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Sample records for non-filariid nematodes angiostrongylus

  1. Elucidating the spread of the emerging canid nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum between Palaearctic and Nearctic ecozones.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, R; Shaw, S E; Willesen, J; Viney, M E; Morgan, E R

    2010-05-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is an emerging parasite that is currently distributed through Western Europe and parts of South America. An isolated population is also present in Newfoundland, Canada. This presents a risk of onward spread into North America, but its origin is unknown. To ascertain the phylogeographic relationships and genetic diversity of A. vasorum within the western Palaearctic and eastern Nearctic ecozones, a total of 143 adult and larval nematode specimens were collected from foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) in Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Portugal and the United Kingdom, and a coyote (Canis latrans) in Canada. DNA was extracted and the second internal transcribed spacer and two mitochondrial loci were amplified and sequenced. Multiple haplotypes (n=35) based on combined mitochondrial sequences (1078bp) of the partial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI), large subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnL) and the complete nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 3 (NADH3) sequences, were observed throughout the Palaearctic countries sampled; however, only a single haplotype was observed for the Canadian A. vasorum population. The likely origin of A. vasorum in Newfoundland is therefore inferred to be within the western Palaearctic. There was no evidence of genetic segregation of parasites in dogs, foxes and coyotes, supporting the hypothesis that transmission occurs between wild and domestic canids. The transmission dynamics and population structure of this nematode are further discussed.

  2. Draft genome of neurotropic nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, causative agent of human eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Razali, Rozaimi; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Poole-Johnson, Johan; Anwar, Arif

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a bursate nematode parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in humans in many parts of the world. The genomic data from A. cantonensis will form a useful resource for comparative genomic and chemogenomic studies to aid the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. We have sequenced, assembled and annotated the genome of A. cantonensis. The genome size is estimated to be ∼260 Mb, with 17,280 genomic scaffolds, 91X coverage, 81.45% for complete and 93.95% for partial score based on CEGMA analysis of genome completeness. The number of predicted genes of ≥300 bp was 17,482. A total of 7737 predicted protein-coding genes of ≥50 amino acids were identified in the assembled genome. Among the proteins of known function, kinases are the most abundant followed by transferases. The draft genome contains 34 excretory-secretory proteins (ES), a minimum of 44 Nematode Astacin (NAS) metalloproteases, 12 Homeobox (HOX) genes, and 30 neurotransmitters. The assembled genome size (260 Mb) is larger than those of Pristionchus pacificus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Necator americanus, Caenorhabditis briggsae, Trichinella spiralis, Brugia malayi and Loa loa, but smaller than Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum. The repeat content (25%) is similar to H. contortus. The GC content (41.17%) is lower compared to P. pacificus (42.7%) and H. contortus (43.1%) but higher compared to C. briggsae (37.69%), A. suum (37.9%) and N. americanus (40.2%) while the scaffold N50 is 42,191. This draft genome will facilitate the understanding of many unresolved issues on the parasite and the disorder it causes.

  3. Angiostrongylus species in wild carnivores in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Gerrikagoitia, X; Barral, M; Juste, R A

    2010-11-24

    A survey of Angiostrongylus parasites was carried out between 2003 and 2006 in wild carnivore species in the Basque Country (Northern Spain). Parasitological examination consisted in the dissection of heart and lungs for the extraction of adult worms. Nematodes were identified using morphometrical features and also PCR amplification and sequencing analysis. The animal species included in this study were Eurasian badger (Meles meles), Weasel (Mustela nivalis), Beech marten (Martes foina), Pine marten (Martes martes), Polecat (Mustela putorius), American mink (Mustela vison), Red fox (Vulpes vulpes), Wolf (Canis lupus), Wild cat (Felis silvestris), and Small-spotted genet (Genetta genetta). Angiostrongylus parasites were only found in foxes and badgers at prevalences of 33.3% and 24%, respectively. Identification of the nematodes by morphometrical features revealed that foxes were infected with A. vasorum while badgers were infected by a different species of Angiostrongylus most likely A. daskalovi. Sequencing data of the second internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA (ITS2) of isolates from each species confirmed the species difference. The high prevalence of Angiostrongylus found in the present survey, indicates that the wild cycle of two different species of Angiostrongylus is present in the Basque Country. To our knowledge this is the first report of A. daskalovi in the Iberian Peninsula.

  4. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. malaysiensis Broadly Overlap in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Myanmar: A Molecular Survey of Larvae in Land Snails.

    PubMed

    Rodpai, Rutchanee; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Laymanivong, Sakhone; Aung, Win Papa; Phosuk, Issarapong; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic nematode parasite causing human eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) worldwide. A closely related species, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis, might also be a human pathogen. Larvae were obtained from land snails in Lao PDR, Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand. We sequenced two nuclear gene regions (nuclear ribosomal ITS2 and SSU rRNA) and a portion of one mitochondrial gene (COI) from these larvae. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. malaysiensis were identified. This is the first report of the molecular identification of the two Angiostrongylus species in Lao PDR, Cambodia and Myanmar. The regional distributions of the two species broadly overlap. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred including data from Angiostrongylus species deposited in public databases. All the gene regions we sequenced have potential value in distinguishing between species of Angiostrongylus. The COI gene exhibited the greatest intraspecific variation in the study region (five haplotypes in A. cantonensis and four in A. malaysiensis) and might be suitable for more detailed phylogeographic studies.

  5. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. malaysiensis Broadly Overlap in Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia and Myanmar: A Molecular Survey of Larvae in Land Snails

    PubMed Central

    Rodpai, Rutchanee; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Laymanivong, Sakhone; Aung, Win Papa; Phosuk, Issarapong; Laummaunwai, Porntip

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic nematode parasite causing human eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) worldwide. A closely related species, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis, might also be a human pathogen. Larvae were obtained from land snails in Lao PDR, Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand. We sequenced two nuclear gene regions (nuclear ribosomal ITS2 and SSU rRNA) and a portion of one mitochondrial gene (COI) from these larvae. Angiostrongylus cantonensis and A. malaysiensis were identified. This is the first report of the molecular identification of the two Angiostrongylus species in Lao PDR, Cambodia and Myanmar. The regional distributions of the two species broadly overlap. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred including data from Angiostrongylus species deposited in public databases. All the gene regions we sequenced have potential value in distinguishing between species of Angiostrongylus. The COI gene exhibited the greatest intraspecific variation in the study region (five haplotypes in A. cantonensis and four in A. malaysiensis) and might be suitable for more detailed phylogeographic studies. PMID:27513930

  6. The Prevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis/mackerrasae Complex in Molluscs from the Sydney Region

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Lee, Rogan; Shea, Michael; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Malik, Richard; Jones, Malcolm; Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Angiostrongylus mackerrasae are metastrongyloid nematodes that infect various rat species. Terrestrial and aquatic molluscs are intermediate hosts of these worms while humans and dogs are accidental hosts. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the major cause of angiostrongyliasis, a disease characterised by eosinophilic meningitis. Although both A. cantonensis and A. mackerrasae are found in Australia, A. cantonensis appears to account for most infections in humans and animals. Due to the occurrence of several severe clinical cases in Sydney and Brisbane, the need for epidemiological studies on angiostrongyliasis in this region has become apparent. In the present study, a conventional PCR and a TaqMan assay were compared for their ability to amplify Angiostrongylus DNA from DNA extracted from molluscs. The TaqMan assay was more sensitive, capable of detecting the DNA equivalent to one hundredth of a nematode larva. Therefore, the TaqMan assay was used to screen molluscs (n=500) of 14 species collected from the Sydney region. Angiostrongylus DNA was detected in 2 of the 14 mollusc species; Cornu aspersum [14/312 (4.5%)], and Bradybaenia similaris [1/10 (10%)], which are non-native terrestrial snails commonly found in urban habitats. The prevalence of Angiostrongylus spp. was 3.0% ± 0.8% (CI 95%). Additionally, experimentally infected Austropeplea lessoni snails shed A. cantonensis larvae in their mucus, implicating mucus as a source of infection. This is the first Australian study to survey molluscs using real-time PCR and confirms that the garden snail, C. aspersum, is a common intermediate host for Angiostrongylus spp. in Sydney. PMID:26000568

  7. The first report of Angiostrongylus vasorum (Nematoda; Metastrongyloidea) in Poland, in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Pyziel, Anna M; Kuligowska, Izabela; Lachowicz, Jacek

    2014-10-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum belongs to the superfamily of Metastrongyloidea. This nematode occurs in foxes, dogs and other predators. The Nematode A. vasorum place themselves in the pulmonary artery and its branches, and in the right ventricle and atrium of the heart. Numerous species of land snails are the intermediate hosts of the parasite. In 2013, lungs and hearts of 76 foxes shot in the Forest District Głęboki Bród in Augustowska Primeval Forest were parasitologically necropsied. Four of the examined foxes were infected with the nematode A. vasorum, a prevalence of 5.2%. In one fox pericardium there were 6 male and 6 female nematodes. In the remaining three foxes nematodes were localized in the pulmonary artery. In two foxes 2 specimens of nematodes were detected (male and female, and two females) while 1 female was detected in the other fox. This is the first report of the presence of the nematode A. vasorum in fox in Poland.

  8. Biology, Systematics, Life Cycle, and Distribution of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the Cause of Rat Lungworm Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a metastrongyloid nematode in the family Angiostrongylidae. It is the cause of angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease), which manifests as eosinophilic meningitis. First described in 1935 from rats in China, A. cantonensis was placed in the genus Parastrongylus in 1986, but most workers have not adopted this treatment. The taxonomy of A. cantonensis and related worms is largely based on adult morphology, notably of the male bursa. However, identification of infective third stage larvae is more difficult. The natural life cycle involves rats as the definitive host and snails or slugs as the intermediate host. Human infection, as accidental hosts, results in worms maturing in the brain, but dying there instead of moving back into the bloodstream, as in rats, thereby leading to eosinophilic meningitis. The disease is an emerging infectious disease; Angiostrongylus cantonensis continues to be reported in new regions beyond its native range. PMID:23901372

  9. Human infections with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Alto, W

    2001-03-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis and has been reported to be present on most Pacific islands. Rats are the principal host and several species of land snails the intermediate host. Important paratenic hosts are fresh water shrimp and fish. Modes of transmission include ingestion by man of raw fish, snails and fresh leafy vegetables contaminated by snail slime trails containing larvae. The parasitic worms are neurotropic in man, and the diagnosis should be considered in any adult or child, who presents, in endemic areas or areas with suitable intermediate hosts, with severe unrelenting headache, paresthesias, or a cranial nerve palsy. Eosinophils in the cerebral spinal fluid suggest the diagnosis. Simple analgesia is sufficient for mild cases. Treatment of those with severe symptoms remains controversial. Glucocorticoids, lumbar puncture to reduce intercranial pressure and antihelminthic agents have been used.

  10. Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; D'Alessio, Nicola; Di Prisco, Francesca; Neola, Benedetto; Restucci, Brunella; Pagano, Teresa B; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) infection was detected at post-mortem examination in the pulmonary arteries and hearts of 34/102 (33,3%) of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from the Campania Region in southern Italy. Pathological changes consisted of granulomatous interstitial pneumonia caused by larvae and intravascular pulmonary adult nematodes. These changes confirm that angiostrongylosis infection in red foxes has a mainly chronic course, in which the infected host may disperse parasite larvae in the environment over its lifetime. Results suggest that the life cycle of A. vasorum is well established in the red fox in the Campania Region representing a potential infection risk for dogs.

  11. Pneumonia from Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens).

    PubMed

    Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Gibbons, Lynda M; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Wenzlow, Nanny; Redrobe, Sharon P

    2009-03-01

    A 9-year-old, male, captive red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) in an urban zoo in the United Kingdom presented with respiratory distress and weight loss. The animal was euthanatized, and a postmortem examination was performed. The lungs were diffusely consolidated with extensive mineralization. Microscopically, there was extensive obliteration of normal pulmonary architecture by sheets and coalescing nodules of partially mineralized fibrous tissue and granulomatous inflammation centered on large numbers of nematode larvae and eggs. First stage nematode larvae were isolated from lung tissue and were characterized as Angiostrongylus vasorum on the basis of their morphology and sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the entire second internal transcribed spacer. Although A. vasorum has previously been reported in red pandas in a zoological collection in Denmark, this study is the first reported case in the United Kingdom and occurs against a background of geographical spread and increased incidence of disease in domestic and wild canids. Angiostrongylus vasorum should be considered a differential diagnosis for respiratory disease in the red panda and taken into account when planning parasite and pest control programs for zoological collections.

  12. Angiostrongylus chabaudi in felids: New findings and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Alessio; Kirkova, Zvezedlina; Abramo, Francesca; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Campbell, Bronwyn; Zizzo, Nicola; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-09-15

    Cardiopulmonary infections by Angiostrongylus chabaudi affect domestic and wild felids but, due to limited information on the biology of this nematode, its pathogenicity remains unclear. This article describes the histopathological alterations associated with Angiostrongylus infection in a wildcat from Bulgaria, and reviews current literature on this feline angiostrongylid. Nematodes were isolated from lung lavage and faecal samples of a road killed wildcat in Southern Bulgaria. The morphological identification of parasite larvae as A. chabaudi was confirmed by molecular analysis of part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. Upon histopathological examination, severe granulomatous pneumonia, ranging from multifocal to coalescing, and pulmonary vascular lesions were observed. Extensive alveolar collapse, alveolar emphysematous changes, parenchymal haemorrhages and small artery wall hyperplasia were observed in the parenchyma adjacent to the granulomas. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of cross-sections of adult female parasites within the lumen of the pulmonary artery branches, the intima altered markedly by subendothelial proliferation and oedematous changes. This study compliments current knowledge of the pathogenesis of feline angiostrongylosis by A. chabaudi in wildcats, as well as of the distribution of this little-known parasite.

  13. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  14. Mitochondrial Genome Supports Sibling Species of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Song, Sze-Looi; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Goh, Share-Yuan; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Chow, Wan-Loo; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abrahams-Sandi, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a zoonotic parasitic nematode that causes abdominal or intestinal angiostrongyliasis in humans. It is endemic to the Americas. Although the mitochondrial genome of the Brazil taxon has been published, there is no available mitochondrial genome data on the Costa Rica taxon. We report here the complete mitochondrial genome of the Costa Rica taxon and its genetic differentiation from the Brazil taxon. The whole mitochondrial genome was obtained from next-generation sequencing of genomic DNA. It had a total length of 13,652 bp, comprising 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes—PCGs, 2 rRNA and 22 tRNA genes) and a control region (A + T rich non-coding region). It is longer than that of the Brazil taxon (13,585 bp). The larger mitogenome size of the Costa Rica taxon is due to the size of the control region as the Brazil taxon has a shorter length (265 bp) than the Costa Rica taxon (318 bp). The size of 6 PCGs and the start codon for ATP6, CYTB and NAD5 genes are different between the Costa Rica and Brazil taxa. Additionally, the two taxa differ in the stop codon of 6 PCGs. Molecular phylogeny based on 12 PCGs was concordant with two rRNA, 22 tRNA and 36 mitochondrial genes. The two taxa have a genetic distance of p = 16.2% based on 12 PCGs, p = 15.3% based on 36 mitochondrial genes, p = 13.1% based on 2 rRNA genes and p = 10.7% based on 22 tRNA genes, indicating status of sibling species. The Costa Rica and Brazil taxa of A. costaricensis are proposed to be accorded specific status as members of a species complex. PMID:26230642

  15. Intermediate Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Tenerife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Abreu-Yanes, Estefanía; Feliu, Carlos; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores; Valladares, Basilio; Foronda, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis, the main clinical manifestation of which is eosinophilic meningitis. Although this parasite has been found recently in its definitive rat host in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), showing a widespread distribution over the north-east part of the island, there are no available data regarding which snail and/or slug species are acting as intermediate hosts on this island. Consequently, the objective of this work was to determine the possible role of three mollusc species, Plutonia lamarckii, Cornu aspersum and Theba pisana, as intermediate hosts of A. cantonensis in Tenerife. Between 2011 and 2014, 233 molluscs were collected from five biotopes where rats had been found previously to harbor either adult worms or antibodies against A. cantonensis, and the identification was carried out on the basis of morphological features and a LAMP technique. The prevalence of A. cantonensis larvae in the mollusc samples, based on morphological identification, was 19.3%, whereas 59 out of the 98 individuals (60.2%) analyzed by LAMP were positive. Positive results were obtained for the three mollusc species analyzed and two of the positive samples, both obtained from P. lamarckii, were confirmed as positive by 18S rRNA and ITS1 PCR. Sequence analysis of 18S rRNA PCR products showed 100% similarity with previously published A. cantonensis sequences. These results may be relevant from a public health point of view, since all the biotopes from which the samples were obtained were in inhabited areas or areas with human activity, but it is also important from the perspective of a possible transmission to other accidental hosts, such as dogs and horses, animals that are present in some of the areas analyzed. PMID:25803658

  16. Clinical manifestations of Eosinophilic meningitis due to infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis in children.

    PubMed

    Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Chindaprasirt, Jarin; Senthong, Vichai; Limpawattana, Panita; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tassniyom, Sompon; Chotmongkol, Verajit; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2013-12-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis, caused by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is prevalent in northeastern Thailand, most commonly in adults. Data regarding clinical manifestations of this condition in children is limited and may be different those in adults. A chart review was done on 19 eosinophilic meningitis patients aged less than 15 years in Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. Clinical manifestations and outcomes were reported using descriptive statistics. All patients had presented with severe headache. Most patients were males, had fever, nausea or vomiting, stiffness of the neck, and a history of snail ingestion. Six patients had papilledema or cranial nerve palsies. It was shown that the clinical manifestations of eosinophilic meningitis due to A. cantonensis in children are different from those in adult patients. Fever, nausea, vomiting, hepatomegaly, neck stiffness, and cranial nerve palsies were all more common in children than in adults.

  17. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae) in the Ryukyu Islands tree rat (Diplothrix legata).

    PubMed

    Okano, Tsukasa; Haga, Atsushi; Mizuno, Eriko; Onuma, Manabu; Nakaya, Yumiko; Nagamine, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic nematode with rodents serving as natural definitive hosts. We report A. cantonensis in the Ryukyu Islands tree rat (Diplothrix legata, Thomas, 1906), a native endangered species in Japan. Adult and larvae of A. cantonensis were macroscopically, histologically, and genetically detected in three tree rats collected between August 2011 and January 2012 in the Yambaru area of Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Pathologic observations of the lungs of rats showed that infection may be lethal. We also conducted a retrospective genetic survey of helminths parasitic in lung in cryopreserved lung samples of Ryukyu Islands tree rats collected between 2007 and 2011 in the Yambaru area and found A. cantonensis DNA in one of 29 samples, which was collected in December 2010.

  18. Molecular identification of novel intermediate host species of Angiostrongylus vasorum in Greater London.

    PubMed

    Patel, Zainab; Gill, A Christina; Fox, Mark T; Hermosilla, Carlos; Backeljau, Thierry; Breugelmans, Karin; Keevash, Esther; McEwan, Claudia; Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Elson-Riggins, Jocelyn G

    2014-12-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a parasitic nematode that can cause serious and potentially fatal disease in dogs and other canids. The aim of this study was to determine the intermediate slug species infected in nature by sampling sites in Greater London and Hertfordshire located within a known hyperendemic region. Overall, A. vasorum larvae were recovered from 6/381 slugs (1.6%) by tissue digestion, and their identity was confirmed by PCR. Infected slugs originated from three different sites in the Greater London area: one in Waltham Forest and two in Bromley. Slugs parasitised by A. vasorum were identified by a combination of external morphological characteristics and molecular techniques and belonged to three different families: the Arionidae, the Milacidae and the Limacidae. This includes two new host records for the parasite: Arion distinctus and Tandonia sowerbyi. This is the first record of A. vasorum in the family Milacidae, indicating that the parasite has a broader intermediate host range than previously recognised.

  19. Detection of Angiostrongylus vasorum in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Brandenburg, Germany.

    PubMed

    Härtwig, Vera; Schulze, Christoph; Barutzki, Dieter; Schaper, Roland; Daugschies, Arwid; Dyachenko, Viktor

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus (A.) vasorum is a nematode that causes angiostrongylosis in domestic and wild canids. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) are suspected of providing a wildlife reservoir for A. vasorum infections in pet dogs. To obtain data on the occurrence of A. vasorum in wildlife, red fox and raccoon dog carcasses (hunted or found dead) were collected from January to September 2009 in the Federal State of Brandenburg, Germany. Lung tissue samples were subjected to DNA extraction and examined for the presence of A. vasorum DNA by means of real-time PCR. A. vasorum DNA was detected in 11 out of 122 (9.0 %) lungs of red foxes and in none of the lung samples of raccoon dogs. These data suggest that red foxes are a reservoir of A. vasorum infections for pet dogs in this area.

  20. Quantitative PCR estimates Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm) infection levels in semi-slugs (Parmarion martensi)

    PubMed Central

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Farias, Margaret E.M.; Howe, Kay; Jacquier, Steven; Hollingsworth, Robert; Pitt, William

    2013-01-01

    The life cycle of the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis involves rats as the definitive host and slugs and snails as intermediate hosts. Humans can become infected upon ingestion of intermediate or paratenic (passive carrier) hosts containing stage L3 A. cantonensis larvae. Here, we report a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay that provides a reliable, relative measure of parasite load in intermediate hosts. Quantification of the levels of infection of intermediate hosts is critical for determining A. cantonensis intensity on the Island of Hawaii. The identification of high intensity infection ‘hotspots’ will allow for more effective targeted rat and slug control measures. qPCR appears more efficient and sensitive than microscopy and provides a new tool for quantification of larvae from intermediate hosts, and potentially from other sources as well. PMID:22902292

  1. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis: an emergent disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; Thiengo, Silvana Carvalho; Fernandez, Monica; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis (EoM) is an acute disease that affects the central nervous system. It is primarily caused by infection with the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This infection was previously restricted to certain Asian countries and the Pacific Islands, but it was first reported in Brazil in 2007. Since then, intermediate and definitive hosts infected with A. cantonensis have been identified within the urban areas of many states in Brazil, including those in the northern, northeastern, southeastern and southern regions. The goals of this review are to draw the attention of the medical community and health centres to the emergence of EoM in Brazil, to compile information about several aspects of the human infection and mode of transmission and to provide a short protocol of procedures for the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:25075779

  2. Morphological aspects of Angiostrongylus costaricensis by light and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Karina M; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Chagas-Moutinho, Vanessa A; Mota, Ester M; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Oliveira-Menezes, Aleksandra; Lenzi, Henrique

    2013-09-01

    Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a parasitic nematode that can cause severe gastrointestinal disease, known as abdominal angiostrongiliasis, in humans. This paper presents the characterization of first- and third-stage larvae and male and female adult worms of A. costaricensis by scanning electron and light microscopy. Several novel anatomical structures were identified by scanning electron microscopy, including details of the cuticular striations of the spicules in male worms and a protective flap of the cuticle covering the vulvar aperture in female worms. Other taxonomic features revealed by light microscopy include the gubernaculum and the esophageal-intestinal valve. The use of two microscopy techniques allowed a detailed characterization of the morphology of this nematode. A number of previously identified taxonomic features, such as the striated nature of the spicules and the lateral alae were confirmed; however, the use of scanning electron microscopy resulted in a reassessment of the correct number of papillae distributed around the oral opening and behind the cloacal opening. These observations, in combination with light microscopy-based characterization of the gubernaculum and esophageal valves, have allowed a more detailed description of this nematode taxonomy.

  3. Use of a commercial serologic test for Angiostrongylus vasorum for the detection of A. chabaudi in wildcats and A. daskalovi in badgers.

    PubMed

    Deak, Georgiana; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Ionică, Angela Monica; Daskalaki, Aikaterini Alexandra; Matei, Ioana Adriana; D'Amico, Gianluca; Domşa, Cristian; Pantchev, Nikola; Mihalca, Andrei Daniel; Cozma, Vasile

    2017-01-15

    Three species of the genus Angiostrongylus are known to infect European carnivores: A. vasorum (mainly in canids but also in other carnivores), A. chabaudi (in felids) and A. daskalovi (in mustelids). A. vasorum is responsible for clinically severe disease in domestic dogs, most commonly diagnosed based on fecal examination and serological detection of circulating antigens. Considering the poorly known host range and the challenging larval differentiation in the feces between the three species of Angiostrongylus infecting European carnivores, our aim was to evaluate the cross-reactivity of A. chabaudi and A. daskalovi with A. vasorum using a commercial serologic test developed for domestic dogs. Badgers (Meles meles) (n=10) and wildcats (Felis silvestris) (n=8) were examined between 2015 and 2016 by full parasitological necropsy with subsequent morphological and molecular identification of nematodes and by serology, using IDEXX Angio Detect™ tests. Five out of the ten badgers and two out of the eight wildcats were harboring nematodes in the pulmonary arteries. All nematodes were identified morphologically as A. daskalovi in badgers and A. chabaudi in wildcats, respectively. Serological examination of the plasma samples revealed the positivity of the same animals as found in necropsy. None of the animals negative at necropsy was positive at serology. The 100% correlation between the necropsy results and the serologic positivity to IDEXX Angio Detect™ in badgers infected with A. daskalovi and wildcats infected with A. chabaudi suggest that these rapid tests are able to identify circulating antigens of all species of Angiostrongylus found in European carnivores: A. vasorum, A. daskalovi and A. chabaudi. The possibility for future in-clinic use of this test in domestic cats should be further investigated.

  4. Intrathecal Synthesis of Immunoglobulins in Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis Due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan; Reiber, Hansotto

    1998-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis due to the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is endemic to Cuba, occurs in children and is due to accidental contact with soil snails. The course is less often fatal than in adult patients in southeastern Asia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples from 24 pediatric patients were analyzed and evaluated in CSF/serum quotient diagrams (Reiber graphs) to characterize the neuroimmunological response and the blood-CSF barrier dysfunction that occur in the course of the disease. At the time of the first diagnostic lumbar puncture, together with eosinophilic pleocytosis (1,920 ± 400 cells/μl), intermediate blood-CSF barrier dysfunction (i.e., an increased CSF/serum albumin quotient) with no intrathecal immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, and IgM class response was observed in all cases. Seven days later, at the time of early clinical recovery, the blood-CSF barrier dysfunction was normalized in 75% of the patients, but meanwhile, intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis emerged in all cases, as either a two-class response (IgG and IgA in 85% of the patients) or a three-class response (IgG, IgA, and IgM; 30%). The fraction of eosinophilic cells (40%) remained large despite a decreasing total cell count. The neuroimmunological pattern of this inflammatory response to the parasite and its toxins is discussed with regard to the CSF patterns of other infectious diseases caused by bacteria or viruses. PMID:9665947

  5. Fatal Angiostrongylus dujardini infection in callitrichid monkeys and suricates in an Italian zoological garden.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Claudia; Di Cesare, Angela; Cavicchio, Paolo; Tonnicchia, Maria Cristina; Meoli, Roberta; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Paoletti, Barbara; Pietrobelli, Mario; De Liberato, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports four fatal cases of metastrongylid nematode Angiostrongylus dujardini infection observed in a Saguinus oedipus and a Callimico goeldii monkey and in two suricates (Suricata suricatta). All animals were kept in captivity in a zoo of central Italy. The two monkeys died with no premonitory signs, while the two-month-old suricates showed malaise, anorexia and tachypnea for a few days prior to death. Cardiomegaly and/or granulomatous pneumonia were the major anatomo-pathological findings. Inflammatory lesions were observed in the liver, heart and kidney of the suricates at histology. A. dujardini diagnosis was confirmed through both morphological identification of adult worms recovered at necropsy and molecular characterization of larvae in tissue samples. Callitrichidae and suricates are active predators and maintain their hunting behaviour in captivity and it is then likely that they were exposed to infection by preying on parasitized gastropods, intermediate hosts of A. dujardini, entering zoo enclosures from the surrounding environment. This is the first report of A. dujardini in Italy and in S. suricatta.

  6. Seroprevalence of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and parasite-specific antibodies in dogs from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Meireles, José; Belo, Silvana; Deplazes, Peter; de Carvalho, Luís Madeira

    2016-07-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a nematode that lives in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of domestic dogs and wild canids. It is increasingly being reported in several European countries and North America. This parasite induces inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. In some instances, coagulopathies, neurological signs and even death may occur. Scant data are available regarding the occurrence of A. vasorum in Portugal. Therefore, sera of 906 shelter dogs from North to South mainland Portugal were collected. ELISAs to detect A. vasorum circulating antigen and specific antibodies against this parasite were performed. A total of six dogs [0.66 %, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 0.24-1.43] were positive for both A. vasorum antigen and antibody detection, indicating an active infection, and 12 dogs (1.32 %, CI 0.68-2.30) were A. vasorum antibody-positive only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly all sampled areas in the country. This is the first large-scale ELISA-based serological survey for A. vasorum in dogs from Portugal. The endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs from different geographical areas of Portugal is therefore confirmed.

  7. Susceptibility of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to concomitant infection with Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Guerino, L R; Carvalho, J F; Magalhães, L A; Zanotti-Magalhães, E M

    2016-09-26

    The easy adaptation of Angiostrongylus costaricensis, nematode responsible for abdominal angiostrongyliasis to several species of terrestrial and freshwater molluscs and the differences observed in the interactions of trematodes with their intermediate hosts have induced us to study the concomitant infection of Biomphalaria glabrata with Schistosoma mansoni and A. costaricensis. Prior exposure of B. glabrata to A. costaricensis (with an interval of 48 hours), favored the development of S. mansoni, observing higher infection rate, increased release of cercariae and increased survival of molluscs, when compared to molluscs exposed only to S. mansoni. Prior exposure of B. glabrata to A. costaricensis and then to S. mansoni also enabled the development of A. costaricensis since in the ninth week of infection, higher amount of A. costaricensis L3 larvae was recovered (12 larvae / mollusc) while for molluscs exposed only to A. costaricensis, the number of larvae recovered was lower (8 larvae / mollusc). However, pre-exposure of B. glabrata to S. mansoni (with an interval of 24 hours), and subsequently exposure to A. costaricensis proved to be very harmful to B. glabrata, causing extensive mortality of molluscs, reduced pre-patent period to release cercariae and greater recovery of L3 A. costaricensis larvae.

  8. Geographical distribution of Angiostrongylus vasorum in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, G; Ferrand, M; De Waal, T; Zintl, A; McGrath, G; Byrne, W; O'Neill, E J

    2016-04-01

    The reported incidence of the metastrongylid nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, that infects dogs and other canids, is increasing worldwide outside recognized endemic foci. This apparent expansion of the parasite's range is causing concern to veterinary clinicians as the disease caused in dogs can be life threatening and its treatment is not straightforward. The red fox is thought to be a reservoir host for dogs. To investigate the spatial distribution of infection in foxes in Ireland, the hearts and lungs of 542 foxes from all over Ireland were examined. The incidence of infection was found to be 39·9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 35·7-44·1] with positive samples occurring in each of the country's 26 counties. This report confirms that the parasite is endemic in Ireland and the overall prevalence is the second highest in Europe. This is the first survey of A. vasorum infection in Irish foxes and highlights the potential exposure of the Irish dog population to high risk of cross-infection. Additionally, Crenosoma vulpis was found in seven of the foxes, a parasite not previously reported in the Irish fox.

  9. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100–500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where

  10. Species of Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) in wildlife: A review.

    PubMed

    Spratt, David M

    2015-08-01

    Twenty-one species of Angiostrongylus plus Angiostrongylus sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea) are known currently in wildlife. These occur naturally in rodents, tupaiids, mephitids, mustelids, procyonids, felids, and canids, and aberrantly in a range of avian, marsupial and eutherian hosts including humans. Adults inhabit the pulmonary arteries and right atrium, ventricle and vena cava, bronchioles of the lung or arteries of the caecum and mesentery. All species pass first-stage larvae in the faeces of the host and all utilise slugs and/or aquatic or terrestrial snails as intermediate hosts. Gastropods are infected by ingestion or penetration of first-stage larvae; definitive hosts by ingestion of gastropods or gastropod slime. Transmission of at least one species may involve ingestion of paratenic hosts. Five developmental pathways are identified in these life cycles. Thirteen species, including Angiostrongylus sp., are known primarily from the original descriptions suggesting limited geographic distributions. The remaining species are widespread either globally or regionally, and are continuing to spread. Small experimental doses of infective larvae (ca. 20) given to normal or aberrant hosts are tolerated, although generally eliciting a granulomatous histopathological response; large doses (100-500 larvae) often result in clinical signs and/or death. Two species, A. cantonensis and A. costaricensis, are established zoonoses causing neurological and abdominal angiostrongliasis respectively. The zoonotic potential of A. mackerrasae, A. malaysiensis and A. siamensis particularly warrant investigation. Angiostrongylus cantonensis occurs in domestic animals, mammalian and avian wildlife and humans in the metropolitan areas of Brisbane and Sydney, Australia, where it has been suggested that tawny frogmouths and brushtail possums may serve as biosentinels. A major conservation issue is the devastating role A. cantonensis may play around zoos and fauna parks where captive

  11. Angiostrongylus cantonensis cathepsin B-like protease (Ac-cathB-1) is involved in host gut penetration

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ying; Cao, Binbin; Yu, Liang; Tukayo, Meks; Feng, Chonglv; Wang, Yinan; Luo, Damin

    2015-01-01

    Although the global spread of the emerging zoonosis, human angiostrongyliasis, has attracted increasing attention, understanding of specific gene function has been impeded by the inaccessibility of genetic manipulation of the pathogen nematode causing this disease, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Many parasitic proteases play key roles in host-parasite interactions, but those of A. cantonensis are always expressed as the inactive form in prokaryotic expression systems, thereby impeding functional studies. Hence, a lentiviral system that drives secreted expression of target genes fused to a Myc-His tag was used to obtain recombinant Ac-cathB-1 with biological activity. Although this class of proteases was always reported to function in nutrition and immune evasion in parasitic nematodes, recombinant Ac-cathB-1 was capable of hydrolysis of fibronectin and laminin as well as the extracellular matrix of IEC-6 monolayer, so that the intercellular space of the IEC-6 monolayer increased 5.15 times as compared to the control, while the shape of the adherent cells partly rounded up. This suggests a probable role for this protease in intestinal epithelial penetration. The inhibition of Ac-cathB-1 enzymatic activity with antiserum partly suppressed larval penetration ability in the isolated intestine. Thus, an effective system for heterologous expression of parasite proteases is presented for studying gene function in A. cantonensis; and Ac-cathB-1 was related to larval penetration ability in the host small intestine. PMID:26682577

  12. Insights into the immuno-molecular biology of Angiostrongylus vasorum through transcriptomics--prospects for new interventions.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; Schnyder, Manuela; Deplazes, Peter; Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Hall, Ross S; Mangiola, Stefano; Boag, Peter R; Hofmann, Andreas; Sternberg, Paul W; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-12-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a metastrongyloid nematode of dogs and other canids of major clinical importance in many countries. In order to gain first insights into the molecular biology of this worm, we conducted the first large-scale exploration of its transcriptome, and predicted essential molecules linked to metabolic and biological processes as well as host immune responses. We also predicted and prioritized drug targets and drug candidates. Following Illumina sequencing (RNA-seq), 52.3 million sequence reads representing adult A. vasorum were assembled and annotated. The assembly yielded 20,033 contigs, which encoded proteins with 11,505 homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, and additional 2252 homologues in various other parasitic helminths for which curated data sets were publicly available. Functional annotation was achieved for 11,752 (58.6%) proteins predicted for A. vasorum, including peptidases (4.5%) and peptidase inhibitors (1.6%), protein kinases (1.7%), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (1.5%) and phosphatases (1.2%). Contigs encoding excretory/secretory and immuno-modulatory proteins represented some of the most highly transcribed molecules, and encoded enzymes that digest haemoglobin were conserved between A. vasorum and other blood-feeding nematodes. Using an essentiality-based approach, drug targets, including neurotransmitter receptors, an important chemosensory ion channel and cysteine proteinase-3 were predicted in A. vasorum, as were associated small molecular inhibitors/activators. Future transcriptomic analyses of all developmental stages of A. vasorum should facilitate deep explorations of the molecular biology of this important parasitic nematode and support the sequencing of its genome. These advances will provide a foundation for exploring immuno-molecular aspects of angiostrongylosis and have the potential to underpin the discovery of new methods of intervention.

  13. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis--a neglected disease with escalating importance.

    PubMed

    Eamsobhana, P

    2014-12-01

    The rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, a food-borne zoonotic parasite, has been recognized as the primary pathogen associated with human eosinophilic meningitis or eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. This neurotropic nematode has a definitive rodent host and a molluscan intermediate host. The adult worms live in the pulmonary arteries of rats. Human is a non-permissive, accidental host. Transmission to humans is by eating of infected raw or undercooked snails, poorly cleaned contaminated vegetables or other infected paratenic hosts such as freshwater prawns, crabs, frogs or monitor lizards. Thousands of diagnosed cases of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis have been reported worldwide. Angiostrongyliasis is of increasing public health importance as globalization contributes to the geographical spread and more international travelers encounter the disease. The parasite is on the move. It has spread from its traditional endemic areas of Asia and the Pacific Basin to the American continent including the USA, Brazil and Caribbean islands. Recently, the incidence of human infections has increased rapidly. Most reports of the disease are from Thailand and Taiwan with increasing reports from mainland China. The rapid global spread of the parasite and the emerging occurrence of the infection pose challenges in clinical and laboratory diagnosis, and in epidemiology and basic biology. Enhanced understanding of the epidemiology of angiostrongyliasis, increased public awareness about the risks associated with eating raw or undercooked food, and enhanced food safety measures are needed. Therefore, current knowledge on various aspects of the parasite and the disease it causes, as well as recent epidemiological status together with significant progress in laboratory investigation of A. cantonensis infection, are overviewed to promote understanding and awareness of this emerging neglected disease.

  14. Seroprevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Wild Rodents from the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Alonso, Aarón; Foronda, Pilar; Quispe-Ricalde, María Antonieta; Feliu, Carlos; Valladares, Basilio

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a lungworm of rats (Muridae) that is the causative agent of human cerebral angiostrongyliasis. The life cycle of A. cantonensis involves rats and mollusks as the definitive and intermediate hosts, respectively. This study was designed to increase the knowledge about the occurrence and distribution of A. cantonensis in its definitive host in the Canary Islands, using parasitological and serological analysis in different areas and age groups. Methodology/Principal Findings Between 2009 and 2010, 54 black rats (Rattus rattus) from Tenerife were captured from six human-inhabited areas and sera samples were obtained. The lung nematodes were identified by morphological and molecular tools as A. cantonensis. The 31-kDa glycoprotein antigen was purified from A. cantonensis adult worms by electrophoresis and electroelution. Of the 54 tested rodents, 30 showed IgG antibodies against A. cantonensis 31-kDa antigen by ELISA. Therefore, the overall seroprevalence was 55.6% (95% CI: 42.4–68). Seroprevalent rodents were found in all the 6 areas. This 31-kDa antigen was not recognized by some sera of rats infected by other helminth species (but not A. cantonensis). Seroprevalence of IgG antibodies against A. cantonensis and prevalence based on the presence of adult worms showed significant correlation (R2 = 0.954, p<0.05). Conclusions/Significance The present results could indicate a high prevalence of A. cantonensis in Tenerife and suggest the inclusion of two new zones in the distribution area of the parasite. The commonness and wide distribution of A. cantonensis in rats implies the presence of intermediate hosts, indicating that humans may be at risk of getting infected. PMID:22110752

  15. First report of Angiostrongylus vasorum and Hepatozoon from a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from West Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Whitney M; Brown, Justin D; Allison, Andrew B; Nemeth, Nicole M; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-02-24

    Angiostrongylus vasorum was identified in the lungs of a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from West Virginia, United States (US), indicating a new geographical location for this metastrongylid nematode. The fox was euthanized and submitted for necropsy after displaying erratic behavior. We did not detect rabies virus or canine distemper virus from the fox. We observed bronchopneumonia associated with A. vasorum infection disseminated in both lungs. In addition, protozoal meronts were observed in the liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph node, and were identified as Hepatozoon canis. Lymphoid depletion was also observed in the spleen and mesenteric lymph node. In addition to A. vasorum and H. canis infections, Eucoleus aerophilus eggs and adult worms were observed in the lungs of the fox. Severe lesions associated with A. vasorum infection were observed in the lungs and these were determined to be the likely cause of morbidity; however, synergistic effects among the multiple infections detected in this fox cannot be ruled out. This is the first report of an autochthonous A. vasorum infection in the US and from outside of Newfoundland Canada, the only place in North America where the parasite is known to be endemic. Additionally, this is the first report of a H. canis infection in a red fox from the US.

  16. Biochemical profile of Achatina fulica (Mollusca: Gastropoda) after infection by different parasitic loads of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae).

    PubMed

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi, Victor Menezes; Amaral, Ludimila Santos; Mota, Esther Maria; Maldonado Júnior, Arnaldo; Pinheiro, Jairo; Garcia, Juberlan

    2015-01-01

    The effect of experimental infection by different parasitic loads of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematode, Metastrongylidae) on the activities of the aminotransferases and concentration of total proteins, uric acid and urea in the hemolymph of Achatina fulica (Mollusca, Gastropoda) were investigated. There was a significant decrease in the concentration of total proteins in the exposed snails to 5000 or more larvae. This change was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of urea and uric acid in the hemolymph, suggesting a higher rate of deamination of the amino acids. Besides this, variations in the activities of the aminotransferases were also observed, with the highest values recorded in the groups exposed to greater parasite load. These results suggest an increase in the use of total proteins, since there was increased formation of nitrogenous catabolites, in conformity with an increase in the aminotransferase activities. Infection was verified by the fact that L3 larvae recovered from the snails was proportion to the exposure dose of L1 larvae. Histopathological results also indicated presence of an inflammatory cell infiltrate, favoring an increase of both transaminases.

  17. Spread of the Rat Lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) in Giant African Land Snails (Lissachatina fulica) in Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, Deborah D; Sanders, Lakyn R; Schill, W Bane; Xayavong, Maniphet V; da Silva, Alexandre J; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Smith, Trevor

    2015-07-01

    The rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) is a parasitic nematode that causes rat lungworm disease. It is the leading cause of eosinophilic meningitis and is a zoonotic health risk. We confirmed the presence of A. cantonensis using species-specific, quantitative PCR in 18 of 50 (36%) giant African land snails (Lissachatina fulica) collected from Miami, Florida, US in May 2013. These snails were collected from seven of 21 core areas that the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services monitor weekly. Rat lungworms have not previously been identified in these areas. Duplicate DNA extractions of foot muscle tissue from each snail were tested. Of the seven core areas we examined, six were positive for A. cantonensis and prevalence of infection ranged from 27% to 100%. Of the 18 positive snails, only five were positive in both extractions. Our results confirm an increase in the range and prevalence of rat lungworm infection in Miami. We also emphasize the importance of extracting sufficient host tissue to minimize false negatives.

  18. Effects of Washing Produce Contaminated with the Snail and Slug Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with Three Common Household Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  19. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms.

  20. Identification and characterisation of microRNAs in young adults of Angiostrongylus cantonensis via a deep-sequencing approach

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Hsin; Tang, Petrus; Lai, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Ming-Ling; Wang, Lian-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an important causative agent of eosinophilic meningitis and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that participate in a wide range of biological processes. This study employed a deep-sequencing approach to study miRNAs from young adults of A. cantonensis. Based on 16,880,456 high-quality reads, 252 conserved mature miRNAs including 10 antisense miRNAs that belonging to 90 families, together with 10 antisense miRNAs were identified and characterised. Among these sequences, 53 miRNAs from 25 families displayed 50 or more reads. The conserved miRNA families were divided into four groups according to their phylogenetic distribution and a total of nine families without any members showing homology to other nematodes or adult worms were identified. Stem-loop real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of aca-miR-1-1 and aca-miR-71-1 demonstrated that their level of expression increased dramatically from infective larvae to young adults and then decreased in adult worms, with the male worms exhibiting significantly higher levels of expression than female worms. These findings provide information related to the regulation of gene expression during the growth, development and pathogenesis of young adults of A. cantonensis. PMID:24037191

  1. Parastrongylus (=Angiostrongylus) cantonensis now endemic in Louisiana wildlife.

    PubMed

    Kim, D Y; Stewart, T B; Bauer, R W; Mitchell, M

    2002-10-01

    Parastrongylus (=Angiostrongylus) cantonensis, a lung worm of rats, was first reported in the United States in 1987, with a probable introduction by infected rats from ships docking in New Orleans, Louisiana, during the mid-1980s. Since then, it has been reported in nonhuman primates and a boy from New Orleans, and in a horse from Picayune, Mississippi, a distance of 87 km from New Orleans. Parastrongylus cantonensis infection is herein reported in a lemur (Varencia variegata rubra) from New Iberia, Louisiana, a distance of 222 km from New Orleans, and in a wood rat (Neotomafloridanus) and in 4 opossums (Didelphis virginiana) from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, a distance of 124 km from New Orleans. The potential of a great variety of gastropods serving as intermediate hosts in Louisiana may pose a threat to wildlife as well as to domesticated animals in the areas where infected Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are present.

  2. [Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in a dog with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection].

    PubMed

    Kruse, B D; Hartmann, K; Groth, A; Schulz, B; Wehner, A

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old female spayed Epagneul-Breton dog was presented with ecchymoses, but an undisturbed general condition. Clinical examination additionally revealed petechia and a haematoma. Travel history included Italy and Denmark. Laboratory abnormalities were moderate thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, aPTT and TT, and elevated d-dimers. Initial therapy consisted of plasma transfusions, fluids, doxycycline and famotidine administration. Babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, leishmaniosis, dirofilariosis or anaplasmosis could not be confirmed. Abdominal ultrasound was unremarkable, while thoracic radiographs showed a bronchointerstitial pattern. Faecal samples collected over 3 days were positive for Angiostrongylus vasorum after examination using the Baermann lungworm test. The A. vasorum infection was successfully treated with fenbendazole, whereupon thrombocytopenia and prolonged coagulation times were resolved. In regions of low prevalence, an infection with A. vasorum should also be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with coagulation abnormalities. Respiratory signs can be absent with this disease. The patient may have acquired the infection abroad or in Germany.

  3. Control measures for slug and snail hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, with special reference to the semi-slug Parmarion martensi.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Robert G; Howe, Kathleen; Jarvi, Susan I

    2013-06-01

    Slugs and snails (class Gastropoda) are the obligate intermediate hosts of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This nematode is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis and the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Humans can become infected by accidental consumption of slugs or snails and possibly flatworms (or a portion of one of these animals) in fresh produce, but the slime from these animals can contain nematodes and may also constitute a disease risk. Gastropod carriers in Hawa'i include, among other species, giant African snails, veronicellid slugs, and the semi-slug Parmarion martensi. This latter species was first discovered on the island of Hawa'i in 2004 and is now common in the area where the majority of the state's documented cases of human angiostrongyliasis occurred between 2005 and 2011. This species is considered a high risk carrier of A. cantonensis because of its climbing behavior, abundance around human dwellings, and high worm burdens. One individual collected from east Hawa'i Island contained >6,800 infective third stage A. cantonensis larvae. Common and efficient control methods for slugs and snails include sanitation (eg, removal of objects that serve as hiding places) and the use of poison food baits, such as those containing metaldehyde and iron. An iron-containing bait that is relatively safe to non-target organisms was effective in controlling semi-slugs in cage experiments, although it killed more slowly than a metaldehyde-containing bait and the majority of slugs affected did not die until 1-2 weeks following ingestion.

  4. Control Measures for Slug and Snail Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, with Special Reference to the Semi-slug Parmarion martensi

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Kathleen; Jarvi, Susan I

    2013-01-01

    Slugs and snails (class Gastropoda) are the obligate intermediate hosts of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This nematode is the causative agent of human angiostrongyliasis and the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Humans can become infected by accidental consumption of slugs or snails and possibly flatworms (or a portion of one of these animals) in fresh produce, but the slime from these animals can contain nematodes and may also constitute a disease risk. Gastropod carriers in Hawai‘i include, among other species, giant African snails, veronicellid slugs, and the semi-slug Parmarion martensi. This latter species was first discovered on the island of Hawai‘i in 2004 and is now common in the area where the majority of the state's documented cases of human angiostrongyliasis occurred between 2005 and 2011. This species is considered a high risk carrier of A. cantonensis because of its climbing behavior, abundance around human dwellings, and high worm burdens. One individual collected from east Hawai‘i Island contained >6,800 infective third stage A. cantonensis larvae. Common and efficient control methods for slugs and snails include sanitation (eg, removal of objects that serve as hiding places) and the use of poison food baits, such as those containing metaldehyde and iron. An iron-containing bait that is relatively safe to non-target organisms was effective in controlling semi-slugs in cage experiments, although it killed more slowly than a metaldehyde-containing bait and the majority of slugs affected did not die until 1–2 weeks following ingestion. PMID:23901389

  5. Pathological findings of Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Central Italy, with the first report of a disseminated infection in this host species.

    PubMed

    Eleni, Claudia; Grifoni, Goffredo; Di Egidio, Alessandra; Meoli, Roberta; De Liberato, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    In Europe, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is considered the reservoir of Angiostrongylus vasorum, nematode residing in the pulmonary arteries and right heart of dogs and many species of wild carnivores. Italy is considered one of the European countries where this nematode is actually spreading. Between May 2007 and November 2013, 62 foxes found dead in Central Italy were necropsied. Right heart and pulmonary arteries were opened and checked for the presence of adult parasites. Impression smears from sectioned lungs were examined for the presence of first-stage larvae, and samples of lungs were processed for histological examination. In order to detect eventual disseminated infections, samples of heart, pulmonary lymph nodes, liver, kidneys, and brain of foxes positive for A. vasorum at necropsy or lungs histological examination were processed for histological examination. An overall prevalence of 43.5% was recorded. Light, mild, and severe lung lesions were detected in 33.3, 22.2, and 25.9% of infected animals, respectively. Severe lesions were more frequent in animals younger than 12 months. In five infected foxes (18.5%), no gross lesions were observed, while for three animals, angiostrongylosis was considered the cause of death. A case of disseminated angiostrongylosis was detected and another one was suspected. This is the firs report of disseminated angiostrongylosis in the fox.

  6. Fleas infesting pets in the era of emerging extra-intestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Donato

    2013-03-07

    Modifications in climatic conditions, movements of hosts and goods, changes in animal phenology and human behaviour and increase of wildlife, are presently concurring in the geographic spread of vectors and cardio-respiratory nematodes, e.g. Dirofilaria immitis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Capillaria aerophila. All these factors may also influence dispersion and clinical significance of fleas, thus posing relevant challenges in those regions where other parasites are emerging at the same time. Ctenocephalides felis, Ctenocephalides canis and Pulex irritans cause discomfort, nuisance, allergic reactions, anaemia, and may transmit several pathogens, some of them are of importance for public health. The present article reviews the importance of fleas in small animal practice and their sanitary relevance for dogs, cats and humans, and discusses current control methods in the present era of emerging extra-intestinal nematodes, towards a possible changing perspective for controlling key parasites affecting companion animals.

  7. Fleas infesting pets in the era of emerging extra-intestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Modifications in climatic conditions, movements of hosts and goods, changes in animal phenology and human behaviour and increase of wildlife, are presently concurring in the geographic spread of vectors and cardio-respiratory nematodes, e.g. Dirofilaria immitis, Angiostrongylus vasorum, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Capillaria aerophila. All these factors may also influence dispersion and clinical significance of fleas, thus posing relevant challenges in those regions where other parasites are emerging at the same time. Ctenocephalides felis, Ctenocephalides canis and Pulex irritans cause discomfort, nuisance, allergic reactions, anaemia, and may transmit several pathogens, some of them are of importance for public health. The present article reviews the importance of fleas in small animal practice and their sanitary relevance for dogs, cats and humans, and discusses current control methods in the present era of emerging extra-intestinal nematodes, towards a possible changing perspective for controlling key parasites affecting companion animals. PMID:23497511

  8. Human Parasitic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Shen; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Taiwan is Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are infected by ingesting terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. In 1998 and 1999, two outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection were reported among 17 adult male immigrant Thai laborers who had eaten raw golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata). Another outbreak associated with consuming a health drink consisting of raw vegetable juice was reported in 2001. These adult cases differed from reports in the 1970s and 1980s, in which most of the cases were in children. With improvements in public health and education of foreign laborers, there have since been only sporadic cases in Taiwan. Review of clinical research indicates inconsistent association of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results with clinical features of eosinophilic meningitis. MRI features were nonspecific but there was an association between the presence of high brain MRI signal intensities and severity of peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Inflammatory markers have been identified in the CSF of patients with eosinophlic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and the matrix metalloproteinase system may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection is not a reportable disease in Taiwan. It is important that a public advisory and education program be developed to reduce future accidental infection. PMID:23901378

  9. Human parasitic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Chen, Yao-Shen; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-06-01

    The major cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Taiwan is Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are infected by ingesting terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. In 1998 and 1999, two outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection were reported among 17 adult male immigrant Thai laborers who had eaten raw golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata). Another outbreak associated with consuming a health drink consisting of raw vegetable juice was reported in 2001. These adult cases differed from reports in the 1970s and 1980s, in which most of the cases were in children. With improvements in public health and education of foreign laborers, there have since been only sporadic cases in Taiwan. Review of clinical research indicates inconsistent association of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results with clinical features of eosinophilic meningitis. MRI features were nonspecific but there was an association between the presence of high brain MRI signal intensities and severity of peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Inflammatory markers have been identified in the CSF of patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and the matrix metalloproteinase system may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection is not a reportable disease in Taiwan. It is important that a public advisory and education program be developed to reduce future accidental infection.

  10. Nematodes (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are roundworms in the phylum Nematoda. Although most are free-living, some nematodes are parasites of plants, humans, or livestock. Entomopathogenic nematodes in the families Steinernematidae & Heterorhabditidae only parasitize insects. These nematodes are used as environmentally friend...

  11. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the vector snails Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica in China: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Langui; Wang, Xiaowen; Yang, Zi; Lv, Zhiyue; Wu, Zhongdao

    2016-03-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is a food-borne parasitic disease induced by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been recognized as the main cause leading to human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans usually acquire infection by digestion of infected Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica, the most predominant intermediate hosts found in China. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the prevalence of A. cantonensis infection among these two snails in China in the past 10 years. Data were systematically collected in electronic databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CNKI, SinoMed, VIP, CSCD, and Wanfang from 2005 to 2015. Thirty-eight studies with a total of 41,299 P. canaliculata and 21,138 Ac. fulica were included in the present study. The overall infection rate of A. cantonensis in China was estimated to be 7.6 % (95 % confidential interval (CI) = 0.063 to 0.090) in P. canaliculata and 21.5 % in Ac. fulica (95 % CI = 0.184 to 0.245), respectively. No significant difference was observed in prevalence rates among publication year and sample size for both snails. Also, it was found that the prevalence in Ac. fulica is significantly higher than that in P. canaliculata (odds ratio (OR) = 3.946, 95 % CI = 3.070 to 5.073). The present study reveals that snail infection with A. cantonensis is clearly prevalent in China. Further studies are required to improve strategies for control of infections of snails, particularly those of Ac. fulica, and to detect further factors and conditions such as geographic region, temperatures, and diagnosis method.

  12. Combined Serological Detection of Circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum Antigen and Parasite-specific Antibodies in Dogs from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Lukács, Zoltán; Hornok, Sándor; Farkas, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of the nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, also known as the French heartworm, is increasingly being reported from various European countries. The adults of this parasite species live in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of wild canids and domestic dogs. Larval stages and eggs in the lungs induce inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. Furthermore, haematological and neurological signs and even death may occur. In Hungary, A. vasorum has been identified in red foxes, golden jackals and in two dogs and some slugs. In this first large-scale survey, 1247 sera from pet dogs were collected and tested by an ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen of A. vasorum and by a separate ELISA to detect specific antibodies against the parasite. A total of 1.36% (n = 17, 95 % confidence intervals, CI: 0.80 - 2.17 %) of the animals were positive in both ELISAs, while 1.76 % (n = 22, CI: 1.11 - 2.66 %) of the tested dogs were antigen-positive only and 2.73 % (n = 34, CI: 1.90 - 3.79 %) were positive for specific antibodies only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly the whole sampled areas of the country. A considerable number of cases was observed in Budapest and also in the southern part of the country bordering Croatia, while in the most eastern part bordering Ukraine no positive samples were detected. These results confirm the endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs originating from different parts of Hungary and the significant advantages of A. vasorum serology in epidemiological studies.

  13. Development-specific differences in the proteomics of Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Cong; Yao, Li-Li; Song, Zeng-Mei; Li, Xing-Pan; Hua, Qian-Qian; Li, Qiang; Pan, Chang-Wang; Xia, Chao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging communicable disease. Several different hosts are required to complete the life cycle of Angiostrongylus cantonensis. However, we lack a complete understanding of variability of proteins across different developmental stages and their contribution to parasite survival and progression. In this study, we extracted soluble proteins from various stages of the A. cantonensis life cycle [female adults, male adults, the fifth-stage female larvae (FL5), the fifth-stage male larvae (ML5) and third-stage larvae (L3)], separated those proteins using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) at pH 4-7, and analyzed the gel images using DeCyder 7.0 software. This proteomic analysis produced a total of 183 different dominant protein spots. Thirty-seven protein spots were found to have high confidence scores (>95%) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that 29 spots represented cytoskeleton-associated proteins and functional proteins. Eight spots were unnamed proteins. Twelve protein spots that were matched to the EST of different-stage larvae of A. cantonensis were identified. Two genes and the internal control 18s were chosen for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and the qPCR results were consistent with those of the DIGE studies. These findings will provide a new basis for understanding the characteristics of growth and development of A. cantonensis and the host-parasite relationship. They may also assist searches for candidate proteins suitable for use in diagnostic assays and as drug targets for the control of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis.

  14. Vectors and Spatial Patterns of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Selected Rice-Farming Villages of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Tujan, Ma. Angelica A.; Fontanilla, Ian Kendrich C.; Paller, Vachel Gay V.

    2016-01-01

    In the Philippines, rats and snails abound in agricultural areas as pests and source of food for some of the local people which poses risks of parasite transmission to humans such as Angiostrongylus cantonensis. This study was conducted to determine the extent of A. cantonensis infection among rats and snails collected from rice-farming villages of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija. A total of 209 rats, 781 freshwater snails, and 120 terrestrial snails were collected for the study. Heart and lungs of rats and snail tissues were examined and subjected to artificial digestion for parasite collection. Adult worms from rats were identified using SSU rDNA gene. Seven nematode sequences obtained matched A. cantonensis. Results revealed that 31% of the rats examined were positive with A. cantonensis. Rattus norvegicus and R. tanezumi showed prevalence of 46% and 29%, respectively. Furthermore, only Pomacea canaliculata (2%) and Melanoides maculata (1%) were found to be positive for A. cantonensis among the snails collected. Analysis of host distribution showed overlapping habitats of rats and snails as well as residential and agricultural areas indicating risks to public health. This study presents a possible route of human infection for A. cantonensis through handling and consumption of P. canaliculata and M. maculata or crops contaminated by these snails. PMID:27313865

  15. Development of Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera and Céspedes 1971 (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) larvae in the intermediate host Sarasinula marginata (Semper 1885) (Mollusca: Soleolifera).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Cristiane L G F; Carvalho, Omar S; Mota, Ester M; Lenzi, Henrique L

    2008-04-01

    In life cycle of Angiostrongylus costaricensis, veronicellidae mollusks participate as the invertebrate host while rodents as the main vertebrate host. The current work shows a sequential larval development of A. costaricensis in Sarasinula marginata, individually killed and digested from day 1 to 43, post infection. Some larvae, recovered from sedimentation, were submitted to selective staining after paraffin embedded or inclusion in JB-4 to study inner structures. As control, four slugs were used, two killed at the beginning of infection and the others at the end of the experiment. At day 2 post infection, larvae were motionless and thick, presenting initial retention of granules. At day 4, L2 were detected, persisting until 43 days post infection. Larvae L2 displayed a large amount of granules rich in lipids and carbohydrates through its overall body, with more accumulation at the medial third corresponding to the esophagus-intestine transition site. Lipid granules, the main energetic source, were located at the basal and apical regions of intestinal cells. Both L1 and L3 presented bilateral alae, which is also common in other nematodes. Transition forms between L2 to L3 molts were also observed.

  16. Extraintestinal nematodes of the red fox Vulpes vulpes in north-west Italy.

    PubMed

    Magi, M; Guardone, L; Prati, M C; Mignone, W; Macchioni, F

    2015-07-01

    Extraintestinal nematodes of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) are a wide group of parasites that infect wild and domestic carnivores and occasionally humans. Nematodes in the cardiopulmonary system, stomach, urinary apparatus and muscle tissue of 165 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from north-west Italy (Liguria and Piedmont) were investigated between 2009 and 2012. Of the cardiopulmonary nematodes, a high prevalence of Angiostrongylus vasorum and Eucoleus aerophilus (syn. Capillaria aerophila) was found, 78.2% and 41.8% respectively; Crenosoma vulpis (15.8%) and Filaroides spp. (4.8%) were also found. Spirocerca lupi (23.5%), Aonchotheca putorii (syn. Capillaria putorii) (8.6%) and Physaloptera spp. (2.5%) were detected in the stomach and Pearsonema plica (syn. Capillaria plica) (56.8%) in the bladder. Eucoleus boehmi (syn. Capillaria boehmi) was also detected in the nasal cavities of one of the two foxes examined. A coprological examination revealed eggs of E. aerophilus, A. putorii, S. lupi, Physaloptera spp. and eggs of intestinal parasites. Filarial worms were absent in all the 165 animals examined, nor was there evidence of Trichinella spp. in any of the foxes. The foxes were found to host a high prevalence of many species of extraintestinal nematodes. The prevalence of A. vasorum in foxes found in the present study is among the highest in Europe. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, E. boehmi and Filaroides spp. have never been reported before in this host in Italy.

  17. Entomopathogenic nematodes and insect management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (genera Heterorhabditis, Steinernema, and Neosteinernema) are used as bioinsecticides. The nematodes are ubiquitous and have been isolated in soil of every continent except Antarctica. The nematodes kill insects through a mutualism with a bacterium (Photorhabdus spp. or ...

  18. Respiratory nematodes in cat populations of Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Angela; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Grillotti, Eleonora; Manzocchi, Simone; Perrucci, Stefania; Beraldo, Paola; Cazzin, Stefania; De Liberato, Claudio; Barros, Luciano A; Simonato, Giulia; Traversa, Donato

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of common respiratory parasites of domestic cats (the metastrongyloid "cat lungworm" Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and the trichuroid Capillaria aerophila) and of neglected respiratory nematodes of felids (Troglostrongylus brevior, Angiostrongylus chabaudi and Oslerus rostratus) was here evaluated in two and three geographical sites of Northern and Central Italy, respectively. In 2014-2015, individual fecal samples of 868 domestic cats were examined microscopically and genetically, and epidemiological data related to parasitic infections were evaluated as possible risk factors by binary logistic regression models. The most common parasite was A. abstrusus in both mono- and poli-specific infections, followed by T. brevior and C. aerophila, while cats scored negative for other parasites. Cats positive for A. abstrusus (1.9-17 % infection rate) and C. aerophila (0.9-4.8 % infection rate) were found in all examined sites, while cats scored positive for T. brevior (1-14.3 % infection rate) in four sites. Also, T. brevior was here found for the first time in a domestic cat from a mountainous area of Northern Italy. The occurrence of lungworms was statistically related to the presence of respiratory signs and more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. Cats living in site C of Central Italy resulted statistically more at risk of infection for lungworms than cats living in the other study sites, while animals ageing less than 1 year were at more risk for troglostrongylosis. Finally, the presence of lungworms was more significant in cats with mixed infection by other lungworms and/or intestinal parasites. These results are discussed under epidemiological and clinical points of views.

  19. Permissibility of Mongolian gerbil for Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection and utility of this animal model for anthelmintic studies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongfang; Hong, Qing; Chen, Daixiong; Liang, Chenjie; Liu, Haiying; Luo, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xunmin

    2014-05-01

    The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) has been indicated to be a useful experimental model host for studying nematode. To understand the possibility of the Mongolian gerbil as an animal model of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection, we investigated the development, migration, and tissue distribution of A. cantonensis and pathological changes in the brain and lungs of the infected Mongolian gerbils. The first stage larvae of A. cantonensis in the stool of the infected gerbils were examined by direct smear method at 45th day postinfection (PI). In addition, a group of the infected gerbils were orally fed with albendazole (100 mg/kg/day/gerbil) at the 8th day PI and continued for 3 consecutive days. The results showed that mortality rate of Mongolian gerbils infected with 10 third stage larvae of A. cantonensis was about 62% at the 30th day PI; the peak period of death was from the 23rd to 30th day PI. About 93% (27/29) of the worms in survivors of infected gerbils could develop to complete sexual maturity at the 46th day PI, and the examinations of 12 gerbils in G3 group revealed that first stage larvae of A. cantonensis could be found in the feces of 4 gerbils at the 45th day PI. About 80% of the worms were in the brain of infected gerbils and 20% in the lungs from the 23rd to 25th day PI; during migration of the worms from the brain to lungs, more than 90% of the worms arrived to the lungs and less than 10% of them still stayed in the brain during from the 45th to 46th day PI. Pathological examination revealed that injuries induced by A. cantonensis in infected gerbils were characterized by eosinophilic meningitis and granulomatous pneumonia. Otherwise, albendazole exhibited a good larvicidal activity in the infected Mongolian gerbils. In contrast with infected control group, no gerbils died in administering albendazole, no worms were recovered, and no nervous system symptoms caused by the infection occurred at the 26th day PI. These findings clearly

  20. Nematode nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Schafer, William

    2016-10-24

    Nematodes comprise one of the largest phyla in the animal kingdom, both in terms of individual numbers and species diversity. Although only 20,000-30,000 species have been described, it is estimated that the true number ranges between 100,000 and 10 million. Marine, freshwater, and terrestrial species are all widespread, and some nematodes have even been isolated from such inhospitable environments as deserts, hot springs, and polar seas. Some nematode species are parasitic, with either plant or animal hosts; other species are free-living microbivores, scavengers, or predators of insects or other nematodes. Nematodes vary widely in size, from small microbivores that grow no larger than 100 μm to large animal parasites growing to several meters in length. They adopt a variety of reproductive strategies: most species are gonochoristic (i.e., have male and female sexes), but self-fertile hermaphroditic species are not uncommon, and parthenogenetic species are also known. Nematodes belong to the superphylum Ecdysozoa, a clade of moulting animals that also includes arthropods, tardigrades and priapulids. Although nematode fossils are rare, the origin of the nematode phylum is believed to be very ancient, with the divergence from arthropods estimated based on molecular data to have been between 900 and 1,300 Ma.

  1. The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Discusses advantages of nematode use for studying patterns of cell division, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Describes nematode development. Cites experimental approaches available for genetic studies. Reviews the topics of control of cell division and differentiation, the nervous system, and muscle assembly and function of the organism. (RT)

  2. Canine and feline cardiopulmonary parasitic nematodes in Europe: emerging and underestimated

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary nematodes of dogs and cats cause parasitic diseases of central relevance in current veterinary practice. In the recent past the distribution of canine and feline heartworms and lungworms has increased in various geographical areas, including Europe. This is true especially for the metastrongyloids Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, Angiostrongylus vasorum and Crenosoma vulpis, the filarioid Dirofilaria immitis and the trichuroid Eucoleus aerophilus (syn. Capillaria aerophila). The reasons of this emergence are little known but many drivers such as global warming, changes in vector epidemiology and movements in animal populations, may be taken into account. The purpose of this article is to review the knowledge of the most important heartworm and lungworm infections of dogs and cats in Europe. In particular recent advances in epidemiology, clinical and control are described and discussed. PMID:20653938

  3. New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Kinsella, John M; Galliari, Carlos; Navone, Graciela T

    2016-03-01

    To date, 21 species of the genus Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) have been reported around the world, 15 of which are parasites of rodents. In this study, new host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp in sigmodontine rodents from Argentina, with an updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment, are provided. Records of Angiostrongylus costaricensis from Akodon montensis and Angiostrongylus morerai from six new hosts and geographical localities in Argentina are reported. The gross and histopathologic changes in the lungs of the host species due to angiostrongylosis are described. Published records of the genus Angiostrongylus from rodents and patterns of host specificity are presented. Individual Angiostrongylus species parasitise between one-19 different host species. The most frequent values of the specificity index (STD) were between 1-5.97. The elevated number of host species (n = 7) of A. morerai with a STD = 1.86 is a reflection of multiple systematic studies of parasites from sigmodontine rodents in the area of Cuenca del Plata, Argentina, showing that an increase in sampling effort can result in new findings. The combination of low host specificity and a wide geographic distribution of Angiostrongylus spp indicates a troubling epidemiological scenario although, as yet, no human cases have been reported.

  4. Reibergram of Intrathecal Synthesis of C4 in Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Bárbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto Juan; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Rodríguez-Rey, Alexis; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Juan Carlos; de Paula-Almeida, Susana Olga

    2010-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis produces eosinophilic meningitis in humans and is endemic in Thailand, Taiwan, China, and the Caribbean region. During infection with this parasite, it is important to know if the complement system may be activated by the classical or lectin pathway. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 20 patients with meningitic angiostrongyliasis were used to quantify C4 levels and albumin. Results were plotted on a C4 CSF/serum quotient diagram or Reibergram. Twelve patients showed intrathecal synthesis of C4. Antibody-dependent complement cytotoxicity should be considered as a possible mechanism that destroys third-stage larvae of this helminth in cerebrospinal fluid of affected patients. PMID:20519605

  5. Sacral myeloradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome) secondary to eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jui-Jen; Chuang, Shin-Hung; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    Elsberg syndrome secondary to eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is uncommon. Clinicians should consider a wide differential diagnosis including tumour, spinal cord infarction, necrosis, vasculitis, drug induced or other sources of infection. In addition, acute urinary retention is a urological emergency and clinicians should keep in mind the prevention of bladder overdistension. The intervention of rehabilitation programmes and clean intermittent catheterisation education for bladder management, in accordance with the patient’s condition, is also important. Earlier rehabilitation is important to ensure a speedy recovery and to prevent further complications. PMID:21811516

  6. Entomopathogenic nematode application technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biocontrol success when using entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema relies on a variety of factors including components of the application event itself. Successful application encompasses both abiotic and biotic influences. For example, adverse array of equi...

  7. Differences in microglia activation between rats-derived cell and mice-derived cell after stimulating by soluble antigen of IV larva from Angiostrongylus cantonensis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Wu, Feng; Sun, Xi; Zeng, Xin; Liang, Jin-Yi; Zheng, Huan-Qin; Yu, Xin-Bing; Zhang, Kou-Xing; Wu, Zhong-Dao

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a rodent nematode. Adult worms of A. cantonensis live in the pulmonary arteries of rats. Humans and mice are accidental hosts or named nonpermissive hosts. The larva cannot develop into an adult worm and only causes serious eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis if humans or mice eat food containing larva of A. cantonensis in the third stage. The differing consequences largely depend on differing immune responses of the host to parasite during A. cantonensis invasion and development. Microglia is considered to be the key immune cell in the central nervous system like macrophage. To further understand the reasons for why mice and rats attain different outcomes in A. cantonensis infection, we set up the method to isolate and culture newborn rats' primary microglia and observe the activation of the microglia cells, comparing with mice microglia cell line N9. We treated cells with soluble antigen of the fourth larva of A. cantonensis (L4 larva) and measured mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, eotaxin, iNOS, and TNF-α by real-time PCR. The results showed that N9 expressed high mRNA level of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin, but primary microglia only had IL-5, IL-13, and eotaxin mRNA level. It implies that microglia from rats and mice had different reaction to soluble antigen of A. cantonensis. Therefore, we supposed that microglia may play an immune modulation role during the brain inflammation induced by A. cantonensis.

  8. Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Blood and Peripheral Tissues of Wild Hawaiian Rats (Rattus rattus) by a Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assay

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a rat lungworm, a zoonotic pathogen that causes human eosinophilic meningitis and ocular angiostrongyliasis characteristic of rat lungworm (RLW) disease. Definitive diagnosis is made by finding and identifying A. cantonensis larvae in the cerebral spinal fluid or by using a custom immunological or molecular test. This study was conducted to determine if genomic DNA from A. cantonensis is detectable by qPCR in the blood or tissues of experimentally infected rats. F1 offspring from wild rats were subjected to experimental infection with RLW larvae isolated from slugs, then blood or tissue samples were collected over multiple time points. Blood samples were collected from 21 rats throughout the course of two trials (15 rats in Trial I, and 6 rats in Trial II). In addition to a control group, each trial had two treatment groups: the rats in the low dose (LD) group were infected by approximately 10 larvae and the rats in the high dose (HD) group were infected with approximately 50 larvae. In Trial I, parasite DNA was detected in cardiac bleed samples from five of five LD rats and five of five HD rats at six weeks post-infection (PI), and three of five LD rats and five of five HD rats from tail tissue. In Trial II, parasite DNA was detected in peripheral blood samples from one of two HD rats at 53 minutes PI, one of two LD rats at 1.5 hours PI, one of two HD rats at 18 hours PI, one of two LD rats at five weeks PI and two of two at six weeks PI, and two of two HD rats at weeks five and six PI. These data demonstrate that parasite DNA can be detected in peripheral blood at various time points throughout RLW infection in rats. PMID:25910229

  9. PHYLOGENY OF ANGIOSTRONGYLUS CANTONENSIS IN THAILAND BASED ON CYTOCHROME C OXIDASE SUBUNIT I GENE SEQUENCE.

    PubMed

    Apichat, Vitta; Narongrit, Srisongcram; Jittranuch, Thiproaj; Anucha, Wongma; Wilaiwan, Polsut; Chamaiporn, Fukruksa; Thatcha, Yimthin; Bandid, Mangkit; Aunchalee, Thanwisai; Paron, Dekumyoy

    2016-05-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an emerging infectious agent causing eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis in humans with clinical manifestation of severe headache. Molecular genetic studies on classification and phylogeny of A. cantonensis in Thailand are limited. This study surveyed A. cantonensis larvae prevalence in natural intermediate hosts across Thailand and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships. A total of 14,032 freshwater and land snails were collected from 19 provinces of Thailand. None of Filopaludina sp, Pomacea sp, and Cyclophorus sp were infected with Angiostrongylus larvae, whereas Achatina fulica, Cryptozona siamensis, and Megaustenia siamensis collected from Kalasin, Kamphaeng Phet, Phetchabun, Phitsanulok, and Tak Provinces were infected, with C. siamensis being the common intermediate host. Based on morphology, larvae isolated from 11 samples of these naturally infected snails preliminarily were identified as A. cantonensis. Comparison of partial nucleotide sequences of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene revealed that four sequences are identical to A. cantonensis haplotype ac4 from Bangkok and the other seven to that of A. cantonensis isolate AC Thai, indicating two independent lineages of A. cantonensis in Thailand.

  10. Severe eosinophilic meningitis owing to Angiostrongylus cantonensis in young Jamaican children: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Evans-Gilbert, Tracy; Lindo, John F; Henry, Sonia; Brown, Paul; Christie, Celia D C

    2014-05-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis is an endemic and emerging disease that affects adults and children in Jamaica. Most cases resolve without sequelae, but young children are at high risk of neurological damage and death. Treatment with corticosteroids and albendazole is considered safe for adults and children, but protocols for its use in children have not been established. A 19-month-old infant with permanent neurological sequlae caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis meningitis is reported, and five other Jamaican cases are summarized. A review of the literature of children with permanent neurological sequlae and death is presented. Children <5 years (especially <2) were at increased risk of incomplete recovery and death if they presented with bulbar signs, flaccid paresis and coma. None of the severe or fatal cases received early intervention with anthelminthics, and disease progression was not altered with corticosteroids. In view of the pathophysiology, necropsy reports and animal studies, it seems that the early use of larvicidals may change the course of severe presentations.

  11. New host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) in rodents from Argentina with updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment

    PubMed Central

    Robles, María del Rosario; Kinsella, John M; Galliari, Carlos; Navone, Graciela T

    2016-01-01

    To date, 21 species of the genus Angiostrongylus (Nematoda: Angiostrongylidae) have been reported around the world, 15 of which are parasites of rodents. In this study, new host, geographic records, and histopathologic studies of Angiostrongylus spp in sigmodontine rodents from Argentina, with an updated summary of records from rodent hosts and host specificity assessment, are provided. Records of Angiostrongylus costaricensis from Akodon montensis andAngiostrongylus morerai from six new hosts and geographical localities in Argentina are reported. The gross and histopathologic changes in the lungs of the host species due to angiostrongylosis are described. Published records of the genus Angiostrongylus from rodents and patterns of host specificity are presented. Individual Angiostrongylusspecies parasitise between one-19 different host species. The most frequent values of the specificity index (STD) were between 1-5.97. The elevated number of host species (n = 7) of A. morerai with a STD = 1.86 is a reflection of multiple systematic studies of parasites from sigmodontine rodents in the area of Cuenca del Plata, Argentina, showing that an increase in sampling effort can result in new findings. The combination of low host specificity and a wide geographic distribution of Angiostrongylus spp indicates a troubling epidemiological scenario although, as yet, no human cases have been reported. PMID:26982178

  12. Roles of Steroids in Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inability of nematodes to biosynthesize steroids de novo and the resulting dependence of parasitic nematodes upon their hosts have enhanced the importance of elucidating the metabolism of sterols and the hormonal and other functions of steroids in nematodes. Biochemical research has revealed th...

  13. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  14. Comparative genomics of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mitreva, Makedonka; Blaxter, Mark L; Bird, David M; McCarter, James P

    2005-10-01

    Recent transcriptome and genome projects have dramatically expanded the biological data available across the phylum Nematoda. Here we summarize analyses of these sequences, which have revealed multiple unexpected results. Despite a uniform body plan, nematodes are more diverse at the molecular level than was previously recognized, with many species- and group-specific novel genes. In the genus Caenorhabditis, changes in chromosome arrangement, particularly local inversions, are also rapid, with breakpoints occurring at 50-fold the rate in vertebrates. Tylenchid plant parasitic nematode genomes contain several genes closely related to genes in bacteria, implicating horizontal gene transfer events in the origins of plant parasitism. Functional genomics techniques are also moving from Caenorhabditis elegans to application throughout the phylum. Soon, eight more draft nematode genome sequences will be available. This unique resource will underpin both molecular understanding of these most abundant metazoan organisms and aid in the examination of the dynamics of genome evolution in animals.

  15. Nematode management in pecans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002, the pecan root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne partityla = PRKN) was found on pecan in the southeastern U.S. and was associated with stressed trees exhibiting dead branches in the upper canopy and (or) typical mouse ear (ME) associated foliar symptoms. This research evaluates the host susceptib...

  16. How nematode sperm crawl.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Dean; Mogilner, Alexander; Roberts, Tom; Stewart, Murray; Oster, George

    2002-01-15

    Sperm of the nematode, Ascaris suum, crawl using lamellipodial protrusion, adhesion and retraction, a process analogous to the amoeboid motility of other eukaryotic cells. However, rather than employing an actin cytoskeleton to generate locomotion, nematode sperm use the major sperm protein (MSP). Moreover, nematode sperm lack detectable molecular motors or the battery of actin-binding proteins that characterize actin-based motility. The Ascaris system provides a simple 'stripped down' version of a crawling cell in which to examine the basic mechanism of cell locomotion independently of other cellular functions that involve the cytoskeleton. Here we present a mechanochemical analysis of crawling in Ascaris sperm. We construct a finite element model wherein (a) localized filament polymerization and bundling generate the force for lamellipodial extension and (b) energy stored in the gel formed from the filament bundles at the leading edge is subsequently used to produce the contraction that pulls the rear of the cell forward. The model reproduces the major features of crawling sperm and provides a framework in which amoeboid cell motility can be analyzed. Although the model refers primarily to the locomotion of nematode sperm, it has important implications for the mechanics of actin-based cell motility.

  17. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  18. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-06-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis.

  19. New Frontiers in Nematode Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Howard

    1993-01-01

    Future areas of emphasis for research and scholarship in nematode ecology are indicated by pressing agricultural and environmental issues, by new directions in applied nematology, and by current technological advances. Studies in nematode ecology must extend beyond observation, counting, and simple statistical analysis. Experimentation and the testing of hypotheses are needed for understanding the biological mechanisms of ecological systems. Opportunities for fruitful experimentation in nematode ecology are emerging at the ecosystem, community, population, and individual levels. Nematode ecologists will best promote their field of study by closely monitoring and participating in the advances, initiatives, developments, and directions in the larger field of ecology. PMID:19279783

  20. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-12-16

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode-predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or 'traps'. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator-prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms.

  1. Social networks of educated nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are obligate lethal parasitoids of insect larvae that navigate a chemically complex belowground environment while interacting with their insect hosts, plants, and each other. In this environment, prior exposure to volatile compounds appears to prime nematodes in a compound...

  2. Managing Nematodes without Methyl Bromide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl bromide is an effective pre-plant soil fumigant used to control nematodes in many high-input, high-value production systems including vegetables, nurseries, ornamentals, tree fruits, strawberries, and grapes. Because methyl bromide has provided a reliable return on investment for nematode c...

  3. Interactions of microfungi and plant parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant parasitic nematodes and microfungi inhabit many of the same ecological habitats and interact in almost every conceivable way. Nematodes can feed on fungi, and conversely fungi can use nematodes as a food source. Fungi have been widely studied as biological controls of plant parasitic nematod...

  4. Intrathecal synthesis of IgE in children with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Hernández, Hermes Fundora; Barroso, Jesús Callol; Sanchez-Martinez, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by the helminth Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is an emerging infectious disease in America. The objective of this paper was to determine if the intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin E is produced during the acute phase of the disease. Methods Thirteen patients, mean age 4.5 years were studied; a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and serum samples taken. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was quantified by nephelometry. Control patients had other infections or other neurological diseases. Results The mean cell count in the CSF was 500 × 10-6 cells/L and of these 23% were eosinophils. In blood the eosinophils were 13%. The chief symptoms of the patients were migraine, vomiting and fever and 50% presented some meningeal signs. IgE intrathecal synthesis analyzed by the corresponding quotient diagram (Reibergram) was observed in all patients. No intrathecal IgE synthesis was seen in control patients. Conclusion Intrathecal synthesis of IgE demonstrates the participation of this immunoglobulin in the destruction of the third stage larvae of the parasite in the CSF. The test should be considered in our environment as a tool to aid diagnosis. PMID:19032790

  5. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification: rapid detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Pomacea canaliculata

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis in humans. The most common source of infection with A. cantonensis is the consumption of raw or undercooked mollusks (e.g., snails and slugs) harbouring infectious third-stage larvae (L3). However, the parasite is difficult to identify in snails. The purpose of this study was to develop a quick, simple molecular method to survey for A. cantonensis in intermediate host snails. Findings We used a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, which was performed using Bst DNA polymerase. Reactions amplified the A. cantonensis 18S rRNA gene and demonstrated high sensitivity; as little as 1 fg of DNA was detected in the samples. Furthermore, no cross-reactivity was found with other parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Schistosoma japonicum, Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Anisakis. Pomacea canaliculata snails were exposed to A. cantonensis first-stage larvae (L1) in the laboratory, and L3 were observed in the snails thirty-five days after infection. All nine samples were positive as determined by the LAMP assay for A. cantonensis, which was identified as positive by using PCR and microscopy, this demonstrates that LAMP is sensitive and effective for diagnosis. Conclusions LAMP is an appropriate diagnostic method for the routine identification of A. cantonensis within its intermediate host snail P. canaliculata because of its simplicity, sensitivity, and specificity. It holds great promise as a useful monitoring tool for A. cantonensis in endemic regions. PMID:22023992

  6. Existence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Chikweto, A; Bhaiyat, M I; Macpherson, C N L; Deallie, C; Pinckney, R D; Richards, C; Sharma, R N

    2009-05-26

    The zoonotic rat lung worm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis is endemic to Asia, North America, Africa and Australia. The parasite is expanding geographically and has recently been recorded in some of the Greater Antilles in the northern part of the Caribbean. In this study A. cantonensis is reported for the first time in the Lesser Antilles in one of the southernmost islands, Grenada. Between September 2005 and September 2006, 192 rats (Rattus norvegicus) were trapped throughout the island. The rats were anesthetized, exsanguinated, necropsied and the lungs were fixed whole in 10% buffered formalin, trimmed, processed, cut at 3microm, stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically. A total of 45 (23.4%) of the 192 rats examined were found to be infected with A. cantonensis and adult worms were found in the cardiopulmonary system of one of the rats. Microscopically, pulmonic lesions, consisting of pulmonary thrombosis, hypertrophy of pulmonary arteries and granulomatous pneumonia were associated with intralesional adults, larvae and embryonated eggs of A. cantonensis. An incidental finding of variably sized (2-7mm) solitary to multiple cysts containing larvae of Taenia taeniaformis were seen in the livers of 57 rats. This report of A. cantonensis in Grenada provides evidence of the further global expansion of this important zoonotic parasite and the public health implications of this discovery is discussed.

  7. Differential proteomics analysis of female and male adults of Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Song, Zengmei; Huang, Huicong; Tan, Feng; Zhang, Erpeng; Hu, Jianwen; Pan, Changwang

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we identified the differentially expressed proteins of female and male adults of Angiostrongylus cantonensis through differential proteomics. We extracted and purified total proteins from male and female adults, separated proteins by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in pH 4-7, analyzed the gel images by DeCyder 7.0 software, and sacrificed the infected rats to count the number of male and female adults. It was found 28 protein spots that were differentially expressed; seven protein spots were then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Five proteins were up-regulated and two proteins down-regulated in male adults compared with female adults. Three of the five up-regulated proteins with known functions ascribed to them were identified as galectin-1, proteasome alpha subunit and peroxiredoxin. The two down-regulated proteins were identified as indoleamine dioxygenase like-myoglobin and galectin. Furthermore, the female was significantly greater than male adults (P<0.01) in the rats. The findings demonstrate the differences in protein expression profiles and the ability to survive in the final host between female and male adults of A. cantonensis, and may provide a theoretical basis to study their developmental biology further.

  8. Spatial, demographic and clinical patterns of Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in the dog population of Southern England.

    PubMed

    Blehaut, T R W; Hardstaff, J L; Chapman, P S; Pfeiffer, D U; Boag, A K; Guitian, F J

    2014-08-09

    A retrospective study was carried out to provide updated knowledge of the spatial pattern of Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in Southern England and to investigate associations between selected host characteristics (age, breed, sex), risk of infection and clinical presentation (cardiorespiratory signs v haemorrhagic diathesis). One hundred and forty-one cases diagnosed between April 1999 and July 2012 were compared with a control population of dogs referred to the same hospital. A significant association was found between haemorrhagic diathesis and breed but not for other host characteristics and clinical presentations. Younger dogs and certain breeds of dog (Jack Russell terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Springer Spaniels, Cavalier King Charles spaniels and Staffordshire Bull Terriers) had significantly higher odds of angiostrongylosis than other breeds in the study. A significant cluster of cases was found in Southern England. Animals presenting with cardiorespiratory signs or haemorrhagic diathesis in Southern England, especially if they are young or of a breed associated with angiostrongylosis, should be given special consideration with regards to possible A. vasorum infestation. Our results should be interpreted bearing in mind that they are based on the retrospective exploration of dogs seen at a referral centre.

  9. Eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Hawaii: clinical characteristics and potential exposures.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Natasha S; Blackburn, Brian G; Park, Sarah Y; Sejvar, James J; Effler, Paul V; Herwaldt, Barbara L

    2011-10-01

    The most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis is Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which is transmitted largely by consumption of snails/slugs. We previously identified cases of angiostrongyliasis that occurred in Hawaii from 2001 to 2005; the highest incidence was on the island of Hawaii. We now report symptoms, laboratory parameters, and exposures. Eighteen patients were evaluated; 94% had headache, and 65% had sensory symptoms (paresthesia, hyperesthesia, and/or numbness). These symptoms lasted a median of 17 and 55 days, respectively. Three persons recalled finding a slug in their food/drink. Case-patients on the island of Hawaii were more likely than case-patients on other islands to consume raw homegrown produce in a typical week (89% versus 0%, P < 0.001) and to see snails/slugs on produce (56% versus 0%, P = 0.03). Residents and travelers should be aware of the potential risks of eating uncooked produce in Hawaii, especially if it is from the island of Hawaii and locally grown.

  10. Eosinophilic meningitis and radiculomyelitis in Thailand, caused by CNS invasion of Gnathostoma spinigerum and Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Schmutzhard, E; Boongird, P; Vejjajiva, A

    1988-01-01

    During the 6 year period from January 1980 to December 1985 44 patients with infection of the central nervous system by Gnathostoma spinigerum or Angiostrongylus cantonensis were admitted to the Division of Neurology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. In 16 patients the diagnosis could be confirmed serologically by means of ELISA techniques. In gnathostomiasis encephalitis, myelitis, radiculitis and subarachnoid haemorrhage formed the majority of clinical syndromes. Intracerebral haematoma and transitory obstructive hydrocephalus are described in this report as being caused by Gnathostoma spinigerum infection for the first time. In angiostronglyus infections the clinical syndrome of meningitis was predominant, but one patient, whose angiostrongyliasis was proved serologically, also showed bilateral paresis of abducens nerve. The main laboratory finding was eosinophilic pleocytosis in the CSF (greater than 10%) which in patients originating or returning from South-East-Asia, particularly Thailand, is highly suggestive of these parasitic infections. Increasing transcontinental travel, influx of refugees and those seeking asylum as well as importation of food from South East Asian countries demand greater awareness of these parasitic infections even in Central Europe. PMID:3351533

  11. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

  12. Nematode-trapping fungi eavesdrop on nematode pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Mahanti, Parag; Schroeder, Frank C.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The recognition of molecular patterns associated with specific pathogens or food sources is fundamental to ecology and plays a major role in the evolution of predator-prey relationships [1]. Recent studies showed that nematodes produce an evolutionarily highly conserved family of small molecules, the ascarosides, which serve essential functions in regulating nematode development and behavior [2-4]. Here we show that nematophagous fungi, natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes [5], can detect and respond to ascarosides. Nematophagous fungi use specialized trapping devices to catch and consume nematodes, and previous studies demonstrated that most fungal species do not produce traps constitutively but rather initiate trap-formation in response to their prey [6]. We found that ascarosides, which are constitutively secreted by many species of soil-dwelling nematodes, represent a conserved molecular pattern used by nematophagous fungi to detect prey and trigger trap formation. Ascaroside-induced morphogenesis is conserved in several closely related species of nematophagous fungi and occurs only under nutrient-deprived condition. Our results demonstrate that microbial predators eavesdrop on chemical communication among their metazoan prey to regulate morphogenesis, providing a striking example of predator-prey co-evolution. We anticipate that these findings will have broader implications for understanding other inter-kingdom interactions involving nematodes, which are found in almost any ecological niche on Earth. PMID:23246407

  13. Nematode-trapping fungi eavesdrop on nematode pheromones.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Mahanti, Parag; Schroeder, Frank C; Sternberg, Paul W

    2013-01-07

    The recognition of molecular patterns associated with specific pathogens or food sources is fundamental to ecology and plays a major role in the evolution of predator-prey relationships. Recent studies showed that nematodes produce an evolutionarily highly conserved family of small molecules, the ascarosides, which serve essential functions in regulating nematode development and behavior. Here, we show that nematophagous fungi, natural predators of soil-dwelling nematodes, can detect and respond to ascarosides. Nematophagous fungi use specialized trapping devices to catch and consume nematodes, and previous studies demonstrated that most fungal species do not produce traps constitutively but rather initiate trap formation in response to their prey. We found that ascarosides, which are constitutively secreted by many species of soil-dwelling nematodes, represent a conserved molecular pattern used by nematophagous fungi to detect prey and trigger trap formation. Ascaroside-induced morphogenesis is conserved in several closely related species of nematophagous fungi and occurs only under nutrient-deprived conditions. Our results demonstrate that microbial predators eavesdrop on chemical communication among their metazoan prey to regulate morphogenesis, providing a striking example of predator-prey coevolution. We anticipate that these findings will have broader implications for understanding other interkingdom interactions involving nematodes, which are found in almost any ecological niche on Earth.

  14. Improved Molecular Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Mollusks and Other Environmental Samples with a Species-Specific Internal Transcribed Spacer 1-Based TaqMan Assay ▿

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Teem, John L.; Hollingsworth, Robert; Bishop, Henry; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Alexandre J.

    2010-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans become infected by ingesting food items contaminated with third-stage larvae that develop in mollusks. We report the development of a real-time PCR assay for the species-specific identification of A. cantonensis in mollusk tissue. PMID:20543049

  15. Improved molecular detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in mollusks and other environmental samples with a species-specific ITS1-based TaqMan assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common cause of human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans can become infected by ingesting food items contaminated with the third-stage infectious larvae released from infected mollusks as well as by ingesting mollusks or paratenic hosts carrying the infectious st...

  16. Social Networks of Educated Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Denis S.; Alborn, Hans T.; Duncan, Larry W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are obligate lethal parasitoids of insect larvae that navigate a chemically complex belowground environment while interacting with their insect hosts, plants, and each other. In this environment, prior exposure to volatile compounds appears to prime nematodes in a compound specific manner, increasing preference for volatiles they previously were exposed to and decreasing attraction to other volatiles. In addition, persistence of volatile exposure influences this response. Longer exposure not only increases preference, but also results in longer retention of that preference. These entomopathogenic nematodes display interspecific social behavioral plasticity; experienced nematodes influence the behavior of different species. This interspecific social behavioral plasticity suggests a mechanism for rapid adaptation of belowground communities to dynamic environments. PMID:26404058

  17. Nematode Chemosensilla: Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    As an introduction to a symposium of nematode chemoreception, the anatomy of nematode chemosensilla, their distribution on plant parasitic nematodes, and their possible functional roles is briefly reviewed. Comparison of nematode chemosensilla with those of other animals shows their greater resemblance to olfactory primary sense cells of vertebrates. Although the sensory process is obviously derived from a cilium, the absence of many ciliary features is noted. Retention of the ciliary necklace may be important functionally. A simple model is proposed, wherein binding of stimulant molecules to receptors in the membrane of the cilium-derived process results in entry of Na⁺ and Ca⁺⁺ (the latter via the ciliary necklace) to produce a receptor potential that spreads along the dendrite to the cell body where action potentials continue along the short axon to synapses. PMID:19295785

  18. Global decline in suitable habitat for Angiostrongylus ( = Parastrongylus) cantonensis: the role of climate change.

    PubMed

    York, Emily M; Butler, Christopher J; Lord, Wayne D

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is implicated in the alteration of the ranges of species worldwide. Such shifts in species distributions may introduce parasites/pathogens, hosts, and vectors associated with disease to new areas. The parasite Angiostrongylus ( = Parastrongylus) cantonensis is an invasive species that causes eosinophilic meningitis in humans and neurological abnormalities in domestic/wild animals. Although native to southeastern Asia, A. cantonensis has now been reported from more than 30 countries worldwide. Given the health risks, it is important to describe areas with potentially favorable climate for the establishment of A. cantonensis, as well as areas where this pathogen might become established in the future. We used the program Maxent to develop an ecological niche model for A. cantonensis based on 86 localities obtained from published literature. We then modeled areas of potential A. cantonensis distribution as well as areas projected to have suitable climatic conditions under four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) scenarios by the 2050s and the 2070s. The best model contained three bioclimatic variables: mean diurnal temperature range, minimum temperature of coldest month and precipitation of warmest quarter. Potentially suitable habitat for A. cantonensis was located worldwide in tropical and subtropical regions. Under all climate change RCP scenarios, the center of the projected distribution shifted away from the equator at a rate of 68-152 km per decade. However, the extent of areas with highly suitable habitat (>50%) declined by 10.66-15.66% by the 2050s and 13.11-16.11% by the 2070s. These results conflict with previous studies, which have generally found that the prevalence of tropical pathogens will increase during the 21st century. Moreover, it is likely that A. cantonensis will continue to expand its current range in the near future due to introductions and host expansion, whereas climate change will reduce the total geographic area of

  19. Characterization of the N-glycans of female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Carolina M; Morassutti, Alessandra L; von Itzstein, Mark; Sutov, Grigorij; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; McAtamney, Sarah; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Glycoconjugates play a crucial role in the host-parasite relationships of helminthic infections, including angiostrongyliasis. It has previously been shown that the antigenicity of proteins from female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms may depend on their associated glycan moieties. Here, an N-glycan profile of A. cantonensis is reported. A total soluble extract (TE) was prepared from female A. cantonensis worms and was tested by western blot before and after glycan oxidation or N- and O-glycosidase treatment. The importance of N-glycans for the immunogenicity of A. cantonensis was demonstrated when deglycosylation of the TE with PNGase F completely abrogated IgG recognition. The TE was also fractionated using various lectin columns [Ulex europaeus (UEA), concanavalin A (Con A), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA)], and then each fraction was digested with PNGase F. Released N-glycans were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Complex-type, high mannose, and truncated glycan structures were identified in all five fractions. Sequential MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis of the major MS peaks identified complex-type structures, with a α1-6 fucosylated core and truncated antennas. Glycoproteins in the TE were labeled with BodipyAF558-SE dye for a lectin microarray analysis. Fluorescent images were analyzed with ProScanArray imaging software followed by statistical analysis. A total of 29 lectins showed positive binding to the TE. Of these, Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), PNA, and Wisteria floribunda (WFA), which recognize galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), exhibited high affinity binding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that female A. cantonensis worms have characteristic helminth N-glycans.

  20. Clinical, laboratory and pathological findings in dogs experimentally infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Fahrion, Anna; Riond, Barbara; Ossent, Pete; Webster, Pia; Kranjc, Asja; Glaus, Tony; Deplazes, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this comparative study was to investigate the development of clinical signs and accompanying haematological, coproscopic and pathological findings as a basis for the monitoring of health condition of Angiostrongylus vasorum infected dogs. Six beagles were orally inoculated with 50 (n=3) or 500 (n=3) A. vasorum third stage larvae (L3) obtained from experimentally infected Biomphalaria glabrata snails. Two dogs were treated with moxidectin/imidacloprid spot-on solution and two further dogs with an oral experimental compound 92 days post infection (dpi), and were necropsied 166 dpi. Two untreated control dogs were necropsied 97 dpi. Prepatency was 47-49 days. Dogs inoculated with 500 L3 exhibited earlier (from 42 dpi) and more severe respiratory signs. Clinical signs resolved 12 days after treatment and larval excretion stopped within 20 days in all four treated dogs. Upon necropsy, 10 and 170 adult worms were recovered from the untreated dogs inoculated with 50 and 500 L3, respectively. Adult worms were also found in two treated dogs, in the absence of L1 or eggs. Despite heavy A. vasorum infection load and severe pulmonary changes including vascular thrombosis, only mild haematological changes were observed. Eosinophilia was absent but the presence of plasma cells was observed. Neutrophilic leucocytes showed a transient increase but only after treatment. Signs for coagulopathies were slight; nevertheless coagulation parameters were inoculation dose dependent. Ten weeks after treatment pulmonary fibrosis was still present. Infections starting from 50 L3 of A. vasorum had a massive impact on lung tissues and therefore on the health of affected dogs, particularly after prepatency, although only mild haematological abnormalities were evident.

  1. Basic and applied research: Entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema kill arthropods with the aid of their bacterial symbionts. These nematodes are potent microbial control agents that have been widely commercialized for control of economically important insect pests. Biocontrol efficacy relies...

  2. Application and commercialization of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Peters, Arne

    2013-07-01

    While nematodes are most commonly known for their negative impact on plants, animals, and humans, there are a number of species which are commercially explored. This review highlights some of the most important success stories for the application of nematodes. They are used as bioindicators in ecological and toxicity studies, as model organisms for elucidating fundamental biological questions and for high throughput screening of drugs. Besides these indirect uses, direct applications include the use of Beddingia siricidicola against a major forest pest and the commercialization of Steinernema, Heterorhabditis, and Phasmarhabditis as biological pest control products. New directions for the commercialization of nematodes are the use as living food, specifically loaded with essential nutrients for various fish and shrimp larvae. Even human parasites or closely related species have been successfully used for curing autoimmune disorders and are currently in the process of being developed as drugs. With the striving development of life sciences, we are likely to see more applications for nematodes in the future. A prerequisite is that we continue to explore the vast number of yet undiscovered nematode species.

  3. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Neil D; Wilson, Leonie; Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C; Maule, Aaron G; Dalzell, Johnathan J

    2017-02-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars.

  4. Nematode neuropeptides as transgenic nematicides

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Cheryl; Fleming, Colin C.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) seriously threaten global food security. Conventionally an integrated approach to PPN management has relied heavily on carbamate, organophosphate and fumigant nematicides which are now being withdrawn over environmental health and safety concerns. This progressive withdrawal has left a significant shortcoming in our ability to manage these economically important parasites, and highlights the need for novel and robust control methods. Nematodes can assimilate exogenous peptides through retrograde transport along the chemosensory amphid neurons. Peptides can accumulate within cells of the central nerve ring and can elicit physiological effects when released to interact with receptors on adjoining cells. We have profiled bioactive neuropeptides from the neuropeptide-like protein (NLP) family of PPNs as novel nematicides, and have identified numerous discrete NLPs that negatively impact chemosensation, host invasion and stylet thrusting of the root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita and the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. Transgenic secretion of these peptides from the rhizobacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and the terrestrial microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reduce tomato infection levels by up to 90% when compared with controls. These data pave the way for the exploitation of nematode neuropeptides as a novel class of plant protective nematicide, using novel non-food transgenic delivery systems which could be deployed on farmer-preferred cultivars. PMID:28241060

  5. Using entomopathogenic nematodes for crop insect control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview on using entomopathogenic nematodes for insect pest control. Entomopathogenic nematodes (genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis), are be used as natural biopesticides. Unlike plant parasitic nematodes, which can be serious crop pests, entomopat...

  6. In vivo production of entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In nature, entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are obligate parasites of insects. The nematodes are used widely as biocontrol agents for insect pests. More than a dozen entomopathogenic nematode species have been commercialized for use as biopesticides. One of ...

  7. 14-3-3β protein expression in eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasite endemic in the Southeast Asian and Pacific regions. Humans are incidentally infected either by eating uncooked intermediate hosts or by consuming vegetables containing the living third-stage larvae. The 14-3-3β protein is a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) marker of neuronal damage during the development of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In addition, increased 14-3-3β protein is also found in CSF from patients with a variety of neurological disorders. The goal of this study is to determine the roles of serum/CSF14-3-3β protein in patients with eosinophilic meningitis. Methods In a cohort study among nine Thai laborers with eosinophilic meningitis due to eating raw snails (Pomacea canaliculata), we examined the CSF weekly while patients were still hospitalized and followed up the serum for 6 months. The levels of 14-3-3β protein in CSF were analyzed by western blot and an in-house 14-3-3β enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurement was established and tested in an animal model of eosinophilic meningitis. Results The elevated 14-3-3β level was detected in the CSF from eight out of nine (81%) patients After 2 weeks of treatment, all patients showed a declined level or cleared of 14-3-3β protein in the CSF. By developing an in-house ELISA for measurement of 14-3-3β protein, it was found that the serum 14-3-3β level was significantly increased in patients during initial visit. . This finding was consistent to the animal experiment result in which there was severe blood brain barrier damage three weeks after infection and increased 14-3-3β protein expression in the CSF and serum by western blot and in house ELISA. After treatment, the serum 14-3-3β level in meningitis patients was rapidly returned to normal threshold. There was a correlation between initial CSF 14-3-3β level with severity of headache (r = 0.692, p = 0.039), CSF pleocytosis (r = 0.807, p = 0.009) and eosinophilia (r = 0

  8. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection on Mayotte Island, Indian Ocean, 2007-2012

    PubMed Central

    Epelboin, Loïc; Blondé, Renaud; Chamouine, Abdourahim; Chrisment, Alexandra; Diancourt, Laure; Villemant, Nicolas; Atale, Agnès; Cadix, Claire; Caro, Valérie; Malvy, Denis; Collet, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human angiostrongyliasis (HA) is a neurological helminthic disease caused by the lung worm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. It is suspected in the combination of travel or a residence in an endemic area and eosinophilic meningitis. In Mayotte, an island in the Indian Ocean, cases are rare but regular. The main objective of our study was to describe the epidemiological and diagnosis clues of HA in Mayotte. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the contribution of Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT- PCR) for the diagnosis of HA, delineate the characteristics of the local transmission and ascertain the presence of A. cantonensis in Achatina fulica, the potential vector of the disease. Materials and Methods Between 2007 and 2012, all cases of eosinophilic meningitis were retrospectively included and investigated by RT- PCR in the CSF. Descriptive analysis was conducted for clinical, biological and radiological features, and were analyzed for all patients together with the search for prognostic factors for mortality. Concurrently, geolocalization and temporal parameters were studied to correlate the occurrence of the cases with rainfall seasons and snails were collected to enhance a parasitic carriage with real time PCR. Results During the 6-year period of the study, 14 cases were identified (2.3 cases/year) and 9 among 10 remaining CSF were positive in PCR. Among 14 cases of EM, 13 were less than 2 year-old children. The 1 year mortality rate was 5/14 (35.7%). Among survivors, 3/7 (42.8%) presented neurological sequelae. Factors associated with mortality were dysfunction of cranial nerves, abnormal brain imaging, and CSF glucose level inferior to 2 mmol/l. Occurrence of cases was temporarily and spatially correlated to the rainy season. Among the 64 collected giant snails, 6 (9.4%) were positive with A. cantonensis PCR. The likely main route of transmission was the children licking snails, carriers of the parasite. Conclusion In Mayotte, HA was mainly

  9. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

  10. Nonhost Root Penetration by Soybean Cyst Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Riggs, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 66 plants in 50 species were inoculated with eggs and juveniles of soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines. Roots were stained and observed for penetration and development of the nematode. Twenty-six plants were not penetrated; twenty-three were penetrated, but there was no development of the nematode; eight were penetrated with some nematode development; two were penetrated and had considerable nematode development, but few nematodes, if any, matured; and seven were penetrated with many nematodes maturing. The penetration of nonhosts may imply some susceptibility and that populations eventually would build up on the penetrated plants. Plants not penetrated may be useful as rotation plants because no reproduction would occur. PMID:19290137

  11. Free-living nematode peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  12. The occurrence of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in nonindigenous snails in the Gulf of Mexico region of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teem, John L.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Bishop, Henry S.; da Silva, Alexandre J.; Carter, Jacoby; White-McLean, Jodi; Smith, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detection assay was used to test nonindigenous apple snails for the rat lungworm parasite in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Florida. Only apple snails obtained from the New Orleans, Louisiana, area tested positive for the parasite. These results provide the first evidence that Angiostrongylus cantonensis does occur in nonindigenous apple snails in the southeastern United States. Additionally, Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the terrestrial species Achatina fulica in Miami, Florida, indicating that rat lungworm is now established in Florida as well as Louisiana. Although the study suggests that the rat lungworm is not widespread in the Gulf States region, the infected snail population could still pose a risk to human health and facilitate the spread of the parasite to new areas.

  13. The Occurrence of the Rat Lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in Nonindigenous Snails in the Gulf of Mexico Region of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Bishop, Henry S; da Silva, Alexandre J; Carter, Jacoby; White-Mclean, Jodi; Smith, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detection assay was used to test nonindigenous apple snails for the rat lungworm parasite in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Florida. Only apple snails obtained from the New Orleans, Louisiana, area tested positive for the parasite. These results provide the first evidence that Angiostrongylus cantonensis does occur in nonindigenous apple snails in the southeastern United States. Additionally, Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the terrestrial species Achatina fulica in Miami, Florida, indicating that rat lungworm is now established in Florida as well as Louisiana. Although the study suggests that the rat lungworm is not widespread in the Gulf States region, the infected snail population could still pose a risk to human health and facilitate the spread of the parasite to new areas. PMID:23901374

  14. Levels of infection with the lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis in terrestrial snails from Thailand, with Cryptozona siamensis as a new intermediate host.

    PubMed

    Vitta, A; Polsut, W; Fukruksa, C; Yimthin, T; Thanwisai, A; Dekumyoy, P

    2016-11-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is primarily considered an emerging infectious agent of eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis with a worldwide distribution. Rodents and snails are important invasive hosts for transmission and expansion of A. cantonensis. The objective of this study was to investigate infection levels of A. cantonensis in snails, the most important natural intermediate host. Our study location was Mueang Kamphaeng Phet district, Kamphaeng Phet Province, and was undertaken between October and December 2012. A total of 2228 freshwater and terrestrial snails were collected, comprising 1119 Filopaludina spp., 409 Pomacea caniculata, 275 Achatina fulica and 425 Cryptozona siamensis. Angiostrongylus larvae were isolated by artificial digestion methods following Baermann's techniques. A low prevalence and intensity of A. cantonensis were observed in A. fulica, while higher numbers were found in C. siamensis. None of the Filopaludina spp. and Pomacea caniculata were infected with A. cantonensis. Molecular characterization was performed by analysing the 264 bp of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI). Three COI sequences of Angiostrongylus were identical to A. cantonensis with 91-99% identity. Cryptozona siamensis has not previously been recorded as an intermediate host for A. cantonensis in Thailand. The infection of A. cantonensis identified in the natural intermediate hosts is new and important information to assist in the prevention and control of human angiostrongyliasis.

  15. Detection of plant-parasitic nematode DNA in the gut of predatory and omnivorous nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A protocol for molecular gut analysis of nematodes was developed to determine if predatory and omnivorous nematodes from five different guilds prey on Rotylenchulus reniformis, Meloidogyne incognita, and Radopholus similis. Mononchoides, Mononchus, Neoactinolaimus, Mesodorylaimus, and Aporcelaimell...

  16. Survey of Nematodes on Coffee in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, S.; Schmitt, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of coffee fields in Hawaii during 1989-1991 indicated the presence of 10 nematode species in 8 genera. After coffee was planted in fields previously in sugarcane, populations of Criconemella sp. and Pratylenchus zeae gradually decreased, while Rotylenchulus reniformis and, in one field, Meloidogyne incognita, increased in numbers. Coffee is a poor host of R. reniformis, but weeds in coffee plantations may support this nematode. At present, nematodes pose no serious threat to Hawaii's expanding coffee industry. PMID:19283060

  17. Management of the Citrus Nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans

    PubMed Central

    Verdejo-Lucas, S.; McKenry, M. V.

    2004-01-01

    Of the many nematode species that parasitize citrus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans is the most important on a worldwide basis. Management of the citrus nematode remains problematic as no one tactic gives adequate control of the nematode. An overall management strategy must include such components as site selection, use of non-infected nursery stock, use of at lease one post-plant nematode control tactic, and careful management of other elements of the environment that may stress the trees. Nematicides continue to play a key role in management of this pest. Optimum results require careful attention to application techniques. PMID:19262822

  18. Endemic Oscheius Nematodes of Hawai'i

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) parasitize insects utilizing mutualistic bacteria to kill the host, allowing the nematode to feed and reproduce within the insect cadaver. Consequently EPNs are highly sought after for their biological control potential. A survey for EPNs was conducted on O’ahu and...

  19. Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes Presenter: Dr. Fatma Kaplan Dispersal is an important behavior for many organisms. It can easily be observed when infectious juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) leave a consumed insect host. Dauer larvae of ...

  20. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  1. Biological Control of Nematodes with Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological control of nematodes is receiving increased attention as environmental considerations with the use of nematicides have increased in importance and their high cost prohibits use on many crops. In addition, nematode resistant cultivars are not available for many crops and resistance that i...

  2. Induction of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin-1beta and matrix metalloproteinases in pulmonary fibrosis of rats infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Tu, W C; Lai, S C

    2006-09-01

    In angiostrongyliasis, chronic parasite-induced granuloma formation can lead to tissue destruction and fibrosis. Here, the histomorphology of granulomatous fibrosis and proteinase production in the lungs of Angiostrongylus cantonensis-infected Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. The relationship between metalloproteinases and granulomatous fibrosis was investigated following infection of each rat with 60 infective larvae. Granulomata and fibrosis were marked in the lungs of rats on day 180 post-inoculation. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of lung mRNA showed an up-expression of proinflammatory cytokine including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta). According to Western blot analysis, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) proenzyme was presented in the lungs of uninfected and infected rats, and partial conversion of 72 kDa proenzyme to the 64 kDa active form occurred in infected rats. In addition, increased protein levels of MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in infected lungs, but were undetectable in controls. The results suggest that TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, MMP-2, -9, and -13 may be associated with the granulomatous fibrosis.

  3. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y.; Whelen, A. Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S.; Sciulli, Rebecca H.; Honda, Stacey A. A.; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M.; da Silva, Alexandre J.

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:26526920

  4. The influence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) infection on the aerobic metabolism of Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria tenagophila (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Lima, Mariana G; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius M; Gaudêncio, Fabrício N; Martins, Florence G; Castro, Rosane N; Thiengo, Silvana C; Garcia, Juberlan S; Maldonado, Arnaldo; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2016-12-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is considered the main agent responsible for human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. This parasite has low specificity for mollusk hosts and it can also use aquatic snails as auxiliary hosts. Studies based on the metabolic profile of Biomphalaria spp. infected by A. cantonensis have been conducted to observe parasite-host interactions. In the present study, the glucose content in the hemolymph and glycogen content in the digestive gland and cephalopedal mass of Biomphalaria tenagophila and Biomphalaria straminea experimentally infected by A. cantonensis were evaluated, along with the activity of LDH. The snails were dissected from 6 to 21days after infection to collect the hemolymph and separate the tissues. Decreases of 96% and 6.4% in the glucose content triggered a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism in the two infected snail species, B. straminea and B. tenagophila, respectively. That finding was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results indicate that when infected, these snails are able to change their metabolic profile, suggesting a strategy to maintain their homeostatic balance.

  5. How do humans affect wildlife nematodes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Human actions can affect wildlife and their nematode parasites. Species introductions and human-facilitated range expansions can create new host–parasite interactions. Novel hosts can introduce parasites and have the potential to both amplify and dilute nematode transmission. Furthermore, humans can alter existing nematode dynamics by changing host densities and the abiotic conditions that affect larval parasite survival. Human impacts on wildlife might impair parasites by reducing the abundance of their hosts; however, domestic animal production and complex life cycles can maintain transmission even when wildlife becomes rare. Although wildlife nematodes have many possible responses to human actions, understanding host and parasite natural history, and the mechanisms behind the changing disease dynamics might improve disease control in the few cases where nematode parasitism impacts wildlife.

  6. How do humans affect wildlife nematodes?

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Sara B; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2015-05-01

    Human actions can affect wildlife and their nematode parasites. Species introductions and human-facilitated range expansions can create new host-parasite interactions. Novel hosts can introduce parasites and have the potential to both amplify and dilute nematode transmission. Furthermore, humans can alter existing nematode dynamics by changing host densities and the abiotic conditions that affect larval parasite survival. Human impacts on wildlife might impair parasites by reducing the abundance of their hosts; however, domestic animal production and complex life cycles can maintain transmission even when wildlife becomes rare. Although wildlife nematodes have many possible responses to human actions, understanding host and parasite natural history, and the mechanisms behind the changing disease dynamics might improve disease control in the few cases where nematode parasitism impacts wildlife.

  7. Improved nematode extraction from carrot disk culture.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L

    1990-07-01

    Radopholus spp. were reared in carrot tissue culture via established procedures, with slight modification. Several plant tissue maceration enzymes and flotation media (salts and sucrose) were evaluated with regard to nematode toxicity and extraction efficiency. Best extraction of viable nematodes and eggs was attained when carrot tissue infested with Radopholus citrophilus or R. similis was macerated with a mixture of 0.50% driselase and 0.50% cellulysin, w/v each, with 2.5 ml of enzyme solution based for each gram of carrot tissue. Maceration slurries containing carrot tissue and nematodes were maintained in open flasks on a rotary shaker (175 rpm) at 26 C for 24 hours. Nematodes and eggs were extracted from resultant culture slurries by flotation with MgSO-7H0 (sp gr 1.1). A protocol is presented to extract large quantities of viable burrowing nematodes and their eggs from carrot disk cultures.

  8. Current research on the major nematode problems in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ichinohe, M

    1988-04-01

    AMONG IMPORTANT NEMATODE SPECIES OCCURRING IN JAPAN, CURRENT RESEARCH ACHIEVEMENTS WITH THE FOLLOWING FOUR NEMATODES ARE REVIEWED: 1) Soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines - breeding for resistance, race determination, association with Cephalosporium gregatum in azuki bean disease, and isolation of hatching stimulant. 2) Potato-cyst nematode (PCN), Globodera rostochiensis - pathotype determination (Ro 1), breeding for resistance, and control recommendations. 3) Pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus - primary pathogen in pine wilt disease, life cycle exhibiting a typical symbiosis with Japanese pine sawyer, Monochamus alternatus, and project for control. 4) Rice root nematodes (RRN), Hirschmanniella imamuri and H. oryzae - distribution of species, population levels in roots, and role of these nematodes in rice culture.

  9. Ascaroside Signaling is Widely Conserved Among Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Andrea; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Kogan, Dima; Gasser, Robin B.; Platzer, Edward G.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Nematodes are among the most successful animals on earth and include important human pathogens, yet little is known about nematode pheromone systems. A group of small molecules called ascarosides has been found to mediate mate finding, aggregation, and developmental diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans, but it is unknown whether ascaroside signaling exists outside of the genus Caenorhabditis. Results To determine whether ascarosides are used as signaling molecules by other nematode species, we performed a mass spectrometry-based screen for ascarosides in secretions from a variety of both free-living and parasitic (plant, insect, and animal) nematodes. We found that most of the species analyzed, including nematodes from several different clades, produce species-specific ascaroside mixtures. In some cases, ascaroside biosynthesis patterns appear to correlate with phylogeny, whereas in other cases, biosynthesis seems to correlate with lifestyle and ecological niche. We further show that ascarosides mediate distinct nematode behaviors, such as retention, avoidance, and long-range attraction, and that different nematode species respond to distinct, but overlapping, sets of ascarosides. Conclusions Our findings indicate that nematodes utilize a conserved family of signaling molecules despite having evolved to occupy diverse ecologies. Their structural features and level of conservation are evocative of bacterial quorum sensing, where acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are both produced and sensed by many species of Gram-negative bacteria. The identification of species-specific ascaroside profiles may enable pheromone-based approaches to interfere with reproduction and survival of parasitic nematodes, which are responsible for significant agricultural losses and many human diseases worldwide. PMID:22503501

  10. [Nematodes of humans in the Primorye Territory].

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, A V; Rumiantseva, E E; Bartkova, A D; Voronok, V M; Poliakova, L F

    2013-01-01

    Nematodes occupy the top in the general pattern of human parasitic diseases in the Primorye Territory. In the south of the Far East, there are a total of 28 nematode species that can parasitize man. However, the authors have identified only 8 nematode-induced diseases, such as ascariasis, enterobiasis, toxocariasis, trichocephaliasis, anisakiasis, trichinosis, dirofilariasis, dioctophymosis. The latter has been found only once in the 1920s. According to official statistical data, the proportion of ascariasis and enterobiasis accounted for 43.8 and 53.5% of the total number of helminthiases, respectively.

  11. An 8-week brain MRI follow-up analysis of rat eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Shyu, L Y; Tsai, H H; Lin, D P; Chang, H H; Tyan, Y S; Weng, J C

    2014-09-01

    Early differential diagnosis and timely follow-up are advantageous in the management of Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection. This study aimed to characterize angiostrongyliasis in the rat brain for an 8-week period using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and R2 mapping sequences. The data were analysed with Mathematica and Matlab software programs for weekly changes in each brain following the infection of 20, 50, 100 and 300 third-stage larvae (L3), respectively. The results showed that the average subarachnoid space detected by T2WI technique was peaked up to 10% increase of original size on day 35 after 100 or 300 larvae infection, while those infected with 20 or 50 larvae showed less than 4% increase during the entire course of observation. This increase was relevant to the mortality of the infected rats, because those with 100 or 300 larvae infections showed a sharp decrease in survival rate before day 40. After day 40, the average subarachnoid space was decreased, but the average ventricle size was persistently increased, with the highest increase observed in the group infected with 300 larvae on day 56. Furthermore, the R2 mapping mean and R2 mapping size were significantly different between the brains with severe infection (100 and 300 larvae groups together) and those with mild infection (20 and 50 larvae groups together) on day 49, but not on day 35. Our results showed that diagnosis for different quantity of larvae infection using MRI is possible and follow-up characterization is informative in revealing the effects of angiostrongyliasis on different brain areas. In conclusion, our results support the use of MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic technique for eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection.

  12. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  13. Nematode molecular diagnostics: from bands to barcodes.

    PubMed

    Powers, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Nematodes are considered among the most difficult animals to identify. DNA-based diagnostic methods have already gained acceptance in applications ranging from quarantine determinations to assessments of biodiversity. Researchers are currently in an information-gathering mode, with intensive efforts applied to accumulating nucleotide sequence of 18S and 28S ribosomal genes, internally transcribed spacer regions, and mitochondrial genes. Important linkages with collateral data such as digitized images, video clips and specimen voucher web pages are being established on GenBank and NemATOL, the nematode-specific Tree of Life database. The growing DNA taxonomy of nematodes has lead to their use in testing specific short sequences of DNA as a "barcode" for the identification of all nematode species.

  14. Interactions between Nematodes and Earthworms: Enhanced Dispersal of Steinernema carpocapsae

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, D. I.; Berry, E. C.; Lewis, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    Dispersal of the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (All strain), applied on the top or the bottom of soil columns, was tested in the presence or absence of two earthworm species, Lumbricus terrestris or Aporrectodea trapezoides. Nematode dispersal was estimated after a 2-week period with a bioassay against the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Vertical dispersal of nematodes was increased in the presence of earthworms. When nematodes were placed on the surface of soil columns, significantly more nematodes dispersed to the lower half of the columns when either earthworm species was present than when earthworms were not present. When nematodes were placed on the bottom of soil columns, significantly more nematodes dispersed to the upper half of the columns when L. terrestris was present than when A. trapezoides was present or in the absence of earthworms. Because nematodes were found on the exterior and in the interior of earthworms, nematode dispersal may be enhanced by direct contact with the earthworms. PMID:19279757

  15. Conserving and enhancing biological control of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Timper, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Conservation biological control is the modification of the environment or existing practices to protect and enhance antagonistic organisms to reduce damage from pests. This approach to biological control has received insufficient attention compared with inundative applications of microbial antagonists to control nematodes. This review provides examples of how production practices can enhance or diminish biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes and other soilborne pests. Antagonists of nematodes can be enhanced by providing supplementary food sources such as occurs when organic amendments are applied to soil. However, some organic amendments (e.g., manures and plants containing allelopathic compounds) can also be detrimental to nematode antagonists. Plant species and genotype can strongly influence the outcome of biological control. For instance, the susceptibility of the plant to the nematode can determine the effectiveness of control; good hosts will require greater levels of suppression than poor hosts. Plant genotype can also influence the degree of rhizosphere colonization and antibiotic production by antagonists, as well the expression of induced resistance by plants. Production practices such as crop rotation, fallow periods, tillage, and pesticide applications can directly disrupt populations of antagonistic organisms. These practices can also indirectly affect antagonists by reducing their primary nematode host. One of the challenges of conservation biological control is that practices intended to protect or enhance suppression of nematodes may not be effective in all field sites because they are dependent on indigenous antagonists. Ultimately, indicators will need to be identified, such as the presence of particular antagonists, which can guide decisions on where it is practical to use conservation biological control. Antagonists can also be applied to field sites in conjunction with conservation practices to improve the consistency, efficacy, and

  16. Conserving and Enhancing Biological Control of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Timper, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation biological control is the modification of the environment or existing practices to protect and enhance antagonistic organisms to reduce damage from pests. This approach to biological control has received insufficient attention compared with inundative applications of microbial antagonists to control nematodes. This review provides examples of how production practices can enhance or diminish biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes and other soilborne pests. Antagonists of nematodes can be enhanced by providing supplementary food sources such as occurs when organic amendments are applied to soil. However, some organic amendments (e.g., manures and plants containing allelopathic compounds) can also be detrimental to nematode antagonists. Plant species and genotype can strongly influence the outcome of biological control. For instance, the susceptibility of the plant to the nematode can determine the effectiveness of control; good hosts will require greater levels of suppression than poor hosts. Plant genotype can also influence the degree of rhizosphere colonization and antibiotic production by antagonists, as well the expression of induced resistance by plants. Production practices such as crop rotation, fallow periods, tillage, and pesticide applications can directly disrupt populations of antagonistic organisms. These practices can also indirectly affect antagonists by reducing their primary nematode host. One of the challenges of conservation biological control is that practices intended to protect or enhance suppression of nematodes may not be effective in all field sites because they are dependent on indigenous antagonists. Ultimately, indicators will need to be identified, such as the presence of particular antagonists, which can guide decisions on where it is practical to use conservation biological control. Antagonists can also be applied to field sites in conjunction with conservation practices to improve the consistency, efficacy, and

  17. Influence of metalaxyl on three nematodes of citrus.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T

    1983-07-01

    Metalaxyl significantly reduced population of Pratylenchus coffeae, Radopholus similis, and Tylenchulus semipenetrans in roots of Citrus limon (rough lemon) under greenhouse conditions. Postinoculation treatment of rough lemon seedlings was not as effective i n reducing nematode populations as was treatment before inoculation. Fewer nematodes infected metalaxyl-treated roots than nontreated roots. However, incubation of nematodes in metalaxyl did not inhibit nematode motility or their ability to locate and infect roots. Cellular responses to nematode injection differed between treated and nontreated tissues. Metalaxyl appeared to confer nematode contraol by modifying citrus roots such that a normally susceptible rootstock became tolerant.

  18. Induced resistance to nematodes in cotton: a novel contribution to nematode management.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Induced resistance against plant-parasitic nematodes has not previously been shown in cotton. We tested whether co-infection of cotton by Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis affected population levels of either nematode compared to single-species infection. In split-root experiments, ...

  19. Interspecific Nematode Signals Regulate Dispersal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T.; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Ali, Jared G.; Akyazi, Faruk; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Edison, Arthur S.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Teal, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJ)s of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs. Methodology/Principal Findings Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9). A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9) and C. elegans (ascr#2) dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers. Conclusions/Significance Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes. PMID:22701701

  20. Larvicidal effect of imidacloprid/moxidectin spot-on solution in dogs experimentally inoculated with Angiostrongylus vasorum.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, M; Fahrion, A; Ossent, P; Kohler, L; Webster, P; Heine, J; Deplazes, P

    2009-12-23

    A controlled, randomized, blinded dose confirmation study was conducted to evaluate the larvicidal efficacy and safety of imidacloprid 10 mg/kg/moxidectin 2.5 mg/kg body weight spot-on solution in dogs experimentally inoculated with 200 infective third stage larvae (L3) of Angiostrongylus vasorum. Twenty-four adult dogs were randomly allocated to three study groups of 8 dogs each. Animals in group 1 were treated 4 days post-inoculation (dpi), those in group 2 at 32 dpi, and the dogs in group 3 were left untreated. All dogs were euthanized and necropsied 56-59 dpi. In order to determine the worm burdens in the arterial lung vessels a method of reverse lung perfusion with phosphate buffered solution after inhibition of coagulation with heparin was applied. In the control group, excretion of first stage larvae (L1) of A. vasorum started 47-55 dpi and all dogs excreted L1 at least on one sample day before euthanasia (0.1-32.5 larvae per gram of faeces). A mean of 99 (SD 42.8) adult parasites were recovered in the post-mortem examinations in these eight control dogs. In contrast, no L1 at all were found in the faeces of dogs of groups 1 and 2, nor were any adult parasites detected at necropsy. Respiratory symptoms were observed in dogs of groups 2 and 3. Pathological findings in the lungs correlated with the treatment groups: in the animals of group 1, no or minimal lesions were found, while in all those of group 2 dispersed patterns of pale pink, slightly raised and consolidated foci were present in all lung lobes. In contrast, the lungs of the dogs from group 3 were severely affected: large confluent areas were hardened, raised and discoloured, with frequent haemorrhagic patches. Pneumonia, thrombi and parasites were histologically confirmed. The lung lymph nodes were regularly enlarged. Hence, imidacloprid/moxidectin spot-on effectively eliminated fourth stage larvae (L4) and immature adult A. vasorum in experimentally infected dogs and prevented patent infections

  1. Two new species of soil nematodes from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Chanu, Loukrakpam Bina; Meitei, N Mohilal; Shah, M Manjur

    2016-09-01

    Survey for soil nematodes associated with mulberry plants in valley districts of Manipur revealed the presence of two new species of soil nematodes of the genus Tylenchus sp. and Telotylenchus sp. The two new species are described and illustrated here.

  2. Molecular Transfer of Nematode Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, V. M.; Ho, J.-Y.; Ma, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques have been used to introduce agronomically valuable traits, including resistance to viruses, herbicides, and insects, into crop plants. Introduction of these genes into plants frequently involves Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer. The potential exists for applying this technology to nematode control by introducing genes conferring resistance to nematodes. Transferred genes could include those encoding products detrimental to nematode development or reproduction as well as cloned host resistance genes. Host genes that confer resistance to cyst or root-knot nematode species have been identified in many plants. The best characterized is Mi, a gene that confers resistance to root-knot nematodes in tomato. A map-based cloning approach is being used to isolate the gene. For development of a detailed map of the region of the genome surrounding Mi, DNA markers genetically linked to Mi have been identified and analyzed in tomato lines that have undergone a recombination event near Mi. The molecular map will be used to identify DNA corresponding to Mi. We estimate that a clone of Mi will be obtained in 2-5 years. An exciting prospect is that introduction of this gene will confer resistance in plant species without currently available sources of resistance. PMID:19282989

  3. Nematodes associated with blackberry in arkansas.

    PubMed

    Wehunt, E J; Golden, A M; Clark, J R; Kirkpatrick, T L; Baker, E C; Brown, M A

    1991-10-01

    A survey of the nematodes in blackberry (Rubus sp.) rhizospheres was conducted in Arkansas from 1986 to 1989. The state was divided arbitrarily into four quadrants. A total of 134 soil samples was collected, and 150-cm 3 subsamples were assayed for nematodes. Twenty-one species of plant-parasitic nematodes in 11 genera were extracted from the samples. There were differences (P = 0.05) among quadrants of the state in percentage occurrence of the nematodes and in population densities in samples. Xiphinema americanum, Helicotylenchus spp. (H. paraplatyurus, H. platyurus, and H. pseudorobustus), and Pratylenchus spp. (P. vulnus and P. zeae) were found in all quadrants. Xiphinema americanum population density was near 1,000 per 150 cm(3) soil in soil samples from two locations. Other nematodes found in one or more quadrants were Criconemella spp. (C. axeste, C. curvata, C. denoudeni, C. ornata, C. sphaerocephala, and C. xenoplax), Paratrichodorus minor, Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, Hirschmanniella oryzae, Hoplolaimus magnistylus, Scutellonema bradys, and undescribed species of Criconema, Tylenchulus, Xiphinema, and Meloidogyne. Criconemella sphaerocephala and Helicotylenchus platyurus are reported from Arkansas for the first time. Helicotylenchus paraplatyurus is reported from the United States for the first time.

  4. Nature and Inheritance of Nematode Resistance in Cereals

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R.

    1974-01-01

    Resistance to a number of nematodes is present in varieties of temperate and tropical cereals. The occurrence, nature, and inheritance of varietal resistance in cereals is reviewed. Evaluation of the practical significance of nematode resistance in a particular host-nematode combination is discussed in relation to host efficiency, host sensitivity, genetic control of resistance, and presence of virulence in the nematode population. PMID:19308117

  5. Nematode feeding sites: unique organs in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Vieira, Paulo; Gheysen, Godelieve; de Almeida-Engler, Janice

    2013-11-01

    Although generally unnoticed, nearly all crop plants have one or more species of nematodes that feed on their roots, frequently causing tremendous yield losses. The group of sedentary nematodes, which are among the most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes, cause the formation of special organs called nematode feeding sites (NFS) in the root tissue. In this review we discuss key metabolic and cellular changes correlated with NFS development, and similarities and discrepancies between different types of NFS are highlighted.

  6. Biocontrol: The Potential of Entomophilic Nematodes in Insect Management

    PubMed Central

    Webster, John M.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the development of entomophilic nematology and a commentary on the potential of entomophilic nematodes in controlling insect pests. The paper considers some of the major contributions to our knowledge of entomophilic nematology; factors involved in insect pest management and how they are applicable to the use of nematodes; nematodes which are most promising as biological control agents; and problems to be solved to facilitate the use of entomophilic nematodes in insect management. PMID:19300702

  7. Towards a genome sequence for reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) currently accounts for $130M in annual losses to the U.S. cotton industry and has supplanted root-knot nematode as the major nematode pest of cotton in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. Moreover, in other cotton-producing states the range and influenc...

  8. A novel flavivirus in the soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterodera glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a subterranean root pathogen that causes the most damaging disease of soybean in the United States. A novel nematode virus genome, soybean cyst nematode virus 5 (SbCNV5), was identified in RNASeq data from SCN eggs and second-stage juveniles. T...

  9. Nematode CLE signaling in Arabidopsis requires CLAVATA2 and CORYNE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/ESR(CLE)-like effector proteins. These proteins have been shown to act as ligand mimics of plant CLE peptides and are required for successful nematode infection; however, the receptors for nematode CLE-like peptides have not been identified. Her...

  10. Site-Specific Detection and Management of Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematode distribution varies significantly throughout a field and is highly correlated to soil texture and other edaphic factors. Field-wide application results in nematicides being applied to areas without nematodes and the application of sub-effective levels in areas with high nematode densities. ...

  11. Opportunity to use native nematodes for pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have surveyed wild cranberry bogs in WI and found three isolates of native nematodes. We have been testing these nematodes as potential biological control agents in for cranberry insect pests including sparganothis fruitworm and flea beetle. The nematodes seem to be effective at finding and killi...

  12. The Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata, a Novel Vector of the Rat Lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis: its Introduction, Spread, and Control in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhong-Dao; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2013-01-01

    The freshwater apple snail Pomacea canaliculata was introduced to Taiwan then to mainland China in the early 1980s from Argentina, its native region, for the purpose of aquaculture. Because of the lack of natural enemies and its tolerance of a wide range of environmental conditions, both its abundance and distribution have dramatically increased and it has become a harmful species to local agriculture and other native species in many areas of China. Unfortunately, the snail also acts as an intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been implicated in transfer of the parasite to people, resulting in angiostrongyliasis manifested as eosinophilic meningitis. Efforts to prevent its further spread and population expansion were initiated many years ago, including the use of chemicals and biological control agents to control the snail. PMID:23901377

  13. Alteration of antibodies against the fifth-stage larvae and changes in brain magnetic resonance images in experimentally infected rabbits with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Chen; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2004-10-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been suggested to be helpful in delineating the lesions during the acute phase of angiostrongyliasis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis. In this study, antibody titers in serum samples of 3 rabbits were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and brain MR images were obtained from 6 rabbits. The antibody titer elevated rapidly in the first 4 wk postinfection (PI) before reaching a plateau. However, suspicious changes in brain MR images near the left lateral ventricle and hippocampus were found only in 1 rabbit on day 28 PI. These findings indicate that immunologic responses in the central nervous system at the early stage of angiostrongyliasis are not sufficient to be observed by image studies.

  14. Nematode problems affecting agriculture in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Davide, R G

    1988-04-01

    Nematodes are considered major pests on most economic crops in the Philippines, particularly on banana, pineapple, citrus, tomato, ramie, and sugarcane. Radopholus similis is the most destructive nematode on banana, while Meloidogyne spp. are more serious on various vegetable crops such as tomato, okra, and celery and on fiber crops such as ramie. Tylenchulus semipenetrans is a problem on citrus and Rotylenchulus reniformis on pineapple and some legume crops. Hirschmanniella oryzae and Aphelenchoides besseyi are becoming serious on rice, and Pratylenchus zeae is affecting corn in some areas. Lately, Globodera rostochiensis has been causing serious damage on potato in the highlands. Control measures such as crop rotation, planting resistant varieties, chemical nematicide application, and biological control have been recommended to control these nematodes.

  15. Nematode taxonomy: from morphology to metabarcoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sapp, M.; Prior, T.; Karssen, G.; Back, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nematodes represent a species rich and morphologically diverse group of metazoans inhabiting both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Their role as biological indicators and as key players in nutrient cycling has been well documented. Some groups of nematodes are also known to cause significant losses to crop production. In spite of this, knowledge of their diversity is still limited due to the difficulty in achieving species identification using morphological characters. Molecular methodology has provided very useful means of circumventing the numerous limitations associated with classical morphology based identification. We discuss herein the history and the progress made within the field of nematode systematics, the limitations of classical taxonomy and how the advent of high throughput sequencing is facilitating advanced ecological and molecular studies.

  16. Remote Sensing of Parasitic Nematodes in Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Gary W.; King, Roger; Kelley, Amber T.; Vickery, John

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for remote sensing of parasitic nematodes in plants, now undergoing development, is based on measurement of visible and infrared spectral reflectances of fields where the plants are growing. Initial development efforts have been concentrated on detecting reniform nematodes (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in cotton plants, because of the economic importance of cotton crops. The apparatus includes a hand-held spectroradiometer. The readings taken by the radiometer are processed to extract spectral reflectances at sixteen wavelengths between 451 and 949 nm that, taken together, have been found to be indicative of the presence of Rotylenchulus reniformis. The intensities of the spectral reflectances are used to estimate the population density of the nematodes in an area from which readings were taken.

  17. Immunological control of gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Klei, T R

    1997-11-01

    Control of nematode parasitism by an active manipulation of the host immune response has been a goal of veterinary and medical parasitologists for decades. The reality of achieving this goal has been questioned vigorously and demonstrations of the feasibility of using immunological control under field conditions are minimal. Nevertheless, with the rapid growth of modern biotechnology and the identification of novel parasite molecules as vaccine targets, the potential for success in this area has recently generated considerable excitement. The induction and regulation of the ruminant immune response against nematode parasites can be controlled either by management programs which include anthelmintic treatment or by vaccination. Both approaches will be discussed in this session.

  18. Detecting Nematode Features from Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    de la Blanca, N. Pérez; Fdez-Valdivia, J.; Castillo, P.; Gómez-Barcina, A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for estimating and calibrating nematode features from digitial images are described and evaluated by illustration and mathematical formulae. Technical problems, such as capturing and cleaning raw images, standardizing the grey level range of images, and the detection of characteristics of the body habitus, presence or absence of stylet knobs, and tail and lip region shape are discussed. This study is the first of a series aimed at developing a set of automated methods to permit more rapid, objective characterizations of nematode features than is achievable by cumbersome conventional methods. PMID:19282998

  19. Mining nematode genome data for novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeremy M; Zhang, Yinhua; Kumar, Sanjay; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2005-03-01

    Expressed sequence tag projects have currently produced over 400 000 partial gene sequences from more than 30 nematode species and the full genomic sequences of selected nematodes are being determined. In addition, functional analyses in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have addressed the role of almost all genes predicted by the genome sequence. This recent explosion in the amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data, provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify pre-validated drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. This article describes the various information sources available and strategies that can expedite this process.

  20. A Trojan horse mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Jianping; Yang, Dongmei; Wei, Kangbi; Niu, Xuemei; An, Zhiqiang; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom; Zou, Chenggang; Yang, Jinkui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of host–pathogen interaction can provide crucial information for successfully manipulating their relationships. Because of its genetic background and practical advantages over vertebrate model systems, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans model has become an attractive host for studying microbial pathogenesis. Here we report a “Trojan horse” mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes. We show that the bacterium Bacillus nematocida B16 lures nematodes by emitting potent volatile organic compounds that are much more attractive to worms than those from ordinary dietary bacteria. Seventeen B. nematocida-attractant volatile organic compounds are identified, and seven are individually confirmed to lure nematodes. Once the bacteria enter the intestine of nematodes, they secrete two proteases with broad substrate ranges but preferentially target essential intestinal proteins, leading to nematode death. This Trojan horse pattern of bacterium–nematode interaction enriches our understanding of microbial pathogenesis. PMID:20733068

  1. Cuticle surface coat of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Davies, Keith G; Curtis, Rosane H C

    2011-01-01

    The surface coat (SC) of the plant-parasitic nematode cuticle is an understudied area of current research, even though it likely plays key roles in both nematode-plant and nematode-microbe interactions. Although in several ways Caenorhabditis elegans is a poor model for plant-parasitic nematodes, it is a useful starting point for investigations of the cuticle and its SC, especially in the light of recent work using this species as a model for innate immunity and the generic biology underpinning much host-parasite biology. We review the research focused on the involvement of the SC of plant-parasitic nematodes. Using the insights gained from animal-parasitic nematodes and other sequenced nematodes, we discuss the key roles that the SC may play.

  2. Meloidogyne incognita nematode resistance QTL in carrot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are major pests attacking carrots (Daucus carota) worldwide, causing galling and forking of the storage roots, rendering them unacceptable for market. Genetic resistance could significantly reduce the need for broad-spectrum soil fumigants in carrot production....

  3. Potato cyst nematodes: pests of national importance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN; G. rostochiensis and G. pallida) are internationally-recognized quarantine pests and considered the most devastating pests of potatoes due to annual worldwide yield losses estimated at 12.2%. PCNs continue to spread throughout North America and were recently detected in I...

  4. The Future of Nematode Management in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.; Koenning, S. R.; Kirkpatrick, T. L.; Robinson, A. F.; Roberts, P. A.; Nichols, R. L.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of plant-parasitic nematodes as yield-limiting pathogens of cotton has received increased recognition and attention in the United States in the recent past. This paper summarizes the remarks made during a symposium of the same title that was held in July 2007 at the joint meeting of the Society of Nematologists and the American Phytopathological Society in San Diego, California. Although several cultural practices, including crop rotation, can be effective in suppressing the populations of the important nematode pathogens of cotton, the economic realities of cotton production limit their use. The use of nematicides is also limited by issues of efficacy and economics. There is a need for development of chemistries that will address these limitations. Also needed are systems that would enable precise nematicide application in terms of rate and placement only in areas where nematode population densities warrant application. Substantial progress is being made in the identification, characterization and mapping of loci for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis. These data will lead to efficient marker-assisted selection systems that will likely result in development and release of nematode-resistant cotton cultivars with superior yield potential and high fiber quality. PMID:19259500

  5. Dolichodorus aestuarius n. sp. (Nematode: Dolichodoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Chow, F. H.; Taylor, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Dolichodorus aestuarius n. sp. from an estuarine habitat near Cedar Key, Florida is described. This nematode has a stylet range of 62-76 μm in females and 60-72 μm in males. The stylet is shorter than those of all described species except D. brevistilus. The probable host plant is Juncus roemerianus. PMID:19305840

  6. Molecular analysis of plant-parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to traditional morphology-based taxonomic approaches, molecular methods are often required to confirm diagnoses or to establish phylogenetic relationships among plant-parasitic nematodes. Current challenges, including limitations of existing methods, and new research directions will be d...

  7. Considering field physical characteristics in assessing risk and delineating nematode management zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific management (SSM) of nematodes requires identifying factors affecting nematode distribution, nematode population density, and nematode-induced yield losses, and then using that information to predict where nematode management will cost-effectively reduce yield loss. Using cotton (Gossy...

  8. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, John T; Haegeman, Annelies; Danchin, Etienne G J; Gaur, Hari S; Helder, Johannes; Jones, Michael G K; Kikuchi, Taisei; Manzanilla-López, Rosa; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Wesemael, Wim M L; Perry, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a 'top 10' list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10) Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly.

  9. Microbiota from Rhabditis regina may alter nematode entomopathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Cortés, Jesús Guillermo; Canales-Lazcano, Jorge; Lara-Reyes, Nancy; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Contreras-Garduño, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    Here we report the presence of the entomopathogenic nematode Rhabditis (Rhabditoides) regina affecting white grubs (Phyllophaga sp. and Anomala sp.) in Mexico and R. regina-associated bacteria. Bioassays were performed to test the entomopathogenic capacity of dauer and L2 and L3 (combined) larval stages. Furthermore, we determined the diversity of bacteria from laboratory nematodes cultivated for 2 years (dauer and L2-L3 larvae) and from field nematodes (dauer and L2-L3 larvae) in addition to the virulence in Galleria mellonella larvae of some bacterial species from both laboratory and field nematodes. Dauer and non-dauer larvae of R. regina killed G. mellonella. Bacteria such as Serratia sp. (isolated from field nematodes) and Klebsiella sp. (isolated from larvae of laboratory and field nematodes) may explain R. regina entomopathogenic capabilities. Different bacteria were found in nematodes after subculturing in the laboratory suggesting that R. regina may acquire bacteria in different environments. However, there were some consistently found bacteria from laboratory and field nematodes such as Pseudochrobactrum sp., Comamonas sp., Alcaligenes sp., Klebsiella sp., Acinetobacter sp., and Leucobacter sp. that may constitute the nematode microbiome. Results showed that some bacteria contributing to entomopathogenicity may be lost in the laboratory representing a disadvantage when nematodes are cultivated to be used for biological control.

  10. Rolling Circle Amplification of Complete Nematode Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2005-01-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80°C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing. PMID:19262866

  11. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes: mechanisms and myths.

    PubMed

    Grencis, Richard K; Humphreys, Neil E; Bancroft, Allison J

    2014-07-01

    Immune responses to gastrointestinal nematodes have been studied extensively for over 80 years and intensively investigated over the last 30-40 years. The use of laboratory models has led to the discovery of new mechanisms of protective immunity and made major contributions to our fundamental understanding of both innate and adaptive responses. In addition to host protection, it is clear that immunoregulatory processes are common in infected individuals and resistance often operates alongside modulation of immunity. This review aims to discuss the recent discoveries in both host protection and immunoregulation against gastrointestinal nematodes, placing the data in context of the specific life cycles imposed by the different parasites studied and the future challenges of considering the mucosal/immune axis to encompass host, parasite, and microbiome in its widest sense.

  12. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  13. All the microbiology nematodes can teach us

    PubMed Central

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Be it their pervasiveness, experimental tractability or their impact on human health and agriculture, nematode–bacterium associations are far-reaching research subjects. Although the omics hype did not spare them and helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners, a huge amount of knowledge still awaits to be harvested from their study. Here, I summarize and compare the kind of research that has been already performed on the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and on symbiotic nematodes, both marine and entomopathogenic ones. The emerging picture highlights how complementing genetic studies with ecological ones (in the case of well-established genetic model systems such as C. elegans) and vice versa (in the case of the yet uncultured Stilbonematinae) will deepen our understanding of how microbial symbioses evolved and how they impact our environment. PMID:26839382

  14. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes: mechanisms and myths

    PubMed Central

    Grencis, Richard K; Humphreys, Neil E; Bancroft, Allison J

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses to gastrointestinal nematodes have been studied extensively for over 80 years and intensively investigated over the last 30–40 years. The use of laboratory models has led to the discovery of new mechanisms of protective immunity and made major contributions to our fundamental understanding of both innate and adaptive responses. In addition to host protection, it is clear that immunoregulatory processes are common in infected individuals and resistance often operates alongside modulation of immunity. This review aims to discuss the recent discoveries in both host protection and immunoregulation against gastrointestinal nematodes, placing the data in context of the specific life cycles imposed by the different parasites studied and the future challenges of considering the mucosal/immune axis to encompass host, parasite, and microbiome in its widest sense. PMID:24942690

  15. On the Methodology of Nematode Extraction from Field Samples: Density Flotation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Viglierchio, David R.; Yamashita, Tom T.

    1983-01-01

    Density flotation has been frequently used for the extraction of nematodes from field samples. Density flotation curves for four nematode species and five solutes have been prepared. The curves confirm that flotation was governed by several factors: solute density, solute osmotic activity, and physiological properties of the nematode species. Nematode viability and function can be adversely affected by improper selection of solute for density extraction of nematodes; nevertheless, some nematode species can be enriched from mixtures by density and solute selection. PMID:19295831

  16. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  17. A White Paper on Nematode Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Bird, David McK.; Blaxter, Mark L.; McCarter, James P.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Sternberg, Paul W.; Thomas, W. Kelley

    2005-01-01

    In response to the new opportunities for genome sequencing and comparative genomics, the Society of Nematology (SON) formed a committee to develop a white paper in support of the broad scientific needs associated with this phylum and interests of SON members. Although genome sequencing is expensive, the data generated are unique in biological systems in that genomes have the potential to be complete (every base of the genome can be accounted for), accurate (the data are digital and not subject to stochastic variation), and permanent (once obtained, the genome of a species does not need to be experimentally re-sampled). The availability of complete, accurate, and permanent genome sequences from diverse nematode species will underpin future studies into the biology and evolution of this phylum and the ecological associations (particularly parasitic) nematodes have with other organisms. We anticipate that upwards of 100 nematode genomes will be solved to varying levels of completion in the coming decade and suggest biological and practical considerations to guide the selection of the most informative taxa for sequencing. PMID:19262884

  18. Evolution of plant parasitism among nematodes.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J G; Nadler, S A; Adams, B J

    2004-01-01

    Despite extraordinary diversity of free-living species, a comparatively small fraction of nematodes are parasites of plants. These parasites represent at least three disparate clades in the nematode tree of life, as inferred from rRNA sequences. Plant parasites share functional similarities regarding feeding, but many similarities in feeding structures result from convergent evolution and have fundamentally different developmental origins. Although Tylenchida rRNA phylogenies are not fully resolved, they strongly support convergent evolution of sedentary endoparasitism and plant nurse cells in cyst and root-knot nematodes. This result has critical implications for using model systems and genomics to identify and characterize parasitism genes for representatives of this clade. Phylogenetic studies reveal that plant parasites have rich and complex evolutionary histories that involve multiple transitions to plant parasitism and the possible use of genes obtained by horizontal transfer from prokaryotes. Developing a fuller understanding of plant parasitism will require integrating more comprehensive and resolved phylogenies with appropriate choices of model organisms and comparative evolutionary methods.

  19. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D; Huffnagle, Ian M; Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  20. Entomopathogenic Nematode Production and Application Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Han, Richou; Dolinksi, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Production and application technology is critical for the success of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in biological control. Production approaches include in vivo, and in vitro methods (solid or liquid fermentation). For laboratory use and small scale field experiments, in vivo production of EPNs appears to be the appropriate method. In vivo production is also appropriate for niche markets and small growers where a lack of capital, scientific expertise or infrastructure cannot justify large investments into in vitro culture technology. In vitro technology is used when large scale production is needed at reasonable quality and cost. Infective juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes are usually applied using various spray equipment and standard irrigation systems. Enhanced efficacy in EPN applications can be facilitated through improved delivery mechanisms (e.g., cadaver application) or optimization of spray equipment. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in developing EPN formulations, particularly for above ground applications, e.g., mixing EPNs with surfactants or polymers or with sprayable gels. Bait formulations and insect host cadavers can enhance EPN persistence and reduce the quantity of nematodes required per unit area. This review provides a summary and analysis of factors that affect production and application of EPNs and offers insights for their future in biological insect suppression. PMID:23482883

  1. Reniform Nematode Resistance in Selected Soybean Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, R. T.; Rakes, L.; Jackson, L. E.; Dombek, D. G.

    1999-01-01

    Two hundred eighty-two soybean cultivars from the variety testing programs of Arkansas and Mississippi were tested in greenhouse pot experiments during summer 1998 to identify soybean cultivars with resistance to the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis. Also included in the tests were the resistant cultivars Forrest and Hartwig, the susceptible control Braxton, and fallow infested soil, which were used as controls. Numbers of reniform nematode extracted from the soil and roots and the ratio of the numbers reproducing on each cultivar compared to the number reproducing on Forrest are reported. Cultivars with reproduction not significantly different from Forrest were classified resistant, whereas those with greater reproductive indices were considered susceptible. One of the 18 cultivars of relative maturity group (RMG) ≤4.4 was classified as resistant. For the 86 cultivars of RMG 4.5-4.9, 18 were found to be resistant. Of the 43 cultivars of RMG 5.0-5.4, 16 were resistant, while 43 of the 91 cultivars of RMG 5.5-5.9 were resistant. Fifteen of the cultivars with an RMG of ≥6.0 were classed as resistant. These data will be useful in the selection of soybean cultivars to use in rotation with cotton to help control the reniform nematode. PMID:19270934

  2. Assaying Environmental Nickel Toxicity Using Model Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D.; Huffnagle, Ian M.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species. PMID:24116204

  3. Nematode locomotion in unconfined and confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Alejandro; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-08-01

    The millimeter-long soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans propels itself by producing undulations that propagate along its body and turns by assuming highly curved shapes. According to our recent study [V. Padmanabhan et al., PLoS ONE 7, e40121 (2012), 10.1371/journal.pone.0040121] all these postures can be accurately described by a piecewise-harmonic-curvature model. We combine this curvature-based description with highly accurate hydrodynamic bead models to evaluate the normalized velocity and turning angles for a worm swimming in an unconfined fluid and in a parallel-wall cell. We find that the worm moves twice as fast and navigates more effectively under a strong confinement, due to the large transverse-to-longitudinal resistance-coefficient ratio resulting from the wall-mediated far-field hydrodynamic coupling between body segments. We also note that the optimal swimming gait is similar to the gait observed for nematodes swimming in high-viscosity fluids. Our bead models allow us to determine the effects of confinement and finite thickness of the body of the nematode on its locomotion. These effects are not accounted for by the classical resistive-force and slender-body theories.

  4. Entomopathogenic and plant pathogenic nematodes as opposing forces in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Eric; Eleftherianos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are responsible for substantial damages within the agriculture industry every year, which is a challenge that has thus far gone largely unimpeded. Chemical nematicides have been employed with varying degrees of success, but their implementation can be cumbersome, and furthermore they could potentially be neutralising an otherwise positive effect from the entomopathogenic nematodes that coexist with plant-parasitic nematodes in soil environments and provide protection for plants against insect pests. Recent research has explored the potential of employing entomopathogenic nematodes to protect plants from plant-parasitic nematodes, while providing their standard degree of protection against insects. The interactions involved are highly complex, due to both the three-organism system and the assortment of variables present in a soil environment, but a strong collection of evidence has accumulated regarding the suppressive capacity of certain entomopathogenic nematodes and their mutualistic bacteria, in the context of limiting the infectivity of plant-parasitic nematodes. Specific factors produced by certain entomopathogenic nematode complexes during the process of insect infection appear to have a selectively nematicidal, or at least repellant, effect on plant-parasitic nematodes. Using this information, an opportunity has formed to adapt this relationship to large-scale, field conditions and potentially relieve the agricultural industry of one of its most substantial burdens.

  5. Distribution patterns of entomopathogenic nematodes applied through drip irrigation systems.

    PubMed

    Wennemann, L; Cone, W W; Wright, L C; Perez, J; Conant, M M

    2003-04-01

    The distribution of entomopathogenic nematodes applied by drip irrigation was evaluated by injecting small volumes of Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) All strain, Steinernema feltiae (Filipjev) SN strain, Steinernema glaseri Steiner, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HP 88 strain Poinar suspensions into drip irrigation lines. Additionally, Steinernema riobrave Cabanillas, Poinar, & Raulston, and S. carpocapsae were injected in a 10-liter volume of water with an injection pump. Overall, the nematodes were evenly distributed along the drip lines. The total number of nematodes recovered from drip emitters was variable ranging from 42 to 92%. However, drip irrigation lines have potential to deliver entomopathogenic nematodes efficiently into pest habitats.

  6. Nematodes Associated with Plants from Naturally Acidic Wetlands Soil

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert John; Smart, Grover C.

    1994-01-01

    Four plants, Cyperus ochraceus, Eriocaulon compressum, Lythrum alatum, and Xyris jupicai, growing along the shoreline of an oligotrophic lake in north central Florida were sampled for nematodes. The nematodes recovered were placed in four trophic groups: bacterivores, herbivores, omnivores, and predators. When the nematodes on all plants were considered, 27% were bacterivores, 23% were herbivores, 7% were omnivores, and 43% were predators. Tripyla was the dominant predator and the dominant genus of all nematodes, and Malenchus was the dominant herbivore. Dominance was not clearly pronounced in the other trophic groups. PMID:19279927

  7. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  8. Dexamethasone downregulated the expression of CSF 14-3-3β protein in mice with eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Bi-Yao; Yen, Chuan-Min; Wann, Shue-Ren; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Chen, Yao-Shen; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the main causative agent of human eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. A previous study demonstrated that the 14-3-3β protein is a neuropathological marker in monitoring neuronal damage in meningitis. Steroids are commonly used in patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection. However, the mechanism by which steroids act in eosinophilic meningitis is unknown. We hypothesized that the beneficial effect of steroids on eosinophilic meningitis is partially mediated by the down-regulation of 14-3-3β protein expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this animal study, we determined the dynamic changes of 14-3-3β protein in mice with eosinophilic meningitis. The 14-3-3β protein in serum and CSF was increased in week 2 and 3 after infections. Dexamethasone administration significantly decreased the amounts of CSF 14-3-3β protein. By developing an in-house ELISA to measure 14-3-3β protein, it was found that the amounts of 14-3-3β protein in the CSF and serum increased over a three-week period after infection. There was a remarkable reduction of 14-3-3β protein in the CSF after 2 weeks of dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, the administration of corticosteroids in mice with eosinophilic meningitis decreased the expression of 14-3-3β protein in the CSF.

  9. Anti-apoptotic effects of Sonic hedgehog signalling through oxidative stress reduction in astrocytes co-cultured with excretory-secretory products of larval Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Yao; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wang, Lian-Chen

    2017-02-07

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is an important aetiologic agent of eosinophilic meningitis and meningoencephalitis in humans. Co-culturing astrocytes with soluble antigens of A. cantonensis activated the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling pathway and inhibited the apoptosis of astrocytes via the activation of Bcl-2. This study was conducted to determine the roles of the Shh signalling pathway, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in astrocytes after treatment with excretory-secretory products (ESP) from A. cantonensis fifth-stage larvae. Although astrocyte viability was significantly decreased after ESP treatment, the expression of Shh signalling pathway related proteins (Shh, Ptch-1 and Gli-1) was significantly increased. However, apoptosis in astrocytes was significantly decreased after activation of the Shh signalling pathway. Moreover, superoxide and hydrogen superoxide levels in astrocytes were significantly reduced after the activation of Shh pathway signalling due to increasing levels of the antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase. These findings indicate that the anti-apoptotic effects of the Shh signalling pathway in the astrocytes of mice infected with A. cantonensis are due to reduced levels of oxidative stress caused by the activation of antioxidants.

  10. Anti-apoptotic effects of Sonic hedgehog signalling through oxidative stress reduction in astrocytes co-cultured with excretory-secretory products of larval Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Yao; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wang, Lian-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is an important aetiologic agent of eosinophilic meningitis and meningoencephalitis in humans. Co-culturing astrocytes with soluble antigens of A. cantonensis activated the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling pathway and inhibited the apoptosis of astrocytes via the activation of Bcl-2. This study was conducted to determine the roles of the Shh signalling pathway, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in astrocytes after treatment with excretory-secretory products (ESP) from A. cantonensis fifth-stage larvae. Although astrocyte viability was significantly decreased after ESP treatment, the expression of Shh signalling pathway related proteins (Shh, Ptch-1 and Gli-1) was significantly increased. However, apoptosis in astrocytes was significantly decreased after activation of the Shh signalling pathway. Moreover, superoxide and hydrogen superoxide levels in astrocytes were significantly reduced after the activation of Shh pathway signalling due to increasing levels of the antioxidants catalase and superoxide dismutase. These findings indicate that the anti-apoptotic effects of the Shh signalling pathway in the astrocytes of mice infected with A. cantonensis are due to reduced levels of oxidative stress caused by the activation of antioxidants. PMID:28169282

  11. [Resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes in sheep and goats].

    PubMed

    Praslicka, J; Corba, J

    1995-08-01

    The article offers a brief view on the most important theoretical knowledge of resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes to anthelmintic drugs in sheep and goats. Besides the definition and basic terms, factors of development and occurrence of resistance on farm are analyzed. Furthermore, methods for detection of resistant nematodes as well as complex of recommended preventive measures are given.

  12. Viability and virulence of entomopathogenic nematodes exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure environmental stress such as from ultraviolet radiation. Our objective was to compare UV tolerance among a broad array of nematode species. We compared 9 different EPN species and ...

  13. 76 FR 60357 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) is a destructive pest of potatoes and other solanaceous plants. Potatoes... no longer required. From 1977 until 2010, potato production fields in the townships of Elba and Byron... nematode quarantine. In 2007, there were 13 farms in Genesee County that harvested potatoes. These...

  14. Control of the peachtree borer using beneficial nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa, is a major pest of peaches and other stone fruits. Our research indicates that entomopathogenic nematodes, also known as beneficial nematodes, can be used effectively to control the insect. We conducted replicated experiments in randomized block designs ov...

  15. Development of Reniform Nematode Resistance in Upland Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this review is to assess development of resistance to the reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Cotton cultivars with reniform nematode resistance are needed. The development of resistant cultivars appears possible but presents a signifi...

  16. Book review: Systematics of Cyst Nematodes (Nematoda: Heteroderinae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyst nematodes are an important group of plant-parasitic nematodes that cause billions of dollars in economic damage to crops every year. This article reviews a recently published, two-volume monograph that describes the morphological and molecular characteristics of these agriculturally signif...

  17. A SURVEY OF CYST NEMATODES (HETERODERA SPP.) IN NORTHERN EGYPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Egypt is important to assess their potential to cause economic damage to crop plants. A nematode survey was conducted in Alexandria and El-Behera Governorates in northern Egypt to identify the species of cy...

  18. Conserved nematode signaling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes, which are ubiquitous in soil and are estimated to cause $100 B of agricultural damage annually, produce novel, highly conserved small sugar-based molecules call ascarosides. Ascarosides play critical roles in nematode development and behavior. We report here that plants recognize these un...

  19. Granite rock outcrops: an extreme environment for soil nematodes?

    PubMed

    Austin, Erin; Semmens, Katharine; Parsons, Charles; Treonis, Amy

    2009-03-01

    We studied soil nematode communities from the surface of granite flatrock outcrops in the eastern Piedmont region of the United States. The thin soils that develop here experience high light intensity and extreme fluctuations in temperature and moisture and host unique plant communities. We collected soils from outcrop microsites in Virginia (VA) and North Carolina (NC) in various stages of succession (Primitive, Minimal, and Mature) and compared soil properties and nematode communities to those of adjacent forest soils. Nematodes were present in most outcrop soils, with densities comparable to forest soils (P > 0.05). Nematode communities in Mature and Minimal soils had lower species richness than forest soils (P < 0.05) and contained more bacterial-feeders and fewer fungal-feeders (P < 0.05). Primitive soils contained either no nematodes (NC) or only a single species (Mesodorylaimus sp., VA). Nematode communities were similar between Mature and Minimal soils, according to trophic group representation, MI, PPI, EI, SI, and CI (P > 0.05). Forest soils had a higher PPI value (P < 0.05), but otherwise community indices were similar to outcrop soils (P > 0.05). Outcrop nematode communities failed to group together in a Bray-Curtis cluster analysis, indicating higher variability in community structure than the Forest soils, which did cluster together. A high proportion of the nematodes were extracted from outcrop soils in coiled form (33-89%), indicating that they used anhydrobiosis to persist in this unique environment.

  20. High Sensitivity NMR and Mixture Analysis for Nematode Behavioral Metabolomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are the most abundant animal on earth, and they parasitize virtually all plants and animals. Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-living nematode that lives in soil and composting material. We have shown that C. elegans releases at least 40 small molecules into its environment including many...

  1. Sex-specific mating pheromones in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite advances in medicine and crop genetics, nematodes remain significant human pathogens and agricultural pests. This warrants investigation of alternative strategies for pest control, such as interference with pheromone-mediated reproduction. Because only two nematode species have had their phe...

  2. Soybean lines evaluated for resistance to reniform nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seventy-four wild and domestic soybean (Glycine max and G. soja) lines were evaluated for resistance to reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) in growth chamber tests with a day length of 16 hours and temperature held constant at 28 C. Several entries for which reactions to reniform nematode w...

  3. Soybean Cyst Nematode in North America - 55 Years Later

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, was first discovered in North America in 1954 in Hanover County, North Carolina, USA, when it was found on soybean in a field that had been planted to Easter lilies obtained from Japan prior to World War II. The nematode is now distributed throughout soybe...

  4. Pineapple Nematode Research in Hawaii: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, E. P.; Apt, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The first written record of pineapple in Hawaii is from 1813. In 1901 commercial pineapple production started, and in 1924 the Experiment Station for pineapple research was established. Nematode-related problems were recognized in the early 1900s by N. A. Cobb. From 1920 to approximately 1945 nematode management in Hawaiian pineapple was based on fallowing and crop rotation. During the 1920s and 1930s G. H. Godfrey conducted research on pineapple nematode management. In the 1930s and 1940s M. B. Linford researched biological control and described several new species of nematodes including Rotylenchulus reniformis. In 1941 nematology and nematode management were advanced by Walter Carter's discovery of the first economical soil fumigant for nematodes, D-D mixture. Subsequently, DBCP was discovered and developed at the Pineapple Research Institute (PRI). Since 1945 soil fumigation has been the main nematode management strategy in Hawaiian pineapple production. Recent research has focused on the development of the nonvolatile nematicides, their potential as systemic nematicides, and their application via drip irrigation. Current and future research addresses biological and cultural alternatives to nematicide-based nematode management. PMID:19287592

  5. Correlations of Nematodes and Soil Properties in Soybean Fields

    PubMed Central

    Norton, D. C.; Frederick, L. R.; Ponchillia, P. E.; Nyhan, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Soil samples from 40 soybean fields were collected in 1967 and 1968 and analyzed for nematodes and soil properties. Correlations o f total nematodes, non-stylet nematodes, Dorylaimoidea (excluding Xiphinema americanum), X. americanum, Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, Tylenchus spp., Aphelenchus avenae, and other groupings of nematodes were made with pH; percentage sand, silt, and clay; percentage organic matter; cation exchange capacity; saturation percentage, and percentage saturation. Organic matter, pH, and cation exchange capacity were most consistently highly correlated with the nematodes. H. pseudorobustus had the most consistently significant correlations with the soil factors. Correlations of nematodes were with more soil factors and were stronger in a wet than in a dry year. The highest numbers of nematodes were usually found in the lighter soils, except in the loamy sand where moisture probably was limiting. In general, soil moisture levels below 20% saturation were probably limiting for most nematodes studied, except for the dorylaims which survived in large numbers in soils with less than 20% saturation. PMID:19322361

  6. Aggregative group behavior in insect parasitic nematode disperal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Movement behavior is critical to determination of spatial ecology and success of foraging in predators and parasites. In this study movement behavior of entomopathogenic nematodes was explored. Movement patterns in sand were investigated when nematodes were applied to a specific locus or when the ne...

  7. Nematodes from terrestrial and freshwater habitats in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Holovachov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    WE PRESENT AN UPDATED LIST OF TERRESTRIAL AND FRESHWATER NEMATODES FROM ALL REGIONS OF THE ARCTIC, FOR WHICH RECORDS OF PROPERLY IDENTIFIED NEMATODE SPECIES ARE AVAILABLE: Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Iceland, Greenland, Nunavut, Northwest territories, Alaska, Lena River estuary, Taymyr and Severnaya Zemlya and Novaya Zemlya. The list includes 391 species belonging to 146 genera, 54 families and 10 orders of the phylum Nematoda.

  8. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, David Evans; Kaplan, David T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare. PMID:19287759

  9. Survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ross, J L; Ivanova, E S; Hatteland, B A; Brurberg, M B; Haukeland, S

    2016-09-01

    A survey of nematodes associated with terrestrial slugs was conducted for the first time in Norway. A total of 611 terrestrial slugs were collected from 32 sample sites. Slugs were identified by means of morphological examination, dissection of genitalia and molecular analysis using mitochondrial DNA. Twelve slug species were identified, representing four different slug families. Internal nematodes were identified by means of morphological analysis and the sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene. Of the sample sites studied, 62.5% were found to be positive for nematode parasites, with 18.7% of all slugs discovered being infected. Five nematode species were identified in this study: Alloionema appendiculatum, Agfa flexilis, Angiostoma limacis, Angiostoma sp. and Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita. Of these species, only one nematode was previously undescribed (Angiostoma sp.). This is the first record of the presence of A. appendiculatum, A. flexilis and A. limacis in Norway.

  10. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus.

    PubMed

    Walter, D E; Kaplan, D T

    1990-10-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare.

  11. Multifaceted effects of host plants on entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hazir, Selcuk; Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Hazir, Canan; Leite, Luis G; Cakmak, Ibrahim; Olson, Dawn

    2016-03-01

    The success of parasites can be impacted by multi-trophic interactions. Tritrophic interactions have been observed in parasite-herbivore-host plant systems. Here we investigate aspects of multi-trophic interactions in a system involving an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), its insect host, and host plant. Novel issues investigated include the impact of tritrophic interactions on nematode foraging behavior, the ability of EPNs to overcome negative tritrophic effects through genetic selection, and interactions with a fourth trophic level (nematode predators). We tested infectivity of the nematode, Steinernema riobrave, to corn earworm larvae (Helicoverpa zea) in three host plants, tobacco, eggplant and tomato. Tobacco reduced nematode virulence and reproduction relative to tomato and eggplant. However, successive selection (5 passages) overcame the deficiency; selected nematodes no longer exhibited reductions in phenotypic traits. Despite the loss in virulence and reproduction nematodes, first passage S. riobrave was more attracted to frass from insects fed tobacco than insects fed on other host plants. Therefore, we hypothesized the reduced virulence and reproduction in S. riobrave infecting tobacco fed insects would be based on a self-medicating tradeoff, such as deterring predation. We tested this hypothesis by assessing predatory success of the mite Sancassania polyphyllae and the springtail Sinella curviseta on nematodes reared on tobacco-fed larvae versus those fed on greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella, tomato fed larvae, or eggplant fed larvae. No advantage was observed in nematodes derived from tobacco fed larvae. In conclusion, our results indicated that insect-host plant diet has an important effect on nematode foraging, infectivity and reproduction. However, negative host plant effects, might be overcome through directed selection. We propose that host plant species should be considered when designing biocontrol programs using EPNs.

  12. First report of the root-lesion nematode, Pratylenchus scribneri, infecting potato in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.) are the most common nematode pests of potato. Five soil samples were collected from a harvested potato field near Cogswell (Sargent County), ND in October 2014 to investigate the occurrence of root-lesion nematodes. Plant-parasitic nematodes were extracted, ...

  13. Vertebrate herbivores influence soil nematodes by modifying plant communities.

    PubMed

    Veen, G F; Olff, Han; Duyts, Henk; van der Putten, Wim H

    2010-03-01

    Abiotic soil properties, plant community composition, and herbivory all have been reported as important factors influencing the composition of soil communities. However, most studies thus far have considered these factors in isolation, whereas they strongly interact in the field. Here, we study how grazing by vertebrate herbivores influences the soil nematode community composition of a floodplain grassland while we account for effects of grazing on plant community composition and abiotic soil properties. Nematodes are the most ubiquitous invertebrates in the soil. They include a variety of feeding types, ranging from microbial feeders to herbivores and carnivores, and they perform key functions in soil food webs. Our hypothesis was that grazing affects nematode community structure and composition through altering plant community structure and composition. Alternatively, we tested whether the effects of grazing may, directly or indirectly, run via changes in soil abiotic properties. We used a long-term field experiment containing plots with and without vertebrate grazers (cattle and rabbits). We compared plant and nematode community structure and composition, as well as a number of key soil abiotic properties, and we applied structural equation modeling to investigate four possible pathways by which grazing may change nematode community composition. Aboveground grazing increased plant species richness and reduced both plant and nematode community heterogeneity. There was a positive relationship between plant and nematode diversity indices. Grazing decreased the number of bacterial-feeding nematodes, indicating that in these grasslands, top-down control of plant production by grazing leads to bottom-up control in the basal part of the bacterial channel of the soil food web. According to the structural equation model, grazing had a strong effect on soil abiotic properties and plant community composition, whereas plant community composition was the main determinant of

  14. Entomopathogenic nematodes in agricultural areas in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Brida, Andressa Lima; Rosa, Juliana Magrinelli Osório; Oliveira, Cláudio Marcelo Gonçalves de; Castro, Bárbara Monteiro de Castro E; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola; Leite, Luis Garrigós; Wilcken, Silvia Renata Siciliano

    2017-04-06

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) can control pests due to the mutualistic association with bacteria that kill the host by septicemia and make the environment favorable for EPNs development and reproduction. The diversity of EPNs in Brazilian soils requires further study. The identification of EPNs, adapted to environmental and climatic conditions of cultivated areas is important for sustainable pest suppression in integrated management programs in agricultural areas of Brazil. The objective was to identify EPNs isolated from agricultural soils with annual, fruit and forest crops in Brazil. Soil samples were collected and stored in 250 ml glass vials. The nematodes were isolated from these samples with live bait traps ([Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae]. Infective juveniles were collected with White traps and identified by DNA barcoding procedures by sequencing the D2/D3 expansion of the 28S rDNA region by PCR. EPNs identified in agricultural areas in Brazil were Heterorhabditis amazonensis, Metarhabditis rainai, Oscheios tipulae and Steinernema rarum. These species should be considered pest biocontrol agents in Brazilian agricultural areas.

  15. Osmoregulation in the parasitic nematode Pseudoterranova decipiens.

    PubMed

    Fusé, M; Davey, K G; Sommerville, R I

    1993-02-01

    When subjected to hyper- or hypo-osmotic stress at 5 degrees C for 24 h, third-stage larvae of the parasitic nematode Pseudoterranova decipiens do not exhibit changes in mass or in the osmotic pressure of the pseudocoelomic fluid. Immersion in solutions containing 3H2O demonstrates that exchange with the water in the pseudocoelomic fluid is substantially complete within 24 h. Sacs composed of cylinders of body wall without the intestine and pseudocoelomic fluid do not gain weight when immersed for 24 h in hypotonic medium. Metabolic poisons abolish the ability of whole worms and sacs to maintain their weight when immersed in hypotonic media. These observations support the conclusion that the nematode is capable of at least short-term osmoregulation and that the site of osmoregulation is the body wall. The observations that more fluid is passed from the anus in some hypo-osmotically stressed worms and that worms ligatured at the tail exhibit a small increase in mass when exposed to hypo-osmotic conditions may indicate that the intestine plays a minor and subsidiary role in osmoregulation.

  16. Entomopathogenic nematodes in agricultural areas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Brida, Andressa Lima; Rosa, Juliana Magrinelli Osório; Oliveira, Cláudio Marcelo Gonçalves de; Castro, Bárbara Monteiro de Castro e; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola; Leite, Luis Garrigós; Wilcken, Silvia Renata Siciliano

    2017-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae) can control pests due to the mutualistic association with bacteria that kill the host by septicemia and make the environment favorable for EPNs development and reproduction. The diversity of EPNs in Brazilian soils requires further study. The identification of EPNs, adapted to environmental and climatic conditions of cultivated areas is important for sustainable pest suppression in integrated management programs in agricultural areas of Brazil. The objective was to identify EPNs isolated from agricultural soils with annual, fruit and forest crops in Brazil. Soil samples were collected and stored in 250 ml glass vials. The nematodes were isolated from these samples with live bait traps ([Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae]. Infective juveniles were collected with White traps and identified by DNA barcoding procedures by sequencing the D2/D3 expansion of the 28S rDNA region by PCR. EPNs identified in agricultural areas in Brazil were Heterorhabditis amazonensis, Metarhabditis rainai, Oscheios tipulae and Steinernema rarum. These species should be considered pest biocontrol agents in Brazilian agricultural areas. PMID:28382937

  17. Evolution of Parasitism in Insect-transmitted Plant Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Giblin-Davis, R. M.; Davies, K. A.; Morris, K.; Thomas, W. K.

    2003-01-01

    Nematode-insect associations have evolved many times in the phylum Nematoda, but these lineages involve plant parasitism only in the Secernentean orders Aphelenchida and Tylenchida. In the Aphelenchida (Aphelenchoidoidea), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Pine wood nematode), B. cocophilus (Red ring or Coconut palm nematode) (Parasitaphelenchidae), and the many potential host-specific species of Schistonchus (fig nematodes) (Aphelenchoididae) nematode-insect interactions probably evolved independently from dauer-forming, mycophagous ancestors that were phoretically transmitted to breeding sites of their insect hosts in plants. Mycophagy probably gave rise to facultative or obligate plant-parasitism because of opportunities due to insect host switches or peculiarities in host behavior. In the Tylenchida, there is one significant radiation of insect-associated plant parasites involving Fergusobia nematodes (Fergusobiinae: Neotylenchidae) and Fergusonina (Fergusoninidae) flies as mutualists that gall myrtaceous plant buds or leaves. These dicyclic nematodes have different phases that are parasitic in either the insect or the plant hosts. The evolutionary origin of this association is unclear. PMID:19265987

  18. Susceptibility of the Plum Curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, to Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Mizell, Russell F.; Campbell, James F.

    2002-01-01

    The plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar, is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Our objective was to determine virulence and reproductive potential of six commercially available nematode species in C. nenuphar larvae and adults. Nematodes tested were Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Hb strain), H. marelatus (Point Reyes strains), H. megidis (UK211 strain), Steinernema riobrave (355 strain), S. carpocapsae (All strain), and S. feltiae (SN strain). Survival of C. nenuphar larvae treated with S. feltiae and S. riobrave, and survival of adults treated with S. carpocapsae and S. riobrave, was reduced relative to non-treated insects. Other nematode treatments were not different from the control. Conotrachelus nenuphar larvae were more susceptible to S. feltiae infection than were adults, but for other nematode species there was no significant insect-stage effect. Reproduction in C. nenuphar was greatest for H. marelatus, which produced approximately 10,000 nematodes in larvae and 5,500 in adults. Other nematodes produced approximately 1,000 to 3,700 infective juveniles per C. nenuphar with no significant differences among nematode species or insect stages. We conclude that S. carpocapsae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for controlling adults, whereas S. feltiae or S. riobrave appears to have the most potential for larval control. PMID:19265940

  19. Pack hunting by a common soil amoeba on nematodes.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Stefan; Rosengarten, Jamila; Koller, Robert; Mulder, Christian; Urich, Tim; Bonkowski, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Soils host the most complex communities on Earth, including the most diverse and abundant eukaryotes, i.e. heterotrophic protists. Protists are generally considered as bacterivores, but evidence for negative interactions with nematodes both from laboratory and field studies exist. However, direct impacts of protists on nematodes remain unknown. We isolated the soil-borne testate amoeba Cryptodifflugia operculata and found a highly specialized and effective pack-hunting strategy to prey on bacterivorous nematodes. Enhanced reproduction in presence of prey nematodes suggests a beneficial predatory life history of these omnivorous soil amoebae. Cryptodifflugia operculata appears to selectively impact the nematode community composition as reductions of nematode numbers were species specific. Furthermore, we investigated 12 soil metatranscriptomes from five distinct locations throughout Europe for 18S ribosomal RNA transcripts of C. operculata. The presence of C. operculata transcripts in all samples, representing up to 4% of the active protist community, indicates a potential ecological importance of nematophagy performed by C. operculata in soil food webs. The unique pack-hunting strategy on nematodes that was previously unknown from protists, together with molecular evidence that these pack hunters are likely to be abundant and widespread in soils, imply a considerable importance of the hitherto neglected trophic link 'nematophagous protists' in soil food webs.

  20. Assaying Predatory Feeding Behaviors in Pristionchus and Other Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Misako; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides multiple methods for the analysis and quantification of predatory feeding behaviors in nematodes. Many nematode species including Pristionchus pacificus display complex behaviors, the most striking of which is the predation of other nematode larvae. However, as these behaviors are absent in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, they have thus far only recently been described in detail along with the development of reliable behavioral assays 1. These predatory behaviors are dependent upon phenotypically plastic but fixed mouth morphs making the correct identification and categorization of these animals essential. In P. pacificus there are two mouth types, the stenostomatous and eurystomatous morphs 2, with only the wide mouthed eurystomatous containing an extra tooth and being capable of killing other nematode larvae. Through the isolation of an abundance of size matched prey larvae and subsequent exposure to predatory nematodes, assays including both "corpse assays" and "bite assays" on correctly identified mouth morph nematodes are possible. These assays provide a means to rapidly quantify predation success rates and provide a detailed behavioral analysis of individual nematodes engaged in predatory feeding activities. In addition, with the use of a high-speed camera, visualization of changes in pharyngeal activity including tooth and pumping dynamics are also possible. PMID:27684744

  1. Nematode Assemblages in Native Plant Communities of Molokai, Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Schmitt, D. P.

    2005-01-01

    Four native plant community types (in decreasing elevation: montane bog, rain forest, wet mesic forest, drier forest) on Molokai were sampled for nematodes. Six samples of 10 cores each were gathered from each community. Nematodes were extracted from 200 cm³ soil by elutriation. All extracted nematodes were counted and identified to species-level taxa. Sixty-seven species were identified among the four plant communities; only eight species occurred in all four communities. Species diversity and evenness were greater in the rain forest and mesic forest than in the bog and the drier forest, but the drier forest and mesic forest had similar species communities. The bog nematode community was not similar to the other three sites. In a presence/absence cluster analysis, all six bog sample assemblages clustered together. The rain forest samples also clustered together but were associated with the mesic forest sample closest to the rain forest edge. Of 11 nematode orders collected, Tylenchida accounted for 40% to 73% of all individuals, followed by Dorylaimida (5% to 17%). Diplogasterida were absent. No plant-parasitic nematodes of known Hawaiian agricultural importance or occurrence were collected in these native plant communities. Calculated nematode densities (76,000 to 321,300/m²) were comparable to those reported for some other Pacific tropical forests. PMID:19262867

  2. Current Surveys of the Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis, Angiostrongylus vasorum and Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Schnyder, Manuela; Vrhovec, Majda Globokar; Schaper, Roland; Tsachev, Ilia

    2015-08-01

    Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) have increasingly become a focus of interest in recent years. Some of the CVBDs are zoonotic and may therefore also represent a risk for the human population. Different factors are in discussion to explain the expansion of vectors and pathogens into formerly unaffected areas. Knowledge of the prevalence and distribution of CVBDs in Bulgaria is scant overall and most data rely on single case descriptions. The aim of the present study was to determine the seroprevalence of important CVBDs in 167 dogs from central-southern Bulgaria (Stara Zagora), with special emphasis on hitherto uninvestigated babesiosis and angiostrongylosis, on poorly investigated Lyme borreliosis and canine granulocytic anaplasmosis, and on the potentially zoonotic dirofilariosis and leishmaniosis. Relatively high prevalence rates were documented for anti-Babesia canis antibodies, Dirofilaria immitis antigen (16.2 %; 27/167 each), anti-Ehrlichia canis (21 %; 35/167) and anti-Anaplasma phagocytophilum antibodies (30.5 - 46.1 %; 51 - 77/167), while Borrelia burgdorferi seroprevalence was low (2.4 %; 4/167). All samples were negative for Leishmania infantum antibodies and Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and antibodies. In total, 64.7 % (108/167) of the samples indicated infection or exposure to at least one agent and a high proportion of dual infections (39.8 %; 43/108) was demonstrated. Multiple infections with up to four different organisms were also detected. Our data underline the importance of CVBDs and especially of co-infections which could influence the clinical outcome in dogs.

  3. Efficacy and safety of imidacloprid/moxidectin spot-on solution and fenbendazole in the treatment of dogs naturally infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum (Baillet, 1866).

    PubMed

    Willesen, J L; Kristensen, A T; Jensen, A L; Heine, J; Koch, J

    2007-07-20

    A randomized, blinded, controlled multicentre field trial study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 2.5% spot-on solution and fenbendazole in treating dogs naturally infected with Angiostrongylus vasorum. Dogs were randomly treated either with a single dose of 0.1 ml/kg bodyweight of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 2.5% spot-on solution or with 25 mg/kg bodyweight fenbendazole per os for 20 days. The study period was 42 days with dogs being examined on days 0, 7 and 42. The primary efficacy parameter was the presence of L1 larvae in faecal samples evaluated by a Baermann test from three consecutive days. Thoracic radiographs performed on each visit were being taken as a paraclinical parameter to support the results of the Baermann test. Twenty-seven dogs in the imidacloprid/moxidectin group and 23 dogs in the fenbendazole group completed the study according to protocol. The efficacies of the two treatment protocols were 85.2% (imidacloprid/moxidectin) and 91.3% (fenbendazole) with no significant difference between treatment groups. On radiographic evaluation pulmonary parenchyma showed similar improvement in each group. No serious adverse effects to treatment were recorded: most of the minor adverse effects were gastrointestinal such as diarrhea (nine dogs), vomitus (eight dogs) and salivation (three dogs). In general, these adverse effects were of short duration (1-2 days) within the first few days after treatment start and required little or no treatment. This prospective study demonstrates that both treatment protocols used are efficacious under field conditions, that treatment of mildly to moderately infected dogs with either of these protocols is safe and yields an excellent prognosis for recovering from the infection.

  4. Intestinal Enterobacteriaceae that Protect Nematodes from the Effects of Benzimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, John H; Robertson, Alan P; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A; Carlson, Steve A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate an interaction between nematodes and gut Enterobacteriaceae that use benzimidazoles as a carbon source. By addressing this objective, we identified an anthelmintic resistance-like mechanism for gastrointestinal nematodes. We isolated 30 gut bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that subsist on and putatively catabolize benzimidazole-class anthelmintics. C. elegans was protected from the effects of benzimidazoles when co-incubated with these Enterobacteriaceae that also protect adult ascarids from the effects of albendazole. This bacterial phenotype represents a novel mechanism by which gastrointestinal nematodes are potentially spared from the effects of benzimidazoles, without any apparent fitness cost to the parasite. PMID:28066686

  5. Biocontrol: Bacillus penetrans and Related Parasites of Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sayre, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus penetrans Mankau, 1975, previously described as Duboscqia penetrans Thorne 1940, is a candidate agent for biocontrol of nematodes. This review considers the life stages of this bacterium: vegetative growth phase, colony fragmentation, sporogenesis, soil phase, spore attachment, and penetration into larvae of root-knot nematodes. The morphology of the microthallus colonies and the unusual external features of the spore are discussed. Taxonomic affinities with the actinomycetes, particularly with the genus Pasteuria, are considered. Also discussed are other soil bacterial species that are potential biocontrol agents. Products of their bacterial fermentation in soil are toxic to nematodes, making them effective biocontrol agents. PMID:19300701

  6. Suppression of plant parasitic nematodes in the chinampa agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, B M; Dicklow, M B; Coles, G C; Garcia-E, R; Marban-Mendoza, N

    1989-06-01

    Soil from the chinampa agricultural system in the Valley of Mexico suppressed damage by plant-parasitic nematodes to tomatoes and beans in greenhouse and growth chamber trials. Sterilization of the chinampa soil resulted in a loss of the suppressive effect, thereby indicating that one or more biotic factors were responsible for the low incidence of nematode damage. Nine organisms were isolated from chinampa soil, which showed antinematodal properties in culture. Naturally occurring populations of plant-parasitic nematodes were of lower incidence in chinampa soil than in Chapingo soil.

  7. The effects of root-knot nematode infection and mi-mediated nematode resistance in tomato on plant fitness.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Brandon P; Jia, Lingling; Sayler, Ronald J; Arevalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Goggin, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    The Mi-1.2 resistance gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) confers resistance against several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). This study examined the impact of M. javanica on the reproductive fitness of near-isogenic tomato cultivars with and without Mi-1.2 under field and greenhouse conditions. Surprisingly, neither nematode inoculation or host plant resistance impacted the yield of mature fruits in field microplots (inoculum=8,000 eggs/plant), or fruit or seed production in a follow-up greenhouse bioassay conducted with a higher inoculum level (20,000 eggs/plant). However, under heavy nematode pressure (200,000 eggs/plant), greenhouse-grown plants carrying Mi-1.2 had more than ten-fold greater fruit production than susceptible plants and nearly forty-fold greater estimated lifetime seed production, confirming prior reports of the benefits of Mi-1.2. In all cases Mi-mediated resistance significantly reduced nematode reproduction. These results indicated that tomato can utilize tolerance mechanisms to compensate for moderate levels of nematode infection, but that the Mi-1.2 resistance gene confers a dramatic fitness benefit under heavy nematode pressure. No significant cost of resistance was detected in the absence of nematode infection.

  8. Effects of catechin polyphenols and preparations from the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines on protease activity and behavior in three nematode species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease activities in preparations from the plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita and the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus were inhibited by exposure to a series of 8 catechin polyphenol analogs, (+)-catechin, (-)- epicatechin (EC), (-)-gallocatechin (GC)...

  9. A Nematode Growth Factor from Baker's Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Buecher, E. J.; Hansen, E. L.; Gottfried, T.

    1970-01-01

    An extract prepared from commercially available yeast supported maturation of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae. The extract can be used to supplement a chemically defined medium or, after a limited dialysis, as a complete medium. Several biologically active fractions were prepared; those containing larger amounts of ribonucleic acid (RNA) had greater biological activity, the most active being a pellet resuspended after centrifugation at 30,000 × g for 30 min. This fraction could be substituted for serum in a medium which supports the maturation of the animal parasites Trichinella spiralis and Hymenolepis nana. Addition of protamine sulfate decreased the RNA content, leaving inactive protein fractions which could be reactivated by specific treatments that caused protein precipitation. It is postulated that biological activity is associated with protein sedimented with ribosomes. PMID:19322277

  10. MSP Dynamics and Retraction in Nematode Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2005-03-01

    Most eukaryotic cells can crawl over surfaces. In general, this motility requires three distinct actions: polymerization at the leading edge, adhesion to the substrate, and retraction at the rear. Recent in vitro experiments with extracts from spermatozoa from the nematode Ascaris suum suggest that retraction forces are generated by depolymerization of the Major Sperm Protein (MSP) cytoskeleton. Combining polymer entropy with a simple kinetic model for disassembly I propose a model for disassembly-induced retraction that fit the in vitro experimental data. This model explains the mechanism by which deconstruction of the cytoskeleton produces the force necessary to pull the cell body forward and suggest further experiments that can test the validity of the model.

  11. MSP dynamics and retraction in nematode sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Roberts, Tom; Oster, George

    2005-03-01

    Most eukaryotic cells can crawl over surfaces. In general, this motility requires three distinct actions: polymerization at the leading edge, adhesion to the substrate, and retraction at the rear. Recent in vitro experiments with extracts from spermatozoa from the nematode Ascaris suum suggest that retraction forces are generated by depolymerization of the Major Sperm Protein (MSP) cytoskeleton. Combining polymer entropy with a simple kinetic model for disassembly I propose a model for disassembly-induced retraction that fit the in vitro experimental data. This model explains the mechanism by which deconstruction of the cytoskeleton produces the force necessary to pull the cell body forward and suggest further experiments that can test the validity of the model.

  12. Ecological Biogeography of the Terrestrial Nematodes of Victoria Land, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Byron J.; Wall, Diana H.; Virginia, Ross A.; Broos, Emma; Knox, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The terrestrial ecosystems of Victoria Land, Antarctica are characteristically simple in terms of biological diversity and ecological functioning. Nematodes are the most commonly encountered and abundant metazoans of Victoria Land soils, yet little is known of their diversity and distribution. Herein we present a summary of the geographic distribution, habitats and ecology of the terrestrial nematodes of Victoria Land from published and unpublished sources. All Victoria Land nematodes are endemic to Antarctica, and many are common and widely distributed at landscape scales. However, at smaller spatial scales, populations can have patchy distributions, with the presence or absence of each species strongly influenced by specific habitat requirements. As the frequency of nematode introductions to Antarctica increases, and soil habitats are altered in response to climate change, our current understanding of the environmental parameters associated with the biogeography of Antarctic nematofauna will be crucial to monitoring and possibly mitigating changes to these unique soil ecosystems. PMID:25061360

  13. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  14. Breeding a super nematode for enhanced insect pest suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes in the genera Heterorhabditis and Steinernema are important regulators of natural insect populations, and are used commercially as biological control agents for pest suppression. Successful biocontrol applications depend on the introduced organism having an array of benef...

  15. Nematodes Attacking Cultivars of Peach in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Barker, K. R.; Clayton, C. N.

    1973-01-01

    Criconemoides xenoplax and Meloidogyne incognita were the nematode species most frequently associated with peach in North Carolina. Other nematodes often found in high numbers on that crop were Pratylenehus vulnus, Helicotylenchus spp., Trichodorus christiei, Xiphinema amerieanum and Tylenchorhynchus claytoni. P. vulnus and P. penetrans reproduced well on rootstocks of 21 peach cultivars tested in the greenhouse. P. zeae, P. brachyurus, P. coffeae and P. scribneri decreased or increased only slightly in most instances. C. xenoplax increased as much as 330-fold and reproduced on all cultivars tested. In a field experiment with six peach cultivars and moderate numbers of P. brachyurus, P. vulnus, C. xenoplax, and M. incognita, only M. incognita caused significant stunting in 30 months. This nematode increased only on root-knot susceptible cultivars, whereas the other nematodes followed the same patterns observed in the greenhouse. In a second field experiment, seedlings were stunted significantly by high numbers of C. xenoplax during an 18-month period. PMID:19319348

  16. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  17. Survey of fresh vegetables for nematodes, amoebae, and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Rude, R A; Jackson, G J; Bier, J W; Sawyer, T K; Risty, N G

    1984-01-01

    Contamination by nematodes, amoebae, and bacteria of the genus Salmonella was estimated in a 2-year survey of salad vegetables obtained from wholesale and retail sources. The vegetables examined were cucumbers, cabbage, lettuce, celery, carrots, radishes, tomatoes, mushrooms, cauliflower, and spinach. Nematode eggs and larvae were recovered by the Nacconol-ether centrifugation method. Some nematode eggs were identified as parasitic Ascaris sp.; the majority of larval nematodes were thought to be soil-dwelling species. Amoebae were recovered by rinsing the vegetables with distilled water, centrifuging the rinse water, and transferring the sediment to agar plates on which a bacterial lawn had previously been grown; trophozoites identified as the potentially pathogenic species--Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. rhysodes, and A. castellanii--were the most common amoebae recovered on the plates. Salmonella spp. were grown from 4 of 50 samples.

  18. Soil Organic Matter and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Mitkowski, N. A.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  19. Exploring the transcriptome of the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Joachim; Mitreva, Makedonka; Vanholme, Bartel; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2008-07-01

    Radopholus similis is an important nematode pest on fruit crops in the tropics. Unraveling the transcriptome of this migratory plant-parasitic nematode can provide insight in the parasitism process and lead to more efficient control measures. For the first high throughput molecular characterization of this devastating nematode, 5,853 expressed sequence tags from a mixed stage population were generated. Adding 1,154 tags from the EST division of GenBank for subsequent analysis, resulted in a total of 7,007 ESTs, which represent approximately 3,200 genes. The mean G + C content of the nucleotides at the third codon position (GC3%) was calculated to be as high as 64.8%, the highest for nematodes reported to date. BLAST-searches resulted in about 70% of the clustered ESTs having homology to (DNA and protein) sequences from the GenBank database, whereas one-third of them did not match to any known sequence. Roughly 40% of these latter sequences are predicted to be coding, representing putative novel protein coding genes. Functional annotation of the sequences by GO annotation revealed the abundance of genes involved in reproduction and development, which reflects the nematode population biology. Genes with a role in the parasitism process are identified, as well as genes essential for nematode survival, providing information useful for parasite control. No evidence was found for the presence of trans-spliced leader sequences commonly occurring in nematodes, despite the use of various approaches. In conclusion, we found three different sources for the EST sequences: the majority has a nuclear origin, approximately 1% of the EST sequences are derived from the mitochondrial transcriptome, and interestingly, 1% of the tags are with high probability derived from Wolbachia, providing the first molecular indication for the presence of this endosymbiont in a plant-parasitic nematode.

  20. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W; Williamson, Valerie M; Schroeder, Frank C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-07-23

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture.

  1. Conserved nematode signalling molecules elicit plant defenses and pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manosalva, Patricia; Manohar, Murli; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Chen, Shiyan; Koch, Aline; Kaplan, Fatma; Choe, Andrea; Micikas, Robert J.; Wang, Xiaohong; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Sternberg, Paul W.; Williamson, Valerie M.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-defense responses are triggered by perception of conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), for example, flagellin or peptidoglycan. However, it remained unknown whether plants can detect conserved molecular patterns derived from plant-parasitic animals, including nematodes. Here we show that several genera of plant-parasitic nematodes produce small molecules called ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones. Picomolar to micromolar concentrations of ascr#18, the major ascaroside in plant-parasitic nematodes, induce hallmark defense responses including the expression of genes associated with MAMP-triggered immunity, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-mediated defense signalling pathways. Ascr#18 perception increases resistance in Arabidopsis, tomato, potato and barley to viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal and nematode infections. These results indicate that plants recognize ascarosides as a conserved molecular signature of nematodes. Using small-molecule signals such as ascarosides to activate plant immune responses has potential utility to improve economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture. PMID:26203561

  2. Cryopreservation of Radopholus similis, a tropical plant-parasitic nematode.

    PubMed

    Elsen, Annemie; Vallterra, Salvador Ferrandis; Van Wauwe, Tom; Thuy, Trinh Thi Thu; Swennen, Rony; De Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart

    2007-10-01

    For obligate plant-parasitic nematodes, cryopreservation has advantages over the usual preservation methods on whole plants or axenic culture systems, because the latter two are labourious and time and space consuming. In addition, cross contamination among different isolates can occur easily. Moreover, specific genetic studies require maintenance of the original population. The nematode under investigation, Radopholus similis, is a plant-parasitic nematode from the humid tropics. Therefore, any treatment at low temperatures is likely to add extra stress to the nematode, making the development of a cryopreservation protocol extremely difficult. In this paper, we describe experiments to achieve a successful cryopreservation protocol for the tropical nematode R. similis using vitrification solution-based methods based on a well defined mixture of cryoprotectants in combination with ultra-rapid cooling and thawing rates. A two-step treatment was used consisting of an incubation in glycerol followed by the application of a vitrifying mixture of methanol, glycerol and glucose. After cryopreservation, the pathogenicity of the nematodes was not altered, since they could infect and reproduce on carrot discs after recovery in the Ringer solution. The cryopreservation method described can be used for routine cryopreservation of R. similis lines from different origins.

  3. Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Deborah A.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of nematode community indices requires a reference to a relatively undisturbed community. Maturity and trophic diversity index values were compared for five pairs of certified organically and conventionally managed soils in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Available nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium) was estimated at various lag periods relative to times of sampling for nematode communities to determine the strength of correlative relationship between nematode communities and nitrogen availability. Soils were sampled six times yearly in 1993 and 1994 to determine the best time of year to sample. Maturity values for plant parasites were greater in organically than conventionally managed soils, and differences between management systems were greater in fall than spring months. However, other maturity and diversity indices did not differ between the two management practices. Differences in crop species grown in the two systems accounted for most differences observed in the community of plant-parasitic nematodes. Indices of free-living nematodes were correlated negatively with concentrations of ammonium, whereas indices of plant-parasitic nematodes were correlated positively with concentrations of nitrate. Due to the similarity of index values between the two systems, organically managed soils are not suitable reference sites for monitoring and assessing the biological aspects of soil quality for annually harvested crops. PMID:19270884

  4. Allelopathy in the Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Halbrendt, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    There are numerous reports of nematicidal chemicals in crude plant homogenates, leachates, and decomposing residues. These compounds are usually assumed to be secondary metabolites, which serve as chemical defenses against disease and parasites. When such compounds are released into the rhizosphere, they are known as allelochemicals. The possibility exists to exploit allelochemicals for nematode control, and there have been many attempts to use this approach either by rotation, intercropping, or green manure treatments. Results have met with mixed success. Proof of allelochemical activity in field situations is difficult to obtain, but it is evident that some rotation crops are significantly better at reducing nematode populations than others. Rotations with non-host plants may simply deny the nematode population an adequate food source for reproduction (passive suppression), whereas allelopathic crops kill nematodes by the production of toxic compounds (active suppression). Progress toward sustainable agriculture should benefit from studies on allelopathic nematode control. However, grower acceptance of new plant-rotation strategies are based on economic and logistical considerations as well as efficacy. A potential practical application of allelopathic nematode control that involves using rapeseed as a green manure crop to reduce populations of Xiphinema americanum sensu lato in temperate orchards is presented. PMID:19277340

  5. Soil sampling and isolation of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae, Heterorhabditidae).

    PubMed

    Orozco, Rousel A; Lee, Ming-Min; Stock, S Patricia

    2014-07-11

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (a.k.a. EPN) represent a group of soil-inhabiting nematodes that parasitize a wide range of insects. These nematodes belong to two families: Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae. Until now, more than 70 species have been described in the Steinernematidae and there are about 20 species in the Heterorhabditidae. The nematodes have a mutualistic partnership with Enterobacteriaceae bacteria and together they act as a potent insecticidal complex that kills a wide range of insect species. Herein, we focus on the most common techniques considered for collecting EPN from soil. The second part of this presentation focuses on the insect-baiting technique, a widely used approach for the isolation of EPN from soil samples, and the modified White trap technique which is used for the recovery of these nematodes from infected insects. These methods and techniques are key steps for the successful establishment of EPN cultures in the laboratory and also form the basis for other bioassays that consider these nematodes as model organisms for research in other biological disciplines. The techniques shown in this presentation correspond to those performed and/or designed by members of S. P. Stock laboratory as well as those described by various authors.

  6. Temperature-based bioclimatic parameters can predict nematode metabolic footprints.

    PubMed

    Bhusal, Daya Ram; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Sgardelis, Stefanos P

    2015-09-01

    Nematode metabolic footprints (MFs) refer to the lifetime amount of metabolized carbon per individual, indicating a connection to soil food web functions and eventually to processes supporting ecosystem services. Estimating and managing these at a convenient scale requires information upscaling from the soil sample to the landscape level. We explore the feasibility of predicting nematode MFs from temperature-based bioclimatic parameters across a landscape. We assume that temperature effects are reflected in MFs, since temperature variations determine life processes ranging from enzyme activities to community structure. We use microclimate data recorded for 1 year from sites differing by orientation, altitude and vegetation cover. At the same sites we estimate MFs for each nematode trophic group. Our models show that bioclimatic parameters, specifically those accounting for temporal variations in temperature and extremities, predict most of the variation in nematode MFs. Higher fungivorous and lower bacterivorous nematode MFs are predicted for sites with high seasonality and low isothermality (sites of low vegetation, mostly at low altitudes), indicating differences in the relative contribution of the corresponding food web channels to the metabolism of carbon across the landscape. Higher plant-parasitic MFs were predicted for sites with high seasonality. The fitted models provide realistic predictions of unknown cases within the range of the predictor's values, allowing for the interpolation of MFs within the sampled region. We conclude that upscaling of the bioindication potential of nematode communities is feasible and can provide new perspectives not only in the field of soil ecology but other research areas as well.

  7. Alternatives to anthelmintics for the control of nematodes in livestock.

    PubMed

    Stear, M J; Doligalska, M; Donskow-Schmelter, K

    2007-02-01

    Efficient and welfare-friendly livestock production demands the control of nematode infection. Current control measures rely upon anthelmintic treatment but are threatened by the widespread evolution of drug-resistance in parasite populations. Several methods have been advocated to control nematodes without relying on effective anthelmintics. These include grazing management, biological control, nutritional supplementation, vaccination, and genetic approaches. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. There are several grazing management schemes that can reduce the severity of infection but they are insufficient on their own to control infection. Biological control includes the use of predatory fungi to control nematode populations and the use of pasture species that can reduce the intensity of infection. Fungi can control nematodes but the current requirement for daily feeding means that this approach will be most useful for animals that are handled daily. Feeding supplementary protein can control nematode infection. The method is simple but can be expensive and may not be cost-effective for some marginal enterprises. Genetic approaches include the use of resistant breeds and selective breeding. Some breeds will thrive in conditions that kill animals from other breeds but substitution of resistant breeds is not always feasible. Selective breeding is effective and inexpensive but requires a high level of expertise. The most appropriate method or set of methods to minimize the adverse consequences of nematode infection may vary among farms.

  8. Diverse Host-Seeking Behaviors of Skin-Penetrating Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Castelletto, Michelle L.; Gang, Spencer S.; Okubo, Ryo P.; Tselikova, Anastassia A.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Platzer, Edward G.; Lok, James B.; Hallem, Elissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Skin-penetrating parasitic nematodes infect approximately one billion people worldwide and are responsible for some of the most common neglected tropical diseases. The infective larvae of skin-penetrating nematodes are thought to search for hosts using sensory cues, yet their host-seeking behavior is poorly understood. We conducted an in-depth analysis of host seeking in the skin-penetrating human parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, and compared its behavior to that of other parasitic nematodes. We found that Str. stercoralis is highly mobile relative to other parasitic nematodes and uses a cruising strategy for finding hosts. Str. stercoralis shows robust attraction to a diverse array of human skin and sweat odorants, most of which are known mosquito attractants. Olfactory preferences of Str. stercoralis vary across life stages, suggesting a mechanism by which host seeking is limited to infective larvae. A comparison of odor-driven behavior in Str. stercoralis and six other nematode species revealed that parasite olfactory preferences reflect host specificity rather than phylogeny, suggesting an important role for olfaction in host selection. Our results may enable the development of new strategies for combating harmful nematode infections. PMID:25121736

  9. Communities of terrestrial nematodes after different approaches to heathland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radochova, Petra; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Since the 20th century, the distribution of European heathlands rapidly decreased due to agricultural intensification, heavy use of artificial fertilizers or acidification (Aerts & Heil, 1993). Therefore, various attempts of heathland restoration are under way in these days. Analysis of nematode community composition can be one of the tools suitable for succession evaluation (Ferris et al., 2001). In 2011, 2013 and 2014, soil samples were collected from heathland restoration experiment (launched in 2011) where different restoration methods were applied in a 3 × 3 factorial experiment; existing heathlands were also sampled to identify the target community both in dry and wet heathland. A total of 60 samples of extracted nematodes were analysed for absolute abundance, trophic groups, and genera dominance. Various indices were calculated to describe the nematode community. We were able to prove faster development of wet heathlands towards the target community. However, because of large data variability, there was no significant difference between treatments. Development of wet and dry heathlands differed also in increased proportion of omniphagous nematodes in 2013 and predators in 2014 in dry heathlands. After three years of heathland restoration, nematode community has not yet reached parameters of the target community. References Aerts, R., Heil, G. W., 1993. Heathlands: patterns and processes in a changing environment, 1st ed, Geobotany: 20. Springer Netherlands, Dordrecht, p. 229. Ferris, H., Bongers, T., De Goede, R. G. M., 2001. A framework for soil food web diagnostics: Extension of the nematode faunal analysis oncept. Appl. Soil Ecol. 18, 13-29.

  10. Directional movement of entomopathogenic nematodes in response to electrical fields: Effects of species, magnitude of voltage, and infective juvenile age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes respond to a variety of stimuli when foraging. Previously, we reported a directional response to electrical fields for two entomopathogenic nematode species; specifically, when electrical fields were generated on agar plates Steinernema glaseri (a nematode that utilizes a...

  11. Plant-parasitic Nematode Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Carbamate and Organophosphate Nematicides.

    PubMed

    Opperman, C H; Chang, S

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of acetylcholinesterases (ACHE) isolated from the plant-parasitic nematodes Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and Heterodera glycines and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to carbamate and organophosphate nematicides was examined. The AChE from plant-parasitic nematode species were more sensitive to carbamate inhibitors than was AChE from C. elegans, but response to the organophosphates was approximately equivalent. The sulfur-containing phosphate nematicides were poor inhibitors of nematode acetylcholinesterase, but treatment with an oxidizing agent greatly improved inhibition. Behavioral bioassays with living nematodes revealed a poor relationship between enzyme inhibition and expression of symptoms in live nematodes.

  12. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tushar K.; Papolu, Pradeep K.; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1), was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60–80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants. PMID:25883594

  13. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A; Lewis, Warren G; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-05-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in

  14. Pan-phylum Comparison of Nematode Metabolic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rahul; Rosa, Bruce A.; Lewis, Warren G.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are among the most important causative pathogens of neglected tropical diseases. The increased availability of genomic and transcriptomic data for many understudied nematode species provides a great opportunity to investigate different aspects of their biology. Increasingly, metabolic potential of pathogens is recognized as a critical determinant governing their development, growth and pathogenicity. Comparing metabolic potential among species with distinct trophic ecologies can provide insights on overall biology or molecular adaptations. Furthermore, ascertaining gene expression at pathway level can help in understanding metabolic dynamics over development. Comparison of biochemical pathways (or subpathways, i.e. pathway modules) among related species can also retrospectively indicate potential mistakes in gene-calling and functional annotation. We show with numerous illustrative case studies that comparisons at the level of pathway modules have the potential to uncover biological insights while remaining computationally tractable. Here, we reconstruct and compare metabolic modules found in the deduced proteomes of 13 nematodes and 10 non-nematode species (including hosts of the parasitic nematode species). We observed that the metabolic potential is, in general, concomitant with phylogenetic and/or ecological similarity. Varied metabolic strategies are required among the nematodes, with only 8 out of 51 pathway modules being completely conserved. Enzyme comparison based on topology of metabolic modules uncovered diversification between parasite and host that can potentially guide therapeutic intervention. Gene expression data from 4 nematode species were used to study metabolic dynamics over their life cycles. We report unexpected differential metabolism between immature and mature microfilariae of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi. A set of genes potentially important for parasitism is also reported, based on an analysis of gene expression in

  15. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and its genome.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, J; Plasterk, R H; Waterston, R H

    1995-10-20

    Over the past two decades, the small soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become established as a major model system for the study of a great variety of problems in biology and medicine. One of its most significant advantages is its simplicity, both in anatomy and in genomic organization. The entire haploid genetic content amounts to 100 million base pairs of DNA, about 1/30 the size of the human value. As a result, C. elegans has also provided a pilot system for the construction of physical maps of larger animal and plant genomes, and subsequently for the complete sequencing of those genomes. By mid-1995, approximately one-fifth of the complete DNA sequence of this animal had been determined. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a test bed not only for the development and application of mapping and sequencing technologies, but also for the interpretation and use of complete sequence information. This article reviews the progress so far toward a realizable goal--the total description of the genome of a simple animal.

  16. GABA localization in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.

    1988-01-01

    A histochemical approach was used to examine the distribution of GABA-associated neurons in the nematode Ascaris, an organism whose small number of morphologically simple neurons make it an excellent preparation for analyzing neuronal phenotypes. Two GABAergic markers were examined: GABA-like immunoreactivity (GLIR), a marker for endogenous stores of GABA; and ({sup 3}H)-GABA uptake, a marker for GABA uptake sites. Strong GLIR was present in the cell bodies, neurites and commissures of dorsal and ventral inhibitory motorneurons present in this region. Strong GLIR was also present in the cell bodies and processes of the four RME neurons in the nerve ring and in several other ganglionic neurons. Staining was absent in excitatory motorneurons, in ventral cord interneurons and in muscle cells and hypodermis. GABA uptake sites were found in single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords. ({sup 3}H)-GABA labeling was also observed in the other two RME cells and several other cephalic neurons. Four putative cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the retrovesicular ganglion (RVG) were heavily labeled. Ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motorneurons did not take up ({sup 3}H)-GABA. Labeling of the ventral cord excitatory motorneuron somata and cell bodies was at or slightly above background. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed.

  17. Precision and Selection of Extraction Methods of Aphelenchid Nematodes from Maritime Pine Wood, Pinus pinaster L.

    PubMed Central

    Penas, Ana C.; DIias, Luis S.; Mota, Manuel M.

    2002-01-01

    Four extraction methods for Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and other aphelenchid nematodes were compared on the number of nematodes per gram recovered, and on the precision of the mean number of nematodes per gram of pine wood. The number of nematodes per gram recovered by each method, in addition to its inherent shortcomings when the actual number of nematodes is unknown, failed to provide clear rankings among the extraction methods. The precision of the mean number of nematodes per gram did provide clear guidelines for selection. Selection of the method may be based on prior knowledge about the range of nematodes to be expected or the independence of precision from the mean number of nematodes. PMID:19265909

  18. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of cotton hairy roots as a model system for studying nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate resistance of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) are poorly understood. Here, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced hairy roots were investigated as a possible research...

  19. Taxonomy, morphology and phylogenetics of coffee-associated root-lesion nematodes, Pratylenchus spp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Although lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus species) can reduce coffee yield worldwide, methods for their identification are often difficult to implement. This review summarizes the diagnostic morphological features for distinguishing the eight previously described lesion nematode sp...

  20. BACTERIAL PREFERENCES OF THE BACTERIVOROUS SOIL NEMATODE CEPHALOBUS BREVICAUDA (CEPHALOBIDAE): EFFECT OF BACTERIAL TYPE AND SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell size and type may affect availability of bacteria for consumption by bacterivorous nematodes in the soil and in culture. This study explored the bacterial preferences of the bacterivorous soil nematode Cephalobus brevicauda (Cephalobidae) by comparing bactgeria isolated dir...

  1. In vitro proteolysis of nematode FLPs by preparations from the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus and two plant-parasitic nematodes (Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteolytic activities in extracts from three nematodes, the plant parasites Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita, and the free-living Panagrellus redivivus, were surveyed for substrate preferences using a battery of seven FRET-modified peptide substrates, all derived from members of the la...

  2. The dual effects of root-cap exudates on nematodes: from quiescence in plant-parasitic nematodes to frenzy in entomopathogenic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hiltpold, Ivan; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2015-01-01

    To defend themselves against herbivores and pathogens, plants produce numerous secondary metabolites, either constitutively or de novo in response to attacks. An intriguing constitutive example is the exudate produced by certain root-cap cells that can induce a state of reversible quiescence in plant-parasitic nematodes, thereby providing protection against these antagonists. The effect of such root exudates on beneficial entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) remains unclear, but could potentially impair their use in pest management programmes. We therefore tested how the exudates secreted by green pea (Pisum sativum) root caps affect four commercial EPN species. The exudates induced reversible quiescence in all EPN species tested. Quiescence levels varied with the green pea cultivars tested. Notably, after storage in root exudate, EPN performance traits were maintained over time, whereas performances of EPNs stored in water rapidly declined. In sharp contrast to high concentrations, lower concentrations of the exudate resulted in a significant increase in EPN activity and infectiousness, but still reduced the activity of two plant-parasitic nematode species. Our study suggests a finely tuned dual bioactivity of the exudate from green pea root caps. Appropriately formulated, it can favour long-term storage of EPNs and boost their infectiousness, while it may also be used to protect plants from plant-parasitic nematodes. PMID:25165149

  3. The FMRFamide-Like Peptide Family in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Peymen, Katleen; Watteyne, Jan; Frooninckx, Lotte; Schoofs, Liliane; Beets, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the FMRFamide peptide was isolated from the mollusk Macrocallista nimbosa, structurally similar peptides sharing a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified across the animal kingdom. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) represent the largest known family of neuropeptides in invertebrates. In the phylum Nematoda, at least 32 flp-genes are classified, making the FLP system of nematodes unusually complex. The diversity of the nematode FLP complement is most extensively mapped in Caenorhabditis elegans, where over 70 FLPs have been predicted. FLPs have shown to be expressed in the majority of the 302 C. elegans neurons including interneurons, sensory neurons, and motor neurons. The vast expression of FLPs is reflected in the broad functional repertoire of nematode FLP signaling, including neuroendocrine and neuromodulatory effects on locomotory activity, reproduction, feeding, and behavior. In contrast to the many identified nematode FLPs, only few peptides have been assigned a receptor and there is the need to clarify the pathway components and working mechanisms of the FLP signaling network. Here, we review the diversity, distribution, and functions of FLPs in nematodes. PMID:24982652

  4. Plant genes involved in harbouring symbiotic rhizobia or pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Hopkins, Julie; Andrio, Emilie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Lecomte, Philippe; Puppo, Alain; Abad, Pierre; Favery, Bruno; Hérouart, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The establishment and development of plant-microorganism interactions involve impressive transcriptomic reprogramming of target plant genes. The symbiont (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and the root knot-nematode pathogen (Meloidogyne incognita) induce the formation of new root organs, the nodule and the gall, respectively. Using laser-assisted microdissection, we specifically monitored, at the cell level, Medicago gene expression in nodule zone II cells, which are preparing to receive rhizobia, and in gall giant and surrounding cells, which play an essential role in nematode feeding and constitute the typical root swollen structure, respectively. We revealed an important reprogramming of hormone pathways and C1 metabolism in both interactions, which may play key roles in nodule and gall neoformation, rhizobia endocytosis and nematode feeding. Common functions targeted by rhizobia and nematodes were mainly down-regulated, whereas the specificity of the interaction appeared to involve up-regulated genes. Our transcriptomic results provide powerful datasets to unravel the mechanisms involved in the accommodation of rhizobia and root-knot nematodes. Moreover, they raise the question of host specificity and the evolution of plant infection mechanisms by a symbiont and a pathogen.

  5. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Ashley N.; Yuan, Xiaojing; Voronin, Denis; Slatko, Barton E.; Hamza, Iqbal; Foster, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Nematodes lack a heme biosynthetic pathway and must acquire heme from exogenous sources. Given the indispensable role of heme, this auxotrophy may be exploited to develop drugs that interfere with heme uptake in parasites. Although multiple heme-responsive genes (HRGs) have been characterized within the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we have undertaken the first study of heme transport in Brugia malayi, a causative agent of lymphatic filariasis. Through functional assays in yeast, as well as heme analog, RNAi, and transcriptomic experiments, we have shown that the heme transporter B. malayi HRG-1 (BmHRG-1) is indeed functional in B. malayi. In addition, BmHRG-1 localizes both to the endocytic compartments and cell membrane when expressed in yeast cells. Transcriptomic sequencing revealed that BmHRG-1, BmHRG-2, and BmMRP-5 (all orthologs of HRGs in C. elegans) are down-regulated in heme-treated B. malayi, as compared to non–heme-treated control worms. Likely because of short gene lengths, multiple exons, other HRGs in B. malayi (BmHRG-3–6) remain unidentified. Although the precise mechanisms of heme homeostasis in a nematode with the ability to acquire heme remains unknown, this study clearly demonstrates that the filarial nematode B. malayi is capable of transporting exogenous heme.—Luck, A. N., Yuan, X., Voronin, D., Slatko, B. E., Hamza, I., Foster, J. M. Heme acquisition in the parasitic filarial nematode Brugia malayi. PMID:27363426

  6. A bioassay to estimate root penetration by nematodes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L

    1991-10-01

    An in vitro bioassay with a 96-well microtiter plate was used to study the effect of lectins on burrowing nematode penetration of citrus roots. In each well, one 4-mm root segment, excised from the zone of elongation of rough lemon roots, was buried in 0.88 g dry sand. Addition of a Radopholus citrophilus suspension containing ca. 300 nematodes in 50 mu1 test solution completely moistened the sand in each well. The technique assured uniform treatment concentration throughout the medium. Within 16-24 hours, burrowing nematodes penetrated citrus root pieces, primarily through the cut ends. The lectins (100 mug/ml) Concanavalin A (Con A), soybean agglutinin (SBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (LOT) stimulated an increase in penetration of citrus root segments by Radopholus citrophilus. Concentrations as low as 12.5 mug/ml Con A, LOT, and WGA stimulated burrowing nematode penetration of citrus roots. Heat denaturation of the lectins reversed their effect on penetration; however, incubation of nematodes in lectin (25 mug/ml) with 25 mM competitive sugars did not. The reason for enhanced penetration associated with lectins is unclear.

  7. Experimental Studies with Nematodes in Ecotoxicology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hägerbäumer, Arne; Höss, Sebastian; Heininger, Peter; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    With respect to their high abundances, their role as intermediaries between microorganisms and higher trophic levels, and their ubiquitous occurrence in all habitats, nematodes are of strong potential interest as environmental indicators. Ecotoxicological methods to evaluate the risk of anthropogenic pollutants on ecosystems require both in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests to investigate either mechanisms or pathways of toxicity and to set accurate toxicity thresholds. For this, the interest in nematodes as model organisms in ecotoxicology increased over the past few decades and existing appropriate experimental methods are reviewed in this manuscript. An overview of the various existing ecotoxicological tools for nematodes, ranging from molecular laboratory methods to experimental model ecosystem approaches, and their role as indicator organisms is given. The reviewed studies, approaches that range from species-based to community-based methods, reveal exciting possibilities for the future use of nematodes in ecotoxicological studies. Suitable ecotoxicological tools and ecological indices for nematodes should be integrated in weight-of-evidence approaches for assessing the ecological risk of contamination. PMID:25861113

  8. Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Amendments to Soil as Nematode Suppressants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.

    1986-01-01

    Inorganic fertilizers containing ammoniacal nitrogen or formulations releasing this form of N in the soil are most effective for suppressing nematode populations. Anhydrous ammonia has been shown to reduce soil populations of Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, Helicotylenchus dihystera, and Heterodera glycines. The rates required to obtain significant suppression of nematode populations are generally in excess of 150 kg N/ha. Urea also suppresses several nematode species, including Meloidogyne spp., when applied at rates above 300 kg N/ha. Additional available carbon must be provided with urea to permit soil microorganisms to metabolize excess N and avoid phytotoxic effects. There is a direct relation between the amount of "protein" N in organic amendments and their effectiveness as nematode population suppressants. Most nematicidal amendments are oil cakes, or animal excrements containing 2-7% (w:w) N; these materials are effective at rates of 4-10 t/ha. Organic soil amendments containing mucopolysaccharides (e.g., mycelial wastes, chitinous matter) are also effective nematode suppressants. PMID:19294153

  9. 78 FR 1713 - Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... The golden nematode (Globodera rostochiensis) is a destructive pest of potatoes and other solanaceous plants. Potatoes cannot be economically grown on land that contains large numbers of the nematode. The... total of 262,847 acres. Golden nematode is a major pest of potato plants and also attacks...

  10. Root knot nematode effects on metabolic profiles of susceptible and resistant grapevine rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) can negatively impact newly planted and stressed vineyards. Nematode infestations also may increase grapevine susceptibility to other stresses such as water deficit or various diseases. However, little is known about direct or indirect effects of nematode feedi...

  11. First report of the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus neglectus on wheat in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.) are important nematode pests that invade roots of plants and restrict productivity of wheat. In August 2015, a soil sample was collected from a harvested wheat field in Walsh County, ND and was found to contain 1,044 root-lesion nematodes per kg of soil usin...

  12. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry of plant CLE peptide ligands by the parasitic nematode Globodera rostochiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes that parasitize plant roots cause huge economic losses and have few mechanisms for control. Many parasitic nematodes infect plants by reprogramming root development to drive the formation of feeding structures. How nematodes take control of plant development is largely unknown. The CLE ...

  13. Discovery and virulence-screening of native nematodes in Wisconsin cranberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three newly discovered entomopathogenic nematodes have been recovered from wild Wisconsin cranberry marshes. All three nematode strains have been shown to attack Sparganothis Fruitworm (SFW), and all seem similar in their virulence (ability to kill the host). Only one nematode line, however, has bee...

  14. Occurence of phytoparasitic nematodes associated with some crop plants in Northern Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of phytoparasitic nematodes in Egypt is very important for agricultural production. A nematode survey was conducted in northern Egypt to identify the genera and species of phytoparasitic nematodes associated with some crop plants. A total of 240...

  15. Molecular and morphological characterization of the corn cyst nematode, Heterodera zeae, from Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn cyst nematode Heterodera zeae was first detected in India, where it has wide distribution. This nematode has also been reported from Pakistan, Egypt, Thailand, Nepal, the United States, and Portugal. There is limited information regarding nematodes attacking cereals in Greece, and thus far ...

  16. Chemical ecology and isolation of biologically active compounds from parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp) are possibly the economically most important and best-studied species of plant parasitic nematodes. However, for Meloidogyne spp and the intensely studied nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, very little is known about signaling within and in-between species. It h...

  17. A SNARE-like protein and biotin are implicated in soybean cyst nematode virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some phytoparasitic nematodes have the ability to infect and reproduce on plants that are normally considered resistant to nematode infection. Such nematodes are referred to as virulent and the mechanisms they use to evade or suppress host plant defenses are not well understood. Here, we report the ...

  18. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  19. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  20. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  1. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  2. 7 CFR 301.85-9 - Movement of live golden nematodes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Movement of live golden nematodes. 301.85-9 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Golden Nematode Quarantine and Regulations § 301.85-9 Movement of live golden nematodes. Regulations requiring a permit for and...

  3. New germplasm lines with high yield and fiber quality combined with nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lines BAR-8, -11, -13, -25, -33, -41, and -48 were developed to have both resistance to nematodes and superior yield and quality. All have resistance to reniform nematodes derived from G. barbadense GB 713 and several carry the DNA marker for Mi1, the gene for resistance to root-knot nematodes....

  4. The development of RNA interference (RNAi) in gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Murray E; Huang, Stanley C; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2012-04-01

    Despite the utility of RNAi for defining gene function in Caenorhabditis elegans and early successes reported in parasitic nematodes, RNAi has proven to be stubbornly inconsistent or ineffective in the animal parasitic nematodes examined to date. Here, we summarise some of our experiences with RNAi in parasitic nematodes affecting animals and discuss the available data in the context of our own unpublished work, taking account of mode of delivery, larval activation, site of gene transcription and the presence/absence of essential RNAi pathway genes as defined by comparisons to C. elegans. We discuss future directions briefly including the evaluation of nanoparticles as a means to enhance delivery of interfering RNA to the target worm tissue.

  5. Efficacy of extracts of immature mango on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Nery, Patrícia S; Nogueira, Flávia A; Oliveira, Neide J F; Martins, Ernane R; Duarte, Eduardo R

    2012-12-01

    The principal health problem in small ruminants is helminthiasis and the rapid development of nematode resistance to anthelminthics has limited the success of control in several countries, stimulating the search for alternatives. In this study, extracts of immature fruits of the mango Mangifera indica L. var Ubá were evaluated for inhibition of larval development and fecal egg count reduction in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the metabolites identified. Aqueous extracts of immature fruits at 100 mg ml(-1) showed 100 % inhibition of larval development. The LC(90) of the extract was 35.9 mg ml(-1) and the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy at 0.740 g kg(-1) (BW, orally) was 53 %. The identification of larvae showed that 99.8 % were Haemonchus spp. In vitro and in vivo results indicate that this fruit could assist ovine nematode control.

  6. New Insights into the Mechanism of Fertilization in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Singson, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Fertilization results from the fusion of male and female gametes in all sexually reproducing organisms. Much of nematode fertility work was focused on Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum. The C. elegans hermaphrodite produces a limited number of sperm initially, and then commits to the exclusive production of oocytes. The post-meiotic differentiation called spermiogenesis converts sessile spermatids into motile spermatozoa. The motility of spermatozoa depends on dynamic assembly and disassembly of a MSP (Major Sperm Protein)-based cytoskeleton uniquely found in nematodes. Both self-derived and male-derived spermatozoa are stored in spermatheca, the site of fertilization in hermaphrodites. The oocytes are arrested in meiotic prophase I until a sperm derived signal relieves the inhibition allowing the meiotic maturation to occur. Oocyte undergoes meiotic maturation, enters into spermatheca, gets fertilized, completes meiosis and exits into uterus as a zygote. This review focuses on our current understanding of the events around fertilization in nematodes. PMID:21749902

  7. Natural Occurrence of Entomogenous Nematodes in Tennessee Nursery Soils

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, L. M.; Osawaru, S. O.; Georgi, L. L.; Harrison, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    To isolate potential insect biocontrol agents, entomogenous nematodes were surveyed in Tennessee plant nurseries in 1991. Soil samples from 113 nursery sites were baited with greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae, house cricket (Acheta domesticus) adults, lesser mealworm (Alphitobius diaperings) adults, and house fly (Musca domestica) larvae. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema carpocapsae were each recovered from 17 soil samples. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora was more common in habitats with crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) and Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis) than other nursery plants, and S. carpocapsae was more frequently recovered from habitats with juniper and Southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora). Bulk density, electrical conductivity, organic matter, pH, temperature, and moisture content of the entomogenous-nematode positive soil samples were compared. Other nematode genera recovered with insect baits included Rhabditis sp., Pelodera sp., Cryptaphelenchoides sp., and Mesodiplogaster sp., which was recovered from a greater percentage of soil samples than the other five genera. PMID:19279756

  8. Meningomyelitis due to nematode infection in four cats.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Mieres, M; Moroni, M; Mora, A; Barrios, N; Simeone, C; Lindsay, D S

    2010-06-24

    Spinal cord parasitic migrations in cats are uncommon. This report describes four cases of chronic hindlimb paraparesis in cats associated with nematode infection. Complete neurologic, hematologic, serum chemistry and radiographic examination was performed on all animals. Computed tomographic (CT)-myelographic examination at the lumbar area in one cat showed a slight swelling of the spinal cord. Necropsy examination of the spinal cord revealed generalized edema and marked submeningeal hemorrhage at the thoracic region in three cats. On histopathologic examination, numerous sections of adult nematodes and eggs were present in histological sections of the affected spinal cord segments in all cats. The morphologic features of the nematode, location and appearance of the lesions suggest that the parasite responsible for the paralysis in these cats is Gurltia paralysans.

  9. Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in Maine Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Huettel, W N.; Francl, L. J.; Henn, A.; Bourgoin, T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with agricultural crops in nine Maine counties, 744 soil samples from 26 potential host plants were analyzed between November 1987 and January 1989. The most commonly encountered nematode genus was Pratylenchus, occurring in 85% of the samples from most crops, except blueberries and onions. Pratylenchus penetrans and P. crenatus were found commonly as species mixtures, with P. penetrans composing 40-80% of the mixture. Meloidogyne hapla was encountered in 16% of the samples in four counties, generally in potato rotations. Other nematodes encountered were Aphelenchoides spp., Criconemella curvature, Ditylenchus spp., Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus, H. digonicus, Heterodera trifolii, Paratylenchus projectus, Trichodorus spp., Tylenchorhynchus maximus, and Xiphinema americanum. Potato fields were the most heavily sampled and thus weighted the statewide results. PMID:19287791

  10. Infection with parasitic nematodes confounds vaccination efficacy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph F; Steenhard, Nina R; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria I; Dawson, Harry D; Iweala, Onyinye I; Nagler, Cathryn R; Noland, Gregory S; Kumar, Nirbhay; Anthony, Robert M; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Weinstock, Joel; Gause, William C

    2007-08-19

    T helper (Th) cells produce signature cytokine patterns, induced largely by intracellular versus extracellular pathogens that provide the cellular and molecular basis for counter regulatory expression of protective immunity during concurrent infections. The production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma, for example, resulting from exposure to many bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens is responsible for Th1-derived protective responses that also can inhibit development of Th2-cells expressing IL-4-dependent immunity to extracellular helminth parasites and vice versa. In a similar manner, concurrent helminth infection alters optimal vaccine-induced responses in humans and livestock; however, the consequences of this condition have not been adequately studied especially in the context of a challenge infection following vaccination. Demands for new and effective vaccines to control chronic and emerging diseases, and the need for rapid deployment of vaccines for bio security concerns requires a systematic evaluation of confounding factors that limit vaccine efficacy. One common albeit overlooked confounder is the presence of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in populations of humans and livestock targeted for vaccination. This is particularly important in areas of the world were helminth infections are prevalent, but the interplay between parasites and emerging diseases that can be transmitted worldwide make this a global issue. In addition, it is not clear if the epidemic in allergic disease in industrialized countries substitutes for geohelminth infection to interfere with effective vaccination regimens. This presentation will focus on recent vaccination studies in mice experimentally infected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus to model the condition of gastrointestinal parasite infestation in mammalian populations targeted for vaccination. In addition, a large animal vaccination and challenge model against Mycoplasma hyopneumonia in swine exposed to Ascaris suum will provide

  11. Nematode Spatial and Ecological Patterns from Tropical and Temperate Rainforests

    PubMed Central

    Porazinska, Dorota L.; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.; Powers, Thomas O.; Thomas, W. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Large scale diversity patterns are well established for terrestrial macrobiota (e.g. plants and vertebrates), but not for microscopic organisms (e.g. nematodes). Due to small size, high abundance, and extensive dispersal, microbiota are assumed to exhibit cosmopolitan distributions with no biogeographical patterns. This assumption has been extrapolated from local spatial scale studies of a few taxonomic groups utilizing morphological approaches. Recent molecularly-based studies, however, suggest something quite opposite. Nematodes are the most abundant metazoans on earth, but their diversity patterns are largely unknown. We conducted a survey of nematode diversity within three vertical strata (soil, litter, and canopy) of rainforests at two contrasting latitudes in the North American meridian (temperate: the Olympic National Forest, WA, U.S.A and tropical: La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica) using standardized sampling designs and sample processing protocols. To describe nematode diversity, we applied an ecometagenetic approach using 454 pyrosequencing. We observed that: 1) nematode communities were unique without even a single common species between the two rainforests, 2) nematode communities were unique among habitats in both rainforests, 3) total species richness was 300% more in the tropical than in the temperate rainforest, 4) 80% of the species in the temperate rainforest resided in the soil, whereas only 20% in the tropics, 5) more than 90% of identified species were novel. Overall, our data provided no support for cosmopolitanism at both local (habitats) and large (rainforests) spatial scales. In addition, our data indicated that biogeographical patterns typical of macrobiota also exist for microbiota. PMID:22984536

  12. Viability and Virulence of Entomopathogenic Nematodes Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Lete, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) can be highly effective biocontrol agents, but their efficacy can be reduced due to exposure to environmental stress such as from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Our objectives were to 1) compare UV tolerance among a broad array of EPN species, and 2) investigate the relationship between reduced nematode viability (after exposure to UV) and virulence. Nematodes exposed to a UV radiation (254 nm) for 10 or 20 min were assessed separately for viability (survival) and virulence to Galleria mellonella. We compared 9 different EPN species and 15 strains: Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (Baine, fl11, Oswego, and Vs strains), H. floridensis (332), H. georgiana (Kesha), H. indica (HOM1), H. megidis (UK211), Steinernema carpocapsae (All, Cxrd, DD136, and Sal strains), S. feltiae (SN), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (355). In viability assessments, steinernematids, particularly strains of S. carpocapsae, generally exhibited superior UV tolerance compared with the heterorhabditids. However, some heterorhabditids tended to be more tolerant than others, e.g., H. megidis and H. bacteriophora (Baine) were most susceptible and H. bacteriophora (Vs) was the only heterorhabditid that did not exhibit a significant effect after 10 min of exposure. All heterorhabditids experienced reduced viability after 20 min exposure though several S. carpocapsae strains did not. In total, after 10 or 20 min exposure, the viability of seven nematode strains did not differ from their non-UV exposed controls. In virulence assays, steinernematids (particularly S. carpocapsae strains) also tended to exhibit higher UV tolerance. However, in contrast to the viability measurements, all nematodes experienced a reduction in virulence relative to their controls. Correlation analysis revealed that viability among nematode strains is not necessarily related to virulence. In conclusion, our results indicate that the impact of UV varies substantially among EPNs, and viability alone

  13. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  14. An evolutionary perspective on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Stear, M J; Singleton, D; Matthews, L

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to discuss from an evolutionary perspective the interaction between domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and their gastrointestinal nematodes. Although evolution is the central theme of biology, there has been little attempt to consider how evolutionary forces have shaped and continue to shape the relationships between domestic animals and their parasite community. Mathematical modelling of the host-parasite relationship indicated that the system is remarkably robust to perturbations in its parameters. This robustness may be a consequence of the long coevolution of host and parasites. Although nematodes can potentially evolve faster than the host, coevolution is not dominated by the parasite and there are several examples where breeds of cattle or sheep have evolved high levels of resistance to disease. Coevolution is a more equal partnership between host and nematode than is commonly assumed. Coevolution between parasites and the host immune system is often described as an arms race where both host immune response genes and parasite proteins evolve rapidly in response to each other. However, initial results indicate that nematode antigens are not evolving rapidly; the arms race between the immune system and nematodes, if it exists, is happening very slowly. Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection states that genes with positive effects on fitness will be fixed by natural selection. Consequently, heritable variation in fitness traits is expected to be low. Contrary to this argument, there is considerable genetic variation in resistance to nematode infection. In particular, the heritabilities of nematode-specific IgA and IgE activity are moderate to high. The reasons for this apparent violation of the fundamental theorem of natural selection are not clear but several possible explanations are explored. Faecal nematode egg counts increase at the beginning of the grazing season - a phenomenon known as the periparturient rise. This

  15. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  16. Stacking resistance to crown gall and nematodes in walnut rootstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crown gall (CG) (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and the root lesion nematodes (RLNs) (Pratylenchus vulnus) are major challenges faced by the California walnut industry, reducing productivity and increasing the cost of establishing and maintaining orchards. Current nematode control strategies include nematicides, crop rotation, and tolerant cultivars, but these methods have limits. Developing genetic resistance through novel approaches like RNA interference (RNAi) can address these problems. RNAi-mediated silencing of CG disease in walnut (Juglans regia L.) has been achieved previously. We sought to place both CG and nematode resistance into a single walnut rootstock genotype using co-transformation to stack the resistance genes. A. tumefaciens, carrying self-complimentary iaaM and ipt transgenes, and Agrobacterium rhizogenes, carrying a self-complimentary Pv010 gene from P. vulnus, were used as co-transformation vectors. RolABC genes were introduced by the resident T-DNA in the A. rhizogenes Ri-plasmid used as a vector for plant transformation. Pv010 and Pv194 (transgenic control) genes were also transferred separately using A. tumefaciens. To test for resistance, transformed walnut roots were challenged with P. vulnus and microshoots were challenged with a virulent strain of A. tumefaciens. Results Combining the two bacterial strains at a 1:1 rather than 1:3 ratio increased the co-transformation efficiency. Although complete immunity to nematode infection was not observed, transgenic lines yielded up to 79% fewer nematodes per root following in vitro co-culture than untransformed controls. Transgenic line 33-3-1 exhibited complete crown gall control and 32% fewer nematodes. The transgenic plants had thicker, longer roots than untransformed controls possibly due to insertion of rolABC genes. When the Pv010 gene was present in roots with or without rolABC genes there was partial or complete control of RLNs. Transformation using only one vector showed 100

  17. ORGANIC VS CONVENTIONAL: SOIL NEMATODE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Kapp, C; Storey, S G; Malan, A P

    2014-01-01

    Global increases in human population are creating an ever-greater need for food production. Poor soil management practices have degraded soil to such an extent that rapidly improved management practices is the only way to ensure future food demands. In South Africa, deciduous fruit producers are realising the need for soil health, and for an increased understanding of the benefits of soil ecology, to ensure sustainable fruit production. This depends heavily on improved orchard management. Conventional farming relies on the addition of artificial fertilizers, and the application of chemicals, to prevent or minimise, the effects of the soil stages of pest insects, and of plant-parasitic nematodes. Currently, there is resistance toward conventional farming practices, which, it is believed, diminishes biodiversity within the soil. The study aimed to establish the soil nematode community structure and function in organically, and conventionally, managed deciduous fruit orchards. This was done by determining the abundance, the diversity, and the functionality of the naturally occurring free-living, and plant-parasitic, nematodes in deciduous fruit orchards in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The objective of the study was to form the basis for the use of nematodes as future indicators of soil health in deciduous fruit orchards. Orchards from neighbouring organic, and conventional, apricot farms, and from an organic apple orchard, were studied. All the nematodes were quantified, and identified, to family level. The five nematode-classified trophic groups were found at each site, while 14 families were identified in each orchard, respectively. Herbivores were dominant in all the orchards surveyed. Organic apples had the fewest herbivores and fungivores, with the highest number of carnivores. When comparing organic with conventional apricot orchards, higher numbers of plant-parasitic nematodes were found in the organic apricot orchards. The Maturity Index (MI

  18. Commercial Development and Future Prospects for Entomogenous Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J. J.; Cupello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Although entomogenous nenmtodes generally have many of the attributes of the ideal biocontrol agent, many of these attributes make the nematodes less than desirable for commercial production. Environmental limitations, lack of patent protection, "shelf life," shipping problems, and the need for users to receive specialized training are factors that have discouraged the involvement of larger companies. The future of these nematodes as commercially available biocontrol products appears to lie with the smaller "cottage industries" or with government-subsidized production. Problems encountered with attempts to produce commercially the mosquito parasite Romanomermis culicivorax are discussed. PMID:19300763

  19. Comparative SDS-page protein patterns of four ascaridid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ashour, A A; Taha, H A; Mohammad A el-H

    1995-12-01

    In order to investigate the degree of homogeneity and heterogeneity of the ascaridid nematodes. Toxascaris leonina, Parascaris equorum, Toxocara canis and T. vitulorum, protein extracts from adult worms of the four nematodes were resolved into a number of bands. Comparative analysis of dominant bands showed that 13 bands were common among the four species, but certain unique bands were also found in each species including 4 in T. vitulorum, one in T. leonina, two in T. canis, while P. equorum shares both T. canis and T. leonina in most of their bands. Among the four ascaridid studied, T. vitulorum appears to be the most divergent species.

  20. Studies onPaecilomyces marquandii from nematode suppressive chinampa soils.

    PubMed

    Marban-Mendoza, N; Garcia-E, R; Dicklow, M B; Zuckerman, B M

    1992-05-01

    Two applications of isolates ofPaecilomyces marquandii from suppressive chinampa soils or P. lilacinus from Peru, fungi that parasitize nematode eggs, generally gave better control of tomato root-knot due toMeloidogyne incognita than did a single application. The effects on root galling by each of thePaecilomyces isolates varied between experiments; however, the ovicidal potential of the three isolates did not differ significantly. Proteins specific for each of the isolates were demonstrated by SDS gel electrophoresis. The results indicate thatP. marquandii is one of the natural soil organisms that contribute to nematode suppression in the chinampa agricultural soils.

  1. A Simple Method to Measure Nematodes' Propulsive Thrust and the Nematode Ratchet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the propulsive thrust of micro organisms provides a more sensitive indicator of the animal's health and response to drugs than motility, a simple, high throughput, direct measurement of the thrust is desired. Taking advantage of the nematode C. elegans being heavier than water, we devised a simple method to determine the propulsive thrust of the animals by monitoring their velocity when swimming along an inclined plane. We find that the swimming velocity is a linear function of the sin of the inclination angle. This method allows us to determine, among other things, the animas' propulsive thrust as a function of genotype, drugs, and age. Furthermore, taking advantage of the animals' inability to swim over a stiff incline, we constructed a sawteeth ratchet-like track that restricts the animals to swim in a predetermined direction. This research was supported, in part, by NIH NIA Grant 5R03AG042690-02.

  2. Nematodes from terrestrial, freshwater and brackish water habitats in Belgium: an updated list with special emphasis on compost nematodes.

    PubMed

    Steel, Hanne; Coomans, August; Decraemer, Wilfrida; Moens, Tom; Bert, Wim

    2014-02-17

    A study of nematodes from a semi-artificial and controlled composting process in Eastern Flanders revealed 35 taxa, 21 of which were new records for Belgium. An updated checklist of free-living, plant-parasitic and entomopathogenic nematodes from terrestrial, freshwater and brackish water habitats in Belgium is presented. The Belgian non-marine nematofauna comprises 418 taxa, representing 4 subclasses, 14 orders, and 76 families. In total 127 new records were added: i.e. 21 from the newly explored compost habitat, 7 from freshwater samples and 99 from published data in literature.

  3. Nematode community structure and diversity pattern in sandy beaches of Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Er; Mu, Fanghong; Zhang, Zhinan; Yang, Shichao; Zhang, Ting; Li, Jia

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the diversity and structure of free-living marine nematode communities at three sandy beaches representing typical intertidal environments of a temperate zone in Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. Average nematode abundance ranged from 1006 to 2170 ind. 10 cm-2, and a total of 34 nematode genera were recorded, of which only 8 were common in all the studied beaches. Pielou's evenness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were the lowest at the second beach where nematode abundance was the highest. The highest species diversity index coincided with the lowest nematode abundance at Shilaoren beach. Sediment median grain size, sorting coefficient, and chlorophyll-a content were essential for differentiation in nematode abundance and species diversity, whereas taxonomic diversity of nematode was homogeneous across the three beaches. In 0-20 cm sediment profile, nematode abundance declined abruptly with depth, whereas nematode diversity changed gently with obvious difference in 16-20 cm layer. Sediment granulometry and chlorophyll- a content were the two foremost factors which influenced the vertical distribution pattern of nematode generic diversity. Non-selective deposit feeders constituted the most dominant trophic group, followed by epistratum feeders. Bathylaimus (family: Tripyloididae) dominated at the second and Yangkou beach, while Theristus (family: Xyalidae) prevailed at Shilaoren beach. Omnivores and predators became important at Shilaoren beach because of the high proportion of Enoplolaimus. Even though, nematode community of the studied beaches did not differ significantly from each other.

  4. Stem nematode counteracts plant resistance of aphids in alfalfa, Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ricardo A; Spears, Lori R

    2014-10-01

    Plants are exploited by a diverse community of insect herbivores and phytopathogens that interact indirectly through plant-mediated interactions. Generally, plants are thought to respond to insects and pathogens through different defensive signaling pathways. As plants are selected for resistance to one phytophagous organism type (insect vs. pathogen) in managed systems, it is not clear how this selection may affect community interactions. This study examined the effect of nematode-resistant varieties on aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) suppression, and then determined how infection by the stem nematode, Ditylenchus dipsaci, mediated ecological effects on aphids and on plant defense proteins. Four alfalfa (Medicago sativa) varieties were selected with resistance to nematodes only (+,-), aphids only (-,+), nematodes and aphids (+,+), and susceptibility to nematodes and aphids (-,-). Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to isolate the effect of nematode infection and aphid abundance on each variety. We found that varieties resistant to nematode, regardless of aphid resistance, had the lowest aphid counts, suggesting possible cross-resistance. Aphid abundance, however, increased when plants were exposed to nematodes. Resistant varieties were associated with elevated saponins but these compounds were not affected by insect or pathogen feeding. Concentrations of peroxidases and trypsin inhibitors, however, were increased in nematode resistant varieties when exposed to nematodes and aphids, respectively. The patterns of plant defense were variable, and a combination of resistance traits and changes in nutrient availability may drive positive interactions between nematodes and aphids aboveground.

  5. Genome Similarity Implies that Citrus-Parasitic Burrowing Nematodes do not Represent a Unique Species.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Opperman, C H

    1997-12-01

    Burrowing nematodes from Central America, Dominican Republic, Florida, Guadeloupe, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico were characterized for their ability to parasitize citrus, but citrus parasites were found only in Florida. Sequence tag sites originally amplified from a citrus-parasitic burrowing nematode were polymorphic among 37 burrowing nematode isolates and were not correlated with citrus parasitism, nematode isolate collection site, or amplification of a 2.4-kb sequence tag site (DK#1). Results of a RAPD analysis and characterization of the isozymes phosphoglucose isomerase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase indicated that the burrowing nematode isolates were highly similar. Citrus parasitism in Florida appears to be associated with limited changes in the burrowing nematode genome. Findings did not substantiate a previous report that R. citrophilus was present in Hawaii. Overall, these data do not support assignment of sibling species status to burrowing nematodes that differ with respect to citrus parasitism.

  6. The Pumping Mechanism of the Nematode Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, J. Richard; Burr, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The radial orientation of the myofilaments in the nematode esophagus raises interesting questions as to how such a structure can function as a pump. A physical model of the esophagus of Ascaris lumbricoides was developed and the membrane theory of shells applied in order to relate the observed dimensional changes to myofilament force, pressure stresses, and membrane elastic constants. By stressing the excised esophagus passively with osmotic pressure, the esophagus was shown to be elastically anisotropic with the ratio of circumferential to longitudinal elastic constants, Eψ/El ≃ 2.74. When this value was incorporated, the model predicted the ratio of the respective strains, εψ/εl, to be 0.52 during an equilibrium contraction of the esophagus. This agreed with the experimental value, 0.46 ± 0.10, measured during occasional, prolonged muscle contractions. When measured during normal pumping, on the other hand, the value of εψ/εl was 0 ± 0.10. This indicated that a nonequilibrium condition normally occurs in which a greater myofilament force per unit area of lumen membrane is not balanced by internal pressure and therefore acceleration of the lumen contents and negative intraluminal pressure occurs. The pumping action of esophagi dissected from Ascaris was observed to be normally peristaltic and periodic. Contraction was initiated by a spontaneous depolarization that propagated at 4.0 ± 0.20 cm/s along the esophageal membrane. A wave of localized increases in the internal pressure of the muscle and localized changes in external dimensions was observed. A subsequent spontaneous repolarization, which propagated at 5.8 ± 0.23 cm/s, triggered relaxation of the muscle during which the localized pressure and dimensional changes returned to resting values. A mechanism was deduced in which fluid is drawn into and moved along the lumen by the wave of contraction. During the wave of relaxation, the lumen contents are pressurized and injected into the intestine by

  7. Doramectin efficacy against gastrointestinal nematodes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T B; Fox, M C; Wiles, S E

    1996-11-01

    Four controlled trials with growing pigs were performed to determine efficacy of doramectin against natural and induced populations of nematodes. In Trial 1 (T1), 20 pigs with natural infections were assigned to one of two like groups on the basis of weight, sex and worm egg counts. In Trial 2 (T2), 20 pigs with negative worm egg counts were assigned to one of two groups on the basis of weight and sex. Each pig was subsequently given (per os) 3000 Trichuris suis embryonated eggs; 2000 Ascaris suum embryonated eggs; 10000 Oesophagostomum spp. infective larvae and 10,000 Strongyloides ransomi infective larvae (SC injection). In Trial 3 (T3), 20 pigs with negative worm egg counts were assigned as in T2, and each pig was subsequently given (per os) 2000 A. suum embryonated eggs, 15000 Oesophagostomum quadrispinulatum infective larvae, and 2891 Hyostrongylus rubidus infective larvae. In Trial 4 (T4), 16 pigs with negative worm egg counts were each assigned to one of two groups as in T2 and were given (per os) 2670 T. suis embryonated eggs. On Day 0 of each trial, each pig of the control group was injected IM in the neck with sterile saline at the rate of 1.5 ml 50 kg-1. Each pig in the treated group of each trial was similarly injected with doramectin at the rate of 300 micrograms kg-1. All pigs were necropsied 14 or 15 days post-treatment and parasites recovered by standard parasitological procedures. Efficacies against natural infections were: A. suum, 100%; Oesophagostomum spp. 100%; H. rubidus, 99.4%; and Strongyloides ransomi, 99.9%. Efficacies against induced infections were: 4th stage A. suum, 100%; 4th stage O.dentatum, 99.9%; 4th stage O.quadrispinulatum, 97.1 and 99.6%; 4th stage H. rubidus, 100%; adult S. ransomi, 100%; adult Trichuris suis in mixed infection, 54.1%; and in pure infection, 95.3%.

  8. Herbal dewormer fails to control gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism is the most important disease of small ruminants. Control is usually based on the use of chemical anthelmintics (dewormers); but these are prohibited from use in organic livestock, and the effectiveness of chemical anthelmintics in conventional operations ...

  9. Garlic exhibits lack of control over gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) continue to hinder small ruminant production because of anthelmintic resistance and lack of effective products for GIN control in organic production. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a commercially available certified organic garlic pr...

  10. Grazing sericea lespedeza for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternatives to chemical dewormers are needed to counter anthelmintic resistance and improve organic management systems. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of grazing sericea lespedeza (SL) compared with grass pastures for control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in lambs. In Experi...

  11. Detecting Microbial Nucleic Acids within Nematode Bodies: A Photo Essay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed a taxa-specific, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to localize microbial nucleic acids within nematode bodies. This technique involves hybridization of a nucleic acid probe to target microbial sequences. Hybridization is detected microscopically, as the probes have f...

  12. 75 FR 54592 - Pale Cyst Nematode; Update of Quarantined Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... INFORMATION: Background The pale cyst nematode (PCN, Globodera pallida) is a major pest of potato crops in... some weeds. The PCN is thought to have originated in Peru and is now widely distributed in many potato-growing regions of the world. PCN infestations may be expressed as patches of poor growth. Affected...

  13. Rooting out Defense Mechanisms in Wheat against Plant Parasitic Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root-lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.) are soil borne pathogens of many important agricultural crops including wheat. Pratylenchus invade root cells and feed using a stylet, resulting in cell death. Common signs of Pratylenchus damage are root lesions, girdling, and lack of lateral branching. ...

  14. Response of Pinus ponderosa Seedlings to Stylet-Bearing Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Viglierchio, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Of 12 stylet-bearing nematodes used for inoculations, Pratylenchus penetrans, P. brachyurus, P. vulnus, Ditylenchus destructor, Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, and M. hapla reproduced on Pinus ponderosa, while Xiphinema index, Aphelenchus avenae, Paratylenehus neoamblycephalus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans, and Macroposthonia xenoplax did not. P. vulnus, P. brachyurus, P. penetrans, A. avenae, D. destructor, T. semipenetrans, and P. neoamblycephalus significantly suppressed both the shoot and root wet weights of ponderosa pine seedlings obtained from stands in five different locations. X. index significantly suppressed root wet weights, M. xenoplax siguificantly suppressed shoot wet weight, and M. incognita, M. javanica, and M. hapla suppressed neither at the inoculation levels used. Injurious nematodes tended to suppress root growth more than shoot growth. Seedlings from two locations produced greater shoot growth wet weight than did seedlings from the other three locations. The more injurious nematodes tended to cause an increase in the water content of shoots. Frequency analyses of seedling population shoot-root ratios indicated that ponderosa pine seedlings could be selected for better shoot-root ratios as well as for resistance to several pathogenic nematodes. PMID:19300659

  15. Evolutionary history of nematodes associated with sweat bees.

    PubMed

    McFrederick, Quinn S; Taylor, Douglas R

    2013-03-01

    Organisms that live in close association with other organisms make up a large part of the world's diversity. One driver of this diversity is the evolution of host-species specificity, which can occur via reproductive isolation following a host-switch or, given the correct circumstances, via cospeciation. In this study, we explored the diversity and evolutionary history of Acrostichus nematodes that are associated with halictid bees in North America. First, we conducted surveys of bees in Virginia, and found six halictid species that host Acrostichus. To test the hypothesis of cospeciation, we constructed phylogenetic hypotheses of Acrostichus based on three genes. We found Acrostichus puri and Acrostichus halicti to be species complexes comprising cryptic, host-specific species. Although several nodes in the host and symbiont phylogenies were congruent and tests for cospeciation were significant, the host's biogeography, the apparent patchiness of the association across the host's phylogeny, and the amount of evolution in the nematode sequence suggested a mixture of cospeciation, host switching, and extinction events instead of strict cospeciation. Cospeciation can explain the relationships between Ac. puri and its augochlorine hosts, but colonization of Halictus hosts is more likely than cospeciation. The nematodes are vertically transmitted, but sexual transmission is also likely. Both of these transmission modes may explain host-species specificity and congruent bee and nematode phylogenies. Additionally, all halictid hosts come from eusocial or socially polymorphic lineages, suggesting that sociality may be a factor in the suitability of hosts for Acrostichus.

  16. Genome-scale evidence of the nematode-arthropod clade

    PubMed Central

    Dopazo, Hernán; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2005-01-01

    Background The issue of whether coelomates form a single clade, the Coelomata, or whether all animals that moult an exoskeleton (such as the coelomate arthropods and the pseudocoelomate nematodes) form a distinct clade, the Ecdysozoa, is the most puzzling issue in animal systematics and a major open-ended subject in evolutionary biology. Previous single-gene and genome-scale analyses designed to resolve the issue have produced contradictory results. Here we present the first genome-scale phylogenetic evidence that strongly supports the Ecdysozoa hypothesis. Results Through the most extensive phylogenetic analysis carried out to date, the complete genomes of 11 eukaryotic species have been analyzed in order to find homologous sequences derived from 18 human chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of datasets showing an increased adjustment to equal evolutionary rates between nematode and arthropod sequences produced a gradual change from support for Coelomata to support for Ecdysozoa. Transition between topologies occurred when fast-evolving sequences of Caenorhabditis elegans were removed. When chordate, nematode and arthropod sequences were constrained to fit equal evolutionary rates, the Ecdysozoa topology was statistically accepted whereas Coelomata was rejected. Conclusions The reliability of a monophyletic group clustering arthropods and nematodes was unequivocally accepted in datasets where traces of the long-branch attraction effect were removed. This is the first phylogenomic evidence to strongly support the 'moulting clade' hypothesis. PMID:15892869

  17. Induction of Tolerance to Root-Knot Nematode by Oxycom

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Safdar A.; McKenry, M. V.; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Anderson, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    Oxycom applications increased plant growth and population levels of Meloidogyne incognita on susceptible tomato. A single Oxycom drench at 2,500 ppm applied 7 days prior to inoculation with M. incognita provided remediation of plant growth measured 63 days later. This occurred without reducing nematode population levels. Follow-up drenches at 2,500 ppm at 10-day intervals stunted shoots and roots (P = 0.05). The same application rates at 20-day intervals did not reduce plant growth. Plants receiving multiple drenches had more galls (P = 0.05), females, and second-stage juveniles (J2) per root system compared to plants receiving only the single treatment. Foliar mass and height of plants treated with a single pre-inoculation Oxycom drench were indistinguishable from plants without nematodes. Oxycom treatments activated signaling pathways for plant defense as confirmed by detection of elevated defense gene transcripts in root tissues. The finding of increased reproduction of root-knot nematode without loss of plant growth is consistent with the definition of induced tolerance. Frequency, rate, and timing of applications need further study with other nematodes and various field settings. PMID:19262766

  18. Root-Knot Nematode Parasitism Suppresses Host RNA Silencing.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Elmore, J M; Taylor, C G

    2017-04-12

    Root-knot nematodes damage crops around the world by developing complex feeding sites from normal root cells of their hosts. The ability to initiate and maintain this feeding site (composed of individual "giant cells") is essential to their parasitism process. RNA silencing pathways in plants serve a diverse set of functions, from directing growth and development to defending against invading pathogens. Influencing a host's RNA silencing pathways as a pathogenicity strategy has been well-documented for viral plant pathogens, but recently, it has become clear that silencing pathways also play an important role in other plant pathosystems. To determine if RNA silencing pathways play a role in nematode parasitism, we tested the susceptibility of plants that express a viral suppressor of RNA silencing. We observed an increase in susceptibility to nematode parasitism in plants expressing viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Results from studies utilizing a silenced reporter gene suggest that active suppression of RNA silencing pathways may be occurring during nematode parasitism. With these studies, we provide further evidence to the growing body of plant-biotic interaction research that suppression of RNA silencing is important in the successful interaction between a plant-parasitic animal and its host.

  19. Dietary copper sulfate for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in goats has necessitated studies for alternative means of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of dietary copper sulfate for control of GIN in meat goats. Naturally infected buck kids received 0 (LC), 78 (M...

  20. Radiation Effects on Nematodes: Results from IML-1 Esperiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Kazarians, G. A.; Righards, G. F.; Benton, E. V; Benton, E. R.; Henke, R.

    1993-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to natural space radiation using the ESA Biorack facility aboard Spacelab on International Microgravity Laboratory 1, STS-42. For the major experimental objective dormant animals were suspended in buffer or on agar or immobilized next to CR-39 plactic nuclear track detectors to correlate fluence of HZE particles with genetic events.

  1. Mermithid Nematodes: Physiological Relationships with their Insect Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Roger

    1981-01-01

    This paper assesses our state of knowledge of physiological processes involved in the relationships between insects and their mermithid nematode parasites. Three major components of the host-parasite relationship(s) are reviewed: effects of mermithids on host physiology, effects of host physiology on mermithids, and the physiology of the nematodes themselves. Mermithids induce an array of changes in host physiology, and the effects on host metabolism and endocrinology are discussed at some length. Few studies have been done to ascertain the effects of the host on the parasites from a physiological standpoint. Whereas host immunity mechanisms against mermithids have been described at the ultrastructural level, the physiological basis of such responses is not known. Mermithids are atypical nematodes, both structurally and physiologically. In the absence of a functional gut, nutrients are absorbed across the outer cuticle and stored in a trophosome. The transcuticular mode of feeding, storage within the trophosome, and metabolism of storage products are discussed. The usefulness of physiological information toward expediting in vitro culture of these nematodes is discussed, and problems that need to be addressed are defined. PMID:19300761

  2. Efficient nematode swimming in a shear thinning colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H; Weitz, David A

    2016-02-14

    The swimming behavior of a nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is investigated in a non-Newtonian shear thinning colloidal suspension. At the onset value (ϕ∼ 8%), the suspension begins to exhibit shear thinning behavior, and the average swimming speed of worms jumps by approximately 12% more than that measured in a Newtonian solution exhibiting no shear dependent viscosity. In the shear thinning regime, we observe a gradual yet significant improvement in swimming efficiency with an increase in ϕ while the swimming speed remains nearly constant. We postulate that this enhanced swimming can be explained by the temporal change in the stroke form of the nematode that is uniquely observed in a shear thinning colloidal suspension: the nematode features a fast and large stroke in its head to overcome the temporally high drag imposed by the viscous medium, whose effective viscosity (ηs) is shown to drop drastically, inversely proportional to the strength of its stroke. Our results suggest new insights into how nematodes efficiently maneuver through the complex fluid environment in their natural habitat.

  3. Putatively novel sources of resistance to soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) remains to be the most economically devastating endo-root parasite of soybean [Glycine max L. (Merrill)], in the USA and worldwide. Currently, two resistance loci, rhg1 and Rhg4 have been the main sources of resistance to SCN. Over 95% of soybean cultivars with SCN resist...

  4. Multifaceted effects of host plants on entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The success of parasites can be impacted by multi-trophic interactions. Here we investigate aspects of multi-trophic interactions in a system involving an entomopathogenic nematode (EPN), its insect host, and host plant. Novel issues investigated include the impact of tritrophic interactions on nema...

  5. DNA barcoding of parasitic nematodes: is it kosher?

    PubMed

    Siddall, Mark E; Kvist, Sebastion; Phillips, Anna; Oceguera-Figuero, Alejandro

    2012-06-01

    Nematode parasites were encountered in kosher-certified fish meat and roe, and the question was raised as to whether or not these food products were kosher as concerns food preparation standards-a matter that pertains to the identity and, by extension, the life cycle of the parasites. To ascertain the identities of parasitic nematodes, given the distorted or damaged nature of the specimens, molecular techniques were applied in the form of DNA barcoding. To our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to an obviously cultural concern as opposed to one of health or economic significance. Results, based both on cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II, suggested that the parasite species found in the fish products are anisakine species that do not inhabit the intestinal lumen of the fish hosts examined. Thus, there was no evidence of failure to adhere to food preparation practices consistent with the proscriptions of Orthodox Judaism. Notwithstanding the success of DNA barcoding in determining at least the higher taxonomic identities of the parasites, some shortcomings of the DNA barcoding pipeline as it pertains to nematode parasites were encountered; specifically, the paucity of data available for the DNA barcoding locus, even for very common nematode taxa.

  6. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae).

    PubMed

    Palomares-Rius, J E; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C; Archidona-Yuste, A; Blok, V C; Castillo, P

    2017-02-02

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species.

  7. The Wolbachia endosymbiont as an anti-filarial nematode target

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark J.; Foster, Jeremy M.

    2010-01-01

    Human disease caused by parasitic filarial nematodes is a major cause of global morbidity. The parasites are transmitted by arthropod intermediate hosts and are responsible for lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis) or onchocerciasis (river blindness). Within these filarial parasites are intracellular alpha-proteobacteria, Wolbachia, that were first observed almost 30 years ago. The obligate endosymbiont has been recognized as a target for anti-filarial nematode chemotherapy as evidenced by the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatment in an extensive series of human trials. While current treatments with doxycycline and rifampicin are not practical for widespread use due to the length of required treatments and contraindications, anti-Wolbachia targeting nevertheless appears a promising alternative for filariasis control in situations where current programmatic strategies fail or are unable to be delivered and it provides a superior efficacy for individual therapy. The mechanisms that underlie the symbiotic relationship between Wolbachia and its nematode hosts remain elusive. Comparative genomics, bioinfomatic and experimental analyses have identified a number of potential interactions, which may be drug targets. One candidate is de novo heme biosynthesis, due to its absence in the genome sequence of the host nematode, Brugia malayi, but presence in Wolbachia and its potential roles in worm biology. We describe this and several additional candidate targets, as well as our approaches for understanding the nature of the host-symbiont relationship. PMID:20730111

  8. Developing Nematode Management Zones Using Soil EC Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much research work is ongoing that is investigating methods and tools for delineating cotton root knot nematode [M. incognita] management zones via soil texture. Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) can be a surrogate measurement for determining soil texture as clay content is a dominant phy...

  9. Evaluation of coffee genotypes for root-knot nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meloidogyne konaensis causes severe damage to the root systems of Coffea arabica cv. Typica ‘Guatemala’ grown in Kona, Hawaii. Farmers currently employ grafting of the nematode tolerant C. liberica var. dewevrei ‘Fukunaga’ to C. arabica cv. Typica scions. Greenhouse experiments confirmed C. liberi...

  10. Influence of Lysobacter enzymogenes Strain C3 on Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Moore, W. H.; Yuen, G. Y.; Kobayashi, D.; Caswell-Chen, E. P.

    2006-01-01

    Chitinolytic microflora may contribute to biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes by causing decreased egg viability through degradation of egg shells. Here, the influence of Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3 on Caenorhabditis elegans, Heterodera schachtii, Meloidogyne javanica, Pratylenchus penetrans, and Aphelenchoides fragariae is described. Exposure of C. elegans to L. enzymogenes strain C3 on agar resulted in almost complete elimination of egg production and death of 94% of hatched juveniles after 2 d. Hatch of H. schachtii eggs was about 50% on a lawn of L. enzymogenes strain C3 on agar as compared to 80% on a lawn of E. coli. Juveniles that hatched on a lawn of L. enzymogenes strain C3 on agar died due to disintegration of the cuticle and body contents. Meloidogyne javanica juveniles died after 4 d exposure to a 7-d-old chitin broth culture of L. enzymogenes strain C3. Immersion of A. fragariae, M. javanica, and P. penetrans juveniles and adults in a nutrient broth culture of L. enzymogenes strain C3 led to rapid death and disintegration of the nematodes. Upon exposure to L. enzymogenes strain C3 cultures in nutrient broth, H. schachtii juveniles were rapidly immobilized and then lysed after three days. The death and disintegration of the tested nematodes suggests that toxins and enzymes produced by this strain are active against a range of nematode species. PMID:19259452

  11. IN VITRO CULTURING OF THE PREDATORY SOIL NEMATODE CLARKUS PAPILLATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clarkus papillatus is a widely distributed predatory soil nematode and is of interest in the study of soil ecology, yet very little information exists on its in vitro culturing. In this investigation, an artificial environment was created to maintain C. papillatus for multi-gener...

  12. Mitochondrial genome diversity in dagger and needle nematodes (Nematoda: Longidoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Palomares-Rius, J. E.; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, C.; Archidona-Yuste, A.; Blok, V. C.; Castillo, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dagger and needle nematodes included in the family Longidoridae (viz. Longidorus, Paralongidorus, and Xiphinema) are highly polyphagous plant-parasitic nematodes in wild and cultivated plants and some of them are plant-virus vectors (nepovirus). The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the dagger and needle nematodes, Xiphinema rivesi, Xiphinema pachtaicum, Longidorus vineacola and Paralongidorus litoralis were sequenced in this study. The four circular mt genomes have an estimated size of 12.6, 12.5, 13.5 and 12.7 kb, respectively. Up to date, the mt genome of X. pachtaicum is the smallest genome found in Nematoda. The four mt genomes contain 12 protein-coding genes (viz. cox1-3, nad1-6, nad4L, atp6 and cob) and two ribosomal RNA genes (rrnL and rrnS), but the atp8 gene was not detected. These mt genomes showed a gene arrangement very different within the Longidoridae species sequenced, with the exception of very closely related species (X. americanum and X. rivesi). The sizes of non-coding regions in the Longidoridae nematodes were very small and were present in a few places in the mt genome. Phylogenetic analysis of all coding genes showed a closer relationship between Longidorus and Paralongidorus and different phylogenetic possibilities for the three Xiphinema species. PMID:28150734

  13. Diversity and prevalence of metastrongyloid nematodes infecting the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in European zoos.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Meyland-Smith, Frederik; Willesen, Jakob L; Jefferies, Ryan; Morgan, Eric R; Monrad, Jesper

    2010-09-20

    Metastrongyloid induced pneumonia has been described sporadically in the red panda (Ailurus fulgens). Early descriptions in pandas recently imported to the USA from China involved parasites morphologically similar to Angiostrongylus spp. and Crenosomatidae. More recently, four cases of severe verminous pneumonia associated with Angiostrongylus vasorum have been reported from European zoos. A coprological survey of the red panda population within European zoos was conducted in 2008. Faecal samples from 115 pandas originating from 54 zoos were collected on 3 consecutive days. Using Baermann technique, 40 animals (35%) from 20 zoos (37%) were found to shed metastrongyloid first stage larvae (L(1)). Based on their morphology and size, the L(1) observed could be divided into three morphologically distinct types: (1) a Crenosoma sp. type (n=5, overall prevalence: 4.3%), (2) an A. vasorum type (n=3, 2.6%), and (3) an unidentified metastrongyloid species, similar to, but morphologically distinct from A. vasorum (n=32, 27.8%). Further confirmation of species identification was provided by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene, which confirmed three different species. The novel Crenosoma species was most genetically analogous to Crenosoma mephitidis and the unidentified metastrongyloid species was most similar to Stenurus minor and Torynurus convulutus. Routine and quarantine health care of red pandas in captivity should take account of the risk of Angiostrongylus and Crenosoma infection in endemic areas, but should also be cognisant of the widespread presence of an apparently less pathogenic species of lungworm. The identity of the two potentially novel species is subject to further work.

  14. Immunological aspects of nematode parasite control in sheep.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Horohov, D W

    2006-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasitism is arguably the most serious constraint affecting sheep production worldwide. Economic losses are caused by decreased production, the costs of prophylaxis and treatment, and the death of the infected animals. The nematode of particular concern is Haemonchus contortus, which can cause severe blood loss resulting in anemia, anorexia, depression, loss of condition, and eventual death. The control of nematode parasites traditionally relies on anthelmintic treatment. The evolution of anthelmintic resistance in nematode populations threatens the success of drug treatment programs. Alternative strategies for control of nematode infections are being developed, and one approach is to take advantage of the host's natural or acquired immune responses, which can be used in selection programs to increase the level of resistance in the population. Vaccination can also be used to stimulate or boost the host's acquired immunity. The induction of protective resistance is dependent on the pattern of cytokine gene expression induced during infection by two defined CD4+ T-helper cell subsets, which have been designated as Th1 or Th2. Intracellular parasites most often invoke a Th1-type response, and helminth parasites a Th2-type response. Breeds of sheep resistant to infection have developed resistance over a much longer term of host-parasite relationship than genetically selected resistant lines. The immune components involved in these different responses and types of host-parasite relationships will be reviewed. The potential for using vaccines has been investigated, with variable results, for several decades. The few successes and potential new antigen candidates will also be reviewed.

  15. Mermithid nematodes found in adult Anopheles from southeastern Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over two dozen mermithid nematodes have been described parasitizing mosquitoes worldwide, however, only two species were found in Africa. Mermithid nematodes kill their mosquito host upon emergence, which suggests that they could be developed as biological control agents of mosquitoes. Both Romanomermis culicivorax and Romanomermis iyengari have been reared for mass release to control numerous Anopheles species vector populations, and in one instance this may have led to reduced malaria prevalence in a human population. Methods Anopheles mosquitoes were collected during a malaria study in southeastern Senegal. Two different adult blood fed mosquitoes had a single mermithid nematode emerge from their anus while they were being held post-capture. Primers from the 18 S rDNA were developed to sequence nematode DNA and screen mosquitoes for mermithid DNA. 18 S rDNA from the Senegalese mermithid and other mermithid entries in GenBank were used to create a Maximum Parsimony tree of the Mermithidae family. Results The mermithid was present in 1.8% (10/551) of the sampled adult Anopheles species in our study area. The mermithid was found in An. gambiae s.s., An. funestus, and An. rufipes from the villages of Ndebou, Boundoucondi, and Damboucoye. Maximum parsimony analysis confirmed that the nematode parasites found in Anopheles were indeed mermithid parasites, and of the mermithid sequences available in GenBank, they are most closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of mermithids from adult Anopheles mosquitoes in Senegal. The mermithid appears to infect Anopheles mosquitoes that develop in diverse larval habitats. Although maximum parsimony analysis determined the mermithid was closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus, several characteristics of the mermithid were more similar to the Empidomermis genus. Future mermithid isolations will hopefully allow: formal taxonomic identification

  16. Detrended-Fluctuation Analysis of Nematode Movement in Heterogeneous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, S. M.; Gonzalez-Nieto, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    We consider multifractal analysis in time scale to analyse the effect of structural heterogeneity on the movement of the slug-parasitic nematode, Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita. The study involves image recording and analysis of nematode movement on a homogeneous layer of technical agar compared to movement of nematodes in a structurally heterogeneous environment that was created by adding sand particles to the plates of agar. The temporal scaling properties of the recorded trails were studied using a detrended fluctuation based method to capture the complex dynamic of movement data by comparing the multiscaling characteristics of nematode step lengths as affected by the different environments. A systematic analysis of the exponent of the structure function and the generalized Hurst exponent revealed that, while in homogeneous environment the movement was characterized by a long-range correlation with a Hurst exponent H(q) close to 1, varying little with respect to the order q of the fluctuation function, the impact of sand particle was to reduce the degree of persistence in the movement, the step lenghts being characterized by a smaller Hurst exponent, yet more variable. The results suggest that the presence of structural heterogeneity introduces a new bias into the movement, which plays an important role in complex environments where the nematode movement may be obstructed by soil particles. References Tarquis, A.M., Morato, M. C., Castellanos M.T., Perdigones A. 2009. Comparison of Structure Function and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Wind Time Series, Riv. Nuevo Cimento, in press. Gao, J., Cao, Y., Tung, W.-W., Hu J., 2007. Multiscale Analysis of Complex Times Series. Eds. John Wiley & Sons.

  17. A sensory code for host seeking in parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Hallem, Elissa A.; Dillman, Adler R.; Hong, Annie V.; Zhang, Yuanjun; Yano, Jessica M.; DeMarco, Stephanie F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Nematodes comprise a large phylum of both free-living and parasitic species that show remarkably diverse lifestyles, ecological niches, and behavioral repertoires. Parasitic species in particular often display highly specialized host-seeking behaviors that reflect their specific host preferences. Many host-seeking behaviors can be triggered by the presence of host odors, yet little is known about either the specific olfactory cues that trigger these behaviors or the neural circuits that underlie them. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema carpocapsae are phylogenetically distant insect-parasitic nematodes whose host-seeking and host-invasion behavior resembles that of some of the most devastating human- and plant-parasitic nematodes. Here we compare the olfactory responses of H. bacteriophora and S. carpocapsae infective juveniles (IJs) to those of Caenorhabditis elegans dauers, which are analogous life stages [1]. We show that the broad host range of these parasites results from their ability to respond to the universally-produced signal carbon dioxide (CO2) as well as a wide array of odors, including host-specific odors that we identified using TD-GC-MS. We show that CO2 is attractive for the parasitic IJs and C. elegans dauers despite being repulsive for C. elegans adults [2–4], and we identify an ancient and conserved sensory neuron that mediates CO2 response in both parasitic and free-living species regardless of whether CO2 is an attractive or a repulsive cue. Finally, we show that the parasites’ odor response profiles are more similar to each other than to that of C. elegans despite their greater phylogenetic distance, likely reflecting evolutionary convergence to insect parasitism. Our results suggest that the olfactory responses of parasitic versus free-living nematodes are highly diverse and that this diversity is critical to the evolution of nematode behavior. PMID:21353558

  18. Potential of an Alkaline-stabilized Biosolid to Manage Nematodes: Case Studies on Soybean Cyst and Root-knot Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2001 a collaborative research effort was initiated to evaluate an alkaline stabilized biosolid amendment for plant-parasitic nematode management. This biosolid amendment, N-Viro Soil (NVS), is produced from a unique process that destroys pathogens through a combination of the following stresses:...

  19. A Large Collection of Novel Nematode-Infecting Microsporidia and Their Diverse Interactions with Caenorhabditis elegans and Other Related Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaotian; Sachse, Martin; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Troemel, Emily R.; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are fungi-related intracellular pathogens that may infect virtually all animals, but are poorly understood. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has recently become a model host for studying microsporidia through the identification of its natural microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii. However, it was unclear how widespread and diverse microsporidia infections are in C. elegans or other related nematodes in the wild. Here we describe the isolation and culture of 47 nematodes with microsporidian infections. N. parisii is found to be the most common microsporidia infecting C. elegans in the wild. In addition, we further describe and name six new species in the Nematocida genus. Our sampling and phylogenetic analysis further identify two subclades that are genetically distinct from Nematocida, and we name them Enteropsectra and Pancytospora. Interestingly, unlike Nematocida, these two genera belong to the main clade of microsporidia that includes human pathogens. All of these microsporidia are horizontally transmitted and most specifically infect intestinal cells, except Pancytospora epiphaga that replicates mostly in the epidermis of its Caenorhabditis host. At the subcellular level in the infected host cell, spores of the novel genus Enteropsectra show a characteristic apical distribution and exit via budding off of the plasma membrane, instead of exiting via exocytosis as spores of Nematocida. Host specificity is broad for some microsporidia, narrow for others: indeed, some microsporidia can infect Oscheius tipulae but not its sister species Oscheius sp. 3, and conversely some microsporidia found infecting Oscheius sp. 3 do not infect O. tipulae. We also show that N. ausubeli fails to strongly induce in C. elegans the transcription of genes that are induced by other Nematocida species, suggesting it has evolved mechanisms to prevent induction of this host response. Altogether, these newly isolated species illustrate the diversity and ubiquity of

  20. Overview of organic amendments for management of plant-parasitic nematodes, with case studies from Florida.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Robert

    2011-06-01

    Organic amendments have been widely used for management of plant-parasitic nematodes. Relatively rapid declines in nematode population levels may occur when decomposing materials release toxic compounds, while longer-term effects might include increases in nematode antagonists. Improved crop nutrition and plant growth following amendment use may lead to tolerance of plant-parasitic nematodes. Results depend on a great variety of factors such as material used, processing/composting of material, application rate, test arena, crop rotation and agronomic practices, soil type, climate, and other environmental factors. Reasons for variable performance and interpretation of results from amendment studies are discussed. Case studies of amendments for nematode management are reviewed from Florida, where composts and crop residues are the most frequently used amendments. Plant growth was often improved by amendment application, free-living nematodes (especially bacterivores) were often stimulated, but suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes was inconsistent. Amendments were generally not as effective as soil fumigation with methyl bromide for managing root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), and often population levels or galling of root-knot nematodes in amended plots did not differ from those in non-amended control plots. While amendments may improve plant growth and stimulate soil food webs, additional study and testing are needed before they could be used reliably for management of plant-parasitic nematodes under Florida conditions.

  1. Overview of Organic Amendments for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes, with Case Studies from Florida

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Organic amendments have been widely used for management of plant-parasitic nematodes. Relatively rapid declines in nematode population levels may occur when decomposing materials release toxic compounds, while longer-term effects might include increases in nematode antagonists. Improved crop nutrition and plant growth following amendment use may lead to tolerance of plant-parasitic nematodes. Results depend on a great variety of factors such as material used, processing/composting of material, application rate, test arena, crop rotation and agronomic practices, soil type, climate, and other environmental factors. Reasons for variable performance and interpretation of results from amendment studies are discussed. Case studies of amendments for nematode management are reviewed from Florida, where composts and crop residues are the most frequently used amendments. Plant growth was often improved by amendment application, free-living nematodes (especially bacterivores) were often stimulated, but suppression of plant-parasitic nematodes was inconsistent. Amendments were generally not as effective as soil fumigation with methyl bromide for managing root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), and often population levels or galling of root-knot nematodes in amended plots did not differ from those in non-amended control plots. While amendments may improve plant growth and stimulate soil food webs, additional study and testing are needed before they could be used reliably for management of plant-parasitic nematodes under Florida conditions. PMID:22791915

  2. Distribution and evolution of glycoside hydrolase family 45 cellulases in nematodes and fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been suggested as the mechanism by which various plant parasitic nematode species have obtained genes important in parasitism. In particular, cellulase genes have been acquired by plant parasitic nematodes that allow them to digest plant cell walls. Unlike the typical glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 cellulase genes which are found in several nematode species from the order Tylenchida, members of the GH45 cellulase have only been identified in a cluster including the families Parasitaphelenchidae (with the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) and Aphelenchoididae, and their origins remain unknown. Results In order to investigate the distribution and evolution of GH45 cellulase genes in nematodes and fungi we performed a wide ranging screen for novel putative GH45 sequences. This revealed that the sequences are widespread mainly in Ascomycetous fungi and have so far been found in a single major nematode lineage. Close relationships between the sequences from nematodes and fungi were found through our phylogenetic analyses. An intron position is shared by sequences from Bursaphelenchus nematodes and several Ascomycetous fungal species. Conclusions The close phylogenetic relationships and conserved gene structure between the sequences from nematodes and fungi strongly supports the hypothesis that nematode GH45 cellulase genes were acquired via HGT from fungi. The rapid duplication and turnover of these genes within Bursaphelenchus genomes demonstrate that useful sequences acquired via HGT can become established in the genomes of recipient organisms and may open novel niches for these organisms to exploit. PMID:24690293

  3. Sequence mining and transcript profiling to explore cyst nematode parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Elling, Axel A; Mitreva, Makedonka; Gai, Xiaowu; Martin, John; Recknor, Justin; Davis, Eric L; Hussey, Richard S; Nettleton, Dan; McCarter, James P; Baum, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyst nematodes are devastating plant parasites that become sedentary within plant roots and induce the transformation of normal plant cells into elaborate feeding cells with the help of secreted effectors, the parasitism proteins. These proteins are the translation products of parasitism genes and are secreted molecular tools that allow cyst nematodes to infect plants. Results We present here the expression patterns of all previously described parasitism genes of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, in all major life stages except the adult male. These insights were gained by analyzing our gene expression dataset from experiments using the Affymetrix Soybean Genome Array GeneChip, which contains probeset sequences for 6,860 genes derived from preparasitic and parasitic H. glycines life stages. Targeting the identification of additional H. glycines parasitism-associated genes, we isolated 633 genes encoding secretory proteins using algorithms to predict secretory signal peptides. Furthermore, because some of the known H. glycines parasitism proteins have strongest similarity to proteins of plants and microbes, we searched for predicted protein sequences that showed their highest similarities to plant or microbial proteins and identified 156 H. glycines genes, some of which also contained a signal peptide. Analyses of the expression profiles of these genes allowed the formulation of hypotheses about potential roles in parasitism. This is the first study combining sequence analyses of a substantial EST dataset with microarray expression data of all major life stages (except adult males) for the identification and characterization of putative parasitism-associated proteins in any parasitic nematode. Conclusion We have established an expression atlas for all known H. glycines parasitism genes. Furthermore, in an effort to identify additional H. glycines genes with putative functions in parasitism, we have reduced the currently known 6,860 H

  4. Distribution, Frequency, and Population Density of Nematodes in West Virginia Peach Orchards

    PubMed Central

    Kotcon, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Nematode population densities were determined in soil and root samples collected from 205 peach (Prunus persica L.) orchard blocks between 25 March and 5 May 1986. Representative specimens from 75 blocks were identified to species; 28 species of plant-parasitic nematodes were identified. Predaceous nematodes (Mononchidae) were observed in 71% of the samples. The most common plant-parasitic genera were Paratylenchus, Helicotylenchus, Pratylenchus, and Xiphinema, occurring in 85, 84, 77, and 74% of the samples, respectively. Population densities of Xiphinema, Pratylenchus, Meloidogyne, Hoplolaimus, and Criconemella were at potentially damaging levels in 74, 19, 13, 10, and 2% of the samples, respectively. Potentially damaging nematode densities were observed in 78% of orchard blocks surveyed, with 35% having two or more nematodes with densities high enough to warrant concern. Nematode densities differed among soil types and tree rootstocks and were correlated with tree mortality rates. PMID:19287785

  5. A novel ascaroside controls the parasitic life cycle of the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora.

    PubMed

    Noguez, Jaime H; Conner, Elizabeth S; Zhou, Yue; Ciche, Todd A; Ragains, Justin R; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2012-06-15

    Entomopathogenic nematodes survive in the soil as stress-resistant infective juveniles that seek out and infect insect hosts. Upon sensing internal host cues, the infective juveniles regurgitate bacterial pathogens from their gut that ultimately kill the host. Inside the host, the nematode develops into a reproductive adult and multiplies until unknown cues trigger the accumulation of infective juveniles. Here, we show that the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora uses a small-molecule pheromone to control infective juvenile development. The pheromone is structurally related to the dauer pheromone ascarosides that the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans uses to control its development. However, none of the C. elegans ascarosides are effective in H. bacteriophora, suggesting that there is a high degree of species specificity. Our report is the first to show that ascarosides are important regulators of development in a parasitic nematode species. An understanding of chemical signaling in parasitic nematodes may enable the development of chemical tools to control these species.

  6. Reflections on Plant and Soil Nematode Ecology: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Howard; Griffiths, Bryan S.; Porazinska, Dorota L.; Powers, Thomas O.; Wang, Koon-Hui; Tenuta, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight key developments in nematode ecology from its beginnings to where it stands today as a discipline within nematology. Emerging areas of research appear to be driven by crop production constraints, environmental health concerns, and advances in technology. In contrast to past ecological studies which mainly focused on management of plant-parasitic nematodes, current studies reflect differential sensitivity of nematode faunae. These differences, identified in both aquatic and terrestrial environments include response to stressors, environmental conditions, and management practices. Methodological advances will continue to influence the role nematodes have in addressing the nature of interactions between organisms, and of organisms with their environments. In particular, the C. elegans genetic model, nematode faunal analysis and nematode metagenetic analysis can be used by ecologists generally and not restricted to nematologists. PMID:23482864

  7. The neural basis of the locomotion of nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdös, Paul; Niebur, Ernst

    A model of electrotonic neurons is presented which allows computer simulation of a physiologically realistic neural network, such as that found in nematodes. The undulatory locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans is investigated by solving the equations of motion of a segmented model of the discretized body taking into account all internal and external forces. The spatio-temporal muscle excitation patterns which produce locomotion are determined, and it is concluded that these are most probably generated by stretch receptor cells and signals which globally turn on or off the neural circuitry governing forward or backward motion. The results are illustrated in the form of a computer generated videotape and compared with the observed motion of a nematode.

  8. Formation and Regulation of Adaptive Response in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Y.-L.; Wang, D.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    All organisms respond to environmental stresses (e.g., heavy metal, heat, UV irradiation, hyperoxia, food limitation, etc.) with coordinated adjustments in order to deal with the consequences and/or injuries caused by the severe stress. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans often exerts adaptive responses if preconditioned with low concentrations of agents or stressor. In C. elegans, three types of adaptive responses can be formed: hormesis, cross-adaptation, and dietary restriction. Several factors influence the formation of adaptive responses in nematodes, and some mechanisms can explain their response formation. In particular, antioxidation system, heat-shock proteins, metallothioneins, glutathione, signaling transduction, and metabolic signals may play important roles in regulating the formation of adaptive responses. In this paper, we summarize the published evidence demonstrating that several types of adaptive responses have converged in C. elegans and discussed some possible alternative theories explaining the adaptive response control. PMID:22997543

  9. Underground leaves of Philcoxia trap and digest nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Caio G.; Almenara, Daniela P.; Winter, Carlos E.; Fritsch, Peter W.; Lambers, Hans; Oliveira, Rafael S.

    2012-01-01

    The recently described genus Philcoxia comprises three species restricted to well lit and low-nutrient soils in the Brazilian Cerrado. The morphological and habitat similarities of Philcoxia to those of some carnivorous plants, along with recent observations of nematodes over its subterranean leaves, prompted the suggestion that the genus is carnivorous. Here we report compelling evidence of carnivory in Philcoxia of the Plantaginaceae, a family in which no carnivorous members are otherwise known. We also document both a unique capturing strategy for carnivorous plants and a case of a plant that traps and digests nematodes with underground adhesive leaves. Our findings illustrate how much can still be discovered about the origin, distribution, and frequency of the carnivorous syndrome in angiosperms and, more generally, about the diversity of nutrient-acquisition mechanisms that have evolved in plants growing in severely nutrient-impoverished environments such as the Brazilian Cerrado, one of the world's 34 biodiversity hotspots. PMID:22232687

  10. Plant-parasitic Nematode Problems in the Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Bridge, J

    1988-04-01

    The Pacific islands have a diverse range of food and cash crops with indigenous and introduced nematode problems. The staple food crops have serious nematode pests, such as Meloidogyne spp. on sweet potato, Hirschmanniella miticausa causing corm rot of taro, and Pratylenchus coffeae and Radopholus sp. producing tuber dry rot of yams. Bananas are infested with P. coffeae or R. similis, citrus with Tylenchulus semipenetrans, rice with Aphelenchoides besseyi, and ginger with Meloidogyne spp. and R. similis. Rotylenchulus reniformis, P. zeae, P. brachyurus, and Helicotylenchus spp. are important on all of these and other crops, such as sugarcane, passion fruit, pawpaw, and cassava. Meloidogyne spp. cause serious damage to local and introduced leaf and fruit vegetables and other crops, such as tobacco, sugarcane, pawpaw, black pepper, and pyrethrum. Many other plant-parasitic genera and species, some undescribed, occur in the Pacific, and there are many islands still to be investigated.

  11. Structure and Function of Nematode RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kaymak, Ebru; Wee, L.M.; Ryder, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are critical effectors of gene expression. They guide mRNA localization, translation, and stability, and potentially play a role in regulating mRNA synthesis. The structural basis for RNA recognition by RNA-binding proteins is the key to understanding how they target specific transcripts for regulation. Compared to other metazoans, nematode genomes contain a significant expansion in several RNA-binding protein families, including Pumilio-FBF (PUF), TTP-like zinc finger (TZF), and argonaute-like (AGO) proteins. Genetic data suggest that individual members of each family have distinct functions, presumably due to sequence variations that alter RNA binding specificity or protein interaction partners. In this review, we highlight example structures and identify the variable regions that likely contribute to functional divergence in nematodes. PMID:20418095

  12. Nematode Parasites of Teiid Lizards from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Lilian Cristina; Gardner, Scott L; Melo, Francisco Tiago Vasconcelos; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-11-30

    This study presents the helminth composition and parameters of infection by several species of nematodes in teiid lizards, Ameiva a. ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Cnemidophorus cryptus Cole & Dessauer, 1993, and Kentropyx calcarata Spix, 1825 from the Brazilian Amazonian Rainforest. The lizard populations we studied were parasitized by six species of Nemata, including: Spinicauda spinicauda (Olfers, 1919), Parapharyngodon alvarengai Freitas, 1957, Physaloptera sp. (adults), Physaloptera sp. (larvae), Piratuba digiticauda Lent and Freitas, 1941, and Anisakidae (larvae). The overall prevalence was 66.17% and the mean intensity of infection was 19.40 ± 25.48. The association between the body-length of lizards and abundance and richness of parasitic nematodes was statistically significant only in Ameiva a. ameiva. A new host record is reported here with one specimen of the family Anasakidae in Ameiva a. ameiva. Both S. spinicauda and Physaloptera sp. represent new records from C. cryptus.

  13. Draft genome of the filarial nematode parasite Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Caler, Elisabet; Zhao, Qi; Crabtree, Jonathan; Allen, Jonathan E; Delcher, Arthur L; Guiliano, David B; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Creasy, Todd; Amedeo, Paolo; Haas, Brian; El-Sayed, Najib M; Wortman, Jennifer R; Feldblyum, Tamara; Tallon, Luke; Schatz, Michael; Shumway, Martin; Koo, Hean; Salzberg, Steven L; Schobel, Seth; Pertea, Mihaela; Pop, Mihai; White, Owen; Barton, Geoffrey J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Crawford, Michael J; Daub, Jennifer; Dimmic, Matthew W; Estes, Chris F; Foster, Jeremy M; Ganatra, Mehul; Gregory, William F; Johnson, Nicholas M; Jin, Jinming; Komuniecki, Richard; Korf, Ian; Kumar, Sanjay; Laney, Sandra; Li, Ben-Wen; Li, Wen; Lindblom, Tim H; Lustigman, Sara; Ma, Dong; Maina, Claude V; Martin, David M A; McCarter, James P; McReynolds, Larry; Mitreva, Makedonka; Nutman, Thomas B; Parkinson, John; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Poole, Catherine; Ren, Qinghu; Saunders, Lori; Sluder, Ann E; Smith, Katherine; Stanke, Mario; Unnasch, Thomas R; Ware, Jenna; Wei, Aguan D; Weil, Gary; Williams, Deryck J; Zhang, Yinhua; Williams, Steven A; Fraser-Liggett, Claire; Slatko, Barton; Blaxter, Mark L; Scott, Alan L

    2007-09-21

    Parasitic nematodes that cause elephantiasis and river blindness threaten hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. We have sequenced the approximately 90 megabase (Mb) genome of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and predict approximately 11,500 protein coding genes in 71 Mb of robustly assembled sequence. Comparative analysis with the free-living, model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans revealed that, despite these genes having maintained little conservation of local synteny during approximately 350 million years of evolution, they largely remain in linkage on chromosomal units. More than 100 conserved operons were identified. Analysis of the predicted proteome provides evidence for adaptations of B. malayi to niches in its human and vector hosts and insights into the molecular basis of a mutualistic relationship with its Wolbachia endosymbiont. These findings offer a foundation for rational drug design.

  14. Influence of Salinity on Survival and Infectivity of Entomopathogenic: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Graham S.; Ni, Yansong; Kaya, Harry K.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure to NaC1, KCI, and CaCl₂ affected the entomopathogenic nematodes Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema glaseri differently. Survival, virulence, and penetration efficiency of S. glaseri were not affected by these salts. At high concentrations, however, all three salts inhibited its ability to move through a soil column and locate and infect a susceptible host. Calcium chloride and KCl had no effect on H. bacteriophora survival, penetration efficiency, or movement through a soil column, but moderate concentrations of these salts enhanced H. bacteriophora virulence. NaCl, however, adversely affected each of these parameters at high salinities (>16 dS/m). Salt effects on S. glaseri are attributed solely to interference with nematode host-finding ability, whereas the NaCl effects on H. bacteriophora are attributed to its toxicity and possibly to interference with host-finding behavior. PMID:19279902

  15. [Prevalence of intestinal nematodes in dogs from Warsaw region].

    PubMed

    Turkowicz, Monika; Cielecka, Danuta

    2002-01-01

    Prevalence of intestinal nematodes in dogs from Warsaw region. Investigation of prevalence of intestinal parasites in dogs have been conducted in order to protect human and animal health. The aim of the study was to establish species composition of intestinal parasites and to evaluate their prevalence in dogs from the shelter in Józefów situated on north from Warsaw. Additionally, urban dogs from Warsaw and village dogs from areas near the shelter, were examined. The prevalence of nematodes was: 62.3% in dogs from shelter, 37.5% in village dogs and 18.8% in urban dogs. In homeless dogs, the most common parasite was Uncinaria stenocephala, then Trichuris vulpis and Toxascaris leonina. In village dogs only eggs of U. stenocephala were detected; in urban dogs Toxocara canis and U. stenocephala were found.

  16. Integrated management of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita infestation in tomato and grapevine.

    PubMed

    Kumari, N Swarna; Sivakumar, C V

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach with the obligate bacterial parasite, Pasteuria penetrans and nematicides was assessed for the management of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita infestation in tomato and grapevine. Seedlings of tomato cv. Co3 were transplanted into pots filled with sterilized soil and inoculated with nematodes (5000 juveniles/pot). The root powder of P. penetrans at 10 mg/pot was applied alone and in combination with carbofuran at 6 mg/pot. Application of P. penetrans along with carbofuran recorded lowest nematode infestation (107 nematodes/200 g soil) compared to control (325 nematodes/200 g soil). The rate of parasitization was 83.1% in the carbofuran and P. penetrans combination treatment as against 61.0% in the P. penetrans treatment only. The plant growth was also higher in the combination treatment compared to all other treatments. A field trial was carried out to assess the efficacy of P. penetrans and nematicides viz., carbofuran and phorate in the management of root-knot nematode, M. incognita infestation of grapevine cv. Muscat Hamburg. A nematode and P. penetrans infested grapevine field was selected and treatments either with carbofuran or phorate at 1 g a.i/vine was given. The observations were recorded at monthly interval. The results showed that the soil nematode population was reduced in nematicide treated plots. Suppression of nematodes was higher under phorate (117 nematodes/200 g soil) than under carbofuran (126.7 nematodes/200 g soil) treatment. The number of juveniles parasitized was also influenced by nematicides and spore load carried/juvenile with phorate being superior and the increase being 17.0 and 29.0% respectively over the control. The results of these experiment confirmed the compatibility of P. penetrans with nematicides and its biological control potential against the root-knot nematode.

  17. Curative Control of the Peachtree Borer Using Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Cottrell, Ted E.; Mizell, Russell F.; Horton, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    The peachtree borer, Synanthedon exitiosa (Say 1823), is a major pest of stone fruit trees in North America. Current management relies upon preventative control using broad-spectrum chemical insecticides, primarily chlorpyrifos, applied in the late summer or early fall. However, due to missed applications, poor application timing, or other factors, high levels of S. exitiosa infestation may still occur and persist through the following spring. Curative treatments applied in the spring to established infestations would limit damage to the tree and prevent the next generation of S. exitiosa from emerging within the orchard. However, such curative measures for control of S. exitiosa do not exist. Our objective was to measure the efficacy of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae, as a curative control for existing infestations of S. exitiosa. In peach orchards, spring applications of S. carpocapsae (obtained from a commercial source) were made to infested trees and compared with chlorpyrifos and a water-only control in 2014 and 2015. Additionally, types of spray equipment were compared: nematodes were applied via boom sprayer, handgun, or trunk sprayer. To control for effects of application method or nematode source, in vivo laboratory-grown S. carpocapsae, applied using a watering can, was also included. Treatment effects were assessed 39 d (2014) or 19 d (2015) later by measuring percentage of trees still infested, and also number of surviving S. exitiosa larvae per tree. Results indicated that S. carpocapsae provided significant curative control (e.g., >80% corrected control for the handgun application). In contrast, chlorpyrifos failed to reduce S. exitiosa infestations or number of surviving larvae. In most comparisons, no effect of nematode application method was detected; in one assessment, only the handgun and watering can methods reduced infestation. In conclusion, our study indicates that S. carpocapsae may be used as an effective curative

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans: A Genetic Guide to Parasitic Nematode Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bird, D. McK.; Opperman, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    The advent of parasite genome sequencing projects, as well as an increase in biology-directed gene discovery, promises to reveal genes encoding many of the key molecules required for nematode-host interactions. However, distinguishing parasitism genes from those merely required for nematode viability remains a substantial challenge. Although this will ultimately require a functional test in the host or parasite, the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can be exploited as a heterologous system to determine function of candidate parasitism genes. Studies of C. elegans also have revealed genetic networks, such as the dauer pathway, that may also be important adaptations for parasitism. As a more directed means of identifying parasitism traits, we developed classical genetics for Heterodera glycines and have used this approach to map genes conferring host resistance-breaking phenotypes. It is likely that the C. elegans and H. glycines genomes will be at least partially syntenic, thus permitting predictive physical mapping of H. glycines genes of interest. PMID:19274223

  19. Genome Editing in C. elegans and Other Nematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a 1 mm long free-living nematode, is a popular model animal that has been widely utilized for genetic investigations of various biological processes. Characteristic features that make C. elegans a powerful model of choice for eukaryotic genetic studies include its rapid life cycle (development from egg to adult in 3.5 days at 20 °C), well-annotated genome, simple morphology (comprising only 959 somatic cells in the hermaphrodite), and transparency (which facilitates non-invasive fluorescence observations). However, early approaches to introducing mutations in the C. elegans genome, such as chemical mutagenesis and imprecise excision of transposons, have required large-scale mutagenesis screens. To avoid this laborious and time-consuming procedure, genome editing technologies have been increasingly used in nematodes including C. briggsae and Pristionchus pacificus, thereby facilitating their genetic analyses. Here, I review the recent progress in genome editing technologies using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcriptional activator-like nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in nematodes and offer perspectives on their use in the future. PMID:26927083

  20. Functional diversification of Argonautes in nematodes: an expanding universe

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Amy H.; Blaxter, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many diverse RNAi (RNA interference) pathways have been discovered that mediate gene silencing at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The diversity of RNAi pathways is inherently linked to the evolution of Ago (Argonaute) proteins, the central protein component of RISCs (RNA-induced silencing complexes). An increasing number of diverse Agos have been identified in different species. The functions of most of these proteins are not yet known, but they are generally assumed to play roles in development, genome stability and/or protection against viruses. Recent research in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has expanded the breadth of RNAi functions to include transgenerational epigenetic memory and, possibly, environmental sensing. These functions are inherently linked to the production of secondary siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) that bind to members of a clade of WAGOs (worm-specific Agos). In the present article, we review briefly what is known about the evolution and function of Ago proteins in eukaryotes, including the expansion of WAGOs in nematodes. We postulate that the rapid evolution of WAGOs enables the exceptional functional plasticity of nematodes, including their capacity for parasitism. PMID:23863149

  1. Scavenging hagfish as a transport host of Anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chen, Hui-Guan; Shih, Hsiu-Hui

    2016-03-15

    Hagfish are the most primitive craniates and scavengers, feeding on dead organisms as well as fish and invertebrates. Hagfish play an important ecological role in recycling nutrients, helping to recycle biomass from the upper water column. We investigated 265 specimens of four hagfish species, including Eptatretus burgeri, Eptatretus yangi, Eptatretus sheni and Eptatretus taiwanae from northeastern Taiwanese waters of the northwestern Pacific from November 2013 to June 2014. Eight species of Anisakid nematodes were identified: Anisakis pegreffii, Anisakis simplex s.s., a recombinant genotype of A. pegreffii and A. simplex s.s., Anisakis typica, Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis physeteris and Hysterothylacium amoyense. Anisakis sp. and H. amoyense represented new locality records. The prevalence, mean intensity and mean abundance of anisakid nematodes for all specimens were 21.51%, 5.39 larvae per fish and 1.16 larvae per fish, respectively. A. pegreffii was the most frequent species in E. burgeri, E. yangi and E. taiwanae, whereas in E. sheni, the dominant species was Anisakis sp. The number of nematodes was significantly related to the host length for E. burgeri and E. sheni, but was not related to the sex of the four hagfish species. This report of scavenging hagfish infected with Anisakid larvae suggests hagfish as a transport/paratenic host between cetaceans and piscivores. Anisakiasis may be caused by the consumption of infectious third-stage larvae in raw or undercooked hagfish.

  2. Sex-specific mating pheromones in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus.

    PubMed

    Choe, Andrea; Chuman, Tatsuji; von Reuss, Stephan H; Dossey, Aaron T; Yim, Joshua J; Ajredini, Ramadan; Kolawa, Adam A; Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T; Teal, Peter E A; Schroeder, Frank C; Sternberg, Paul W; Edison, Arthur S

    2012-12-18

    Nematodes use an extensive chemical language based on glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose for developmental regulation (dauer formation), male sex attraction, aggregation, and dispersal. However, no examples of a female- or hermaphrodite-specific sex attractant have been identified to date. In this study, we investigated the pheromone system of the gonochoristic sour paste nematode Panagrellus redivivus, which produces sex-specific attractants of the opposite sex. Activity-guided fractionation of the P. redivivus exometabolome revealed that males are strongly attracted to ascr#1 (also known as daumone), an ascaroside previously identified from Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites. Female P. redivivus are repelled by high concentrations of ascr#1 but are specifically attracted to a previously unknown ascaroside that we named dhas#18, a dihydroxy derivative of the known ascr#18 and an ascaroside that features extensive functionalization of the lipid-derived side chain. Targeted profiling of the P. redivivus exometabolome revealed several additional ascarosides that did not induce strong chemotaxis. We show that P. redivivus females, but not males, produce the male-attracting ascr#1, whereas males, but not females, produce the female-attracting dhas#18. These results show that ascaroside biosynthesis in P. redivivus is highly sex-specific. Furthermore, the extensive side chain functionalization in dhas#18, which is reminiscent of polyketide-derived natural products, indicates unanticipated biosynthetic capabilities in nematodes.

  3. Sex-specific mating pheromones in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Andrea; Chuman, Tatsuji; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Dossey, Aaron T.; Yim, Joshua J.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Kolawa, Adam A.; Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T.; Teal, Peter E. A.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Edison, Arthur S.

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes use an extensive chemical language based on glycosides of the dideoxysugar ascarylose for developmental regulation (dauer formation), male sex attraction, aggregation, and dispersal. However, no examples of a female- or hermaphrodite-specific sex attractant have been identified to date. In this study, we investigated the pheromone system of the gonochoristic sour paste nematode Panagrellus redivivus, which produces sex-specific attractants of the opposite sex. Activity-guided fractionation of the P. redivivus exometabolome revealed that males are strongly attracted to ascr#1 (also known as daumone), an ascaroside previously identified from Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites. Female P. redivivus are repelled by high concentrations of ascr#1 but are specifically attracted to a previously unknown ascaroside that we named dhas#18, a dihydroxy derivative of the known ascr#18 and an ascaroside that features extensive functionalization of the lipid-derived side chain. Targeted profiling of the P. redivivus exometabolome revealed several additional ascarosides that did not induce strong chemotaxis. We show that P. redivivus females, but not males, produce the male-attracting ascr#1, whereas males, but not females, produce the female-attracting dhas#18. These results show that ascaroside biosynthesis in P. redivivus is highly sex-specific. Furthermore, the extensive side chain functionalization in dhas#18, which is reminiscent of polyketide-derived natural products, indicates unanticipated biosynthetic capabilities in nematodes. PMID:23213209

  4. Microfluidic bioassay to characterize parasitic nematode phenotype and anthelmintic resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baozhen; Deutmeyer, Alex; Carr, John; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J; Pandey, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    With increasing resistance to anti-parasitic drugs, it has become more important to detect and recognize phenotypes of resistant isolates. Molecular methods of detecting resistant isolates are limited at present. Here, we introduce a microfluidic bioassay to measure phenotype using parameters of nematode locomotion. We illustrate the technique on larvae of an animal parasite Oesophagostomum dentatum. Parameters of sinusoidal motion such as propagation velocity, wavelength, wave amplitude, and oscillation frequency depended on the levamisole-sensitivity of the isolate of parasitic nematode. The levamisole-sensitive isolate (SENS) had a mean wave amplitude of 135 μm, which was larger than 123 μm of the levamisole-resistant isolate (LEVR). SENS had a mean wavelength of 373 μm, which was less than 393 μm of LEVR. The mean propagation velocity of SENS, 149 μm s-1, was similar to LEVR, 143 μm s-1. The propagation velocity of the isolates was inhibited by levamisole in a concentration-dependent manner above 0.5 μm. The EC50 for SENS was 3 μm and the EC50 for LEVR was 10 μm. This microfluidic technology advances present-day nematode migration assays and provides a better quantification and increased drug sensitivity. It is anticipated that the bioassay will facilitate study of resistance to other anthelmintic drugs that affect locomotion.

  5. Recruitment of entomopathogenic nematodes by insect-damaged maize roots.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Hiltpold, Ivan; Toepfer, Stefan; Kuhlmann, Ulrich; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Turlings, Ted C J

    2005-04-07

    Plants under attack by arthropod herbivores often emit volatile compounds from their leaves that attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Here we report the first identification of an insect-induced belowground plant signal, (E)-beta-caryophyllene, which strongly attracts an entomopathogenic nematode. Maize roots release this sesquiterpene in response to feeding by larvae of the beetle Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, a maize pest that is currently invading Europe. Most North American maize lines do not release (E)-beta-caryophyllene, whereas European lines and the wild maize ancestor, teosinte, readily do so in response to D. v. virgifera attack. This difference was consistent with striking differences in the attractiveness of representative lines in the laboratory. Field experiments showed a fivefold higher nematode infection rate of D. v. virgifera larvae on a maize variety that produces the signal than on a variety that does not, whereas spiking the soil near the latter variety with authentic (E)-beta-caryophyllene decreased the emergence of adult D. v. virgifera to less than half. North American maize lines must have lost the signal during the breeding process. Development of new varieties that release the attractant in adequate amounts should help enhance the efficacy of nematodes as biological control agents against root pests like D. v. virgifera.

  6. Recent advances in our knowledge of Australian anisakid nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, Shokoofeh

    2014-01-01

    Anisakidosis is an emerging infection associated with a wide range of clinical syndromes in humans caused by members of the family Anisakidae. Anisakid nematodes have a cosmopolitan distribution and infect a wide range of invertebrates and vertebrates during their life cycles. Since the first report of these parasites in humans during the early 60s, anisakid nematodes have attracted considerable attention as emerging zoonotic parasites. Along with rapid development of various molecular techniques during last several decades, this has caused a significant change in the taxonomy and systematics of these parasites. However, there are still huge gaps in our knowledge on various aspects of the biology and ecology of anisakid nematodes in Australia. Although the use of advanced morphological and molecular techniques to study anisakids had a late start in Australia, great biodiversity was found and unique species were discovered. Here an updated list of members within the family and the current state of knowledge on Australian anisakids will be provided. Given that the employment of advanced techniques to study these important emerging zoonotic parasites in Australia is recent, further research is needed to understand the ecology and biology of these socio economically important parasites. After a recent human case of anisakidosis in Australia, such understanding is crucial if control and preventive strategies are to be established in this country. PMID:25180162

  7. Attraction of undulatory swimmers, such as nematodes, to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David; Bau, Haim

    2014-11-01

    Nematodes play a significant role in the ecosystem; agriculture; human, animal, and plant disease; and medical research. The interactions between nematodes and surfaces may play an important role in nematodes' life cycle and ability to invade a host. We studied the effect of a surface on the dynamics of low-Reynolds number, undulating swimmers such as Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans -both wild type and touch-insensitive. The experiments demonstrated that swimmers located far from a surface selected randomly their direction of motion. In contrast, surface-proximate swimmers rotated towards, collided with, and swam along the surface for considerable time intervals, periodically contacting the surface with their anterior. Likewise, swimmers in a swarm were present at higher concentrations close to the surface. Both resistive force theory-based calculations and symmetry arguments predict that short range hydrodynamic torque, resulting from the interaction between the swimmer-induced flow field and the surface, rotate the swimmer towards the surface. We conclude that the surface attraction and following results from the interplay between short-range hydrodynamic and steric forces and is genotype-independent. The work was supported, in part, by NIH NIA 5R03AG042690-02 and NBIC NSF NSEC DMR08-32802.

  8. Functional diversification of Argonautes in nematodes: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Buck, Amy H; Blaxter, Mark

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, many diverse RNAi (RNA interference) pathways have been discovered that mediate gene silencing at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The diversity of RNAi pathways is inherently linked to the evolution of Ago (Argonaute) proteins, the central protein component of RISCs (RNA-induced silencing complexes). An increasing number of diverse Agos have been identified in different species. The functions of most of these proteins are not yet known, but they are generally assumed to play roles in development, genome stability and/or protection against viruses. Recent research in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has expanded the breadth of RNAi functions to include transgenerational epigenetic memory and, possibly, environmental sensing. These functions are inherently linked to the production of secondary siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) that bind to members of a clade of WAGOs (worm-specific Agos). In the present article, we review briefly what is known about the evolution and function of Ago proteins in eukaryotes, including the expansion of WAGOs in nematodes. We postulate that the rapid evolution of WAGOs enables the exceptional functional plasticity of nematodes, including their capacity for parasitism.

  9. Differential vascularization of nematode-induced feeding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, Stefan; Stadler, Ruth; Sauer, Norbert; Hammes, Ulrich Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are destructive plant pathogens that cause significant yield losses. In the roots of their host plants, cyst nematodes (CNs) and root-knot nematodes (RKNs) induce different, highly specialized feeding sites—syncytia or giant cells (GCs), respectively—to optimize nutrient uptake. We compared the mechanisms by which nutrients are delivered from the model host plant, Arabidopsis, to GCs induced by the RKN Meloidogyne incognita or to syncytia induced by the CN Heterodera schachtii. From previous work, syncytia were known to be symplastically connected to newly formed host phloem composed of sieve elements (SEs) and companion cells. Here we studied the formation of plasmodesmata (PD) during GC and syncytia development by monitoring a viral movement protein that targets branched PD and the development of host phloem during GC formation by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Analyses of plants expressing soluble or membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein in their phloem demonstrated symplastic isolation of GCs. GCs were found to be embedded in a tissue that consists exclusively of SEs. These de novo-formed SEs, contained nuclei and were interconnected by secondary PD. A similar interconnection of SEs was observed around syncytia. However, these secondary PD were also present at the SE–syncytium interface, demonstrating the postulated symplastic connection. Our results show that CNs and RKNs, despite their close phylogenetic relatedness, employ fundamentally different strategies to withdraw nutrients from host plants. PMID:18711135

  10. A New Methodology for Evaluation of Nematode Viability

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; Mendes, Tiago Antônio Oliveira; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; de Araújo, Jackson Victor; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes infections are responsible for debilitating conditions and economic losses in domestic animals as well as livestock and are considered an important public health problem due to the high prevalence in humans. The nematode resistance for drugs has been reported for livestock, highlighting the importance for development of new anthelmintic compounds. The aim of the current study was to apply and compare fluorimetric techniques using Sytox and propidium iodide for evaluating the viability of C. elegans larvae after treatment with anthelmintic drugs. These fluorescent markers were efficient to stain larvae treated with ivermectin and albendazole sulfoxide. We observed that densitometric values were proportional to the concentration of dead larvae stained with both markers. Furthermore, data on motility test presented an inverse correlation with fluorimetric data when ivermectin was used. Our results showed that lower concentrations of drugs were effective to interfere in the processes of cellular transport while higher drugs concentrations were necessary in order to result in any damage to cell integrity. The methodology described in this work might be useful for studies that aim to evaluate the viability of nematodes, particularly for testing of new anthelminthic compounds using an easy, economic, reproducible, and no time-consuming technique. PMID:25866820

  11. Discovery of filarial nematode DNA in Amblyomma americanum in Northern Virginia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tyler C; Orr, John M; Smith, Joshua D; Arias, Jorge R; Rasgon, Jason L; Norris, Douglas E

    2016-03-01

    Ticks collected in 2011 were screened for the presence of filarial nematode genetic material, and positive samples were sequenced for analysis. Monanema-like filarial nematode DNA was recently discovered in Amblyomma americanum in northern Virginia, marking the first time genetic material from this parasite has been discovered in ticks in the state. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this material was directly related to a previously discovered filarial nematode in A. americanum populations in Maryland as well as recently identified parasites in Ixodes scapularis from southern Connecticut. Further study is warranted to visually confirm the presence of these nematodes, characterize their distribution, and determine if these ticks are intermediate hosts.

  12. Sensitivity of Nematode Life-History Groups to Ions and Osmotic Tensions of Nitrogenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Tenuta, Mario; Ferris, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Guild designation of nematodes of similar trophic function and life-history strategy provides a basis for using nematode faunal analyses in an integrative assessment of soil food web condition. Omnivorous and predaceous nematodes, categorized at the upper end of a colonizer-persister (c-p) continuum of nematode functional guilds are generally not abundant in cropped soil. These nematodes are more sensitive to heavy metal concentrations than those in other c-p groups, but whether sensitivity to agrochemicals contributes to the observed low abundance of high c-p groups in cropped soils is less well understood. An exposure assay in solution was used to compare the sensitivity of nematodes representing various guilds obtained from field soils and from laboratory culture to several nitrogen sources. Nematodes in c-p groups 4 and 5 were more sensitive to nitrogen solutions than nematodes representing lower c-p groups. There were both osmotic and specific ion effects—the latter most evident in exposure of nematodes to NaNO₂ and (NH₄)₂SO₄. The RC₅₀ (concentration resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for (NH₄)₂SO₄ was < 0.052 M-N for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to much greater values (0.34 to 0.81 M-N) for c-p groups 1 to 3. In non-ionic polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions, osmotic tensions of 0.40 to 0.43 MPa reduced the recovery of exposed nematodes by half (RT₅₀; water potential of solution resulting in nematode recovery of one half of that of distilled water) for c-p groups 4 and 5 compared to > 1.93 MPa for c-p groups 1 to 3. RT₅₀ values for urea solutions, also non-ionic, were greater than for PEG. Caenorhabditis elegans N2 (c-p 1) and Meloidogyne javanica (c-p 3) reared on solid medium and in hydroponic culture, respectively, were slightly more sensitive to specific ion and osmotic effects than nematodes of similar c-p groups obtained from soil. The greater sensitivity of c-p 4 and 5 nematodes to nitrogen

  13. Nematodes Infect, But Do Not Manipulate Digging By, Sand Crabs, Lepidopa benedicti

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Meera; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    We examined sand crabs (Lepidopa benedicti) for endoparasites, and found the only parasite consistently infecting the studied population were small nematodes. Because many nematodes have complex life cycles involving multiple hosts, often strongly manipulating their hosts, we hypothesized that nematodes alter the behavior of their sand crab hosts. We predicted that more heavily infected crabs would spend more time above sand than less heavily infected crabs. Our data indicate infection by nematodes was not correlated with duration of time crabs spent above sand. We also suggest that organisms living in sandy beaches may benefit from relatively low parasite loads due to the low diversity of species in the habitat. PMID:24916475

  14. Identification and analysis of insulin like peptides in nematode secretomes provide targets for parasite control

    PubMed Central

    Gahoi, Shachi; Gautam, Budhayash

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like (ins) peptides play an important role in development and metabolism across the metazoa. In nematodes, these are also required for dauer formation and longevity and are expressed in different types of neurons across various life stages which demonstrate their role in parasites and could become possible targets for parasite control. To date, many nematode genomes are publically available. However, a systematic screening of ins peptides across different nematode group has not been reported. In the present study, we systematically identified ins peptides in the secretomes of 73 nematodes with fully sequenced genomes covering five different groups viz. plant parasitic, animal parasitic, human parasitic, entomopathogenic and free living nematodes. From the total of 93,949 secretory proteins, 176 proteins were uniquely mapped to 40 identified C. elegans ins families. The obtained result showed that 74.15% of the identified ins proteins were represented in free living nematodes only and remaining 25.84% were combinedly identified in all other nematode groups. The ins-1, ins-17 and ins-18 were the only ins families which were detected in all the studied nematode groups. Out of 176 proteins, 96 of ins proteins were predicted as hydrophilic in nature and 39 proteins were found stable using ProtParam analysis. Our study provides insight into the distribution of ins peptides across different group of nematodes and this information could be useful for further experimental study. PMID:28356679

  15. Nematode-Bacterium Symbioses - Cooperation and Conflict Revealed in the 'Omics' Age

    PubMed Central

    Murfin, Kristen E.; Dillman, Adler R.; Foster, Jeremy M.; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Slatko, Barton E.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes are ubiquitous organisms that have a significant global impact on ecosystems, economies, agriculture, and human health. The applied importance of nematodes and the experimental tractability of many species have promoted their use as models in various research areas, including developmental biology, evolutionary biology, ecology, and animal-bacterium interactions. Nematodes are particularly well suited for investigating host associations with bacteria because all nematodes have interacted with bacteria during their evolutionary history and engage in a diversity of association types. Interactions between nematodes and bacteria can be positive (mutualistic) or negative (pathogenic/parasitic) and may be transient or stably maintained (symbiotic). Furthermore, since many mechanistic aspects of nematode-bacterium interactions are conserved their study can provide broader insights into other types of associations, including those relevant to human diseases. Recently, genome-scale studies have been applied to diverse nematode-bacterial interactions, and have helped reveal mechanisms of communication and exchange between the associated partners. In addition to providing specific information about the system under investigation, these studies also have helped inform our understanding of genome evolution, mutualism, and innate immunity. In this review we will discuss the importance and diversity of nematodes, 'omics' studies in nematode-bacterial systems, and the wider implications of the findings. PMID:22983035

  16. Soil nematode responses to increases in nitrogen deposition and precipitation in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xiaoke; Zhang, Shixiu; Dai, Guanhua; Han, Shijie; Liang, Wenju

    2013-01-01

    The environmental changes arising from nitrogen (N) deposition and precipitation influence soil ecological processes in forest ecosystems. However, the corresponding effects of environmental changes on soil biota are poorly known. Soil nematodes are the important bioindicator of soil environmental change, and their responses play a key role in the feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change. Therefore, to explore the responsive mechanisms of soil biota to N deposition and precipitation, soil nematode communities were studied after 3 years of environmental changes by water and/or N addition in a temperate forest of Changbai Mountain, Northeast China. The results showed that water combined with N addition treatment decreased the total nematode abundance in the organic horizon (O), while the opposite trend was found in the mineral horizon (A). Significant reductions in the abundances of fungivores, plant-parasites and omnivores-predators were also found in the water combined with N addition treatment. The significant effect of water interacted with N on the total nematode abundance and trophic groups indicated that the impacts of N on soil nematode communities were mediated by water availability. The synergistic effect of precipitation and N deposition on soil nematode communities was stronger than each effect alone. Structural equation modeling suggested water and N additions had direct effects on soil nematode communities. The feedback of soil nematodes to water and nitrogen addition was highly sensitive and our results indicate that minimal variations in soil properties such as those caused by climate changes can lead to severe changes in soil nematode communities.

  17. Free-Living Nematodes in the Freshwater Food Web: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Majdi, Nabil; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Free-living nematodes are well-recognized as an abundant and ubiquitous component of benthic communities in inland waters. Compelling evidence from soil and marine ecosystems has highlighted the importance of nematodes as trophic intermediaries between microbial production and higher trophic levels. However, the paucity of empirical evidence of their role in freshwater ecosystems has hampered their inclusion in our understanding of freshwater food web functioning. This literature survey provides an overview of research efforts in the field of freshwater nematode ecology and of the complex trophic interactions between free-living nematodes and microbes, other meiofauna, macro-invertebrates, and fishes. Based on an analysis of the relevant literature and an appreciation of the potential of emerging approaches for the evaluation of nematode trophic ecology, we point out research gaps and recommend relevant directions for further research. The latter include (i) interactions of nematodes with protozoans and fungi; (ii) nonconsumptive effects of nematodes on microbial activity and the effects of nematodes on associated key ecosystem processes (decomposition, primary production); and (iii) the feeding selectivity and intraspecific feeding variability of nematodes and their potential impacts on the structure of benthic communities. PMID:25861114

  18. Control of root-knot nematodes on tomato in stone wool substrate with biological nematicides.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Jose Antonio; Edwards, Scott; Ploeg, Antoon

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of four biological nematicides on root-galling, root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) reproduction, and shoot weight of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) grown in stone wool substrate or in pots with sandy soil was compared to an oxamyl treatment and a non-treated control. In stone wool grown tomato, Avid® (a.i. abamectin) was highly effective when applied as a drench at time of nematode inoculation. It strongly reduced root-galling and nematode reproduction, and prevented a reduction in tomato shoot weight. However, applying the product one week before, or two weeks after nematode inoculation was largely ineffective. This shows that Avid® has short-lived, non-systemic activity. The effects of Avid® on nematode symptoms and reproduction on soil-grown tomato were only very minor, probably due to the known strong adsorption of the active ingredient abamectin to soil particles. The neem derived product Ornazin® strongly reduced tomato root-galling and nematode reproduction only in stone wool and only when applied as a drench one week prior to nematode inoculation, suggesting a local systemic activity or modification of the root system, rendering them less suitable host for the nematodes. This application however also had some phytotoxic effect, reducing tomato shoot weights. The other two products, Nema-Q™ and DiTera®, did not result in strong or consistent effects on nematode symptoms or reproduction.

  19. Effect of Crotalaria juncea Amendment on Nematode Communities in Soil with Different Agricultural Histories

    PubMed Central

    Wang, K.-H.; McSorley, R.; Gallaher, R. N.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) hay amendment on nematode community structure in the soil surrounding roots of yellow squash (Cucurbita pepo) infected with root-knot nematodes was examined in two greenhouse experiments. Soils were from field plots treated long-term (LT) with yard-waste compost or no yard-waste compost in LT experiment, and from a short-term (ST) agricultural site in ST experiment. Soils collected were either amended or not amended with C. juncea hay. Nematode communities were examined 2 months after squash was inoculated with Meloidogyne incognita. Amendment increased (P < 0.05) omnivorous nematodes in both experiments but increased only bacterivorous nematodes in ST experiment (P < 0.05), where the soil had relatively low organic matter (<2%). This effect of C. juncea amendment did not occur in LT experiment, in which bacterivores were already abundant. Fungivorous nematodes were not increased by C. juncea amendment in either experiment, but predatory nematodes were increased when present. Although most nematode faunal indices, including enrichment index, structure index, and channel index, were not affected by C. juncea amendment, structure index values were affected by previous soil organic matter content. Results illustrate the importance of considering soil history (organic matter, nutrient level, free-living nematode number) in anticipating changes following amendment with C. juncea hay. PMID:19262764

  20. Control of Larval Northern Corn Rootworm. (Diabrotica barberi) with Two Steinernematid Nematode Species

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, G. S.; Yule, W. N.

    1990-01-01

    The entomogenous nematodes Steinerema feltiae and S. bibionis did not penetrate the roots of corn, Zea mays, to infect larval northern corn rootworm (NCR), Diabrotica barberi, feeding within. Laboratory bioassays against first instar NCR indicated that S. feltiae, Mexican strain (LD₅₀ = 49 nematodes/insect) is more virulent than S. bibionis (LD₅₀ = 100). Numbers of NCR larvae in a grain corn crop were reduced by both nematode species applied at corn seeding time at the rate of 10,000 infective-stage juveniles per linear meter of corn row. The chemical insecticide fonofos provided significantly better control than either nematode species. PMID:19287699

  1. Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in molluscs in the municipality of São Gonçalo, a metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: role of the invasive species Achatina fulica in parasite transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ana PM; Gentile, Rosana; Maldonado, Arnaldo; Torres, Eduardo J Lopes; Thiengo, Silvana C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the infection dynamics ofAngiostrongylus cantonensis in its possible intermediate hosts over two years in an urban area in the state of Rio de Janeiro where the presence ofA. cantonensis had been previously recorded in molluscs. Four of the seven mollusc species found in the study were exotic.Bradybaena similaris was the most abundant, followed byAchatina fulica, Streptaxis sp., Subulina octona, Bulimulus tenuissimus, Sarasinula linguaeformis and Leptinaria unilamellata. Only A. fulica and B. similaris were parasitised by A. cantonensis and both presented co-infection with other helminths. The prevalence of A. cantonensisin A. fulica was more than 50% throughout the study. There was an inverse correlation between the population size ofA. fulica and the prevalence of A. cantonensis and abundance of the latter was negatively related to rainfall. The overall prevalence of A. cantonensis in B. similariswas 24.6%. A. fulica was the most important intermediary host of A. cantonensis in the studied area andB. similaris was secondary in importance for A. cantonensis transmission dynamics. PMID:26517652

  2. RNA-Seq reveals the molecular mechanism of trapping and killing of root-knot nematodes by nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Ramesh; Patel, Reena; Patel, Namrata; Bhatt, Vaibhav; Joshi, Chaitanya; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kunjadia, Anju

    2017-04-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are well known for their inherent potential to trap and kill nematodes using specialized trapping devices. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trapping and subsequent processes are still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined differential genes expression in two nematode-trapping fungi after baiting with nematode extracts. In Arthrobotrys conoides, 809 transcripts associated with diverse functions such as signal transduction, morphogenesis, stress response and peroxisomal proteins, proteases, chitinases and genes involved in the host-pathogen interaction showed differential expression with fold change (>±1.5 fold) in the presence of nematode extract with FDR (p-value < 0.001). G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases are considered crucial for signal transduction mechanism. Results of qRT-PCR of 20 genes further validated the sequencing data. Further, variations in gene expression among Duddingtonia flagrans and A. conoides showed septicity of nematode-trapping fungi for its host. The findings illustrate the molecular mechanism of fungal parasitism in A. conoides which may be helpful in developing a potential biocontrol agent against parasitic nematodes.

  3. Bioinformatic prediction of arthropod/nematode-like peptides in non-arthropod, non-nematode members of the Ecdysozoa.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Nolan, Daniel H; Garcia, Zachery A; McCoole, Matthew D; Harmon, Sarah M; Congdon-Jones, Benjamin; Ohno, Paul; Hartline, Niko; Congdon, Clare Bates; Baer, Kevin N; Lenz, Petra H

    2011-02-01

    The Onychophora, Priapulida and Tardigrada, along with the Arthropoda, Nematoda and several other small phyla, form the superphylum Ecdysozoa. Numerous peptidomic studies have been undertaken for both the arthropods and nematodes, resulting in the identification of many peptides from each group. In contrast, little is known about the peptides used as paracrines/hormones by species from the other ecdysozoan taxa. Here, transcriptome mining and bioinformatic peptide prediction were used to identify peptides in members of the Onychophora, Priapulida and Tardigrada, the only non-arthropod, non-nematode members of the Ecdysozoa for which there are publicly accessible expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The extant ESTs for each phylum were queried using 106 arthropod/nematode peptide precursors. Transcripts encoding calcitonin-like diuretic hormone and pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH) were identified for the onychophoran Peripatopsis sedgwicki, with transcripts encoding C-type allatostatin (C-AST) and FMRFamide-like peptide identified for the priapulid Priapulus caudatus. For the Tardigrada, transcripts encoding members of the A-type allatostatin, C-AST, insect kinin, orcokinin, PDH and tachykinin-related peptide families were identified, all but one from Hypsibius dujardini (the exception being a Milnesium tardigradum orcokinin-encoding transcript). The proteins deduced from these ESTs resulted in the prediction of 48 novel peptides, six onychophoran, eight priapulid and 34 tardigrade, which are the first described from these phyla.

  4. Paralysis of nematodes: shifts in the transcriptome of the nematode-trapping fungus Monacrosporium haptotylum during infection of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Csaba; Tholander, Margareta; Rajashekar, Balaji; Ahrén, Dag; Friman, Eva; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2008-02-01

    The transcriptional response in the parasitic fungus Monacrosporium haptotylum and its nematode host Caenorhabditis elegans were analysed during infection using cDNA microarrays. The array contained 2684 fungal and 372 worm gene reporters. Dramatic shifts occurred in the transcriptome of M. haptotylum during the different stages of the infection. An initial transcriptional response was recorded after 1 h of infection when the traps adhered to the cuticle, but before immobilization of the captured nematodes. Among the differentially expressed genes were two serine protease genes (spr1 and spr2), and several homologues to genes known to be regulated in other pathogenic fungi. After 4 h, when approximately 40% of the nematodes were paralysed, we identified an upregulated cluster of 372 fungal genes which were not regulated during the other phases of the infection. This cohort contained a large proportion (79%) of genes that appear to be specific for M. haptotylum and closely related species. These genes were of two different classes: those translating into presumably functional peptides and those with no apparent protein coding potential (non-coding RNAs). Among the infection-induced C. elegans genes were those encoding antimicrobial peptides, protease inhibitors and lectins.

  5. Carbofuran effects in soil nematode communities: using trait and taxonomic based approaches.

    PubMed

    Chelinho, Sónia; Dieter Sautter, Klaus; Cachada, Anabela; Abrantes, Isabel; Brown, George; Costa Duarte, Armando; Sousa, José Paulo

    2011-10-01

    This work intends to implement the use of native soil nematode communities in ecotoxicological tests using a model pesticide and two geographically nematode communities (Mediterranean and sub-tropical) in order to obtain new perspectives on the evaluation of the toxic potential of chemical substances. The environmental condition of the nematode communities was described using a trait-based approach (grouping the organisms according to their feeding traits) and a traditional taxonomic method (identification to family level). Effects on total nematode abundance, number of families and abundance of nematode feeding groups as well as potential shifts in both trophic and family structure were assessed. Agricultural soils from Curitiba (Brazil) and Coimbra (Portugal) were sampled and the corresponding nematode communities were extracted. Part of the collected soil was defaunated and spiked with four doses of a carbofuran commercial formulation. Afterwards each of the replicates was inoculated with a nematode suspension containing ≈200 or 300 nematodes. After 14 and 28 d of exposure the nematodes were extracted, counted and identified at family level and separately classified according to their feeding traits. The patterns of nematode responses revealed a decrease in the total abundance and a reduction in the number of families. Despite the similar effects observed for both communities, statistically significant toxic effects were only found within the Portuguese community. The total nematode abundance was significantly reduced at the highest carbofuran concentrations and significant shifts in the family structure were detected. However, the trophic structure, i.e., the contribution of each feeding group for the overall community structure, did not significantly change along the contamination gradient. Results showed that using such a trait-based approach may increase the ecological relevance of toxicity data, by establishing communalities in the response to a chemical

  6. Sensory interaction between attractant diacetyl and repellent 2-nonanone in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Izumi, Junichi; Hioki, Mamoru; Nagaya, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Yasuaki

    2013-06-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the odorant diacetyl is sensed by AWA sensory neurons in the amphid sensory organ and elicits an attractive response, whereas 2-nonanone is sensed by AWB amphid sensory neurons and elicits an avoidance response. In the present study, we report that nematodes exhibit a sensory interaction between the attractant diacetyl and repellent 2-nonanone. In the presence of food, the chemotactic response to 0.01% diacetyl in nematodes preexposed to 0.1% diacetyl was greater than that in nonexposed naive nematodes (P < 0.05). The response to diacetyl was also greater in nematodes preexposed to 3% 2-nonanone in the presence of food than that in naive nematodes (P < 0.01). In the absence of food, the response to diacetyl in nematodes preexposed to diacetyl or 2-nonanone was significantly lower than that in nonexposed control nematodes (P < 0.01). The avoidance response to 10% 2-nonanone in nematodes preexposed to each odorant in the presence or absence of food was lower than that in nonexposed nematodes (P < 0.05). To confirm the validity of our results, the chemotactic responses to diacetyl and 2-nonanone were observed using che-3, odr-4, and odr-10 mutants, which exhibited defective sensitivity to diacetyl or 2-nonanone. From the results of our experiments, we conclude that nematodes exhibit a sensory interaction between diacetyl and 2-nonanone and speculate that this interaction is driven by higher-level neuronal circuits that underlie sensory integration.

  7. Soil nematode assemblages as bioindicators of radiation impact in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

    PubMed

    Lecomte-Pradines, C; Bonzom, J-M; Della-Vedova, C; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Villenave, C; Gaschak, S; Coppin, F; Dubourg, N; Maksimenko, A; Adam-Guillermin, C; Garnier-Laplace, J

    2014-08-15

    In radioecology, the need to understand the long-term ecological effects of radioactive contamination has been emphasised. This requires that the health of field populations is evaluated and linked to an accurate estimate of received radiological dose. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of current radioactive contamination on nematode assemblages at sites affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. First, we estimated the total dose rates (TDRs) absorbed by nematodes, from measured current soil activity concentrations, Dose Conversion Coefficients (DCCs, calculated using EDEN software) and soil-to-biota concentration ratios (from the ERICA tool database). The impact of current TDRs on nematode assemblages was then evaluated. Nematodes were collected in spring 2011 from 18 forest sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) with external gamma dose rates, measured using radiophotoluminescent dosimeters, varying from 0.2 to 22 μGy h(-1). These values were one order of magnitude below the TDRs. A majority of bacterial-, plant-, and fungal-feeding nematodes and very few of the disturbance sensitive families were identified. No statistically significant association was observed between TDR values and nematode total abundance or the Shannon diversity index (H'). The Nematode Channel Ratio (which defines the relative abundance of bacterial- versus fungal-feeding nematodes) decreased significantly with increasing TDR, suggesting that radioactive contamination may influence nematode assemblages either directly or indirectly by modifying their food resources. A greater Maturity Index (MI), usually characterising better soil quality, was associated with higher pH and TDR values. These results suggest that in the CEZ, nematode assemblages from the forest sites were slightly impacted by chronic exposure at a predicted TDR of 200 μGy h(-1). This may be imputable to a dominant proportion of pollutant resistant nematodes in all sites. This might

  8. Insights into adaptations to a near-obligate nematode endoparasitic lifestyle from the finished genome of Drechmeria coniospora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematophagous fungi employ three distinct predatory strategies: nematode trapping, parasitism of females and eggs, and endoparasitism. While endoparasites play key roles in controlling nematode populations in nature, their application for integrated pest management is hindered by the limited underst...

  9. New Discoveries in Resistances to Columbia Root-knot Nematode and Corky Ringspot Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Columbia root-knot nematode CRKN (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) is a serious pest of potato in the Pacific Northwest. In the warmer zones, with longer growing seasons, this nematode builds up to high populations and damages the potato tubers by invading and causing discoloration and galling. It is pr...

  10. Screening Locally Adapted Spring Wheat Lines for Resistance to Cereal Cyst Nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera avenae) has become an increasing problem in the high precipitation areas of eastern Washington and the Palouse. Since 2010, surveys have discovered serious infestations of this nematode, which infects wheat, barley and grassy weeds. It causes severe yield loss, restr...

  11. Nematode and Grape Rootstock Interactions Including an Improved Understanding of Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    McKenry, M.V.; Anwar, Safdar A.

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen cultivars of grape were screened over a two-year period in the presence or absence of 10 different nematode populations. Populations of Meloidogyne spp., Xiphinema index, and Mesocriconema xenoplax developed more rapidly and caused greater damage than populations of X. americanum and Tylenchulus semipenetrans. Populations of mixed Meloidogyne spp. having a history of feeding on grape were among the fastest developing populations. Tolerance to nematode parasitism appeared to be based on different mechanisms. Slow developing, less pathogenic nematode populations often stimulated vine growth, thus vines appeared to possess tolerance. Likewise, cultivars selected for nematode resistance often stimulated vine growth when fed upon by the nematode. However, tolerance sources that resulted from nematode resistance are vulnerable due to the occurrence of populations that break resistance mechanisms. Growth of cultivars with phylloxera (Daktalospharia vitifoliae) resistance was unchanged by the presence of nematodes, indicating that phylloxera resistance may provide a useful source of nematode relief. These and several additional sources of specific tolerance are discussed. PMID:19259534

  12. Resiliency of a nematode community and suppressive service to tillage and nematicide application.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that populations of predatory and omnivorous nematodes would be slower to recover from conventional tillage and nematicide application than the other nematode trophic groups, and that lower populations of predators and omnivores would lead to greater survival and reproduction of plan...

  13. Observations on the foliar nematode, Aphelenchoides besseyi, infecting tuberose and rice in India

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The foliar nematode Aphelenchoides besseyi causes white tip disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and floral malady in tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L.). This nematode is widely distributed in the rice fields of many states of India, including West Bengal (WB), Andhra Pradesh (AP), Madhya Pradesh (MP) a...

  14. Toxicity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) to Plant-parasitic and Bacterial-feeding Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Halbrendt, John M.; Carta, Lynn K.; Skantar, Andrea M.; Liu, Ting; Abdelnabby, Hazem M. E.; Vinyard, Bryan T.

    2009-01-01

    The antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) is produced by some isolates of the beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. DAPG is toxic to many organisms, and crop yield increases have been reported after application of DAPG-producing P. fluorescens. This study was conducted to determine whether DAPG is toxic to selected nematodes. The plant-parasitic nematodes Heterodera glycines, Meloidogyne incognita, Pratylenchus scribneri and Xiphinema americanum, and the bacterial-feeding nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans, Pristionchus pacificus, and Rhabditis rainai, were immersed in concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 μg/ml DAPG. Egg hatch and viability of juveniles and adults were determined. DAPG was toxic to X. americanum adults, with an LD50 of 8.3 μg/ml DAPG. DAPG decreased M. incognita egg hatch, but stimulated C. elegans hatch during the first hours of incubation. Viability of M. incognita J2 and of C. elegans J1 and adults was not affected. There were no observed effects on the other nematodes. The study indicated that DAPG is not toxic to all nematodes, and did not affect the tested species of beneficial bacterial-feeding nematodes. Augmentation of DAPG-producing P. fluorescens populations for nematode biocontrol could be targeted to specific nematode species known to be affected by this compound and by other antibiotics produced by the bacteria, or these bacteria could be used for other possible effects, such as induced plant resistance. PMID:22736826

  15. Onchocerca lupi Nematodes in Dogs Exported from the United States into Canada

    PubMed Central

    Conboy, Gary; Lejeune, Manigandan; Marron, Fany; Hanna, Paul; MacDonald, Erin; Skorobohach, Brian; Wilcock, Brian; Kutz, Susan J.; Gilleard, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The Onchocerca lupi nematode is an emerging helminth capable of infecting pets and humans. We detected this parasite in 2 dogs that were imported into Canada from the southwestern United States, a region to which this nematode is endemic. We discuss risk for establishment of O. lupi in Canada. PMID:27434170

  16. A novel approach to biocontrol: release of live insect hosts pre-infected with entomopathogenic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a new application approach, we tested the efficacy of releasing live insect hosts that were pre-infected with entomopathogenic nematodes against insect pests living in cryptic habitats. We hypothesized that the pre-infected hosts could carry the next generation of emerging nematode infective juv...

  17. Assessment of the effects of Hirsutella minnesotensis on Soybean Cyst Nematode and growth of soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hirsutella minnesotensis is a fungal endoparasite of nematodes juvenile and parasitizes soybean cyst nematodes (SCN) with high frequency. In this study, the effects of two H. minnesotensis isolates on population and distribution of SCN and growth of soybean were evaluated. Experiments were conducted...

  18. Registration of JTN-5203 soybean germplasm with resistance to multiple cyst nematode populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    JTN-5203 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] (Reg. No. XX-XXX, PI 664903) was developed and released by USDA-ARS in collaboration with the University of Tennessee in 2012 for its broad resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines Ichinohe), as well as reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus ...

  19. First report of Lance Nematode (Hoplolaimus magnistylus) on corn, soybean and cotton in Tennessee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lance nematode, Hoplolaimus galeatus, has been reported in Tennessee on field crops, forage pastures, home gardens, woody ornamentals, turf, and commercial vegetables across the state. In May 2011, another lance nematodes, H. magnistylus, was recovered from corn, cotton and soybean fields in west Te...

  20. Enhanced biological control potential of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema carpocapsae, applied with a protective gel formulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes combined with the anti-desiccation gel, Barricade®, have potential as an effective pest management tool. We (1) ascertained whether Barricade® could provide protection to entomopathogenic nematode s at low concentrations when applied in direct sun, (2) determined if other ...

  1. Is there any seasonal variation in marine nematodes within the sediments of the intertidal zone?

    PubMed

    Yodnarasri, Supaporn; Montani, Shigeru; Tada, Kuninao; Shibanuma, Seiichiro; Yamada, Toshiro

    2008-01-01

    The sediment parameters and nematode assemblages in the intertidal zone of the Hichirippu shallow lagoon, Hokkaido, Japan, were investigated. The objectives of this study were to observe the seasonal variation in the nematodes in the sediment, and to investigate the relationships between the nematodes and environmental factors. Samples were collected bi-monthly from five stations on the tidal flat from April 2003 to February 2004. It was found that the sediment parameters (Chl a concentration, AVS, TOC and TN contents) varied throughout the 10-month study. Fifty-four species of nematodes were found in the study area. The density and biomass of the nematodes varied in accordance with the sediment temperature during the sampling period. In this study, there was a seasonal variation in the nematode assemblage found in the intertidal zone of this shallow lagoon. The important factors affecting this variation were sediment temperature, and food competition among the nematodes themselves. The seasonal variation of the nematode also showed a relationship with the Chl a concentration in the sediment during the sampling period.

  2. [Structural characteristics of soil nematodes community under different land uses in Changchun City].

    PubMed

    Wu, Donghui; Zhang, Bai; Chen, Peng

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, an investigation on the species richness and abundance of soil nematodes in farmland, natural secondary forest, shelter forest and green space was made in Changchun City in July and September, 2003. Soil nematodes were extracted with Baermann extractor, and identified to the genus level with the aid of microscope. A total of 7273 soil nematode individuals were captured, and fell into 2 classes, 7 orders, 20 families, and 27 genera. Aphelenchus, Tylenchus and Pratylenchus were the dominant genera, which accounted for 61.58% of total individuals. Land use type had a significant effect on the community structure of soil nematodes, and aboveground litter removal and cultivation activity were the main factors affecting soil nematodes community structure. Above-ground litter removal considerably decreased soil nematodes individual density and community diversity, while cultivation activity changed the vertical distribution of soil nematodes individual density in the soil profile. Above-ground vegetation structure and landscape pattern appeared to have little effect on the ecological structure of soil nematodes community.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops (Castagnone-Sereno et al. 2013) and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields...

  4. Transcript Analysis of Parasitic Females of the Sedentary Semi-Endoparasitic Nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira, is a sedentary semi-endoparasitic roundworm that infects the roots of many economically important plant species. Engineered resistance to plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs) via RNA-interference (RNAi) has shown promise in providing h...

  5. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of root knot-nematode in transformed soybean roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause about $100 billion in crop losses annually. Root-knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne spp.) are sedentary endoparasites, and the genus has been found on more than 3000 host plant species. In this study four different gene constructs were designed to produce RNA interferen...

  6. A novel nematode effector suppresses plant immunity by activating host reactuve oxygen species-scavenging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative burst is a hallmark event of the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI), which is the first line of plant defense mechanisms, but it remains unclear how nematodes can overcome this defense mechanism. In this study, we show that plant-parasitic nematode Meloid...

  7. Effects of Midas® on Nematodes in Commercial Floriculture Production in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cut flower producers currently have limited options for nematode control. Four field trials were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to evaluate Midas® (iodomethane:chloropicrin 50:50) for control of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria) on Celosia argentea var. cristata in a commercial floriculture pr...

  8. Identification of a SNP marker associated with WB242 nematode resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet-cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schmidt) is one of the major diseases of sugar beet. The identification of molecular markers associated to the nematode resistance would be helpful for developing resistant varieties. The aim of this study was the identification of SNP (Single Nucleotide ...

  9. Molecular markers and mapping of root-knot nematode resistance in cotton.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-plant resistance is economic and highly effective for root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita control in cotton Gossypium hirsutum. Recently, nematode R gene mapping in cotton has revealed relationships between resistance sources and linked molecular markers. Markers are important for th...

  10. HOW FUNGI INTERACT WITH NEMATODE TO ACTIVATE THE PLANT DEFENCE RESPONSE TO TOMATO PLANTS.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, P; Costanza, A; Zonno, M C; Molinari, S; Altomare, C

    2014-01-01

    Management of plant parasitic nematodes with nematode predators, parasites or antagonists is an eco-friendly approach that may avoid the problems arisen by the use of toxic chemicals. Fungi belonging to Trichoderma spp. are well known in literature for their role in control of plant parasitic nematodes. Root-knot nematodes (RKNs), Meloidogyne spp., are obligate parasites that cause the formation of familiar galls on the roots of many cultivated plants. The interaction between the M. incognita motile second stage juveniles (J2s) and the isolate ITEM 908 of Trichoderma harzianum was examined in its effect on the nematode infestation level of susceptible tomato plants. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ITEM 908 interacts with nematode-infected tomato plants, the expression patterns of the genes PR1 (marker of Salycilic Acid-depending resistance signalling pathway) and JERF3 (marker of the Jasmonic Acid/Ethylene-depending resistance signalling pathway) were detected over time in: i) untreated roots; ii) roots pre-treated with the fungus; iii) roots inoculated with the nematode; iv) pre-treated and inoculated roots. Infestation parameters were checked in untreated plants and plants treated with the fungus to test the effect of the fungus on nematode infestation level and to compare this effect with the expression of the genes PR1 and JERF3, involved in induced resistance.

  11. Low cost production of nematodes for biological control of insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic nematodes are produced in two ways: in artificial media using liquid or solid fermentation methods (in vitro) or by mass producing insect hosts to be artificially exposed to mass infection by nematodes (in vivo). The yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) is a good host for in vivo nema...

  12. First report of the stubby root nematode Paratrichodorus allius on potato in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stubby root nematodes (Paratrichodorus and Trichodorus) are migratory ectoparasites that feed on roots and vector tobraviruses. These nematodes are important to the potato industry as they transmit Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) causing corky ringspot (CRS) disease that has a direct economic impact on g...

  13. Evaluating the predatory potential of carnivorous nematodes against Rotylenchulus reniformis and Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predatory behavior of a nematode is usually determined through gut content observation or prey delimitation counts. In this experiment, Mononchus and Neoactinolaimus predation of Rotylenchulus reniformis or Meloidogyne incognita was determined using a PCR-based nematode gut content analysis. Soil sa...

  14. DYNAMICS OF NEMATODE POPULATIONS IN CACAO GROWN UNDER TRADIONALLY SYSTEM OF MANAGEMENT IN PERUVIAN AMAZON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nature of crops and management systems greatly influences population dynamics of parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes in soil. An experiment was undertaken at Tropical Crop Research institute (ICT), Tarapoto, Peru to assess the population dynamics of nematodes in a Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.)-Banana ...

  15. Evaluation of University of Georgia turfgrass for response to sting nematode feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turfgrasses grown in the sandy, well-drained soils of the Atlantic coastal plain in the United States will likely encounter sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) pressure. The identification of resistance or tolerance genes which would allow new cultivars to thrive in plant-parasitic nematode...

  16. Poly(T) variation in heteroderid nematode mitochondrial genomes is predominantly an artifact of amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the rate of in vitro polymerase errors at polythymidine tracts in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of a heteroderid nematode (Heterodera cajani). The mtDNA of these nematodes contains unusually high numbers of poly(T) tracts, and has previously been suggested to contain biological poly(T) l...

  17. Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe: diseases caused by nematodes (roundworms).

    PubMed

    Auer, Herbert; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    The third part of the overview "Helminths and helminthoses in Central Europe" deals with the medically relevant nematodes (roundworms) and nematode-caused diseases occurring in Central Europe. The paper comprises data on the biology of the parasites and their ways of transmission, describes the symptomatology of the diseases, summarizes the possibilities of diagnosis and refers to the prophylactic means.

  18. Extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangement in a genus of plant parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nematodes Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are two of the only animals known to have multipartite mitochondrial genomes. In such genomes, mitochondrial genes are distributed on multiple circles. The entire sequence of a nematode (Radopholus similis) that belongs to the same superfamily (...

  19. Role of nematode peptides and other small molecules in plant parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular, genetic, and biochemical studies are demonstrating an increasingly important role of peptide signaling in nematode parasitism of plants. To date, the majority of nematode-secreted peptides identified share similarity with plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE) peptides, but bioinformatics analyses of n...

  20. Activation of geminivirus V-sense promoters in roots is restricted to nematode feeding sites.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Carolina; García, Alejandra; Aristizábal, Fabio; Portillo, Mary; Herreros, Esther; Munoz-Martín, M Angeles; Grundler, Florian; Mullineaux, Phillip M; Fenoll, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Obligate sedentary endoparasitic nematodes, such as the root-knot and cyst nematodes, elicit the differentiation of specialized nematode nurse or feeding cells [nematode feeding sites (NFS), giant cells and syncytia, respectively]. During NFS differentiation, marked changes in cell cycle progression occur, partly similar to those induced by some geminiviruses. In this work, we describe the activation of V-sense promoters from the Maize streak virus (MSV) and Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) in NFS formed by root-knot and cyst nematodes. Both promoters were transiently active in microinjection experiments. In tobacco and Arabidopsis transgenic lines carrying promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusions, the MSV V-sense promoter was activated in the vascular tissues of aerial plant parts, primarily leaf and cotyledon phloem tissue and some floral structures. Interestingly, in roots, promoter activation was restricted to syncytia and giant cells tested with four different nematode populations, but undetectable in the rest of the root system. As the activity of the promoter in transgenic rootstocks should be restricted to NFS only, the MSV promoter may have utility in engineering grafted crops for nematode control. Therefore, this study represents a step in the provision of some of the much needed additional data on promoters with restricted activation in NFS useful in biotechnological nematode control strategies.

  1. Canine Infections with Onchocerca lupi Nematodes, United States, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Alessio; Latrofa, Maria S.; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Chavkin, Matt; Kennard, Gavin; Eberhard, Mark L.; Bowman, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Onchocerca lupi nematodes are diagnosed sporadically in the United States. We report 8 cases of canine onchocercosis in Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida. Identification of 1 cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene haplotype identical to 1 of 5 from Europe suggests recent introduction of this nematode into the United States. PMID:25897859

  2. Current status of phytoparasitic nematodes and their host plants in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Egypt many phytoparasitic nematodes constitute a major constraint to agricultural production, especially in sandy soil and reclaimed desert lands. Nematological surveys were conducted to determine the genera and species of phytoparasitic nematodes on associated host plants in Egypt. The results i...

  3. The use of entomopathogenic nematodes in the US and issues related to genetic degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research and commercial application of entomopathogenic nematodes in North America has a long history. In the pursuit of commercial viability, there have been a number of success stories, but also quite a number of dead ends. We provide insight into new opportunities for entomopathogenic nematodes...

  4. The plant-parasitic nematode collections of RRIP: The realization of an ISTC project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are important pests of agricultural and wild plants throughout Russia and the world. The best strategy for management of nematode damage is an integrated approach to the problem: i.e., the use of agrotechnological approaches (crop rotation, soil amendments, etc.), reasonabl...

  5. Some taxonomic and phylogenetic trends for free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The information, techniques and strategies used by nematode taxonomists have improved in major ways over the last 15 years. New methods of specimen preparation, new microscopic procedures, and new morphological and molecular characters have improved the quality of nematode descriptions. Testing taxo...

  6. A survey of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with forage crops in Bingol, Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During June 2011, a survey was conducted in four districts of Bingol Province, Turkey, to investigate the occurrence, population abundance and spatial distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes associated with pastures. A total of 24 soil samples were collected. Nematodes were extracted from soil by ...

  7. Evaluation of Rubus spp. and Hybrids for Root Lesion Nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, is a production-limiting pest in red raspberry, Rubus ideaus, in the United States. Having resistance as a tool to manage P. penetrans in raspberries would reduce the impact of this nematode on raspberry productivity as well as reduce the need for p...

  8. Host status of Rubus species and hybrids for the root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans, is a production-limiting pest in red raspberry, Rubus idaeus, in the United States. Having resistance as a tool to manage P. penetrans in raspberries would reduce the impact of this nematode on raspberry productivity as well as reduce the need for pr...

  9. Product evaluation for reniform nematode suppression in Mississippi Delta sweetpotato production, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, can cause significant losses in sweetpotato, Ipomoea batatas, production in the Mississippi Delta. Reniform nematode is a microscopic plant parasite that feeds on sweetpotato roots causing severe stunting of root growth. Reduction in yield due to the ...

  10. The discovery of fluazaindolizine: A new product for the control of plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lahm, George P; Desaeger, Johan; Smith, Ben K; Pahutski, Thomas F; Rivera, Michel A; Meloro, Tony; Kucharczyk, Roman; Lett, Renee M; Daly, Anne; Smith, Brenton T; Cordova, Daniel; Thoden, Tim; Wiles, John A

    2017-04-01

    Fluazaindolizine is a new highly effective and selective product for the control of plant parasitic nematodes. Specificity for nematodes coupled with absence of activity against the target sites of commercial nematicides suggests that fluazaindolizine has a novel mode of action. The discovery, structure-activity development and biological properties for this new class of nematicides are presented.

  11. Post-Plant nematicides for the control of root lesion nematode in red raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are currently few registered post-plant nematicides available to control root lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans, RLN) in red raspberry (Rubus ideaus). The rate of raspberry decline due to RLN depends upon the nematode population density but usually occurs over a 3- to 4-year period. To ...

  12. Distribution and infestation rate of cyst nematodes (Tylenchida: Heteroderidae) in cabbage growing areas in Samsun

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Samsun, Turkey is needed to assess their potential to cause economic damage on many crop plants. Surveys on the distribution and infestation rates of cyst nematodes in cabbage fields in Samsun were conducte...

  13. Cotton Cultivar Response to Root-Knot Nematodes in Two Tillage Regimes, 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six cotton cultivars were evaluated for yield response to the root-knot nematode in a naturally infested field at E. V. Smith Research and Extension Center, near Shorter, Alabama. The field had a long history of root-knot nematode infestation, and the soil type was classified as a sandy loam. Plots ...

  14. Canine Infections with Onchocerca lupi Nematodes, United States, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Giannelli, Alessio; Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Chavkin, Matt; Kennard, Gavin; Eberhard, Mark L; Bowman, Dwight D

    2015-05-01

    Infections with Onchocerca lupi nematodes are diagnosed sporadically in the United States. We report 8 cases of canine onchocercosis in Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida. Identification of 1 cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene haplotype identical to 1 of 5 from Europe suggests recent introduction of this nematode into the United States.

  15. Biological Control of the Nematode Infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae Family With Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Rahdar, Mahmoud; Gholamian, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biological control of parasitic nematodes by microorganisms is a promising approach to control such parasites. Microorganisms such as fungi, viruses and bacteria are recognized as biocontrol agents of nematodes. Objectives: The current study mainly aimed to evaluate the in vitro Potential of various saprophyte soil-fungi in reducing the infective larvae stage of parasitic nematode Trichostrongylidae family. Materials and Methods: Sheep feces were employed to provide the required third stage larvae source for the experiments. The nematode infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae family including three species of Ostertagia circumcincta, Marshalgia marshali and Heamonchos contortus were collected by Berman apparatus. Fifteen isolates of filamentous fungi were tested in the current study. One milliliter suspension containing 200 third stage larvae of Trichostrongylidae family was separately added to the fungal cultures in 2% water-agar medium Petri-dishes. Every day the live larvae were counted with light microscope (10X) and the number of captured larvae was recorded on different days. Results: Significant differences were observed in the results of co-culture of nematodes larva and fungi after seven days. The most effective fungi against the nematodes larvae were Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp., Fusarium equisetti, after seven days of incubation. Conclusions: The studies on fungi could be applied as suitable tools in biocontrol of nematode infections. However, additional surveys are required to select efficient with the ability to reduce the nematode larvae in the environment. PMID:25893084

  16. Two simple methods for the collection of individual life stages of reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sedentary semi-endoparasitic nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis, the reniform nematode, is a serious pest of cotton and soybean in the United States. In recent years, interest in the molecular biology of the interaction between R. reniformis and its plant hosts has increased; however, the unusual...

  17. Sunn Hemp cover cropping and organic fertilizer effects on the nematode community under temperate growing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plantings of sunn hemp as a cover crop have been experimentally shown to improve soil health, reduce plant-parasitic nematodes, and increase nematode-antagonistic microorganisms. However, these studies have been largely conducted in tropical and subtropical regions. To investigate the impacts of sun...

  18. Effects of mixed cropping on a soil nematode community in honduras.

    PubMed

    Powers, L E; McSorley, R; Dunn, R A

    1993-12-01

    Nematode-resistant tropical legumes are effective in reducing populations of plant-parasitic nematodes when used in rotation systems. Mixed cropping is a common practice of many small farmers in Central America, but little is known about the effects of tropical legumes on nematode communities under these systems. To examine the effects of intercropping on the nematode fauna associated with squash (Cucurbita pepo) and cucumber (Cucumis sativa) in Honduras, two field experiments were conducted to compare nematode density and diversity in soil under cucurbits grown as a monocrop with that in soil under cucurbits intercropped with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) or hairy indigo (Indigofera hirsuta). A parallel series of field tests compared soil nematode communities associated with a cucurbit monocrop and a cucurbit intercropped with marigold (Tagetes patula), which may decrease nematode populations through the production of toxic root exudates. Among all four tests, over a period of 90 days, there were no consistent differences in densities of various nematode genera or trophic groups in intercropped versus monocropped plants, nor were there consistent differences in community diversities among treatments.

  19. Ecology of Nematodes Under Influence of Cucurbita spp. and Different Fertilizer Types

    PubMed Central

    Porazinska, D. L.; Coleman, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    In a field study conducted in Georgia, cucurbit plants with high (Cucurbita andreana) and low (Cucurbita maxima) concentrations of cucurbitacins were used in combination with two types of fertilizers to investigate their effects on the community of soil nematodes. Ecological measures of soil nematode community structure such as total nematode abundance, number of genera, trophic diversity, trophic group proportions, fungivore/bacterivore ratio, and modified maturity index were assessed and compared among treatments. In general, poultry manure (an organic source of nitrogen) and synthetic fertilizer (a nonorganic source of nitrogen) did not differ in their effects on the nematode communities throughout one growing season. Few differences between the two plant species were found for any of the nematode community measurements. Bacterial- and fungal-feeding nematodes were the most abundant trophic groups, averaging 60% and 20% of the nematode community, respectively. Trophic diversity, nematode maturity index, and fungivore/ bacterivore values were lowest at the beginning and highest at the end of the experiment. PMID:19277330

  20. Plant-parasitic nematodes associated with grapevines, Vitis vinifera, in Washington and Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys were conducted in eastern Washington and Idaho to determine the plant-parasitic nematodes associated with wine grape (Vitis vinifera) vineyards. The most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington and Idaho wine grape vineyards were Meloidogyne hapla, Paratylenchus ...

  1. Effects of grafted heirloom tomatoes on parasitic nematode populations in an organic production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grafting vegetable crops has shown potential to contribute to root-knot nematode management alone and in combination with chemical treatments. In organic production, there are extremely limited options currently available to growers for control of phytoparasitic nematodes. Grafting desirable tomat...

  2. Impact of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) varieties on reproduction of the northern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne hapla)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic soil worms that attack the roots of grape plants and cause yield loss. One of the most commonly encountered plant-parasitic nematodes in eastern Washington Vitis vinifera vineyards is Meloidogyne hapla, the northern root-knot nematode. The selection of plant...

  3. In-vitro Assays of Meloidogyne incognita and Heterodera glycines for Detection of Nematode-antagonistic Fungal Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nitao, James K.; Meyer, Susan L. F.; Chitwood, David J.

    1999-01-01

    In-vitro methods were developed to test fungi for production of metabolites affecting nematode egg hatch and mobility of second-stage juveniles. Separate assays were developed for two nematodes: root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). For egg hatch to be successfully assayed, eggs must first be surface-disinfested to avoid the confounding effects of incidental microbial growth facilitated by the fungal culture medium. Sodium hypochlorite was more effective than chlorhexidine diacetate or formaldehyde solutions at surface-disinfesting soybean cyst nematode eggs from greenhouse cultures. Subsequent rinsing with sodium thiosulfate to remove residual chlorine from disinfested eggs did not improve either soybean cyst nematode hatch or juvenile mobility. Soybean cyst nematode hatch in all culture media was lower than in water. Sodium hypochlorite was also used to surface-disinfest root-knot nematode eggs. In contrast to soybean cyst nematode hatch, root-knot nematode hatch was higher in potato dextrose broth medium than in water. Broth of the fungus Fusarium equiseti inhibited root-knot nematode egg hatch and was investigated in more detail. Broth extract and its chemical fractions not only inhibited egg hatch but also immobilized second-stage juveniles that did hatch, confirming that the fungus secretes nematode-antagonistic metabolites. PMID:19270887

  4. The Effect of Endophytic Fungi on Nematode Populations in Summer-dormant and Summer-active Tall Fescue

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, James K.; Walker, Nathan R.; Young, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Summer-active (continental) and summer-dormant (Mediterranean) tall fescue morphotypes are each adapted to different environmental conditions. Endophyte presence provides plant parasitic nematode resistance, but not with all endophyte strains and cultivar combinations. This study sought to compare effects of four nematode genera on continental and Mediterranean cultivars infected with common toxic or novel endophyte strains. A 6-mon greenhouse study was conducted with continental cultivars, Kentucky 31 (common toxic) and Texoma MaxQ II (novel endophyte) and the Mediterranean cultivar Flecha MaxQ (novel endophyte). Endophyte-free plants of each cultivar were controls. Each cultivar × endophyte combination was randomly assigned to a control, low or high inoculation rate of a mixed nematode culture containing stunt nematodes (Tylenchorhynchus spp.), ring nematodes (Criconemella spp.), spiral nematodes (Helicotylenchus spp.), and lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.). Endophyte infection had no effect on nematode population densities. The cultivar × endophyte interaction was significant. Population densities of stunt nematode, spiral nematode, and ring nematodes were higher for Flecha MaxQ than other cultivar × endophyte combinations. Novel endophyte infection enhances suitability of Flecha MaxQ as a nematode host. PMID:27418701

  5. Mercury in parasitic nematodes and trematodes and their double-crested cormorant hosts: bioaccumulation in the face of sequestration by nematodes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacey A; Forbes, Mark R; Hebert, Craig E

    2010-10-15

    Endoparasites can alter their host's heavy metal concentrations by sequestering metals in their own tissues. Contracaecum spp. (a nematode), but not Drepanocephalus spathans (a trematode), were bioaccumulating mercury to concentrations 1.5 times above cormorant hosts. Nematodes did not have significantly greater stable nitrogen isotope values (δ(15)N) than their hosts, which is contradictory to prey-predator trophic enrichment studies, but is in agreement with other endoparasite-host relationships. However, Contracaecum spp. δ(13)C values were significantly greater than their hosts, which suggest that nematodes were consuming host tissues. Nematodes were accumulating and thus sequestering some of their cormorant hosts' body burden of methyl mercury; however, they were not dramatically reducing their hosts' accumulation of methyl mercury.

  6. Effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection on the ruminant immune system.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, L C

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of ruminants evoke a wide variety of immune responses in their hosts. In terms of specific immune responses directed against parasite antigens, the resulting immune responses may vary from those that give strong protection from reinfection after a relatively light exposure (e.g. Oesophagostomum radiatum) to responses that are very weak and delayed in their onset (e.g. Ostertagia ostertagi). The nature of these protective immune responses has been covered in another section of the workshop and the purpose of this section will be to explore the nature of changes that occur in the immune system of infected animals and to discuss the effect of GI nematode infections upon the overall immunoresponsiveness of the host. The discussion will focus primarily on Ostertagia ostertagi because this parasite has received the most attention in published studies. The interaction of Ostertagia and the host immune system presents what appears to be an interesting contradiction. Protective immunity directed against the parasite is slow to arise and when compared to some of the other GI nematodes, is relatively weak. Although responses that reduce egg output in the feces or increase the number of larvae undergoing inhibition may occur after a relatively brief exposure (3-4 months), immune responses which reduce the number of parasites that can establish in the host are not evident until the animal's second year. Additionally, even older animals that have spent several seasons on infected pastures will have low numbers of Ostertagia in their abomasa, indicating that sterilizing immune responses against the parasite are uncommon. In spite of this apparent lack of specific protective immune responses, infections with Ostertagia induce profound changes in the host immune system. These changes include a tremendous expansion of both the number of lymphocytes in the local lymph nodes and the number of lymphoid cells in the mucosa of the abomasum. This expansion

  7. Plant-parasitic nematode infections in rice: molecular and cellular insights.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Fernandez, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2014-01-01

    Being one of the major staple foods in the world, and an interesting model monocot plant, rice (Oryza sativa L.) has recently received attention from molecular nematologists studying the cellular and molecular aspects of the interaction between this crop and plant-parasitic nematodes. In this review, we highlight recent advances in this field, with a focus on the best-studied root-knot nematodes. Histological studies have revealed the cellular changes inside root-knot nematode-induced feeding sites, both in the compatible interaction with Oryza sativa and the incompatible interaction with the related species Oryza glaberrima. After comparing the published data from transcriptome analyses, mutant studies, and exogenous hormone applications, we provide a comprehensive model showing the role and interaction of plant hormone pathways in defense of this monocot crop against root nematodes, where jasmonate seems to play a key role. Finally, recent evidence indicates that effectors secreted from rice-infecting nematodes can suppress plant defense.

  8. Field Responses of Bermudagrass and Seashore paspalum Cultivars to Sting and Spiral Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wenjing; Luc, John E.; Crow, William T.; Kenworthy, Kevin E.; Giblin-Davis, Robin M.; McSorley, Robert; Kruse, Jason K.

    2011-01-01

    Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Helicotylenchus spp. are damaging nematode species on bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) and seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) in sandy soils of the southeastern United States. Eight bermudagrass and three seashore paspalum cultivars were tested for responses to both nematode species in field plots for two years in Florida. Soil samples were taken every three months and nematode population densities in soil were quantified. Turfgrass aboveground health was evaluated throughout the growing season. Results showed that all bermudagrass cultivars, except TifSport, were good hosts for B. longicaudatus, and all seashore paspalum cultivars were good hosts for H. pseudorobustus. Overall, bermudagrass was a better host for B. longicaudatus while seashore paspalum was a better host for H. pseudorobustus. TifSport bermudagrass and SeaDwarf seashore paspalum cultivars supported the lowest population densities of B. longicaudatus. Seashore paspalum had a higher percent green cover than bermudagrass in the nematode-infested field. Nematode intolerant cultivars were identified. PMID:23430148

  9. Community Analyses of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes in the Kalsow Prairie, Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Don C.; Schmitt, Donald P.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-one species of plant-parasitic nematodes were recovered from 15 sites in the Kalsow Prairie, Iowa. Nematode communities were analyzed by prominence and importance values of the nematode species and also by diversity and concentration of dominance. The use of numbers and biomass were compared in indices of diversity and concentration of dominance. Tylenchorhynchus maximns ranked first in mean density/site, prominence value, and importance value, although it was not found as frequently as many other nematodes. Xiphinema americanum and T. maximus were among the dominant nematodes in 11 of 15 sites when biomass was used in the concentration-of-dominance index, but they were dominant in only five sites when numbers were used. PMID:19305833

  10. Field Application of Entomopathogenic Nematodes for Control of Delia radicum in Collards

    PubMed Central

    Simser, Dave

    1992-01-01

    Control of Delia radicum (cabbage maggot) in field collards (Brassica oleracea) was compared after one or two applications of entomopathogenic nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae (All strain) and Heterorhabditis bacterophora (HP88 strain), a single application of granular chlorpyrifos, and a water-only treatment. Nematodes were applied with a sprayer during the egg stage of first-generation D. radicum, and chlorpyrifos was hand placed around collard stems during the same period. A second nematode application was made 10 days later. Chlorpyrifos treatment resulted in fewer puparia per plant, less root damage and higher yield than all other treatments, including the control. Collard yield from nematode-treated beds did not differ from controls. These data indicate that, under these field conditions, the species or strains of entomopathogenic nematodes tested did not reduce the number of active cabbage maggots, nor did they prevent collard root damage. PMID:19283012

  11. Suppression of Root-knot Nematode Populations with Selected Rapeseed Cultivars as Green Manure

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedi, H.; Santo, G. S.; Hang, A. N.; Wilson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Meloidogyne chitwoodi races 1 and 2 and M. hapla reproduced on 12 cultivars of Brassica napus and two cultivars of B. campestris. The mean reproductive factors (Rf), Rf = Pf at 55 days ÷ 5,000, for the three nematodes were 8.3, 2.2, and 14.3, respectively. All three nematodes reproduced more efficiently (P < 0.05) on B. campestris than on B. napus. Amending M. chitwoodi-infested soil in plastic bags with chopped shoots of Jupiter rapeseed reduced the nematode population more (P < 0.05) than amendment with wheat shoots. Incorporating Jupiter shoots to soil heavily infested with M. chitwoodi in microplots reduced the nematode population more (P < 0.05) than fallow or corn shoot treatments. The greatest reduction in nematode population density was attained by cropping rapeseed for 2 months and incorporating it into the soil as a green manure. PMID:19283108

  12. Ancient horizontal transfers of retrotransposons between birds and ancestors of human pathogenic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Witt, Christopher C.; Menger, Juliana; Sadanandan, Keren R.; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Gerth, Michael; Weigert, Anne; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Mudge, Joann; Edwards, Scott V.; Rheindt, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Parasite host switches may trigger disease emergence, but prehistoric host ranges are often unknowable. Lymphatic filariasis and loiasis are major human diseases caused by the insect-borne filarial nematodes Brugia, Wuchereria and Loa. Here we show that the genomes of these nematodes and seven tropical bird lineages exclusively share a novel retrotransposon, AviRTE, resulting from horizontal transfer (HT). AviRTE subfamilies exhibit 83–99% nucleotide identity between genomes, and their phylogenetic distribution, paleobiogeography and invasion times suggest that HTs involved filarial nematodes. The HTs between bird and nematode genomes took place in two pantropical waves, >25–22 million years ago (Myr ago) involving the Brugia/Wuchereria lineage and >20–17 Myr ago involving the Loa lineage. Contrary to the expectation from the mammal-dominated host range of filarial nematodes, we hypothesize that these major human pathogens may have independently evolved from bird endoparasites that formerly infected the global breadth of avian biodiversity. PMID:27097561

  13. Meiobenthos and nematode community in Yenisei Bay and adjacent parts of the Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnova, D. A.; Garlitska, L. A.; Udalov, A. A.; Kondar, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Material is collected on a meridional profile from Yenisei Bay to adjacent parts of the Kara Sea shelf. The length of the profile is 550 km; 13 to 62 m depths. A multiple corer and Niemistö corer are used as sampling tools. The meiobenthos is represented by 13 taxa. Nematodes are the most abundant taxon, and harpacticoid copepods (Harpacticoida) are subdominant. The abundance and taxonomic diversity of meiobenthos and nematodes increases from the freshwater part of Yenisei Bay towards the Kara Sea shelf. Three types of taxocene are distinguished: freshwater, brackish-water, and marine. The taxocene of the estuary is not distinguished by any specific set of species and consists of species characteristic of the nematode community both in the freshwater and marine zones. The trophic structure of the taxocene of nematodes in Yenisei Bay is dominated by nematodes with well-defined stoma and are differently armed. The estuary and shelf are dominated by selective and nonselective deposit feeders.

  14. Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses primarily infect intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Carl J; Renshaw, Hilary; Frezal, Lise; Jiang, Yanfang; Félix, Marie-Anne; Wang, David

    2014-01-05

    The discoveries of Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses, three viruses infecting either Caenorhabditis elegans or its relative Caenorhabditis briggsae, enable the study of virus-host interactions using natural pathogens of these two well-established model organisms. We characterized the tissue tropism of infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes by these viruses. Using immunofluorescence assays targeting proteins from each of the viruses, and in situ hybridization, we demonstrate viral proteins and RNAs localize to intestinal cells in larval stage Caenorhabditis nematodes. Viral proteins were detected in one to six of the 20 intestinal cells present in Caenorhabditis nematodes. In Orsay virus-infected C. elegans, viral proteins were detected as early as 6h post-infection. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid proteins of Orsay virus exhibited different subcellular localization patterns. Collectively, these observations provide the first experimental insights into viral protein expression in any nematode host, and broaden our understanding of viral infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  15. Distribution of plant-parasitic nematodes on sugarcane in louisiana and efficacy of nematicides.

    PubMed

    Bond, J P; McGawley, E C; Hoy, J W

    2000-12-01

    A survey conducted from May 1995 through August 1998 revealed diverse nematode communities in Louisiana sugarcane fields. High populations of Mesocriconema, Paratrichodorus, Pratylenchus, and Tylenchorhynchus were widespread in nine sugarcane production parishes. Comparisons of plant cane and ratoon sugarcane crops indicated that nematode community levels increase significantly in successive ratoon crops. Nematicide trials evaluated the efficacy of aldicarb, ethoprop, and phorate against indigenous nematode populations. Aldicarb consistently increased the number of millable stalks, cane tonnage, and yield of sucrose in soils with a high sand content. Yield increases were concomitant with reductions in the density of the nematode community shortly after planting and at harvest. In soils with a higher clay content, the chemicals were less effective in controlling nematode populations and, as a result, yield increases were minimal.

  16. Granular Nematicides as Adjuncts to Fumigants for Control of Cotton Root-knot Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, E C

    1979-04-01

    Growth and yield of cotton were best with combinations of fumigants and organophosphate and carbamate nematicides. Organophosphates or carbamates used alone did not give season-long control of root-knot nematodes. Long-term control was poor because the temporary sublethal effects of these materials diminished soon enough lhat the nematodes could reproduce. The nematodes survived the treatments and a year of nonhost culture, and damaged a susceptible host crop 2 years after treatment. No such damage occurred in plots treated with fumigant, fumigant plus organophosphate, or fumigant plus carbamate. Treatment of seed and treatment of cotton, either in furrow at planting or sidedressing at midseason, with organophosphate and carbamate nematicides resulted in little or no yield increase, because nematode control was only minimal and temporary; or in a yield decrease, because the toxicity of the materials was manifested when nematode populations were low.

  17. Treatment of Nematodes with Ozone Gas: A Sustainable Alternative to Nematicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msayleb, Nahed; Ibrahim, Saiid

    This study tests Ozone as a Nematicides' alternative. Nematode-infected soil samples were treated with ascending doses of O3 by submerging the outlet of an "MB1000 Ozone Generator" in the 40 ml samples; then to test the O3 nematicidal effect by gas fumigation, Ozone gas was released into a sealed bag containing 80 g of each of the 6 nematode-infected soil samples with ascending doses and a repetition of each. With water-ozonation, 900 mg O3 were needed to kill 100% of nematodes, and the O3-Nematodes LD50 was identified by 420 mg. With the second experiment, O3 soil fumigation for 50 minutes at a dose of 1,125 mg in an air volume of 5 litres, were needed to control 95% of living nematodes.

  18. nGASP – the nematode genome annotation assessment project

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, Avril; Fiedler, Tristan J; McKay, Sheldon J; Flicek, Paul; Harris, Todd W; Blasiar, Darin; Stein, Lincoln D

    2008-01-01

    Background While the C. elegans genome is extensively annotated, relatively little information is available for other Caenorhabditis species. The nematode genome annotation assessment project (nGASP) was launched to objectively assess the accuracy of protein-coding gene prediction software in C. elegans, and to apply this knowledge to the annotation of the genomes of four additional Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. Seventeen groups worldwide participated in nGASP, and submitted 47 prediction sets across 10 Mb of the C. elegans genome. Predictions were compared to reference gene sets consisting of confirmed or manually curated gene models from WormBase. Results The most accurate gene-finders were 'combiner' algorithms, which made use of transcript- and protein-alignments and multi-genome alignments, as well as gene predictions from other gene-finders. Gene-finders that used alignments of ESTs, mRNAs and proteins came in second. There was a tie for third place between gene-finders that used multi-genome alignments and ab initio gene-finders. The median gene level sensitivity of combiners was 78% and their specificity was 42%, which is nearly the same accuracy reported for combiners in the human genome. C. elegans genes with exons of unusual hexamer content, as well as those with unusually many exons, short exons, long introns, a weak translation start signal, weak splice sites, or poorly conserved orthologs posed the greatest difficulty for gene-finders. Conclusion This experiment establishes a baseline of gene prediction accuracy in Caenorhabditis genomes, and has guided the choice of gene-finders for the annotation of newly sequenced genomes of Caenorhabditis and other nematode species. We have created new gene sets for C. briggsae, C. remanei, C. brenneri, C. japonica, and Brugia malayi using some of the best-performing gene-finders. PMID:19099578

  19. Specific microbial attachment to root knot nematodes in suppressive soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Mohamed; Westphal, Andreas; Hallmann, Johannes; Heuer, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the interactions of plant-parasitic nematodes with antagonistic soil microbes could provide opportunities for novel crop protection strategies. Three arable soils were investigated for their suppressiveness against the root knot nematode Meloidogyne hapla. For all three soils, M. hapla developed significantly fewer galls, egg masses, and eggs on tomato plants in unsterilized than in sterilized infested soil. Egg numbers were reduced by up to 93%. This suggested suppression by soil microbial communities. The soils significantly differed in the composition of microbial communities and in the suppressiveness to M. hapla. To identify microorganisms interacting with M. hapla in soil, second-stage juveniles (J2) baited in the test soil were cultivation independently analyzed for attached microbes. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of fungal ITS or 16S rRNA genes of bacteria and bacterial groups from nematode and soil samples was performed, and DNA sequences from J2-associated bands were determined. The fingerprints showed many species that were abundant on J2 but not in the surrounding soil, especially in fungal profiles. Fungi associated with J2 from all three soils were related to the genera Davidiella and Rhizophydium, while the genera Eurotium, Ganoderma, and Cylindrocarpon were specific for the most suppressive soil. Among the 20 highly abundant operational taxonomic units of bacteria specific for J2 in suppressive soil, six were closely related to infectious species such as Shigella spp., whereas the most abundant were Malikia spinosa and Rothia amarae, as determined by 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. In conclusion, a diverse microflora specifically adhered to J2 of M. hapla in soil and presumably affected female fecundity.

  20. Distribution of the entomopathogenic nematodes from La Rioja (Northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Campos-Herrera, Raquel; Escuer, Miguel; Labrador, Sonia; Robertson, Lee; Barrios, Laura; Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2007-06-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) distribution in natural areas and crop field edges in La Rioja (Northern Spain) has been studied taking into account environmental and physical-chemical soil factors. Five hundred soil samples from 100 sites of the most representative habitats were assayed for the presence of EPNs. The occurrence of EPNs statistically fitted to a negative binomial distribution, which pointed out that the natural distribution of these nematodes in La Rioja was in aggregates. There were no statistical differences (p < or = 0.05) in the abundance of EPNs to environmental and physical-chemical variables, although, there were statistical differences in the altitude, annual mean air temperature and rainfall, potential vegetation series and moisture percentage recovery frequency. Twenty-seven samples from 14 sites were positive for EPNs. From these samples, twenty isolates were identified to a species level and fifteen strains were selected: 11 Steinernema feltiae, two S. carpocapsae and two S. kraussei strains. S. kraussei was isolated from humid soils of cool and high altitude habitats and S. carpocapsae was found to occur in heavy soils of dry and temperate habitats. S. feltiae was the most common species with a wide range of altitude, temperature, rainfall, pH and soil moisture, although this species preferred sandy soils. The virulence of nematode strains were assessed using G. mellonella as insect host, recording the larval mortality percentage and the time to insect die, as well as the number of infective juveniles produced to evaluate the reproductive potential and the time tooks to leave the insect cadaver to determinate the infection cycle length. The ecological trends and biological results are discussed in relationship with their future use as biological control.

  1. Microsporidia Are Natural Intracellular Parasites of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Troemel, Emily R; Félix, Marie-Anne; Whiteman, Noah K; Barrière, Antoine; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    For decades the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been an important model system for biology, but little is known about its natural ecology. Recently, C. elegans has become the focus of studies of innate immunity and several pathogens have been shown to cause lethal intestinal infections in C. elegans. However none of these pathogens has been shown to invade nematode intestinal cells, and no pathogen has been isolated from wild-caught C. elegans. Here we describe an intracellular pathogen isolated from wild-caught C. elegans that we show is a new species of microsporidia. Microsporidia comprise a large class of eukaryotic intracellular parasites that are medically and agriculturally important, but poorly understood. We show that microsporidian infection of the C. elegans intestine proceeds through distinct stages and is transmitted horizontally. Disruption of a conserved cytoskeletal structure in the intestine called the terminal web correlates with the release of microsporidian spores from infected cells, and appears to be part of a novel mechanism by which intracellular pathogens exit from infected cells. Unlike in bacterial intestinal infections, the p38 MAPK and insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathways do not appear to play substantial roles in resistance to microsporidian infection in C. elegans. We found microsporidia in multiple wild-caught isolates of Caenorhabditis nematodes from diverse geographic locations. These results indicate that microsporidia are common parasites of C. elegans in the wild. In addition, the interaction between C. elegans and its natural microsporidian parasites provides a system in which to dissect intracellular intestinal infection in vivo and insight into the diversity of pathogenic mechanisms used by intracellular microbes. PMID:19071962

  2. Anthelmintic resistance in cattle nematodes in the US.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C

    2014-07-30

    The first documented case of macrocyclic lactone resistance in gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of cattle was seen in the US approximately 10 years ago. Since that time the increase incidence of anthelmintic resistance has continued at an alarming rate. Currently parasites of the genera Cooperia and/or Haemonchus resistant to generic or brand-name macrocyclic lactones have be demonstrated in more than half of all operations examined. Both of these parasite genera are capable of causing economic losses by decreasing food intake and subsequently animal productivity. Currently, there are no easy and quick means to detect anthelmintic resistant GI nematodes. Definitive identification requires killing of cattle. The most commonly used field detection method is the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). This method can be adapted for use as a screening agent for Veterinarians and producers to identify less than desired clearance of the parasites after anthelmintic treatment. Further studies can then define the reasons for persistence of the egg counts. The appearance of anthelmintic resistance is largely due to the development of very effective nematode control programs that have significantly improved the productivity of the US cattle industry, but at the same time has placed a high level of selective pressure on the parasite genome. The challenges ahead include the development of programs that control the anthelmintic resistant nematodes but at the same time result in more sustainable parasite control. The goal is to maintain high levels of productivity but to exert less selective pressures on the parasites. One of the most effective means to slow the development of drug resistance is through the simultaneous use of multiple classes of anthelmintics, each of which has a different mode of action. Reduction of the selective pressure on the parasites can be attained through a more targeted approach to drug treatments where the producer's needs are met by selective

  3. A Pathogenic Nematode Targets Recognition Proteins to Avoid Insect Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Toubarro, Duarte; Avila, Mónica Martinez; Montiel, Rafael; Simões, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Steinernemacarpocapsae is a nematode pathogenic in a wide variety of insect species. The great pathogenicity of this nematode has been ascribed to its ability to overcome the host immune response; however, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this process. The analysis of an expressed sequence tags (EST) library in the nematode during the infective phase was performed and a highly abundant contig homologous to serine protease inhibitors was identified. In this work, we show that this contig is part of a 641-bp cDNA that encodes a BPTI-Kunitz family inhibitor (Sc-KU-4), which is up-regulated in the parasite during invasion and installation. Recombinant Sc-KU-4 protein was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to inhibit chymotrypsin and elastase activities in a dose-dependent manner by a competitive mechanism with Ki values of 1.8 nM and 2.6 nM, respectively. Sc-KU-4 also inhibited trypsin and thrombin activities to a lesser extent. Studies of the mode of action of Sc-KU-4 and its effects on insect defenses suggest that although Sc-KU-4 did not inhibit the activation of hemocytes or the formation of clotting fibers, it did inhibit hemocyte aggregation and the entrapment of foreign particles by fibers. Moreover, Sc-KU-4 avoided encapsulation and the deposition of clotting materials, which usually occurs in response to foreign particles. We show by protein-protein interaction that Sc-KU-4 targets recognition proteins of insect immune system such as masquerade-like and serine protease-like homologs. The interaction of Sc-KU-4 with these proteins explains the ability of the nematode to overcome host reactions and its large pathogenic spectrum, once these immune proteins are well conserved in insects. The discovery of this inhibitor targeting insect recognition proteins opens new avenues for the development of S. carpocapsae as a biological control agent and provides a new tool to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24098715

  4. Influence of plant-parasitic nematodes on longleaf pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ruehle, J L

    1973-01-01

    Seedlings of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) were grown in 20-cm pots for 5 to 7 months in the greenhouse following inoculation with a high or low level of one of seven species of plant-parasitic nematodes. Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Helicotylenchus dihystera had no effect on seedling growth. High inoculum densities of Hoplolaimus galeatus and Tylenchorhynchus claytoni caused a significant reduction of fresh weight of seedling roots. Root and top weights of seedlings grown in soil infested with Meloidodera floridensis or Pratylenchus brachyurus were significantly less than those of seedlings in noninfested soil. Root growth of seedlings was stimulated by the higher inoculum density of Scutellonema brachyurum.

  5. Cambium Destruction in Conifers Caused by Pinewood Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Ronald F.

    1986-01-01

    Percentage and rate of mortality in 2-4-year-old conifers depended upon the numbers of pinewood nematodes Bursaphelenchus xylophilus inoculated into their stems. In addition, percentage of conifer mortality was greater for spring inoculations when cambial activity was greater than for late summer and fall inoculations. Gross and histological examination of stems revealed destruction of the cambial layer, including fusiform and ray intitials and their derivatives. These data suggest that cambial and ray destruction causes tree death through blockage of tracheids by gas, oleoresin, or metabolites from dying ray tissues. PMID:19294198

  6. Line Detection and Texture Analysis for Automatic Nematode Identification

    PubMed Central

    Fdez-Valdivia, J.; Pérez de la Blanca, N.; Castillo, P.; Gómez-Barcina, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series studying procedures for estimating and calibrating features of nematodes from digital images. Two kinds of features were analyzed for recognition: those with a directional component and those with a textural component. Features that have a directional component (lateral field and annules) were preprocessed with classic algorithms and modified by directional filters. Features having texture (esophagus and intestine) were analyzed with vectors of measures to define them and the statistical technique CART (classification and regression trees) to explain the role that each measure plays in the identification and discrimination process. PMID:19283037

  7. Generalists at the interface: Nematode transmission between wild and domestic ungulates

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Josephine G.; Morgan, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Many parasitic nematode species are generalists capable of infecting multiple host species. The complex life cycle of nematodes, involving partial development outside of the host, facilitates transmission of these parasites between host species even when there is no direct contact between hosts. Infective nematode larvae persist in the environment, and where grazing or water sources are shared ingestion of parasite larvae deposited by different host species is likely. In this paper we examine the extent to which nematode parasite species have been observed in sympatric wild and domestic ungulates. First, using existing host–parasite databases, we describe expected overlap of 412 nematode species between 76 wild and 8 domestic ungulate host species. Our results indicate that host-specific parasites make up less than half of the nematode parasites infecting any particular ungulate host species. For wild host species, between 14% (for common warthog) and 76% (for mouflon) of parasitic nematode species are shared with domestic species. For domestic host species, between 42% (for horse) and 77% (for llamas/alpacas) of parasitic nematode species are shared with wild species. We also present an index of liability to describe the risk of cross-boundary parasites to each host species. We then examine specific examples from the literature in which transmission of nematode parasites between domestic and wild ungulates is described. However, there are many limitations in the existing data due to geographical bias and certain host species being studied more frequently than others. Although we demonstrate that many species of parasitic nematode are found in both wild and domestic hosts, little work has been done to demonstrate whether transmission is occurring between species or whether similar strains circulate separately. Additional research on cross-species transmission, including the use of models and of genetic methods to define strains, will provide evidence to answer

  8. Nematicide impacts on nematodes and feedbacks on plant productivity in a plant diversity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Ackermann, Michael; Gass, Svenja; Klier, Matthias; Migunova, Varvara; Nitschke, Norma; Ruess, Liliane; Sabais, Alexander C. W.; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Scheu, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    A major issue in current ecological research is the effect of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning. Although several studies reported a positive diversity - productivity relationship, the role of soil animals has been largely neglected. Nematodes are among the most widespread and important herbivores causing substantial yield losses in agriculture; however, impacts of nematodes on the diversity - productivity relationship in semi-natural plant communities have not been investigated until today. In the framework of the Jena Experiment (Thuringia, Germany) we established control and nematicide treated subplots to manipulate nematode densities on plots varying in plant species (1-16) and functional group richness (1-4). We explored the interacting effects of nematicide application and plant diversity on the main trophic groups of nematodes and on aboveground plant productivity. Nematicide application reduced the number of nematodes significantly, particularly that of plant feeders and predators. The negative impact of nematicide application on plant and bacterial feeders depended however on the diversity of the plant community. Total plant shoot biomass tended to decrease in the presence of ambient nematode densities. In detail, nematode effects varied however with plant functional group identity by reducing only the shoot biomass of herbs significantly but not that of legumes. Furthermore, the shoot biomass of grasses tended to decrease in the presence of ambient nematode densities. In contrast to total shoot biomass, nematodes decreased grass shoot biomass only in high diverse but not in low diverse plant communities. Thus, the present study for the first time highlights that nematodes likely modify the community structure und functions of semi-natural plant communities by altering the competition between plant functional groups and by attenuating the diversity - productivity relationship.

  9. [Characteristics of soil nematode communities in coastal wetlands with different vegetation types].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei-Bei; Ye, Cheng-Long; Yu, Li; Jiao, Jia-Guo; Liu, Man-Qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-Xin

    2012-11-01

    An investigation was conducted on the characteristics of soil nematode communities in different vegetation belts (Spartina alterniflora belt, Sa; Suaeda glauca belt, Sg; bare land, B1; Phragmites australis belt, Pa; and wheat land, Wl) of Yancheng Wetland Reserve, Jiangsu Province of East China. A total of 39 genera and 20 families of soil nematodes were identified, and the individuals of dominant genera and common genera occupied more than 90% of the total. The total number of the nematodes differed remarkably with vegetation belts, ranged from 79 to 449 individuals per 100 grams of dry soil. Wheat land had the highest number of soil nematodes, while bare land had the lowest one. The nematode ecological indices responded differently to the vegetation belts. The Shannon index (H) and evenness index (J) decreased in the order of Pa > Sg > Wl > Sa > Bl, and the dominance index (lambda) was in the order of Bl > Sa > Wl > Sg > Pa, suggesting that the diversity and stability of the nematode community in bare land were lower than those in the other vegetation belts, and the nematode community in the bare land tended to be simplified. The maturity index (MI) was higher in uncultivated vegetation belts than in wheat land, suggesting that the wheat land was disturbed obviously. The nematode community structure differed significantly with vegetation belts, and the main contributing species in different vegetation belts also differed. There existed significant correlations between the soil physical and chemical characteristics and the nematode numbers, trophic groups, and ecological indices. Our results demonstrated that the changes of soil nematode community structure could be used as an indicator well reflecting the diversity of vegetation belt habitat, and an important bio-indicator of coastal wetland ecosystem.

  10. Nematode community composition and feeding shaped by contrasting productivity regimes in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Lidia; da Silva, Maria Cristina; Hauquier, Freija; Esteves, André Morgado; Vanreusel, Ann

    2015-05-01

    In the Southern Ocean, during the ANT-XXVIII expedition (RV Polarstern), four stations contrasting in terms of surface primary productivity were studied along the Polar Front from 39°W to 10°E. We investigated to what extent differences in surface primary productivity, together with benthic environmental parameters (concentration of Chlorophyll a and its derivatives, and sediment fatty acid composition) mirrored in nematode standing stocks (i.e. density and biomass) and differences in community composition. Moreover, nematode fatty acid (FA) analyses were performed to unravel feeding selectivity patterns on "bulk" nematodes and particular nematode taxa (Desmodora and Desmoscolecidae). South Georgia station, located NW of South Georgia island, possessed not only highest surface primary productivity, but also highest Chlorophyll a (and its derivatives) and total sediment FA concentrations, also reflected in up to 10-fold higher nematode standing stocks. FA composition from "bulk" nematodes, Desmodora and desmoscolecids revealed a planktonic-based diet, as revealed by diatom biomarkers (16:1 ω 7/16:0 > 1) for "bulk" nematodes and Desmodora from South Georgia. Nematodes at the other stations situated more to the east showed non-selectivity for fresh diatom material based on the FA composition, associated with low surface primary productivity and low labile carbon concentrations (low Chlorophyll a values) in these areas. Uncommonly found in typical deep-sea environments, the nematode genus Desmodora exhibited high numbers at South Georgia station, probably as a response to the high primary productivity at the surface, confirming the strong benthic-pelagic coupling even at great depths. This study suggests that alterations in nematode standing stocks and community composition, together with selective feeding reflected by distinct FA composition, can be positively associated and shaped by surface productivity regimes.

  11. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung.

  12. Evaluation of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil on goat gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; de Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Fernandes; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Amóra, Sthenia Dos Santos Albano

    2011-01-01

    Phytotherapy may be an alternative strategy for controlling gastrointestinal parasites. This study evaluated the anthelmintic efficacy of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil (EcEO). The in vitro effects of EcEO were determined through testing the inhibition of egg hatching and larval development of Haemonchus contortus. EcEO was subjected to acute toxicity testing on mice, orally and intraperitoneally. The in vivo effects of EcEO were determined by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) in goats infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The results showed that 5.3 mg.mL(-1) EcEO inhibited egg hatching by 98.8% and 10.6 mg.mL(-1) EcEO inhibited H. contortus larval development by 99.71%. The lethal doses for 50% of the mice were 4153 and 622.8 mg.kg(-1), for acute toxicity orally and intraperitoneally. In the FECRT, the efficacy of EcEO and ivermectin was 66.25 and 79.16% respectively, on goat gastrointestinal nematodes eight days after treatment. EcEO showed in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity.

  13. Mitochondrial Phylogenomics yields Strongly Supported Hypotheses for Ascaridomorph Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Nadler, Steven A.; Liu, Shan-Shan; Podolska, Magdalena; D’Amelio, Stefano; Shao, Renfu; Gasser, Robin B.; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Ascaridomorph nematodes threaten the health of humans and other animals worldwide. Despite their medical, veterinary and economic importance, the identification of species lineages and establishing their phylogenetic relationships have proved difficult in some cases. Many working hypotheses regarding the phylogeny of ascaridomorphs have been based on single-locus data, most typically nuclear ribosomal RNA. Such single-locus hypotheses lack independent corroboration, and for nuclear rRNA typically lack resolution for deep relationships. As an alternative approach, we analyzed the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of anisakids (~14 kb) from different fish hosts in multiple countries, in combination with those of other ascaridomorphs available in the GenBank database. The circular mt genomes range from 13,948-14,019 bp in size and encode 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes. Our analysis showed that the Pseudoterranova decipiens complex consists of at least six cryptic species. In contrast, the hypothesis that Contracaecum ogmorhini represents a complex of cryptic species is not supported by mt genome data. Our analysis recovered several fundamental and uncontroversial ascaridomorph clades, including the monophyly of superfamilies and families, except for Ascaridiidae, which was consistent with the results based on nuclear rRNA analysis. In conclusion, mt genome analysis provided new insights into the phylogeny and taxonomy of ascaridomorph nematodes. PMID:27982084

  14. Family of FLP Peptides in Caenorhabditis elegans and Related Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chris; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides regulate all aspects of behavior in multicellular organisms. Because of their ability to act at long distances, neuropeptides can exert their effects beyond the conventional synaptic connections, thereby adding an intricate layer of complexity to the activity of neural networks. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a large number of neuropeptide genes that are expressed throughout the nervous system have been identified. The actions of these peptides supplement the synaptic connections of the 302 neurons, allowing for fine tuning of neural networks and increasing the ways in which behaviors can be regulated. In this review, we focus on a large family of genes encoding FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These genes, the flp genes, have been used as a starting point to identifying flp genes throughout Nematoda. Nematodes have the largest family of FaRPs described thus far. The challenges in the future are the elucidation of their functions and the identification of the receptors and signaling pathways through which they function. PMID:25352828

  15. Neuronal uptake of pesticides disrupts chemosensory cells of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Winter, M D; McPherson, M J; Atkinson, H J

    2002-12-01

    Low doses of the acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting carbamate nematicides disrupt chemoreception in plant-parasitic nematodes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/dextran conjugates up to 12 kDa are taken up from the external medium by certain chemosensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similar chemoreceptive neurons of the non-feeding infective stage of Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode) fill with FITC and the nuclei of their cell bodies selectively stain with bisbenzimide. The widely used nematicide aldicarb disrupts the chemoreceptive response of H. glycines with 50% inhibition at very low concentrations (ca 1 pM), some 10(-6)-fold lower than required to affect locomotion. Similarly, the anthelmintic levamisole had this effect at 1 nM. Peptides selected as mimetics of aldicarb and levamisole also disrupt chemoreception in H. glycines and Globodera pallida at 10(-3)-fold or lower concentration than required to inhibit locomotion. We propose an uptake pathway for aldicarb, levamisole, peptide mimetics and other soluble molecules by retrograde transport along dendrites of chemoreceptive neurons to the cell bodies and synapses where they act. This may prove to be a general mechanism for the low-dose effects of some nematicides and anthelmintics.

  16. Differential Toxicities of Nickel Salts to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Dean; Birdsey, Jennifer M; Wendolowski, Mark A; Dobbin, Kevin K; Williams, Phillip L

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on assessing whether nickel (Ni) toxicity to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was affected by the molecular structure of the Ni salt used. Nematodes were exposed to seven Ni salts [Ni sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4·6H2O), Ni chloride hexahydrate (NiCl2·6H2O), Ni acetate tetrahydrate (Ni(OCOCH3)2·4H2O), Ni nitrate hexahydrate (N2NiO6·6H2O), anhydrous Ni iodide (NiI2), Ni sulfamate hydrate (Ni(SO3NH2)2·H2O), and Ni fluoride tetrahydrate (NiF2·4H2O)] in an aquatic medium for 24 h, and lethality curves were generated and analyzed. Ni fluoride, Ni iodide, and Ni chloride were most toxic to C. elegans, followed by Ni nitrate, Ni sulfamate, Ni acetate, and Ni sulfate. The LC50 values of the halogen-containing salts were statistically different from the corresponding value of the least toxic salt, Ni sulfate. This finding is consistent with the expected high bioavailability of free Ni ions in halide solutions. We recommend that the halide salts be used in future Ni testing involving aquatic invertebrates.

  17. Pathogenesis in Pine Wilt Caused by Pinewood Nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Ronald F.

    1988-01-01

    The progression of events in the development of pine wilt disease following the invasion by Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is reviewed from early migration through pine tissues until symptom development on foliage. Disease resistance in pines, especially the hypersensitive reaction that is successful in controlling many potential pests and pathogens, is explored. Pathologies resulting from the activities of pinewood nematode include cortical trails and cavities; formation of cambial gaps and traumatic resin cysts; browning and death of cortex, phloem, cambium, and ray tissues; granulation and shrinkage of cell cytoplasm in rays; and destruction of resin canal epithelial and ray parenchyma cells. Death of parenchyma, production of toxins, and leakage of oleoresins and other material into tracheids are typical of the hypersensitive reaction occurring in pines following migration of small numbers of pinewood nematodes. The hypothesis presented is that a spreading hypersensitive reaction results in some of the observed pathologies and symptoms and eventually causes pine death. The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis is used to help explain predisposition, oleoresin production and toxicity, susceptibility and resistance, and the effects of variation in climate on host pines as related to pinewilt disease. PMID:19290207

  18. Effects of climatic changes on anisakid nematodes in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokicki, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    Anisakid nematodes are common in Antarctic, sub-Antarctic, and Arctic areas. Current distributional knowledge of anisakids in the polar regions is reviewed. Climatic variables influence the occurrence and abundance of anisakids, directly influencing their free-living larval stages and also indirectly influencing their predominantly invertebrate (but also vertebrate) hosts. As these parasites can also be pathogenic for humans, the paucity of information available is a source of additional hazard. As fish are a major human dietary component in Arctic and Antarctic areas, and are often eaten without heat processing, a high risk of infection by anisakid larvae might be expected. The present level of knowledge, particularly relating to anisakid larval stages present in fishes, is far from satisfactory. Preliminary molecular studies have revealed the presence of species complexes. Contemporary climate warming is modifying the marine environment and may result in an extension of time during which anisakid eggs can persist and hatch, and of the time period during which newly hatched larvae remain viable. As a result there may be an increase in the extent of anisakid distribution. Continued warming will modify the composition of the parasitic nematode fauna of marine animals, due to changes in feeding habits, as the warming of the sea and any localised reduction in salinity (from freshwater runoff) can be expected to bring about changes in the species composition of pelagic and benthic invertebrates.

  19. Reproduction of the Reniform Nematode on Thirty Soybean Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, R. T.; Rakes, L.; Elkins, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    In greenhouse experiments conducted in 1991 and 1992, the 30 soybean (Glycine max) cultivars most commonly grown in Arkansas in 1990 were tested for resistance to the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis. 'Forrest' was the most resistant cultivar, whereas 'Braxton' was the most susceptible to R. reniformis. Cultivars Coker 485, Centennial, Stonewall, and Sharkey did not differ from Forrest (P = 0.01). Cultivars Lee 74, Coker 6955, Waiters, Davis, Pioneer 9442, and Narow did not differ from Braxton (P = 0.01). Cultivar Lloyd had the second highest reproductive index (Pf/Pi) in 1992 and for the combined test, but was significantly different from Braxton in 1991. The remaining cultivars were inconsistent in their reproductive indices. Two cultivars, Leflore and Lloyd, exhibited large variation in Pf/Pi. This may be due to multiple resistance genes and (or) segregation for resistance among individual seedlings. Segregation is possible because these varieties were not selected or tested for reniform nematode resistance during the cultivar development process. PMID:19279944

  20. The mitochondrial genome of the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Tracey; Farrugia, Daniel; Barrett, Jeff; Chitwood, David J; Rowe, Janet; Subbotin, Sergei; Dowton, Mark

    2011-07-01

    We sequenced the entire coding region of the mitochondrial genome of Heterodera glycines. The sequence obtained comprised 14.9 kb, with PCR evidence indicating that the entire genome comprised a single, circular molecule of approximately 21-22 kb. The genome is the most T-rich nematode mitochondrial genome reported to date, with T representing over half of all nucleotides on the coding strand. The genome also contains the highest number of poly(T) tracts so far reported (to our knowledge), with 60 poly(T) tracts ≥ 12 Ts. All genes are transcribed from the same mitochondrial strand. The organization of the mitochondrial genome of H. glycines shows a number of similarities compared with Radopholus similis, but fewer similarities when compared with Meloidogyne javanica. Very few gene boundaries are shared with Globodera pallida or Globodera rostochiensis. Partial mitochondrial genome sequences were also obtained for Heterodera cardiolata (5.3 kb) and Punctodera chalcoensis (6.8 kb), and these had identical organizations compared with H. glycines. We found PCR evidence of a minicircular mitochondrial genome in P. chalcoensis, but at low levels and lacking a noncoding region. Such circularised genome fragments may be present at low levels in a range of nematodes, with multipartite mitochondrial genomes representing a shift to a condition in which these subgenomic circles predominate.

  1. The regulation of spermatogenesis and sperm function in nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ronald E.; Stanfield, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    In the nematode C. elegans, both males and self-fertile hermaphrodites produce sperm. As a result, researchers have been able to use a broad range of genetic and genomic techniques to dissect all aspects of sperm development and function. Their results show that the early stages of spermatogenesis are controlled by transcriptional and translational processes, but later stages are dominated by protein kinases and phosphatases. Once spermatids are produced, they participate in many interactions with other cells — signals from the somatic gonad determine when sperm activate and begin to crawl, signals from the female reproductive tissues guide the sperm, and signals from sperm stimulate oocytes to mature and be ovulated. The sperm also show strong competitive interactions with other sperm and oocytes. Some of the molecules that mediate these processes have conserved functions in animal sperm, others are conserved proteins that have been adapted for new roles in nematode sperm, and some are novel proteins that provide insights into evolutionary change. The advent of new techniques should keep this system on the cutting edge of research in cellular and reproductive biology. PMID:24718317

  2. Mitochondrial Phylogenomics yields Strongly Supported Hypotheses for Ascaridomorph Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Nadler, Steven A; Liu, Shan-Shan; Podolska, Magdalena; D'Amelio, Stefano; Shao, Renfu; Gasser, Robin B; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-12-16

    Ascaridomorph nematodes threaten the health of humans and other animals worldwide. Despite their medical, veterinary and economic importance, the identification of species lineages and establishing their phylogenetic relationships have proved difficult in some cases. Many working hypotheses regarding the phylogeny of ascaridomorphs have been based on single-locus data, most typically nuclear ribosomal RNA. Such single-locus hypotheses lack independent corroboration, and for nuclear rRNA typically lack resolution for deep relationships. As an alternative approach, we analyzed the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of anisakids (~14 kb) from different fish hosts in multiple countries, in combination with those of other ascaridomorphs available in the GenBank database. The circular mt genomes range from 13,948-14,019 bp in size and encode 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes. Our analysis showed that the Pseudoterranova decipiens complex consists of at least six cryptic species. In contrast, the hypothesis that Contracaecum ogmorhini represents a complex of cryptic species is not supported by mt genome data. Our analysis recovered several fundamental and uncontroversial ascaridomorph clades, including the monophyly of superfamilies and families, except for Ascaridiidae, which was consistent with the results based on nuclear rRNA analysis. In conclusion, mt genome analysis provided new insights into the phylogeny and taxonomy of ascaridomorph nematodes.

  3. Technological advancements and their importance for nematode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Sapp, Melanie; Prior, Thomas; Karssen, Gerrit; Back, Matthew Alan

    2016-06-01

    Nematodes represent a species-rich and morphologically diverse group of metazoans known to inhabit both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Their role as biological indicators and as key players in nutrient cycling has been well documented. Some plant-parasitic species are also known to cause significant losses to crop production. In spite of this, there still exists a huge gap in our knowledge of their diversity due to the enormity of time and expertise often involved in characterising species using phenotypic features. Molecular methodology provides useful means of complementing the limited number of reliable diagnostic characters available for morphology-based identification. We discuss herein some of the limitations of traditional taxonomy and how molecular methodologies, especially the use of high-throughput sequencing, have assisted in carrying out large-scale nematode community studies and characterisation of phytonematodes through rapid identification of multiple taxa. We also provide brief descriptions of some the current and almost-outdated high-throughput sequencing platforms and their applications in both plant nematology and soil ecology.

  4. Postplant Fumigation with DBCP for Citrus Nematode Control in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Tarjan, A. C.; O'Bannon, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven citrus groves of diverse varieties and ages infected with Tylenchulus semipenetrans growing in differing soils in Florida were treated with three rates of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) applied by various means. Yield, fruit size, and T. semipenetrans populations in the roots were compared between DBCP-treated and untreated trees over a period of I-3 yr. Maximum fruit size and yield were obtained by applying DBCP at 38-58 kg/hectare (ha) (34-52 lb/acre); whereas best nematode control was with a rate of 77 kg/ha (69 lb/acre). Application of chemical emulsion with a special, drilled, low-profile sprinkler irrigation ground pipe was the most suitable method. Effect of DBCP treatment generally lasted for 3 yr. A mean annual I. 1% increase in fruit diameter, 15.2% increase in fruit yield and a 55.7% decrease incitrus nematode populations was found for D BC P-treated trees in contrast to untreated trees. PMID:19319363

  5. Plant-parasitic Nematodes Associated with Cherry Rootstocks in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Melakeberhan, H; Bird, G W; Perry, R

    1994-12-01

    In two field trials, 10-year-old sweet and tart cherry rooted on 'Mazzard', 'Mahaleb', 'MXM 2', 'MXM 14', 'MXM 39', 'MXM 60', 'MXM 97', and 'Colt' showed 10-203 Pratylenchus penetrans per g fresh root from all tart rootstocks, and up to 46 Pratylenchus, Criconemella, and Xiphinema spp. per 100 cm(3) soil. Infestation of soil containing 1-year-old Mazzard, Mahaleb, MXM 60, 'GI148-1', and 'G1148-8' with 625/100 cm(3) soil of either P. penetrans or C. xenoplax resulting in final nematode population densities of 123-486 and 451-2,496/g fresh root plus 100 cm(3) soil, respectively, and had little effect on plant height or dry weight after 157 days in a greenhouse. Population densities of neither nematode differed among the five rootstocks. In a second greenhouse experiment, soil containing the same rootstocks was infested with P. penetrans (1,250/100 cm(3) soil), maintained for 8 months in a greenhouse, 4 months in a cold room (2-4 C), and 3 additional months in a greenhouse. The number of P. penetrans recovered at the end of 475 days was approximately 10% of those recovered in the first experiment, probably due to the cold treatment. The ability of P. penetrans and C. xenoplax to infect the cherry rootstocks may be of concern in cherry management programs.

  6. The nucleotide sequence of a nematode vitellogenin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Spieth, J; Denison, K; Zucker, E; Blumenthal, T

    1985-01-01

    The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, contains a family of six genes that code for vitellogenins. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of one of these genes, vit-5. The gene specifies a mRNA of 4869 nucleotides, including untranslated regions of 9 bases at the 5' end and 51 bases at the 3' end. Vit-5 contains four short introns totalling 218 bp. The predicted vitellogenin, yp170A, has a molecular weight of 186,430. At its N terminus it is clearly related to the vitellogenins of vertebrates. However, the vit-5-encoded protein does not contain a serine-rich sequence related to the vertebrate vitellin, phosvitin. In fact, the amino acid composition of the nematode protein is very similar to that of the vertebrate protein without phosvitin. Vit-5 has a highly asymmetric codon choice dictionary. The favored codons are different from those favored in other organisms, but are characteristic of highly expressed C. elegans genes. The strong selection against rare codons is not as great near the 5' end of the gene; rare codons are 15 times more frequent within the first 54 bp than in the next 4.8 kb. PMID:3855245

  7. Hormone signaling and phenotypic plasticity in nematode development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ralf J; Ogawa, Akira

    2011-09-27

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the ability of an organism to adopt different phenotypes depending on environmental conditions. In animals and plants, the progression of juvenile development and the formation of dormant stages are often associated with phenotypic plasticity, indicating the importance of phenotypic plasticity for life-history theory. Phenotypic plasticity has long been emphasized as a crucial principle in ecology and as facilitator of phenotypic evolution. In nematodes, several examples of phenotypic plasticity have been studied at the genetic and developmental level. In addition, the influence of different environmental factors has been investigated under laboratory conditions. These studies have provided detailed insight into the molecular basis of phenotypic plasticity and its ecological and evolutionary implications. Here, we review recent studies on the formation of dauer larvae in Caenorhabditis elegans, the evolution of nematode parasitism and the generation of a novel feeding trait in Pristionchus pacificus. These examples reveal a conserved and co-opted role of an endocrine signaling module involving the steroid hormone dafachronic acid. We will discuss how hormone signaling might facilitate life-history and morphological evolution.

  8. Trophic interactions in soils as they affect energy and nutrient dynamics. III. Biotic interactions of bacteria, amoebae, and nematodes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R V; Elliott, E T; McClellan, J F; Coleman, D C; Cole, C V; Hunt, H W

    1977-12-01

    Bacteria (Pseudomonas), amoebae (Acanthamoeba), and nematodes (Mesodiplogaster) were raised in soil microcosms with and without glucose additions. Nematode and amoebal grazing on bacteria significantly reduced bacterial populations by the end of a 24-day incubation period. Amoebal numbers decreased in the presence of nematodes with a corresponding increase in nematode numbers which reached a maximum of 230 nematodes/g of soil in the treatment with amoebae and glucose additions. After 24 days the nematode populations in the treatments without carbon additions were dominated by resistant dauer larvae indicating the unavailability of food. Although larval numbers were high in the treatments with glucose additions, the adult component of the population was still increasing at the end of the 24-day experiment. The effect of the presence of amoebae on nematode abundance was of the same magnitude as addition of 600Μg glucose-C.

  9. Ascarosides coordinate the dispersal of a plant-parasitic nematode with the metamorphosis of its vector beetle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lilin; Zhang, Xinxing; Wei, Yanan; Zhou, Jiao; Zhang, Wei; Qin, Peijun; Chinta, Satya; Kong, Xiangbo; Liu, Yunpeng; Yu, Haiying; Hu, Songnian; Zou, Zhen; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Sun, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Insect vectors are required for the transmission of many species of parasitic nematodes, but the mechanisms by which the vectors and nematodes coordinate their life cycles are poorly understood. Here, we report that ascarosides, an evolutionarily conserved family of nematode pheromones, are produced not only by a plant-parasitic nematode, but also by its vector beetle. The pinewood nematode and its vector beetle cause pine wilt disease, which threatens forest ecosystems world-wide. Ascarosides secreted by the dispersal third-stage nematode LIII larvae promote beetle pupation by inducing ecdysone production in the beetle and up-regulating ecdysone-dependent gene expression. Once the beetle develops into the adult stage, it secretes ascarosides that attract the dispersal fourth-stage nematode LIV larvae, potentially facilitating their movement into the beetle trachea for transport to the next pine tree. These results demonstrate that ascarosides play a key role in the survival and spread of pine wilt disease. PMID:27477780

  10. Gastrointestinal nematode community of spiny mice (Acomys dimidiatus) from St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Maha F M; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Zalat, Samy M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study gastrointestinal nematode community infecting Acomys dimidiatus in different wadis of St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt. Fieldwork was conducted in three Wadis over a 4 weeks period during April-May, 2003 in St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt. Faecal samples from 47 spiny mice were analysed for gastrointestinal nematode community. The nematodes community consisted of four genera Dentostomella spp., Syphacia spp., Aspicularis spp. and Spirurids species. The overall prevalence of infection was 55.3 %. A significant difference in prevalence was found per wadis. Wadi Toffaha showed the highest diversity when compared to other Wadis. Mean species richness was higher in Wadi Tlah (0.87) when compared to other Wadis. Syphacia spp. was frequently found coexisting with other nematodes. A significant interaction was found between both site and co-infection for Aspicularis spp. The spatial stability of nematode community was discussed compared to other related studies. In terms of similarity, the nematode community from Wadi Toffaha was closest to Wadi Tlah. In conclusion, this study showed that there is spatial variation in the distribution of nematode community. Possible factors affecting the stability of parasite community were discussed and further studies are needed.

  11. Investigation of Low-Pressure Ultraviolet Radiation on Inactivation of Rhabitidae Nematode from Water

    PubMed Central

    DEHGHANI, Mohammad Hadi; JAHED, Gholam-Reza; ZAREI, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rhabditidae is a family of free-living nematodes. Free living nematodes due to their active movement and resistance to chlorination, do not remove in conventional water treatment processes thus can be entered to distribution systems and cause adverse health effects. Ultraviolet radiation (UV) can be used as a method of inactivating for these organisms. This cross sectional study was done to investigate the efficiency of ultraviolet lamp in the inactivation of free living nematode in water. Methods: The effects of radation time, turbidity, pH and temperature were invistigated in this study. Ultraviolet lamp used in this study was a 11 W lamp and intensity of this lamp was 24 μw / cm2. Results: Radiation time required to achieve 100% efficiency for larvae nematode and adults was 9 and 10 minutes respectively. There was a significant correlation between the increase in radiation time, temperature rise and turbidity reduction with inactivation efficiency of lamp (P<0.001). Increase of turbidity up 25 NTU decreased inactivation efficiency of larvae and adult nematodes from 100% to 66% and 100% to 64% respectively. Change in pH range from 6 to 9 did not affect the efficiency of inactivation. With increasing temperature inactivation rate increased. Also the effect of the lamp on inactivation of larvae nematod was mor than adults. Conclusions: It seems that with requiring the favorable conditions low-pressure ultraviolet radiation systems can be used for disinfection of water containing Rhabitidae nematode. PMID:23641409

  12. NemaCount: quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior in a browser.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-06-01

    Nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans offer a very effective and tractable system to probe the underlying mechanisms of diverse sensory behaviors. Numerous platforms exist for quantifying nematode behavior and often require separate dependencies or software. Here I describe a novel and simple tool called NemaCount that provides a versatile solution for the quantification of nematode chemotaxis behavior. The ease of installation and user-friendly interface makes NemaCount a practical tool for measuring diverse behaviors and image features of nematodes such as C. elegans. The main advantage of NemaCount is that it operates from within a modern browser such as Google Chrome or Apple Safari. Any features that change in total number, size, shape, or angular distance between control and experimental preparations are suited to NemaCount for image analysis, while commonly used chemotaxis assays can be quantified, and statistically analyzed using a suite of functions from within NemaCount. NemaCount also offers image filtering options that allow the user to improve object detection and measurements. NemaCount was validated by examining nematode chemotaxis behavior; angular distances of locomotory tracks in C. elegans; and body lengths of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora nematodes. Apart from a modern browser, no additional software is required to operate NemaCount, making NemaCount a cheap, simple option for the analysis of nematode images and chemotaxis behavior.

  13. Manipulation of plant cells by cyst and root-knot nematode effectors.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Baum, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes is the release of effector proteins from their esophageal gland cells through their stylets into host roots. These proteinaceous stylet secretions have been shown to be crucial for successful parasitism by mediating the transition of normal root cells into specialized feeding sites and by negating plant defenses. Recent technical advances of purifying mRNA from esophageal gland cells of plant-parasitic nematodes coupled with emerging sequencing technologies is steadily expanding our knowledge of nematode effector repertoires. Host targets and biological activities of a number of nematode effectors are continuously being reported and, by now, a first picture of the complexity of sedentary nematode parasitism at the molecular level is starting to take shape. In this review, we highlight effector mechanisms that recently have been uncovered by studying the host-pathogen interaction. These mechanisms range from mediating susceptibility of host plants to the actual triggering of defense responses. In particular, we portray and discuss the mechanisms by which nematode effectors modify plant cell walls, negate host defense responses, alter auxin and polyamine signaling, mimic plant molecules, regulate stress signaling, and activate hypersensitive responses. Continuous molecular characterization of newly discovered nematode effectors will be needed to determine how these effectors orchestrate host signaling pathways and biological processes leading to successful parasitism.

  14. Helminth.net: expansions to Nematode.net and an introduction to Trematode.net.

    PubMed

    Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce A; Ozersky, Philip; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Bhonagiri-Palsikar, Veena; Tyagi, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Choi, Young-Jun; Gao, Xin; McNulty, Samantha N; Brindley, Paul J; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Helminth.net (http://www.helminth.net) is the new moniker for a collection of databases: Nematode.net and Trematode.net. Within this collection we provide services and resources for parasitic roundworms (nematodes) and flatworms (trematodes), collectively known as helminths. For over a decade we have provided resources for studying nematodes via our veteran site Nematode.net (http://nematode.net). In this article, (i) we provide an update on the expansions of Nematode.net that hosts omics data from 84 species and provides advanced search tools to the broad scientific community so that data can be mined in a useful and user-friendly manner and (ii) we introduce Trematode.net, a site dedicated to the dissemination of data from flukes, flatworm parasites of the class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes. Trematode.net is an independent component of Helminth.net and currently hosts data from 16 species, with information ranging from genomic, functional genomic data, enzymatic pathway utilization to microbiome changes associated with helminth infections. The databases' interface, with a sophisticated query engine as a backbone, is intended to allow users to search for multi-factorial combinations of species' omics properties. This report describes updates to Nematode.net since its last description in NAR, 2012, and also introduces and presents its new sibling site, Trematode.net.

  15. Strategies for transgenic nematode control in developed and developing world crops.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Howard J; Lilley, Catherine J; Urwin, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    Nematodes cause an estimated $118b annual losses to world crops and they are not readily controlled by pesticides or other control options. For many crops natural resistance genes are unavailable to plant breeders or progress by this approach is slow. Transgenic plants can provide nematode resistance for such crops. Two approaches have been field trialled that control a wide range of nematodes by either limiting use of their dietary protein uptake from the crop or by preventing root invasion without a direct lethality. In addition, RNA interference increasingly in tandem with genomic studies is providing a range of potential resistance traits that involve no novel protein production. Transgenic resistance can be delivered by tissue specific promoters to just root tissues where most economic nematodes invade and feed rather than the harvested yield. High efficacy and durability can be provided by stacking nematode resistance traits including any that natural resistance provides. The constraints to uptake centre on market acceptance and not the availability of appropriate biotechnology. The need to deploy nematode resistance is intensifying with loss of pesticides, an increased need to protect crop profit margins and in many developing world countries where nematodes severely damage both commodity and staple crops.

  16. Influence of mycorrhizal fungus, phosphorus, and burrowing nematode interactions on growth of rough lemon citrus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Smith, G S; Kaplan, D T

    1988-10-01

    Rough lemon seedlings were grown in mycorrhizal-infested or phosphorus-amended soil (25 and 300 mg P/kg) in greenhouse experiments. Plants Were inoculated with the citrus burrowing nematode, Radopholus citrophilus (0, 50, 100, or 200 nematodes per pot). Six months later, mycorrhizal plants and nonmycorrhizal, high-P plants had larger shoot and root weights than did non-mycorrhizal, low-P plants. Burrowing nematode population densities were lower in roots of mycorrhizal or nonmycorrhizal, high-P plants than in roots of nonmycorrhizal, low-P plants; however, differences in plant growth between mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants were not significant with respect to initial nematode inoculum densities. Phosphorus content in leaf tissue was significantly greater in mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal, high-P plants compared with nonmycorrhizal, low-P plants. Nutrient concentrations of K, Mg, and Zn were unaffected by nematode parasitism, whereas P, Ca, Fe, and Mn were less in nematode-infected plants. Enhanced growth associated with root colonization by the mycorrhizal fungus appeared to result from improved P nutrition and not antagonism between the fungus and the nematode.

  17. Host Suitability of the Olive Cultivars Arbequina and Picual for Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Nico, A. I.; Jiménez-Díaz, R. M.; Castillo, P.

    2003-01-01

    Host suitability of olive cultivars Arbequina and Picual to several plant-parasitic nematodes was studied under controlled conditions. Arbequina and Picual were not suitable hosts for the root-lesion nematodes Pratylenchus fallax, P. thornei, and Zygotylenchus guevarai. However, the ring nematode Mesocriconema xenoplax and the spiral nematodes Helicotylenchus digonicus and H. pseudorobustus reproduced on both olive cultivars. The potential of Meloidogyne arenaria race 2, M. incognita race 1, and M. javanica, as well as P. vulnus and P. penetrans to damage olive cultivars, was also assessed. Picual planting stocks infected by root-knot nematodes showed a distinct yellowing affecting the uppermost leaves, followed by a partial defoliation. Symptoms were more severe on M. arenaria and M. javanica-infected plants than on M. incognita-infected plants. Inoculation of plants with 15,000 eggs + second-stage juveniles/pot of these Meloidogyne spp. suppressed the main height of shoot and number of nodes of Arbequina, but not Picual. Infection by each of the two lesion nematodes (5,000 nematodes/pot) or by each of the three Meloidogyne spp. suppressed (P < 0.05) the main stem diameter of both cultivars. On Arbequina, the reproduction rate of Meloidogyne spp. was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Pratylenchus spp.; on Picual, Pratylenchus spp. reproduction was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Meloidogyne spp. PMID:19265971

  18. Generation of transgenic plantain (Musa spp.) with resistance to plant pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Leena; Babirye, Annet; Wang, Dong; Tripathi, Jaindra; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-10-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes impose a severe constraint on plantain and banana productivity; however, the sterile nature of many cultivars precludes conventional breeding for resistance. Transgenic plantain cv. Gonja manjaya (Musa AAB) plants, expressing a maize cystatin that inhibits nematode digestive cysteine proteinases and a synthetic peptide that disrupts nematode chemoreception, were assessed for their ability to resist nematode infection. Lines were generated that expressed each gene singly or both together in a stacked defence. Nematode challenge with a single species or a mixed population identified 10 lines with significant resistance. The best level of resistance achieved against the major pest species Radopholus similis was 84% ± 8% for the cystatin, 66% ± 14% for the peptide and 70% ± 6% for the dual defence. In the mixed population, trial resistance was also demonstrated to Helicotylenchus multicinctus. A fluorescently labelled form of the chemodisruptive peptide underwent retrograde transport along certain sensory dendrites of R. similis as required to disrupt chemoreception. The peptide was degraded after 30 min in simulated intestinal fluid or boiling water and after 1 h in nonsterile soil. In silico sequence analysis suggests that the peptide is not a mammalian antigen. This work establishes the mode of action of a novel nematode defence, develops the evidence for its safe and effective deployment against multiple nematode species and identifies transgenic plantain lines with a high level of resistance for a proposed field trial.

  19. Composition of the Cockroach Gut Microbiome in the Presence of Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ozawa, Sota; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are parasitized by thelastomatid nematodes, which live in an obligate manner in their hindgut and interact with the resident microbial community. In the present study, a composition analysis was performed on the gut microbiome of Periplaneta fuliginosa and P. americana to investigate natural and artificial infection by thelastomatid nematodes. Nine libraries of the 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 region were prepared for pyrosequencing. We examined the complete gut microbiome (fore-, mid-, and hindgut) of lab-reared P. fuliginosa naturally infected with the parasitic nematode Leidynema appendiculatum and those that were nematode-free, and complemented our study by characterizing the hindgut microbial communities of lab-reared P. americana naturally infected with Hammerschmidtiella diesingi and Thelastoma bulhoesi, artificially infected with L. appendiculatum, and those that were nematode-free. Our results revealed that the fore- and midgut of naturally infected and nematode-free P. fuliginosa have close microbial communities, which is in contrast with hindgut communities; the hindgut communities of both cockroaches exhibit higher microbial diversities in the presence of their natural parasites and marked differences were observed in the abundance of the most representative taxa, namely Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Our results have provided basic information and encourage further studies on multitrophic interactions in the cockroach gut as well as the thelastomatid nematodes that play a role in this environment. PMID:27524304

  20. Nematodes in Dryland Field Crops in the Semiarid Pacific Northwest United States

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Richard W.; Merrifield, Kathy; Patterson, Lisa-Marie; Whittaker, Ruth G.; Gourlie, Jennifer A.; Easley, Sandra A.

    2004-01-01

    Soils and roots of field crops in low-rainfall regions of the Pacific Northwest were surveyed for populations of plantparasitic and non-plant-parasitic nematodes. Lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus species) were recovered from 123 of 130 non-irrigated and 18 of 18 irrigated fields. Pratylenchus neglectus was more prevalent than P. thornei, but mixed populations were common. Population densities in soil were affected by crop frequency and rotation but not by tillage or soil type (P < 0.05). Many fields (25%) cropped more frequently than 2 of 4 years had potentially damaging populations of lesion nematodes. Pratylenchus neglectus density in winter wheat roots was inversely correlated with grain yield (r2 = 0.64, P = 0.002), providing the first field-derived evidence that Pratylenchus is economically important in Pacific Northwest dryland field crops. Stunt nematodes (Tylenchorhynchus clarus and Geocenamus brevidens) were detected in 35% of fields and were occasionally present in high numbers. Few fields were infested with pin (Paratylenchus species) and root-knot (Meloidogyne naasi and M. chitwoodi) nematodes. Nematodes detected previously but not during this survey included cereal cyst (Heterodera avenae), dagger (Xiphinema species), and root-gall (Subanguina radicicola) nematodes. PMID:19262788