plasma processing conditions. Measurements imply that both gaseous and aqueous chemistry are highly sensitive to operating conditions. In particular, chemical species in air treated by plasma exist in either a low-power ozone-dominated mode or a high-power nitrogen oxide-dominated mode, with an unstable transition region at intermediate discharge power and treatment time. Ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) are mutually exclusive in this system and that the transition region corresponds to the transition from ozone- to nitrogen oxides-mode. Aqueous chemistry agrees well with to air plasma chemistry, and a similar transition in liquid-phase composition

  4. Global dynamics of non-equilibrium gliding in animals.

    PubMed

    Yeaton, Isaac J; Socha, John J; Ross, Shane D

    2017-03-17

    Gliding flight-moving horizontally downward through the air without power-has evolved in a broad diversity of taxa and serves numerous ecologically relevant functions such as predator escape, expanding foraging locations, and finding mates, and has been suggested as an evolutionary pathway to powered flight. Historically, gliding has been conceptualized using the idealized conditions of equilibrium, in which the net aerodynamic force on the glider balances its weight. While this assumption is appealing for its simplicity, recent studies of glide trajectories have shown that equilibrium gliding is not the norm for most species. Furthermore, equilibrium theory neglects the aerodynamic differences between species, as well as how a glider can modify its glide path using control. To investigate non-equilibrium glide behavior, we developed a reduced-order model of gliding that accounts for self-similarity in the equations of motion, such that the lift and drag characteristics alone determine the glide trajectory. From analysis of velocity polar diagrams of horizontal and vertical velocity from several gliding species, we find that pitch angle, the angle between the horizontal and chord line, is a control parameter that can be exploited to modulate glide angle and glide speed. Varying pitch results in changing locations of equilibrium glide configurations in the velocity polar diagram that govern passive glide dynamics. Such analyses provide a new mechanism of interspecies comparison and tools to understand experimentally-measured kinematics data and theory. In addition, this analysis suggests that the lift and drag characteristics of aerial and aquatic autonomous gliders can be engineered to passively alter glide trajectories with minimal control effort.

  5. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  6. Non-equilibrium vibrational and electron energy distribution functions in mtorr, high-electron-density nitrogen discharges and afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitelli, M.; Colonna, G.; D’Ammando, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Pietanza, L. D.

    2017-03-01

    Non-equilibrium vibrational distributions (vdf) and non-equilibrium electron energy distribution functions (eedf) in a nitrogen plasma at low pressure (mtorr) have been calculated by using a time-dependent plasma physics model coupled to the Boltzmann equation and heavy particle kinetics. Different case studies have been selected showing the non-equilibrium character of both vdf and eedf under discharge and post-discharge conditions in the presence of large concentrations of electrons. Particular attention is devoted to the electron-molecule resonant vibrational excitation cross sections acting in the whole vibrational ladder. The results in the post-discharge conditions show the interplay of superelastic vibrational and electronic collisions in forming structures in the eedf. The link between the present results in the mtorr afterglow regime with the existing eedf in the torr and atmospheric regimes is discussed.

  7. The influence of non-equilibrium pressure on rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardadkhan, Irfan Rashid

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of pressure relaxation on steady, incompressible flows with strong streamline curvature. In the early part of this dissertation research, the significance of non-equilibrium pressure forces in controlling the structure of a steady, two dimensional axial vortex was demonstrated. In order to extend the study of pressure relaxation influences on more complex rotating flows, this dissertation has examined other rotating flow features that can be associated with hurricanes, tornadoes and dust devils. To model these flows, modified boundary layer equations were developed for a fluid column rotating near a solid plane including the influence of non-equilibrium pressure forces. The far-field boundary conditions were inferred using the asymptotic behavior of the governing equations, and the boundary conditions for the axial and radial components of velocity were shown to be dependent on the pressure relaxation coefficient, η p, and the characteristic angular velocity of the rotating fluid column, ω. This research has shown for the first time that the inclusion of non-equilibrium pressure results in a free-standing stagnation plane at the top of a funnel shaped rotating fluid column, which is consistent with observational data for hurricanes, tornadoes and dust devils. It has also been shown that in the absence of non-equilibrium pressure, the stagnation plane for rotating flows cannot be observed. The velocity and pressure distributions resulting from incorporating non-equilibrium pressure effects were then compared with available observational data for tornadoes and dust devils. The general profiles of the velocity and pressure distributions were found to be in good agreement with physical measurements, which was not possible without introducing empirical turbulence effects, in the absence of non-equilibrium pressure effects.

  8. Bright solitons in non-equilibrium coherent quantum matter

    PubMed Central

    Pinsker, F.; Flayac, H.

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for bright soliton generation in spinor non-equilibrium Bose–Einstein condensates made of atoms or quasi-particles such as polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. We give analytical expressions for bright (half) solitons as minimizing functions of a generalized non-conservative Lagrangian elucidating the unique features of inter and intra-competition in non-equilibrium systems. The analytical results are supported by a detailed numerical analysis that further shows the rich soliton dynamics inferred by their instability and mutual cross-interactions. PMID:26997892

  9. Pressure Scaling of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    4, Al(CH3)3, and Ga(CH3)3 are presented, as are the properties of the fire suppressants CF3Br and CF3I. Electron impact ionization in a simple...results at 50 eV. The primary reaction is that of Ar+ with C2F4 to produce C2F4+. This result might be anticipated on thermodynamic grounds, because...that is most likely to be responsible for CO bond formation is shown in figure 23: C2HF4+ + H2O C2HF2O+ + 2HF The thermodynamic

  10. Optical Measurements in Non-Equilibrium Plasmas and Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    collision model, the exponent x is equal to 0.5, from simple kinetic theory. For most realistic inter-molecular potentials, the exponent x is in the range...Chemical Physics, Vol. 89, p. 5568 (1988). 9. Rosasco, G.J., Lempert, W., Hurst , W.S., and Fein, A., in “Spectral Line Shapes, Vol 2, Walter de Gruyter

  11. Caloric and entropic temperatures in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Restuccia, L.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the non-equilibrium consequences of two different definitions of temperature in systems out of equilibrium: one is based on the internal energy (caloric temperature), and the other one on the entropy (entropic temperature). We discuss the relation between the values obtained from these two definitions in ideal gases and in two-level systems.

  12. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  13. Terahertz wave absorption via preformed air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, Tong; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2016-12-01

    Terahertz wave generation from laser-induced air plasma has continued to be an exciting field of research over the course of the past decade. In this paper, we report on an investigation concerning terahertz wave absorption with preformed plasma created by another laser pulse. We examine terahertz absorption behavior by varying the pump power and then analyze the polarization effect of the preplasma beam on terahertz wave absorption. The results of experiments conducted in which a type-I beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed before the preformed air plasma indicate that the fundamental (ω) and second harmonic (2ω) pulses can also influence terahertz absorption.

  14. Optical Measurements of Air Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-05

    generated in air by means of an electron beam is highly efficient. Fast electrons propagating through air result in production of electron- ion pairs...through the mechanism of impact ionization, which requires 33.7 eV per electron- ion pair. The air pressure, concentration of variable species, such as...and polyatomic species. Because our time scales are in the 1 ms to 10 ms range, there is a strong possibility of obtaining real-time absorption

  15. Spontaneous Raman Scattering Measurements of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium in High-Speed Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reising, Heath; Haller, Timothy; Clemens, Noel; Varghese, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Vibrational non-equilibrium is detected and quantified in a high-speed jet using spontaneous Raman scattering. The non-equilibrium is induced by rapid mixing of the different temperature streams of the jet and coflow which are approximately 500 K and 1000 K, respectively. Simultaneous measurements of vibrational and rotational temperatures are made using fits of time-averaged high-resolution Stokes spectra of both N2 and O2 to high fidelity models of the spectrum. Independent measurements of these two species temperatures show good agreement in rotational temperature while the vibrational temperatures show only N2 to have a strong non-equilibrium. This suggests that vibrational energy transfer between these two molecules is very inefficient at these conditions. Work is being conducted to extend the technique to single-shot measurements by employing a multiple-pass cell to increase the incident laser fluence in the measurement volume. This new capability will allow for statistics of vibrational temperature to be quantified. The instantaneous nature of the measurements will also allow the technique to be applied in regions of large temperature fluctuations, such as the base of a lifted turbulent jet flame, where time-average measurements are not valid. This work was supported by funding from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  17. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, Aaron; Johnston, Chris; Cruden, Brett

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements and simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation relevant to high-speed Earth entry data obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79 N2 : 21 O2) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08 N2 : 20.95 O2 : 0.04 CO2 : 0.93 Ar). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to promote discussion about various aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance profiles integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the VUV through to the NIR, were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURAHARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50 and over-predict by as much as 20 depending on the shock speed. DPLRNEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40 and over-predict by as much as 12 depending on the shock speed. In terms of an upper bound estimate for the absolute error in wall-directed heat flux, at the lower speeds investigated in this paper, 8 to 9 km/s, even

  18. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  19. Non-equilibrium freezing behaviour of aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, A P

    1977-03-29

    The tendencies to non-equilibrium freezing behaviour commonly noted in representative aqueous systems derive from bulk and surface properties according to the circumstances. Supercooling and supersaturation are limited by heterogeneous nucleation in the presence of solid impurities. Homogeneous nucleation has been observed in aqueous systems freed from interfering solids. Once initiated, crystal growth is ofter slowed and, very frequently, terminated with increasing viscosity. Nor does ice first formed always succeed in assuming its most stable crystalline form. Many of the more significant measurements on a given systeatter permitting the simultaneous representation of thermodynamic and non-equilibrium properties. The diagram incorporated equilibrium melting points, heterogeneous nucleation temperatures, homogeneous nucleation temperatures, glass transition and devitrification temperatures, recrystallization temperatures, and, where appropriate, solute solubilities and eutectic temperatures. Taken together, the findings on modle systems aid the identification of the kinetic and thermodynamic factors responsible for the freezing-thawing survival of living cells.

  20. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  1. Boltzmann equation solver adapted to emergent chemical non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Birrell, Jeremiah; Wilkening, Jon; Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-15

    We present a novel method to solve the spatially homogeneous and isotropic relativistic Boltzmann equation. We employ a basis set of orthogonal polynomials dynamically adapted to allow for emergence of chemical non-equilibrium. Two time dependent parameters characterize the set of orthogonal polynomials, the effective temperature T(t) and phase space occupation factor ϒ(t). In this first paper we address (effectively) massless fermions and derive dynamical equations for T(t) and ϒ(t) such that the zeroth order term of the basis alone captures the particle number density and energy density of each particle distribution. We validate our method and illustrate the reduced computational cost and the ability to easily represent final state chemical non-equilibrium by studying a model problem that is motivated by the physics of the neutrino freeze-out processes in the early Universe, where the essential physical characteristics include reheating from another disappearing particle component (e{sup ±}-annihilation)

  2. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  3. Construction of a Non-Equilibrium Thermal Boundary Layer Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Drummond; Ebadi, Alireza; Ma, Allen; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    A thermally conductive, electrically heated wall-plate forming the bottom wall of a wind tunnel has been constructed and validation tests have been performed. The wall-plate is a sectioned wall design, where each section is independently heated and controlled. Each section consists of an aluminum 6061 plate, an array of resistive heaters affixed to the bottom of the aluminum plate, and a calcium silicate holder used for thermal isolation. Embedded thermocouples in the aluminum plates are used to monitor the wall temperature and for feedback control of wall heating. The wall-plate is used to investigate thermal transport in both equilibrium and non-equilibrium boundary layers. The non-equilibrium boundary layer flow investigated is oscillatory flow produced by a rotor-stator mechanism placed downstream of the test section of the wind tunnel.

  4. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    For Earth re-entry at velocities between 8 and 11.5 km/s, the accuracy of NASA's computational uid dynamic and radiative simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation is assessed through comparisons with measurements. These measurements were obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79% N2 : 21% O2 by mole) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08% N2 : 20.95% O2 : 0.04% CO2 : 0.93% Ar by mole). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth re-entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to examine critical aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance pro les integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) through to the Near Infra-Red (NIR), were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURA/HARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40% and over-predict by as much as 12% depending on the shock speed. DPLR/NEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50% and over-predict by as much as 20% depending

  5. Approach to non-equilibrium behaviour in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kripfganz, J.; Perlt, H.

    1989-05-01

    We study the real-time evolution of quantum field theoretic systems in non-equilibrium situations. Results are presented for the example of scalar /lambda//phi//sup 4/ theory. The degrees of freedom are discretized by studying the system on a torus. Short-wavelength modes are integrated out to one-loop order. The long-wavelength modes considered to be the relevant degrees of freedom are treated by semiclassical phase-space methods. /copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  6. Non-equilibrium Numerical Analysis of Microwave-supported Detonation Threshold Propagating through Diatomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Microwave-supported Detonation (MSD), one type of Microwave-supported Plasma (MSP), is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for beam-powered space propulsion systems. In this study, I numerically simulate MSD waves propagating through a diatomic gas. In order to evaluate the threshold of beam intensity, I use the physical-fluid dynamics scheme, which has been developed for simulating unsteady and non-equilibrium LSD waves propagating through a hydrogen gas.

  7. Novel non-equilibrium modelling of a DC electric arc in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, M.; Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel non-equilibrium model has been developed to describe the interplay of heat and mass transfer and electric and magnetic fields in a DC electric arc. A complete diffusion treatment of particle fluxes, a generalized form of Ohm’s law, and numerical matching of the arc plasma with the space-charge sheaths adjacent to the electrodes are applied to analyze in detail the plasma parameters and the phenomena occurring in the plasma column and the near-electrode regions of a DC arc generated in atmospheric pressure argon for current levels from 20 A up to 200 A. Results comprising electric field and potential, current density, heating of the electrodes, and effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium are presented and discussed. The current-voltage characteristic obtained is in fair agreement with known experimental data. It indicates a minimum for arc current of about 80 A. For all current levels, a field reversal in front of the anode accompanied by a voltage drop of (0.7-2.6) V is observed. Another field reversal is observed near the cathode for arc currents below 80 A.

  8. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, S.; Murata, R. M.; Saxena, D.; Kuo, S. P.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-15

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  9. Air plasma effect on dental disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S.; Kuo, S. P.; Murata, R. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Saxena, D.; Huang, K. J.; Popovic, S.

    2011-07-01

    A nonthermal low temperature air plasma jet is characterized and applied to study the plasma effects on oral pathogens and biofilms. Experiments were performed on samples of six defined microorganisms' cultures, including those of gram-positive bacteria and fungi, and on a cultivating biofilm sample of Streptococcus mutans UA159. The results show that the plasma jet creates a zone of microbial growth inhibition in each treated sample; the zone increases with the plasma treatment time and expands beyond the entire region directly exposed to the plasma jet. With 30s plasma treatment twice daily during 5 days of biofilm cultivation, its formation was inhibited. The viability of S. mutans cells in the treated biofilms dropped to below the measurable level and the killed bacterial cells concentrated to local regions as manifested by the fluorescence microscopy via the environmental scanning electron microscope. The emission spectroscopy of the jet indicates that its plasma effluent carries an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen, providing catalyst for the observed plasma effect.

  10. Non-equilibrium mechanisms of light in the microwave region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortenson, Juliana H. J.

    2011-09-01

    Quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry have taught for more than 100 years that "photons" associated with microwaves cannot exert photochemical effects because their "photon energies" are smaller than chemical bond energies. Those quantum theories have been strongly contradicted within the last few decades by physical experiments demonstrating non-equilibrium, photochemical and photomaterial activity by microwaves. Reactions among scientists to these real physical models and proofs have varied from disbelief and denial, to acceptance of the real physical phenomena and demands for revisions to quantum theory. At the previous "Nature of Light" meeting, an advance in the foundations of quantum mechanics was presented. Those discoveries have revealed the source of these conflicts between quantum theory and microwave experiments. Critical variables and constants were missing from quantum theory due to a minor mathematical inadvertence in Planck's original quantum work. As a result, erroneous concepts were formed nearly a century ago regarding the energetics and mechanisms of lower frequency light, such as in the microwave region. The new discoveries have revealed that the traditional concept of "photons" mistakenly attributed elementary particle status to what is actually an arbitrarily time-based collection of sub-photonic, elementary particles. In a mathematical dimensional sense, those time-based energy measurements cannot be mathematically equivalent to bond energies as historically believed. Only an "isolated quantity of energy", as De Broglie referred to it, can be equivalent to bond energy. With the aid of the new variables and constants, the non-equilibrium mechanisms of light in the microwave region can now be described. They include resonant absorption, splitting frequency stimulation leading to electronic excitation, and resonant acoustic transduction. Numerous practical engineering applications can be envisioned for non-equilibrium microwaves.

  11. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  12. Fluctuations and large deviations in non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, B.

    2005-05-01

    For systems in contact with two reservoirs at different densities or with two thermostats at different temperatures, the large deviation function of the density gives a possible way of extending the notion of free energy to non-equilibrium systems. This large deviation function of the density can be calculated explicitly for exclusion models in one dimension with open boundary conditions. For these models, one can also obtain the distribution of the current of particles flowing through the system and the results lead to a simple conjecture for the large deviation function of the current of more general diffusive systems.

  13. The non-equilibrium nature of culinary evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinouchi, Osame; Diez-Garcia, Rosa W.; Holanda, Adriano J.; Zambianchi, Pedro; Roque, Antonio C.

    2008-07-01

    Food is an essential part of civilization, with a scope that ranges from the biological to the economic and cultural levels. Here, we study the statistics of ingredients and recipes taken from Brazilian, British, French and Medieval cookery books. We find universal distributions with scale invariant behaviour. We propose a copy-mutate process to model culinary evolution that fits our empirical data very well. We find a cultural 'founder effect' produced by the non-equilibrium dynamics of the model. Both the invariant and idiosyncratic aspects of culture are accounted for by our model, which may have applications in other kinds of evolutionary processes.

  14. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  15. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  16. NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION MODELING OF THE CURRENT SHEET IN A SIMULATED SOLAR ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Chengcai; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Lin Jun; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.

    2013-08-20

    The current sheet that extends from the top of flare loops and connects to an associated flux rope is a common structure in models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the observational properties of CME current sheets, we generated predictions from a flare/CME model to be compared with observations. We use a simulation of a large-scale CME current sheet previously reported by Reeves et al. This simulation includes ohmic and coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. Using the results of this simulation, we perform time-dependent ionization calculations of the flow in a CME current sheet and construct two-dimensional spatial distributions of ionic charge states for multiple chemical elements. We use the filter responses from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the predicted intensities of emission lines to compute the count rates for each of the AIA bands. The results show differences in the emission line intensities between equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization. The current sheet plasma is underionized at low heights and overionized at large heights. At low heights in the current sheet, the intensities of the AIA 94 A and 131 A channels are lower for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization. At large heights, these intensities are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization inside the current sheet. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a significant underestimate of the temperature low in the current sheet and overestimate at larger heights. We also calculate the intensities of ultraviolet lines and predict emission features to be compared with events from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, including a low-intensity region around the current sheet corresponding to this model.

  17. Macroscopic Fluctuation Theory for Stationary Non-Equilibrium States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, L.; de Sole, A.; Gabrielli, D.; Jona-Lasinio, G.; Landim, C.

    2002-05-01

    We formulate a dynamical fluctuation theory for stationary non-equilibrium states (SNS) which is tested explicitly in stochastic models of interacting particles. In our theory a crucial role is played by the time reversed dynamics. Within this theory we derive the following results: the modification of the Onsager-Machlup theory in the SNS; a general Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the macroscopic entropy; a non-equilibrium, nonlinear fluctuation dissipation relation valid for a wide class of systems; an H theorem for the entropy. We discuss in detail two models of stochastic boundary driven lattice gases: the zero range and the simple exclusion processes. In the first model the invariant measure is explicitly known and we verify the predictions of the general theory. For the one dimensional simple exclusion process, as recently shown by Derrida, Lebowitz, and Speer, it is possible to express the macroscopic entropy in terms of the solution of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation; by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we obtain a logically independent derivation of this result.

  18. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  19. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-01

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  20. The non-equilibrium and energetic cost of sensory adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, G.; Sartori, Pablo; Tu, Y.

    2011-03-24

    Biological sensory systems respond to external signals in short time and adapt to permanent environmental changes over a longer timescale to maintain high sensitivity in widely varying environments. In this work we have shown how all adaptation dynamics are intrinsically non-equilibrium and free energy is dissipated. We show that the dissipated energy is utilized to maintain adaptation accuracy. A universal relation between the energy dissipation and the optimum adaptation accuracy is established by both a general continuum model and a discrete model i n the specific case of the well-known E. coli chemo-sensory adaptation. Our study suggests that cellular level adaptations are fueled by hydrolysis of high energy biomolecules, such as ATP. The relevance of this work lies on linking the functionality of a biological system (sensory adaptation) with a concept rooted in statistical physics (energy dissipation), by a mathematical law. This has been made possible by identifying a general sensory system with a non-equilibrium steady state (a stationary state in which the probability current is not zero, but its divergence is, see figure), and then numerically and analytically solving the Fokker-Planck and Master Equations which describe the sensory adaptive system. The application of our general results to the case of E. Coli has shed light on why this system uses the high energy SAM molecule to perform adaptation, since using the more common ATP would not suffice to obtain the required adaptation accuracy.

  1. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of harmonically trapped bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángel García-March, Miguel; Fogarty, Thomás; Campbell, Steve; Busch, Thomas; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    We apply the framework of non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics to the physics of quenched small-sized bosonic quantum gases in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. We show that dynamical orthogonality can occur in these few-body systems with strong interactions after a quench and we find its occurrence analytically for an infinitely repulsive pair of atoms. We further show this phenomena is related to the fundamental excitations that dictate the dynamics from the spectral function. We establish a clear qualitative link between the amount of (irreversible) work performed on the system and the establishment of entanglement. We extend our analysis to multipartite systems by examining the case of three trapped atoms. We show the initial (pre-quench) interactions play a vital role in determining the dynamical features, while the qualitative features of the two particle case appear to remain valid. Finally, we propose the use of the atomic density profile as a readily accessible indicator of the non-equilibrium properties of the systems in question.

  2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  3. Scalar Fluctuations from Extended Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    In the framework of extended non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the local non-equilibrium state of a liquid is described by the density, temperature, and a structural variable, ζ, and its rate-of-change. ζ is the ensemble average of a function A (Q) of the configuration co-ordinates, and it is assumed to relax to local equilibrium in a time short compared to the time for diffusion of an appreciable number of particles into the system. By a projection operator technique of Grabert, an equation is derived from the Liouville equation for the distribution of fluctuations in TV, the particle number, and in A and Ȧ. An approximate solution is proposed which exhibits nonequilibrium corrections to the Einstein function in the form of a sum of thermodynamic forces. For a particular structural model, the corresponding non-Einstein contributions to correlation functions are estimated to be very small. For variables of the type considered here, the thermodynamic pressure is found to equal the pressure trace.

  4. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  5. Non-equilibrium configurational Prigogine-Defay ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garden, Jean-Luc; Guillou, Hervé; Richard, Jacques; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2012-06-01

    Classically, the Prigogine-Defay (PD) ratio involves differences in isobaric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric thermal expansion coefficient between a super-cooled liquid and the corresponding glass at the glass transition. However, determining such differences by extrapolation of coefficients that have been measured for super-cooled liquid and glassy state, respectively, poses the problem that it does not exactly take into account the non-equilibrium character of the glass transition. In this paper, we assess this question by taking into account the time dependence of configurational contributions to the three thermodynamic coefficients in the glass transition range upon varying temperature and/or pressure. Macroscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is applied to obtain a generalised form of the PD ratio. The classical PD ratio can then be taken as a particular case of this generalisation. Under some assumptions, the configurational PD ratio (CPD ratio) can be expressed in terms of fictive temperature and fictive pressure which, hence, provides another possibility to experimentally verify this formalism.

  6. Turbulence as a Problem in Non-equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Shih, Hong-Yan

    2016-12-01

    The transitional and well-developed regimes of turbulent shear flows exhibit a variety of remarkable scaling laws that are only now beginning to be systematically studied and understood. In the first part of this article, we summarize recent progress in understanding the friction factor of turbulent flows in rough pipes and quasi-two-dimensional soap films, showing how the data obey a two-parameter scaling law known as roughness-induced criticality, and exhibit power-law scaling of friction factor with Reynolds number that depends on the precise form of the nature of the turbulent cascade. These results hint at a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation that applies to turbulent flows. The second part of this article concerns the lifetime statistics in smooth pipes around the transition, showing how the remarkable super-exponential scaling with Reynolds number reflects deep connections between large deviation theory, extreme value statistics, directed percolation and the onset of coexistence in predator-prey ecosystems. Both these phenomena reflect the way in which turbulence can be fruitfully approached as a problem in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  7. Etching of polymers, proteins and bacterial spores by atmospheric pressure DBD plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminova, A.; Kretková, T.; Kylián, O.; Hanuš, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Prukner, V.; Doležalová, E.; Šimek, M.; Biederman, H.

    2017-04-01

    Many studies proved that non-equilibrium discharges generated at atmospheric pressure are highly effective for the bio-decontamination of surfaces of various materials. One of the key processes that leads to a desired result is plasma etching and thus the evaluation of etching rates of organic materials is of high importance. However, the comparison of reported results is rather difficult if impossible as different authors use diverse sources of atmospheric plasma that are operated at significantly different operational parameters. Therefore, we report here on the systematic study of the etching of nine different common polymers that mimic the different structures of more complicated biological systems, bovine serum albumin (BSA) selected as the model protein and spores of Bacillus subtilis taken as a representative of highly resistant micro-organisms. The treatment of these materials was performed by means of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sustained in open air at constant conditions. All tested polymers, BSA and spores, were readily etched by DBD plasma. However, the measured etching rates were found to be dependent on the chemical structure of treated materials, namely on the presence of oxygen in the structure of polymers.

  8. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2015-09-07

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min(-1), consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min(-1) and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  9. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  10. Complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-jin; Nicholson, S. B.

    2015-08-01

    We present novel complementary relations in non-equilibrium stochastic processes. Specifically, by utilising path integral formulation, we derive statistical measures (entropy, information, and work) and investigate their dependence on variables (x, v), reference frames, and time. In particular, we show that the equilibrium state maximises the simultaneous information quantified by the product of the Fisher information based on x and v while minimising the simultaneous disorder/uncertainty quantified by the sum of the entropy based on x and v as well as by the product of the variances of the PDFs of x and v. We also elucidate the difference between Eulerian and Lagrangian entropy. Our theory naturally leads to Hamilton-Jacobi relation for forced-dissipative systems.

  11. Dynamical Systems Based Non Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics for Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevost, Mireille

    We introduce an abstract framework concerning non-equilibrium statistical mechanics in the specific context of Markov chains. This framework encompasses both the Evans-Searles and the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorems. To support and expand on these concepts, several results are proven, among which a central limit theorem and a large deviation principle. The interest for Markov chains is twofold. First, they model a great variety of physical systems. Secondly, their simplicity allows for an easy introduction to an otherwise complicated field encompassing the statistical mechanics of Anosov and Axiom A diffeomorphisms. We give two examples relating the present framework to physical cases modelled by Markov chains. One of these concerns chemical reactions and links key concepts from the framework to their well known physical counterpart.

  12. A non-equilibrium formulation of food security resilience.

    PubMed

    Smerlak, Matteo; Vaitla, Bapu

    2017-01-01

    Resilience, the ability to recover from adverse events, is of fundamental importance to food security. This is especially true in poor countries, where basic needs are frequently threatened by economic, environmental and health shocks. An empirically sound formalization of the concept of food security resilience, however, is lacking. Here, we introduce a general non-equilibrium framework for quantifying resilience based on the statistical notion of persistence. Our approach can be applied to any food security variable for which high-frequency time-series data are available. We illustrate our method with per capita kilocalorie availability for 161 countries between 1961 and 2011. We find that resilient countries are not necessarily those that are characterized by high levels or less volatile fluctuations of kilocalorie intake. Accordingly, food security policies and programmes will need to be tailored not only to welfare levels at any one time, but also to long-run welfare dynamics.

  13. Relativistic hydrodynamics and non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillane, Michael; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We review recent interest in the relativistic Riemann problem as a method for generating a non-equilibrium steady state. In the version of the problem under consideration, the initial conditions consist of a planar interface between two halves of a system held at different temperatures in a hydrodynamic regime. The new double shock solutions are in contrast with older solutions that involve one shock and one rarefaction wave. We use numerical simulations to show that the older solutions are preferred. Briefly we discuss the effects of a conserved charge. Finally, we discuss deforming the relativistic equations with a nonlinear term and how that deformation affects the temperature and velocity in the region connecting the asymptotic fluids.

  14. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of the Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Sola, Alessandro; Magni, Alessandro; Kuepferling, Michaela; Pasquale, Massimo

    In this paper we employ non equilibrium thermodynamics of fluxes and forces to describe magnetization and heat transport. By the theory we are able to identify the thermodynamic driving force of the magnetization current as the gradient of the effective field ▿H*. This definition permits to define the spin Seebeck coefficient ɛM which relates ▿H* and the temperature gradient ▿T. By applying the theory to the geometry of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect we are able to obtain the optimal conditions for generating large magnetization currents. Furthermore, by using the results of recent experiments, we obtain an order of magnitude for the value of ɛM ∼ 10-2 TK-1 for yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12).

  15. Microscopic versus macroscopic approaches to non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional symmetric simple exclusion process (SSEP) is one of the very few exactly soluble models of non-equilibrium statistical physics. It describes a system of particles which diffuse with hard core repulsion on a one-dimensional lattice in contact with two reservoirs of particles at unequal densities. The goal of this paper is to review the two main approaches which lead to the exact expression of the large deviation functional of the density of the SSEP in its steady state: a microscopic approach (based on the matrix product ansatz and an additivity property) and a macroscopic approach (based on the macroscopic fluctuation theory of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio and Landim).

  16. Non-Equilibrium Conductivity at Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Andrew; Bhaseen, M. J.; Green, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The behaviour of quantum systems driven out of equilibrium is a field in which we are still searching for general principles and universal results. Quantum critical systems are useful in this search as their out of equilibrium steady states may inherit universal features from equilibrium. While this has been shown in some cases, the calculational techniques used often involve simplified models or calculational tricks, which can obscure some of the underlying physical processes. Here we use a Boltzmann transport approach to study the steady-state non-equilibrium properties - conductivity and current noise, of the Bose-Hubbard model head-on. We must explicitly consider heat-flow and rate limiting processes in the establishment of the steady-state to show that it can indeed be universal. Our analysis reveals the importance of the hydrodynamic limit and the limitations of current approaches.

  17. Thermal Non-equilibrium Consistent with Widespread Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Mok, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time correlation analysis has been used to show widespread cooling in the solar corona; this cooling has been interpreted as a result of impulsive (nanoflare) heating. In this work, we investigate wide-spread cooling using a 3D model for a solar active region which has been heated with highly stratified heating. This type of heating drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions, meaning that though the heating is effectively steady, the density and temperature in the solution are not. We simulate the expected observations in narrowband EUV images and apply the time correlation analysis. We find that the results of this analysis are qualitatively similar to the observed data. We discuss additional diagnostics that may be applied to differentiate between these two heating scenarios.

  18. A non-equilibrium formulation of food security resilience

    PubMed Central

    Vaitla, Bapu

    2017-01-01

    Resilience, the ability to recover from adverse events, is of fundamental importance to food security. This is especially true in poor countries, where basic needs are frequently threatened by economic, environmental and health shocks. An empirically sound formalization of the concept of food security resilience, however, is lacking. Here, we introduce a general non-equilibrium framework for quantifying resilience based on the statistical notion of persistence. Our approach can be applied to any food security variable for which high-frequency time-series data are available. We illustrate our method with per capita kilocalorie availability for 161 countries between 1961 and 2011. We find that resilient countries are not necessarily those that are characterized by high levels or less volatile fluctuations of kilocalorie intake. Accordingly, food security policies and programmes will need to be tailored not only to welfare levels at any one time, but also to long-run welfare dynamics. PMID:28280586

  19. Modeling Inflation Using a Non-Equilibrium Equation of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflation is a change in the prices of goods that takes place without changes in the actual values of those goods. The Equation of Exchange, formulated clearly in a seminal paper by Irving Fisher in 1911, establishes an equilibrium relationship between the price index P (also known as "inflation"), the economy's aggregate output Q (also known as "the real gross domestic product"), the amount of money available for spending M (also known as "the money supply"), and the rate at which money is reused V (also known as "the velocity of circulation of money"). This paper offers first a qualitative discussion of what can cause these factors to change and how those causes might be controlled, then develops a quantitative model of inflation based on a non-equilibrium version of the Equation of Exchange. Causal relationships are different from equations in that the effects of changes in the causal variables take time to play out-often significant amounts of time. In the model described here, wages track prices, but only after a distributed lag. Prices change whenever the money supply, aggregate output, or the velocity of circulation of money change, but only after a distributed lag. Similarly, the money supply depends on the supplies of domestic and foreign money, which depend on the monetary base and a variety of foreign transactions, respectively. The spreading of delays mitigates the shocks of sudden changes to important inputs, but the most important aspect of this model is that delays, which often have dramatic consequences in dynamic systems, are explicitly incorporated.macroeconomics, inflation, equation of exchange, non-equilibrium, Athena Project

  20. Plasma treatment of air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Amutha Rani, D; Gomez, E; Boccaccini, A R; Hao, L; Deegan, D; Cheeseman, C R

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from waste incineration have been blended with silica and alumina and the mix melted using DC plasma arc technology. The chemical composition of the fully amorphous homogeneous glass formed has been determined. Waste acceptance criteria compliance leach testing demonstrates that the APC residue derived glass releases only trace levels of heavy metals (Pb (<0.007mg/kg) and Zn (0.02mg/kg)) and Cl(-) (0.2mg/kg). These are significantly below the limit values for disposal to inert landfill. It is concluded that plasma treatment of APC residues can produce an inert glass that may have potential to be used either in bulk civil engineering applications or in the production of higher value glass-ceramic products.

  1. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  2. Numerical Analysis on Thermal Non-Equilibrium Process of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave in Axisymmetric Nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-28

    Numerical Analyses on Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP) have been performed for researching the mechanism of laser absorption occurring in the laser propulsion system. Above all, Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), categorized as one type of LSP, is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for performing highly effective propulsion. For simulating generation and propagation of LSD wave, I have performed thermal non-equilibrium analyses by Navier-stokes equations, using a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser into an inert gas, where the most important laser absorption mechanism for LSD propagation is Inverse Bremsstrahlung. As a numerical method, TVD scheme taken into account of real gas effects and thermal non-equilibrium effects by using a 2-temperature model, is applied. In this study, I analyze a LSD wave propagating through a conical nozzle, where an inner space of an actual laser propulsion system is simplified.

  3. Numerical Analysis on Thermal Non-Equilibrium Process of Laser-Supported Detonation Wave in Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-01

    Numerical Analyses on Laser-Supported Plasma (LSP) have been performed for researching the mechanism of laser absorption occurring in the laser propulsion system. Above all, Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), categorized as one type of LSP, is considered as one of the most important phenomena because it can generate high pressure and high temperature for performing highly effective propulsion. For simulating generation and propagation of LSD wave, I have performed thermal non-equilibrium analyses by Navier-stokes equations, using a CO2 gasdynamic laser into an inert gas, where the most important laser absorption mechanism for LSD propagation is Inverse Bremsstrahlung. As a numerical method, TVD scheme taken into account of real gas effects and thermal non-equilibrium effects by using a 2-temperature model, is applied. In this study, I analyze a LSD wave propagating through a conical nozzle, where an inner space of an actual laser propulsion system is simplified.

  4. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  5. Non-equilibrium Transport in Carbon based Adsorbate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürst, Joachim; Brandbyge, Mads; Stokbro, Kurt; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-03-01

    We have used the Atomistix Tool Kit(ATK) and TranSIESTA[1] packages to investigate adsorption of iron atoms on a graphene sheet. The technique of both codes is based on density functional theory using local basis sets[2], and non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) to calculate the charge distribution under external bias. Spin dependent electronic structure calculations are performed for different iron coverages. These reveal adsorption site dependent charge transfer from iron to graphene leading to screening effects. Transport calculations show spin dependent scattering of the transmission which is analysed obtaining the transmission eigenchannels for each spin type. The phenomena of electromigration of iron in these systems at finite bias will be discussed, estimating the so-called wind force from the reflection[3]. [1] M. Brandbyge, J.-L. Mozos, P. Ordejon, J. Taylor, and K. Stokbro. Physical Review B (Condensed Matter and Materials Physics), 65(16):165401/11-7, 2002. [2] Jose M. Soler, Emilio Artacho, Julian D. Gale, Alberto Garcia, Javier Junquera, Pablo Ordejon, and Daniel Sanchez-Portal. Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, 14(11):2745-2779, 2002. [3] Sorbello. Theory of electromigration. Solid State Physics, 1997.

  6. A probability theory for non-equilibrium gravitational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    This paper uses dynamical invariants to describe the evolution of collisionless systems subject to time-dependent gravitational forces without resorting to maximum-entropy probabilities. We show that collisionless relaxation can be viewed as a special type of diffusion process in the integral-of-motion space. In time-varying potentials with a fixed spatial symmetry the diffusion coefficients are closely related to virial quantities, such as the specific moment of inertia, the virial factor and the mean kinetic and potential energy of microcanonical particle ensembles. The non-equilibrium distribution function is found by convolving the initial distribution function with the Green function that solves Einstein's equation for freely diffusing particles. Such a convolution also yields a natural solution to the Fokker-Planck equations in the energy space. Our mathematical formalism can be generalized to potentials with a time-varying symmetry, where diffusion extends over multiple dimensions of the integral-of-motion space. The new probability theory is in many ways analogous to stochastic calculus, with two significant differences: (i) the equations of motion that govern the trajectories of particles are fully deterministic, and (ii) the diffusion coefficients can be derived self-consistently from microcanonical phase-space averages without relying on ergodicity assumptions. For illustration we follow the cold collapse of N-body models in a time-dependent logarithmic potential. Comparison between the analytical and numerical results shows excellent agreement in regions where the potential evolution does not depart too strongly from the adiabatic regime.

  7. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  8. Non-equilibrium control of complex solids by nonlinear phononics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankowsky, Roman; Först, Michael; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We review some recent advances in the use of optical fields at terahertz frequencies to drive the lattice of complex materials. We will focus on the control of low energy collective properties of solids, which emerge on average when a high frequency vibration is driven and a new crystal structure induced. We first discuss the fundamentals of these lattice rearrangements, based on how anharmonic mode coupling transforms an oscillatory motion into a quasi-static deformation of the crystal structure. We then discuss experiments, in which selectively changing a bond angle turns an insulator into a metal, accompanied by changes in charge, orbital and magnetic order. We then address the case of light induced non-equilibrium superconductivity, a mysterious phenomenon observed in some cuprates and molecular materials when certain lattice vibrations are driven. Finally, we show that the dynamics of electronic and magnetic phase transitions in complex-oxide heterostructures follow distinctly new physical pathways in case of the resonant excitation of a substrate vibrational mode.

  9. Non Equilibrium Transformations of Molecular Compounds Induced Mechanically

    SciTech Connect

    Descamps, M.; Willart, J. F.; Dudognon, E.

    2006-05-05

    Results clarifying the effects of mechanical milling on molecular solids are shortly reviewed. Special attention has been paid to the temperature of milling with regard to the glass transition temperature of the compounds. It is shown that decreasing the grinding temperature has for incidence to increase the amorphization tendency whereas milling above Tg produces a crystal-to-crystal transformation between polymorphic varieties. These observations contradict the usual proposition that grinding transforms the physical state only by a heating effect which induces a local melting. Equilibrium thermodynamics does not seem to be appropriate for describing the process. The driven alloys concept offers a more rational framework to interpret the effect of the milling temperature. Other results are presented which demonstrate the possibility for grinding to realize low temperature solid state alloying which offers new promising ways to stabilize amorphous molecular solids. In a second part the effect of dehydration of a molecular hydrate is described. It is shown that the rate of the dehydration process is a driving force for this other type of mechanical non equilibrium transformation.

  10. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  11. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  12. Non-equilibrium phase transitions of aqueous starch systems.

    PubMed

    Biliaderis, C G

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data on phase transitions of aqueous starch systems, obtained by thermal analysis (TA) methods, are often indicative of irreversible (non-equilibrium) processes involving various metastable states. The thermal responses usually reflect composite effects from contributions of several opposing processes [e.g. annealing, melting, and (re)crystallization] taking place concurrently during TA. It is important, therefore, to recognize the temperature- and time-dependence of the structure of starch materials, if non-isothermal techniques are used for their characterization. Identifying the pertinent morphological features (supermolecular structure) of each particular system, as well as recognizing the role of water as a plasticizer which depresses the Tg of the amorphous domains, is essential to predict heat/moisture-mediated transformations of this biopolymer. The phase transition behaviour of granular starch and amylose-lipid complexes, as revealed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermomechanical Analysis, and the metastability of these materials are considered herein with respect to the effects of water and low molecular weight solutes.

  13. Properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.; Riquel, G.

    2012-07-01

    We present the calculation and the main results of the properties of air-aluminum thermal plasmas, useful for complete modelling of arc systems involving aluminum contacts. The properties are calculated assuming thermal equilibrium and correspond to the equilibrium composition, thermodynamic functions, transport coefficients including diffusion coefficients and net emission coefficient representing the divergence of the radiative flux in the hottest plasma regions. The calculation is developed in the temperature range between 2000 and 30 000 K, for a pressure range from 0.1 to 1 bar and for several metal mass proportions. As in the case of other metals, the presence of aluminum vapours has a strong influence on three properties at intermediate temperatures: the electron number density, the electrical conductivity and the net emission coefficient. Some comparisons with other metal vapour (Cu, Fe and Ag) properties are made and show the original behaviour for Al-containing mixtures: mass density at high temperatures is low due to the low Al atomic mass; high electrical conductivity at T < 10 000 K due to low ionization potential (around 2 V less for Al than for the other metals); very strong self-absorption of ionized aluminum lines, leading to a net emission coefficient lower than that of pure air when T > 10 000 K, in contrast to copper or iron radiation.

  14. Step-wise pulling protocols for non-equilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van Anh

    The fundamental laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, and the deeper understandings of quantum mechanics have been rebuilt in recent years. It is partly because of the increasing power of computing resources nowadays, that allow shedding direct insights into the connections among the thermodynamics laws, statistical nature of our world, and the concepts of quantum mechanics, which have not yet been understood. But mostly, the most important reason, also the ultimate goal, is to understand the mechanisms, statistics and dynamics of biological systems, whose prevailing non-equilibrium processes violate the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, deviate from statistical mechanics, and finally complicate quantum effects. I believe that investigations of the fundamental laws of non-equilibrium dynamics will be a frontier research for at least several more decades. One of the fundamental laws was first discovered in 1997 by Jarzynski, so-called Jarzynski's Equality. Since then, different proofs, alternative descriptions of Jarzynski's Equality, and its further developments and applications have been quickly accumulated. My understandings, developments and applications of an alternative theory on Jarzynski's Equality form the bulk of this dissertation. The core of my theory is based on stepwise pulling protocols, which provide deeper insight into how fluctuations of reaction coordinates contribute to free-energy changes along a reaction pathway. We find that the most optimal pathways, having the largest contribution to free-energy changes, follow the principle of detailed balance. This is a glimpse of why the principle of detailed balance appears so powerful for sampling the most probable statistics of events. In a further development on Jarzynski's Equality, I have been trying to use it in the formalism of diagonal entropy to propose a way to extract useful thermodynamic quantities such temperature, work and free-energy profiles from far

  15. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  16. PREFACE: International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010 International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Matsuyama, A.; Ohta, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-07-01

    Soft matter is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field covering a range of subject areas including physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics and engineering. Some of the important universal features of these materials are their mesoscopic structures and their dynamics. Due to the existence of such large-scale structures, which nevertheless exhibit interactions of the order of the thermal energy, soft matter can readily be taken out of equilibrium by imposing a weak external field such as an electric field, a mechanical stress or a shear flow. The importance of the coexistence of microscopic molecular dynamics and the mesoscopic/macroscopic structures and flows requires us to develop hierarchical approaches to understand the nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, which is one of the central issues of current soft matter research. This special section presents selected contributions from the 'International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010' held from 17-20 August 2010 in Nara, Japan, which aimed to describe recent advances in soft matter research focusing especially on its nonequilibrium aspects. The topics discussed cover statics and dynamics of a wide variety of materials ranging from traditional soft matter like polymers, gels, emulsions, liquid crystals and colloids to biomaterials such as biopolymers and biomembranes. Among these studies, we highlighted the physics of biomembranes and vesicles, which has attracted great attention during the last decade; we organized a special session for this active field. The work presented in this issue deals with (1) structure formation in biomembranes and vesicles, (2) rheology of polymers and gels, (3) mesophases in block copolymers, (4) mesoscopic structures in liquid crystals and ionic liquids, and (5) nonequilibrium dynamics. This symposium was organized as part of a research project supported by the Grant-in-Aid for the priority area 'Soft Matter Physics' (2006-2010) from the Ministry of Education

  17. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non-equilibrium

  18. Advanced Integrated TPS and Non Equilibrium Chemistry Instrumentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    occur in interaction with numerical simulation. At IRS, the flow field solver URANUS and the plasma radiation database PARADE are used to rebuild...the URANUS code [27] in combination with a spectral simulation of the emission with the plasma radiation database PARADE [28]. Two grid lines were...line of sight yielding the simulated spectrometer response. Simulations with the URANUS code were performed for altitudes of 70 km/s where strong

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm-3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  -  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  20. Non-equilibrium phase behavior and friction of confined molecular films under shear: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maćkowiak, Sz.; Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Brańka, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    The phase behavior of a confined liquid at high pressure and shear rate, such as is found in elastohydrodynamic lubrication, can influence the traction characteristics in machine operation. Generic aspects of this behavior are investigated here using Non-equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations of confined Lennard-Jones (LJ) films under load with a recently proposed wall-driven shearing method without wall atom tethering [C. Gattinoni et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 043302 (2014)]. The focus is on thick films in which the nonequilibrium phases formed in the confined region impact on the traction properties. The nonequilibrium phase and tribological diagrams are mapped out in detail as a function of load, wall sliding speed, and atomic scale surface roughness, which is shown can have a significant effect. The transition between these phases is typically not sharp as the external conditions are varied. The magnitude of the friction coefficient depends strongly on the nonequilibrium phase adopted by the confined region of molecules, and in general does not follow the classical friction relations between macroscopic bodies, e.g., the frictional force can decrease with increasing load in the Plug-Slip (PS) region of the phase diagram owing to structural changes induced in the confined film. The friction coefficient can be extremely low (˜0.01) in the PS region as a result of incommensurate alignment between a (100) face-centered cubic wall plane and reconstructed (111) layers of the confined region near the wall. It is possible to exploit hysteresis to retain low friction PS states well into the central localization high wall speed region of the phase diagram. Stick-slip behavior due to periodic in-plane melting of layers in the confined region and subsequent annealing is observed at low wall speeds and moderate external loads. At intermediate wall speeds and pressure values (at least) the friction coefficient decreases with increasing well depth of the LJ potential

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of atmospheric air plasma induced by multi-MeV pulsed X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulois, Mélissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Pouzalgues, Romain; Garrigues, Alain; Delbos, Christophe; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Quantification of electromagnetic stresses on electronic systems, following irradiation of the air by ionizing radiations, requires a thorough study of the plasma generated. In this work, the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium air plasmas self-induced by energetic X-rays is experimentally and theoretically investigated at atmospheric pressure. Time resolved electron density measurements are based on transmission measurements of an electromagnetic wave in the microwave range. The electromagnetic wave is launched into a wave guide, which is irradiated by a high flux of multi-MeV pulsed X-rays. For different X-ray fluxes, the electron density is determined from the comparison between the transmitted microwave signal at the waveguide output, and the result of the calculation of the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through time varying plasma contained in a waveguide. These measurements require a priori assumptions on electron temperature, which is obtained and confirmed by a reaction kinetics model of the evolution of the electron energy and the densities of the different humid air plasma species inside the waveguide. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 39 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 265 selected reactions. A good agreement is observed between the calculated and measured time evolution of the transmitted signal for specific profiles of electron energy and density. In our experiments, the maximum electron density is of the order of few 1012 cm-3, for a mean electron energy of about 0.5 eV. For doses range from 3 Gy to 21 Gy, the discrepancies between the measurements and the model for the maximum of the electron density are within a factor of 2.

  2. Non-equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2007-07-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow us to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (for example, non-Gaussian fluctuations of density or non-convexity of the large deviation function which generalizes the notion of free energy) are compared with those of systems at equilibrium.

  3. Experimental measurements of a non-equilibrium thermal boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Drummond; Ebadi, Alireza; Whie, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Data from a newly constructed non-equilibrium and thermal boundary layer wind tunnel is presented. The bottom wall of the tunnel is a sectioned-wall design composed of twelve aluminum 6061 plates with resistive heaters adhered to their underside. Each section is heated and controlled using independent feedback loop controllers. The freestream temperature is controlled by an upstream array of resistive heaters and a feedback controller. Experimental data with strong perturbations that produce non-equilibrium boundary layer flow behaviors is presented. Data for ZPG conditions are provided for validation purposes, and the effects of non-equilibrium behaviors on the transport of momentum and heat are discussed.

  4. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-23

    or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non- equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we...published online 23 December 2013) Thermal non- equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional

  5. Dynamic relaxation of a levitated nanoparticle from a non-equilibrium steady state.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Jan; Quidant, Romain; Dellago, Christoph; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuation theorems are a generalization of thermodynamics on small scales and provide the tools to characterize the fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium nanoscale systems. They are particularly important for understanding irreversibility and the second law in fundamental chemical and biological processes that are actively driven, thus operating far from thermal equilibrium. Here, we apply the framework of fluctuation theorems to investigate the important case of a system relaxing from a non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. Using a vacuum-trapped nanoparticle, we demonstrate experimentally the validity of a fluctuation theorem for the relative entropy change occurring during relaxation from a non-equilibrium steady state. The platform established here allows non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to be studied experimentally for arbitrary steady states and can be extended to investigate quantum fluctuation theorems as well as systems that do not obey detailed balance.

  6. Search for the Non-Equilibrium Ionization State in Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are considered that they have evolved by their merging. Many observations of the merging cluster with their shock wave are reported recently (e.g. Akamatsu et al. 2012, PASJ, 64, 67, Bourdin et al. 2013, ApJ, 764, 82). If the shock heats the plasma, the non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) state occurs. Even so, an intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed that it is in collisional ionization equilibrium state, because the timescale of the evolution of galaxy clusters is longer than the timescale that the NEI plasma reaches the equilibrium state. Actually, no observation of the NEI plasma in the ICM is reported. However, for the merging cluster, if its merging timescale is 108 yr, the condition of the NEI state of the ionization parameter (net <1013 s/cm3) is filled in the ICM with the electron density of ~10-3 /cm3. In fact, numerical simulation of the merging cluster shows that the NEI state in the ICM occurs due to the shock heating (e.g. Akahori & Yoshikawa 2010, PASJ, 62, 335). Our purpose is to detect the NEI plasma in the merging cluster, to estimate its timescale from the shock heating quantitatively by ionization parameter to reveal the cluster evolution.From this point, we have analyzed the ionization state of the merging cluster, Abell 754. We used the Suzaku observation data and measured the ratio of the intensities of He-like Fe and H-like Fe lines. As a result, we find that the temperature in the cluster increases from southeast to northwest along the direction of merging. Furthermore, at the specific region with highest temperature (kT = 13.3+1.41-1.14 keV), we find the plasma with ionization parameter, net = 6.98+14.57-3.92 x1011 s/cm3. Its timescale estimated by the ionization parameter is 7.7~54.4 Myr in 90% confidence level. We conclude that the plasma in this region is NEI state due to the recent shock heating. The Ionization state in the ICM can provide a physically meaningful way to estimate the phase and/or timescale of the merging

  7. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure II. Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, G. D.; Leroy, O.; Coche, P.; Gadonna, K.; Guerra, V.; Minea, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an experimental study of microwave (2.45 GHz excitation frequency) micro-plasmas, generated in dry air (N2 80%: O2 20%) within a small radius silica capillary (345 µm inner radius) at low pressure (300 Pa) and low powers (80-130 W). Experimental diagnostics are performed using optical emission spectroscopy calibrated in absolute intensity. Axial-resolved measurements (50 µm spatial resolution) of atomic transitions N(3p4S)  →  N(3s4P) O(3p5P)  →  O(3s5S) and molecular transitions N2(C,v‧)  →  N2(B,v″) \\text{N}2+ (B,v‧)  →  \\text{N}2+ (X,v″) allow us to obtain, as a function of the coupled power, the absolute densities of N(3p4S), O(3p5P), N2(C), N2(B) and \\text{N}2+ (B), as well as the gas (rotational) temperature (700-1000 K), the vibrational temperature of N2(C,v) (7000-10 000 K) and the excitation temperatures of N2(C) and N2(B) (11 000 K). The analysis of the H β line-width gives an upper limiting value of 1013 cm-3 for the electron density; its axial variation (4  ×  1011-6  ×  1012 cm-3) being estimated by solving the wave electrodynamics equations for the present geometry, plasma length and electron-neutral collision frequency. The experimental results were compared with the results from a 0D model, presented in companion paper I [1], which couples the system of rate balance equations for the dominant neutral and charged plasma species to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, taking the measured gas temperature and the estimated electron density as input parameters. Good qualitative agreement is found between the measurements and calculations of the local species densities for various powers and axial positions. The dissociation degree of oxygen is found above 10%. Moreover, both the measurements and calculations show evidence of the non-equilibrium behavior of low-temperature plasmas, with vibrational and excitation temperatures at least

  8. Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Arantchouk, L.; Pellet, M.

    2012-12-24

    We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

  9. Effect of glow discharge air plasma on grain crops seed

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A.E.; Lazarenko, E.M.; Selemir, V.D.

    2000-02-01

    Oat and barley seeds have been exposed to both continuous and pulsed glow discharge plasmas in air to investigate the effects on germination and sprout growth. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of plasma exposure on the percentage germination and length of sprout growth. A stimulating effect of plasma exposure was found together with a strong dependence on whether continuous or pulsed discharges were used.

  10. Thermal And Chemical Non-Equilibrium Effects In The Wake Of A Boundary-Layer Sized Object In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Marcel; Stemmer, Christian; Adams, Nikolaus N.

    2011-05-01

    Investigations of hypersonic boundary-layer flows around a cubical obstacle with a height in the order of half the boundary layer thickness were carried out in this work. Special interest was laid on the influence of chemical non-equilibrium effects on the wake flow of the obstacle. Direct numerical simulations were conducted using three different gas models, a caloric perfect, an equilibrium and a chemical non-equilibrium gas model. The geometry was chosen as a wedge with a six degree half angle, according to the aborted NASA HyBoLT free flight experiment. At 0.5 m downstream of the leading edge, a surface trip was positioned. The free-stream flow was set to Mach 8.5 with air conditions taken from the 1976 standard atmosphere at an altitude of 42 km according to the predicted flight path. The simulations were done in three steps for all models. First, two-dimensional calculations of the whole configuration including the leading edge and the obstacle were conducted. These provide constant span-wise profiles for detailed, steady three-dimensional simulations around the close vicinity of the obstacle. A free-stream Mach number of about 6.3 occurs behind the shock. A cross-section in the wake of the object then delivers the steady inflow for detailed unsteady simulations of the wake. Perturbations at unstable frequencies, obtained from a bi-global secondary stability analysis, were added to these profiles. The solutions are time-Fourier transformed to investigate the unsteady downstream development of the different modes due to the interaction with the base-flow containing two counter-rotating vortices. Results will be presented that show the influence of the presence of chemical non-equilibrium on the instability in the wake of the object leading to a laminar or a turbulent wake.

  11. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  12. Spectral Modeling in Astrophysics - The Physics of Non-equilibrium Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, Gary; Williams, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Collisional-radiative spectral modeling plays a central role in astrophysics, probing phenomena ranging from the chemical evolution of the Universe to the energy production near supermassive black holes in distant quasars. The observed emission lines form in non-equilibrium clouds that have very low densities by laboratory standards, and are powered by energy sources which themselves are not in equilibrium. The spectrum is the result of a large number of microphysical processes, thermal statistics often do not apply, and analytical theory cannot be used. Numerical simulations are used to understand the physical state and the resulting spectrum. The greatest distinction between astrophysical modeling and conventional plasma simulations lies in the range of phenomena that must be considered. A single astronomical object will often have gas with kinetic temperatures of T˜10^6 K, 10^4 K, and T≤ 10^3 K, with the physical state ranging from molecular to fully ionized, and emitting over all wavelengths between the radio and x-ray. Besides atomic, plasma, and chemical physics, condensed matter physics is important because of the presence of small solid `grains' which affect the gas through catalytic reactions and the infrared emission they produce. The ionization, level populations, chemistry, and grain properties must be determined self-consistently, along with the radiation transport, to predict the observed spectrum. Although the challenge is great, so are the rewards. Numerical spectral simulations allow us to read the message contained in the spectrum emitted by objects far from the Earth that existed long ago.

  13. Unsteady non-equilibrium model of laser induced detonation wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Takeharu; Fujiwara, Toshitaka

    1992-12-01

    Now that laser propulsion is hoped to become a next-generation space propulsion system, it is important to analyze the mechanisms of LSD (Laser-Supported Detonation) wave caused by laser absorption. The performance of laser propulsion is determined mainly by laser absorption efficiency. To absorb laser energy effectively, it is necessary to generate sufficient free electrons in the laser absorbing zone. Thus, the LSD wave must be monitored. At first, the incident laser energy vaporizes the solid propellant and produces free electrons. These free electrons start laser absorption and as a result produce high temperature and pressure. Then an ignition occurs and this grows into a detonation wave. Four types of physico-chemical processes take place in the LSD wave. First, laser energy is first absorbed by free electrons through inverse bremsstrahlung. Next this energy is distributed to heavy particles (atoms and ions) through elastic and inelastic collision processes, and is lost partly by bremsstrahlung as radiation energy. Based on such backgrounds, this LSD wave is simulated by using a plane one-dimensional numerical analysis to clarify the mechanism on the ignition phenomenon in a laser-sustained plasma. In this study, a TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) code which takes account of real gas effects is utilized.

  14. Evaporation from Soils Under Thermal Boundary Conditions: Experimental and Modeling Investigation to Compare Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the shallow subsurface immediately below the land-atmosphere interface, it is widely recognized that the movement of water vapor is closely coupled to thermal processes. However, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical applications where it becomes necessary to understand and predict the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the inherent complexities of the problem in field systems and the scarcity of field or laboratory data with accurately known hydraulic and thermal parameters of soils, thus limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theories. In addition, it is often assumed in traditional soil physics applications that water vapor concentration in the air adjacent to the water phase in soil pores is always in equilibrium with liquid water, i.e., vaporization occurs instantaneously, which can result in over prediction of evaporation from soil. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture and temperature using soil with accurately known hydraulic/thermal properties and use this data to test existing theories and develop appropriate numerical models. In this work, water vapor flow under varying temperature gradients was implemented based on a concept that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion. In order to validate this new approach, we developed a long column apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and generated data under well-controlled thermal boundary conditions at the soil surface. Water saturation, capillary pressure, temperature, relative humidity and column weight to record total mass of water in the column were continuously monitored. Results from numerical simulations based on the conventional equilibrium and non-equilibrium approaches were compared with

  15. Scaled-Up Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    electrode pairs will be tested to increase the plasma volume. In addition, thermionic cathodes (LaCrO3, LaB6) will be examined to enhance the electron...measure the cathode fall in the glow discharge regime. Current density, electric field strength and other important plasma parameters will be...thermal nonequilibrium, and together with electrical discharge characteristics, estimating the electron density and reduced electric field strength (E/N

  16. Non-equilibrium Helium Ionization in an MHD Simulation of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11-18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  17. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Raheleh; Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron-electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current-voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron-electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U2 IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior.

  18. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  19. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11–18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  20. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  1. Air-Plasma Bullets Propagating Inside Microcapillaries and in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Bourdon, Anne; Kuribara, Koichi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    We report on the characterization of air-plasma bullets formed inside microcapillary tubes and in ambient air, obtained without the use of inert or noble gases. The bullets are produced by nanosecond discharges, applied at 1 kHz in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. The anode consists of a tungsten wire with a 50- μm diameter, centered in the microcapillary, while the cathode is a silver ring, fixed on the outer surface of the fused silica tube. The gap distance is kept constant at 1.35 mm. The microcapillary is fed with a 4-sccm flow of air at atmospheric pressure. In the tubes and in ambient air, the propagation of air plasma bullets is observed. The temporal evolution of the bullet propagation has been studied with the aid of an ICCD camera. The effect of the applied voltage (from 5.2 to 8.2 kV) and the inner diameter of the microcapillaries (from 100 to 500 μm) on the discharge dynamics are investigated. Inside the tubes, while the topology of the bullets seems to be strongly dependent on the diameter, their velocity (on the order of 1 to 5 ×105 ms-1) is only a function of the applied voltage. In ambient air, the air-plasma bullets propagate at a velocity of 1 . 25 ×105 ms-1. Possible mechanisms for the propagation of air-plasma bullets in ambient air are discussed.

  2. Effect of Non-Equilibrium Surface Thermochemistry in Simulation of Carbon Based Ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coupling of a material thermal response code and a flow solver using non-equilibrium gas/surface interaction model provides time-accurate solutions for the multidimensional ablation of carbon based charring ablators. The material thermal response code used in this study is the Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal-response and AblatioN Program (TITAN), which predicts charring material thermal response and shape change on hypersonic space vehicles. Its governing equations include total energy balance, pyrolysis gas mass conservation, and a three-component decomposition model. The flow code solves the reacting Navier-Stokes equations using Data Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) method. Loose coupling between the material response and flow codes is performed by solving the surface mass balance in DPLR and the surface energy balance in TITAN. Thus, the material surface recession is predicted by finite-rate gas/surface interaction boundary conditions implemented in DPLR, and the surface temperature and pyrolysis gas injection rate are computed in TITAN. Two sets of nonequilibrium gas/surface interaction chemistry between air and the carbon surface developed by Park and Zhluktov, respectively, are studied. Coupled fluid-material response analyses of stagnation tests conducted in NASA Ames Research Center arc-jet facilities are considered. The ablating material used in these arc-jet tests was Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA). Computational predictions of in-depth material thermal response and surface recession are compared with the experimental measurements for stagnation cold wall heat flux ranging from 107 to 1100 Watts per square centimeter.

  3. A non-equilibrium equation-of-motion approach to quantum transport utilizing projection operators.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Maicol A; Galperin, Michael; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-11-12

    We consider a projection operator approach to the non-equilibrium Green function equation-of-motion (PO-NEGF EOM) method. The technique resolves problems of arbitrariness in truncation of an infinite chain of EOMs and prevents violation of symmetry relations resulting from the truncation (equivalence of left- and right-sided EOMs is shown and symmetry with respect to interchange of Fermi or Bose operators before truncation is preserved). The approach, originally developed by Tserkovnikov (1999 Theor. Math. Phys. 118 85) for equilibrium systems, is reformulated to be applicable to time-dependent non-equilibrium situations. We derive a canonical form of EOMs, thus explicitly demonstrating a proper result for the non-equilibrium atomic limit in junction problems. A simple practical scheme applicable to quantum transport simulations is formulated. We perform numerical simulations within simple models and compare results of the approach to other techniques and (where available) also to exact results.

  4. The non-equilibrium phase diagrams of flow-induced crystallization and melting of polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Ju, Jianzhu; Yang, Junsheng; Ma, Zhe; Liu, Dong; Cui, Kunpeng; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Liangbin

    2016-09-01

    Combining extensional rheology with in-situ synchrotron ultrafast x-ray scattering, we studied flow-induced phase behaviors of polyethylene (PE) in a wide temperature range up to 240 °C. Non-equilibrium phase diagrams of crystallization and melting under flow conditions are constructed in stress-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline δ, hexagonal and orthorhombic phases. The non-crystalline δ phase is demonstrated to be either a metastable transient pre-order for crystallization or a thermodynamically stable phase. Based on the non-equilibrium phase diagrams, nearly all observations in flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of PE can be well understood. The interplay of thermodynamic stabilities and kinetic competitions of the four phases creates rich kinetic pathways for FIC and diverse final structures. The non-equilibrium flow phase diagrams provide a detailed roadmap for precisely processing of PE with designed structures and properties.

  5. The transformation dynamics towards equilibrium in non-equilibrium w/w/o double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Youchuang; Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2016-10-01

    We use a glass-based microfluidic device to generate non-equilibrium water-in-water-in-oil (w/w/o) double emulsions and study how they transform into equilibrium configurations. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, with two of them from the phase-separated aqueous two-phase systems. We find that the transformation is accompanied by an expansion rim, while the characteristic transformation speed of the rim mainly depends on the interfacial tension between the innermost and middle phases, as well as the viscosity of the innermost phase when the middle phase is non-viscous. Remarkably, the viscosity of the outermost phase has little effect on the transformation speed. Our results account for the dynamics of non-equilibrium double emulsions towards their equilibrium structure and suggest a possibility to utilize the non-equilibrium drops to synthesize functional particles.

  6. The non-equilibrium phase diagrams of flow-induced crystallization and melting of polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Ju, Jianzhu; Yang, Junsheng; Ma, Zhe; Liu, Dong; Cui, Kunpeng; Yang, Haoran; Chang, Jiarui; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Liangbin

    2016-01-01

    Combining extensional rheology with in-situ synchrotron ultrafast x-ray scattering, we studied flow-induced phase behaviors of polyethylene (PE) in a wide temperature range up to 240 °C. Non-equilibrium phase diagrams of crystallization and melting under flow conditions are constructed in stress-temperature space, composing of melt, non-crystalline δ, hexagonal and orthorhombic phases. The non-crystalline δ phase is demonstrated to be either a metastable transient pre-order for crystallization or a thermodynamically stable phase. Based on the non-equilibrium phase diagrams, nearly all observations in flow-induced crystallization (FIC) of PE can be well understood. The interplay of thermodynamic stabilities and kinetic competitions of the four phases creates rich kinetic pathways for FIC and diverse final structures. The non-equilibrium flow phase diagrams provide a detailed roadmap for precisely processing of PE with designed structures and properties. PMID:27609305

  7. Non-equilibrium effects upon the non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bolivar, A.O.

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > Classical Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation. > Quantization process. > Quantum Brownian motion described by a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett equation. > A non-equilibrium quantum thermal force is predicted. - Abstract: We obtain a non-Markovian quantum master equation directly from the quantization of a non-Markovian Fokker-Planck equation describing the Brownian motion of a particle immersed in a generic environment (e.g. a non-thermal fluid). As far as the especial case of a heat bath comprising of quantum harmonic oscillators is concerned, we derive a non-Markovian Caldeira-Leggett master equation on the basis of which we work out the concept of non-equilibrium quantum thermal force exerted by the harmonic heat bath upon the Brownian motion of a free particle. The classical limit (or dequantization process) of this sort of non-equilibrium quantum effect is scrutinized, as well.

  8. Non-equilibrium assembly of microtubules: from molecules to autonomous chemical robots.

    PubMed

    Hess, H; Ross, Jennifer L

    2017-03-22

    Biological systems have evolved to harness non-equilibrium processes from the molecular to the macro scale. It is currently a grand challenge of chemistry, materials science, and engineering to understand and mimic biological systems that have the ability to autonomously sense stimuli, process these inputs, and respond by performing mechanical work. New chemical systems are responding to the challenge and form the basis for future responsive, adaptive, and active materials. In this article, we describe a particular biochemical-biomechanical network based on the microtubule cytoskeletal filament - itself a non-equilibrium chemical system. We trace the non-equilibrium aspects of the system from molecules to networks and describe how the cell uses this system to perform active work in essential processes. Finally, we discuss how microtubule-based engineered systems can serve as testbeds for autonomous chemical robots composed of biological and synthetic components.

  9. Interpolative Hyperbolic Realizable Moment Closures for Non-Equilibrium Flows with Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tensuda, Boone Rudy

    The predictive capabilities of a novel, 14-moment, maximum-entropy-based, interpolative closure are explored for multi-dimensional non-equilibrium flows of a monatomic gas with heat transfer. Unlike the maximum-entropy closure on which it is based, the interpolative closure provides closed-form expressions for the closing fluxes while retaining a large region of hyperbolicity. Properties of the moment system are explored via a dispersion analysis and an implicit finite-volume solution procedure is proposed. Multi-dimensional applications of the closure are then examined for several canonical non-equilibrium flow problems in order to provide an assessment of its capabilities. The predictive capabilities of the closure were found to surpass those of the 10-moment Gaussian closure. It was also found to predict interesting non-equilibrium phenomena, such as counter-gradient heat flux. The proposed implicit solver showed improved computational performance compared to the previously studied semi-implicit technique.

  10. Plasma kinetics in ethanol/water/air mixture in a 'tornado'-type electrical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D.; Shchedrin, A.; Chernyak, V.; Olszewski, S.; Nedybaliuk, O.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a modified 'tornado'-type electrical discharge. Numerical modelling clarifies the nature of non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of non-equilibrium plasma chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to the characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

  11. Effects of grid geometry on non-equilibrium dissipation in grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Saiki, Teppei; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Ito, Yasumasa; Iwano, Koji

    2017-01-01

    A total of 11 grids in four families, including single- and multi-scale grids, are tested to investigate the development and decay characteristics of grid-generated turbulence. Special attention has been focused on dissipation and non-equilibrium characteristics in the decay region. A wide non-equilibrium region is observed for fractal square grids with three and four iterations. The distributions of the Taylor microscale λ, integral length scale Lu, and dissipation coefficient C ɛ show that a simple combination of large and small grids does not reproduce elongated non-equilibrium regions as realized by the fractal square grid. On the other hand, a new kind of grid, quasi-fractal grids, in which the region of the smaller fractal elements ( N = 2 - 4 ) of the fractal square grid is replaced by regular grids, successfully reproduce a similar flow field and non-equilibrium nature to that seen in the fractal square grid case. This suggests that the combination of large square grid and inhomogeneously arranged smaller grids produces an elongated non-equilibrium region. The dissipation coefficient C ɛ is better collapsed using R e 0 = t 0 U ∞ / ν (where t0 is the thickness of the largest grid bar, U ∞ the inflow velocity, and ν the kinematic viscosity) as a global/inlet Reynolds number rather than R e M = M U ∞ / ν (where M is the mesh size) [P. C. Valente and J. C. Vassilicos, "Universal dissipation scaling for non-equilibrium turbulence," Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 214503 (2012)].

  12. Numerical Analysis of Threshold between Laser-Supported Detonation and Combustion Wave Using Thermal Non-Equilibrium and Multi-Charged Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Yuya

    Laser-supported Detonation (LSD), which is one type of Laser-supported Plasma (LSP), is an important phenomenon because it can generate high pressures and temperatures for laser absorption. In this study, using thermal-non-equilibrium model, we numerically simulate LSPs, which are categorized as either LSDs or laser-supported combustion-waves (LSCs). For the analysis model, a two-temperature (heavy particle and electron-temperature) model has been used because the electronic mode excites first in laser absorption and a thermal non-equilibrium state easily arises. In the numerical analysis of the LSDs, laser absorption models are particularly important. Therefore, a multi-charged ionization model is considered to evaluate precisely the propagation and the structure transition of the LSD waves in the proximity of the LSC-LSD threshold. In the new model, the transition of the LSD construction near the threshold, which is indicated by the ionization delay length, becomes more practical.

  13. Non-equilibrium processes by a gas phase synthesis of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebrov, A. K.; Yudin, I. B.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of influence of heterogeneous reactions in rarefied gas flows with dissociation and recombination is carried on for the first time, at least for hydrogen and methane flows. The flow in channels with heterogeneous reaction can be equilibrium and non-equilibrium, depending on a flow rate. Non-equilibrium effects are pronounced as a rule in the space between channel exit and substrate, where the activated gas flow to the surface of diamond deposition is formed. The gas dynamic analysis of gas jet deposition of diamond facilitates the optimization of experiments and their analysis.

  14. Non-equilibrium origin of high electrical conductivity in gallium zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zakutayev, Andriy Ginley, David S.; Lany, Stephan; Perry, Nicola H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-12-02

    Non-equilibrium state defines physical properties of materials in many technologies, including architectural, metallic, and semiconducting amorphous glasses. In contrast, crystalline electronic and energy materials, such as transparent conductive oxides (TCO), are conventionally thought to be in equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate that high electrical conductivity of crystalline Ga-doped ZnO TCO thin films occurs by virtue of metastable state of their defects. These results imply that such defect metastability may be important in other functional oxides. This finding emphasizes the need to understand and control non-equilibrium states of materials, in particular, their metastable defects, for the design of novel functional materials.

  15. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  16. Correlations of the density and of the current in non-equilibrium diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhu, Tridib; Derrida, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    We use fluctuating hydrodynamics to analyze the dynamical properties in the non-equilibrium steady state of a diffusive system coupled with reservoirs. We derive the two-time correlations of the density and of the current in the hydrodynamic limit in terms of the diffusivity and the mobility. Within this hydrodynamic framework we discuss a generalization of the fluctuation dissipation relation in a non-equilibrium steady state where the response function is expressed in terms of the two-time correlations. We compare our results to an exact solution of the symmetric exclusion process. This exact solution also allows one to directly verify the fluctuating hydrodynamics equation.

  17. Studying non-equilibrium many-body dynamics using one-dimensional Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Tim; Gring, Michael; Kuhnert, Maximilian; Rauer, Bernhard; Geiger, Remi; Mazets, Igor; Smith, David Adu; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Kitagawa, Takuya; Demler, Eugene

    2014-12-04

    Non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems play an important role in many areas of physics. However, a general answer to the question of how these systems relax is still lacking. We experimentally study the dynamics of ultracold one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases. This reveals the existence of a quasi-steady prethermalized state which differs significantly from the thermal equilibrium of the system. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of non-equilibrium quantum many-body systems is a far richer process than has been assumed in the past.

  18. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Chemistry and the Composition of the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    A high priority objective of the Mars Exploration Program is to Determine if life exists today (MEPAG Goal I, Objective A). The measurement of gases of biogenic origin may be an approach to detect the presence of microbial life on the surface or subsurface of Mars. Chemical thermodynamic calculations indicate that on both Earth and Mars, certain gases should exist in extremely low concentrations, if at all. Microbial metabolic activity is an important non-equilibrium chemistry process on Earth, and if microbial life exists on Mars, may be an important nonequilibrium chemistry process on Mars. The non-equilibrium chemistry of the atmosphere of Mars is discussed in this paper.

  19. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct

  20. Portable microwave air plasma device for wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. K.; Kim, H. Y.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. K.

    2015-06-01

    A portable microwave air plasma has been developed for safe and effective wound healing. The device is operated by a fixed microwave power and two different air gas flows (main and cooling air flow). It was found that the speeds of the two air flows determine the stability of the plasma jet and gas temperature and thereby regulate the concentrations of the individual reactive species. Two different regimes, i.e. the NO abundant (0.1 slm main air flow) and ozone abundant regimes (4 slm main air flow), were identified as suitable for wound healing without thermal damage and toxicity. These regimes show similar plasma characteristics (e.g. less than 40 °C at the treatment point, less than 4 ppm of NO2) except for different NO and ozone amounts. Both regimes show more than twice as fast wound healing speed compared with the untreated case without any histological damages. Faster healing speed with intrinsic ozone safety make the NO abundant regime the best operation regime for wound healing. Finally, the stability of the developed device was demonstrated by a one-hour continuous operation test with a 24 V battery.

  1. Evaporation from soils under diurnal boundary conditions: Experimental and modeling investigation to evaluate Non-equilibrium-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, Andrew; Smits, Kathleen; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation from bare soil is a key component of the hydrologic cycle and the process primarily responsible for governing water and energy exchanges between the land and atmosphere. Despite its importance, there is still a great deal of uncertainty associated with our current understanding of this complex multiphase phenomenon. A common approach when modeling the movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the soil immediately below the land-atmosphere interface is to assume that water vapor concentration in air is always in equilibrium with liquid water. However, this equilibrium assumption is called into question by experiments about liquid/gas phase change in porous media suggesting that the equilibrium establishment is not instantaneous; a volatilization or condensation time is observed at the macroscopic scale under certain conditions. Introduction of such a non-equilibrium mass transfer relationship is based on the Hertz-Knudsen equation (HKE) derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been presented to represent the rate of phase change between water and vapor, many relying on empirical fitting parameters due to limited experimental data. The purpose of this work is to perform an unbiased comparison between various conceptual and mathematical formulations for non-equilibrium phase change on evaporation and develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. The key to such a comparison is the availability of accurate data. As such data at the scale of interest is not possible to obtain in field settings, a unique two-dimensional cell apparatus was developed. The test cell was equipped with a network of sensors for automated and continuous monitoring of soil moisture, soil and air temperature and relative humidity, and wind velocity to generate precision data. A fully-coupled numerical model to solve the governing equations for heat, liquid water and water vapor transport in soil was developed. The code implements a

  2. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma-liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed.

  3. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  4. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  5. Information-theoretic tools for parametrized coarse-graining of non-equilibrium extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Plecháč, Petr

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we focus on the development of new methods suitable for efficient and reliable coarse-graining of non-equilibrium molecular systems. In this context, we propose error estimation and controlled-fidelity model reduction methods based on Path-Space Information Theory, combined with statistical parametric estimation of rates for non-equilibrium stationary processes. The approach we propose extends the applicability of existing information-based methods for deriving parametrized coarse-grained models to Non-Equilibrium systems with Stationary States. In the context of coarse-graining it allows for constructing optimal parametrized Markovian coarse-grained dynamics within a parametric family, by minimizing information loss (due to coarse-graining) on the path space. Furthermore, we propose an asymptotically equivalent method—related to maximum likelihood estimators for stochastic processes—where the coarse-graining is obtained by optimizing the information content in path space of the coarse variables, with respect to the projected computational data from a fine-scale simulation. Finally, the associated path-space Fisher Information Matrix can provide confidence intervals for the corresponding parameter estimators. We demonstrate the proposed coarse-graining method in (a) non-equilibrium systems with diffusing interacting particles, driven by out-of-equilibrium boundary conditions, as well as (b) multi-scale diffusions and the corresponding stochastic averaging limits, comparing them to our proposed methodologies.

  6. Rheology modulated non-equilibrium fluctuations in time-dependent diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debonil; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-11-01

    The effect of non-Newtonian rheology, manifested through a viscoelastic linearized Maxwell model, on the time-dependent non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations due to free diffusion as well as thermal diffusion of a species is analyzed theoretically. Contrary to the belief that non-equilibrium Rayleigh line is not influenced by viscoelastic effects, through rigorous calculations, we put forward the fact that viscoelastic effects do influence the non-equilibrium Rayleigh line, while the effects are absent for the equilibrium scenario. The non-equilibrium process is quantified through the concentration fluctuation auto-correlation function, also known as the structure factor. The analysis reveals that the effect of rheology is prominent for both the cases of free diffusion and thermal diffusion at long times, where the influence of rheology dictates not only the location of the peaks in concentration dynamic structure factors, but also the magnitudes; such peaks in dynamic structure factors are absent in the case of Newtonian fluid. At smaller times, for the case of free diffusion, presence of time-dependent peak(s) are observed, which are weakly dependent on the influence of rheology, a phenomenon which is absent in the case of thermal diffusion. Different regimes of the frequency dependent overall dynamic structure factor, depending on the interplay of the fluid relaxation time and momentum diffusivity, are evaluated. The static structure factor is not affected to a great extent for the case of free-diffusion and is unaffected for the case of thermal diffusion.

  7. Non-equilibrium condensation process in holographic superconductor with nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqi; Gong, Yungui; Wang, Bin

    2016-02-01

    We study the non-equilibrium condensation process in a holographic superconductor with nonlinear corrections to the U (1) gauge field. We start with an asymptotic Anti-de-Sitter (AdS) black hole against a complex scalar perturbation at the initial time, and solve the dynamics of the gravitational systems in the bulk. When the black hole temperature T is smaller than a critical value T c , the scalar perturbation grows exponentially till saturation, the final state of spacetime approaches to a hairy black hole. In the bulk theory, we find the clue of the influence of nonlinear corrections in the gauge filed on the process of the scalar field condensation. We show that the bulk dynamics in the non-equilibrium process is completely consistent with the observations on the boundary order parameter. Furthermore we examine the time evolution of horizons in the bulk non-equilibrium transformation process from the bald AdS black hole to the AdS hairy hole. Both the evolution of apparent and event horizons show that the original AdS black hole configuration requires more time to finish the transformation to become a hairy black hole if there is nonlinear correction to the electromagnetic field. We generalize our non-equilibrium discussions to the holographic entanglement entropy and find that the holographic entanglement entropy can give us further understanding of the influence of the nonlinearity in the gauge field on the scalar condensation.

  8. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  9. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through th...

  10. Modelling non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems from the speed-gradient principle.

    PubMed

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A; Shalymov, Dmitry S

    2017-03-06

    The application of the speed-gradient (SG) principle to the non-equilibrium distribution systems far away from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated. The options for applying the SG principle to describe the non-equilibrium transport processes in real-world environments are discussed. Investigation of a non-equilibrium system's evolution at different scale levels via the SG principle allows for a fresh look at the thermodynamics problems associated with the behaviour of the system entropy. Generalized dynamic equations for finite and infinite number of constraints are proposed. It is shown that the stationary solution to the equations, resulting from the SG principle, entirely coincides with the locally equilibrium distribution function obtained by Zubarev. A new approach to describe time evolution of systems far from equilibrium is proposed based on application of the SG principle at the intermediate scale level of the system's internal structure. The problem of the high-rate shear flow of viscous fluid near the rigid plane plate is discussed. It is shown that the SG principle allows closed mathematical models of non-equilibrium processes to be constructed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  11. Modelling non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems from the speed-gradient principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.; Shalymov, Dmitry S.

    2017-03-01

    The application of the speed-gradient (SG) principle to the non-equilibrium distribution systems far away from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated. The options for applying the SG principle to describe the non-equilibrium transport processes in real-world environments are discussed. Investigation of a non-equilibrium system's evolution at different scale levels via the SG principle allows for a fresh look at the thermodynamics problems associated with the behaviour of the system entropy. Generalized dynamic equations for finite and infinite number of constraints are proposed. It is shown that the stationary solution to the equations, resulting from the SG principle, entirely coincides with the locally equilibrium distribution function obtained by Zubarev. A new approach to describe time evolution of systems far from equilibrium is proposed based on application of the SG principle at the intermediate scale level of the system's internal structure. The problem of the high-rate shear flow of viscous fluid near the rigid plane plate is discussed. It is shown that the SG principle allows closed mathematical models of non-equilibrium processes to be constructed. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  12. Jet quenching and gluon to hadron fragmentation function in non-equilibrium QCD at RHIC and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gouranga C.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical understanding of the observed jet quenching measurements at RHIC and LHC is challenging in QCD because it requires understanding of parton to hadron fragmentation function in non-equilibrium QCD. In this paper, by using closed-time path integral formalism, we derive the gauge invariant definition of the gluon to hadron fragmentation function in non-equilibrium QCD which is consistent with factorization theorem in non-equilibrium QCD from first principles.

  13. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  14. Pure air-plasma bullets propagating inside microcapillaries and in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Bourdon, Anne; Kuribara, Koichi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of air-plasma bullets in microcapillary tubes and in ambient air, obtained without the use of inert or noble gases. The bullets were produced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, applied in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. The anode was a tungsten wire with a diameter of 50 µm, centered in the microcapillary, while the cathode was a silver ring, fixed on the outer surface of the fused silica tube. The effects of the applied voltage and the inner diameter of the microcapillary tube on the plasma behavior were investigated. Inside the tubes, while the topology of the bullets seems to be strongly dependent on the diameter, their velocity is only a function of the amplitude of the applied voltage. In ambient air, the propagation of air bullets with a velocity of about 1.25 × 105 m s-1 is observed.

  15. On determining continuum quantities of non-equilibrium processes via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao

    In this dissertation, a high-fidelity atomistic-to-continuum link for highly non-equilibrium processes has been established by making several modifications to Hardy's theory. Although Hardy's thermomechanical quantities were derived analytically to conserve mass, momentum and energy, they have not been rigorously tested and validated numerically in the past. Hence the first task was to investigate the effectiveness of ensemble averaging in removing thermal fluctuations and compare with conventional time averaging for fcc crystals simulated using both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where the non-equilibrium process was introduced by a shock impact. It has been found that the ensemble averaging has better convergence than time averaging due to the statistical independence of the thermomechanical quantities computed using ensemble averaging. The second task was to test the validity of Hardy's theory by checking if it is able to conserve mass, momentum and energy numerically. A few highly non-equilibrium processes were simulated using MD, including Gaussian wave and shock impact propagation in 1D and 3D fcc crystals. Based on the test results, a new normalization rule has been proposed so that the computed thermomechanical quantities can conserve the fundamental properties more accurately. To a large extent, Hardy's theory has been found to be valid regardless of the width of the localization function, the interatomic potential and crystal structure, and with and without ensemble averaging. To further test the validity of Hardy's theory for more complex non-equilibrium processes, where plastic deformation is accomplished through dislocation glide and slip band emission, a crack propagation problem in iron crystal with a pre-created center crack is simulated using MD. The computed Hardy's thermomechanical quantities can generally conserve mass, momentum and energy. Exceptions have been found around the crack region, where the

  16. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  17. Infinite-mode squeezed coherent states and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (phase-space-picture approach)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Leehwa

    1993-01-01

    The phase-space-picture approach to quantum non-equilibrium statistical mechanics via the characteristic function of infinite-mode squeezed coherent states is introduced. We use quantum Brownian motion as an example to show how this approach provides an interesting geometrical interpretation of quantum non-equilibrium phenomena.

  18. The molecular photo-cell: quantum transport and energy conversion at strong non-equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Ajisaka, Shigeru; Žunkovič, Bojan; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-02-09

    The molecular photo-cell is a single molecular donor-acceptor complex attached to electrodes and subject to external illumination. Besides the obvious relevance to molecular photo-voltaics, the molecular photo-cell is of interest being a paradigmatic example for a system that inherently operates in out-of-equilibrium conditions and typically far from the linear response regime. Moreover, this system includes electrons, phonons and photons, and environments which induce coherent and incoherent processes, making it a challenging system to address theoretically. Here, using an open quantum systems approach, we analyze the non-equilibrium transport properties and energy conversion performance of a molecular photo-cell, including both coherent and incoherent processes and treating electrons, photons, and phonons on an equal footing. We find that both the non-equilibrium conditions and decoherence play a crucial role in determining the performance of the photovoltaic conversion and the optimal energy configuration of the molecular system.

  19. Numerical investigation of non-equilibrium effects in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum; Kim, John; Zhong, Xiaolin; Eldredge, Jeff

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing hypersonic boundary layer have been conducted in order to investigate thermal and chemical non-equilibrium effects in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. Two different flows, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen flows with specific total enthalpy, h0 ,O2 = 9 . 5017 MJ/kg and h0 ,N2 = 19 . 1116 MJ/kg, respectively, have been considered. The boundary edge conditions were obtained from a separate calculation of a flow over a blunt wedge at free-stream Mach numbers M∞ ,O2 = 15 and M∞ ,N2 = 20 . The inflow conditions were obtained from a simulation of a turbulent boundary layer of a perfect gas. Non-equilibrium effects on turbulence statistics and near-wall turbulence structures were examined by comparing with those obtained in a simulation of the same boundary layer with a perfect-gas assumption.

  20. Development of a non-equilibrium quantum transport calculation method based on constrained density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium quantum transport process. Within the scheme, non-equilibrium situation and quantum transport within the open-boundary condition are described by the region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method and matrix Green's function theory, respectively. We will discuss our solutions to the technical difficulties in describing bias-dependent electron transport at complicated nanointerfaces and present several application examples. Global Frontier Program (2013M3A6B1078881), Basic Science Research Grant (2012R1A1A2044793), EDISON Program (No. 2012M3C1A6035684), and 2013 Global Ph.D fellowship program of the National Research Foundation. KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C3-021).

  1. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Yildiz, Bilge; Herbert, F. William; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-03-09

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr{sup 1+}, Zr{sup 2+}, and Zr{sup 3+} as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr{sup 4+} in the stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2}. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr{sup 0} and Zr{sup 4+} at the metal-oxide interface. The presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  2. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; ...

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields andmore » the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.« less

  3. Fast Scanning Calorimetry study of non-equilibrium relaxation in fragile organic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadtchenko, Vlad; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; O'Reilly, Liam

    2013-03-01

    Fast scanning calorimetry (FSC), capable of heating rates in excess of 1000000 K/s, was combined with vapor deposition technique to investigate non-equilibrium relaxation in micrometer thick viscous liquid films of several organic compounds (e.g.2-ethyl-1-hexanol, Toluene, and 1-propanol) under high vacuum conditions. Rapid heating of samples, vapor deposited at temperatures above their standard glass softening transition (Tg), resulted in observable endotherms which onset temperatures were strongly dependent on heating rate and the deposition temperature. Furthermore, all of the studied compounds were characterized by distinct critical deposition temperatures at which observation of endotherm became impossible. Based on the results of these studies, we have developed a simple model which makes it possible to infer the equilibrium enthalpy relaxation times for liquids from FSC data. We will discuss implications of these studies for contemporary models of non-equilibrium relaxation in glasses and supercooled liquids. Supported by NSF Grant 1012692.

  4. Non-equilibrium behaviour in coacervate-based protocells under electric-field-induced excitation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yudan; Niu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaocui; Zhao, Meiping; Zhang, Zexin; Mann, Stephen; Liang, Dehai

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous strategies are now available to generate rudimentary forms of synthetic cell-like entities, minimal progress has been made in the sustained excitation of artificial protocells under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we demonstrate that the electric field energization of coacervate microdroplets comprising polylysine and short single strands of DNA generates membrane-free protocells with complex, dynamical behaviours. By confining the droplets within a microfluidic channel and applying a range of electric field strengths, we produce protocells that exhibit repetitive cycles of vacuolarization, dynamical fluctuations in size and shape, chaotic growth and fusion, spontaneous ejection and sequestration of matter, directional capture of solute molecules, and pulsed enhancement of enzyme cascade reactions. Our results highlight new opportunities for the study of non-equilibrium phenomena in synthetic protocells, provide a strategy for inducing complex behaviour in electrostatically assembled soft matter microsystems and illustrate how dynamical properties can be activated and sustained in microcompartmentalized media. PMID:26876162

  5. Non-equilibrium behaviour in coacervate-based protocells under electric-field-induced excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yudan; Niu, Lin; Zhu, Xiaocui; Zhao, Meiping; Zhang, Zexin; Mann, Stephen; Liang, Dehai

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous strategies are now available to generate rudimentary forms of synthetic cell-like entities, minimal progress has been made in the sustained excitation of artificial protocells under non-equilibrium conditions. Here we demonstrate that the electric field energization of coacervate microdroplets comprising polylysine and short single strands of DNA generates membrane-free protocells with complex, dynamical behaviours. By confining the droplets within a microfluidic channel and applying a range of electric field strengths, we produce protocells that exhibit repetitive cycles of vacuolarization, dynamical fluctuations in size and shape, chaotic growth and fusion, spontaneous ejection and sequestration of matter, directional capture of solute molecules, and pulsed enhancement of enzyme cascade reactions. Our results highlight new opportunities for the study of non-equilibrium phenomena in synthetic protocells, provide a strategy for inducing complex behaviour in electrostatically assembled soft matter microsystems and illustrate how dynamical properties can be activated and sustained in microcompartmentalized media.

  6. From tunneling to contact in a magnetic atom: The non-equilibrium Kondo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Deung-Jang; Abufager, Paula; Limot, Laurent; Lorente, Nicolás

    2017-03-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was employed to study the differential conductance in an atomic junction formed by an adsorbed Co atom on a Cu(100) surface and a copper-covered tip. A zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) reveals spin scattering off the Co atom, which is assigned to a Kondo effect. The ZBA exhibits a characteristic asymmetric lineshape when electrons tunnel between tip and sample, while upon the tip-Co contact it symmetrizes and broadens. Through density functional theory calculations and the non-equilibrium non-crossing approximation, we show that the lineshape broadening is mainly a consequence of the additional coupling to the tip, while non-equilibrium effects only modify the large-bias tails of the ZBA.

  7. The Molecular Photo-Cell: Quantum Transport and Energy Conversion at Strong Non-Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Ajisaka, Shigeru; Žunkovič, Bojan; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular photo-cell is a single molecular donor-acceptor complex attached to electrodes and subject to external illumination. Besides the obvious relevance to molecular photo-voltaics, the molecular photo-cell is of interest being a paradigmatic example for a system that inherently operates in out-of-equilibrium conditions and typically far from the linear response regime. Moreover, this system includes electrons, phonons and photons, and environments which induce coherent and incoherent processes, making it a challenging system to address theoretically. Here, using an open quantum systems approach, we analyze the non-equilibrium transport properties and energy conversion performance of a molecular photo-cell, including both coherent and incoherent processes and treating electrons, photons, and phonons on an equal footing. We find that both the non-equilibrium conditions and decoherence play a crucial role in determining the performance of the photovoltaic conversion and the optimal energy configuration of the molecular system. PMID:25660494

  8. Non-equilibrium universality in the dynamics of dissipative cold atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuzzi, M.; Levi, E.; Li, W.; Garrahan, J. P.; Olmos, B.; Lesanovsky, I.

    2015-07-01

    The theory of continuous phase transitions predicts the universal collective properties of a physical system near a critical point, which for instance manifest in characteristic power-law behaviours of physical observables. The well-established concept at or near equilibrium, universality, can also characterize the physics of systems out of equilibrium. The most fundamental instance of a genuine non-equilibrium phase transition is the directed percolation (DP) universality class, where a system switches from an absorbing inactive to a fluctuating active phase. Despite being known for several decades it has been challenging to find experimental systems that manifest this transition. Here we show theoretically that signatures of the DP universality class can be observed in an atomic system with long-range interactions. Moreover, we demonstrate that even mesoscopic ensembles—which are currently studied experimentally—are sufficient to observe traces of this non-equilibrium phase transition in one, two and three dimensions.

  9. Invariance of specific mass increment in the case of non-equilibrium growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Sergeev, A. P.; Terentiev, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    The invariance of specific mass increments of crystalline structures that co-exist in the case of non-equilibrium growth is grounded for the first time by using the maximum entropy production principle. Based on the hypothesis of the existence of a universal growth equation, and through the dimensional analysis, an explicit form of the time-dependent specific mass increment is proposed. The applicability of the obtained results for describing growth in animate nature is discussed.

  10. AC Power Consumption of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Interconnects: Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Sasaoka, Kenji; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the emittance and dynamic dissipation of a nanoscale interconnect consisting of a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique for AC electronic transport. We show that the emittance and dynamic dissipation depend strongly on the contact conditions of the interconnect and that the power consumption can be reduced by adjusting the contact conditions. We propose an appropriate condition of contact that yields a high power factor and low apparent power.

  11. Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Condensation Phenomena in Tuneable 3D and 2D Bose Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    equilibrium and non-equilibrium many-body phenomena, trapping ultracold atomic gases in different geometries including both 3 and 2 spatial dimensions...box trap we created the world’s first atomic BEC in a quasi-uniform potential. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Bose gas, ultracold, condensation, equilibrium... atom trap, Bose-Einstein condensate 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 3 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  12. The non-equilibrium allele frequency spectrum in a Poisson random field framework.

    PubMed

    Kaj, Ingemar; Mugal, Carina F

    2016-10-01

    In population genetic studies, the allele frequency spectrum (AFS) efficiently summarizes genome-wide polymorphism data and shapes a variety of allele frequency-based summary statistics. While existing theory typically features equilibrium conditions, emerging methodology requires an analytical understanding of the build-up of the allele frequencies over time. In this work, we use the framework of Poisson random fields to derive new representations of the non-equilibrium AFS for the case of a Wright-Fisher population model with selection. In our approach, the AFS is a scaling-limit of the expectation of a Poisson stochastic integral and the representation of the non-equilibrium AFS arises in terms of a fixation time probability distribution. The known duality between the Wright-Fisher diffusion process and a birth and death process generalizing Kingman's coalescent yields an additional representation. The results carry over to the setting of a random sample drawn from the population and provide the non-equilibrium behavior of sample statistics. Our findings are consistent with and extend a previous approach where the non-equilibrium AFS solves a partial differential forward equation with a non-traditional boundary condition. Moreover, we provide a bridge to previous coalescent-based work, and hence tie several frameworks together. Since frequency-based summary statistics are widely used in population genetics, for example, to identify candidate loci of adaptive evolution, to infer the demographic history of a population, or to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanics of speciation events, the presented results are potentially useful for a broad range of topics.

  13. Direct-Numerical and Large-Eddy Simulations of a Non-Equilibrium Turbulent Kolmogorov Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, S. L.; Shebalin, J. V.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    A non-equilibrium form of turbulent Kolmogorov flow is set up by making an instantaneous change in the amplitude of the spatially-periodic forcing. It is found that the response of the flow to this instantaneous change becomes more dramatic as the wavenumber of the forcing is increased, and, at the same time, that the faithfulness with which the large-eddy-simulation results agree with the direct-numerical results decreases.

  14. Dynamical Detailed Balance and Local Kms Condition for Non-Equilibrium States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Imafuku, Kentaro

    The principle of detailed balance is at the basis of equilibrium physics and is equivalent to the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition (under quite general assumptions). In the present paper we prove that a large class of non-equilibrium quantum systems satisfies a dynamical generalization of the detailed balance condition (dynamical detailed balance) expressing the fact that all the micro-currents, associated to the Bohr frequencies are constant. The usual (equilibrium) detailed balance condition is characterized by the property that this constant is identically zero. From this we deduce a simple and experimentally measurable relation expressing the microcurrent associated to a transition between two levels ɛm→ɛn as a linear combination of the occupation probabilities of the two levels, with coefficients given by the generalized susceptivities (transport coefficients). We then give a second characterization of the dynamical detailed balance condition using a master equation rather than the microcurrents. Finally we show that these two conditions are equivalent to a "local" generalization of the usual KMS condition. Summing up: rather than postulating some ansatz on the basis of phenomenological models or of numerical simulations, we deduce, directly in the quantum domain and from fundamental principles, some natural and simple non equilibrium generalizations of the three main characterizations of equilibrium states. Then we prove that these three, apparently very far, conditions are equivalent. These facts support our convinction that these three equivalent conditions capture a universal aspect of non equilibrium phenomena.

  15. Second law considerations on the third law: From Boltzmann and Loschmidt paradox to non equilibrium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-02-01

    The balance of forces and processes between the system and the environment and the processes inside the system are the result of the flows of the quanta. Moreover, the transition between two thermodynamic states is the consequence of absorption or emission of quanta, but, during the transition, the entropy variation due to the irreversibility occurs and it breaks any symmetry of time. Consequently, the irreversibility is the result of a transition, a process, an interaction between the system and its environment. This interaction results completely time-irreversible for any real process because of irreversibility. As a consequence, a proof of the third law is obtained proving that the zero temperature state can be achieved only for an infinite work lost for dissipation or in an infinite time. The fundamental role of time both in equilibrium and in non equilibrium analysis is pointed out. Moreover, the non equilibrium temperature is related to the entropy generation and its fluctuation rate; indeed, non-stationary temperature means that the system has not yet attained free energy minimum state, i.e., the maximum entropy state; the consequence is that the zero temperature state can be achieved only for an infinite work lost for dissipation or in an infinite time. In engineering thermodynamics the efficiency is always obtained without any consideration on time, while, here, just the time is introduced as a fundamental quantity of the analysis of non equilibrium states.

  16. Space charge corrected electron emission from an aluminum surface under non-equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelen, W.; Bogaerts, A.; Mueller, B. Y.; Rethfeld, B.; Autrique, D.

    2012-06-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted of ultrashort pulsed laser induced electron emission from an aluminum surface. Electron emission fluxes retrieved from the commonly employed Fowler-DuBridge theory were compared to fluxes based on a laser-induced non-equilibrium electron distribution. As a result, the two- and three-photon photoelectron emission parameters for the Fowler-DuBridge theory have been approximated. We observe that at regimes where photoemission is important, laser-induced electron emission evolves in a more smooth manner than predicted by the Fowler-DuBridge theory. The importance of the actual electron distribution decreases at higher laser fluences, whereas the contribution of thermionic emission increases. Furthermore, the influence of a space charge effect on electron emission was evaluated by a one dimensional particle-in-cell model. Depending on the fluences, the space charge reduces the electron emission by several orders of magnitude. The influence of the electron emission flux profiles on the effective electron emission was found to be negligible. However, a non-equilibrium electron velocity distribution increases the effective electron emission significantly. Our results show that it is essential to consider the non-equilibrium electron distribution as well as the space charge effect for the description of laser-induced photoemission.

  17. Non-equilibrium effects in atmospheric characteristic oscillations due to radiation balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliyeva, K. E.; Somsikov, V. M.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays researches on global change of climate are faces the challenge of insufficient development of open system theory. In this connection the problem of energy and entropy exchange process between solar radiation and atmospheric gas influence on atmospheric dynamics in the frames of non-equilibrium thermodynamics was studied in this work. For this purpose the equations of flow [fluid] dynamics for interacting medium - gas and radiation - with taking into account the entropy production in atmosphere and its exchanging between gas and radiation were used in this work. Dispersion relation numerical analysis of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in non-equilibrium atmosphere was carried out. It has been established that the spectra in the daytime hours shifts on high-frequency region in comparison with nighttime spectra. This difference can reach several percent in certain atmospheric regions. For the spectrum of the equilibrium model of the atmosphere the difference between the daytime and nighttime spectra makes up several fractions of percent. A comparison of the theoretical calculations of AGWs spectrum with observations confirmed the availability of non-equilibrium effects in the AGWs spectral composition. In particular, that concerns of Antarctic data results gave the difference is about 4 percent, Almaty data results ranges between 1.3 - 6 per cent in depends of season. Investigation of wave disturbances on sunset and sunrise periods of time shows that there is a tendency for low frequency region at evening-time spectra and high frequency region at morning- time spectra.

  18. The efficiency of driving chemical reactions by a physical non-equilibrium is kinetically controlled.

    PubMed

    Göppel, Tobias; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Gerland, Ulrich

    2016-07-27

    An out-of-equilibrium physical environment can drive chemical reactions into thermodynamically unfavorable regimes. Under prebiotic conditions such a coupling between physical and chemical non-equilibria may have enabled the spontaneous emergence of primitive evolutionary processes. Here, we study the coupling efficiency within a theoretical model that is inspired by recent laboratory experiments, but focuses on generic effects arising whenever reactant and product molecules have different transport coefficients in a flow-through system. In our model, the physical non-equilibrium is represented by a drift-diffusion process, which is a valid coarse-grained description for the interplay between thermophoresis and convection, as well as for many other molecular transport processes. As a simple chemical reaction, we consider a reversible dimerization process, which is coupled to the transport process by different drift velocities for monomers and dimers. Within this minimal model, the coupling efficiency between the non-equilibrium transport process and the chemical reaction can be analyzed in all parameter regimes. The analysis shows that the efficiency depends strongly on the Damköhler number, a parameter that measures the relative timescales associated with the transport and reaction kinetics. Our model and results will be useful for a better understanding of the conditions for which non-equilibrium environments can provide a significant driving force for chemical reactions in a prebiotic setting.

  19. Direct measurement of DNA bending by type IIA topoisomerases: implications for non-equilibrium topology simplification

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Ashley H.; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Seol, Yeonee; Liou, Grace F.; Osheroff, Neil; Neuman, Keir C.

    2011-01-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases modify DNA topology by passing one segment of duplex DNA (transfer or T–segment) through a transient double-strand break in a second segment of DNA (gate or G–segment) in an ATP-dependent reaction. Type IIA topoisomerases decatenate, unknot and relax supercoiled DNA to levels below equilibrium, resulting in global topology simplification. The mechanism underlying this non-equilibrium topology simplification remains speculative. The bend angle model postulates that non-equilibrium topology simplification scales with the bend angle imposed on the G–segment DNA by the binding of a type IIA topoisomerase. To test this bend angle model, we used atomic force microscopy and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the extent of bending imposed on DNA by three type IIA topoisomerases that span the range of topology simplification activity. We found that Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV, yeast topoisomerase II and human topoisomerase IIα each bend DNA to a similar degree. These data suggest that DNA bending is not the sole determinant of non-equilibrium topology simplification. Rather, they suggest a fundamental and conserved role for DNA bending in the enzymatic cycle of type IIA topoisomerases. PMID:21421557

  20. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer. PMID:26419420

  1. An Initial Non-Equilibrium Porous-Media Model for CFD Simulation of Stirling Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Simon, Terry; Gedeon, David; Ibrahim, Mounir; Rong, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to define empirical parameters for an initial thermal non-equilibrium porous-media model for use in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for simulation of Stirling regenerators. The two codes currently used at Glenn Research Center for Stirling modeling are Fluent and CFD-ACE. The codes porous-media models are equilibrium models, which assume solid matrix and fluid are in thermal equilibrium. This is believed to be a poor assumption for Stirling regenerators; Stirling 1-D regenerator models, used in Stirling design, use non-equilibrium regenerator models and suggest regenerator matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location and time during the cycle. Experimentally based information was used to define: hydrodynamic dispersion, permeability, inertial coefficient, fluid effective thermal conductivity, and fluid-solid heat transfer coefficient. Solid effective thermal conductivity was also estimated. Determination of model parameters was based on planned use in a CFD model of Infinia's Stirling Technology Demonstration Converter (TDC), which uses a random-fiber regenerator matrix. Emphasis is on use of available data to define empirical parameters needed in a thermal non-equilibrium porous media model for Stirling regenerator simulation. Such a model has not yet been implemented by the authors or their associates.

  2. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  3. Dynamic scaling for the growth of non-equilibrium fluctuations during thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Roberto; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; Vailati, Alberto

    2015-09-30

    Diffusion processes are widespread in biological and chemical systems, where they play a fundamental role in the exchange of substances at the cellular level and in determining the rate of chemical reactions. Recently, the classical picture that portrays diffusion as random uncorrelated motion of molecules has been revised, when it was shown that giant non-equilibrium fluctuations develop during diffusion processes. Under microgravity conditions and at steady-state, non-equilibrium fluctuations exhibit scale invariance and their size is only limited by the boundaries of the system. In this work, we investigate the onset of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations induced by thermophoretic diffusion in microgravity, a regime not accessible to analytical calculations but of great relevance for the understanding of several natural and technological processes. A combination of state of the art simulations and experiments allows us to attain a fully quantitative description of the development of fluctuations during transient diffusion in microgravity. Both experiments and simulations show that during the onset the fluctuations exhibit scale invariance at large wave vectors. In a broader range of wave vectors simulations predict a spinodal-like growth of fluctuations, where the amplitude and length-scale of the dominant mode are determined by the thickness of the diffuse layer.

  4. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  5. Air spark-like plasma source for antimicrobial NOx generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, M. J.; Ono, T.; Galleher, C.; Curtis, B.; Clark, D. S.; Machala, Z.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate and analyse the generation of nitrogen oxides and their antimicrobial efficacy using atmospheric air spark-like plasmas. Spark-like discharges in air in a 1 L confined volume are shown to generate NOx at an initial rate of about 1.5  ×  1016 NOx molecules/J dissipated in the plasma. Such a discharge operating in this confined volume generates on the order of 6000 ppm NOx in 10 min. Around 90% of the NOx is in the form of NO2 after several minutes of operation in the confined volume, suggesting that NO2 is the dominant antimicrobial component. The strong antimicrobial action of the NOx mixture after several minutes of plasma operation is demonstrated by measuring rates of E. coli disinfection on surfaces and in water exposed to the NOx mixture. Some possible applications of plasma generation of NOx (perhaps followed by dissolution in water) include disinfection of surfaces, skin or wound antisepsis, and sterilization of medical instruments at or near room temperature.

  6. Design and characterization of a novel coaxial VHF plasma source for air plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrns, Brandon; Wooten, Daniel; Shannon, Steven

    2011-10-01

    A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design, plasma characterization, and preliminary surface treatments of HDPE will be presented. A key challenge in the expansion of atmospheric plasma applicators into new markets is the effective surface area that these systems can efficiently treat. To this end, a large area atmospheric air glow discharge, with approximately 9.5 cm2 cross sectional area, is obtained using a simple coaxial structure. The room air plasma is driven by a 162MHz generator at powers ranging from 300W-1000W. The VHF drive appears to produce a steady state glow void of streamers or arcs typically found in atmospheric air systems. Electrical measurements coupled with a global plasma model and transmission line theory allow for the calculation of electron density. Densities calculated for 400W are approximately 1011 cm-3. Spectroscopy data shows dominant emissions consist of OH, N2, and N2+,along with a continuum indicating neutral bremsstrahlung radiation; this is used for electron density calculations and model validation. In this presentation, source design

  7. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue Fang, Jing

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  8. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  9. Energy Conversion in High Enthalpy Flows and Non-equilibrium Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Igor V. Adamovich5, Walter R. Lempert6, and J. William Rich*7 Michael A. Chaszeyka Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratories, Department of...Uribarri and Ned Allen); and The Michael A. Chaszeyka Gift to the OSU Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratories. We wish to thank Dr. Graham Candler and...Burks, T.L., and Lin, M.C., Chemical Physics, vol. 44, 1979, pp. 143-150 44. Hancock, G., Ridley, B.A., Smith, I.W.M., J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2

  10. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes' hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes' hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes' hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus.

  12. Calcium influx through TRP channels induced by short-lived reactive species in plasma-irradiated solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium helium atmospheric-pressure plasma (He-APP), which allows for a strong non-equilibrium chemical reaction of O2 and N2 in ambient air, uniquely produces multiple extremely reactive products, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), in plasma-irradiated solution. We herein show that relatively short-lived unclassified reactive species (i.e., deactivated within approximately 10 min) generated by the He-APP irradiation can trigger physiologically relevant Ca2+ influx through ruthenium red- and SKF 96365-sensitive Ca2+-permeable channel(s), possibly transient receptor potential channel family member(s). Our results provide novel insight into understanding of the interactions between cells and plasmas and the mechanism by which cells detect plasma-induced chemically reactive species, in addition to facilitating development of plasma applications in medicine.

  13. Calcium influx through TRP channels induced by short-lived reactive species in plasma-irradiated solution

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium helium atmospheric-pressure plasma (He-APP), which allows for a strong non-equilibrium chemical reaction of O2 and N2 in ambient air, uniquely produces multiple extremely reactive products, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), in plasma-irradiated solution. We herein show that relatively short-lived unclassified reactive species (i.e., deactivated within approximately 10 min) generated by the He-APP irradiation can trigger physiologically relevant Ca2+ influx through ruthenium red- and SKF 96365-sensitive Ca2+-permeable channel(s), possibly transient receptor potential channel family member(s). Our results provide novel insight into understanding of the interactions between cells and plasmas and the mechanism by which cells detect plasma-induced chemically reactive species, in addition to facilitating development of plasma applications in medicine. PMID:27169489

  14. TiO2 anatase nanorods with non-equilibrium crystallographic {001} facets and their coatings exhibiting high photo-oxidation of NO gas.

    PubMed

    Habran, Margarita; Krambrock, Klaus; Maia da Costa, M E H; Morgado, Edisson; Marinkovic, Bojan A

    2017-03-08

    Development of highly active photocatalysts is mandatory for more widespread application of this alternative environmental technology. Synthesis of photocatalysts, such as anatase TiO2, with more reactive, non-equilibrium, crystallographic facets is theoretically justified by a more efficient interfacial charge transfer to reactive adsorbed species, increasing quantum efficiency of photocatalyst. Air and vacuum calcinations of protonated trititanate nanotubes lead to their transformation to anatase nanorods. The nanorods synthesized by air calcination demonstrate photo-oxidation of NO gas more than three times superior to the one presented by the benchmark P-25 photocatalyst. This performance has been explained in terms of 50% higher specific surface area and, more importantly, through the predominance of more reactive, non-equilibrium, {001} crystallographic facets of the anatase nanorods. These facets present a high density of undercoordinated Ti cations, which favors adsorption of reactant species, and strained Ti-O-Ti bonds, leading to more efficient photo-oxidation reactions. Reduced Ti species, such as Ti(3+), were not observed in the as-obtained nanorods, while reactive adsorbed molecules are scarce on the nanorods obtained through vacuum calcination. Dip-coating of TiO2 anatase nanorods (air calcined) over soda-lime glass plates was used to prepare visible light transparent, superhydrophilic and highly adherent photocatalytic coatings with homogenously distributed nanopores.

  15. The dynamics of a non-equilibrium bubble near bio-materials.

    PubMed

    Ohl, S W; Klaseboer, E; Khoo, B C

    2009-10-21

    In many medical treatments oscillating (non-equilibrium) bubbles appear. They can be the result of high-intensity-focused ultrasound, laser treatments or shock wave lithotripsy for example. The physics of such oscillating bubbles is often not very well understood. This is especially so if the bubbles are oscillating near (soft) bio-materials. It is well known that bubbles oscillating near (hard) materials have a tendency to form a high speed jet directed towards the material during the collapse phase of the bubble. It is equally well studied that bubbles near a free interface (air) tend to collapse with a jet directed away from this interface. If the interface is neither 'free' nor 'hard', such as often occurs in bio-materials, the resulting flow physics can be very complex. Yet, in many bio-applications, it is crucial to know in which direction the jet will go (if there is a jet at all). Some applications require a jet towards the tissue, for example to destroy it. For other applications, damage due to impacting jets is to be prevented at all cost. This paper tries to address some of the physics involved in these treatments by using a numerical method, the boundary element method (BEM), to study the dynamics of such bubbles near several bio-materials. In the present work, the behaviour of a bubble placed in a water-like medium near various bio-materials (modelled as elastic fluids) is investigated. It is found that its behaviour depends on the material properties (Young's modulus, Poisson ratio and density) of the bio-material. For soft bio-materials (fat, skin, brain and muscle), the bubble tends to split into smaller bubbles. In certain cases, the resulting bubbles develop opposing jets. For hard bio-materials (cornea, cartilage and bone), the bubble collapses towards the interface with high speed jets (between 100 and about 250 m s(-1)). A summary graph is provided identifying the combined effects of the dimensionless elasticity (kappa) and density ratio (alpha

  16. The dynamics of a non-equilibrium bubble near bio-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, S. W.; Klaseboer, E.; Khoo, B. C.

    2009-10-01

    In many medical treatments oscillating (non-equilibrium) bubbles appear. They can be the result of high-intensity-focused ultrasound, laser treatments or shock wave lithotripsy for example. The physics of such oscillating bubbles is often not very well understood. This is especially so if the bubbles are oscillating near (soft) bio-materials. It is well known that bubbles oscillating near (hard) materials have a tendency to form a high speed jet directed towards the material during the collapse phase of the bubble. It is equally well studied that bubbles near a free interface (air) tend to collapse with a jet directed away from this interface. If the interface is neither 'free' nor 'hard', such as often occurs in bio-materials, the resulting flow physics can be very complex. Yet, in many bio-applications, it is crucial to know in which direction the jet will go (if there is a jet at all). Some applications require a jet towards the tissue, for example to destroy it. For other applications, damage due to impacting jets is to be prevented at all cost. This paper tries to address some of the physics involved in these treatments by using a numerical method, the boundary element method (BEM), to study the dynamics of such bubbles near several bio-materials. In the present work, the behaviour of a bubble placed in a water-like medium near various bio-materials (modelled as elastic fluids) is investigated. It is found that its behaviour depends on the material properties (Young's modulus, Poisson ratio and density) of the bio-material. For soft bio-materials (fat, skin, brain and muscle), the bubble tends to split into smaller bubbles. In certain cases, the resulting bubbles develop opposing jets. For hard bio-materials (cornea, cartilage and bone), the bubble collapses towards the interface with high speed jets (between 100 and about 250 m s-1). A summary graph is provided identifying the combined effects of the dimensionless elasticity (κ) and density ratio (α) of the

  17. An Initial Non-Equilibrium Porous-Media Model for CFD Simulation of Stirling Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy; Simon, Terry; Gedeon, David; Ibrahim, Mounir; Rong, Wei

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to define empirical parameters (or closwre models) for an initial thermai non-equilibrium porous-media model for use in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes for simulation of Stirling regenerators. The two CFD codes currently being used at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for Stirling engine modeling are Fluent and CFD-ACE. The porous-media models available in each of these codes are equilibrium models, which assmne that the solid matrix and the fluid are in thermal equilibrium at each spatial location within the porous medium. This is believed to be a poor assumption for the oscillating-flow environment within Stirling regenerators; Stirling 1-D regenerator models, used in Stirling design, we non-equilibrium regenerator models and suggest regenerator matrix and gas average temperatures can differ by several degrees at a given axial location end time during the cycle. A NASA regenerator research grant has been providing experimental and computational results to support definition of various empirical coefficients needed in defining a noa-equilibrium, macroscopic, porous-media model (i.e., to define "closure" relations). The grant effort is being led by Cleveland State University, with subcontractor assistance from the University of Minnesota, Gedeon Associates, and Sunpower, Inc. Friction-factor and heat-transfer correlations based on data taken with the NASAlSunpower oscillating-flow test rig also provide experimentally based correlations that are useful in defining parameters for the porous-media model; these correlations are documented in Gedeon Associates' Sage Stirling-Code Manuals. These sources of experimentally based information were used to define the following terms and parameters needed in the non-equilibrium porous-media model: hydrodynamic dispersion, permeability, inertial coefficient, fluid effective thermal conductivity (including themal dispersion and estimate of tortuosity effects}, and fluid-solid heat transfer

  18. Response theory for non-equilibrium systems: theory and applications (Outstanding Young Scientist Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2010-05-01

    We consider the general response theory recently proposed by Ruelle for describing the impact of small perturbations to the non-equilibrium steady states resulting from Axiom A dynamical systems. We show that the causality of the response functions entails the possibility of writing a set of Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relations for the corresponding susceptibilities at all orders of nonlinearity, and specific results are provided for the case of arbitrary order harmonic response. These results shed light on the very general impact of considering the principle of causality for testing self-consistency: the described dispersion relations constitute unavoidable benchmarks that any experimental and model generated dataset must obey. These results, taking into account the chaotic hypothesis by Gallavotti and Cohen, might be relevant in several fields, including climate research. In particular, whereas the fluctuation-dissipation theorem does not work for non-equilibrium systems, because of the non-equivalence between internal and external fluctuations, K-K relations might be robust tools for the definition of a self-consistent theory of climate change. Along these lines, we present here the first evidence of the validity of these integral relations for the linear and the second harmonic response for the perturbed Lorenz 63 system, by showing that numerical simulations agree up to high degree of accuracy with the theoretical predictions. The numerical results confirm the conceptual validity of the nonlinear response theory, suggest that the theory can be extended for more general non equilibrium steady state systems, and shed new light on the applicability of very general tools, based only upon the principle of causality, for diagnosing the behavior of perturbed chaotic systems and reconstructing their output signals.

  19. Upscaling of Compositional Flow Simulation based on a non-Equilibrium Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, A.; Voskov, D.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Modeling multiphase flow of large number of components in natural porous media is a challenging problem of strong interest across many disciplines. Even with the most advanced computational methods and computer platforms, compositional simulation using the fine-scale (so-called geocellular) model is often too expensive; as a result, upscaling methods for compositional flows are essential. We describe a consistent representation of the coarse-scale equations, and we introduce upscaled flow functions to account for the sub-scale variations in both the absolute and relative permeability, as well as, compressibility effects. Upscaling of the thermodynamic phase behavior is the main focus of this work. We assume instantaneous phase equilibrium at the fine scale, and we derive coarse-scale equations, in which the phase behavior is represented in a non-equilibrium form. Viscous fingering, gravity override, and channeling at the sub-grid scale are possible reasons for this non-equilibrium behavior. Coarse-scale thermodynamic functions are introduced to quantify the difference in chemical potential of each component among the different phases and to capture the deviation of coarse blocks from equilibrium. These upscaled functions transform the two-phase region of the fine-scale, formed by equilibrium tie-lines, to a modified region with tilted tie-lines. We quantify the effect of the degree of heterogeneity variance and heterogeneity patterns on the modified non-equilibrium phase space in the upscaled representation. We also analyze the interplay of phase behavior and numerical dispersion at the coarse-scale, and we demonstrate how the averaging of sub-scale heterogeneities and the use of larger grid blocks can alter the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of proposed methodology is tested for various challenging gas injection problems, and we show that the approach accurately reproduces the averaged fine-scale solutions.

  20. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, maximum entropy production and Earth-system evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-01-13

    The present-day atmosphere is in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This uniqueness is for instance reflected in the high concentration of molecular oxygen and the low relative humidity in the atmosphere. Given that the concentration of atmospheric oxygen has likely increased throughout Earth-system history, we can ask whether this trend can be generalized to a trend of Earth-system evolution that is directed away from thermodynamic equilibrium, why we would expect such a trend to take place and what it would imply for Earth-system evolution as a whole. The justification for such a trend could be found in the proposed general principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), which states that non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems maintain steady states at which entropy production is maximized. Here, I justify and demonstrate this application of MEP to the Earth at the planetary scale. I first describe the non-equilibrium thermodynamic nature of Earth-system processes and distinguish processes that drive the system's state away from equilibrium from those that are directed towards equilibrium. I formulate the interactions among these processes from a thermodynamic perspective and then connect them to a holistic view of the planetary thermodynamic state of the Earth system. In conclusion, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and MEP have the potential to provide a simple and holistic theory of Earth-system functioning. This theory can be used to derive overall evolutionary trends of the Earth's past, identify the role that life plays in driving thermodynamic states far from equilibrium, identify habitability in other planetary environments and evaluate human impacts on Earth-system functioning.

  1. Asymptotic analysis of discrete schemes for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xia Yuan, Guang-wei; Shen, Zhi-jun

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by providing well-behaved fully discrete schemes in practice, this paper extends the asymptotic analysis on time integration methods for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion in [2] to space discretizations. Therein studies were carried out on a two-temperature model with Larsen's flux-limited diffusion operator, both the implicitly balanced (IB) and linearly implicit (LI) methods were shown asymptotic-preserving. In this paper, we focus on asymptotic analysis for space discrete schemes in dimensions one and two. First, in construction of the schemes, in contrast to traditional first-order approximations, asymmetric second-order accurate spatial approximations are devised for flux-limiters on boundary, and discrete schemes with second-order accuracy on global spatial domain are acquired consequently. Then by employing formal asymptotic analysis, the first-order asymptotic-preserving property for these schemes and furthermore for the fully discrete schemes is shown. Finally, with the help of manufactured solutions, numerical tests are performed, which demonstrate quantitatively the fully discrete schemes with IB time evolution indeed have the accuracy and asymptotic convergence as theory predicts, hence are well qualified for both non-equilibrium and equilibrium radiation diffusion. - Highlights: • Provide AP fully discrete schemes for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion. • Propose second order accurate schemes by asymmetric approach for boundary flux-limiter. • Show first order AP property of spatially and fully discrete schemes with IB evolution. • Devise subtle artificial solutions; verify accuracy and AP property quantitatively. • Ideas can be generalized to 3-dimensional problems and higher order implicit schemes.

  2. Magnetic field applied to thermochemical non-equilibrium reentry flows in 2D - five species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávio de Góes Maciel, Edisson

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a study involving magnetic field actuation over reentry flows in thermochemical non-equilibrium is performed. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The proposed numerical algorithm is centred and second-order accurate. The hypersonic flow around a blunt body is simulated. Three time integration methods are tested. The reactive simulations involve Earth atmosphere of five species. The work of Gaitonde is the reference to couple the fluid dynamics and Maxwell equations of electromagnetism. The results have indicated that the Maciel scheme, using the Mavriplis dissipation model, yields the best prediction of the stagnation pressure.

  3. Electron-Impact Excitation Cross Sections for Modeling Non-Equilibrium Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Munafo, Alessandro; Wray, Alan; Carbon, Duane F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a database for modeling hypersonic entry in a partially ionized gas under non-equilibrium, the electron-impact excitation cross sections of atoms have been calculated using perturbation theory. The energy levels covered in the calculation are retrieved from the level list in the HyperRad code. The downstream flow-field is determined by solving a set of continuity equations for each component. The individual structure of each energy level is included. These equations are then complemented by the Euler system of equations. Finally, the radiation field is modeled by solving the radiative transfer equation.

  4. The impact of non-equilibrium microstructure on the mechanical response of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomin, James D.

    2007-12-01

    Experiments have shown that polymer nanocomposites can have mechanical properties that are greatly reinforced compared to the pure polymer, or even to equivalent micro-composites. However, despite a wealth of experimental observations, exactly how this occurs is still under debate. Using Molecular Dynamics computer simulations, we have shown that three primary physical effects can be present, depending on the system specifics. First, attractive particle-polymer interactions lead to a slowing of polymer motion in the interfacial zone. This effect then leads to an overall increase in the stress relaxation curve, in proportion to the volume fraction of the interfacial zone. Second, at high volume fractions of particles, "jamming" can occur whereby the particles make direct contact. This leads to solid-like behavior that is not polymer-based. Jamming can also occur at low volume fractions when the polymer-particle attractions are strong enough that polymer molecules form a bound layer around the particles, increasing the effective diameter to above the percolation threshold. The third effect is polymer-based, and can result in the formation of a long-time plateau in the relaxation modulus, or a substantial increase in the entanglement plateau. It occurs when polymer-particle interactions are strong enough that polymers are immobilized on the particle surface, but at volume fractions where there is a separation between bulk and interfacial regions. When these conditions are met, interparticle bridges may form, which then lead to network reinforcement. These conditions are by nature non-equilibrium, meaning that there are glassy regions which do not relax within accessible time-scales. Therefore, the properties of the composite depend strongly on processing history. At the opposite extreme, when polymer-particle interactions are weak, non-equilibrium particle clustering occurs. In contrast to the melt structures which are glassy because of strong enthalpic interactions

  5. Fundamental Properties of Non-equilibrium Laser-Supported Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-30

    For developing laser propulsion, it is very important to analyze the mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), because it can generate high pressure and high temperature to be used by laser propulsion can be categorized as one type of hypersonic reacting flows, where exothermicity is supplied not by chemical reaction but by radiation absorption. I have numerically simulated the 1-D and Quasi-1-D LSD waves propagating through an inert gas, which absorbs CO2 gasdynamic laser, using a 2-temperature model. Calculated results show the fundamental properties of the non-equilibrium LSD Waves.

  6. A numerical study of non-equilibrium flows with different vibrational relaxation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N. V.; Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Shoev, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    Comparative analysis of a widely used Landau-Teller formula for small deviations from thermal equilibrium and its generalized form, derived from the kinetic theory of gaseous, for an arbitrary deviation from the thermal equilibrium is performed by numerical simulation. Thermally non-equilibrium flows of carbon dioxide near a sharp-edged plate, pure nitrogen flows between two symmetrically located wedges, and the N2/N mixture flow with vibrational relaxation and dissociation over a cone have been considered. A comparison has been performed with the available experimental data.

  7. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Reis, D. A.; Wang, X. J.; Dürr, H. A.

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  8. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  9. Diffusive-convective transition in the non-equilibrium charging of an electric double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobaskin, Vladimir; Netz, Roland R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the non-equilibrium electrolyte kinetics in a planar nanocapacitor that is driven by periodically switching surfaces charges using simulations, theory and scaling analysis. The combined effects of inter-ionic charge correlations and hydrodynamic interactions lead to correlated convective behavior for weakly charged ions. These dynamic correlations, signaling the breakdown of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory, are distinct from static correlations that are manifested by the crossover from Poisson-Boltzmann to strong-coupling theory that occurs as the ion valency increases.

  10. Lyapunov Functions, Stationary Distributions, and Non-equilibrium Potential for Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj; Wiuf, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    We consider the relationship between stationary distributions for stochastic models of reaction systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well-known Lyapunov function of reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non-equilibrium potential of the stationary distribution of stochastically modeled complex balanced systems. We extend this result to general birth-death models and demonstrate via example that similar scaling limits can yield Lyapunov functions even for models that are not complex or detailed balanced, and may even have multiple equilibria.

  11. Virial Theorem and Non-Equilibrium Canonical-Dissipative Distributions Characterizing Parkinson Tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.

    The virial theorem and the concept of canonical-statistical distributions represent two fundamental elements of statistical physics. We apply these concepts to hand tremor oscillations recorded from six Parkinson patients. We find that the virial theorem holds for Parkinson tremor oscillations. In contrast, we find that the concept of canonical distributions fails to a certain extent and needs to be replaced by the notion of non-canonical (i.e., canonical-dissipative) distributions. In doing so, our analysis reveals both general statistical aspects and non-equilibrium aspects of Parkinson hand tremor.

  12. Non-equilibrium slave bosons approach to quantum pumping in interacting quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, Roberta; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    We review a time-dependent slave bosons approach within the non-equilibrium Green's function technique to analyze the charge and spin pumping in a strongly interacting quantum dot. We study the pumped current as a function of the pumping phase and of the dot energy level and show that a parasitic current arises, beyond the pure pumping one, as an effect of the dynamical constraints. We finally illustrate an all-electrical mean for spin-pumping and discuss its relevance for spintronics applications.

  13. Vibrational non-equilibrium in the hydrogen-oxygen reaction. Comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrebkov, Oleg V.

    2015-03-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the chemical and vibrational kinetics of hydrogen oxidation based on consistent accounting of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical that forms as a result of the bimolecular recombination H+O2 → HO2. In the proposed model, the chain branching H+O2 = O+OH and inhibiting H+O2+M = HO2+M formal reactions are treated (in the terms of elementary processes) as a single multi-channel process of forming, intramolecular energy redistribution between modes, relaxation, and unimolecular decay of the comparatively long-lived vibrationally excited HO2 radical, which is able to react and exchange energy with the other components of the mixture. The model takes into account the vibrational non-equilibrium of the starting (primary) H2 and O2 molecules, as well as the most important molecular intermediates HO2, OH, O2(1Δ), and the main reaction product H2O. It is shown that the hydrogen-oxygen reaction proceeds in the absence of vibrational equilibrium, and the vibrationally excited HO2(v) radical acts as a key intermediate in a fundamentally important chain branching process and in the generation of electronically excited species O2(1Δ), O(1D), and OH(2Σ+). The calculated results are compared with the shock tube experimental data for strongly diluted H2-O2 mixtures at 1000 < T < 2500 K, 0.5 < p < 4 atm. It is demonstrated that this approach is promising from the standpoint of reconciling the predictions of the theoretical model with experimental data obtained by different authors for various compositions and conditions using different methods. For T < 1500 K, the nature of the hydrogen-oxygen reaction is especially non-equilibrium, and the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical is the essence of this process. The quantitative estimation of the vibrational relaxation characteristic time of the HO2 radical in its collisions with H2 molecules has been obtained as a result of the comparison of different experimental data on

  14. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  15. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yen Vinokur, Marcel; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model’s accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  16. Fundamental Properties of Non-equilibrium Laser-Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-03-01

    For developing laser propulsion, it is very important to analyze the mechanism of Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD), because it can generate high pressure and high temperature to be used by laser propulsion can be categorized as one type of hypersonic reacting flows, where exothermicity is supplied not by chemical reaction but by radiation absorption. I have numerically simulated the 1-D and Quasi-1-D LSD waves propagating through an inert gas, which absorbs CO2 gasdynamic laser, using a 2-temperature model. Calculated results show the fundamental properties of the non-equilibrium LSD Waves.

  17. Electron Broadening of Isolated Lines with Stationary Non-Equilibrium Level Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A

    2005-01-12

    It is shown that a quantum kinetic theory approach to line broadening, extended to stationary non-equilibrium states, yields corrections to the standard electron impact widths of isolated lines that depend on the population of the radiator internal levels. A consistent classical limit from a general quantum treatment of the perturbing electrons also introduces corrections to the isolated line widths. Both effects are essential in preserving detailed-balance relations. Preliminary analysis indicates that these corrections may resolve existing discrepancies between theoretical and experimental widths of isolated lines. An experimental test of the results is proposed.

  18. Non-equilibrium Phenomenon between Electron and Lattice Systems Induced by the Peltier Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Hideo; Hori, Hidenobu; Sasaki, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Temperature distributions of the electron and lattice systems induced by the Peltier effect have been precisely measured by improved Harman method, where the temperature differences (Δ Tel and Δ Tla) have been independently evaluated for several terminal lengths (LV) in thermoelectric materials (Bi,Sb)2Te3. Both temperature distributions have different behaviors in the stationary state, that is, the LV dependences of Δ Tel and Δ Tla show positive and negative curvatures, respectively. It is also indicated that the temperature difference has a linear relation to LV in the whole system and the observed non-equilibrium phenomenon is consistent with a law of the conservation of heat quantity.

  19. Unusual dileptions at RHIC a field theoretic approach based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, F.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on unusual dileptons at Brookhaven RHIC. A field theory approach is used based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transformation utilizing the schroedinger and Heisenberg picture.

  20. Remembrance of things past: non-equilibrium effects and the evolution of critical fluctuations near the QCD critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Swagato; Venugopalan, Raju; Yin, Yi

    2016-12-01

    We report on recent progress in the study of the evolution of non-Gaussian cumulants of critical fluctuations. We explore the implications of non-equilibrium effects on the search for the QCD critical point.

  1. Potential and flux field landscape theory. I. Global stability and dynamics of spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2013-09-28

    We established a potential and flux field landscape theory to quantify the global stability and dynamics of general spatially dependent non-equilibrium deterministic and stochastic systems. We extended our potential and flux landscape theory for spatially independent non-equilibrium stochastic systems described by Fokker-Planck equations to spatially dependent stochastic systems governed by general functional Fokker-Planck equations as well as functional Kramers-Moyal equations derived from master equations. Our general theory is applied to reaction-diffusion systems. For equilibrium spatially dependent systems with detailed balance, the potential field landscape alone, defined in terms of the steady state probability distribution functional, determines the global stability and dynamics of the system. The global stability of the system is closely related to the topography of the potential field landscape in terms of the basins of attraction and barrier heights in the field configuration state space. The effective driving force of the system is generated by the functional gradient of the potential field alone. For non-equilibrium spatially dependent systems, the curl probability flux field is indispensable in breaking detailed balance and creating non-equilibrium condition for the system. A complete characterization of the non-equilibrium dynamics of the spatially dependent system requires both the potential field and the curl probability flux field. While the non-equilibrium potential field landscape attracts the system down along the functional gradient similar to an electron moving in an electric field, the non-equilibrium flux field drives the system in a curly way similar to an electron moving in a magnetic field. In the small fluctuation limit, the intrinsic potential field as the small fluctuation limit of the potential field for spatially dependent non-equilibrium systems, which is closely related to the steady state probability distribution functional, is

  2. Non-equilibrium processes in ash-laden volcanic plumes: new insights from 3D multiphase flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Cerminara, Matteo

    2016-10-01

    In the framework of the IAVCEI (International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth Interior) initiative on volcanic plume models intercomparison, we discuss three-dimensional numerical simulations performed with the multiphase flow model PDAC (Pyroclastic Dispersal Analysis Code). The model describes the dynamics of volcanic and atmospheric gases (in absence of wind) and two pyroclastic phases by adopting a non-equilibrium Eulerian-Eulerian formulation. Accordingly, gas and particulate phases are treated as interpenetrating fluids, interacting with each other through momentum (drag) and heat exchange. Numerical results describe the time-wise and spatial evolution of weak (mass eruption rate: 1.5 × 106 kg/s) and strong (mass eruption rate: 1.5 × 109 kg/s) plumes. The two tested cases display a remarkably different phenomenology, associated with the different roles of atmospheric stratification, compressibility and mechanism of buoyancy reversal, reflecting in a different structure of the plume, of the turbulent eddies and of the atmospheric circulation. This also brings about different rates of turbulent mixing and atmospheric air entrainment. The adopted multiphase flow model allows to quantify temperature and velocity differences between the gas and particles, including settling, preferential concentration by turbulence and thermal non-equilibrium, as a function of their Stokes number, i.e., the ratio between their kinetic equilibrium time and the characteristic large-eddy turnover time of the turbulent plume. As a result, the spatial and temporal distribution of coarse ash in the atmosphere significantly differs from that of the fine ash, leading to a modification of the plume shape. Finally, three-dimensional numerical results have been averaged in time and across horizontal slices in order to obtain a one-dimensional picture of the plume in a stationary regime. For the weak plume, the results are consistent with one-dimensional models, at

  3. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity

    PubMed Central

    O'Meara, Brian C.; Smith, Stacey D.; Armbruster, W. Scott; Harder, Lawrence D.; Hardy, Christopher R.; Hileman, Lena C.; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A.; Stevens, Peter F.; Fenster, Charles B.; Diggle, Pamela K.

    2016-01-01

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years. PMID:27147092

  4. Verification of Onsager's reciprocal relations for evaporation and condensation using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Kjelstrup, S; Bedeaux, D; Røsjorde, A; Rekvig, L

    2006-07-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamic (NEMD) simulations have been used to study heat and mass transfer across a vapor-liquid interface for a one-component system using a Lennard-Jones spline potential. It was confirmed that the relation between the surface tension and the surface temperature in the non-equilibrium system was the same as in equilibrium (local equilibrium). Interfacial transfer coefficients were evaluated for the surface, which expressed the heat and mass fluxes in temperature and chemical potential differences across the interfacial region (film). In this analysis it was assumed that the Onsager reciprocal relations were valid. In this paper we extend the number of simulations such that we can calculate all four interface film transfer coefficients along the whole liquid-vapor coexistence curve. We do this analysis both for the case where we use the measurable heat flux on the vapor side and for the case where we use the measurable heat flux on the liquid side. The most important result we found is that the coupling coefficients within the accuracy of the calculation are equal. This is the first verification of the validity of the Onsager relations for transport through a surface using molecular dynamics. The interfacial film transfer coefficients are found to be a function of the surface temperature alone. New expressions are given for the kinetic theory values of these coefficients which only depend on the surface temperature. The NEMD values were found to be in good agreement with these expressions.

  5. Contributions of equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters to viscosity in concentrated protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangapani, Prasad; Hudson, Steven; Pathak, Jai; Migler, Kalman

    2013-03-01

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium clustering are ubiquitous phenomena in soft matter physics and are typically observed in systems ranging from colloidal suspensions to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Such phenomena are central to understanding and preventing irreversible aggregation in addition to controlling viscosity challenges related to formulation and drug delivery of protein therapeutics. Curiously, little work has been done in exploring the cluster size dependence of low-shear viscosity and intrinsic viscosity in protein solutions in a controlled manner. In this work, we carefully control cluster size of reversible and irreversible clusters formed by globular proteins or monoclonal antibodies over a concentration range of 2 mg/mL-500 mg/mL and pH from 3-9. We find a marked dependence of low-shear viscosity on cluster size using custom-designed silicon-based microfluidic viscometers. Measurements of cluster sizes using static light scattering reveal a correlation of low shear viscosity as well as intrinsic viscosity with the average cluster size. We model the composition dependence of viscosity for the case of equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters using an adaptation of a model recently presented by Minton for protein mixtures.

  6. Entropy production in photovoltaic-thermoelectric nanodevices from the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Fabienne; Crépieux, Adeline; Beltako, Katawoura

    2017-05-04

    We discuss some thermodynamic aspects of energy conversion in electronic nanosystems able to convert light energy into electrical or/and thermal energy using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. In a first part, we derive the photon energy and particle currents inside a nanosystem interacting with light and in contact with two electron reservoirs at different temperatures. Energy conservation is verified, and radiation laws are discussed from electron non-equilibrium Green's functions. We further use the photon currents to formulate the rate of entropy production for steady-state nanosystems, and we recast this rate in terms of efficiency for specific photovoltaic-thermoelectric nanodevices. In a second part, a quantum dot based nanojunction is closely examined using a two-level model. We show analytically that the rate of entropy production is always positive, but we find numerically that it can reach negative values when the derived particule and energy currents are empirically modified as it is usually done for modeling realistic photovoltaic systems.

  7. Hsp70 chaperones are non-equilibrium machines that achieve ultra-affinity by energy consumption.

    PubMed

    De Los Rios, Paolo; Barducci, Alessandro

    2014-05-27

    70-kDa Heat shock proteins are ATP-driven molecular chaperones that perform a myriad of essential cellular tasks. Although structural and biochemical studies have shed some light on their functional mechanism, the fundamental issue of the role of energy consumption, due to ATP-hydrolysis, has remained unaddressed. Here we establish a clear connection between the non-equilibrium nature of Hsp70, due to ATP hydrolysis, and the determining feature of its function, namely its high affinity for its substrates. Energy consumption can indeed decrease the dissociation constant of the chaperone-substrate complex by several orders of magnitude with respect to an equilibrium scenario. We find that the biochemical requirements for observing such ultra-affinity coincide with the physiological conditions in the cell. Our results rationalize several experimental observations and pave the way for further analysis of non-equilibrium effects underlying chaperone functions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02218.001.

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium cluster phases in colloids with competing interactions.

    PubMed

    Mani, Ethayaraja; Lechner, Wolfgang; Kegel, Willem K; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2014-07-07

    The phase behavior of colloids that interact via competing interactions - short-range attraction and long-range repulsion - is studied by computer simulation. In particular, for a fixed strength and range of repulsion, the effect of the strength of an attractive interaction (ε) on the phase behavior is investigated at various colloid densities (ρ). A thermodynamically stable equilibrium colloidal cluster phase, consisting of compact crystalline clusters, is found below the fluid-solid coexistence line in the ε-ρ parameter space. The mean cluster size is found to linearly increase with the colloid density. At large ε and low densities, and at small ε and high densities, a non-equilibrium cluster phase, consisting of elongated Bernal spiral-like clusters, is observed. Although gelation can be induced either by increasing ε at constant density or vice versa, the gelation mechanism is different in either route. While in the ρ route gelation occurs via a glass transition of compact clusters, gelation in the ε route is characterized by percolation of elongated clusters. This study both provides the location of equilibrium and non-equilibrium cluster phases with respect to the fluid-solid coexistence, and reveals the dependencies of the gelation mechanism on the preparation route.

  9. Multiple temperature kinetic model and gas-kinetic method for hypersonic non-equilibrium flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2008-07-01

    It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flowfields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations lose accuracy. For the high speed diatomic molecular flow in the transitional regime, the inaccuracies are partially attributed to the single temperature approximations in the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, we propose a continuum multiple temperature model based on the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation for the non-equilibrium flow computation. In the current model, the Landau-Teller-Jeans relaxation model for the rotational energy is used to evaluate the energy exchange between the translational and rotational modes. Due to the multiple temperature approximation, the second viscosity coefficient in the Navier-Stokes equations is replaced by the temperature relaxation term. In order to solve the multiple temperature kinetic model, a multiscale gas-kinetic finite volume scheme is proposed, where the gas-kinetic equation is numerically solved for the fluxes to update the macroscopic flow variables inside each control volume. Since the gas-kinetic scheme uses a continuous gas distribution function at a cell interface for the fluxes evaluation, the moments of a gas distribution function can be explicitly obtained for the multiple temperature model. Therefore, the kinetic scheme is much more efficient than the DSMC method, especially in the near continuum flow regime. For the non-equilibrium flow computations, i.e., the nozzle flow and hypersonic rarefied flow over flat plate, the computational results are validated in comparison with experimental measurements and DSMC solutions.

  10. Turbulent diffusion from a heated line source in non-equilibrium grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated turbulent diffusion of heat injected passively from a line source in equilibrium and non-equilibrium grid-generated turbulence, which are, respectively, flows in which the value of the non-dimensional rate of kinetic energy dissipation is constant or changes with streamwise distance from the grid. We used three grids with uniform square meshes and one fractal square grid (FSG), all of the same solidity, to generate non-equilibrium and equilibrium turbulence in a wind-tunnel. The regular grids have mesh sizes that are comparable to the first (RG160), second (RG80) and fourth (RG18) iterations of the fractal grid. The heated line source was inserted on the centre-plane of the grids at either of two downstream locations or an upstream one and it spanned the entire width of the wind-tunnel. We found that RG160 produced the greatest heat diffusion, followed by FSG, RG80 and RG18, in this order. The apparent turbulent diffusivity produced by the four grids also decreased in the same order. These findings conform with Taylor's theory of diffusion by continuous movements. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that the fractal space-scale unfolding (SSU) mechanism does not apply to grids with the same solidity but different effective mesh sizes. Supported by NSERC.

  11. Non-equilibrium entropy and dynamics in a system with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    We extend the core-halo approach of Levin et al (2014 Phys. Rep. 535, 1) for the violent relaxation of long-range interacting system with a waterbag initial condition, in the case of a widely studied Hamiltonian mean field model. The Gibbs entropy maximization principle is considered with the constraints of energy conservation and of coarse-grained Casimir invariants of the Vlasov equation. The core-halo distribution function depends only on the one-particle mean-field energy, as is expected from the Jeans theorem, and depends on a set of parameters which in our approach is completely determined without having to solve an envelope equation for the contour of the initial state, as required in the original approach. We also show that a different ansatz can be used for the core-halo distribution with similar results. This work also reveals a link between a parametric resonance causing the non-equilibrium phase transition in the model, a dynamical property, and a discontinuity of the (non-equilibrium) entropy of the system.

  12. Single-molecule measurement of the effective temperature in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is a well-defined quantity for systems in equilibrium. For glassy systems, it has been extended to the non-equilibrium regime, showing up as an effective quantity in a modified version of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. However, experimental evidence supporting this definition remains scarce. Here, we present the first direct experimental demonstration of the effective temperature by measuring correlations and responses in single molecules in non-equilibrium steady states generated under external random forces. We combine experiment, analytical theory and simulations for systems with different levels of complexity, ranging from a single bead in an optical trap to two-state and multiple-state DNA hairpins. From these data, we extract a unifying picture for the existence of an effective temperature based on the relative order of various timescales characterizing intrinsic relaxation and external driving. Our study thus introduces driven small systems as a fertile ground to address fundamental concepts in statistical physics, condensed-matter physics and biophysics.

  13. A note on non-equilibrium work fluctuations and equilibrium free energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman Kalyan, M.; Anjan Prasad, G.; Sastry, V. S. S.; Murthy, K. P. N.

    2011-04-01

    We consider in this paper, a few important issues in non-equilibrium work fluctuations and their relations to equilibrium free energies. First we show that the Jarzynski identity can be viewed as a cumulant expansion of work. For a switching process which is nearly quasistatic the work distribution is sharply peaked and Gaussian. We show analytically that dissipation given by average work minus reversible work WR, decreases when the process becomes more and more quasistatic. Eventually, in the quasistatic reversible limit, the dissipation vanishes. However the estimate of p, the probability of violation of the second law given by the integral of the tail of the work distribution from -∞ to WR, increases and takes a value of 0.5 in the quasistatic limit. We show this analytically employing Gaussian integrals given by error functions and the Callen-Welton theorem that relates fluctuations to dissipation in process that is nearly quasistatic. Then we carry out Monte Carlo simulation of non-equilibrium processes in a liquid crystal system in the presence of an electric field and present results on reversible work, dissipation, probability of violation of the second law and distribution of work.

  14. Asymptotic analysis of discrete schemes for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xia; Yuan, Guang-wei; Shen, Zhi-jun

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by providing well-behaved fully discrete schemes in practice, this paper extends the asymptotic analysis on time integration methods for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion in [2] to space discretizations. Therein studies were carried out on a two-temperature model with Larsen's flux-limited diffusion operator, both the implicitly balanced (IB) and linearly implicit (LI) methods were shown asymptotic-preserving. In this paper, we focus on asymptotic analysis for space discrete schemes in dimensions one and two. First, in construction of the schemes, in contrast to traditional first-order approximations, asymmetric second-order accurate spatial approximations are devised for flux-limiters on boundary, and discrete schemes with second-order accuracy on global spatial domain are acquired consequently. Then by employing formal asymptotic analysis, the first-order asymptotic-preserving property for these schemes and furthermore for the fully discrete schemes is shown. Finally, with the help of manufactured solutions, numerical tests are performed, which demonstrate quantitatively the fully discrete schemes with IB time evolution indeed have the accuracy and asymptotic convergence as theory predicts, hence are well qualified for both non-equilibrium and equilibrium radiation diffusion.

  15. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  16. Time-dependent non-equilibrium dielectric response in QM/continuum approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Feizhi; Lingerfelt, David B.; Li, Xiaosong E-mail: li@chem.washington.edu; Mennucci, Benedetta E-mail: li@chem.washington.edu

    2015-01-21

    The Polarizable Continuum Models (PCMs) are some of the most inexpensive yet successful methods for including the effects of solvation in quantum-mechanical calculations of molecular systems. However, when applied to the electronic excitation process, these methods are restricted to dichotomously assuming either that the solvent has completely equilibrated with the excited solute charge density (infinite-time limit), or that it retains the configuration that was in equilibrium with the solute prior to excitation (zero-time limit). This renders the traditional PCMs inappropriate for resolving time-dependent solvent effects on non-equilibrium solute electron dynamics like those implicated in the instants following photoexcitation of a solvated molecular species. To extend the existing methods to this non-equilibrium regime, we herein derive and apply a new formalism for a general time-dependent continuum embedding method designed to be propagated alongside the solute’s electronic degrees of freedom in the time domain. Given the frequency-dependent dielectric constant of the solvent, an equation of motion for the dielectric polarization is derived within the PCM framework and numerically integrated simultaneously with the time-dependent Hartree fock/density functional theory equations. Results for small molecular systems show the anticipated dipole quenching and electronic state dephasing/relaxation resulting from out-of-phase charge fluctuations in the dielectric and embedded quantum system.

  17. Generalized Metropolis acceptance criterion for hybrid non-equilibrium molecular dynamics—Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-14

    A family of hybrid simulation methods that combines the advantages of Monte Carlo (MC) with the strengths of classical molecular dynamics (MD) consists in carrying out short non-equilibrium MD (neMD) trajectories to generate new configurations that are subsequently accepted or rejected via an MC process. In the simplest case where a deterministic dynamic propagator is used to generate the neMD trajectories, the familiar Metropolis acceptance criterion based on the change in the total energy ΔE, min[1,  exp( − βΔE)], guarantees that the hybrid algorithm will yield the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. However, the functional form of the acceptance probability is more complex when the non-equilibrium switching process is generated via a non-deterministic stochastic dissipative propagator coupled to a heat bath. Here, we clarify the conditions under which the Metropolis criterion remains valid to rigorously yield a proper equilibrium Boltzmann distribution within hybrid neMD-MC algorithm.

  18. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; Yildiz, Bilge

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  19. Non-equilibrium disordered Bose gases: condensation, superfluidity and dynamical Bose glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Liang, Zhaoxin; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    In an equilibrium three-dimensional (3D) disordered condensate, it is well established that disorder can generate an amount of normal fluid ρ n equaling to 4/3 of ρ ex , where ρ ex is a sum of interaction-induced quantum depletion and disorder-induced condensate deformation. The concept that the superfluid is more volatile to the existence of disorder than the condensate is crucial to the understanding of the Bose glass phase. In this work, we show that, by bringing a weakly disordered 3D condensate to non-equilibrium regime via a quantum quench in the interaction, disorder can destroy superfluid significantly more, leading to a steady state of Hamiltonian H f in which the ρ n far exceeds 4/3 of the ρ ex . This suggests the possibility of engineering Bose glass in the dynamic regime. Here, we refer to the dynamical Bose glass as the case where in the steady state of quenched condensate, the superfluid density goes to zero while the condensate density remains finite. As both the ρ n and ρ ex are measurable quantities, our results allow an experimental demonstration of the dramatized interplay between the disorder and interaction in the non-equilibrium scenario.

  20. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis on the Performance of AN Irreversible Thermally Driven Brownian Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tianfu; Chen, Jincan

    Based on the general model of thermally-driven Brownian motors, an equivalent cycle system is established and the Onsager coefficients and efficiency at the maximum power output of the system are analytically calculated from non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is found that the Onsager reciprocity relation holds and the Onsager coefficients are affected by the main irreversibilities existing in practical systems. Only when the heat leak and the kinetic energy change of the particle in the system are negligible, can the determinant of the Onsager matrix vanish. It is also found that in the frame of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the power output and efficiency of an irreversible Brownian motor can be expressed to be the same form as those of an irreversible Carnot heat engine, so the results obtained here are of general significance. Moreover, these results are used to analyze the performance characteristics of a class of thermally-driven Brownian motors so that some important conclusions in literature may be directly derived from the present paper.

  1. Multi-Scale Microstructural Thermoelectric Materials: Transport Behavior, Non-Equilibrium Preparation, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianli; Wei, Ping; Li, Han; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Peng; Su, Chuqi; Xie, Changjun; Zhao, Wenyu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-01-23

    Considering only about one third of the world's energy consumption is effectively utilized for functional uses, and the remaining is dissipated as waste heat, thermoelectric (TE) materials, which offer a direct and clean thermal-to-electric conversion pathway, have generated a tremendous worldwide interest. The last two decades have witnessed a remarkable development in TE materials. This Review summarizes the efforts devoted to the study of non-equilibrium synthesis of TE materials with multi-scale structures, their transport behavior, and areas of applications. Studies that work towards the ultimate goal of developing highly efficient TE materials possessing multi-scale architectures are highlighted, encompassing the optimization of TE performance via engineering the structures with different dimensional aspects spanning from the atomic and molecular scales, to nanometer sizes, and to the mesoscale. In consideration of the practical applications of high-performance TE materials, the non-equilibrium approaches offer a fast and controllable fabrication of multi-scale microstructures, and their scale up to industrial-size manufacturing is emphasized here. Finally, the design of two integrated power generating TE systems are described-a solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid system and a vehicle waste heat harvesting system-that represent perhaps the most important applications of thermoelectricity in the energy conversion area.

  2. Giant THz photoconductivity and possible non-equilibrium superconductivity in metallic K3C60

    PubMed Central

    Mitrano, M.; Cantaluppi, A.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Perucchi, A.; Lupi, S.; Di Pietro, P.; Pontiroli, D.; Riccò, M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    The non-equilibrium control of emergent phenomena in solids is an important research frontier, encompassing effects like the optical enhancement of superconductivity 1 . Recently, nonlinear excitation 2 , 3 of certain phonons in bilayer cuprates was shown to induce superconducting-like optical properties at temperatures far above Tc 4,5,6. This effect was accompanied by the disruption of competing charge-density-wave correlations7,8, which explained some but not all of the experimental results. Here, we report a similar phenomenon in a very different compound. By exciting metallic K3C60 with mid-infrared optical pulses, we induce a large increase in carrier mobility, accompanied by the opening of a gap in the optical conductivity. Strikingly, these same signatures are observed at equilibrium when cooling metallic K3C60 below the superconducting transition temperature (Tc = 20 K). Although optical techniques alone cannot unequivocally identify non-equilibrium high-temperature superconductivity, we propose this scenario as a possible explanation of our results. PMID:26855424

  3. Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Brian C; Smith, Stacey D; Armbruster, W Scott; Harder, Lawrence D; Hardy, Christopher R; Hileman, Lena C; Hufford, Larry; Litt, Amy; Magallón, Susana; Smith, Stephen A; Stevens, Peter F; Fenster, Charles B; Diggle, Pamela K

    2016-05-11

    Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction) and non-equilibrium dynamics on the evolutionary history of angiosperms, a clade well known for the abundance of some trait combinations and the rarity of others. Our analysis reveals that three character states (corolla present, bilateral symmetry, reduced stamen number) act synergistically as a key innovation, doubling diversification rates for lineages in which this combination occurs. However, this combination is currently less common than predicted at equilibrium because the individual characters evolve infrequently. Simulations suggest that angiosperms will remain far from the equilibrium frequencies of character states well into the future. Such non-equilibrium dynamics may be common when major innovations evolve rarely, allowing lineages with ancestral forms to persist, and even outnumber those with diversification-enhancing states, for tens of millions of years.

  4. A non-equilibrium state diagram for liquid/fluid/particle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Velankar, Sachin S

    2015-11-21

    The equilibrium structures of ternary oil/water/surfactant systems are often represented within a triangular composition diagram with various regions of the triangle corresponding to different equilibrium states. We transplant this idea to ternary liquid/fluid/particle systems that are far from equilibrium. Liquid/liquid/particle mixtures or liquid/gas/particle mixtures yield a wide diversity of morphologies including Pickering emulsions, bijels, pendular aggregates, spherical agglomerates, capillary suspensions, liquid marbles, powdered liquids, and particle-stabilized foams. This paper argues that such ternary liquid/fluid/particle mixtures can be unified into a non-equilibrium state diagram. What is common among all these systems is that the morphology results from an interplay between the preferential wettability of the particles, capillarity, and viscous forces encountered during mixing. Therefore all such systems share certain universal features, regardless of the details of the particles or fluids used. These features guide the construction of a non-equilibrium state diagram which takes the form of a triangular prism, where each triangular cross-section of the prism corresponds to a different relative affinity of the particles towards the two fluids. We classify the prism into regions in which the various morphologies appear and also emphasize the major difference between systems in which the particles are fully-wetted by one of the fluids vs. partially-wetted by both fluids. We also discuss how the state diagram may change with mixing intensity or with interparticle attractions.

  5. Path-space variational inference for non-equilibrium coarse-grained systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harmandaris, Vagelis; Katsoulakis, Markos; Plecháč, Petr

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we discuss information-theoretic tools for obtaining optimized coarse-grained molecular models for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular simulations. The latter are ubiquitous in physicochemical and biological applications, where they are typically associated with coupling mechanisms, multi-physics and/or boundary conditions. In general the non-equilibrium steady states are not known explicitly as they do not necessarily have a Gibbs structure. The presented approach can compare microscopic behavior of molecular systems to parametric and non-parametric coarse-grained models using the relative entropy between distributions on the path space and setting up a corresponding path-space variational inference problem. The methods can become entirely data-driven when the microscopic dynamics are replaced with corresponding correlated data in the form of time series. Furthermore, we present connections and generalizations of force matching methods in coarse-graining with path-space information methods. We demonstrate the enhanced transferability of information-based parameterizations to different observables, at a specific thermodynamic point, due to information inequalities. We discuss methodological connections between information-based coarse-graining of molecular systems and variational inference methods primarily developed in the machine learning community. However, we note that the work presented here addresses variational inference for correlated time series due to the focus on dynamics. The applicability of the proposed methods is demonstrated on high-dimensional stochastic processes given by overdamped and driven Langevin dynamics of interacting particles.

  6. Non-equilibrium Steady-State Behavior in a Scale-Free Quantum Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    We describe the nonequilibrium dynamics of a cold atomic gas held in a spatially random optical potential and gravity, subject to a controlled amount of dissipation in the form of an extremely slow dark-state laser cooling process. Reaching local kinetic temperatures below the 100nK scale, such systems provide a novel context for observing the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) behavior of a disordered quantum system. For sufficiently deep potentials and strong dissipation, this system can be modeled by a self-organized version of directed percolation, and exhibits power-law decay of phase-space density with time due to the presence of absorbing clusters with a wide distribution of entropy and coupling rates. In the absence of dissipation, such a model cannot apply, and we observe the crossover to exponential loss of phase-space density. We provide measurements of the power-law decay constant by observing the non-equilibrium motion of atoms over a ten-minute period, consistent with γ = 0 . 31 +/- 0 . 04 , and extract scaling of the absorbed number with dissipation rate, showing another power-law behavior, with exponent 0 . 5 +/- 0 . 2 over two decades of optical excitation probability.

  7. Non-equilibrium colloidal assembly pathways via synergistic dipolar, depletion, and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Anna; Bevan, Michael

    The ability to assemble nano- and micro- colloidal particles into ordered materials and controllable devices provides the basis for emerging technologies. However, current capabilities for manipulating colloidal assembly are limited by the degree of order, time to generate/reconfigure structures, and scalability to large areas. These limitations are due to problems with designing, controlling, and optimizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of colloidal assembly. Our approach is to provide viable non-equilibrium pathways for rapid assembly of defect free colloidal crystals using combinations of magnetic field and depletion mediated assembly. Results include video microscopy experiments and Stokesian Dynamic computer simulations of superparamagnetic colloidal particles experiencing depletion attraction in time varying magnetic fields. Findings show multi-body hydrodynamic interactions and magnetic dipole relaxation mechanisms are essential to capture assembly and annealing of attractive colloidal crystals. With the ability to measure, model and tune colloidal interactions and dynamics, we demonstrate the use of time varying fields to manipulate non-equilibrium pathways for the assembly, disassembly, and repair of colloidal microstructures.

  8. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  9. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  10. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  11. Plasma quenching by air during single-bubble sonoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, David J; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2006-08-03

    We report the observation of sudden and dramatic changes in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) intensity (i.e., radiant power, phi(SL)) and spectral profiles at a critical acoustic pressure (P(c)) for solutions of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) containing mixtures of air and noble gas. Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen (N2), and atomic oxygen emission lines are visible just below P(c). At P(c), very bright (factor of 7000 increase in phi(SL)) and featureless SBSL is observed when Ar is present. In addition, Ar lines are observed from a dimmed bubble that has been driven above P(c). These observations suggest that bright SBSL from H2SO4 is due to a plasma, and that molecular components of air suppress the onset of bright light emission through quenching mechanisms and endothermic processes. Determination of temperatures from simulations of the emission lines shows that air limits the heating during single-bubble cavitation. When He is present, phi(SL) increases by only a factor of 4 at P(c), and the SBSL spectrum is not featureless as for Ar, but instead arises from sulfur oxide (SO) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) bands. These differences are attributed to the high thermal conductivity and ionization potential of He compared to Ar.

  12. Transfer of microwave energy along a filament plasma column in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prade, B.; Houard, A.; Larour, J.; Pellet, M.; Mysyrowicz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of microwave radiation into a plasma channel formed by laser filamentation in air, leading to the amplification by two orders of magnitude of longitudinal oscillations of the plasma. Transfer of this longitudinal excitation toward unexcited region of the plasma column occurs over >10 cm, in good agreement with a theoretical model describing the propagation of a TM wave guided along the surface between air and plasma. We foresee that high-power low-frequency electromagnetic waves injected into a multi-filament plasma could initiate and sustain a long-lived plasma over several meters distance.

  13. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.

    2015-03-01

    With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank-Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m-2. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 °C). Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure), which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different) models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous media. Overall, this non-equilibrium

  14. Perturbative Calculation of Quasi-Potential in Non-equilibrium Diffusions: A Mean-Field Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Gawȩdzki, Krzysztof; Nardini, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    In stochastic systems with weak noise, the logarithm of the stationary distribution becomes proportional to a large deviation rate function called the quasi-potential. The quasi-potential, and its characterization through a variational problem, lies at the core of the Freidlin-Wentzell large deviations theory (Freidlin and Wentzell, Random perturbations of dynamical systems, 2012). In many interacting particle systems, the particle density is described by fluctuating hydrodynamics governed by Macroscopic Fluctuation Theory (Bertini et al., arXiv:1404.6466 , 2014), which formally fits within Freidlin-Wentzell's framework with a weak noise proportional to 1/√{N}, where N is the number of particles. The quasi-potential then appears as a natural generalization of the equilibrium free energy to non-equilibrium particle systems. A key physical and practical issue is to actually compute quasi-potentials from their variational characterization for non-equilibrium systems for which detailed balance does not hold. We discuss how to perform such a computation perturbatively in an external parameter λ , starting from a known quasi-potential for λ =0. In a general setup, explicit iterative formulae for all terms of the power-series expansion of the quasi-potential are given for the first time. The key point is a proof of solvability conditions that assure the existence of the perturbation expansion to all orders. We apply the perturbative approach to diffusive particles interacting through a mean-field potential. For such systems, the variational characterization of the quasi-potential was proven by Dawson and Gartner (Stochastics 20:247-308, 1987; Stochastic differential systems, vol 96, pp 1-10, 1987). Our perturbative analysis provides new explicit results about the quasi-potential and about fluctuations of one-particle observables in a simple example

  15. Computational studies of thermal and quantum phase transitions approached through non-equilibrium quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Wei

    Phase transitions and their associated critical phenomena are of fundamental importance and play a crucial role in the development of statistical physics for both classical and quantum systems. Phase transitions embody diverse aspects of physics and also have numerous applications outside physics, e.g., in chemistry, biology, and combinatorial optimization problems in computer science. Many problems can be reduced to a system consisting of a large number of interacting agents, which under some circumstances (e.g., changes of external parameters) exhibit collective behavior; this type of scenario also underlies phase transitions. The theoretical understanding of equilibrium phase transitions was put on a solid footing with the establishment of the renormalization group. In contrast, non-equilibrium phase transition are relatively less understood and currently a very active research topic. One important milestone here is the Kibble-Zurek (KZ) mechanism, which provides a useful framework for describing a system with a transition point approached through a non-equilibrium quench process. I developed two efficient Monte Carlo techniques for studying phase transitions, one is for classical phase transition and the other is for quantum phase transitions, both are under the framework of KZ scaling. For classical phase transition, I develop a non-equilibrium quench (NEQ) simulation that can completely avoid the critical slowing down problem. For quantum phase transitions, I develop a new algorithm, named quasi-adiabatic quantum Monte Carlo (QAQMC) algorithm for studying quantum quenches. I demonstrate the utility of QAQMC quantum Ising model and obtain high-precision results at the transition point, in particular showing generalized dynamic scaling in the quantum system. To further extend the methods, I study more complex systems such as spin-glasses and random graphs. The techniques allow us to investigate the problems efficiently. From the classical perspective, using the

  16. The Influence of Trapped Ions and Non-equilibrium EDF on Dust Particle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.; Antipov, S. N.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    Dust particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically with the help of model for trapped and free ions coupled with the self-consistent solution of Poisson equation for electric potential. Non-equilibrium (non-Maxwellian) character of electron energy distribution function depending on gas pressure and electric field was also taken into account on the basis of the solution of kinetic Boltzmann equation. The results were compared with the experimental measurements of dust particle charge depending on gas pressure. It was shown that the calculated effective charge, i.e. the difference of the dust particle charge and trapped ion charge, is in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Manipulating energy and spin currents in non-equilibrium systems of interacting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, V.; Livi, R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider a generic interacting chain of qubits, which are coupled at the edges to baths of fixed polarizations. We can determine the non-equilibrium steady states, described by the fixed point of the Lindblad master equation. Under rather general assumptions about local pumping and interactions, symmetries of the reduced density matrix are revealed. The symmetries drastically restrict the form of the steady density matrices in such a way that an exponentially large subset of one-point and many-point correlation functions are found to vanish. As an example we show how in a Heisenberg spin chain a suitable choice of the baths can completely switch off either the spin or the energy current, or both of them, despite the presence of large boundary gradients.

  18. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Yimei; Gan, Hong; Mo, Yifei; Stach, Eric A; Murray, Christopher B; Su, Dong

    2016-05-09

    Spinel transition metal oxides are important electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, whose lithiation undergoes a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential manner. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how their kinetics affects the overall electrochemical response. Here we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite by employing a strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach. This method allows direct, real-time, high-resolution visualization of how lithiation proceeds along specific reaction pathways. We find that the initial intercalation process follows a two-phase reaction sequence, whereas further lithiation leads to the coexistence of three distinct phases within single nanoparticles, which has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. We use phase-field theory to model and describe these non-equilibrium reaction pathways, and to directly correlate the observed phase evolution with the battery's discharge performance.

  19. Non-equilibrium Landauer transport model for Hawking radiation from a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Blencowe, M. P.; Nori, Franco

    2012-03-01

    We propose that the Hawking radiation energy and entropy flow rates from a black hole can be viewed as a one-dimensional (1D), non-equilibrium Landauer transport process. Support for this viewpoint comes from previous calculations invoking conformal symmetry in the near-horizon region, which give radiation rates that are identical to those of a single 1D quantum channel connected to a thermal reservoir at the Hawking temperature. The Landauer approach shows in a direct way the particle statistics independence of the energy and entropy fluxes of a black hole radiating into vacuum, as well as one near thermal equilibrium with its environment. As an application of the Landauer approach, we show that Hawking radiation gives a net entropy production that is 50% larger than that obtained assuming standard 3D emission into vacuum.

  20. Upwind MacCormack Euler solver with non-equilibrium chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherer, Scott E.; Scott, James N.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code, designated UMPIRE, is currently under development to solve the Euler equations in two dimensions with non-equilibrium chemistry. UMPIRE employs an explicit MacCormack algorithm with dissipation introduced via Roe's flux-difference split upwind method. The code also has the capability to employ a point-implicit methodology for flows where stiffness is introduced through the chemical source term. A technique consisting of diagonal sweeps across the computational domain from each corner is presented, which is used to reduce storage and execution requirements. Results depicting one dimensional shock tube flow for both calorically perfect gas and thermally perfect, dissociating nitrogen are presented to verify current capabilities of the program. Also, computational results from a chemical reactor vessel with no fluid dynamic effects are presented to check the chemistry capability and to verify the point implicit strategy.

  1. Accelerated self-replication under non-equilibrium, periodic energy delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2014-01-03

    Self-replication is a remarkable phenomenon in nature that has fascinated scientists for decades. In a self-replicating system, the original units are attracted to a template, which induce their binding. In equilibrium, the energy required to disassemble the newly assembled copy from the mother template is supplied by thermal energy. The possibility of optimizing self-replication was explored by controlling the frequency at which energy is supplied to the system. A model system inspired by a class of light-switchable colloids was considered where light is used to control the interactions. Conditions under which self-replication can be significantly more effective under non-equilibrium, cyclic energy delivery than under equilibrium constant energy conditions were identified. Optimal self-replication does not require constant energy expenditure. Instead, the proper timing at which energy is delivered to the system is an essential controllable parameter to induce high replication rates.

  2. Gaussian-inspired auxiliary non-equilibrium thermostat (GIANT) for Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Khani, Shaghayegh; Maia, Joao

    2015-12-01

    We present in this letter an auxiliary thermostat for non-equilibrium simulations in Dissipative Particle Dynamics based on the Gaussian distribution of particle velocities in the fluid. We demonstrate the ability of the thermostat to maintain the temperature under a wide range of shear rates and dissipative parameters, and to extend the shear rate window accessible by DPD significantly. The effect of proposed method on the viscosity of a DPD fluid is studied which is particularly of interest when the rheological behavior of a complex fluids is subject of DPD simulations. Furthermore, performance of the proposed method is compared to the ones from the well-known Lowe-Andersen scheme in regards to temperature and viscosity measurements.

  3. Manipulating shear-induced non-equilibrium transitions in colloidal films by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Vezirov, Tarlan A; Gerloff, Sascha; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-01-14

    Using Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations we investigate non-equilibrium transitions of sheared colloidal films under controlled shear stress σxz. In our approach the shear rate [small gamma, Greek, dot above] is a dynamical variable, which relaxes on a time scale τc such that the instantaneous, configuration-dependent stress σxz(t) approaches a pre-imposed value. Investigating the dynamics under this "feedback-control" scheme we find unique behavior in regions where the flow curve σxz([small gamma, Greek, dot above]) of the uncontrolled system is monotonic. However, in non-monotonic regions our method allows to select between dynamical states characterized by different in-plane structure and viscosities. Indeed, the final state strongly depends on τc relative to an intrinsic relaxation time of the uncontrolled system. The critical values of τc are estimated on the basis of a simple model.

  4. The voltage limitation for phase coherence experiments: non-equilibrium effects versus Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, H.; Omling, P.; Xu, Hongqi; Lindelof, P. E.

    1996-12-01

    The breaking of phase coherence of electrons by a finite bias voltage is studied in a quasi-one-dimensional electron gas. Although the wire is longer than the energy relaxation length we find that Joule heating in the wire is not important for dephasing of non-equilibrium electrons. Instead, phase breaking occurs by electron-electron interaction due to the excess energy of the injected electrons with respect to the Fermi energy. The relevant limiting parameter for phase coherence is, therefore, the bias voltage, rather than the dissipated power. A model calculation suggests that our results are of general relevance for coherence experiments in one-dimensional geometry on length scales of the same order of magnitude as the energy relaxation length.

  5. On the non-equilibrium dynamics of cavitation around the underwater projectile in variable motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Lu, C. J.; Li, J.; Chen, X.; Gong, Z. X.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the dynamic behavior of the non-equilibrium cavitation occurring around the underwater projectiles navigating with variable speed was numerically and theoretically investigated. The cavity collapse induced by the decelerating motion of the projectiles can be classified into two types: periodic oscillation and damped oscillation. In each type the evolution of the total mass of vapor in cavity are found to have strict correlation with the pressure oscillation in far field. By defining the equivalent radius of cavity, we introduce the specific kinetic energy of collapse and demonstrate that its change-rate is in good agreement with the pressure disturbance. We numerically investigated the influence of angle of attack on the collapse effect. The result shows that when the projectile decelerates, an asymmetric-focusing effect of the pressure induced by collapse occurs on its pressure side. We analytically explained such asymmetric-focusing effect.

  6. The asymmetric simple exclusion process: an integrable model for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinelli, Olivier; Mallick, Kirone

    2006-10-01

    The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) plays the role of a paradigm in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We review exact results for the ASEP obtained by the Bethe ansatz and put emphasis on the algebraic properties of this model. The Bethe equations for the eigenvalues of the Markov matrix of the ASEP are derived from the algebraic Bethe ansatz. Using these equations we explain how to calculate the spectral gap of the model and how global spectral properties such as the existence of multiplets can be predicted. An extension of the Bethe ansatz leads to an analytic expression for the large deviation function of the current in the ASEP that satisfies the Gallavotti-Cohen relation. Finally, we describe some variants of the ASEP that are also solvable by the Bethe ansatz.

  7. Impurity-tuned non-equilibrium phase transition in a bacterial carpet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Teng; Wu, Kuan-Ting; Uchida, Nariya; Woon, Wei-Yen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of impurity on the non-equilibrium phase transition in Vibrio alginolyticus bacterial carpets are investigated through a position-sensitive-diode implemented optical tweezers-microsphere assay. The collective flow increases abruptly as we increase the rotation rate of flagella via Na+ concentration. The effects of impurities on the transition behavior are examined by mixing cells of a wild type strain (VIO5) with cells of a mutant strain (NMB136) in different swimming patterns. For dilute impurities, the transition point is shifted toward higher Na+ concentration. Increasing the impurities' ratio to over 0.25 leads to a significant drop in the collective force, suggesting a partial orientational order with a smaller correlation length.

  8. Entropy-based artificial viscosity stabilization for non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Delchini, Marc O. Ragusa, Jean C. Morel, Jim

    2015-09-01

    The entropy viscosity method is extended to the non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations. The method employs a viscous regularization to stabilize the numerical solution. The artificial viscosity coefficient is modulated by the entropy production and peaks at shock locations. The added dissipative terms are consistent with the entropy minimum principle. A new functional form of the entropy residual, suitable for the Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations, is derived. We demonstrate that the viscous regularization preserves the equilibrium diffusion limit. The equations are discretized with a standard Continuous Galerkin Finite Element Method and a fully implicit temporal integrator within the MOOSE multiphysics framework. The method of manufactured solutions is employed to demonstrate second-order accuracy in both the equilibrium diffusion and streaming limits. Several typical 1-D radiation-hydrodynamic test cases with shocks (from Mach 1.05 to Mach 50) are presented to establish the ability of the technique to capture and resolve shocks.

  9. Non-equilibrium work distributions from fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasarayya Chari, S. Siva; Murthy, K. P. N.

    2012-06-01

    We switch a system from an equilibrium to a non-equilibrium state, by changing the value of a macroscopic control variable as per a specified protocol. The distribution of work performed during the process is obtained for various switching times. The free energy difference (ΔF) is determined from the work fluctuation relation. Some of the work values in the ensemble shall be less than ΔF. We term these as the second law violating switching. We employ fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate a switching experiment on an ideal gas system. Our results show that, the probability of violation of second law increases as the switching time increases and in the reversible limit goes to one-half. We explain this result by invoking Callen-Welton theorem.

  10. Gravity effects on Soret-induced non-equilibrium fluctuations in ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pancorbo, Pablo; Ortiz de Zárate, José M; Bataller, Henri; Croccolo, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the gravity effects on the dynamics of composition fluctuations in a ternary mixture around the non-equilibrium quiescent state induced by thermodiffusion when subjected to a stationary temperature gradient. We found that the autocorrelation matrix of concentration fluctuations can be expressed as the sum of two exponentially decaying concentration modes. Without accounting for confinement, we obtained exact analytical expressions for the two decay rates which, as a consequence of gravity, display a wave-number-dependent mixing. The stability of the quiescent solution is also examined, as a function of the two solutal Rayleigh numbers used to express the decay rates. After having discussed the dynamics of the two concentration modes, we calculate the corresponding amplitudes. Consequences for optical experiments are discussed.

  11. Non-equilibrium tunneling in zigzag graphene nanoribbon break-junction results in spin filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Sharafat Hossain, Md; Al-Dirini, Feras; Evans, Robin; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-02-01

    Spintronic devices promise new faster and lower energy-consumption electronic systems. Graphene, a versatile material and candidate for next generation electronics, is known to possess interesting spintronic properties. In this paper, by utilizing density functional theory and non-equilibrium green function formalism, we show that Fano resonance can be generated by introducing a break junction in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). Using this effect, we propose a new spin filtering device that can be used for spin injection. Our theoretical results indicate that the proposed device could achieve high spin filtering efficiency (over 90%) at practical fabrication geometries. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ZGNR break junction lattice configuration can dramatically affect spin filtering efficiency and thus needs to be considered when fabricating real devices. Our device can be fabricated on top of spin transport channel and provides good integration between spin injection and spin transport.

  12. Thermal Non-equilibrium Revealed by Periodic Pulses of Random Amplitudes in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchère, F.; Froment, C.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.

    2016-08-01

    We recently detected variations in extreme ultraviolet intensity in coronal loops repeating with periods of several hours. Models of loops including stratified and quasi-steady heating predict the development of a state of thermal non-equilibrium (TNE): cycles of evaporative upflows at the footpoints followed by falling condensations at the apex. Based on Fourier and wavelet analysis, we demonstrate that the observed periodic signals are indeed not signatures of vibrational modes. Instead, superimposed on the power law expected from the stochastic background emission, the power spectra of the time series exhibit the discrete harmonics and continua expected from periodic trains of pulses of random amplitudes. These characteristics reinforce our earlier interpretation of these pulsations as being aborted TNE cycles.

  13. Chemical Cycle Kinetics: Removing the Limitation of Linearity of a Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.; Kjelstrup, S.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical cycle kinetics is customarily analyzed by means of the law of mass action which describes how the concentrations of the substances vary with time. The connection of this approach with non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) has traditionally been restricted to the linear domain close to equilibrium in which the reaction rates are linear functions of the affinities. We show, by a pertinent formulation of the concept of local equilibrium in the mesoscopic description along the reaction coordinates, that the connection between kinetic and thermodynamic approaches is deeper than thought and holds in the nonlinear domain far from equilibrium, for higher values of the affinity. This new perspective indicates how to overcome the inherent limitation of classical NET in treating cyclic reactions, providing a description of closed and open cycles operating far from equilibrium, in accordance with thermodynamic principles. We propose that the new set of equations are tested and used for data reduction in chemical reaction kinetics.

  14. Photon number statistics uncover the fluctuations in non-equilibrium lattice dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Martina; Titimbo, Kelvin; Zimmermann, Klaus; Giusti, Francesca; Randi, Francesco; Boschetto, Davide; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Floreanini, Roberto; Benatti, Fabio; Fausti, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Fluctuations of the atomic positions are at the core of a large class of unusual material properties ranging from quantum para-electricity to high temperature superconductivity. Their measurement in solids is the subject of an intense scientific debate focused on seeking a methodology capable of establishing a direct link between the variance of the atomic displacements and experimentally measurable observables. Here we address this issue by means of non-equilibrium optical experiments performed in shot-noise-limited regime. The variance of the time-dependent atomic positions and momenta is directly mapped into the quantum fluctuations of the photon number of the scattered probing light. A fully quantum description of the non-linear interaction between photonic and phononic fields is benchmarked by unveiling the squeezing of thermal phonons in α-quartz. PMID:26690958

  15. Non-equilibrium tunneling in zigzag graphene nanoribbon break-junction results in spin filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Liming; Qiu, Wanzhi; Sharafat Hossain, Md; Al-Dirini, Feras; Skafidas, Efstratios; Evans, Robin

    2016-02-07

    Spintronic devices promise new faster and lower energy-consumption electronic systems. Graphene, a versatile material and candidate for next generation electronics, is known to possess interesting spintronic properties. In this paper, by utilizing density functional theory and non-equilibrium green function formalism, we show that Fano resonance can be generated by introducing a break junction in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR). Using this effect, we propose a new spin filtering device that can be used for spin injection. Our theoretical results indicate that the proposed device could achieve high spin filtering efficiency (over 90%) at practical fabrication geometries. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ZGNR break junction lattice configuration can dramatically affect spin filtering efficiency and thus needs to be considered when fabricating real devices. Our device can be fabricated on top of spin transport channel and provides good integration between spin injection and spin transport.

  16. Entropy analysis on non-equilibrium two-phase flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Karwat, H.; Ruan, Y.Q.

    1995-09-01

    A method of entropy analysis according to the second law of thermodynamics is proposed for the assessment of a class of practical non-equilibrium two-phase flow models. Entropy conditions are derived directly from a local instantaneous formulation for an arbitrary control volume of a structural two-phase fluid, which are finally expressed in terms of the averaged thermodynamic independent variables and their time derivatives as well as the boundary conditions for the volume. On the basis of a widely used thermal-hydraulic system code it is demonstrated with practical examples that entropy production rates in control volumes can be numerically quantified by using the data from the output data files. Entropy analysis using the proposed method is useful in identifying some potential problems in two-phase flow models and predictions as well as in studying the effects of some free parameters in closure relationships.

  17. A non-equilibrium thermodynamics model of multicomponent mass and heat transport in pervaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaluenga, Juan P. G.; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2012-12-01

    The framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) is used to derive heat and mass transport equations for pervaporation of a binary mixture in a membrane. In this study, the assumption of equilibrium of the sorbed phase in the membrane and the adjacent phases at the feed and permeate sides of the membrane is abandoned, defining the interface properties using local equilibrium. The transport equations have been used to model the pervaporation of a water-ethanol mixture, which is typically encountered in the dehydration of organics. The water and ethanol activities and temperature profiles are calculated taking mass and heat coupling effects and surfaces into account. The NET approach is deemed good because the temperature results provided by the model are comparable to experimental results available for water-alcohol systems.

  18. Collective Flocking Dynamics: Long Rang Order in a Non-Equilibrium 2D XY Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    1996-03-01

    We propose and study a non-equilibrium continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large groups of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, slime molds, schools of fishs, etc.) (J. Toner and Y. Tu, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 75(23), 4326(1995) Our model becomes highly non-trivial, and different from the equilibrium model, for d

  19. Non-equilibrium Green's functions method: Non-trivial and disordered leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Wang, Yu; Klimeck, Gerhard; Kubis, Tillmann

    2014-11-01

    The non-equilibrium Green's function algorithm requires contact self-energies to model charge injection and extraction. All existing approaches assume infinitely periodic leads attached to a possibly quite complex device. This contradicts today's realistic devices in which contacts are spatially inhomogeneous, chemically disordered, and impacting the overall device characteristics. This work extends the complex absorbing potentials method for arbitrary, ideal, or non-ideal leads in atomistic tight binding representation. The algorithm is demonstrated on a Si nanowire with periodic leads, a graphene nanoribbon with trumpet shape leads, and devices with leads of randomly alloyed Si0.5Ge0.5. It is found that alloy randomness in the leads can reduce the predicted ON-state current of Si0.5Ge0.5 transistors by 45% compared to conventional lead methods.

  20. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of spall in single crystal tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Eric N.; Germann, Timothy C.; Ravelo, Ramon J.; Hammerberg, James E.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Ductile tensile failure of tantalum is examined through large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Several loading schemes including flyer plate impact, decaying shock loading via a frozen piston, and quasi-isentropic (constant strain-rate) expansion are employed to span tensile strain-rates of 108 to 1014 per second. Single crystals of <001> orientation are specifically evaluated to eliminate grain boundary effects. Heterogeneous void nucleation occurs principally at the intersection of deformation twins in single crystals. At high strain rates, multiple spall events occur throughout the material and voids continue to nucleate until relaxation waves arrive from adjacent events. At ultra-high strain rates, those approaching or exceeding the atomic vibrational frequency, spall strength saturates near the maximum theoretical spall strength.

  1. Noise analysis of coaxial Schottky barrier carbon nanotube fets using non equilibrium Green's function formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassaninia, Iman; Ghayour, Rahim; Abiri, Habib; Sheikhi, Mohammad

    2009-12-01

    The effect of noise on the performance of Schottky Barrier Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors (SB-CNTFETs) has been investigated under various bias conditions. In order to calculate the noise power spectral density, the Non-Equilibrium Green's Function formalism (NEGF) is used to obtain the transmission coefficient and the number of carriers inside the channel. Results are presented in two sections: In the first section the Hooge's empirical rule is used to investigate the flicker noise properties of SB-CNTFETs with defects in the gate oxide region, while in the second section the thermal and shot noise properties of SB-CNTFETs are studied. Finally, the best bias points in the ON and OFF states have been suggested according to the total noise power spectral density and the device signal to noise ratio.

  2. Non-equilibrium simulation of CH4 production through the depressurization method from gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Khadijeh; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) in nature are formed from various hydrate formers (i.e. aqueous, gas, and adsorbed phases). As a result, due to Gibbs phase rule and the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics CH4-hydrate cannot reach thermodynamic equilibrium in real reservoir conditions. CH4 is the dominant component in NGH reservoirs. It is formed as a result of biogenic degradation of biological material in the upper few hundred meters of subsurface. It has been estimated that the amount of fuel-gas reserve in NGHs exceed the total amount of fossil fuel explored until today. Thus, these reservoirs have the potential to satisfy the energy requirements of the future. However, released CH4 from dissociated NGHs could find its way to the atmosphere and it is a far more aggressive greenhouse gas than CO2, even though its life-time is shorter. Lack of reliable field data makes it difficult to predict the production potential, as well as safety of CH4 production from NGHs. Computer simulations can be used as a tool to investigate CH4 production through different scenarios. Most hydrate simulators within academia and industry treat hydrate phase transitions as an equilibrium process and those which employ the kinetic approach utilize simple laboratory data in their models. Furthermore, it is typical to utilize a limited thermodynamic description where only temperature and pressure projections are considered. Another widely used simplification is to assume only a single route for the hydrate phase transitions. The non-equilibrium nature of hydrate indicates a need for proper kinetic models to describe hydrate dissociation and reformation in the reservoir with respect to thermodynamics variables, CH4 mole-fraction, pressure and temperature. The RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) hydrate simulator has previously been extended to model CH4-hydrate dissociation towards CH4 gas and water. CH4-hydrate is added to the RCB data-base as a pseudo mineral. Phase transitions are treated

  3. Approximate solutions for half-dark solitons in spinor non-equilibrium Polariton condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, Florian

    2015-11-15

    In this work I generalize and apply an analytical approximation to analyze 1D states of non-equilibrium spinor polariton Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC). Solutions for the condensate wave functions carrying black solitons and half-dark solitons are presented. The derivation is based on the non-conservative Lagrangian formalism for complex Ginzburg–Landau type equations (cGLE), which provides ordinary differential equations for the parameters of the dark soliton solutions in their dynamic environment. Explicit expressions for the stationary dark soliton solution are stated. Subsequently the method is extended to spin sensitive polariton condensates, which yields ordinary differential equations for the parameters of half-dark solitons. Finally a stationary case with explicit expressions for half-dark solitons is presented.

  4. Non-equilibrium 8π Josephson effect in atomic Kitaev wires

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, C.; Budich, J. C.; Zoller, P.; Dalmonte, M.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of fractionalized excitations, such as Majorana quasi-particles, would be a striking signal of the realization of exotic quantum states of matter. While the paramount demonstration of such excitations would be a probe of their non-Abelian statistics via controlled braiding operations, alternative proposals exist that may be easier to access experimentally. Here we identify a signature of Majorana quasi-particles, qualitatively different from the behaviour of a conventional superconductor, which can be detected in cold atom systems using alkaline-earth-like atoms. The system studied is a Kitaev wire interrupted by an extra site, which gives rise to super-exchange coupling between two Majorana-bound states. We show that this system hosts a tunable, non-equilibrium Josephson effect with a characteristic 8π periodicity of the Josephson current. The visibility of the 8π periodicity of the Josephson current is then studied including the effects of dephasing and particle losses. PMID:27481540

  5. Damage of Honeybee Colonies and Non-Equilibrium Percolation Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peipei; Su, Beibei; He, Da-Ren

    Recently the mechanism of the damage caused by invasion of Apis mellifera capensis honeybee into the normal A. M. Scutellata colonies became interesting for scientists due to the fact that the mechanism may resemble those of cancer vicious hyperplasia, spreading of some epidemic, and turbulence of society induced by some bad society groups. We suggest a new guess that losing control of self-reproduction disturbs and throws information structure of the society into confuse. We simulate the damage process with a cellular automata based on the guess. The simulation shows that the process is equivalent to a non-equilibrium percolation phase transition. This discussion remind us that the management and monitor on the information network between society members may be a more effective way for avoiding the overflow of the destructor sub-colonies.

  6. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics simultaneously operate in the Galápagos islands.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Phillimore, Albert B; Etienne, Rampal S

    2015-08-01

    Island biotas emerge from the interplay between colonisation, speciation and extinction and are often the scene of spectacular adaptive radiations. A common assumption is that insular diversity is at a dynamic equilibrium, but for remote islands, such as Hawaii or Galápagos, this idea remains untested. Here, we reconstruct the temporal accumulation of terrestrial bird species of the Galápagos using a novel phylogenetic method that estimates rates of biota assembly for an entire community. We show that species richness on the archipelago is in an ascending phase and does not tend towards equilibrium. The majority of the avifauna diversifies at a slow rate, without detectable ecological limits. However, Darwin's finches form an exception: they rapidly reach a carrying capacity and subsequently follow a coalescent-like diversification process. Together, these results suggest that avian diversity of remote islands is rising, and challenge the mutual exclusivity of the non-equilibrium and equilibrium ecological paradigms.

  7. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-09-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes.

  8. An alternative order-parameter for non-equilibrium generalized spin models on honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Francisco; Henkel, Malte

    2016-04-01

    An alternative definition for the order-parameter is proposed, for a family of non-equilibrium spin models with up-down symmetry on honeycomb lattices, and which depends on two parameters. In contrast to the usual definition, our proposal takes into account that each site of the lattice can be associated with a local temperature which depends on the local environment of each site. Using the generalised voter motel as a test case, we analyse the phase diagram and the critical exponents in the stationary state and compare the results of the standard order-parameter with the ones following from our new proposal, on the honeycomb lattice. The stationary phase transition is in the Ising universality class. Finite-size corrections are also studied and the Wegner exponent is estimated as ω =1.06(9).

  9. Non-equilibrium physics and evolution—adaptation, extinction, and ecology: a Key Issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussell, E.; Vucelja, M.

    2014-10-01

    Evolutionary dynamics in nature constitute an immensely complex non-equilibrium process. We review the application of physical models of evolution, by focusing on adaptation, extinction, and ecology. In each case, we examine key concepts by working through examples. Adaptation is discussed in the context of bacterial evolution, with a view toward the relationship between growth rates, mutation rates, selection strength, and environmental changes. Extinction dynamics for an isolated population are reviewed, with emphasis on the relation between timescales of extinction, population size, and temporally correlated noise. Ecological models are discussed by focusing on the effect of spatial interspecies interactions on diversity. Connections between physical processes—such as diffusion, turbulence, and localization—and evolutionary phenomena are highlighted.

  10. Air Plasma Kinetics Under the Influence of Sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated to an impulsive (t = 5 ms) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer going through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63 km, 68 km and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2, and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated to a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid- latitude regions (+ 38°), and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O3- at 68 km and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO4- at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOX predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase in about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost three

  11. Air plasma kinetics under the influence of sprites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated with an impulsive (τ = 5 µs) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer passing through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63, 68 and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2 and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated with a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid-latitude regions (+38°N) and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O_{3}^{-} at 68 and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO_{4}^{-} at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOx predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase by about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost

  12. Eliminating the Cuspidal Temperature Profile of a Non-equilibrium Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, Michael M.; M. Morgado, Welles A.; Duarte Queirós, Sílvio M.

    2017-03-01

    In 1967, Z. Rieder, J. L. Lebowitz, and E. Lieb (RLL) introduced a model of heat conduction on a crystal that became a milestone problem of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Along with its inability to reproduce Fourier's law—which subsequent generalizations have been trying to amend—the RLL model is also characterized by awkward cusps at the ends of the non-equilibrium chain, an effect that has endured all these years without a satisfactory answer. In this paper, we first show that such trait stems from the insufficiency of pinning interactions between the chain and the substrate. Assuming the possibility of pinning the chain, the analysis of the temperature profile in the space of parameters reveals that for a proper combination of the border and bulk pinning values, the temperature profile may shift twice between the RLL cuspidal behavior and the expected monotonic local temperature evolution along the system, as a function of the pinning. At those inversions, the temperature profile along the chain is characterized by perfect plateaux: at the first threshold, the cumulants of the heat flux reach their maxima and the vanishing of the two-point velocity correlation function for all sites of the chain so that the system behaves similarly to a "phonon box." On the other hand, at the second change of the temperature profile, we still have the vanishing of the two-point correlation function but only for the bulk, which explains the emergence of the temperature plateau and thwarts the reaching of the maximal values of the cumulants of the heat flux.

  13. Non-equilibrium atomic condensates and mixtures: collective modes, condensate growth and thermalisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loon Lee, Kean; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2016-11-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of trapped ultracold atomic gases, or mixtures thereof, is an extremely rich subject. Despite 20 years of studies, and remarkable progress mainly on the experimental front, numerous open question remain, related to the growth, relaxation and thermalisation of such systems, and there is still no universally accepted theory for their theoretical description. In this paper we discuss one of the state-of-the-art kinetic approaches, which gives an intuitive picture of the physical processes happening at the microscopic scale, being broadly applicable both below and above the critical region (but not within the critical region itself, where fluctuations become dominant and symmetry breaking takes place). Specifically, the ‘Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin’ (ZNG) scheme provides a self-consistent description of the coupling between the condensate and the thermal atoms, including the collisions between these two subsystems. It has been successfully tested against experiments in various settings, including investigation of collective modes (e.g. monopole, dipole and quadrupole modes), dissipation of topological excitations (solitons and vortices) as well as surface evaporative cooling. Here, we show that the ZNG model can capture two important aspects of non-equilibrium dynamics for both single-component and two-component BECs: the Kohn mode (the undamped dipole oscillation independent of interactions and temperature) and (re)thermalisation leading to condensate growth following sudden evaporation. Our simulations, performed in a spherically symmetric trap reveal (i) an interesting two-stage dynamics and the emergence of a prominent monopole mode in the evaporative cooling of a single-component Bose gas, and (ii) the long thermalisation time associated with the sympathetic cooling of a realistic two-component mixture. Related open questions arise about the mechanisms and the nature of thermalisation in such systems, where further controlled

  14. Microscopic Simulation and Macroscopic Modeling for Thermal and Chemical Non-Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Vinokur, Marcel; Clarke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the accurate microscopic simulation and macroscopic modeling of extreme non-equilibrium phenomena, such as encountered during hypersonic entry into a planetary atmosphere. The state-to-state microscopic equations involving internal excitation, de-excitation, dissociation, and recombination of nitrogen molecules due to collisions with nitrogen atoms are solved time-accurately. Strategies to increase the numerical efficiency are discussed. The problem is then modeled using a few macroscopic variables. The model is based on reconstructions of the state distribution function using the maximum entropy principle. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe the non-equilibrium gases. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients. The modeling is completely physics-based, and its accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used. The model makes no assumption at the microscopic level, and all possible collisional and radiative processes are allowed. The model is applicable to both atoms and molecules and their ions. Several limiting cases are presented to show that the model recovers the classical twotemperature models if all states are in one group and the model reduces to the microscopic equations if each group contains only one state. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out for both the uniform and linear distributions. Results show that the original over nine thousand microscopic equations can be reduced to 2 macroscopic equations using 1 to 5 groups with excellent agreement. The computer time is decreased from 18 hours to less than 1 second.

  15. Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich-Von Neumann-Doring Theory and Reactive Flow Modeling of Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M; Forbes, J W; Urtiew, P A

    2002-05-02

    This paper discusses the Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich - von Neumann - Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation waves and the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model of shock initiation and detonation wave propagation in solid explosives. The NEZND theory identified the non-equilibrium excitation processes that precede and follow the exothermic decomposition of a large high explosive molecule into several small reaction product molecules. The thermal energy deposited by the leading shock wave must be distributed to the vibrational modes of the explosive molecule before chemical reactions can occur. The induction time for the onset of the initial endothermic reactions can be calculated using high pressure, high temperature transition state theory. Since the chemical energy is released well behind the leading shock front of a detonation wave, a physical mechanism is required for this chemical energy to reinforce the leading shock front and maintain its overall constant velocity. This mechanism is the amplification of pressure wavelets in the reaction zone by the process of de-excitation of the initially highly vibrationally excited reaction product molecules. This process leads to the development of the three-dimensional structure of detonation waves observed for all explosives. For practical predictions of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic codes, phenomenological reactive flow models have been developed. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model of shock initiation and detonation in solid explosives has been very successful in describing the overall flow measured by embedded gauges and laser interferometry. This reactive flow model uses pressure and compression dependent reaction rates, because time resolved experimental temperature data is not yet available. Since all chemical reaction rates are ultimately controlled by temperature, the next generation of reactive flow models will use temperature dependent reaction rates. Progress on a

  16. Optical tweezers manipulation of colloids and biopolymers: non-equilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. M.; Sevick, E. M.

    2008-08-01

    The Fluctuation Theorems (FTs) of Evans & Searles and of Crooks are fundamental theorems of modern thermodynamics that have been suggested to be of practical use to scientists and engineers. Non-equilibrium processes with energy fluctuations on the order of thermal energy, κBT, are described by the FTs; examples include the stretching of a DNA molecule, the localisation of a colloidal particle in an optical trap of changing strength, and translation of an optically trapped colloidal particle. If the path or process is traversed over long times or the system is sufficiently large that it can be considered in the classical, thermodynamic limit, then, in principle, there is only one value of the energy characterising the path. However, for small systems, there exists a distribution of energy values and this distribution is associated with non-equilibrium fluctuations of the system that do not average out over short time. The FT of Evans & Searles, as well as the FT of Crooks (from which the Jarzynski relation is derived), describe the symmetry of this energy distribution about zero. This distribution is inherent to the dynamics of small systems, such as nano-machines and single molecular motors. In this paper we present the FTs in a single unified language, considering that the work done on the system is either purely dissipative, achieves a change in thermodynamic state of the system, or a combination of these. We demonstrate this with a single colloidal particle in an optical trap and a single DNA molecule stretched in an OT experiment.

  17. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  18. Unfolding single RNA molecules: bridging the gap between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    During the last 15 years, scientists have developed methods that permit the direct mechanical manipulation of individual molecules. Using this approach, they have begun to investigate the effect of force and torque in chemical and biochemical reactions. These studies span from the study of the mechanical properties of macromolecules, to the characterization of molecular motors, to the mechanical unfolding of individual proteins and RNA. Here I present a review of some of our most recent results using mechanical force to unfold individual molecules of RNA. These studies make it possible to follow in real time the trajectory of each molecule as it unfolds and characterize the various intermediates of the reaction. Moreover, if the process takes place reversibly it is possible to extract both kinetic and thermodynamic information from these experiments at the same time that we characterize the forces that maintain the three-dimensional structure of the molecule in solution. These studies bring us closer to the biological unfolding processes in the cell as they simulate in vitro, the mechanical unfolding of RNAs carried out in the cell by helicases. If the unfolding process occurs irreversibly, I show here that single-molecule experiments can still provide equilibrium, thermodynamic information from non-equilibrium data by using recently discovered fluctuation theorems. Such theorems represent a bridge between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In fact, first derived in 1997, the first experimental demonstration of the validity of fluctuation theorems was obtained by unfolding mechanically a single molecule of RNA. It is perhaps a sign of the times that important physical results are these days used to extract information about biological systems and that biological systems are being used to test and confirm fundamental new laws in physics.

  19. Markov state models from short non-equilibrium simulations—Analysis and correction of estimation bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüske, Feliks; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Wehmeyer, Christoph; Clementi, Cecilia; Noé, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Many state-of-the-art methods for the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of large and complex biomolecular systems by simulation rely on ensemble approaches, where data from large numbers of relatively short trajectories are integrated. In this context, Markov state models (MSMs) are extremely popular because they can be used to compute stationary quantities and long-time kinetics from ensembles of short simulations, provided that these short simulations are in "local equilibrium" within the MSM states. However, over the last 15 years since the inception of MSMs, it has been controversially discussed and not yet been answered how deviations from local equilibrium can be detected, whether these deviations induce a practical bias in MSM estimation, and how to correct for them. In this paper, we address these issues: We systematically analyze the estimation of MSMs from short non-equilibrium simulations, and we provide an expression for the error between unbiased transition probabilities and the expected estimate from many short simulations. We show that the unbiased MSM estimate can be obtained even from relatively short non-equilibrium simulations in the limit of long lag times and good discretization. Further, we exploit observable operator model (OOM) theory to derive an unbiased estimator for the MSM transition matrix that corrects for the effect of starting out of equilibrium, even when short lag times are used. Finally, we show how the OOM framework can be used to estimate the exact eigenvalues or relaxation time scales of the system without estimating an MSM transition matrix, which allows us to practically assess the discretization quality of the MSM. Applications to model systems and molecular dynamics simulation data of alanine dipeptide are included for illustration. The improved MSM estimator is implemented in PyEMMA of version 2.3.

  20. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  1. Common versus noble Bacillus subtilis differentially responds to air and argon gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Winter, Theresa; Bernhardt, Jörg; Winter, Jörn; Mäder, Ulrike; Schlüter, Rabea; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Hecker, Michael; Kusch, Harald

    2013-09-01

    The applications of low-temperature plasma are not only confined to decontamination and sterilization but are also found in the medical field in terms of wound and skin treatment. For the improvement of already established and also for new plasma techniques, in-depth knowledge on the interactions between plasma and microorganism is essential. In an initial study, the interaction between growing Bacillus subtilis and argon plasma was investigated by using a growth chamber system suitable for low-temperature gas plasma treatment of bacteria in liquid medium. In this follow-up investigation, a second kind of plasma treatment-namely air plasma-was applied. With combined proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, we were able to investigate the plasma-specific stress response of B. subtilis toward not only argon but also air plasma. Besides an overlap of cellular responses due to both argon and air plasma treatment (DNA damage and oxidative stress), a variety of gas-dependent cellular responses such as growth retardation and morphological changes were observed. Only argon plasma treatments lead to a phosphate starvation response whereas air plasma induced the tryptophan operon implying damage by photooxidation. Biological findings were supported by the detection of reactive plasma species by optical emission spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Hořava–Lifshitz early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Khodadi, M. Sepangi, H.R.

    2014-07-15

    We study the phase transition from quark–gluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about 1–10 μs old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Hořava–Lifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker universe filled with a non-causal and a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Hořava–Lifshitz gravity, λ, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature T, scale factor a, deceleration parameter q and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density (ξ)/s . We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively. -- Highlights: •In this paper we have studied quark–hadron phase transition in the early universe in the context of the Hořava–Lifshitz model. •We use a flat FRW universe with the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeying the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the Israel–Stewart fluid, respectively.

  3. The Effect of Air Plasma on Sterilization of Escherichia coli in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Guo, Yun

    2012-08-01

    In this work, a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) air plasma was used to sterilize Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the surface of medical Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) film. The leakage of cellular DNA and protein by optical absorbance measurement at 260 nm and 280 nm, together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) about cell morphology were performed after sterilization to analyse inactivation mechanisms. The results indicated that the DBD air plasma was very effective in E. coli sterilization. The plasma germicidal efficiency depended on the plasma treatment time, the air-gap distance, and the applied voltage. Within 5 min of plasma treatment, the germicidal efficiency against E. coli could reach 99.99%. An etching action on cell membranes by electrons, ions and radicals is the primary mechanism for DBD air plasma sterilization, which leads to the effusion of cellular contents (DNA and protein) and bacterial death.

  4. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; ...

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  5. Direct measurement of the Einstein relation in a macroscopic, non-equilibrium system of chaotic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Kyle; Liebman-Pelaez, Alexander; Corwin, Eric

    Equilibrium statistical mechanics is traditionally limited to thermal systems. Can it be applied to athermal, non-equilibrium systems that nonetheless satisfy the basic criteria of steady-state chaos and isotropy? We answer this question using a macroscopic system of chaotic surface waves which is, by all measures, non-equilibrium. The waves are generated in a dish of water that is vertically oscillated above a critical amplitude. We have constructed a rheometer that actively measures the drag imparted by the waves on a buoyant particle, a quantity entirely divorced in origin from the drag imparted by the fluid in which the particle floats. We also perform a separate, passive measurement, extracting a diffusion constant and effective temperature. Having directly measured all three properties (temperature, diffusion constant, and drag coefficient) we go on to show that our macroscopic, non-equilibrium case is wholly consistent with the Einstein relation, a classic result for equilibrium thermal systems.

  6. The effects of metallicity, UV radiation and non-equilibrium chemistry in high-resolution simulations of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richings, A. J.; Schaye, Joop

    2016-05-01

    We present a series of hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies with stellar mass of 109 M⊙. The models use a resolution of 750 M⊙ per particle and include a treatment for the full non-equilibrium chemical evolution of ions and molecules (157 species in total), along with gas cooling rates computed self-consistently using the non-equilibrium abundances. We compare these to simulations evolved using cooling rates calculated assuming chemical (including ionization) equilibrium, and we consider a wide range of metallicities and UV radiation fields, including a local prescription for self-shielding by gas and dust. We find higher star formation rates and stronger outflows at higher metallicity and for weaker radiation fields, as gas can more easily cool to a cold (few hundred Kelvin) star-forming phase under such conditions. Contrary to variations in the metallicity and the radiation field, non-equilibrium chemistry generally has no strong effect on the total star formation rates or outflow properties. However, it is important for modelling molecular outflows. For example, the mass of H2 outflowing with velocities {>}50 {km} {s}^{-1} is enhanced by a factor ˜20 in non-equilibrium. We also compute the observable line emission from C II and CO. Both are stronger at higher metallicity, while C II and CO emission are higher for stronger and weaker radiation fields, respectively. We find that C II is generally unaffected by non-equilibrium chemistry. However, emission from CO varies by a factor of ˜2-4. This has implications for the mean XCO conversion factor between CO emission and H2 column density, which we find is lowered by up to a factor ˜2.3 in non-equilibrium, and for the fraction of CO-dark molecular gas.

  7. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  8. Scaled-Up Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas Generated by DC and Pulsed Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-08

    scalability of nonequilibrium plasmas produced by electrical discharges in atmospheric pressure air. Both DC and repetitively pulsed discharges ...Key results demonstrate that both DC glow discharge and pulsed transient spark generate air plasmas of required parameters. Glow discharge is easier...Corona discharge as a temperature probe was developed to diagnose the microwave torch preheated air. A new concept of the DC-driven pulsed

  9. Plasma Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels in Non-Thermal Plasma-Liquid Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    and advantageous of non- equilibrium chemically reacting plasmas. The main ideas are related to possibilities of cost-effective non-thermal plasma...properties of non- equilibrium plasma in heterogeneous gas-liquid systems; characteristics of plasma reforming of ethanol-water mixtures in plasma...thermodynamically equilibrium , has characteristics of high ionization by higher energetic density. This has merits of good rate of fuel decomposition but demerits

  10. Non-linear quantum-classical scheme to simulate non-equilibrium strongly correlated fermionic many-body dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kreula, J. M.; Clark, S. R.; Jaksch, D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-linear, hybrid quantum-classical scheme for simulating non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated fermions described by the Hubbard model in a Bethe lattice in the thermodynamic limit. Our scheme implements non-equilibrium dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and uses a digital quantum simulator to solve a quantum impurity problem whose parameters are iterated to self-consistency via a classically computed feedback loop where quantum gate errors can be partly accounted for. We analyse the performance of the scheme in an example case. PMID:27609673

  11. PREFACE: Fourh Workshop on Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Supercooled Fluids, Glasses and Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, Laura; Giordano, Marco; Leporini, Dino; Tosi, Mario

    2007-04-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents the Proceedings of the Fourh Workshop on Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Supercooled Fluids, Glasses and Amorphous Materials, held in Pisa from 17-22 September 2006. This was the fourth of a series of workshops on this theme started in 1995 as a joint initiative of the Università di Pisa and the Scuola Normale Superiore. The 2006 edition was attended by about 200 participants from Europe, Asia and the Americas. As for the earlier workshops, the main objective was to bring together scientists from different areas of science, technology and engineering, to comparatively discuss experimental facts and theoretical predictions on the dynamical processes that occur in supercooled fluids and other disordered materials in non-equilibrium states. The underlying conceptual unity of the field provides a common background for the scientific community working in its various areas. In this edition the number of sessions was increased to cover a wider range of topics of general and current interest, in a larger number of stimulating lectures. The core of the workshop was a set of general lectures followed by more specific presentations on current issues in the main areas of the field. The sessions were in sequence devoted to: non-equilibrium dynamics, aging and secondary relaxations, biomaterials, polyamorphism and water, polymer dynamics I, complex systems, pressure-temperature scaling, thin films, nanometre length-scale studies, folded states of proteins and polymer crystals, theoretical aspects and energy landscape approaches, relaxation and heterogeneous dynamics, rheology in fluids and entangled polymers, biopolymers, and polymer dynamics II. We thank the session chairmen and all speakers for the high quality of their contributions. The structure of this issue of the proceedings follows the sequence of the oral presentations in the workshop, complemented by some papers selected from the poster sessions. Two

  12. Modification of polysulfone porous hollow fiber membranes by air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. V.; Ibragimov, R. G.; Abdullin, I. Sh; Gallyamov, R. T.; Ovcharova, A. A.; Bildyukevich, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Air plasma treatment was used to enhance the surface hydrophilic properties of the polysulfone porous hollow fiber membranes prepared via a dry-wet phase invertion technique in the free spinning mode in air. Membranes prepared had porous asymmetric structure with macroporous support on the shell side and fine-porous selective layer on the lumen side. The wettability of the inner membrane surfaces were checked by contact angle measurements and FTIR was used to compare the surfaces before and after plasma treatment. Membrane morphology was examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Contact angle measurements confirm that air plasma treatment affords improvement in the wettability of polysulfone membranes and FTIR results show that air plasmas chemically modify the lumen side membrane surface, however, there is no significant change in membranes chemical structure after modification. CSLM data obtained, as well as gas permeability (He and CO2) measurements show that after plasma treatment pore etching occurs.

  13. Air plasma processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) micro-beads: Surface characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaozong; Cui, Nai-Yi; Osbeck, Susan; Liang, He

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the surface processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) micro-beads by using a rotary air plasma reactor, and its effects on surface properties. The surface properties, including surface wettability, surface chemistry and textures of the PMMA beads, were characterised. It was observed that the air plasma processing can improve the surface wettability of the PMMA microbeads significantly. A 15 min plasma processing can reduce the surface water contact angle of PMMA beads to about 50° from its original value of 80.3°. This was accompanied by about 8% increase in surface oxygen concentration as confirmed by XPS analysis. The optical profilometry examination revealed the air plasma processing resulted in a rougher surface that has a “delicate” surface texture. It is concluded that the surface chemistry and texture, induced by air plasma processing, co-contributed to the surface wettability improvement of PMMA micro-beads.

  14. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  15. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2 mm in thickness.

  16. The lagRST Model: A Turbulence Model for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Olsen, Michael E.; Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new class of turbulence model designed for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows with separation. The model addresses deficiencies seen in the modeling of nonequilibrium turbulent flows. These flows generally have variable adverse pressure gradients which cause the turbulent quantities to react at a finite rate to changes in the mean flow quantities. This "lag" in the response of the turbulent quantities can t be modeled by most standard turbulence models, which are designed to model equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. The model presented uses a standard 2-equation model as the baseline for turbulent equilibrium calculations, but adds transport equations to account directly for non-equilibrium effects in the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) that are seen in large pressure gradients involving shock waves and separation. Comparisons are made to several standard turbulence modeling validation cases, including an incompressible boundary layer (both neutral and adverse pressure gradients), an incompressible mixing layer and a transonic bump flow. In addition, a hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with separation is assessed along with a transonic capsule flow. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWTBLI flows assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide redox systems: A perspective on redox systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Melissa; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of redox elements in biologic systems remains a major challenge for redox signaling and oxidative stress research. Central redox elements include evolutionarily conserved subsets of cysteines and methionines of proteins which function as sulfur switches and labile reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which function in redox signaling. The sulfur switches depend upon redox environments in which rates of oxidation are balanced with rates of reduction through the thioredoxins, glutathione/glutathione disulfide and cysteine/cystine redox couples. These central couples, which we term redox control nodes, are maintained at stable but non-equilibrium steady states, are largely independently regulated in different subcellular compartments and are quasi-independent from each other within compartments. Disruption of the redox control nodes can differentially affect sulfur switches, thereby creating a diversity of oxidative stress responses. Systems biology provides approaches to address the complexity of these responses. In the present review, we summarize thiol/disulfide pathway, redox potential and rate information as a basis for kinetic modeling of sulfur switches. The summary identifies gaps in knowledge especially related to redox communication between compartments, definition of redox pathways and discrimination between types of sulfur switches. A formulation for kinetic modeling of GSH/GSSG redox control indicates that systems biology could encourage novel therapeutic approaches to protect against oxidative stress by identifying specific redox-sensitive sites which could be targeted for intervention. PMID:18155672

  18. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  19. Current & Heat Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons: Role of Non-Equilibrium Phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Gary; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The conducting channel of a graphitic nanoscale device is expected to experience a larger degree of thermal isolation when compared to traditional inversion channels of electronic devices. This leads to enhanced non-equilibrium phonon populations which are likely to adversely affect the mobility of graphene-based nanoribbons due to enhanced phonon scattering. Recent reports indicating the importance of carrier scattering with substrate surface polar optical phonons in carbon nanotubes^1 and graphene^2,3 show that this mechanism may allow enhanced heat removal from the nanoribbon channel. To investigate the effects of hot phonon populations on current and heat conduction, we solve the graphene nanoribbon multiband Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo transport techniques are used since phonon populations may be tracked and updated temporally.^4 The electronic structure is solved using the NRL Tight-Binding method,^5 where carriers are scattered by confined acoustic, optical, edge and substrate polar optical phonons. [1] S. V. Rotkin et al., Nano Lett. 9, 1850 (2009). [2] J. H. Chen, C. Jang, S. Xiao, M. Ishigami and M. S. Fuhrer, Nature Nanotech. 3, 206 (2008). [3] V. Perebeinos and P. Avouris, arXiv:0910.4665v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2009). [4] P. Lugli et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 50, 1251 (1987). [5] D. Finkenstadt, G. Pennington & M.J. Mehl, Phys. Rev. B 76, 121405(R) (2007).

  20. Influence of boundary slip effect on thermal environment in thermo-chemical non-equilibrium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Wenbo; Zhang, Liang; Li, Junhong; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2014-12-01

    A kind of new hypersonic vehicle makes long-time flight in transitional flow regime where boundary slip effect caused by low gas density will have an important influence on the thermal environment around the vehicles. Numerical studies on the boundary slip effect as hypersonic vehicles fly in high Mach number has been carried out. The method for solving non-equilibrium flows considering slip boundary, surface catalysis and chemical reactions has been built up, and been validated by comparing the thermal environment results with STS-2 flight test data. The mechanism and rules of impact on surface heat flux by different boundary slip level (Knudsen number from 0.01 to 0.05) has been investigated in typical hypersonic flow conditions. The results show that the influence mechanisms of boundary slip effect are different on component diffusion heat flux and convective heat flux; slip boundary increases the near wall temperature which diminish the convective heat; whereas enhances the near wall gas diffusion heat because of the internal energy's growing. Component diffusion heat flux takes a smaller portion of the total heat flux, so the slip boundary reduces the total wall heat flux. As Knudsen number goes up, the degree of rarefaction increases, the influences of slip boundary on convective and component diffusion heat flux are both enhanced, total heat flux grows by a small margin, and boundary slip effect is more distinct.

  1. An improved dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2013-11-01

    A non-equilibrium wall-model based on unsteady 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been implemented in an unstructured mesh environment. The method is similar to that of the wall-model described by Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051, (2002)], but is supplemented by a new dynamic eddy viscosity/conductivity model that corrects the effect of the resolved Reynolds stress (resolved turbulent heat flux) on the skin friction (wall heat flux). This correction is crucial for accurate prediction of the skin friction and wall heat flux. Unlike earlier models, this eddy viscosity/conductivity model does not have a stress-matching procedure or a tunable free parameter, and it shows consistent performance over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The wall-model is validated against canonical (attached) transitional and fully turbulent flows at moderate to very high Reynolds number: a turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 2000, an H-type transitional boundary layer up to Reθ = 3300, and a high Reynolds number boundary layer at Reθ = 31000. An application to the flow over NACA4412 airfoil is ongoing and hopefully will be presented. This work was supported by the Winston and Fu-Mei Stanford Graduate Fellowship, NASA Aeronautics Scholarship Program, and NASA under the Subsonic Fixed-Wing Program and the Boeing Company.

  2. Electrical characteristics of TIG arcs in argon from non-equilibrium modelling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeva, Margarita; Uhrlandt, Dirk; Siewert, Erwan

    2016-09-01

    Electric arcs are widely used in industrial processes so that a thorough understanding of the arc characteristics is highly important to industrial research and development. TIG welding arcs operated with pointed electrodes made of tungsten, doped with cerium oxide, have been studied in order to analyze in detail the electric field and the arc voltage. Newly developed non-equilibrium model of the arc is based on a complete diffusion treatment of particle fluxes, a generalized form of Ohm's law, and boundary conditions accounting for the space-charge sheaths within the magneto-hydrodynamic approach. Experiments have been carried out for electric currents in the range 5-200 A. The electric arc has been initiated between a WC20 cathode and a water-cooled copper plate placed 0.8 mm from each other. The arc length has been continuously increased by 0.1 mm up to 15 mm and the arc voltage has been simultaneously recorded. Modelling and experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  3. Non-equilibrium relaxation in a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2016-04-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to study a stochastic Lotka-Volterra model on a two-dimensional square lattice with periodic boundary conditions. If the (local) prey carrying capacity is finite, there exists an extinction threshold for the predator population that separates a stable active two-species coexistence phase from an inactive state wherein only prey survive. Holding all other rates fixed, we investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation of the predator density in the vicinity of the critical predation rate. As expected, we observe critical slowing-down, i.e., a power law dependence of the relaxation time on the predation rate, and algebraic decay of the predator density at the extinction critical point. The numerically determined critical exponents are in accord with the established values of the directed percolation universality class. Following a sudden predation rate change to its critical value, one finds critical aging for the predator density autocorrelation function that is also governed by universal scaling exponents. This aging scaling signature of the active-to-absorbing state phase transition emerges at significantly earlier times than the stationary critical power laws, and could thus serve as an advanced indicator of the (predator) population’s proximity to its extinction threshold.

  4. Non-equilibrium relaxation in a two-dimensional stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to study a stochastic Lotka-Volterra model on a two-dimensional square lattice with periodic boundary conditions. There are stable states when the predators and prey coexist. If the local prey carrying capacity is finite, there emerges an extinction threshold for the predator population at a critical value of the predation rate. We investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation of the predator density in the vicinity of this critical point. The expected power law dependence between the relaxation time and predation rate is observed (critical slowing down). The numerically determined associated critical exponents are in accord with the directed percolation universality class. Following a sudden predation rate change to its critical value, one observes critical aging for the predator density autocorrelation function with a universal scaling exponent. This aging scaling signature of the absorbing state phase transition emerges at significantly earlier times than stationary critical power laws, and could thus serve as an advanced indicator of the population's proximity to its extinction threshold. This research is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  5. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  6. Numerical solution of 2D wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation and real thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hric, V.; Halama, J.

    2015-03-10

    An approach to modeling of wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation phenomenon is presented. The first part of our flow model is homogeneous Euler system of transport equations for mass, momentum and total energy of wet steam (mixture). The additional second part describes liquid phase via non-homogeneous system of transport equations for moments of droplets number distribution function and relies on corrected classical nucleation theory. Moment equations are closed by linearization of droplet growth rate model. All necessary relations for thermodynamic properties of steam are provided by IAPWS set of equations. However, properties of condensate are simply modeled by liquid saturation data. Two real equations of state are implemented. Recently developed CFD formulation for entropy (does not require iteration process) and so-called IAPWS special gas equation for Helmholtz energy (one iteration loop is necessary). Flow model is validated on converging-diverging supersonic nozzle with Barschdorff geometry. Simulations were performed by in-house CFD code based on finite volume method and stiff character of equations was solved by symmetrical time operator splitting. Achieved results satisfactorily agreed with experimental data.

  7. Non-equilibrium Phonons in CaWO4: Issues for Phonon Mediated Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msall, Madeleine; Head, Timothy; Jumper, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The CRESST experiment looks for evidence of dark matter particles colliding with nuclei in CaWO4, using cryogenic bolometers sensitive to energy deposition ˜ 10 keV with a few percent accuracy. Calibration of the energy deposited in the phonon system depends upon the details of the evolution of the non-equilibrium energy in the CaWO4 absorber. Our phonon images sensitively measure variations in angular phonon flux, providing key information about the elastic constants and scattering rates that determine the energy evolution. Phonon pulses, created by focused photoexcitation of a 150 nm Cu film, are detected after propagation through 3 mm of CaWO4. The 20 ns Ar-ion laser pulse creates a localized (10-3 mm^2) source of 10-20 K blackbody phonons. The sample is at 2 K. Our images show that the elastic constants derived from ultrasonic velocities along high symmetry axes do not accurately predict the total phonon flux along non-symmetry directions. We present new data on the dependence of phonon flux on excitation level and discuss the influence of isotope and anharmonic decay on the shape of phonon pulses in these ultrapure samples. Thanks to J.P. Wolfe and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Urbana, IL, for partial support of this work.

  8. Non-equilibrium optical phonon dynamics in bulk and low-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, G. P.

    2007-02-01

    We present theoretical investigations of the intrinsic dynamics of long-wavelength non-equilibrium optical phonons in bulk and low-dimensional semiconductors. The theory is based on the application of Fermi's golden rule formula, with phonon dispersion relations as well as crystal anharmonicity considered in the framework of isotropic continuum model. Contributions to the decay rates of the phonon modes are discussed in terms of four possible channels: Klemens channel (into two acoustic daughter modes), generalised Ridley channel (into one acoustic and one optical mode), generalised Vallee-Bogani channel (into a lower mode of the same branch and an acoustic mode), and Barman-Srivastava channel (into two lower-branch optical modes). The role of crystal structure and cation/anion mass ratio in determining the lifetime of such modes in bulk semiconductors is highlighted. Estimates of lifetimes of such modes in silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes will also be presented. The results support and explain available experimental data, and make predictions in some cases.

  9. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, B.; Wang, Z.; Berrill, M. A.; Birke, M.; Pernice, M.

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  10. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  11. The Ion-Specific, Non-Equilibrium Structural Behavior of DNA Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dan; Saleh, Omar

    The highly tunable, sequence-dependent hybridization of DNA has enabled construction of DNA hydrogels with applications ranging from drug delivery to responsive materials. Though many have examined the structural characteristics of DNA hydrogels at equilibrium, relatively little is known about their non-equilibrium behavior, apart from their degradation rates when delivering molecular payloads. Here, we examine the effect of changing salt concentration on the dynamic formation, ageing, and degradation of DNA hydrogels comprised of branched DNA nanostars with palindromic overhangs. First, we observe that hydrogel phase is sensitive to the presence of a single unpaired base on the overhang, resulting in either a percolated network or a liquid-liquid phase separated state at high salt concentrations. Particular to the percolated network, we can induce the system to either contract or relax by changing the salt concentration. Decreasing monovalent NaCl induces the network to irreversibly contract whereas decreasing divalent MgCl2 induces the network to reversibly expand; this behavior runs counter to what is expected solely from electrostatic screening. We qualitatively understand these results by assuming that the monovalent salt modulates the dynamic hybridization between nanostar binding partners, whereas the divalent salt drives the dramatic/reversible induction of the `stacked-X' conformation in the DNA nanostars. Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program.

  12. Slip length of water on graphene: limitations of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2012-01-14

    Data for the flow rate of water in carbon nanopores is widely scattered, both in experiments and simulations. In this work, we aim at precisely quantifying the characteristic large slip length and flow rate of water flowing in a planar graphene nanochannel. First, we quantify the slip length using the intrinsic interfacial friction coefficient between water and graphene, which is found from equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. We then calculate the flow rate and the slip length from the streaming velocity profiles obtained using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations and compare with the predictions from the EMD simulations. The slip length calculated from NEMD simulations is found to be extremely sensitive to the curvature of the velocity profile and it possesses large statistical errors. We therefore pose the question: Can a micrometer range slip length be reliably determined using velocity profiles obtained from NEMD simulations? Our answer is "not practical, if not impossible" based on the analysis given as the results. In the case of high slip systems such as water in carbon nanochannels, the EMD method results are more reliable, accurate, and computationally more efficient compared to the direct NEMD method for predicting the nanofluidic flow rate and hydrodynamic boundary condition.

  13. Non-equilibrium relaxation in a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-04-19

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to study a stochastic Lotka-Volterra model on a two-dimensional square lattice with periodic boundary conditions. If the (local) prey carrying capacity is finite, there exists an extinction threshold for the predator population that separates a stable active two-species coexistence phase from an inactive state wherein only prey survive. Holding all other rates fixed, we investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation of the predator density in the vicinity of the critical predation rate. As expected, we observe critical slowing-down, i.e., a power law dependence of the relaxation time on the predation rate, and algebraic decay of the predator density at the extinction critical point. The numerically determined critical exponents are in accord with the established values of the directed percolation universality class. Following a sudden predation rate change to its critical value, one finds critical aging for the predator density autocorrelation function that is also governed by universal scaling exponents. This aging scaling signature of the active-to-absorbing state phase transition emerges at significantly earlier times than the stationary critical power laws, and could thus serve as an advanced indicator of the (predator) population's proximity to its extinction threshold.

  14. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Yimei; Gan, Hong; Mo, Yifei; Stach, Eric A.; Murray, Christopher B.; Su, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Spinel transition metal oxides are important electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, whose lithiation undergoes a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential manner. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how their kinetics affects the overall electrochemical response. Here we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite by employing a strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach. This method allows direct, real-time, high-resolution visualization of how lithiation proceeds along specific reaction pathways. We find that the initial intercalation process follows a two-phase reaction sequence, whereas further lithiation leads to the coexistence of three distinct phases within single nanoparticles, which has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. We use phase-field theory to model and describe these non-equilibrium reaction pathways, and to directly correlate the observed phase evolution with the battery's discharge performance. PMID:27157119

  15. Ultrafast non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in semiconductor laser mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hader, J.; Scheller, M.; Laurain, A.; Kilen, I.; Baker, C.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the mode-locking dynamics in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers with semiconductor and graphene saturable absorber mirrors are reviewed with an emphasis on the role of nonequilibrium carrier effects. The systems are studied theoretically using a fully microscopic many-body model for the carrier distributions and polarizations, coupled to Maxwell’s equations for the field propagation. Pump-probe measurements are performed with (sub-) 100 fs resolution. The analysis shows that the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in the gain quantum-wells and saturable absorber medium significantly influences the system’s response and the resulting mode-locked pulses. The microscopic model is used to study the pulse build up from spontaneous emission noise and to determine the dependence of achievable pulse lengths and fluences on the amounts of saturable and non-saturable losses and the optical gain. The change of the group delay dispersion (GDD) on the pump level is examined and the dependence of the pulse lengths on the total amount of GDD is demonstrated experimentally. Theory-experiment comparisons are used to demonstrate the highly quantitative accuracy of the fully microscopic modeling.

  16. Improvements on non-equilibrium and transport Green function techniques: The next-generation TRANSIESTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papior, Nick; Lorente, Nicolás; Frederiksen, Thomas; García, Alberto; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-03-01

    We present novel methods implemented within the non-equilibrium Green function code (NEGF) TRANSIESTA based on density functional theory (DFT). Our flexible, next-generation DFT-NEGF code handles devices with one or multiple electrodes (Ne ≥ 1) with individual chemical potentials and electronic temperatures. We describe its novel methods for electrostatic gating, contour optimizations, and assertion of charge conservation, as well as the newly implemented algorithms for optimized and scalable matrix inversion, performance-critical pivoting, and hybrid parallelization. Additionally, a generic NEGF ;post-processing; code (TBTRANS/PHTRANS) for electron and phonon transport is presented with several novelties such as Hamiltonian interpolations, Ne ≥ 1 electrode capability, bond-currents, generalized interface for user-defined tight-binding transport, transmission projection using eigenstates of a projected Hamiltonian, and fast inversion algorithms for large-scale simulations easily exceeding 106 atoms on workstation computers. The new features of both codes are demonstrated and bench-marked for relevant test systems.

  17. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  18. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  19. Anomalous long-range correlations at a non-equilibrium phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschenfeld, A.; Derrida, B.

    2012-02-01

    Non-equilibrium diffusive systems are known to exhibit long-range correlations, which decay like the inverse 1/L of the system size L in one dimension. Here, taking the example of the ABC model, we show that this size dependence becomes anomalous (the decay becomes a non-integer power of L) when the diffusive system approaches a second-order phase transition. This power-law decay as well as the L-dependence of the time-time correlations can be understood in terms of the dynamics of the amplitude of the first Fourier mode of the particle densities. This amplitude evolves according to a Langevin equation in a quartic potential, which was introduced in a previous work to explain the anomalous behavior of the cumulants of the current near this second-order phase transition. Here we also compute some of these cumulants away from the transition and show that they become singular as the transition is approached, matching with what we already knew in the critical regime.

  20. The crossover between organized and disorganized states in some non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego Luis; Téllez, Gabriel

    2009-05-01

    We study numerically the crossover between organized and disorganized states of three non-equilibrium systems: the Poisson/coalesce random walk (PCRW), a one-dimensional spin system and a quasi one-dimensional lattice gas. In all cases, we describe this crossover in terms of the average spacing between particles/domain borders langS(t)rang and the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s). The nature of the crossover is not the same for all systems; however, we found that for all systems the nearest neighbor distribution p(0)(s) is well fitted by the Berry-Robnik model. The destruction of the level repulsion in the crossover between organized and disorganized states is present in all systems. Additionally, we found that the correlations between domains in the gas and spin systems are not strong and can be neglected in a first approximation, but for the PCRW the correlations between particles must be taken into account. To find p(n)(s) with n > 1, we propose two different analytical models based on the Berry-Robnik model. Our models give us a good approximation for the statistical behavior of these systems at their crossover and allow us to quantify the degree of order/disorder of the system.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Contribute to Ion Selectivity in the KcsA Channel

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stephan; Farley, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of biological ion channels to conduct selected ions across cell membranes is critical for the survival of both animal and bacterial cells. Numerous investigations of ion selectivity have been conducted over more than 50 years, yet the mechanisms whereby the channels select certain ions and reject others are not well understood. Here we report a new application of Jarzynski’s Equality to investigate the mechanism of ion selectivity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of Na+ and K+ ions moving through the KcsA channel. The simulations show that the selectivity filter of KcsA adapts and responds to the presence of the ions with structural rearrangements that are different for Na+ and K+. These structural rearrangements facilitate entry of K+ ions into the selectivity filter and permeation through the channel, and rejection of Na+ ions. A mechanistic model of ion selectivity by this channel based on the results of the simulations relates the structural rearrangement of the selectivity filter to the differential dehydration of ions and multiple-ion occupancy and describes a mechanism to efficiently select and conduct K+. Estimates of the K+/Na+ selectivity ratio and steady state ion conductance for KcsA from the simulations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. This model also accurately describes experimental observations of channel block by cytoplasmic Na+ ions, the “punch through” relief of channel block by cytoplasmic positive voltages, and is consistent with the knock-on mechanism of ion permeation. PMID:24465882

  2. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-28

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  3. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H.; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-01

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  4. Non-equilibrium physics of Rydberg lattices in the presence of noise and dissipative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Wildan; Gil, Laura I. R.

    2016-12-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of driven spin lattices in the presence of decoherence caused by either laser phase noise or strong decay. In the first case, we discriminate between correlated and uncorrelated noise and explore their effect on the mean density of Rydberg states and the full counting statistics (FCS). We find that while the mean density is almost identical in both cases, the FCS differ considerably. The main method employed is the Langevin equation (LE) but for the sake of efficiency in certain regimes, we use a Markovian master equation and Monte Carlo rate equations, respectively. In the second case, we consider dissipative systems with more general power-law interactions. We determine the phase diagram in the steady state and analyse its generation dynamics using Monte Carlo rate equations. In contrast to nearest-neighbour models, there is no transition to long-range-ordered phases for realistic interactions and resonant driving. Yet, for finite laser detunings, we show that Rydberg lattices can undergo a dissipative phase transition to a long-range-ordered antiferromagnetic (AF) phase. We identify the advantages of Monte Carlo rate equations over mean field (MF) predictions.

  5. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and collective vibrational modes of liquid water in an inhomogeneous electric field.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Adam D; Drusová, Sandra; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C

    2016-06-28

    In this experiment liquid water is subject to an inhomogeneous electric field (∇(2)Ea≈ 10(10) V m(2)) using a high voltage (20 kV) point-plane electrode system. Using interferometry it was found that the application of a strong electric field gradient to water generates local changes in the refractive index of the liquid, polarizes the surface and creates a downward moving electro-convective jet. A maximum temperature difference of 1 °C is measured in the immediate vicinity of the point electrode. Raman spectroscopy performed on water reveals an enhancement of the vibrational collective modes (3250 cm(-1)) as well as an increase in the local mode (3490 cm(-1)) energy. This bimodal enhancement indicates that the spectral changes are not due to temperature changes. The intense field gradient thus establishes an excited subpopulation of vibrational oscillators far from thermal equilibrium. Delocalization of the collective vibrational mode spatially expands this excited population beyond the microscale. Hindered rotational freedom due to electric field pinning of molecular dipoles retards the heat flow and generates a chemical potential gradient. These changes are responsible for the observed changes in the refractive index and temperature. It is demonstrated that polar liquids can thus support local non-equilibrium thermodynamic transient states critical to biochemical and environmental processes.

  6. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-07-20

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} for magnetic models and 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of -0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate {zeta} and the temperature T as ({zeta}T){sup 1/2}. The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H{sup +}{sub 3} ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  7. A microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for cosmic structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Fabis, Felix; Berg, Daniel; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Viermann, Celia

    2016-04-01

    Building upon the recent pioneering work by Mazenko and by Das and Mazenko, we develop a microscopic, non-equilibrium, statistical field theory for initially correlated canonical ensembles of classical microscopic particles obeying Hamiltonian dynamics. Our primary target is cosmic structure formation, where initial Gaussian correlations in phase space are believed to be set by inflation. We give an exact expression for the generating functional of this theory and work out suitable approximations. We specify the initial correlations by a power spectrum and derive general expressions for the correlators of the density and the response field. We derive simple closed expressions for the lowest-order contributions to the nonlinear cosmological power spectrum, valid for arbitrary wave numbers. We further calculate the bispectrum expected in this theory within these approximations and the power spectrum of cosmic density fluctuations to first order in the gravitational interaction, using a recent improvement of the Zel’dovich approximation. We show that, with a modification motivated by the adhesion approximation, the nonlinear growth of the density power spectrum found in numerical simulations of cosmic structure evolution is reproduced well to redshift zero and for arbitrary wave numbers even within first-order perturbation theory. Our results present the first fully analytic calculation of the nonlinear power spectrum of cosmic structures.

  8. A localized momentum constraint for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2015-02-21

    A method which controls momentum evolution in a sub-region within a molecular dynamics simulation is derived from Gauss's principle of least constraint. The technique for localization is founded on the equations by Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] expressed in a weak form according to the control volume (CV) procedure derived by Smith et al. [Phys. Rev. E. 85, 056705 (2012)]. A term for the advection of molecules appears in the derived constraint and is shown to be essential in order to exactly control the time evolution of momentum in the subvolume. The numerical procedure converges the total momentum in the CV to the target value to within machine precision in an iterative manner. The localized momentum constraint can prescribe essentially arbitrary flow fields in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology also forms a rigorous mathematical framework for introducing coupling constraints at the boundary between continuum and discrete systems. This functionality is demonstrated with a boundary-driven flow test case.

  9. Optimization of an oligonucleotide microchip for microbial identification studies: a non-equilibrium dissociation approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Stahl, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray (microchip) for identifying strains of five closely related bacilli (Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus medusa and Bacillus subtilis) was demonstrated using an approach that compares the non-equilibrium dissociation rates ('melting curves') of all probe-target duplexes simultaneously. For this study, a hierarchical set of 30 oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA of these bacilli at multiple levels of specificity (approximate taxonomic ranks of domain, kingdom, order, genus and species) was designed and immobilized in a high-density matrix of gel pads on a glass slide. Reproducible melting curves for probes with different levels of specificity were obtained using an optimized salt concentration. Clear discrimination between perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) duplexes was achieved. By normalizing the signals to an internal standard (a universal probe), a more than twofold discrimination (> 2.4x) was achieved between PM and 1-MM duplexes at the dissociation temperature at which 50% of the probe-target duplexes remained intact. This provided excellent differentiation among representatives of different Bacillus species, both individually and in mixtures of two or three. The overall pattern of hybridization derived from this hierarchical probe set also provided a clear 'chip fingerprint' for each of these closely related Bacillus species.

  10. A steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach for the study of evaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Yahia-Ouahmed, Méziane; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Two non-equilibrium methods (called bubble method and splitting method, respectively) have been developed and tested to study the steady state evaporation of a droplet surrounded by its vapor, where the evaporation continuously occurs at the vapor-liquid interface while the droplet size remains constant. In the bubble method, gas molecules are continuously reinserted into a free volume (represented by a bubble) located at the centre of mass of the droplet to keep the droplet size constant. In the splitting method, a molecule close to the centre of mass of the droplet is split into two: In this way, the droplet size is also maintained during the evaporation. By additional local thermostats confined to the area of insertion, the effect of frequent insertions on properties such as density and temperature can be limited to the immediate insertion area. Perturbations are not observed in other parts of the droplet. In the end, both the bubble method and the splitting method achieve steady-state droplet evaporation. Although these methods have been developed using an isolated droplet, we anticipate that they will find a wide range of applications in the study of the evaporation of isolated films and droplets or thin films on heated substrates or under confinement. They can in principle also be used to study the steady-state of other physical processes, such as the diffusion or permeation of gas molecules or ions in a pressure gradient or a concentration gradient.

  11. The effect of turbulent fluctuations on the relaxation of thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Sualeh; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    In many engineering and natural systems, the microscopic behavior of constituent molecules can affect the macroscopic behavior of the flow. This interaction is significant when the two phenomena have commensurate time scales. We study the effect of turbulence on the relaxation of thermal non-equilibrium (TNE), in particular vibrational energy relaxation, using direct numerical simulation (DNS). First order effects are observed in the evolution of both vibrational energy and turbulence. For example, the rate of decay of kinetic energy is accelerated and temperature fluctuations are amplified. Analytic expressions for equilibrium vibrational energy, Ev*,and characteristic relaxation time scale, τv, are compared against DNS data and used to understand features of the decay. This decay can be divided into two regimes, one dominated by TNE exchanges in time scales of the order of τv followed by a turbulence decay. Between the two regimes, some vibrationally hot flows become cold before reaching equilibrium. This reflects an aspect of the strong coupling between turbulence and TNE in both regimes. Compressiblity effects, quantified by turbulent Mach number (Mt), are also discussed.

  12. Slowing-down of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudet, Cédric; Bataller, Henri; Sun, Yifei; Donev, Aleksandar; María Ortiz de Zárate, José; Croccolo, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    Fluctuations in a fluid are strongly affected by the presence of a macroscopic gradient making them long-ranged and enhancing their amplitude. While small-scale fluctuations exhibit diffusive lifetimes, moderate-scale fluctuations live shorter because of gravity. In this letter we explore fluctuations of even larger size, comparable to the extent of the system in the direction of the gradient, and find experimental evidence of a dramatic slowing-down of their dynamics. We recover diffusive behavior for these strongly confined fluctuations, but with a diffusion coefficient that depends on the solutal Rayleigh number. Results from dynamic shadowgraph experiments are complemented by theoretical calculations and numerical simulations based on fluctuating hydrodynamics, and excellent agreement is found. Hence, the study of the dynamics of non-equilibrium fluctuations allows to probe and measure the competition of physical processes such as diffusion, buoyancy and confinement, i.e. the ingredients included in the Rayleigh number, which is the control parameter of our system.

  13. Collective non-equilibrium dynamics at surfaces and the spatio-temporal edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuzzi, M.; Gambassi, A.; Pleimling, M.

    2012-11-01

    Symmetries represent a fundamental constraint for physical systems and relevant new phenomena often emerge as a consequence of their breaking. An important example is provided by space- and time-translational invariance in statistical systems, which hold at a coarse-grained scale in equilibrium and are broken by spatial and temporal boundaries, the former being implemented by surfaces —unavoidable in real samples— the latter by some initial condition for the dynamics which causes a non-equilibrium evolution. While the separate effects of these two boundaries are well understood, we demonstrate here that additional, unexpected features arise upon approaching the effective edge formed by their intersection. For this purpose, we focus on the classical semi-infinite Ising model with spin-flip dynamics evolving out of equilibrium at its critical point. Considering both subcritical and critical values of the coupling among surface spins, we present numerical evidence of a scaling regime with universal features which emerges upon approaching the spatio-temporal edge and we rationalise these findings within a field-theoretical approach.

  14. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of Nano-channel Confined DNA: A Brownian Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket; Huang, Aiqun; Reisner, Walter

    We carry out Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation for a semi-flexible polymer chain characterized by a contour length Na and a persistence length lp confined inside a rectangular nanochannel to study its compression and retraction dynamics while being pushed on one end at a constant velocity by a ``nano-dozer''. We study the evolution of one dimensional concentration profile c (x , t) and the chain extension R along the channel axis (x-axis) during both the contracting as well as the retracting phases as a function of the velocity of the nano-dozer, both in steady states and in transients. Furthermore, we measure the transverse fluctuations of the chain under contraction and retraction, and the amplitude of the density profile, and compare these simulation results with those obtained from an analytical model proposed by Khorshid et al. Our studies are guided by recent experimental results by Khorshid et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett, 113, 268104 (2014)) and provide further justification to use a one dimensional PDE approach to understand the non-equilibrium dynamics of confined polymers.

  15. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  16. Mass conserved elementary kinetics is sufficient for the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I

    2012-12-07

    Living systems are forced away from thermodynamic equilibrium by exchange of mass and energy with their environment. In order to model a biochemical reaction network in a non-equilibrium state one requires a mathematical formulation to mimic this forcing. We provide a general formulation to force an arbitrary large kinetic model in a manner that is still consistent with the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state. We can guarantee the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state assuming only two conditions; that every reaction is mass balanced and that continuous kinetic reaction rate laws never lead to a negative molecule concentration. These conditions can be verified in polynomial time and are flexible enough to permit one to force a system away from equilibrium. With expository biochemical examples we show how reversible, mass balanced perpetual reaction(s), with thermodynamically infeasible kinetic parameters, can be used to perpetually force various kinetic models in a manner consistent with the existence of a steady state. Easily testable existence conditions are foundational for efforts to reliably compute non-equilibrium steady states in genome-scale biochemical kinetic models.

  17. Improving the Efficiency of Non-equilibrium Sampling in the Aqueous Environment via Implicit-Solvent Simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Fu; Sun, Huiyong; Li, Dan; Hou, Tingjun

    2017-04-11

    By means of estimators based on non-equilibrium work, equilibrium free energy differences or potentials of mean force (PMFs) of a system of interest can be computed from biased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach, however, is often plagued by slow conformational sampling and poor convergence, especially when the solvent effects are taken into account. Here, as a possible way to alleviate the problem, several widely used implicit-solvent models, which are derived from the analytic generalized Born (GB) equation and implemented in the AMBER suite of programs, were employed in free energy calculations based on non-equilibrium work and evaluated for their abilities to emulate explicit water. As a test case, pulling MD simulations were carried out on an alanine polypeptide with different solvent models and protocols, followed by comparisons of the reconstructed PMF profiles along the unfolding coordinate. The results show that when employing the non-equilibrium work method, sampling with an implicit-solvent model is several times faster and, more importantly, converges more rapidly than that with explicit water due to reduction of dissipation. Among the assessed GB models, the Neck variants outperform the OBC and HCT variants in terms of accuracy, whereas their computational costs are comparable. In addition, for the best-performing models, the impact of the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) dependent nonpolar solvation term was also examined. The present study highlights the advantages of implicit-solvent models for non-equilibrium sampling.

  18. Angularly Adaptive P1 - Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-08-08

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  19. Angularly Adaptive P1-Double P0 Flux-Limited Diffusion Solutions of Non-Equilibrium Grey Radiative Transfer Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2005-12-13

    The double spherical harmonics angular approximation in the lowest order, i.e. double P{sub 0} (DP{sub 0}), is developed for the solution of time-dependent non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer problems in planar geometry. Although the DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation is expected to be less accurate than the P{sub 1} diffusion approximation at and near thermodynamic equilibrium, the DP{sub 0} angular approximation can more accurately capture the complicated angular dependence near a non-equilibrium radiation wave front. In addition, the DP{sub 0} approximation should be more accurate in non-equilibrium optically thin regions where the positive and negative angular domains are largely decoupled. We develop an adaptive angular technique that locally uses either the DP{sub 0} or P{sub 1} flux-limited diffusion approximation depending on the degree to which the radiation and material fields are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Numerical results are presented for two test problems due to Su and Olson and to Ganapol and Pomraning for which semi-analytic transport solutions exist. These numerical results demonstrate that the adaptive P{sub 1}-DP{sub 0} diffusion approximation can yield improvements in accuracy over the standard P{sub 1} diffusion approximation, both without and with flux-limiting, for non-equilibrium grey radiative transfer.

  20. An investigation of an underwater steam plasma discharge as alternative to air plasmas for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah N.; Foster, John E.; Garcia, Maria C.

    2015-10-01

    An underwater steam plasma discharge, in which water itself is the ionizing media, is investigated as a means to introduce advanced oxidation species into contaminated water for the purpose of water purification. The steam discharge avoids the acidification observed with air discharges and also avoids the need for a feed gas, simplifying the system. Steam discharge operation did not result in a pH changes in the processing of water or simulated wastewater, with the actual pH remaining roughly constant during processing. Simulated wastewater has been shown to continue to decompose significantly after steam treatment, suggesting the presence of long-lived plasma produced radicals. During steam discharge operation, nitrate production is limited, and nitrite production was found to be below the detection threshold of (roughly 0.2 mg L-1). The discharge was operated over a broad range of deposited power levels, ranging from approximately 30 W to 300 W. Hydrogen peroxide production was found to scale with increasing power. Additionally, the hydrogen peroxide production efficiency of the discharge was found to be higher than many of the rates reported in the literature to date.

  1. The energy pump and the origin of the non-equilibrium flux of the dynamical systems and the networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liufang; Shi, Hualin; Feng, Haidong; Wang, Jin

    2012-04-28

    The global stability of dynamical systems and networks is still challenging to study. We developed a landscape and flux framework to explore the global stability. The potential landscape is directly linked to the steady state probability distribution of the non-equilibrium dynamical systems which can be used to study the global stability. The steady state probability flux together with the landscape gradient determines the dynamics of the system. The non-zero probability flux implies the breaking down of the detailed balance which is a quantitative signature of the systems being in non-equilibrium states. We investigated the dynamics of several systems from monostability to limit cycle and explored the microscopic origin of the probability flux. We discovered that the origin of the probability flux is due to the non-equilibrium conditions on the concentrations resulting energy input acting like non-equilibrium pump or battery to the system. Another interesting behavior we uncovered is that the probabilistic flux is closely related to the steady state deterministic chemical flux. For the monostable model of the kinetic cycle, the analytical expression of the probabilistic flux is directly related to the deterministic flux, and the later is directly generated by the chemical potential difference from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. For the limit cycle of the reversible Schnakenberg model, we also show that the probabilistic flux is correlated to the chemical driving force, as well as the deterministic effective flux. Furthermore, we study the phase coherence of the stochastic oscillation against the energy pump, and argue that larger non-equilibrium pump results faster flux and higher coherence. This leads to higher robustness of the biological oscillations. We also uncovered how fluctuations influence the coherence of the oscillations in two steps: (1) The mild fluctuations influence the coherence of the system mainly through the probability flux while

  2. The energy pump and the origin of the non-equilibrium flux of the dynamical systems and the networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liufang; Shi, Hualin; Feng, Haidong; Wang, Jin

    2012-04-01

    The global stability of dynamical systems and networks is still challenging to study. We developed a landscape and flux framework to explore the global stability. The potential landscape is directly linked to the steady state probability distribution of the non-equilibrium dynamical systems which can be used to study the global stability. The steady state probability flux together with the landscape gradient determines the dynamics of the system. The non-zero probability flux implies the breaking down of the detailed balance which is a quantitative signature of the systems being in non-equilibrium states. We investigated the dynamics of several systems from monostability to limit cycle and explored the microscopic origin of the probability flux. We discovered that the origin of the probability flux is due to the non-equilibrium conditions on the concentrations resulting energy input acting like non-equilibrium pump or battery to the system. Another interesting behavior we uncovered is that the probabilistic flux is closely related to the steady state deterministic chemical flux. For the monostable model of the kinetic cycle, the analytical expression of the probabilistic flux is directly related to the deterministic flux, and the later is directly generated by the chemical potential difference from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. For the limit cycle of the reversible Schnakenberg model, we also show that the probabilistic flux is correlated to the chemical driving force, as well as the deterministic effective flux. Furthermore, we study the phase coherence of the stochastic oscillation against the energy pump, and argue that larger non-equilibrium pump results faster flux and higher coherence. This leads to higher robustness of the biological oscillations. We also uncovered how fluctuations influence the coherence of the oscillations in two steps: (1) The mild fluctuations influence the coherence of the system mainly through the probability flux while

  3. Experimental study of the heat transfer process of air around atmospheric arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi Meidanshahi, F.; Madanipour, Kh.; Shokri, Babak

    2011-05-01

    The experimental investigation of thermodynamic properties such heat and mass transfer of plasmas has many applications in different industries. Laboratory atmospheric arc plasma is studied in this work. The refractive index of the air around the plasma is changed because of convection phenomena. When the convection creates the air flowing around the plasma, the density and consequently, the refractive index of air are distributed symmetrically. Moiré deflectometry is a technique of wave front analysis which in both Talbot effect and moiré technique is applied for measuring phase objects. Deflection of light beam passing through the inhomogeneous medium is utilized to obtain the refractive index distribution. In experimental set-up, an expanded collimated He-Ne laser propagate through the arc plasma and the around air. The temperature distribution is obtained by use of thermo-optic coefficient of air. To calculate the thermo- optic coefficient and the refractive index of air for a given wavelength of light and given atmospheric conditions (air temperature, pressure, and humidity), the Edlén equation is used. The convective heat transfer coefficient is obtained by calculating the temperature gradient on the plasma border. This method is not expensive, complicated and sensitive to environmental vibrations.

  4. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  5. Evaporation and condensation in soils: Experimental and modeling investigation to compare non-equilibrium-based approaches under different atmospheric boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Evaporation and condensation in bare soils govern water and energy fluxes between the land and atmosphere. Despite their importance to the hydrologic cycle, there is great uncertainty associated with our understanding of these complex multiphase phenomena. At the representative elementary volume scale, phase change (i.e. evaporation/condensation) between water vapor and liquid water is commonly evaluated in soil hydrology using the equilibrium assumption. The equilibrium-based approach assumes that within the soil pores, phase change occurs instantaneously. However, finite volatilization/condensation times have been observed experimentally under certain conditions calling into question the validity of using the equilibrium assumption for all possible land-atmospheric interaction scenarios. The use of non-equilibrium mass transfer relationships is based on the Hertz-Knudsen (HK) equation derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been posited to numerically represent phase change between water vapor and liquid water, many relying on empirical fitting parameters. The purpose of this investigation was to perform an unbiased comparison between the various non-equilibrium phase change formulations using a fully coupled heat and mass transfer model that simulates the processes of evaporation/condensation from soils using precision generated laboratory data. A non-isothermal solution was implemented in a numerical model to account for five different non-equilibrium phase change formulations reported in literature. A series of five experiments were performed using a unique laboratory system consisting of a soil tank with controlled airflow boundary conditions at the soil surface. The apparatus was equipped with a sensor network for continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind velocity data. Soil surface conditions (e.g. temperature, diurnal variations and wind speed) and initial

  6. Efficient hybrid non-equilibrium molecular dynamics--Monte Carlo simulations with symmetric momentum reversal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Roux, Benoît

    2014-09-21

    Hybrid schemes combining the strength of molecular dynamics (MD) and Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) offer a promising avenue to improve the sampling efficiency of computer simulations of complex systems. A number of recently proposed hybrid methods consider new configurations generated by driving the system via a non-equilibrium MD (neMD) trajectory, which are subsequently treated as putative candidates for Metropolis MC acceptance or rejection. To obey microscopic detailed balance, it is necessary to alter the momentum of the system at the beginning and/or the end of the neMD trajectory. This strict rule then guarantees that the random walk in configurational space generated by such hybrid neMD-MC algorithm will yield the proper equilibrium Boltzmann distribution. While a number of different constructs are possible, the most commonly used prescription has been to simply reverse the momenta of all the particles at the end of the neMD trajectory ("one-end momentum reversal"). Surprisingly, it is shown here that the choice of momentum reversal prescription can have a considerable effect on the rate of convergence of the hybrid neMD-MC algorithm, with the simple one-end momentum reversal encountering particularly acute problems. In these neMD-MC simulations, different regions of configurational space end up being essentially isolated from one another due to a very small transition rate between regions. In the worst-case scenario, it is almost as if the configurational space does not constitute a single communicating class that can be sampled efficiently by the algorithm, and extremely long neMD-MC simulations are needed to obtain proper equilibrium probability distributions. To address this issue, a novel momentum reversal prescription, symmetrized with respect to both the beginning and the end of the neMD trajectory ("symmetric two-ends momentum reversal"), is introduced. Illustrative simulations demonstrate that the hybrid neMD-MC algorithm robustly yields a correct

  7. Non-equilibrium phase map, optical and electrical properties of Cu-Zn-O alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniyan, Archana; Perkins, John; O'Hayre, Ryan; Ginley, David; Lany, Stephan; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2014-03-01

    Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is a candidate p-type solar cell absorber material that has been spotlighted recently due to its low cost, earth abundant and non-toxic nature. The maximum reported efficiency of Cu2O based solar cells is rather low (5. 38%) and it can in part be attributed its forbidden direct band gap (2.1 eV) and higher absorption threshold (2.6 eV). Here, we alloy Cu2O with ZnO via combinatorial RF magnetron sputtering as a function of temperature (T) and composition at fixed 20 mTorr Ar pressure to modify the electronic band structure and reduce its absorption threshold, which can potentially enhance the solar cell performance. A non-equilibrium Cu-Zn-O phase map was generated in the T range 100 - 400 °C and Zn composition 0 - 37 at%. Highly crystalline Cu2O structured Cu-Zn-O alloys with Zn content of 0 to 17 at% were synthesized in the T range 200 - 270 °C. With increasing Zn at%, the preferential orientation in Cu-Zn-O alloy changes from (200) to (111) direction. At lower T (<200 °C), either amorphous or poor crystalline Cu2O structured alloys were observed, whereas at higher T (>270 ° C) and higher Zn composition (>25 at%), CuO or ZnO second phases were observed. The absorption coefficient of all Cu-Zn-O alloys was higher than that of phase pure Cu2O. The absorption threshold () was also reduced significantly, for example, at = 2*104 cm-1 the absorption threshold of Cu-Zn-O alloy with 10 at% Zn reduced from 2.4 eV to 2.1 eV. The electrical conductivity of all Cu-Zn-O alloys was measured to be within 2 - 5 mS/cm.

  8. Bimodality of low-redshift circumgalactic O VI in non-equilibrium EAGLE zoom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Crain, Robert A.; Schaye, Joop; Rahmati, Alireza; Richings, Alexander J.; Trayford, James W.; Tumlinson, Jason; Bower, Richard G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a series of 20 cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of L* (M200 = 1011.7-1012.3 M⊙) and group-sized (M200 = 1012.7-1013.3 M⊙) haloes run with the model used for the EAGLE project, which additionally includes a non-equilibrium ionization and cooling module that follows 136 ions. The simulations reproduce the observed correlation, revealed by COS-Halos at z ˜ 0.2, between {O {VI}} column density at impact parameters b < 150 kpc and the specific star formation rate (sSFR ≡ SFR/M*) of the central galaxy at z ˜ 0.2. We find that the column density of circumgalactic {O {VI}} is maximal in the haloes associated with L* galaxies, because their virial temperatures are close to the temperature at which the ionization fraction of {O {VI}} peaks (T ˜ 105.5 K). The higher virial temperature of group haloes (>106 K) promotes oxygen to higher ionization states, suppressing the {O {VI}} column density. The observed N_{O {VI}}-sSFR correlation therefore does not imply a causal link, but reflects the changing characteristic ionization state of oxygen as halo mass is increased. In spite of the mass dependence of the oxygen ionization state, the most abundant circumgalactic oxygen ion in both L* and group haloes is {O VII}; {O {VI}} accounts for only 0.1 per cent of the oxygen in group haloes and 0.9-1.3 per cent with L* haloes. Nonetheless, the metals traced by {O {VI}} absorbers represent a fossil record of the feedback history of galaxies over a Hubble time; their characteristic epoch of ejection corresponds to z > 1 and much of the ejected metal mass resides beyond the virial radius of galaxies. For both L* and group galaxies, more of the oxygen produced and released by stars in the circumgalactic medium (within twice the virial radius) than in the stars and interstellar medium of the galaxy.

  9. Long-period Intensity Pulsations in Coronal Loops Explained by Thermal Non-equilibrium Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froment, C.; Auchère, F.; Aulanier, G.; Mikić, Z.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.

    2017-02-01

    In solar coronal loops, thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) is a phenomenon that can occur when the heating is both highly stratified and quasi-constant. Unambiguous observational identification of TNE would thus permit us to strongly constrain heating scenarios. While TNE is currently the standard interpretation of coronal rain, the long-term periodic evolution predicted by simulations has never been observed. However, the detection of long-period intensity pulsations (periods of several hours) has been recently reported with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/EIT, and this phenomenon appears to be very common in loops. Moreover, the three intensity-pulsation events that we recently studied with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) show strong evidence for TNE in warm loops. In this paper, a realistic loop geometry from linear force-free field (LFFF) extrapolations is used as input to 1D hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulations show that, for the present loop geometry, the heating has to be asymmetrical to produce TNE. We analyze in detail one particular simulation that reproduces the average thermal behavior of one of the pulsating loop bundle observed with AIA. We compare the properties of this simulation with those deduced from the observations. The magnetic topology of the LFFF extrapolations points to the presence of sites of preferred reconnection at one footpoint, supporting the presence of asymmetric heating. In addition, we can reproduce the temporal large-scale intensity properties of the pulsating loops. This simulation further strengthens the interpretation of the observed pulsations as signatures of TNE. This consequently provides important information on the heating localization and timescale for these loops.

  10. Entropic screening preserves non-equilibrium nature of nematic phase while enthalpic screening destroys it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2016-02-01

    The present manuscript describes the role of entropic and enthalpic forces mediated by organic non-polar (hexane) and polar (methanol) solvents on the bulk and microscopic phase transition of a well known nematic liquid crystalline material MBBA (N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline) through Differential Scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-Visible (UV-Vis), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC study indicates continuous linear decreases in both nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature and enthalpy of MBBA in presence of hexane while both these parameters show a saturation after an initial decay in methanol. These distinct transitional behaviours were explained in terms of the "depletion force" model for entropic screening in hexane and "screening-self-screening" model for methanol. Heating rate dependent DSC studies find that non-Arrhenius behaviour, characteristic of pristine MBBA and a manifestation of non-equilibrium nature [Dan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 094501 (2015)], is preserved in presence of entropic screening in the hexane solution, while it changes to Arrhenius behaviour (signifying equilibrium behaviour) in presence of enthalpic screening in methanol solution. FTIR spectra show similar dependence on the solvent induced screening in the intensities of the imine (—C = N) stretch and the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings of MBBA with hexane and methanol as in DSC, further establishing our entropic and enthalpic screening models. UV-Vis spectra of the electronic transitions in MBBA as a function of temperature also exhibit different dependences of intensities on the solvent induced screening, and an exponential decrease is observed in presence of hexane while methanol completely changes the nature of interaction to follow a linear dependence.

  11. Construction of Low Dissipative High Order Well-Balanced Filter Schemes for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, Bjorn; Magin, Thierry; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to generalize the well-balanced approach for non-equilibrium flow studied by Wang et al. [26] to a class of low dissipative high order shock-capturing filter schemes and to explore more advantages of well-balanced schemes in reacting flows. The class of filter schemes developed by Yee et al. [30], Sjoegreen & Yee [24] and Yee & Sjoegreen [35] consist of two steps, a full time step of spatially high order non-dissipative base scheme and an adaptive nonlinear filter containing shock-capturing dissipation. A good property of the filter scheme is that the base scheme and the filter are stand alone modules in designing. Therefore, the idea of designing a well-balanced filter scheme is straightforward, i.e., choosing a well-balanced base scheme with a well-balanced filter (both with high order). A typical class of these schemes shown in this paper is the high order central difference schemes/predictor-corrector (PC) schemes with a high order well-balanced WENO filter. The new filter scheme with the well-balanced property will gather the features of both filter methods and well-balanced properties: it can preserve certain steady state solutions exactly; it is able to capture small perturbations, e.g., turbulence fluctuations; it adaptively controls numerical dissipation. Thus it shows high accuracy, efficiency and stability in shock/turbulence interactions. Numerical examples containing 1D and 2D smooth problems, 1D stationary contact discontinuity problem and 1D turbulence/shock interactions are included to verify the improved accuracy, in addition to the well-balanced behavior.

  12. Comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium distribution coefficients for the human drug carbamazepine in soil.

    PubMed

    Williams, C F; Watson, J E; Nelson, S D

    2014-01-01

    The distribution coefficient (KD) for the human drug carbamazepine was measured using a non-equilibrium technique. Repacked soil columns were prepared using an Airport silt loam (Typic Natrustalf) with an average organic matter content of 2.45%. Carbamazepine solutions were then leached through the columns at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mL min(-1) representing average linear velocities of 1.8, 3.5 and 5.3 cm h(-1) respectively. Each flow rate was replicated three times and three carbamazepine pulses were applied to each column resulting in a total of 9 columns with 27 total carbamazepine pulses. Breakthrough curves were used to determine KD using the parameter fitting software CXTFIT. Results indicate that as flow rate decreased from 5.3 to 1.8 cm h(-1), KD increased an average of 21%. Additionally, KD determined by column leaching (14.7-22.7 L kg(-1)) was greater than KD determined by a 2h batch equilibrium adsorption (12.6 L kg(-1)). Based on these KD's carbamazepine would be generally characterized as non-mobile in the soil investigated. However, repeated carbamazepine applications resulted in an average 22% decrease in KD between the first and third applications. Decreasing KD is attributed to differences in sorption site kinetics and carbamazepine residence time in contact with the soil. This would indicate that the repeated use of reclaimed wastewater at high application rates for long-term irrigation or groundwater recharge has the potential to lead to greater transport of carbamazepine than KD determined by batch equilibrium would predict.

  13. Non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling in the diffuse interstellar medium - II. Shielded gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richings, A. J.; Schaye, J.; Oppenheimer, B. D.

    2014-08-01

    We extend the non-equilibrium model for the chemical and thermal evolution of diffuse interstellar gas presented in Richings et al. to account for shielding from the UV radiation field. We attenuate the photochemical rates by dust and by gas, including absorption by H I, H2, He I, He II and CO where appropriate. We then use this model to investigate the dominant cooling and heating processes in interstellar gas as it becomes shielded from the UV radiation. We consider a one-dimensional plane-parallel slab of gas irradiated by the interstellar radiation field, either at constant density and temperature or in thermal and pressure equilibrium. The dominant thermal processes tend to form three distinct regions in the clouds. At low column densities, cooling is dominated by ionized metals such as Si II, Fe II, Fe III and C II, which are balanced by photoheating, primarily from H I. Once the hydrogen-ionizing radiation becomes attenuated by neutral hydrogen, photoelectric dust heating dominates, while C II becomes dominant for cooling. Finally, dust shielding triggers the formation of CO and suppresses photoelectric heating. The dominant coolants in this fully shielded region are H2 and CO. The column density of the H I-H2 transition predicted by our model is lower at higher density (or at higher pressure for gas clouds in pressure equilibrium) and at higher metallicity, in agreement with previous photodissociation region models. We also compare the H I-H2 transition in our model to two prescriptions for molecular hydrogen formation that have been implemented in hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Non-equilibrium simulations of thermally induced electric fields in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirnsberger, P.; Fijan, D.; Šarić, A.; Neumann, M.; Dellago, C.; Frenkel, D.

    2016-06-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, it has been recently demonstrated that water molecules align in response to an imposed temperature gradient, resulting in an effective electric field. Here, we investigate how thermally induced fields depend on the underlying treatment of long-ranged interactions. For the short-ranged Wolf method and Ewald summation, we find the peak strength of the field to range between 2 × 107 and 5 × 107 V/m for a temperature gradient of 5.2 K/Å. Our value for the Wolf method is therefore an order of magnitude lower than the literature value [J. A. Armstrong and F. Bresme, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 014504 (2013); J. Armstrong et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 036101 (2015)]. We show that this discrepancy can be traced back to the use of an incorrect kernel in the calculation of the electrostatic field. More seriously, we find that the Wolf method fails to predict correct molecular orientations, resulting in dipole densities with opposite sign to those computed using Ewald summation. By considering two different multipole expansions, we show that, for inhomogeneous polarisations, the quadrupole contribution can be significant and even outweigh the dipole contribution to the field. Finally, we propose a more accurate way of calculating the electrostatic potential and the field. In particular, we show that averaging the microscopic field analytically to obtain the macroscopic Maxwell field reduces the error bars by up to an order of magnitude. As a consequence, the simulation times required to reach a given statistical accuracy decrease by up to two orders of magnitude.

  15. Entropic screening preserves non-equilibrium nature of nematic phase while enthalpic screening destroys it

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2016-02-14

    The present manuscript describes the role of entropic and enthalpic forces mediated by organic non-polar (hexane) and polar (methanol) solvents on the bulk and microscopic phase transition of a well known nematic liquid crystalline material MBBA (N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline) through Differential Scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-Visible (UV–Vis), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC study indicates continuous linear decreases in both nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature and enthalpy of MBBA in presence of hexane while both these parameters show a saturation after an initial decay in methanol. These distinct transitional behaviours were explained in terms of the “depletion force” model for entropic screening in hexane and “screening-self-screening” model for methanol. Heating rate dependent DSC studies find that non-Arrhenius behaviour, characteristic of pristine MBBA and a manifestation of non-equilibrium nature [Dan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 094501 (2015)], is preserved in presence of entropic screening in the hexane solution, while it changes to Arrhenius behaviour (signifying equilibrium behaviour) in presence of enthalpic screening in methanol solution. FTIR spectra show similar dependence on the solvent induced screening in the intensities of the imine (—C = N) stretch and the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings of MBBA with hexane and methanol as in DSC, further establishing our entropic and enthalpic screening models. UV–Vis spectra of the electronic transitions in MBBA as a function of temperature also exhibit different dependences of intensities on the solvent induced screening, and an exponential decrease is observed in presence of hexane while methanol completely changes the nature of interaction to follow a linear dependence.

  16. 2-D Modeling of Nanoscale MOSFETs: Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Electron-electron interaction is treated within Hartree approximation by solving NEGF and Poisson equations self-consistently. For the calculations presented here, parallelization is performed by distributing the solution of NEGF equations to various processors, energy wise. We present simulation of the "benchmark" MIT 25nm and 90nm MOSFETs and compare our results to those from the drift-diffusion simulator and the quantum-corrected results available. In the 25nm MOSFET, the channel length is less than ten times the electron wavelength, and the electron scattering time is comparable to its transit time. Our main results are: (1) Simulated drain subthreshold current characteristics are shown, where the potential profiles are calculated self-consistently by the corresponding simulation methods. The current predicted by our quantum simulation has smaller subthreshold slope of the Vg dependence which results in higher threshold voltage. (2) When gate oxide thickness is less than 2 nm, gate oxide leakage is a primary factor which determines off-current of a MOSFET (3) Using our 2-D NEGF simulator, we found several ways to drastically decrease oxide leakage current without compromising drive current. (4) Quantum mechanically calculated electron density is much smaller than the background doping density in the poly silicon gate region near oxide interface. This creates an additional effective gate voltage. Different ways to. include this effect approximately will be discussed.

  17. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations in a critical binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Fornasieri, Alessandro; Vailati, Alberto; Cerbino, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    When a macroscopic concentration gradient is present across a binary mixture, long-ranged non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations (NCF) appear as a consequence of the coupling between the gradient and spontaneous equilibrium velocity fluctuations. Long-ranged equilibrium concentration fluctuations (ECF) may be also observed when the mixture is close to a critical point. Here we study the interplay between NCF and critical ECF in a near-critical mixture aniline/cyclohexane in the presence of a vertical concentration gradient. To this aim, we exploit a commercial optical microscope and a simple, custom-made, temperature-controlled cell to obtain simultaneous static and dynamic scattering information on the fluctuations. We first characterise the critical ECF at fixed temperature T above the upper critical solution temperature Tc, in the wide temperature range [Formula: see text] (°)C. In this range, we observe the expected critical scaling behaviour for both the scattering intensity and the mass diffusion coefficient and we determine the critical exponents [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], which are found in agreement with the 3D Ising values. We then study the system in the two-phase region (T < T c). In particular, we characterise the interplay between ECF and NCF when the mixture, initially at a temperature Ti, is rapidly brought to a temperature T f > T i. During the transient, a vertical diffusive mass flux is present that causes the onset of NCF, whose amplitude vanishes with time, as the flux goes to zero. We also study the time dependence of the equilibrium scattering intensity I eq, of the crossover wave vector q co and of the diffusion coefficient D during diffusion and find that all these quantities exhibit an exponential relaxation enslaved to the diffusive kinetics.

  18. Many-body quantum electrodynamics networks: Non-equilibrium condensed matter physics with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hur, Karyn; Henriet, Loïc; Petrescu, Alexandru; Plekhanov, Kirill; Roux, Guillaume; Schiró, Marco

    2016-10-01

    We review recent developments regarding the quantum dynamics and many-body physics with light, in superconducting circuits and Josephson analogues, by analogy with atomic physics. We start with quantum impurity models addressing dissipative and driven systems. Both theorists and experimentalists are making efforts towards the characterization of these non-equilibrium quantum systems. We show how Josephson junction systems can implement the equivalent of the Kondo effect with microwave photons. The Kondo effect can be characterized by a renormalized light frequency and a peak in the Rayleigh elastic transmission of a photon. We also address the physics of hybrid systems comprising mesoscopic quantum dot devices coupled with an electromagnetic resonator. Then, we discuss extensions to Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) Networks allowing one to engineer the Jaynes-Cummings lattice and Rabi lattice models through the presence of superconducting qubits in the cavities. This opens the door to novel many-body physics with light out of equilibrium, in relation with the Mott-superfluid transition observed with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices. Then, we summarize recent theoretical predictions for realizing topological phases with light. Synthetic gauge fields and spin-orbit couplings have been successfully implemented in quantum materials and with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices - using time-dependent Floquet perturbations periodic in time, for example - as well as in photonic lattice systems. Finally, we discuss the Josephson effect related to Bose-Hubbard models in ladder and two-dimensional geometries, producing phase coherence and Meissner currents. The Bose-Hubbard model is related to the Jaynes-Cummings lattice model in the large detuning limit between light and matter (the superconducting qubits). In the presence of synthetic gauge fields, we show that Meissner currents subsist in an insulating Mott phase.

  19. Inviscid flux-splitting algorithms for real gases with non-equilibrium chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun; Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram

    1990-01-01

    Formulations of inviscid flux splitting algorithms for chemical nonequilibrium gases are presented. A chemical system for air dissociation and recombination is described. Numerical results for one-dimensional shock tube and nozzle flows of air in chemical nonequilibrium are examined.

  20. Fluorocarbon nano-coating of polyester fabrics by atmospheric air plasma with aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, F.; Campagne, C.; Perwuelz, A.; Gengembre, L.

    2008-04-01

    A fluorocarbon coating was deposited on polyester (PET) woven fabric using pulse discharge plasma treatment by injecting a fluoropolymer directly into the plasma dielectric barrier discharge. The objective of the treatment was to improve the hydrophobic properties as well as the repellent behaviour of the polyester fabric. Plasma treatment conditions were optimised to obtain optimal hydrophobic properties which were evaluated using water contact angle measurement as well as spray-test method at the polyester fabric surface. The study showed that adhesion of the fluoropolymer to the woven PET was greatly enhanced by the air plasma treatment. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed chemical surface modifications occurring after the plasma treatments.