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Sample records for non-glucose induced insulin

  1. Acute Glucagon Induces Postprandial Peripheral Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patarrão, Rita S.; Lautt, W. Wayne; Macedo, M. Paula

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon levels are often moderately elevated in diabetes. It is known that glucagon leads to a decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH) synthesis that in turn is associated with decreased postprandial insulin sensitivity. Given that cAMP pathway controls GSH levels we tested whether insulin sensitivity decreases after intraportal (ipv) administration of a cAMP analog (DBcAMP), and investigated whether glucagon promotes insulin resistance through decreasing hepatic GSH levels.Insulin sensitivity was determined in fed male Sprague-Dawley rats using a modified euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp in the postprandial state upon ipv administration of DBcAMP as well as glucagon infusion. Glucagon effects on insulin sensitivity was assessed in the presence or absence of postprandial insulin sensitivity inhibition by administration of L-NMMA. Hepatic GSH and NO content and plasma levels of NO were measured after acute ipv glucagon infusion. Insulin sensitivity was assessed in the fed state and after ipv glucagon infusion in the presence of GSH-E. We founf that DBcAMP and glucagon produce a decrease of insulin sensitivity, in a dose-dependent manner. Glucagon-induced decrease of postprandial insulin sensitivity correlated with decreased hepatic GSH content and was restored by administration of GSH-E. Furthermore, inhibition of postprandial decrease of insulin sensitivity L-NMMA was not overcome by glucagon, but glucagon did not affect hepatic and plasma levels of NO. These results show that glucagon decreases postprandial insulin sensitivity through reducing hepatic GSH levels, an effect that is mimicked by increasing cAMP hepatic levels and requires physiological NO levels. These observations support the hypothesis that glucagon acts via adenylate cyclase to decrease hepatic GSH levels and induce insulin resistance. We suggest that the glucagon-cAMP-GSH axis is a potential therapeutic target to address insulin resistance in pathological conditions. PMID:25961284

  2. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  3. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  4. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:26340929

  5. Methimazole-induced insulin autoimmune syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nidhi; Savani, Malvi; Agarwal, Manyoo; Kadaria, Dipen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia in a critical care setting is often multifactorial with iatrogenic insulin use, sulfonylurea (SU) use, sepsis, adrenal insufficiency and insulinoma among the common causes. Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of hypoglycemia characterized by the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies to the sulfhydryl group-containing agents. We report a case of methimazole-induced IAS managed in the intensive care unit. Case presentation: A 76-year-old woman with a history of primary hyperthyroidism was sent from a nursing home for unresponsiveness. Vital signs were significant for hypotension (74/46) and low blood sugars. Fluid resuscitations with normal saline and 50% dextrose stabilized the blood pressure (BP) to 135/75 and her blood glucose to 264. Due to respiratory distress and septic appearance, she required emergency intubation. Nursing home medications were noted for methimazole and absence of any insulin or SU use. Empiric antibiotic treatment was started and fluid resuscitation was continued while home medications were held. Her laboratory values were significant for elevated creatinine, lactic acid, serum cortisol, C-peptide, and insulin. Her cultures, SU screen and computerized tomography (CT) scan were negative for significant findings. On day 2, in addition to 10% dextrose, octreotide was initiated for recurrent hypoglycemia. Her blood glucose (BG) continued to drop throughout the day for which she required glucagon support and a D20 infusion. By day 4, the rate of infusion was titrated up and her BG continued to drop to <60 mg/dl despite D20, octreotide and tube feeds with concentrated calories (1.5 cal/ml). Due to her declining health, her family endorsed palliative care and she was extubated. After day 11, her hypoglycemic episodes resolved and she remained endogenously euglycemic. Conclusions: IAS is associated with methimazole use due to formation of autoantibodies to insulin after its interaction with Sulfhydryl (SH

  6. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  7. Insulin-induced lipohypertrophy: report of a case with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Junji; Fujimoto, Muneya; Yasue, Shintaro; Noguchi, Michio; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Tachibana, Takao; Sugihara, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2005-10-01

    An 82-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes had been treated with recombinant human insulin for 16 years. She developed large swellings in both sides of her lower abdomen. The masses were soft, painless, and located around her insulin injection sites. Based on the history and clinical features, a diagnosis of insulin-induced lipohypertrophy was made. Total resection revealed that the lesions were composed entirely of fatty tissue. Microscopic examination showed nests of mature adipocytes expanding toward the dermal reticular layer. The hypertrophic adipocytes were twice as large as those from normal subcutaneous areas and contained numerous small lipid droplets. Electron microscopic analysis also revealed a minor population of small adipocytes, suggesting active differentiation or proliferation. Thus, the possible in vivo effects of insulin on adipocytes were clearly observed in this case of insulin-induced lipohypertrophy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of insulin-induced lipohypertrophy with detailed histological examinations.

  8. [Insulin-induced lipohypertrophy treated by liposuction].

    PubMed

    Brun, A; Comparin, J-P; Voulliaume, D; Chekaroua, K; Foyatier, J-L; Perrot, P

    2007-06-01

    The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus increase permanently, with early diagnosis. Insulin is the treatment of this pathology. Insulin therapy is associated with complication such as lipodystrophies at injection sites leading functional and aesthetics disorders (pain, reduction of treatment efficiency, haematomas and oedemas). Our report two cases to illustrate the effectiveness of the suction-assisted lipectomy (SAL) on these lipodystrophies. We present two cases of insulin dependent diabetics patients with lipodystrophies of thighs, abdomen, and shoulders treated by SAL. The various analyzed parameters are: aesthetic aspect, efficiency of insulin treatment, ease injection, and pain reduction. We observe a significant reduction of insulin dose necessary to obtain a normoglycemia half time. This treatment allow a better control of pain, control of haematomas and oedemas at the injection sites and an aesthetic improvement. The lipoaspiration is thus a simple and effective treatment of lipodystrophies due to insulin.

  9. Aprotinin induced lipohypertrophy and glomerulonephritis in an insulin dependent diabetic.

    PubMed

    Dandona, P; Mier, A; Boag, F; Chappell, M; Beckett, A G

    1985-07-01

    In an insulin dependent diabetic who was hyperglycaemic and ketotic despite 3,000 u of insulin injected subcutaneously in 2 divided doses daily, 50 u of intravenous insulin infused over 24 hr restored normal glucose homeostasis. A combination of insulin (800 u) and aprotinin (10,000 u) given twice daily also produced adequate glucose homeostasis for a period of 12 months. The patient then developed local hypertrophy of subcutaneous tissue at the injection site and her diabetic control deteriorated. Non-selective proteinuria followed and she developed nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed a membraneous glomerulonephritis with subepithelial immune complexes, appearances consistent with a drug-induced glomerulonephritis. Withdrawal of aprotinin led to a gradual remission of nephrotic syndrome and proteinuria over several months. During this period, her diabetes was well controlled with continuous subcutaneous infusion of insulin at a dose of 500 u/24 hr. This case report demonstrates: the effective use of aprotinin for prolonged periods in insulin dependent diabetics with abnormal absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin; aprotinin induced lipohypertrophy which was not observed when insulin was injected alone; aprotinin-associated glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome; the effective use of CSII--at higher insulin doses--in such patients with subcutaneous malabsorption of insulin.

  10. Caffeine intake improves fructose-induced hypertension and insulin resistance by enhancing central insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tung-Chen; Liu, Chun-Peng; Cheng, Wen-Han; Chen, Bo-Rong; Lu, Pei-Jung; Cheng, Pei-Wen; Ho, Wen-Yu; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Liou, Jau-Cheng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2014-03-01

    Recent clinical studies found that fructose intake leads to insulin resistance and hypertension. Fructose consumption promotes protein fructosylation and formation of superoxide. In a previous study, we revealed that inhibition of superoxide production in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) reduces blood pressure. Caffeine displays significant antioxidant ability in protecting membranes against oxidative damage and can lower the risk of insulin resistance. However, the mechanism through which caffeine improves fructose-induced insulin resistance is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caffeine consumption can abolish superoxide generation to enhance insulin signaling in the NTS, thereby reducing blood pressure in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. Treatment with caffeine for 4 weeks decreased blood pressure, serum fasting glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, and triglyceride levels and increased the serum direct high-density lipoprotein level in fructose-fed rats but not in control rats. Caffeine treatment resulted in the recovery of fructose-induced decrease in nitric oxide production in the NTS. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses further showed that caffeine reduced the fructose-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1(S307)) and reversed Akt(S473) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. Similarly, caffeine was able to improve insulin sensitivity and decrease insulin levels in the NTS evoked by fructose. Caffeine intake also reduced the production of superoxide and expression of receptor of advanced glycation end product in the NTS. These results suggest that caffeine may enhance insulin receptor substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-neuronal nitric oxide synthase signaling to decrease blood pressure by abolishing superoxide production in the NTS.

  11. Role of PTEN in TNF Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, David A; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. PMID:25918024

  12. Leptin Deficiency Causes Insulin Resistance Induced by Uncontrolled Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    German, Jonathan P.; Wisse, Brent E.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Oh-I, Shinsuke; Sarruf, David A.; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Fischer, Jonathan D.; Matsen, Miles E.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Morton, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Depletion of body fat stores during uncontrolled, insulin-deficient diabetes (uDM) results in markedly reduced plasma leptin levels. This study investigated the role of leptin deficiency in the genesis of severe insulin resistance and related metabolic and neuroendocrine derangements induced by uDM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adult male Wistar rats remained nondiabetic or were injected with the β-cell toxin, streptozotocin (STZ) to induce uDM and subsequently underwent subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump containing either vehicle or leptin at a dose (150 μg/kg/day) designed to replace leptin at nondiabetic plasma levels. To control for leptin effects on food intake, another group of STZ-injected animals were pair fed to the intake of those receiving leptin. Food intake, body weight, and blood glucose levels were measured daily, with body composition and indirect calorimetry performed on day 11, and an insulin tolerance test to measure insulin sensitivity performed on day 16. Plasma hormone and substrate levels, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, and measures of tissue insulin signal transduction were also measured. RESULTS Physiologic leptin replacement prevented insulin resistance in uDM via a mechanism unrelated to changes in food intake or body weight. This effect was associated with reduced total body fat and hepatic triglyceride content, preservation of lean mass, and improved insulin signal transduction via the insulin receptor substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-hydroxy kinase pathway in the liver, but not in skeletal muscle or adipose tissue. Although physiologic leptin replacement lowered blood glucose levels only slightly, it fully normalized elevated plasma glucagon and corticosterone levels and reversed the increased hepatic expression of gluconeogenic enzymes characteristic of rats with uDM. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that leptin deficiency plays a key role in the pathogenesis of severe insulin resistance and related endocrine

  13. Insulin Cannot Induce Adipogenic Differentiation in Primary Cardiac Cultures.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Sreejit; Sharma, Rajendra K

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac tissue contains a heterogeneous population of cardiomyocytes and nonmyocyte population especially fibroblasts. Fibroblast differentiation into adipogenic lineage is important for fat accumulation around the heart which is important in cardiac pathology. The differentiation in fibroblast has been observed both spontaneously and due to increased insulin stimulation. The present study aims to observe the effect of insulin in adipogenic differentiation of cardiac cells present in primary murine cardiomyocyte cultures. Oil Red O (ORO) staining has been used for observing the lipid accumulations formed due to adipogenic differentiation in murine cardiomyocyte cultures. The accumulated lipids were quantified by ORO assay and normalized using protein estimation. The lipid accumulation in cardiac cultures did not increase in presence of insulin. However, addition of other growth factors like insulin-like growth factor 1 and epidermal growth factor promoted adipogenic differentiation even in the presence of insulin and other inhibitory molecules such as vitamins. Lipid accumulation also increased in cells grown in media without insulin after an initial exposure to insulin-containing growth media. The current study adds to the existing knowledge that the insulin by itself cannot induce adipogenic induction in the cardiac cultures. The data have significance in the understanding of cardiovascular health especially in diabetic patients. PMID:27574386

  14. Metabolic Acidosis-Induced Insulin Resistance and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Gema; Donapetry, Cristóbal; Calviño, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Microalbuminuria has been conclusively established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, and there is evidence of an association between insulin resistance and microalbuminuria, the former preceding the latter in prospective studies. It has been demonstrated that even the slightest degree of metabolic acidosis produces insulin resistance in healthy humans. Many recent epidemiological studies link metabolic acidosis indicators with insulin resistance and systemic hypertension. The strongly acidogenic diet consumed in developed countries produces a lifetime acidotic state, exacerbated by excess body weight and aging, which may result in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes, contributing to cardiovascular risk, along with genetic causes, lack of physical exercise, and other factors. Elevated fruits and vegetables consumption has been associated with lower diabetes incidence. Diseases featuring severe atheromatosis and elevated cardiovascular risk, such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney failure, are typically characterized by a chronic state of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic patients consume particularly acidogenic diets, and deficiency of insulin action generates ketone bodies, creating a baseline state of metabolic acidosisworsened by inadequate metabolic control, which creates a vicious circle by inducing insulin resistance. Even very slight levels of chronic kidney insufficiency are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, which may be explained at least in part by deficient acid excretory capacity of the kidney and consequent metabolic acidosis-induced insulin resistance. PMID:21352078

  15. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Sørensen, Ditte; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe–/– mice (Irs1/Apoe–/–) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE–/– mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE–/– mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr–/– and Irs1/Ldlr–/– mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr–/– mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  16. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  17. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bulger, David A.; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  18. Insulin-induced lipohypertrophy treated by liposuction.

    PubMed

    Barak, A; Har-Shai, Y; Ullmann, Y; Hirshowitz, B

    1996-10-01

    Lipohypertrophy is one of the local side effects of repeated subcutaneous insulin injections. This case report demonstrates the successful cosmetic and therapeutic treatment of two lipohypertrophic masses in the lower abdomen of a young diabetic patient by suction-assisted lipectomy.

  19. Insulin Resistance Induces Posttranslational Hepatic Sortilin 1 Degradation in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J.; Li, Tiangang

    2015-01-01

    Insulin promotes hepatic apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) degradation, whereas insulin resistance is a major cause of hepatic apoB100/triglyceride overproduction in type 2 diabetes. The cellular trafficking receptor sortilin 1 (Sort1) was recently identified to transport apoB100 to the lysosome for degradation in the liver and thus regulate plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Genetic variation of SORT1 was strongly associated with cardiovascular disease risk in humans. The major goal of this study is to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of insulin regulation of Sort1. Results showed that insulin induced Sort1 protein, but not mRNA, in AML12 cells. Treatment of PI3K or AKT inhibitors decreased Sort1 protein, whereas expression of constitutively active AKT induced Sort1 protein in AML12 cells. Consistently, hepatic Sort1 was down-regulated in diabetic mice, which was partially restored after the administration of the insulin sensitizer metformin. LC-MS/MS analysis further revealed that serine phosphorylation of Sort1 protein was required for insulin induction of Sort1 in a casein kinase 2-dependent manner and that inhibition of PI3K signaling or prevention of Sort1 phosphorylation accelerated proteasome-dependent Sort1 degradation. Administration of a PI3K inhibitor to mice decreased hepatic Sort1 protein and increased plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Sort1 in the liver prevented PI3K inhibitor-induced Sort1 down-regulation and decreased plasma triglyceride but had no effect on plasma cholesterol in mice. This study identified Sort1 as a novel target of insulin signaling and suggests that Sort1 may play a role in altered hepatic apoB100 metabolism in insulin-resistant conditions. PMID:25805502

  20. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications.

  1. Overexpression of Insulin Degrading Enzyme could Greatly Contribute to Insulin Down-regulation Induced by Short-Term Swimming Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Goo, Jun Seo; Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, So Hee; Choi, Sun Il; Lee, Hye Ryun; Hwang, In Sik; Shim, Sun Bo; Jee, Seung Wan; Lee, Su Hae; Bae, Chang Joon; Cho, Jung Sik; Cho, Jun Yong; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2011-03-01

    Exercise training is highly correlated with the reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), although it enhanced insulin sensitivity, glucose uptake and glucose transporter expression to reduce severity of diabetic symptoms. This study investigated the impact of short-term swimming exercise on insulin regulation in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat as a non-obese model of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Wistar (W/S) and GK rats were trained 2 hours daily with the swimming exercise for 4 weeks, and then the changes in the metabolism of insulin and glucose were assessed. Body weight was markedly decreased in the exercised GK rats compare to their non-exercised counterpart, while W/S rats did not show any exercise-related changes. Glucose concentration was not changed by exercise, although impaired glucose tolerance was improved in GK rats 120 min after glucose injection. However, insulin concentration was decreased by swimming exercise as in the decrease of GSIS after running exercise. To identify the other cause for exercise-induced insulin down-regulation, the changes in the levels of key factors involved in insulin production (C-peptide) and clearance (insulin-degrading enzyme; IDE) were measured in W/S and GK rats. The C-peptide level was maintained while IDE expression increased markedly. Therefore, these results showed that insulin down-regulation induced by short-term swimming exercise likely attributes to enhanced insulin clearance via IDE over-expression than by altered insulin production.

  2. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  3. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. PMID:26833850

  4. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  5. Insulin enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 signaling by inducing GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, centrally regulates energy homeostasis. Overlaps in the regulation of glucose and energy homeostasis have been reported between leptin and insulin. However, the effects of insulin on leptin’s actions in the central nervous system (CNS) have not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we found that insulin potentiated leptin’s actions through GRP78 in the neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y-ObRb. Since insulin induces GRP78, we speculated that it may also enhance leptin’s actions through this induction. We found that insulin enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and this effect was ameliorated by the knockdown of GRP78. The role of GRP78 in leptin’s actions was also confirmed by impairments in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in HEK293-ObRb cells in which GRP78 was knocked down. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of GRP78 enhanced leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. These results suggest that GRP78 plays an important role in leptin’s actions. Furthermore, insulin may enhance the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 by inducing GRP78, which may provide an important connection between insulin and leptin in the CNS. PMID:27677243

  6. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pump is connected to your body by a flexible tube that has a tip that sticks under your skin. A cartridge of insulin is put in the pump. The insulin flows through the tube into your body. The pump controls how much insulin goes into your body. The ...

  7. Failure of Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance to Detect Marked Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Marilyn; Stefanovski, Darko; Richey, Joyce M.; Kim, Stella P.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Ionut, Viorica; Kabir, Morvarid; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate quantification of insulin resistance is essential for determining efficacy of treatments to reduce diabetes risk. Gold-standard methods to assess resistance are available (e.g., hyperinsulinemic clamp or minimal model), but surrogate indices based solely on fasting values have attractive simplicity. One such surrogate, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), is widely applied despite known inaccuracies in characterizing resistance across groups. Of greater significance is whether HOMA-IR can detect changes in insulin sensitivity induced by an intervention. We tested the ability of HOMA-IR to detect high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance in 36 healthy canines using clamp and minimal model analysis of the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) to document progression of resistance. The influence of pancreatic function on HOMA-IR accuracy was assessed using the acute insulin response during the IVGTT (AIRG). Diet-induced resistance was confirmed by both clamp and minimal model (P < 0.0001), and measures were correlated with each other (P = 0.001). In striking contrast, HOMA-IR ([fasting insulin (μU/mL) × fasting glucose (mmol)]/22.5) did not detect reduced sensitivity induced by fat feeding (P = 0.22). In fact, 13 of 36 animals showed an artifactual decrease in HOMA-IR (i.e., increased sensitivity). The ability of HOMA-IR to detect diet-induced resistance was particularly limited under conditions when insulin secretory function (AIRG) is less than robust. In conclusion, HOMA-IR is of limited utility for detecting diet-induced deterioration of insulin sensitivity quantified by glucose clamp or minimal model. Caution should be exercised when using HOMA-IR to detect insulin resistance when pancreatic function is compromised. It is necessary to use other accurate indices to detect longitudinal changes in insulin resistance with any confidence. PMID:24353184

  8. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution.

  9. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. PMID:27016579

  10. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a physiologically relevant inhibitor of insulin signaling. GRK2 abundanceis increased in humans with metabolic syndrome and in different murine models of insulin resistance. To support GRK2 as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes and obesity, we investigated whether lowering GRK2 abundance reversed an ongoing systemic insulin-resistant phenotype, using a mouse model of tamoxifen-induced GRK2 ablation after high fat diet-dependent obesity and insulin resistance. Tamoxifen-triggered GRK2 deletion impeded further body weight gain, normalized fa sting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance and was associated with preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, thereby maintaining whole body glucose homeostasis. Moreover, when continued to be fed a high fat diet, these animals displayed reduced fat mass and smaller adipocytes, were resistant to the development of liver steatosis, and showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory markers in the liver. Our results indicate that GRK2 acts as a hub to control metabolic functions in different tissues, which is key to controlling insulin resistance development in vivo. These data suggest that inhibiting GRK2 could reverse an established insulin-resistant and obese phenotype, thereby putting forward this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target linking glucose homeostasis and regulation of adiposity. PMID:26198359

  11. Cysteine analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon, H.P.; Hehl, K.H.; Enz, G.; Setiadi-Ranti, A.; Verspohl, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    In rat pancreatic islets, cysteine analogues, including glutathione, acetylcysteine, cysteamine, D-penicillamine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, and cysteine-potentiated glucose (11.1 mM) induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. Their maximal effects were similar and occurred at approximately 0.05, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.0 mM, respectively. At substimulatory glucose levels (2.8 mM), insulin release was not affected by these compounds. In contrast, thiol compounds, structurally different from cysteine and its analogues, such as mesna, tiopronin, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), dimercaprol (BAL), beta-thio-D-glucose, as well as those cysteine analogues that lack a free-thiol group, including L-cystine, cystamine, D-penicillamine disulfide, S-carbocysteine, and S-carbamoyl-L-cysteine, did not enhance insulin release at stimulatory glucose levels (11.1 mM); cystine (5 mM) was inhibitory. These in vitro data indicate that among the thiols tested here, only cysteine and its analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas thiols that are structurally not related to cysteine do not. This suggests that a cysteine moiety in the molecule is necessary for the insulinotropic effect. For their synergistic action to glucose, the availability of a sulfhydryl group is also a prerequisite. The maximal synergistic action is similar for all cysteine analogues tested, whereas the potency of action is different, suggesting similarity in the mechanism of action but differences in the affinity to the secretory system.

  12. Beneficial effect of the insulin sensitizer (HSP inducer) BGP-15 on olanzapine-induced metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Literáti-Nagy, B; Péterfai, E; Kulcsár, E; Literáti-Nagy, Zs; Buday, B; Tory, K; Mandl, J; Sümegi, B; Fleming, A; Roth, J; Korányi, L

    2010-11-20

    Olanzapine is a widely used atypical antipsychotic, with well known metabolic side effects such as weight gain, insulin resistance and blood glucose abnormalities. It has been previously shown in a phase II clinical trial that BGP-15, an amidoxim derivative has insulin-sensitizing effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of BGP-15 for the treatment of olanzapine-induced metabolic side effects, in healthy volunteers. Thirty-seven (37) subjects (ages 18-55 years) with normal glucose metabolism were randomly assigned to 17 days of once-daily treatment with 400mg of BGP-15 or placebo and 5mg of olanzapine for 3 days followed by 10mg for 14 days. Total body and muscle tissue glucose utilization was determined by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique. As expected the 17-day olanzapine treatment provoked insulin resistance and body weight gain (p<0.05) in both groups. Administration of BGP-15 significantly reduced olanzapine-induced insulin resistance. The protective effect of BGP-15 on insulin stimulated glucose utilization had the highest magnitude in the values calculated for the muscle tissue (p=0.002). In healthy individuals BGP-15 was safe and well tolerated during the whole study period. It is suggested that BGP-15 can be a successful insulin sensitizer agent to prevent side effects of olanzapine treatment.

  13. Protein kinase Cδ but not PKCα is involved in insulin-induced glucose metabolism in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Brutman-Barazani, Tamar; Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Brand, Chagit; Brodie, Chaya; Rosa, Jagoda; Sampson, Sanford R

    2012-06-01

    The liver is a major insulin-responsive tissue responsible for glucose regulation. One important mechanism in this phenomenon is insulin-induced glycogen synthesis. Studies in our laboratory have shown that protein kinase Cs delta (PKCδ) and alpha (α) have important roles in insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and that their expression and activity are regulated by insulin. Their importance in glucose regulation in liver cells is unclear. In this study we investigated the possibility that these isoforms are involved in the mediation of insulin-induced glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes. Studies were done on rat hepatocytes in primary culture and on the AML-12 (alpha mouse liver) cell line. Insulin increased activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCδ within 5 min. In contrast, activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCα were not increased by insulin. PKCδ was constitutively associated with IR, and this was increased by insulin stimulation. Suppression of PKCδ expression by transfection with RNAi, or overexpression of kinase dead (dominant negative) PKCδ reduced both the insulin-induced activation of PKB/Akt and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and reduced significantly insulin-induced glucose uptake. In addition, treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with rottlerin abrogated insulin-induced increase in glycogen synthesis. Neither overexpression nor inhibition of PKCα appeared to alter activation of PKB, phosphorylation of GSK3 or glucose uptake in response to insulin. We conclude that PKCδ, but not PKCα, plays an essential role in insulin-induced glucose uptake and glycogenesis in hepatocytes.

  14. Small molecules induce efficient differentiation into insulin-producing cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kunisada, Yuya; Tsubooka-Yamazoe, Noriko; Shoji, Masanobu; Hosoya, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cells have potential uses for drug discovery and cell therapy, including generation of pancreatic β-cells for diabetes research and treatment. In this study, we developed a simple protocol for generating insulin-producing cells from hiPS cells. Treatment with activin A and a GSK3β inhibitor enhanced efficient endodermal differentiation, and then combined treatment with retinoic acid, a bone morphogenic protein inhibitor, and a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) inhibitor induced efficient differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells from definitive endoderm. Expression of the pancreatic progenitor markers PDX1 and NGN3 was significantly increased at this step and most cells were positive for anti-PDX1 antibody. Moreover, several compounds, including forskolin, dexamethasone, and a TGF-β inhibitor, were found to induce the differentiation of insulin-producing cells from pancreatic progenitor cells. By combined treatment with these compounds, more than 10% of the cells became insulin positive. The differentiated cells secreted human c-peptide in response to various insulin secretagogues. In addition, all five hiPS cell lines that we examined showed efficient differentiation into insulin-producing cells with this protocol.

  15. Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The manipulation of organic materials--cells, tissues, and even living organisms--offers many exciting possibilities for the future from organic computers to improved aquaculture. Commercial researchers are using the microgravity environment to produce large near perfect protein crystals Research on insulin has yielded crystals that far surpass the quality of insulin crystals grown on the ground. Using these crystals industry partners are working to develop new and improved treatments for diabetes. Other researchers are exploring the possibility of producing antibiotics using plant cell cultures which could lead to both orbital production and the improvement of ground-based antibiotic production.

  16. Hippocampal memory processes are modulated by insulin and high-fat-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McNay, Ewan C; Ong, Cecilia T; McCrimmon, Rory J; Cresswell, James; Bogan, Jonathan S; Sherwin, Robert S

    2010-05-01

    Insulin regulates glucose uptake and storage in peripheral tissues, and has been shown to act within the hypothalamus to acutely regulate food intake and metabolism. The machinery for transduction of insulin signaling is also present in other brain areas, particularly in the hippocampus, but a physiological role for brain insulin outside the hypothalamus has not been established. Recent studies suggest that insulin may be able to modulate cognitive functions including memory. Here we report that local delivery of insulin to the rat hippocampus enhances spatial memory, in a PI-3-kinase dependent manner, and that intrahippocampal insulin also increases local glycolytic metabolism. Selective blockade of endogenous intrahippocampal insulin signaling impairs memory performance. Further, a rodent model of type 2 diabetes mellitus produced by a high-fat diet impairs basal cognitive function and attenuates both cognitive and metabolic responses to hippocampal insulin administration. Our data demonstrate that insulin is required for optimal hippocampal memory processing. Insulin resistance within the telencephalon may underlie the cognitive deficits commonly reported to accompany type 2 diabetes.

  17. Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 but not Shc can activate the insulin receptor independent of insulin and induce proliferation in CHO-IR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, Markus . E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch; Jaschinski, Frank; Item, Flurin; McNamara, Morgan P.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Trueb, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Ligand-activated insulin receptor (IR) attracts and phosphorylates various substrates such as insulin receptor substrates 1-4 (IRS) and Shc. To investigate how binding affinity for substrate affects signalling we generated chimeric receptors with the {beta}-chain of the insulin receptor containing NPXY motives with different affinities for receptor substrates. We found that the extent of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation positively correlates with binding affinity towards IRS1/2 but not towards Shc. Moreover, overexpression of IRS1 or IRS2 but not of Shc increased IR tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, also independent of insulin. Molecular truncations of IRS1 revealed that neither the isolated PH and PTB domains nor the C-terminus with the tyrosine phosphorylation sites alone are sufficient for substrate-dependent receptor activation. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 impaired insulin-induced internalization of the IR in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that IRS proteins prevent endosome-associated receptor dephosphorylation/inactivation. IRS1 and IRS2 could therefore target the activated IR to different cellular compartments. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 inhibited insulin-stimulated activation of the MAP kinases Erk1/2 while it increased/induced activation of Akt/PKB. Finally, overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 but not of Shc induced DNA synthesis in starved CHO-IR cells independent of exogenous growth factors. Our results demonstrate that variations in cellular IRS1 and IRS2 concentration affect insulin signalling both upstream and downstream and that IRS proteins could play instructive rather than just permissive roles in signal transmission.

  18. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  19. Progranulin induces adipose insulin resistance and autophagic imbalance via TNFR1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Li, Huixia; Liu, Jiali; Xu, Lin; Guo, Qinyue; Sun, Hongzhi; Wu, Shufang

    2015-12-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) has recently emerged as an important regulator for insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of PGRN in vivo and the underlying role of progranulin in adipose insulin resistance involving the autophagy mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, mice treated with PGRN for 21 days exhibited the impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, remarkable adipose autophagy as well as attenuated insulin signaling via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, blockade of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) by TNFR1BP-Fc injection resulted in the restoration of impaired insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling induced by PGRN. Consistent with these findings in vivo, PGRN treatment induced defective insulin signaling, abnormal autophagic and mitochondrial activity in cultured adipocytes, while such effects were nullified by the blockade of TNFR1. In addition, PGRN-deficient adipocytes were more refractory to tunicamycin- or dexamethasone-induced insulin resistance, indicating the causative role of the TNFR1 pathway in the action of PGRN. Collectively, our findings support the notion that PGRN is a key regulator of insulin resistance and that PGRN may mediate its effects, at least in part, by inducing autophagy via the TNFR1-dependent mechanism.

  20. Stabilization of insulin against agitation-induced aggregation by the GMO cubic phase gel.

    PubMed

    Sadhale, Y; Shah, J C

    1999-11-25

    The main objective of the study was to evaluate if the liquid crystalline cubic phase gel of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) protects insulin from agitation induced aggregation. The aggregation of Humulin(R), Regular Iletin I(R) and Regular Iletin II(R), in cubic phase GMO gels at 30 U/g of gel was compared with that in PBS at 100 oscillations/min at 37 degrees C using optical density at 600 nm. The effect of agitation on the secondary structure of insulin in solution and in the gels was determined with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the time course of aggregation was also followed by HPLC. A sigmoidal increase in optical density of solution with time indicated formation of increasing amounts of insoluble insulin aggregates. However, in the gels, optical density values stayed at, or around, the initial optical density value, comparable with that of a blank gel suggesting that insulin had not aggregated in the gel. CD spectroscopy of the soluble insulin showed a total loss of native conformation upon aggregation of insulin in solution. In contrast, CD spectra of insulin in the gel were unaltered suggesting protection from aggregation during agitation. Furthermore, agitation of insulin in gels for a duration as long as 2 months at 37 degrees C, had very little adverse effect on the native conformation of insulin, as indicated by the lack of a significant change in its CD spectrum. Therefore, the cubic phase gel was indeed able to protect insulin from agitation-induced aggregation and subsequent precipitation. Although the majority of insulin in solution appeared to have aggregated and precipitated after 8 days by UV and CD spectroscopy, RP-HPLC results indicated the presence of some soluble aggregates of insulin. In summary, the liquid crystalline cubic phase gel of GMO protects peptides, like insulin, from agitation-induced aggregation.

  1. Atorvastatin ameliorates endothelium-specific insulin resistance induced by high glucose combined with high insulin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ou; Li, Jinliang; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jie; Kong, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an endothelial cell model of endothelium-specific insulin resistance to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on insulin resistance-associated endothelial dysfunction and to identify the potential pathway responsible for its action. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated with different concentrations of glucose with, or without, 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h, following which the cells were treated with atorvastatin. The tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS‑1), the production of nitric oxide (NO), the activity and phosphorylation level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) on serine1177, and the mRNA levels of endothelin‑1 (ET‑1) were assessed during the experimental procedure. Treatment of the HUVECs with 30 mM glucose and 10‑5 M insulin for 24 h impaired insulin signaling, with reductions in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and protein expression of IRS‑1 by almost 75 and 65%, respectively. This, in turn, decreased the activity and phosphorylation of eNOS on serine1177, and reduced the production of NO by almost 80%. By contrast, the mRNA levels of ET‑1 were upregulated. All these changes were ameliorated by atorvastatin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that high concentrations of glucose and insulin impaired insulin signaling leading to endothelial dysfunction, and that atorvastatin ameliorated these changes, acting primarily through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:27484094

  2. Genetic variation in insulin-induced kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Isabel Xiaorong; Ramrattan, Girish; Cheung, Vivian G

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in sensitivity to insulin contribute to disease susceptibility including diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Cellular responses to insulin are well studied. However, which steps in these response pathways differ across individuals remains largely unknown. Such knowledge is needed to guide more precise therapeutic interventions. Here, we studied insulin response and found extensive individual variation in the activation of key signaling factors, including ERK whose induction differs by more than 20-fold among our subjects. This variation in kinase activity is propagated to differences in downstream gene expression response to insulin. By genetic analysis, we identified cis-acting DNA variants that influence signaling response, which in turn affects downstream changes in gene expression and cellular phenotypes, such as protein translation and cell proliferation. These findings show that polymorphic differences in signal transduction contribute to individual variation in insulin response, and suggest kinase modulators as promising therapeutics for diseases characterized by insulin resistance. PMID:26202599

  3. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  4. Insulin-induced localized lipoatrophy preceded by shingles (herpes zoster): a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Localized involutional lipoatrophy of subcutaneous adipose tissue may develop due to subcutaneous injection of pharmaceutical preparations. The pathogenesis of this adverse drug reaction is unknown. The progression of localized involutional lipoatrophy ceases and occasionally it resolves after withdrawing the inducing agent. In case of localized involutional lipoatrophy due to subcutaneous insulin therapy, low-dose systemic corticosteroids may be curative despite ongoing insulin administration. Case presentation We report a recurrence of insulin-induced localized involutional lipoatrophy at the abdominal wall in a 57-year-old Caucasian woman with type-1 diabetes on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The first episode of insulin-induced localized involutional lipoatrophy two years previously had been cured by oral prednisone. The recurrence was treated immediately with 10mg prednisone once daily for five months, and was cured thereafter. The insulin analog preparation (Humalog™) and the insulin pump equipment (Accu-Chek Spirit™) applied were the same during both episodes. Both episodes were preceded by a temporary disturbance of the immune balance (the first episode by vaccination, the second episode through shingles). Conclusions This case confirms that insulin-induced localized involutional lipoatrophy in type-1 diabetes can occur again, and can be cured by systemic corticosteroids. We suggest that temporary disturbance of the immune balance may trigger this transitory idiosyncratic reaction in a susceptible individual. PMID:24961832

  5. Nox2 mediates skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Souto Padron de Figueiredo, Alvaro; Salmon, Adam B; Bruno, Francesca; Jimenez, Fabio; Martinez, Herman G; Halade, Ganesh V; Ahuja, Seema S; Clark, Robert A; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; El Jamali, Amina

    2015-05-22

    Inflammation and oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are consistently associated with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes. Although the role of Nox2, a major ROS-generating enzyme, is well described in host defense and inflammation, little is known about its potential role in insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet was mitigated in Nox2-null mice compared with wild-type mice after 3 or 9 months on the diet. High fat feeding increased Nox2 expression, superoxide production, and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle tissue of wild-type mice but not in Nox2-null mice. Exposure of C2C12 cultured myotubes to either high glucose concentration, palmitate, or H2O2 decreases insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. Pretreatment with catalase abrogated these effects, indicating a key role for H2O2 in mediating insulin resistance. Down-regulation of Nox2 in C2C12 cells by shRNA prevented insulin resistance induced by high glucose or palmitate but not H2O2. These data indicate that increased production of ROS in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in skeletal muscle cells is a consequence of Nox2 activation. This is the first report to show that Nox2 is a key mediator of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  6. Myotubes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells mirror in vivo insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Salvatore; Burkart, Alison M; Warren, Laura; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-02-16

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a unique tool for the study of the pathophysiology of human disease, because these cells can be differentiated into multiple cell types in vitro and used to generate patient- and tissue-specific disease models. Given the critical role for skeletal muscle insulin resistance in whole-body glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes, we have created a novel cellular model of human muscle insulin resistance by differentiating iPS cells from individuals with mutations in the insulin receptor (IR-Mut) into functional myotubes and characterizing their response to insulin in comparison with controls. Morphologically, IR-Mut cells differentiated normally, but had delayed expression of some muscle differentiation-related genes. Most importantly, whereas control iPS-derived myotubes exhibited in vitro responses similar to primary differentiated human myoblasts, IR-Mut myotubes demonstrated severe impairment in insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Transcriptional regulation was also perturbed in IR-Mut myotubes with reduced insulin-stimulated expression of metabolic and early growth response genes. Thus, iPS-derived myotubes from individuals with genetically determined insulin resistance demonstrate many of the defects observed in vivo in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle and provide a new model to analyze the molecular impact of muscle insulin resistance. PMID:26831110

  7. Myotubes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells mirror in vivo insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Salvatore; Burkart, Alison M; Warren, Laura; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-02-16

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a unique tool for the study of the pathophysiology of human disease, because these cells can be differentiated into multiple cell types in vitro and used to generate patient- and tissue-specific disease models. Given the critical role for skeletal muscle insulin resistance in whole-body glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes, we have created a novel cellular model of human muscle insulin resistance by differentiating iPS cells from individuals with mutations in the insulin receptor (IR-Mut) into functional myotubes and characterizing their response to insulin in comparison with controls. Morphologically, IR-Mut cells differentiated normally, but had delayed expression of some muscle differentiation-related genes. Most importantly, whereas control iPS-derived myotubes exhibited in vitro responses similar to primary differentiated human myoblasts, IR-Mut myotubes demonstrated severe impairment in insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Transcriptional regulation was also perturbed in IR-Mut myotubes with reduced insulin-stimulated expression of metabolic and early growth response genes. Thus, iPS-derived myotubes from individuals with genetically determined insulin resistance demonstrate many of the defects observed in vivo in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle and provide a new model to analyze the molecular impact of muscle insulin resistance.

  8. Insulin suppresses ghrelin-induced calcium signaling in neuropeptide Y neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Yuko; Kohno, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) play an important role in feeding regulation. Plasma levels of ghrelin and insulin show reciprocal dynamics before and after meals. We hypothesized that ghrelin and insulin also exert reciprocal effects on ARC NPY neurons. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured by fura-2 microfluorometry in single neurons isolated from ARC of adult rats, followed by immunocytochemical identification of NPY neurons. Ghrelin at 10−10 M increased [Ca2+]i in isolated ARC neurons, and co-administration of insulin concentration-dependently suppressed the ghrelin-induced [Ca2+]i increases. Insulin at 10−16 M, 10−14 M, 10−12 M and 10−10 M counteracted ghrelin action in 26%, 41%, 61% and 53% of ghrelin-responsive neurons, respectively, showing a maximal effect at 10−12 M, the estimated postprandial concentration of insulin in the brain. The majority (>70%) of the ghrelin-activated insulin-inhibited neurons were shown to contain NPY. Double-immunohistochemistry revealed that 85% of NPY neurons in ARC express insulin receptors. These data demonstrate that insulin directly interacts with ARC NPY neurons and counteracts ghrelin action. Our results suggest that postprandial increase in plasma insulin/ghrelin ratio and insulin inhibition of ghrelin action on ARC NPY neurons cooperate to effectively inhibit the neuron activity and terminate feeding. PMID:22081645

  9. Downregulation of diacylglycerol kinase delta contributes to hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chibalin, Alexander V; Leng, Ying; Vieira, Elaine; Krook, Anna; Björnholm, Marie; Long, Yun Chau; Kotova, Olga; Zhong, Zhihui; Sakane, Fumio; Steiler, Tatiana; Nylén, Carolina; Wang, Jianjun; Laakso, Markku; Topham, Matthew K; Gilbert, Marc; Wallberg-Henriksson, Harriet; Zierath, Juleen R

    2008-02-01

    Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is a progressive metabolic disorder arising from genetic and environmental factors that impair beta cell function and insulin action in peripheral tissues. We identified reduced diacylglycerol kinase delta (DGKdelta) expression and DGK activity in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients. In diabetic animals, reduced DGKdelta protein and DGK kinase activity were restored upon correction of glycemia. DGKdelta haploinsufficiency increased diacylglycerol content, reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, insulin signaling, and glucose transport, and led to age-dependent obesity. Metabolic flexibility, evident by the transition between lipid and carbohydrate utilization during fasted and fed conditions, was impaired in DGKdelta haploinsufficient mice. We reveal a previously unrecognized role for DGKdelta in contributing to hyperglycemia-induced peripheral insulin resistance and thereby exacerbating the severity of type 2 diabetes. DGKdelta deficiency causes peripheral insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility. These defects in glucose and energy homeostasis contribute to mild obesity later in life. PMID:18267070

  10. Edible Bird's Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Sarega, Nadarajan; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Ismail, Norsharina; Chan, Kim Wei; Hou, Zhiping; Yusuf, Norhayati Binti

    2015-01-01

    Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance. PMID:26273674

  11. Edible Bird's Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Sarega, Nadarajan; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Ismail, Norsharina; Chan, Kim Wei; Hou, Zhiping; Yusuf, Norhayati Binti

    2015-01-01

    Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance. PMID:26273674

  12. Dietary (n-3) long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent sucrose-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghafoorunissa; Ibrahim, Ahamed; Rajkumar, Laxmi; Acharya, Vani

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of substituting (n-3) long-chain PUFAs (LCPUFAs) for linoleic acid and hence decreasing the (n-6):(n-3) fatty acid ratio on sucrose-induced insulin resistance in rats. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed casein-based diets containing 100 g/kg fat for 12 wk. Insulin resistance was induced by replacing starch (ST) with sucrose (SU). The dietary fats were formulated with groundnut oil, palmolein, and fish oil to provide the following ratios of (n-6):(n-3) fatty acids: 210 (ST-210, SU-210), 50 (SU-50), 10 (SU-10), and 5 (SU-5). Compared with starch (ST-210), sucrose feeding (SU-210) significantly increased the plasma insulin and triglyceride concentrations and the plasma insulin area under the curve (AUC) in response to an oral glucose load. Adipocytes isolated from rats fed SU-210 had greater lipolytic rate, lower insulin stimulated glucose transport, and lower insulin-mediated antilipolysis than those from rats fed ST-210. Decreasing the dietary (n-6):(n-3) ratio in sucrose-fed rats (SU-10 and SU-5) normalized the plasma insulin concentration and the AUC of insulin after a glucose load. The sucrose-induced increase in plasma triglyceride concentration was normalized in rats fed SU-50, SU-10 and SU-5. Further, sucrose-induced alterations in adipocyte lipolysis and antilipolysis were partially reversed and glucose transport improved in rats fed diets SU-5 and SU-10. In diaphragm phospholipids, decreasing the (n-6):(n-3) ratio in the diet increased the concentration of (n-3) LCPUFAs with concomitant decreases in the concentration of (n-6) LCPUFAs. These results suggest that (n-3) LCPUFAs at a level of 2.6 g/kg diet [0.56% energy (n-3) LCPUFAs, (n-6):(n-3) ratio = 10] may prevent sucrose-induced insulin resistance by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  13. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V.; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. Materials and Methods For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Results Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Conclusions Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26196892

  14. Heterozygous caveolin-3 mice show increased susceptibility to palmitate-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talukder, M A Hassan; Preda, Marilena; Ryzhova, Larisa; Prudovsky, Igor; Pinz, Ilka M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance and diabetes are comorbidities of obesity and affect one in 10 adults in the United States. Despite the high prevalence, the mechanisms of cardiac insulin resistance in obesity are still unclear. We test the hypothesis that the insulin receptor localizes to caveolae and is regulated through binding to caveolin-3 (CAV3). We further test whether haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases the susceptibility to high-fat-induced insulin resistance. We used in vivo and in vitro studies to determine the effect of palmitate exposure on global insulin resistance, contractile performance of the heart in vivo, glucose uptake in the heart, and on cellular signaling downstream of theIR We show that haploinsufficiency forCAV3 increases susceptibility to palmitate-induced global insulin resistance and causes cardiomyopathy. On the basis of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) experiments, we show thatCAV3 andIRdirectly interact in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate impairs insulin signaling by a decrease in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt that corresponds to an 87% decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake inHL-1 cardiomyocytes. Despite loss of Akt phosphorylation and lower glucose uptake, palmitate increased insulin-independent serine phosphorylation ofIRS-1 by 35%. In addition, we found lipid induced downregulation ofCD36, the fatty acid transporter associated with caveolae. This may explain the problem the diabetic heart is facing with the simultaneous impairment of glucose uptake and lipid transport. Thus, these findings suggest that loss ofCAV3 interferes with downstream insulin signaling and lipid uptake, implicatingCAV3 as a regulator of theIRand regulator of lipid uptake in the heart. PMID:27033451

  15. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations.

    PubMed

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  16. Simvastatin may induce insulin resistance through a novel fatty acid mediated cholesterol independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Vasundhara; Kapadia, Bandish; Misra, Parimal; Saxena, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Statins are a class of oral drugs that are widely used for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Recent clinical data suggest that chronic use of these drugs increases the frequency of new onset diabetes. Studies to define the risks of statin-induced diabetes and its underlying mechanisms are clearly necessary. We explored the possible mechanism of statin induced insulin resistance using a well-established cell based model and simvastatin as a prototype statin. Our data show that simvastatin induces insulin resistance in a cholesterol biosynthesis inhibition independent fashion but does so by a fatty acid mediated effect on insulin signaling pathway. These data may help design strategies for prevention of statin induced insulin resistance and diabetes in patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26345110

  17. Odontella aurita-enriched diet prevents high fat diet-induced liver insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Amine, Hamza; Benomar, Yacir; Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Meskini, Nadia; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effect of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (w-3 FA) consumption regarding cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and inflammation has been widely reported. Fish oil is considered as the main source of commercialized w-3 FAs, and other alternative sources have been reported such as linseed or microalgae. However, despite numerous reports, the underlying mechanisms of action of w-3 FAs on insulin resistance are still not clearly established, especially those from microalgae. Here, we report that Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in w-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid, prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in the liver of Wistar rats. Indeed, a high fat diet (HFD) increased plasma insulin levels associated with the impairment of insulin receptor signaling and the up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions. Importantly, Odontella aurita-enriched HFD (HFOA) reduces body weight and plasma insulin levels and maintains normal insulin receptor expression and responsiveness. Furthermore, HFOA decreased TLR4 expression, JNK/p38 phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that diet supplementation with whole Ondontella aurita overcomes HFD-induced insulin resistance through the inhibition of TLR4/JNK/p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways.

  18. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation.

  19. Thiazolidinediones block tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inhibition of insulin signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Xu, M; Spiegelman, B M

    1997-01-01

    TNF-alpha has been shown to be an important mediator of insulin resistance linked to obesity. This cytokine induces insulin resistance, at least in part, through inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the insulin receptor. Recently, a new class of compounds, the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs), has been shown to improve insulin resistance in obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in both rodents and man. Here we show that TZDs have powerful effects on the ability of TNF-alpha to alter the most proximal steps of insulin signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and its major substrate, IRS-1, and activation of PI3-kinase. Troglitazone or pioglitazone essentially eliminate the reduction in tyrosine phosphorylation of IR and IRS-1 caused by TNF-alpha in fat cells, even at relatively high doses (25 ng/ml). That this effect of TZDs operates through activation of the nuclear receptor PPARgamma/ RXR complex is shown by the fact that similar effects are observed with other PPARgamma/RXR ligands such as 15 deoxy Delta12,14PGJ2 and LG268. The TZDs do not inhibit all TNF-alpha signaling in that the transcription factor NF-kB is still induced well. These data indicate that TZDs can specifically block certain actions of TNF-alpha related to insulin resistance, suggesting that this block may contribute to their antidiabetic actions. PMID:9312188

  20. Odontella aurita-enriched diet prevents high fat diet-induced liver insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Amine, Hamza; Benomar, Yacir; Haimeur, Adil; Messaouri, Hafida; Meskini, Nadia; Taouis, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effect of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid (w-3 FA) consumption regarding cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance and inflammation has been widely reported. Fish oil is considered as the main source of commercialized w-3 FAs, and other alternative sources have been reported such as linseed or microalgae. However, despite numerous reports, the underlying mechanisms of action of w-3 FAs on insulin resistance are still not clearly established, especially those from microalgae. Here, we report that Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in w-3 FAs eicosapentaenoic acid, prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in the liver of Wistar rats. Indeed, a high fat diet (HFD) increased plasma insulin levels associated with the impairment of insulin receptor signaling and the up-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expressions. Importantly, Odontella aurita-enriched HFD (HFOA) reduces body weight and plasma insulin levels and maintains normal insulin receptor expression and responsiveness. Furthermore, HFOA decreased TLR4 expression, JNK/p38 phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory factors. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that diet supplementation with whole Ondontella aurita overcomes HFD-induced insulin resistance through the inhibition of TLR4/JNK/p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways. PMID:26459640

  1. Resveratrol improves hepatic insulin signaling and reduces the inflammatory response in streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Pektaş, Mehmet Bilgehan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Tosun, Murat; Koca, Tulay

    2015-10-10

    Diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous metabolic disorder essentially characterized by deficiency of insulin secretion, insulin receptor or post-receptor events. This study aims to investigate the effects of resveratrol administration on the metabolic characteristics, hepatic functions, histopathological features and insulin signaling pathway components in streptozotocin induced diabetes. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control/vehicle; (2) control/20mg/kg resveratrol; (3) diabetic/vehicle; and (4) diabetic/20mg/kg resveratrol. Histopathological examinations were carried out to reveal hepatic tissue damage and inflammation. In addition to hepatic glucose, lipid, insulin, ALT, AST, resistin and XOD contents, gene and protein expressions of insulin signaling pathway components such as insulin Rβ, IRS-1, IRS-2, eNOS, PI3K, Akt, and FOXO3a were analyzed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. The rats in the diabetes group had significantly lower terminal body weight and hepatic insulin level, but significantly higher hepatic glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride and resistin concentrations. Diabetes triggered the inflammatory process in the liver tissues that was evidenced by histopathological deformations and increase in the hepatic ALT and AST levels. Hepatic inflammation was considerably associated with insulin signaling pathway ever since a significant down-regulation of insulin signaling components; IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3K, Akt and mTOR have been identified in the diabetic group. To some extent, resveratrol treatment reversed the diabetes-induced changes in the liver tissues. Taken together, resveratrol partly improved hepatic dysfunction induced by diabetes. This may be due to the healing activity of resveratrol on insulin signaling pathway, resistin levels and hepatic glucose-lipid contents.

  2. Human amnion epithelial cells can be induced to differentiate into functional insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Huang, Qin; Liu, Tianjin; Guo, Lihe

    2008-09-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation has demonstrated that long-term insulin independence may be achieved in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus type 1. However, limited availability of islet tissue means that new sources of insulin-producing cells that are responsive to glucose are required. Here, we show that human amnion epithelial cells (HAEC) can be induced to differentiate into functional insulin-producing cells in vitro. After induction of differentiation, HAEC expressed multiple pancreatic beta-cell genes, including insulin, pancreas duodenum homeobox-1, paired box gene 6, NK2 transcription factor-related locus 2, Islet 1, glucokinase, and glucose transporter-2, and released C-peptide in a glucose-regulated manner in response to other extracellular stimulations. The transplantation of induced HAEC into streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57 mice reversed hyperglycemia, restored body weight, and maintained euglycemia for 30 d. These findings indicated that HAEC may be a new source for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  3. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the release of adrenocorticotropin predominantly via central and propranolol insensitive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Kovács, K; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M; Makara, G B

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic patterns of pituitary-adrenocortical and sympatho-adrenal hormone responses to insulin hypoglycemia as well as the relative importance of central vs. peripheral control of hypoglycemia-induced ACTH secretion were evaluated. In conscious rats bearing indwelling cannulae, the changes in hormone concentrations after insulin injection were dependent on the changes in blood glucose levels with respect to both time course and magnitude. ACTH, corticosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine levels were found to be maximal at 60 min after 2.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected ip, whereas earlier (20 min) but smaller increases were obtained in response to 0.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected iv. In rats 6-7 days after lesions of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), the rise of ACTH during insulin hypoglycemia was markedly inhibited and corticosterone levels were significantly reduced. Simultaneously, the hypoglycemia-induced increase in plasma epinephrine was unchanged and that in plasma norepinephrine was significantly enhanced in rats with the MBH destroyed. The beta-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol did not inhibit ACTH and corticosterone responses to hypoglycemia in either sham-operated or MBH-lesioned animals. We conclude that the main factors triggering ACTH release during insulin-induced hypoglycemia are of central rather than peripheral origin. The high concentrations of circulating catecholamines occurring during insulin hypoglycemia are not responsible for pituitary-adrenocortical activation by direct, beta-adrenoreceptor mediated action at the pituitary level. PMID:3023036

  4. Insulin inhibits hepatocyte iNOS expression induced by cytokines by an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Harbrecht, Brian G; Nweze, Ikenna; Smith, Jason W; Zhang, Baochun

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte inducible nitric oxide synthese (iNOS) expression is a tightly controlled pathway that mediates hepatic inflammation and hepatocyte injury in a variety of disease states. We have shown that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates cytokine-induced hepatocyte iNOS expression through mechanisms that involve protein kinase B/Akt. We hypothesized that insulin, which activates Akt signaling in hepatocytes, as well as signaling through p38 and MAPK p42/p44, would regulate iNOS expression during inflammation. In primary rat hepatocytes, insulin inhibited cytokine-stimulated nitrite accumulation and iNOS expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MAPK p42/p44 with PD98059 had no effect on iNOS activation, whereas SB203580 to block p38 reversed insulin's inhibitory effect. However, insulin did not increase p38 activation and inhibition of p38 signaling with a dominant negative p38 plasmid had no effect on cytokine- or insulin-mediated effects on iNOS. We found that SB203580 blocked insulin-induced Akt activation. Inhibition of Akt signaling with LY294002 or a dominant negative Akt plasmid increased cytokine-stimulated nitrite production and iNOS protein expression and blocked the inhibitory effects of insulin. NF-κB induces iNOS expression and can be regulated by Akt, but insulin had no effect on cytokine-mediated IκBα levels or NF-κB p65 translocation. Our data demonstrate that insulin inhibits cytokine-stimulated hepatocyte iNOS expression and does so through effects on Akt-mediated signaling. PMID:22038823

  5. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels.

  6. NOD2 activation induces muscle cell-autonomous innate immune responses and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Akhilesh K; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Chiu, Tim T; Foley, Kevin P; Bilan, Philip J; Philpott, Dana J; Klip, Amira

    2010-12-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation in vivo, largely mediated by activated innate immune cells. Cytokines and pathogen-derived ligands of surface toll-like receptors can directly cause insulin resistance in muscle cells. However, it is not known if intracellular pathogen sensors can, on their own, provoke insulin resistance. Here, we show that the cytosolic pattern recognition receptors nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)1 and NOD2 are expressed in immune and metabolic tissues and hypothesize that their activation in muscle cells would result in cell-autonomous responses leading to insulin resistance. Bacterial peptidoglycan motifs that selectively activate NOD2 were directly administered to L6- GLUT4myc myotubes in culture. Within 3 h, insulin resistance arose, characterized by reductions in each insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation, and insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Muscle cell-autonomous responses to NOD2 ligand included activation of the stress/inflammation markers c-Jun N-terminal kinase, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, degradation of inhibitor of κBα, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. These results show that NOD2 alone is capable of acutely inducing insulin resistance within muscle cells, possibly by activating endogenous inflammatory signals and/or through cytokine production, curbing upstream insulin signals. NOD2 is hence a new inflammation target connected to insulin resistance, and this link occurs without the need of additional contributing cell types. This study provides supporting evidence for the integration of innate immune and metabolic responses through the involvement of NOD proteins and suggests the possible participation of cell autonomous immune responses in the development of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, the major depot for postprandial glucose utilization.

  7. Insulin granule trafficking in beta-cells: mathematical model of glucose-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Salinari, Serenella; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-07-01

    A mathematical model that represents the dynamics of intracellular insulin granules in beta-cells is proposed. Granule translocation and exocytosis are controlled by signals assumed to be essentially related to ATP-to-ADP ratio and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. The model provides an interpretation of the roles of the triggering and amplifying pathways of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Values of most of the model parameters were inferred from available experimental data. The numerical simulations represent a variety of experimental conditions, such as the stimulation by high K(+) and by different time courses of extracellular glucose, and the predicted responses agree with published experimental data. Model capacity to represent data measured in a hyperglycemic clamp was also tested. Model parameter changes that may reflect alterations of beta-cell function present in type 2 diabetes are investigated, and the action of pharmacological agents that bind to sulfonylurea receptors is simulated.

  8. Nicotinamide induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells into insulin-secreting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vaca, Pilar; Berna, Genoveva; Araujo, Raquel; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Bedoya, Francisco J.; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz

    2008-03-10

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, nicotinamide, induces differentiation and maturation of fetal pancreatic cells. In addition, we have previously reported evidence that nicotinamide increases the insulin content of cells differentiated from embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the possibility of nicotinamide acting as a differentiating agent on its own has never been completely explored. Islet cell differentiation was studied by: (i) X-gal staining after neomycin selection; (ii) BrdU studies; (iii) single and double immunohistochemistry for insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iv) insulin and C-peptide content and secretion assays; and (v) transplantation of differentiated cells, under the kidney capsule, into streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic mice. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse ES cells treated with nicotinamide: (i) showed an 80% decrease in cell proliferation; (ii) co-expressed insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iii) had values of insulin and C-peptide corresponding to 10% of normal mouse islets; (iv) released insulin and C-peptide in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; and (v) after transplantation into diabetic mice, normalized blood glucose levels over 7 weeks. Our data indicate that nicotinamide decreases ES cell proliferation and induces differentiation into insulin-secreting cells. Both aspects are very important when thinking about cell therapy for the treatment of diabetes based on ES cells.

  9. Angelica acutiloba root attenuates insulin resistance induced by high-fructose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, I-Min; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju

    2011-09-01

    Angelica acutiloba root (Japanese Dong Quai), used for treatment of gynecological disorders, is currently cultivated in Taiwan. The present study evaluated the preventative effect of Angelica acutiloba root (Japanese Dong Quai) on the induction of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was induced in rats by feeding a high fructose diet for 6 weeks. Thereafter, the rats were maintained on the same diet and treated with oral A. acutiloba root extract or pioglitazone once daily for 8 weeks. At the end of treatment, the degree of basal insulin resistance was measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Insulin sensitivity was calculated using the composite whole body insulin sensitivity index (ISIcomp). Protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting. A. acutiloba (300 mg/kg/day) displayed similar characteristics to pioglitazone (20 mg/kg/day) in reducing HOMA-IR and elevating ISIcomp. Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin levels and hyperinsulinemia were ameliorated by A. acutiloba treatment without hepatotoxic or nephrotoxic effects. A. acutiloba treatment improved dyslipidemia, induced lipoprotein lipase activity and enhanced hepatic glycogen accumulation. Further, A. acutiloba treatment enhanced the action of insulin on muscle glucose transporter subtype 4 translocation and attenuated hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. The findings suggest that A. acutiloba may be an effective ethnomedicine for improving insulin sensitivity.

  10. Insulin Resistance: A Proinflammatory State Mediated by Lipid-Induced Signaling Dysfunction and Involved in Atherosclerotic Plaque Instability

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2008-01-01

    The dysregulation of the insulin-glucose axis represents the crucial event in insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance increases atherogenesis and atherosclerotic plaque instability by inducing proinflammatory activities on vascular and immune cells. This condition characterizes several diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and other endocrinopathies, but also cancer. Recent studies suggest that the pathophysiology of insulin resistance is closely related to interferences with insulin-mediated intracellular signaling on skeletal muscle cells, hepatocytes, and adipocytes. Strong evidence supports the role of free fatty acids (FFAs) in promoting insulin resistance. The FFA-induced activation of protein kinase C (PKC) delta, inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK), or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) modulates insulin-triggered intracellular pathway (classically known as PI3-K-dependent). Therefore, reduction of FFA levels represents a selective target for modulating insulin resistance. PMID:18604303

  11. Use of insulin to decrease septic shock-induced myocardial depression in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Levenbrown, Yosef; Penfil, Scott; Rodriguez, Elena; Zhu, Yan; Hossain, Jobayer; Bhat, A Majeed; Hesek, Anne; O'Neil, Karen B; Tobin, Kelly; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2013-12-01

    Insulin is known to attenuate septic shock-induced myocardial depression. Possible mechanisms include an anti-inflammatory or inotropic effect of insulin. The objective of this study was to determine whether the mechanism of action of insulin in attenuating septic shock-induced myocardial depression is through an immunomodulatory effect. Fourteen pigs were assigned to one of two groups. Both groups received a 4-h infusion of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin from Escherichia coli 0111:B4. Group 2 additionally received insulin at 1.5 U/kg/h with infusions of D50 normal saline and KCl to maintain normal serum glucose and potassium levels. Cardiac function was measured with shortening fraction using transthoracic echocardiogram. Plasma TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were obtained every 30 min. Postmortem cytokine analysis and histomorphology were performed on the heart tissue. Although insulin attenuated septic shock-induced myocardial depression, this was not due to an anti-inflammatory effect and, therefore, likely resulted from an inotropic effect of insulin.

  12. Photo-induced inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation on online laser measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} We compare the structures of insulin upon heating with or without laser irradiation. {yields} Laser irradiation inhibits insulin fibrillation and may be of insert for mechanistic disease studies. {yields} Online laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins. -- Abstract: Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation can lead to several serious diseases and protein drugs ineffectiveness; thus, the detection and inhibition of these processes have been of great interest. In the present study, the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation by laser irradiation was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), far-UV circular dichroism (far-UV CD), and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. During heat-induced aggregation, the size distribution of two insulin solutions obtained by online and offline dynamic light scattering were different. The laser-on insulin in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl exhibited fewer fibrils than the laser-off insulin, whereas no insulin fibril under laser irradiation was observed in the absence of 0.1 M NaCl for 45 h incubation. Moreover, our CD results showed that the laser-irradiated insulin solution maintained mainly an {alpha}-helical conformation, but the laser-off insulin solution formed bulk fibrils followed by a significant increase in {beta}-sheet content for 106 h incubation. These findings provide an inhibition method for insulin amyloid fibrillation using the laser irradiation and demonstrate that the online long-time laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins because they may change the original results.

  13. Glutamate receptors in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus contribute to insulin-induced sympathoexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kathryn W.

    2014-01-01

    The sympathoexcitatory response to insulin is mediated by neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH). Previous studies have reported that stimulation of ARC neurons increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) through glutamate receptor activation in the PVH. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PVH contributes to insulin-induced sympathoexcitation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (275–400 g) were infused with isotonic saline or insulin (3.75 mU·kg−1·min−1) plus 50% dextrose to maintain euglycemia. Intravenous infusion of insulin significantly increased lumbar SNA without a significant change in mean ABP, renal SNA, heart rate, or blood glucose. Bilateral PVH injection of the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid (KYN) lowered lumbar SNA and ABP of animals infused with insulin. Similarly, a cocktail of the NMDA antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and non-NMDA antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) reduced lumbar SNA and mean ABP during infusion of insulin. In a final experiment, bilateral PVH injection of AP5 only, but not CNQX, lowered lumbar SNA and mean ABP of animals infused with insulin. The peak changes in lumbar SNA and mean ABP of insulin-treated animals were not different between KYN, AP5 plus CNQX, or AP5 alone. These drug treatments did not alter any variable in animals infused with saline. Altogether, these findings suggest that glutamatergic NMDA neurotransmission in the PVH contributes to insulin-induced sympathoexcitation. PMID:25475355

  14. Serpine1 Mediates Porphyromonas gingivalis Induced Insulin Secretion in the Pancreatic Beta Cell Line MIN6

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Uppoor G.; Watanabe, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease resulting in destruction of gingiva and alveolar bone caused by an exuberant host immunological response to periodontal pathogens. Results from a number of epidemiological studies indicate a close association between diabetes and periodontitis. Results from cross-sectional studies indicate that subjects with periodontitis have a higher odds ratio of developing insulin resistance (IR). However, the mechanisms by which periodontitis influences the development of diabetes are not known. Results from our previous studies using an animal model of periodontitis suggest that periodontitis accelerates the onset of hyperinsulinemia and IR. In addition, LPS from a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), stimulates Serpine1 expression in the pancreatic beta cell line MIN6. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that a periodontal pathogen induces hyperinsulinemia and Serpine1 may be involved in this process. To test this hypothesis, we co-incubated Pg with the pancreatic beta cell line MIN6 and measured the effect on insulin secretion by MIN6 cells. We further determined the involvement of Serpine1 in insulin secretion by downregulating Serpine1 expression. Our results indicated that Pg stimulated insulin secretion by approximately 3.0 fold under normoglycemic conditions. In a hyperglycemic state, Pg increased insulin secretion by 1.5 fold. Pg significantly upregulated expression of the Serpine1 gene and this was associated with increased secretion of insulin by MIN6 cells. However, cells with downregulated Serpine1 expression were resistant to Pg stimulated insulin secretion under normoglycemic conditions. We conclude that the periodontal pathogen, Pg, induced insulin secretion by MIN6 cells and this induction was, in part, Serpine1 dependent. Thus, Serpine1 may play a pivotal role in insulin secretion during the accelerated development of hyperinsulinemia and the resulting IR in the setting of periodontitis. PMID

  15. INSULIN INDUCED EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR ACTIVATION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS IS ADAM-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background With the rise in metabolic syndrome, understanding the role of insulin signaling within the cells of vasculature has become more important but yet remains poorly defined. The study examines the role of insulin actions on a pivotal cross-talk receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor linked tyrosine kinases and is key to many of their responses. Objective To determine the pathway of EGFR transactivation by insulin in human coronary smooth muscle cells (VSMC) Methods VSMC were cultured in vitro. Assays of EGFR phosphorylation were examined in response to insulin in the presence and absence of the plasmin inhibitors (e-aminocaproic acid and aprotinin) matrix metalloprotease (MMP) inhibitor GM6001, the ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase Domain) inhibitors TAPI-0 and TAPI-1, Heparin binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) inhibitor, CRM197, HB-EGF inhibitory antibodies, EGF inhibitory antibodies and the EGFR inhibitor AG1478. Results Insulin induced time-dependent EGFR phosphorylation, which was inhibited by AG1478 in a concentration dependent manner. Application of the plasmin inhibitors did not block the response. EGFR phosphorylation by insulin was blocked by inhibition of MMP activity and the ligand HB-EGF. The presence of the ADAM inhibitors, TAPI-0 and TAPI-1 significantly decreased EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation by EGF was not interrupted by inhibition of plasmin, MMPs TAPIs, or HB-EGF. Direct blockade of the EGFR prevented activation by both insulin and EGF. Conclusion Insulin can induce transactivation of EGFR by an ADAM-mediated, HB-EGF dependent process. This is the first description of crosstalk via ADAM between insulin and EGFR in vascular SMC. Targeting a pivotal cross-talk receptor such as EGFR, which can be transactivated by both G-protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases is an attractive molecular target. PMID:18656632

  16. Insulin Resistance Induced by Hyperinsulinemia Coincides with a Persistent Alteration at the Insulin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Karyn J.; Maddux, Betty A.; Szary, Jaroslaw; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Schaufele, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, the diminished response of target tissues to insulin, is associated with the metabolic syndrome and a predisposition towards diabetes in a growing proportion of the worldwide population. Under insulin resistant states, the cellular response of the insulin signaling pathway is diminished and the body typically responds by increasing serum insulin concentrations to maintain insulin signaling. Some evidence indicates that the increased insulin concentration may itself further dampen insulin response. If so, insulin resistance would worsen as the level of circulating insulin increases during compensation, which could contribute to the transition of insulin resistance to more severe disease. Here, we investigated the consequences of excess insulin exposure to insulin receptor (IR) activity. Cells chronically exposed to insulin show a diminished the level of IR tyrosine and serine autophosphorylation below that observed after short-term insulin exposure. The diminished IR response did not originate with IR internalization since IR amounts at the cell membrane were similar after short- and long-term insulin incubation. Förster resonance energy transfer between fluorophores attached to the IR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain showed that a change in the TK domain occurred upon prolonged, but not short-term, insulin exposure. Even though the altered ‘insulin refractory’ IR TK FRET and IR autophosphorylation levels returned to baseline (non-stimulated) levels after wash-out of the original insulin stimulus, subsequent short-term exposure to insulin caused immediate re-establishment of the insulin-refractory levels. This suggests that some cell-based ‘memory’ of chronic hyperinsulinemic exposure acts directly at the IR. An improved understanding of that memory may help define interventions to reset the IR to full insulin responsiveness and impede the progression of insulin resistance to more severe disease states. PMID:25259572

  17. Effect of insulin deficiency on the rewarding properties of methamphetamine in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Amir-Hossein; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    The reward is a positive behavioural response to the pleasant stimuli that can be induced by drugs, such as psychostimulants. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that many people throughout the world suffer from. Methamphetamine (METH), as a psychostimulant, engages the dopaminergic system in the reward circuitry and the synapses of dopaminergic terminals can be modified by insulin. In this study, in order to assess the effect of insulin deficiency on reward, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals were used as an appropriate model. One hundred and thirty-two adult male rats were divided into nine groups (three non-diabetic and six diabetic groups) to determine the most effective dose of METH (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg ip), and insulin replacement (10U/kg; ip) during the acquisition period in a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. The diabetes model was induced by a single injection of STZ (60mg/kg; ip). The conditioning score was considered to be the difference in time spent in drug- and saline-paired compartments. The results demonstrated that the most effective doses of METH were 1 and 2mg/kg in non-diabetic animals. Although the place preference was not shown in non-diabetic animals at the dose of 0.5mg/kg, this dose significantly induced place preference to METH in STZ-diabetic rats. Additionally, insulin replacement could reverse the METH-induced CPP in diabetic animals. Our findings suggest that the positive effect of insulin deficiency on METH rewarding properties is dependent on insulin level in part, and the replacement of the insulin in diabetic rats as a treatment can improve the rewarding properties of METH.

  18. Insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide stimulates amino acid transport in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Varela, I; Avila, M; Mato, J M; Hue, L

    1990-01-01

    The ability of the insulin-induced phospho-oligosaccharide to stimulate amino acid transport was studied in isolated rat hepatocytes. At low alpha-aminoisobutyric acid concentrations (0.1 mM), both 100 nM-insulin and 10 microM-phospho-oligosaccharide doubled amino acid uptake after 2 h of incubation. This stimulation was prevented by 0.1 mM-cycloheximide or 5 micrograms of actinomycin D/ml, indicating that the phospho-oligosaccharide, like insulin, was acting via the synthesis of a high-affinity transport component. The effects of the phospho-oligosaccharide and of insulin were blocked by Ins2P (2.5 mM), but not by myo-inositol, inositol hexaphosphoric acid or several monosaccharides such as mannose, glucosamine and galactose. Both the temporal effect on amino acid entry and the extent of stimulation of this process by the phospho-oligosaccharide indicate that this molecule mimics, and may mediate, some of the long-term actions of insulin. However, the effects of phospho-oligosaccharide and insulin were not exactly the same, since the effect of insulin, but not of the phospho-oligosaccharide, was additive with that of glucagon. PMID:2185744

  19. Pregnancy-induced insulin resistance in liver and skeletal muscles of the conscious rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Hauguel, S.; Gilbert, M.; Girard, J.

    1987-02-01

    Insulin sensitivity of maternal nonuterine tissues (liver and skeletal muscles) has been investigated in the conscious rabbit during late gestation (24 and 30 days). The specific effect of insulin on glucose production and utilization was evaluated with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique using two types of labelled microspheres (VXCo and TSn). The net balance of glucose across the hindlimb muscles was studied by means of the Fick principle in basal and insulin stimulated conditions (clamp study). The results show that an insulin-resistant state developed between days 24 and 30 of gestation in the rabbit and involves both glucose producing (liver) and utilizing (muscles) tissues. On day 30 of gestation, muscle glucose uptake was not significantly stimulated at a plasma insulin concentration of 700 U/ml determined by radioimmunoassay, whereas it was stimulated by 30-40% in nonpregnant and 24 day pregnant rabbits. At similar plasma insulin concentration, endogenous glucose production was suppressed by 85% in both nonpregnant and 24 day pregnant rabbits, whereas it was decreased by only 30% in 30 day pregnant rabbits. The present data suggest that hindlimb muscles of late pregnant rabbits are able to reduce their insulin-induced glucose utilization. This could contribute to meet the glucose requirements of pregnant uterus in late gestation.

  20. Metabolic disturbances and defects in insulin secretion in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Szkudelski, T; Zywert, A; Szkudelska, K

    2013-01-01

    Rats with diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide (NA) are often used in animal studies concerning various aspects of diabetes. In this experimental model, the severity of diabetes is different depending on doses of STZ and NA. Moreover, diabetic changes in rats with STZ-NA-induced diabetes are not fully characterized. In our present study, metabolic changes and insulin secretion were investigated in rats with diabetes induced by administration of 60 mg of STZ and 90 mg of NA per kg body weight. Four to six weeks after diabetes induction, insulin, glucagon and some metabolic parameters were determined to evaluate the severity of diabetes. Moreover, insulin secretory capacity of pancreatic islets isolated from control and diabetic rats was compared. It was demonstrated that administration of 60 mg of STZ and 90 mg of NA per kg body weight induced relatively mild diabetes, since insulin, glucagon and other analyzed parameters were only slightly affected in diabetic rats compared with control animals. In vitro studies revealed that insulin secretory response was preserved in pancreatic islets of diabetic rats, however, was lower than in islets of control animals. This effect was observed in the presence of different stimuli. Insulin secretion induced by 6.7 and 16.7 mmol/l glucose was moderately reduced in islets of diabetic rats compared with control islets. In the presence of leucine with glutamine, insulin secretion appeared to be also decreased in islets of rats with STZ-NA-induced diabetes. Insulinotropic action of 6.7 mmol/l glucose with forskolin was also deteriorated in diabetic islets. Moreover, it was demonstrated that at a non-stimulatory glucose, pharmacological depolarization of plasma membrane with a concomitant activation of protein kinase C evoked significant rise in insulin release in islets of control and diabetic rats. However, in diabetic islets, this effect was attenuated. These results indicate that impairment in insulin

  1. Hypoglycemic effect of aqueous shallot and garlic extracts in rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Razieh; Bagheri, Sayyed Majid; Moghimi, Ali; Rasuli, Morteza Behnam

    2007-11-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of shallot (Allium ascalonicum) and garlic (Allium satium) on the fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) of fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Male albino Wistar rats were fed either normal or high-fructose diet for a period of eight weeks. Fasting blood glucose level, fasting blood triglyceride level, FIRI, and the area under the glucose tolerance curve were significantly elevated in fructose-fed animals. Fructose-induced insulin resistance rats treated by aqueous shallot or garlic extract (500 mg/kg body weight/day, i.p.) for duration of eight weeks. Control animals only received normal saline (0.9%). The results showed that neither shallot nor garlic extracts significantly altered the FIRI and the IPGTT at the fourth week after treatment. The fasting blood glucose in fructose-induced insulin resistance animals has been significantly decreased in 8-week treated animals by both shallot and garlic extracts. Shallot extract administration, but not garlic extract, for a period of eight weeks can significantly improve the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and diminish the FIRI. These results indicate that shallot and garlic extracts have a hypoglycemic influence on the fructose-induced insulin resistance animals and aqueous shallot extract is a stronger hypoglycemic agent than the garlic extract.

  2. Hypoglycemic effect of aqueous shallot and garlic extracts in rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Razieh; Bagheri, Sayyed Majid; Moghimi, Ali; Rasuli, Morteza Behnam

    2007-11-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of shallot (Allium ascalonicum) and garlic (Allium satium) on the fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) of fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Male albino Wistar rats were fed either normal or high-fructose diet for a period of eight weeks. Fasting blood glucose level, fasting blood triglyceride level, FIRI, and the area under the glucose tolerance curve were significantly elevated in fructose-fed animals. Fructose-induced insulin resistance rats treated by aqueous shallot or garlic extract (500 mg/kg body weight/day, i.p.) for duration of eight weeks. Control animals only received normal saline (0.9%). The results showed that neither shallot nor garlic extracts significantly altered the FIRI and the IPGTT at the fourth week after treatment. The fasting blood glucose in fructose-induced insulin resistance animals has been significantly decreased in 8-week treated animals by both shallot and garlic extracts. Shallot extract administration, but not garlic extract, for a period of eight weeks can significantly improve the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and diminish the FIRI. These results indicate that shallot and garlic extracts have a hypoglycemic influence on the fructose-induced insulin resistance animals and aqueous shallot extract is a stronger hypoglycemic agent than the garlic extract. PMID:18299719

  3. Impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets transplanted to diabetic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jansson, L; Eizirik, D L; Pipeleers, D G; Borg, L A; Hellerström, C; Andersson, A

    1995-08-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell dysfunction may be an important component in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. However, most available data in this field were obtained from rodent islets. To investigate the relevance of this hypothesis for human beta-cells in vivo, human pancreatic islets were transplanted under the renal capsule of nude mice. Experimental groups were chosen so that grafted islets were exposed to either hyper- or normoglycemia or combinations of these for 4 or 6 wk. Grafts of normoglycemic recipients responded with an increased insulin release to a glucose stimulus during perfusion, whereas grafts of hyperglycemic recipients failed to respond to glucose. The insulin content of the grafts in the latter groups was only 10% of those observed in controls. Recipients initially hyperglycemic (4 wk), followed by 2 wk of normoglycemia regained a normal graft insulin content, but a decreased insulin response to glucose remained. No ultrastructural signs of beta-cell damage were observed, with the exception of increased glycogen deposits in animals hyperglycemic at the time of killing. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to a diabetic environment induces a long-term secretory defect in human beta-cells, which is not dependent on the size of the islet insulin stores.

  4. Paradoxical Acceleration of Dithiothreitol-Induced Aggregation of Insulin in the Presence of a Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bumagina, Zoya; Gurvits, Bella; Artemova, Natalya; Muranov, Konstantin; Kurganov, Boris

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of human recombinant insulin and the effect of α-crystallin, a representative of the family of small heat shock proteins, on the aggregation process have been studied using dynamic light scattering technique. Analysis of the distribution of the particles by size measured in the course of aggregation showed that the initial stage of the aggregation process was the stage of formation of the start aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of about 90 nm. When studying the effect of α-crystallin on the rate of DTT-induced aggregation of insulin, it was demonstrated that low concentrations of α-crystallin dramatically accelerated the aggregation process, whereas high concentrations of α-crystallin suppressed insulin aggregation. In the present study, at the molar stoichiometric ratio (insulin:α-crystallin) less than 1:0.5, a pronounced accelerating effect of α-crystallin was observed; whereas a ratio exceeding the value of 1:0.6 caused suppression of insulin aggregation. The mechanisms underlying the dual effect of α-crystallin have been proposed. It is assumed that heterogeneous nucleation occurring on the surface of the α-crystallin particle plays the key role in the paradoxical acceleration of insulin aggregation by α-crystallin that may provide an alternative biologically significant pathway of the aggregation process. PMID:21151456

  5. Myeloperoxidase deletion prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilong; Xie, Zhonglin; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Huaiping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein primarily expressed in granules of neutrophils, is associated with the development of obesity. However, whether MPO mediates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance remains to be determined. Here, we found that consumption of an HFD resulted in neutrophil infiltration and enhanced MPO expression and activity in epididymal white adipose tissue, with an increase in body weight gain and impaired insulin signaling. MPO knockout (MPO(-/-)) mice were protected from HFD-enhanced body weight gain and insulin resistance. The MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide reduced peroxidase activity of neutrophils and prevented HFD-enhanced insulin resistance. MPO deficiency caused high body temperature via upregulation of uncoupling protein-1 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue. Lack of MPO also attenuated HFD-induced macrophage infiltration and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We conclude that activation of MPO in adipose tissue contributes to the development of obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance. Inhibition of MPO may be a potential strategy for prevention and treatment of obesity and insulin resistance.

  6. Inhibition of ceramide synthesis ameliorates glucocorticoid-, saturated-fat-, and obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Holland, William L; Brozinick, Joseph T; Wang, Li-Ping; Hawkins, Eric D; Sargent, Katherine M; Liu, Yanqi; Narra, Krishna; Hoehn, Kyle L; Knotts, Trina A; Siesky, Angela; Nelson, Don H; Karathanasis, Sotirios K; Fontenot, Greg K; Birnbaum, Morris J; Summers, Scott A

    2007-03-01

    Insulin resistance occurs in 20%-25% of the human population, and the condition is a chief component of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer. Herein, we demonstrate that the sphingolipid ceramide is a common molecular intermediate linking several different pathological metabolic stresses (i.e., glucocorticoids and saturated fats, but not unsaturated fats) to the induction of insulin resistance. Moreover, inhibition of ceramide synthesis markedly improves glucose tolerance and prevents the onset of frank diabetes in obese rodents. Collectively, these data have two important implications. First, they indicate that different fatty acids induce insulin resistance by distinct mechanisms discerned by their reliance on sphingolipid synthesis. Second, they identify enzymes required for ceramide synthesis as therapeutic targets for combating insulin resistance caused by nutrient excess or glucocorticoid therapy.

  7. Chromium (D-phenylalanine)3 alleviates high fat-induced insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kandadi, Machender Reddy; Unnikrishnan, M K; Warrier, Ajaya Kumar Sankara; Du, Min; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    High-fat diet has been implicated as a major cause of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of dietary-supplementation of chromium (D-phenylalanine)(3) [Cr(D-Phe)(3)] on glucose and insulin tolerance in high-fat diet fed mice. C57BL/6-mice were randomly assigned to orally receive vehicle or Cr(D-Phe)(3) (45 μg of elemental chromium/kg/day) for 8-weeks. High-fat-fed mice exhibited impaired whole-body-glucose and -insulin tolerance and elevated serum triglyceride levels compared to normal chow-fed mice. Insulin-stimulated glucose up-take in the gastrocnemius muscles, assessed as 2-[(3)H-deoxyglucose] incorporation was markedly diminished in high-fat fed mice compared to control mice. Treatment with chromium reconciled the high-fat diet-induced alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Treatment of cultured, differentiated myotubes with palmitic acid evoked insulin resistance as evidenced by lower levels of insulin-stimulated Akt-phosphorylation, elevated JNK-phosphorylation, (assessed by Western blotting), attenuation of phosphoinositol-3-kinase activity (determined in the insulin-receptor substrate-1-immunoprecipitates by measuring the extent of phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol by γ-(32)P-ATP), and impairment in cellular glucose up-take, all of which were inhibited by Cr(d-Phe)(3). These results suggest a beneficial effect of chromium-supplementation in insulin resistant conditions. It is likely that these effects of chromium may be mediated by augmenting downstream insulin signaling.

  8. Imaging dynamic insulin release using a fluorescent zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR).

    PubMed

    Li, Daliang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Bellomo, Elisa A; Tarasov, Andrei I; Kaut, Callan; Rutter, Guy A; Li, Wen-hong

    2011-12-27

    Current methods of monitoring insulin secretion lack the required spatial and temporal resolution to adequately map the dynamics of exocytosis of native insulin granules in intact cell populations in three dimensions. Exploiting the fact that insulin granules contain a high level of Zn(2+), and that Zn(2+) is coreleased with insulin during secretion, we have developed a fluorescent, cell surface-targeted zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR). ZIMIR displayed a robust fluorescence enhancement on Zn(2+) chelation and bound Zn(2+) with high selectivity against Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). When added to cultured β cells or intact pancreatic islets at low micromolar concentrations, ZIMIR labeled cells rapidly, noninvasively, and stably, and it reliably reported changes in Zn(2+) concentration near the sites of granule fusion with high sensitivity that correlated well with membrane capacitance measurement. Fluorescence imaging of ZIMIR-labeled β cells followed the dynamics of exocytotic activity at subcellular resolution, even when using simple epifluorescence microscopy, and located the chief sites of insulin release to intercellular junctions. Moreover, ZIMIR imaging of intact rat islets revealed that Zn(2+)/insulin release occurred largely in small groups of adjacent β cells, with each forming a "secretory unit." Concurrent imaging of ZIMIR and Fura-2 showed that the amplitude of cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation did not necessarily correlate with insulin secretion activity, suggesting that events downstream of Ca(2+) signaling underlie the cell-cell heterogeneity in insulin release. In addition to studying stimulation-secretion coupling in cells with Zn(2+)-containing granules, ZIMIR may find applications in β-cell engineering and screening for molecules regulating insulin secretion on high-throughput platforms. PMID:22160693

  9. Imaging dynamic insulin release using a fluorescent zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daliang; Chen, Shiuhwei; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Tarasov, Andrei I.; Kaut, Callan; Rutter, Guy A.; Li, Wen-hong

    2011-01-01

    Current methods of monitoring insulin secretion lack the required spatial and temporal resolution to adequately map the dynamics of exocytosis of native insulin granules in intact cell populations in three dimensions. Exploiting the fact that insulin granules contain a high level of Zn2+, and that Zn2+ is coreleased with insulin during secretion, we have developed a fluorescent, cell surface-targeted zinc indicator for monitoring induced exocytotic release (ZIMIR). ZIMIR displayed a robust fluorescence enhancement on Zn2+ chelation and bound Zn2+ with high selectivity against Ca2+ and Mg2+. When added to cultured β cells or intact pancreatic islets at low micromolar concentrations, ZIMIR labeled cells rapidly, noninvasively, and stably, and it reliably reported changes in Zn2+ concentration near the sites of granule fusion with high sensitivity that correlated well with membrane capacitance measurement. Fluorescence imaging of ZIMIR-labeled β cells followed the dynamics of exocytotic activity at subcellular resolution, even when using simple epifluorescence microscopy, and located the chief sites of insulin release to intercellular junctions. Moreover, ZIMIR imaging of intact rat islets revealed that Zn2+/insulin release occurred largely in small groups of adjacent β cells, with each forming a “secretory unit.” Concurrent imaging of ZIMIR and Fura-2 showed that the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ elevation did not necessarily correlate with insulin secretion activity, suggesting that events downstream of Ca2+ signaling underlie the cell-cell heterogeneity in insulin release. In addition to studying stimulation-secretion coupling in cells with Zn2+-containing granules, ZIMIR may find applications in β-cell engineering and screening for molecules regulating insulin secretion on high-throughput platforms. PMID:22160693

  10. Beneficial effects of combined resveratrol and metformin therapy in treating diet-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Frendo-Cumbo, Scott; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Wright, David C

    2016-08-01

    The polyphenol compound resveratrol (RSV) has attracted attention due to its reputed beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. Our lab has previously identified protective effects of RSV against the development of type 2 diabetes in rats. These effects occurred in a manner similar to thiazolidinedione's (TZDs), a class of insulin sensitizing drugs. TZDs are commonly prescribed in combination with metformin (MET) and thus we sought to examine the combined effects of RSV and MET in treating insulin resistance. Male C57BL6 mice were fed a low- (LFD; 10% Kcal from fat) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% Kcal from fat) for 9 weeks to induce glucose and insulin intolerance. HFD mice were then assigned to control (HFD), MET (231.28 ± 12.24 mg/kg/day), RSV (93.68 ± 3.51 mg/kg/day), or combined (COM; MET 232.01 ± 17.12 mg/kg/day and RSV 92.77 ± 6.92 mg/kg/day) treatment groups. Changes in glucose and insulin tolerance and tissue-specific insulin signaling were measured 4 weeks post-treatment. RSV or MET alone did not have beneficial effects on glucose tolerance, although MET significantly improved insulin tolerance compared to HFD Glucose and insulin tolerance were significantly improved in COM compared to HFD and this was mirrored by enhanced insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation in triceps muscle and inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue in COM compared to HFD mice. Improvements with COM treatment were not explained by differences in body weight, adiposity, or markers of adipose tissue inflammation. In summary, this study provides evidence of beneficial effects of combined RSV and MET therapy in treating impairments in glucose homeostasis. PMID:27482073

  11. TWEAK prevents TNF-α-induced insulin resistance through PP2A activation in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Carballo, Ana; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Chacón, Matilde R; Maymó-Masip, Elsa; Lorenzo, Margarita; Porras, Almudena; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2013-07-01

    Visceral fat is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation and inflammatory cytokine production are considered key mediators of insulin signaling inhibition. TWEAK is a relatively new member of the TNF cytokine superfamily, which can exist as full length membrane-associated (mTWEAK) and soluble (sTWEAK) isoforms. Although TWEAK has been shown to have important functions in chronic inflammatory diseases its physiological role in adipose tissue remains unresolved. In this study, we explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the modulation of TNF-α-induced effects on insulin sensitivity by sTWEAK in a human visceral adipose cell line and also in primary human adipocytes obtained from visceral fat depots. Our data reveal that sTWEAK ameliorates TNF-α-induced insulin resistance on glucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation and insulin signaling without affecting other metabolic effects of TNF-α such as lipolysis or apoptotis. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments in adipose cells revealed that pretreatment with sTWEAK specifically inhibits TRAF2 association with TNFR1, but not with TNFR2, which mediates insulin resistance. However, sTWEAK does not affect other downstream molecules activated by TNF-α, such as TAK1. Rather, sTWEAK abolishes the stimulatory effect of TNF-α on JNK1/2, which is directly involved in the development of insulin resistance. This is associated with an increase in PP2A activity upon sTWEAK treatment. Silencing of the PP2A catalytic subunit gene overcomes the dephosphorylation effect of sTWEAK on JNK1/2, pointing to PP2A as a relevant mediator of sTWEAK-induced JNK inactivation. Overall, our data reveal a protective role of TWEAK in glucose homeostasis and identify PP2A as a new driver in the modulation of TNF-α signaling by sTWEAK.

  12. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    PubMed

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD.

  13. Analysis of in vitro insulin-resistance models and their physiological relevance to in vivo diet-induced adipose insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kinyui Alice; Labadorf, Adam; Kennedy, Norman J; Han, Myoung Sook; Yap, Yoon Sing; Matthews, Bryan; Xin, Xiaofeng; Sun, Lei; Davis, Roger J; Lodish, Harvey F; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2013-10-17

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) predisposes individuals to insulin resistance, and adipose tissue has a major role in the disease. Insulin resistance can be induced in cultured adipocytes by a variety of treatments, but what aspects of the in vivo responses are captured by these models remains unknown. We use global RNA sequencing to investigate changes induced by TNF-α, hypoxia, dexamethasone, high insulin, and a combination of TNF-α and hypoxia, comparing the results to the changes in white adipose tissue from DIO mice. We found that different in vitro models capture distinct features of DIO adipose insulin resistance, and a combined treatment of TNF-α and hypoxia is most able to mimic the in vivo changes. Using genome-wide DNase I hypersensitivity followed by sequencing, we further examined the transcriptional regulation of TNF-α-induced insulin resistance, and we found that C/EPBβ is a potential key regulator of adipose insulin resistance.

  14. Effect of Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin Resistance on Follicle Development and Ovulation1

    PubMed Central

    Hackbart, Katherine S.; Cunha, Pauline M.; Meyer, Rudelle K.; Wiltbank, Milo C.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hyperandrogenemia, polycystic ovaries, and menstrual disturbance and a clear association with insulin resistance. This research evaluated whether induction of insulin resistance, using dexamethasone (DEX), in a monovular animal model, the cow, could produce an ovarian phenotype similar to PCOS. In all of these experiments, DEX induced insulin resistance in cows as shown by increased glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance). Experiment 1: DEX induced anovulation (zero of five DEX vs. four of four control cows ovulated) and decreased circulating estradiol (E2). Experiment 2: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was administered to determine pituitary and follicular responses during insulin resistance. GnRH induced a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge and ovulation in both DEX (seven of seven) and control (seven of seven) cows. Experiment 3: E2 was administered to determine hypothalamic responsiveness after induction of an E2 surge in DEX (eight of eight) and control (eight of eight) cows. An LH surge was induced in control (eight of eight) but not DEX (zero of eight) cows. All control (eight of eight) but only two of eight DEX cows ovulated within 60 h of E2 administration. Experiment 4: Short-term DEX was initiated 24 h after induced luteal regression to determine if DEX could acutely block ovulation before peak insulin resistance was induced, similar to progesterone (P4). All control (five of five), no P4-treated (zero of six), and 50% of DEX-treated (three of six) cows ovulated by 96 h after luteal regression. All anovular cows had reduced circulating E2. These data are consistent with DEX creating a lesion in hypothalamic positive feedback to E2 without altering pituitary responsiveness to GnRH or ovulatory responsiveness of follicles to LH. It remains to be determined if the considerable insulin resistance and the reduced follicular E2 production induced by DEX

  15. Synergistic effects of C-peptide and insulin on low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocytes participate in the matching of oxygen (O2) delivery with local need in skeletal muscle via the release of O2 and the vasodilator, ATP. It was reported that a concentration of insulin found in humans with insulin resistance inhibits low O2-induced ATP release. However, in vivo, insulin is coreleased with connecting peptide (C-peptide) at equimolar concentrations, but because of the shorter insulin half-life, the peptides circulate at ratios of C-peptide to insulin ranging from 1:1 to 6:1. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that C-peptide and insulin work synergistically to maintain low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes. Using a thin-film tonometer to alter O2 tension, we determined that either C-peptide or insulin alone inhibits low O2-induced ATP release in a concentration-dependent manner; however, coadministration of the peptides at a 1:1 ratio does not (n = 5; P < 0.05). Because this ratio of C-peptide to insulin is not present in vivo for extended periods, we also investigated the effect of additional physiological ratios on ATP release. In the presence of insulin concentrations that would be found in fasting humans (0.05 nM), C-peptide to insulin ratios of 4:1 and 6:1 did not adversely affect low O2-induced ATP release. However, at a concentration of insulin found in the peripheral circulation of humans under postprandial conditions (0.5 nM), a ratio of C-peptide to insulin of 6:1 inhibited low O2-induced ATP release (n = 5). These findings demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized synergism between C-peptide and insulin that could have physiological importance in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:24089376

  16. The neuronal insulin sensitizer dicholine succinate reduces stress-induced depressive traits and memory deficit: possible role of insulin-like growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A number of epidemiological studies have established a link between insulin resistance and the prevalence of depression. The occurrence of depression was found to precede the onset of diabetes and was hypothesized to be associated with inherited inter-related insufficiency of the peripheral and central insulin receptors. Recently, dicholine succinate, a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor, was shown to stimulate insulin-dependent H2O2 production of the mitochondrial respiratory chain leading to an enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. As such, this mechanism can be a novel target for the elevation of insulin signaling. Results Administration of DS (25 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal) in CD1 mice for 7 days prior to the onset of stress procedure, diminished manifestations of anhedonia defined in a sucrose test and behavioral despair in the forced swim test. Treatment with dicholine succinate reduced the anxiety scores of stressed mice in the dark/light box paradigm, precluded stress-induced decreases of long-term contextual memory in the step-down avoidance test and hippocampal gene expression of IGF2. Conclusions Our data suggest that dicholine succinate has an antidepressant-like effect, which might be mediated via the up-regulation of hippocampal expression of IGF2, and implicate the neuronal insulin receptor in the pathogenesis of stress-induced depressive syndrome. PMID:22989159

  17. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas.

  18. Deepure Tea Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Na; Li, Juan; Mu, Hong-Na; Liu, Yu-Ying; Wang, Ming-Xia; Pan, Chun-Shui; Fan, Jing-Yu; Ye, Fei; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study was to explore the protective effects of Deepure tea against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis and elucidate the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks to induce the metabolic syndrome. In the Deepure tea group, HFD mice were administrated with Deepure tea at 160 mg/kg/day by gavage for 14 days. The mice in HFD group received water in the same way over the same period. The age-matched C57BL/6 mice fed with standard chow were used as normal control. Compared to the mice in HFD group, mice that received Deepure tea showed significantly reduced plasma insulin and improved insulin sensitivity. Deepure tea increased the expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS-2), which plays an important role in hepatic insulin signaling pathway. Deepure tea also led to a decrease in hepatic fatty acid synthesis and lipid accumulation, which were mediated by the downregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthesis (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) proteins that are involved in liver lipogenesis. These results suggest that Deepure tea may be effective for protecting against insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis via modulating IRS-2 and downstream signaling SREBP-1c, FAS, and ACC. PMID:26504484

  19. Antidepressant-like Effect of Insulin in Streptozotocin-induced Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats.

    PubMed

    Sestile, Caio C; Maraschin, Jhonatan C; Rangel, Marcel P; Cuman, Roberto K N; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of insulin compared to sertraline and a combination of insulin and sertraline in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats submitted to the forced swim test (FST). Male Wistar rats were daily treated for 21 days with insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.), with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.), or with a combination of insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.) and sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and submitted to the FST. We also evaluated the water and food intake, urine volume and weight gain of the rats. Rats treated with STZ showed impaired glucose tolerance. Chronic treatment with sertraline showed an antidepressant-like effect in non-diabetic and diabetic rats. Furthermore, sertraline promoted lower weight gain in diabetic rats. Insulin reduced the immobility behaviour in T2DM rats with impaired glucose tolerance. In conclusion, our results showed that insulin has an antidepressant-like effect comparable to that of sertraline. Sertraline is effective as an antidepressant and reduces weight gain, which reinforces its superiority over other SSRIs in the treatment of major depression disorder in patients with T2DM.

  20. Brain insulin lowers circulating BCAA levels by inducing hepatic BCAA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew C.; Fasshauer, Martin; Filatova, Nika; Grundell, Linus A.; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Scherer, Thomas; Lindtner, Claudia; White, Phillip J.; Lapworth, Amanda L.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Knippschild, Uwe; Wolf, Anna M.; Scheja, Ludger; Grove, Kevin L.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Lynch, Christopher J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Buettner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Summary Circulating branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) levels are elevated in obesity/diabetes and are a sensitive predictor for type 2 diabetes. Here we show in rats that insulin dose-dependently lowers plasma BCAA levels through induction of hepatic protein expression and activity of branched-chain α keto-acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the BCAA degradation pathway. Selective induction of hypothalamic insulin signaling in rats and genetic modulation of brain insulin receptors in mice demonstrate that brain insulin signaling is a major regulator of BCAA metabolism by inducing hepatic BCKDH. Short-term overfeeding impairs the ability of brain insulin to lower BCAAs in rats. High-fat feeding in non-human primates and obesity and/or diabetes in humans is associated with reduced BCKDH protein in liver. These findings support the concept that decreased hepatic BCKDH is a major cause of increased plasma BCAAs, and that hypothalamic insulin resistance may account for impaired BCAA metabolism in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25307860

  1. FOXO1 Mediates Vitamin D Deficiency-induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcang; Villalta, Armando; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies have consistently shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This is supported by recent trials showing that vitamin D supplementation in prediabetic or insulin-resistant patients with inadequate vitamin D levels improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-induced insulin resistance and DM2 remain unknown. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance is a primary defect in the majority of patients with DM2. While sustained activation of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in skeletal muscle causes insulin resistance, a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and FOXO1 activation in muscle is unknown. We generated skeletal muscle-specific vitamin D receptor (VDR)-null mice and discovered that these mice developed insulin resistance and glucose intolerance accompanied by increased expression and activity of FOXO1. We also found sustained FOXO1 activation in the skeletal muscle of global VDR-null mice. Treatment of C2C12 muscle cells with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (VD3) reduced FOXO1 expression, nuclear translocation, and activity. The VD3-dependent suppression of FOXO1 activation disappeared by knockdown of VDR, indicating that it is VDR-dependent. Taken together, these results suggest that FOXO1 is a critical target mediating VDR-null signaling in skeletal muscle. The novel findings provide the conceptual support that persistent FOXO1 activation may be responsible for insulin resistance and impaired glucose metabolism in vitamin D signaling-deficient mice, as well as evidence for the utility of vitamin D supplementation for intervention in DM2. PMID:26462119

  2. FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo is mediated by PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra; Park, Edward; Mori, Yusaku; Haber, C Andrew; Han, Ping; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Stavar, Laura; Oprescu, Andrei I; Koulajian, Khajag; Ivovic, Alexander; Yu, Zhiwen; Li, Deling; Bowman, Thomas A; Dewald, Jay; El-Benna, Jamel; Brindley, David N; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K T; Najjar, Sonia M; McKay, Robert A; Bhanot, Sanjay; Fantus, I George; Giacca, Adria

    2014-07-01

    Fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although PKC and inflammatory pathways have been implicated in fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance, the sequence of events leading to impaired insulin signaling is unknown. We used Wistar rats to investigate whether PKCδ and oxidative stress play causal roles in this process and whether this occurs via IKKβ- and JNK-dependent pathways. Rats received a 7-h infusion of Intralipid plus heparin (IH) to elevate circulating free fatty acids (FFA). During the last 2 h of the infusion, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with tracer was performed to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), prevented IH-induced hepatic insulin resistance in parallel with prevention of decreased IκBα content, increased JNK phosphorylation (markers of IKKβ and JNK activation, respectively), increased serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2, and impaired insulin signaling in the liver without affecting IH-induced hepatic PKCδ activation. Furthermore, an antisense oligonucleotide against PKCδ prevented IH-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) (marker of NADPH oxidase activation) and hepatic insulin resistance. Apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, prevented IH-induced hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance similarly to NAC. These results demonstrate that PKCδ, NADPH oxidase, and oxidative stress play a causal role in FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance in vivo and suggest that the pathway of FFA-induced hepatic insulin resistance is FFA → PKCδ → NADPH oxidase and oxidative stress → IKKβ/JNK → impaired hepatic insulin signaling.

  3. Levocetirizine ameliorates high fructose diet-induced insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and hepatic steatosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Noha M; Shehatou, George S G; Abdel Rahim, Mona; Suddek, Ghada M; Gameil, Nariman M

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of levocetirizine against fructose-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and vascular dysfunction, in comparison to pioglitazone, a standard insulin sensitizer. Male Sprague Dawley rats (150-200 g) were divided into 4 groups. Three groups were fed on high fructose diets (HFD) containing 60% w/w fructose, while the fourth control group was fed on standard laboratory food for 8 weeks. AUCOGTT, AUCITT, fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, hepatic glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, C-reactive protein (CRP) level and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and liver steatosis scores were significantly higher in HFD group compared to control group. Moreover, body weight gain, food intake, feeding efficiency, HOMA-β, Emax and pEC50 of acetylcholine-induced relaxations of aortic rings and hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were significantly lower in HFD group than in control group. Treatment with levocetirizine caused significant decreases in AUCOGTT, AUCITT, HOMA-IR, hepatic GSH and MDA levels and serum CRP level and LDH activity and significant increases in hepatic SOD activity and HOMA-β when compared with the HFD group. Although levocetirizine failed to alter TC and LDL-C levels, it produced a significant increase in HDL-C level relative to control group. Levocetirizine was also able to improve acetylcholine-induced relaxations of aortic rings, indicating a protective effect against insulin resistance-induced endothelial damage comparable to that offered by pioglitazone. Moreover, levocetirizine substantially attenuated insulin resistance-associated liver macrovesicular steatosis. These findings demonstrate that levocetirizine ameliorates insulin resistance, improves glucose tolerance and attenuates insulin resistance-linked hepatic steatosis and vascular damage. PMID:25064340

  4. SIRT1 attenuates high glucose-induced insulin resistance via reducing mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Li-Na; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Shao, Ming-Wei; Liu, Fei; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often characterized as the most critical factor contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sustained high glucose is an important extracellular environment that induces insulin resistance. Acquired insulin resistance is associated with reduced insulin-stimulated mitochondrial activity as a result of increased mitochondrial dysfunction. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is one member of the SIRT2 (Sir2)-like family of proteins involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in mammals. Although SIRT1 has a therapeutic effect on metabolic deterioration in insulin resistance, it is still not clear how SIRT1 is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that pcDNA3.1 vector-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates insulin resistance in the high glucose-induced insulin-resistant skeleton muscle cells. These beneficial effects were associated with ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies have demonstrated that SIRT1 restores mitochondrial complex I activity leading to decreased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, SIRT1 significantly elevated the level of another SIRT which is named SIRT3, and SIRT3 siRNA-suppressed SIRT1-induced mitochondria complex activity increments. Taken together, these results showed that SIRT1 improves insulin sensitivity via the amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction, and this is achieved through the SIRT1–SIRT3–mitochondrial complex I pathway. PMID:25710929

  5. Gut microbe-derived extracellular vesicles induce insulin resistance, thereby impairing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoo; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Jeon, Jinseong; Jang, Su Chul; Wang, Taejun; Ban, Minjee; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Kim, Min-Sun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Jee, Young-Koo; Gho, Yong Song; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes might influence host metabolic homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is characterized by insulin resistance. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases once believed to be non-infectious. Here, we hypothesize that gut microbe-derived EVs are important in the pathogenesis of T2D. In vivo administration of stool EVs from high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance compared to regular diet (RD)-fed mice. Metagenomic profiling of stool EVs by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing revealed an increased amount of EVs derived from Pseudomonas panacis (phylum Proteobacteria) in HFD mice compared to RD mice. Interestingly, P. panacis EVs blocked the insulin signaling pathway in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Moreover, isolated P. panacis EVs induced typical diabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance after glucose administration or systemic insulin injection. Thus, gut microbe-derived EVs might be key players in the development of insulin resistance and impairment of glucose metabolism promoted by HFD.

  6. Gut microbe-derived extracellular vesicles induce insulin resistance, thereby impairing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoo; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Jeon, Jinseong; Jang, Su Chul; Wang, Taejun; Ban, Minjee; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Kim, Min-Sun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Jee, Young-Koo; Gho, Yong Song; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes might influence host metabolic homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is characterized by insulin resistance. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases once believed to be non-infectious. Here, we hypothesize that gut microbe-derived EVs are important in the pathogenesis of T2D. In vivo administration of stool EVs from high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance compared to regular diet (RD)-fed mice. Metagenomic profiling of stool EVs by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing revealed an increased amount of EVs derived from Pseudomonas panacis (phylum Proteobacteria) in HFD mice compared to RD mice. Interestingly, P. panacis EVs blocked the insulin signaling pathway in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Moreover, isolated P. panacis EVs induced typical diabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance after glucose administration or systemic insulin injection. Thus, gut microbe-derived EVs might be key players in the development of insulin resistance and impairment of glucose metabolism promoted by HFD. PMID:26510393

  7. Preventive effects of jujube polysaccharides on fructose-induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xingbin; Ren, Daoyuan; Wang, Dongying; Xuan, Yang

    2014-08-01

    High fructose intake is associated with adverse metabolic syndromes. This study was designed to investigate whether the polysaccharides derived from Zizyphus jujube cv. Shaanbeitanzao (ZSP) could alleviate high fructose-induced insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. ZSP was identified by capillary zone electrophoresis as an acidic heteropolysaccharide with l-arabinose, d-galactose and d-galacturonic acid being the main component monosaccharides. Mice were provided with 20% high-fructose water and ZSP was administered intragastrically at doses of 0, 200 or 400 mg kg(-1) BW for 4 weeks. Fructose-treated mice showed hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia with impaired insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05). Administration of ZSP at a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) BW significantly reduced the serum levels of glucose, insulin, TC, TG, LDL-C, and VLDL-C (p < 0.01). ZSP also markedly improved the HDL-C level, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-β), and decreased the atherogenic index (AI) of the mice exposed to high-fructose water. Histopathological test with H&E and oil red O staining confirmed liver steatosis induced by a high-fructose diet and the hepatoprotective effect of ZSP. These findings indicate that the jujube polysaccharides may ameliorate insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in fructose-treated mice.

  8. Taste-induced changes in plasma insulin and glucose turnover in lean and genetically obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, E; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F; Proietto, J; Rivest, R W; Jeanrenaud, B

    1988-06-01

    Cephalic-phase insulin release (CPIR) and the changes in glucose turnover induced by saccharin ingestion were studied in freely moving lean and genetically obese fa/fa rats equipped with chronic catheters for blood sampling. Six-hour-fasted lean and obese rats were trained to drink 1 ml sodium saccharin (0.15%) or 1 ml glucose (70%), and blood samples were taken before and after the stimuli. As early as 1-1.5 min poststimulus, there was a significant increase in CPIR in lean and obese rats. The amplitude of the CPIR induced either by saccharin or by glucose in the obese rats was significantly higher than it was in the lean rats. The effect of saccharin ingestion on the hepatic glucose production (HGP) and the rate of glucose disappearance (Rd) was studied in 6-h-fasted lean and obese rats, under non-steady-state conditions, according to a method previously validated. Saccharin ingestion produced a significant increase in HGP and Rd in lean and obese rats compared with basal values. The saccharin-induced increments in HGP and Rd were higher in the obese than in the lean animals. We conclude that saccharin (through taste) appears to elicit parasympathetic (insulin release) and sympathetic (HGP increase) reflexes in lean and obese rats. These taste-induced changes in plasma insulin and glucose turnover are exaggerated in the obese rats and may participate in obesity and in insulin resistance of the overall syndrome.

  9. Palmitate induces insulin resistance without significant intracellular triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-young; Cho, Hyang-Ki; Kwon, Young Hye

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies showed that increased release of free fatty acids from adipocytes leads to insulin resistance and triglyceride (TG) accumulation in the liver, which may progress into hepatic steatohepatitis. We and other investigators have previously reported that palmitate induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated toxicity in several tissues. This work investigated whether palmitate could induce insulin resistance and steatosis in HepG2 cells. We treated cells with either saturated fatty acid (palmitate) or unsaturated fatty acid (oleate), and observed that palmitate significantly activated c-jun N-terminal kinase and inactivated protein kinase B. Both 4-phenylbutyric acid and glycerol significantly activated protein kinase B, confirming the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in palmitate-mediated insulin resistance. Oleate, but not palmitate, significantly induced intracellular TG deposition and activated sterol regulatory element binding protein-1. Instead, diacylglycerol level and protein kinase C epsilon activity were significantly increased by palmitate, suggesting the possible role of diacylglycerol in palmitate-mediated lipotoxicity. Therefore, the present study clearly showed that palmitate impairs insulin resistance, but does not induce significant TG accumulation in HepG2 cells. PMID:20006364

  10. A high-fructose diet induces hippocampal insulin resistance and exacerbates memory deficits in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Wen; Ren, Lai-Feng; Zhou, Xing; Han, De-Wu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a long-term high-fructose diet on the insulin-signaling pathway of the hippocampus. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either on a control (0% fructose solution) or high-fructose diet (10% fructose solution). Food intake and body mass were measured regularly. Eight months later, peripheral insulin sensitivity, the activity of the hippocampal insulin pathway, and memory tasks were assessed. Compared to the control group, the high fructose group exhibited more weight gain, peripheral insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and memory impairments. In addition, insulin signaling in the hippocampus was attenuated in the high fructose group. These results suggested that a high-fructose diet induced peripheral insulin resistance and an abnormal insulin-signaling pathway in the hippocampus which exacerbated memory deficits in the rats.

  11. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  12. ERK1/2 activation by angiotensin II inhibits insulin-induced glucose uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Yuki; Yoshizumi, Masanori; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ali, Nermin; Kanematsu, Yasuhisa; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Obata, Toshiyuki; Ebina, Yousuke; Tomita, Shuhei; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2005-08-15

    Clinical evidence suggests a relationship between hypertension and insulin resistance, and cross-talk between angiotensin II (Ang II) and insulin signaling pathways may take place. We now report the effect of Ang II on insulin-induced glucose uptake and its intracellular mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We examined the translocation of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucose uptake in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and Akt activities, and phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at the serine and tyrosine residues were measured by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. As a result, Ang II inhibited insulin-induced GLUT-4 translocation from cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in RASMC. Ang II induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and IRS-1 phosphorylation at Ser307 and Ser616. Ang II-induced Ser307 and Ser616 phophorylation of IRS-1 was inhibited by a MEK inhibitor, PD98059, and a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. Ang II inhibition of insulin-stimulated IRS-1 tyrosyl phophorylation and Akt activation were reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. Ang II inhibited insulin-induced glucose uptake, which was also reversed by PD98059 but not by SP600125. It is shown that Ang II-induced ERK1/2 activation inhibits insulin-dependent glucose uptake through serine phophorylation of IRS-1 in RASMC.

  13. Changes in blood glucose and plasma insulin levels induced by bradykinin in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Damas, Jacques; Hallet, Claude; Lefebvre, Pierre J

    2001-01-01

    The influence of bradykinin (BK) on blood glucose and plasma insulin levels was investigated in anaesthetized rats. Blood glucose level was dose-dependently increased by intravenous infusion of BK. This effect of BK was enhanced by captopril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Des-Arg9-bradykinin (DABK), a kinin B1 receptor agonist, did not modify blood glucose levels while the effect of BK was inhibited by Hoe-140, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist. The effect of BK was reduced by the NO-synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), and by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin. The effect of BK was suppressed by the association of propranolol with phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine. It was also reduced by hexamethonium, a ganglion-blocking drug. In adrenalectomized rats, the infusion of BK slightly decreased blood glucose levels. The hyperglycaemic effect of adrenaline was suppressed by propranolol associated with phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine, but it was not modified by L-NAME. Infusion of BK did not modify plasma insulin levels. However, after phentolamine and propranolol, BK induced a transient 2 fold rise in plasma insulin levels. The release of insulin was dose-dependent and inhibited by Hoe-140. We conclude that infusion of BK induces, via a stimulation of B2 receptors, the release of NO and of prostanoids. The latter agents activate through a reflex pathway the release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. This release increases blood glucose levels and reduces plasma insulin levels. After adrenoceptor inhibition, BK induces a secretion of insulin, via the stimulation of B2 receptors. PMID:11704652

  14. Insulin-induced changes in mechanical characteristics of lipid bilayers modified by liver plasma membrane fragments.

    PubMed

    Hianik, T; Kavecanský, J; Zórad, S; Macho, L

    1988-04-01

    Insulin interaction with BLM with incorporated fragments of rat liver plasma membranes, containing hormone receptors, was studied by determining Young modulus of elasticity of bilayer lipid membranes in direction perpendicular to the surface, E. The presence of membrane proteins in a concentration of 60 micrograms.ml-1 induced a significant decrease in parameter E (to approx. 50%) as compared with values obtained in non-modified membranes during insulin action (concentration interval 10(-11)-10(-9) mol.l-1). The extent of the effect was dependent on the initial phase state of the membrane, on cholesterol content in BLM as well as on membrane proteins concentration in lipid bilayer.

  15. Structural insights into ligand-induced activation of the insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.; Lawrence, M.; Streltsov, V.; Garrett, T.; McKern, N.; Lou, M.-Z.; Lovrecz, G.; Adams, T.

    2008-04-29

    The current model for insulin binding to the insulin receptor proposes that there are two binding sites, referred to as sites 1 and 2, on each monomer in the receptor homodimer and two binding surfaces on insulin, one involving residues predominantly from the dimerization face of insulin (the classical binding surface) and the other residues from the hexamerization face. High-affinity binding involves one insulin molecule using its two surfaces to make bridging contacts with site 1 from one receptor monomer and site 2 from the other. Whilst the receptor dimer has two identical site 1-site 2 pairs, insulin molecules cannot bridge both pairs simultaneously. Our structures of the insulin receptor (IR) ectodomain dimer and the L1-CR-L2 fragments of IR and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) explain many of the features of ligand-receptor binding and allow the two binding sites on the receptor to be described. The IR dimer has an unexpected folded-over conformation which places the C-terminal surface of the first fibronectin-III domain in close juxtaposition to the known L1 domain ligand-binding surface suggesting that the C-terminal surface of FnIII-1 is the second binding site involved in high-affinity binding. This is very different from previous models based on three-dimensional reconstruction from scanning transmission electron micrographs. Our single-molecule images indicate that IGF-1R has a morphology similar to that of IR. In addition, the structures of the first three domains (L1-CR-L2) of the IR and IGF-1R show that there are major differences in the two regions governing ligand specificity. The implications of these findings for ligand-induced receptor activation will be discussed. This review summarizes the key findings regarding the discovery and characterization of the insulin receptor, the identification and arrangement of its structural domains in the sequence and the key features associated with ligand binding. The remainder of the review

  16. Insulin-induced oedema in a patient with diabetes mellitus complicated by ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Onyiriuka, Alphonsus N; Ehirim, Frances A

    2014-10-01

    In this article we reported a recent case of a 15-year-old grossly underweight (29 kg) Nigerian girl diagnosed of type 1 diabetes mellitus four years ago and who defaulted from follow up but presented with diabetic ketoacidosis. Glycaemic control was poor because of poor compliance. On the 5th day on admission, a non tender pitting oedema without skin discolouration developed over the ankles. The natural history of insulin-induced oedema was observed in this patient since the oedema resolved seven days later without any specific therapy, such as administration of diuretics. The major causes of generalized oedema in childhood and adolescence, such as kwashiorkor, nephrotic syndrome, liver cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and acute glumerulonephritis were excluded by findings from the history, physical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Having excluded these major causes of oedema, the obvious conclusion was that the insulin therapy was the cause of the oedema observed in our patient. The aim of this article is to review existing medical literature on the subject of insulin-induced oedema and raise the awareness of clinicians on the subject. In conclusion, insulin-induced oedema should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oedema in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus complicated by ketoacidosis, particularly if they are underweight.

  17. Preadipocyte factor 1 induces pancreatic ductal cell differentiation into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Marie; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Won; Ham, Dong-Sik; Park, Heon-Seok; Yang, Hae Kyung; Shin, Ju-Young; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Young-Bum; Youn, Byung-Soo; Sul, Hei Sook; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The preadipocyte factor 1 (Pref-1) is involved in the proliferation and differentiation of various precursor cells. However, the intracellular signaling pathways that control these processes and the role of Pref-1 in the pancreas remain poorly understood. Here, we showed that Pref-1 induces insulin synthesis and secretion via two independent pathways. The overexpression of Pref-1 activated MAPK signaling, which induced nucleocytoplasmic translocation of FOXO1 and PDX1 and led to the differentiation of human pancreatic ductal cells into β-like cells and an increase in insulin synthesis. Concurrently, Pref-1 activated Akt signaling and facilitated insulin secretion. A proteomics analysis identified the Rab43 GTPase-activating protein as a downstream target of Akt. A serial activation of both proteins induced various granular protein syntheses which led to enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In a pancreatectomised diabetic animal model, exogenous Pref-1 improved glucose homeostasis by accelerating pancreatic ductal and β-cell regeneration after injury. These data establish a novel role for Pref-1, opening the possibility of applying this molecule to the treatment of diabetes. PMID:27044861

  18. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  19. Skeletal muscle salt inducible kinase 1 promotes insulin resistance in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Mark; Stewart-Fitzgibbon, Randi; Fu, Jingqi; Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.; Rivera-Molina, Yisel A.; Gibson, Micah; Berglund, Eric D.; Justice, Nicholas J.; Berdeaux, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance causes type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia due to excessive hepatic glucose production and inadequate peripheral glucose uptake. Our objectives were to test the hypothesis that the proposed CREB/CRTC2 inhibitor salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) contributes to whole body glucose homeostasis in vivo by regulating hepatic transcription of gluconeogenic genes and also to identify novel SIK1 actions on glucose metabolism. Methods We created conditional (floxed) SIK1-knockout mice and studied glucose metabolism in animals with global, liver, adipose or skeletal muscle Sik1 deletion. We examined cAMP-dependent regulation of SIK1 and the consequences of SIK1 depletion on primary mouse hepatocytes. We probed metabolic phenotypes in tissue-specific SIK1 knockout mice fed high fat diet through hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and biochemical analysis of insulin signaling. Results SIK1 knockout mice are viable and largely normoglycemic on chow diet. On high fat diet, global SIK1 knockout animals are strikingly protected from glucose intolerance, with both increased plasma insulin and enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity. Surprisingly, liver SIK1 is not required for regulation of CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis, despite contributions of SIK1 to hepatocyte CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis regulation ex vivo. Sik1 mRNA accumulates in skeletal muscle of obese high fat diet-fed mice, and knockout of SIK1 in skeletal muscle, but not liver or adipose tissue, improves insulin sensitivity and muscle glucose uptake on high fat diet. Conclusions SIK1 is dispensable for glycemic control on chow diet. SIK1 promotes insulin resistance on high fat diet by a cell-autonomous mechanism in skeletal muscle. Our study establishes SIK1 as a promising therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese individuals without deleterious effects on hepatic glucose production. PMID:26844205

  20. [The treatment of type-1 diabetics with insulin-induced lipohypertrophy by liposuction].

    PubMed

    Hauner, H; Olbrisch, R R

    1994-03-25

    Extensive areas of lipohypertrophy at the insulin injection sites on both thighs, upper arms and buttocks had developed in a 22-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes. Tissue biopsy showed fat cells of normal size, while the stromal cells in primary culture from the lipohypertrophy tissue demonstrated a greater degree of new fat-cell formation than normal fat tissue, i.e. there was fat-cell hyperplasia. Although the patient avoided these sites for insulin injection during the subsequent 18 months, the amount of excessive fat tissue did not decrease. As the very obvious fat pads distressed the patient, local liposuction was applied without complication at the six affected sites, removing a total of 2,000 ml of fat.-Liposuction is a low-risk curative procedure for removing extensive insulin-induced lipohypertrophic tissue and quickly achieves a cosmetically satisfactory result.

  1. GPR142 Controls Tryptophan-Induced Insulin and Incretin Hormone Secretion to Improve Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Efanov, Alexander M.; Fang, Xiankang; Beavers, Lisa S.; Wang, Xuesong; Wang, Jingru; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Ma, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    GPR142, a putative amino acid receptor, is expressed in pancreatic islets and the gastrointestinal tract, but the ligand affinity and physiological role of this receptor remain obscure. In this study, we show that in addition to L-Tryptophan, GPR142 signaling is also activated by L-Phenylalanine but not by other naturally occurring amino acids. Furthermore, we show that Tryptophan and a synthetic GPR142 agonist increase insulin and incretin hormones and improve glucose disposal in mice in a GPR142-dependent manner. In contrast, Phenylalanine improves in vivo glucose disposal independently of GPR142. Noteworthy, refeeding-induced elevations in insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide are blunted in Gpr142 null mice. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate GPR142 is a Tryptophan receptor critically required for insulin and incretin hormone regulation and suggest GPR142 agonists may be effective therapies that leverage amino acid sensing pathways for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27322810

  2. Exposure to excess insulin (glargine) induces type 2 diabetes mellitus in mice fed on a chow diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Guo, Huailan; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that insulin plays an important role in the nutrient-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to excess long-acting insulin (glargine) can cause typical type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in normal mice fed on a chow diet. C57BL/6 mice were treated with glargine once a day for 8 weeks, followed by evaluations of food intake, body weight, blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and cytokines, insulin signaling, histology of pancreas, ectopic fat accumulation, oxidative stress level, and cholesterol content in mitochondria in tissues. Cholesterol content in mitochondria and its association with oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes and β-cells were also examined. Results show that chronic exposure to glargine caused insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and relative insulin deficiency (T2DM). Treatment with excess glargine led to loss of pancreatic islets, ectopic fat accumulation in liver, oxidative stress in liver and pancreas, and increased cholesterol content in mitochondria of liver and pancreas. Prolonged exposure of cultured primary hepatocytes and HIT-TI5 β-cells to insulin induced oxidative stress in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to excess insulin can induce typical T2DM in normal mice fed on a chow diet.

  3. Exposure to excess insulin (glargine) induces type 2 diabetes mellitus in mice fed on a chow diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Guo, Huailan; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that insulin plays an important role in the nutrient-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic exposure to excess long-acting insulin (glargine) can cause typical type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in normal mice fed on a chow diet. C57BL/6 mice were treated with glargine once a day for 8 weeks, followed by evaluations of food intake, body weight, blood levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and cytokines, insulin signaling, histology of pancreas, ectopic fat accumulation, oxidative stress level, and cholesterol content in mitochondria in tissues. Cholesterol content in mitochondria and its association with oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes and β-cells were also examined. Results show that chronic exposure to glargine caused insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and relative insulin deficiency (T2DM). Treatment with excess glargine led to loss of pancreatic islets, ectopic fat accumulation in liver, oxidative stress in liver and pancreas, and increased cholesterol content in mitochondria of liver and pancreas. Prolonged exposure of cultured primary hepatocytes and HIT-TI5 β-cells to insulin induced oxidative stress in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together, our results show that chronic exposure to excess insulin can induce typical T2DM in normal mice fed on a chow diet. PMID:24741073

  4. Mouse Insulin Cells Expressing an Inducible RIPCre Transgene Are Functionally Impaired

    PubMed Central

    Teitelman, Gladys; Kedees, Mamdouh

    2015-01-01

    We used cre-lox technology to test whether the inducible expression of Cre minimize the deleterious effect of the enzyme on beta cell function. We studied mice in which Cre is linked to a modified estrogen receptor (ER), and its expression is controlled by the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Following the injection of tamoxifen (TM), CreER- migrates to the nucleus and promotes the appearance of a reporter protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), in cells. Immunocytochemical analysis indicated that 46.6 ± 2.1% insulin cells of adult RIPCreER- EYFP expressed EYFP. RIPCreER-EYFP (+TM) mice were normoglycemic throughout the study, and their glucose tolerance test results were similar to control CD-1 mice. However, an extended exposure to reagents that stimulate insulin synthesis was detrimental to the survival of IN+EYFP+cells. The administration of an inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP4i), which prevents the cleavage of glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), to adult RIPCreER-EYFP mice lead to a decrease in the percentage of IN+EYFP+ to 17.5 ± 1.73 and a significant increase in apoptotic cells in islets. Similarly, a 2-week administration of the GLP-1 analog exendin 4 (ex-4) induced an almost complete ablation of IN+ expressing a different reporter protein and a significant decrease in the beta cell mass and rate of beta cell proliferation. Since normal beta cells do not die when induced to increase insulin synthesis, our observations indicate that insulin cells expressing an inducible RIPCre transgene are functionally deficient. Studies employing these mice should carefully consider the pitfalls of the Cre-Lox technique. PMID:25533471

  5. MG53-induced IRS-1 ubiquitination negatively regulates skeletal myogenesis and insulin signalling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Park, Jun Sub; Ham, Young-Mi; Nguyen, Nga; Lee, Na-Rae; Hong, Jin; Kim, Bong-Woo; Lee, Hyun; Lee, Chang-Seok; Jeong, Byung-Cheon; Song, Hyun Kyu; Cho, Hana; Kim, Yoon Ki; Lee, Jae-Seon; Park, Kyong Soo; Shin, Haksub; Choi, Inho; Lee, Seung Hee; Park, Woo Jin; Park, Shi-Young; Choi, Cheol Soo; Lin, Peihui; Karunasiri, Malith; Tan, Tao; Duann, Pu; Zhu, Hua; Ma, Jianjie; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Mitsugumin 53 (MG53) negatively regulates skeletal myogenesis by targeting insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). Here, we show that MG53 is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that induces IRS-1 ubiquitination with the help of an E2-conjugating enzyme, UBE2H. Molecular manipulations that disrupt the E3-ligase function of MG53 abolish IRS-1 ubiquitination and enhance skeletal myogenesis. Skeletal muscles derived from the MG53-/- mice show an elevated IRS-1 level with enhanced insulin signalling, which protects the MG53-/- mice from developing insulin resistance when challenged with a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. Muscle samples derived from human diabetic patients and mice with insulin resistance show normal expression of MG53, indicating that altered MG53 expression does not serve as a causative factor for the development of metabolic disorders. Thus, therapeutic interventions that target the interaction between MG53 and IRS-1 may be a novel approach for the treatment of metabolic diseases that are associated with insulin resistance. PMID:23965929

  6. Bezafibrate Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Metabolic Flexibility in STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Franko, Andras; Huypens, Peter; Neschen, Susanne; Irmler, Martin; Rozman, Jan; Rathkolb, Birgit; Neff, Frauke; Prehn, Cornelia; Dubois, Guillaume; Baumann, Martina; Massinger, Rebecca; Gradinger, Daniel; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Repp, Birgit; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Schommers, Philipp; Stöhr, Oliver; Sanchez-Lasheras, Carmen; Adamski, Jerzy; Peter, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Beckers, Johannes; Walch, Axel K; Fuchs, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard; Schubert, Markus; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Bezafibrate (BEZ), a pan activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), has been generally used to treat hyperlipidemia for decades. Clinical trials with type 2 diabetes patients indicated that BEZ also has beneficial effects on glucose metabolism, although the underlying mechanisms of these effects remain elusive. Even less is known about a potential role for BEZ in treating type 1 diabetes. Here we show that BEZ markedly improves hyperglycemia and glucose and insulin tolerance in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, an insulin-deficient mouse model of type 1 diabetes. BEZ treatment of STZ mice significantly suppressed the hepatic expression of genes that are annotated in inflammatory processes, whereas the expression of PPAR and insulin target gene transcripts was increased. Furthermore, BEZ-treated mice also exhibited improved metabolic flexibility as well as an enhanced mitochondrial mass and function in the liver. Finally, we show that the number of pancreatic islets and the area of insulin-positive cells tended to be higher in BEZ-treated mice. Our data suggest that BEZ may improve impaired glucose metabolism by augmenting hepatic mitochondrial performance, suppressing hepatic inflammatory pathways, and improving insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility. Thus, BEZ treatment might also be useful for patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. PMID:27284107

  7. Free fatty acid-induced PP2A hyperactivity selectively impairs hepatic insulin action on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Olsen, Grith Skytte; Quistorff, Bjørn; Nishimura, Erica

    2011-01-01

    In type 2 Diabetes (T2D) free fatty acids (FFAs) in plasma are increased and hepatic insulin resistance is "selective", in the sense that the insulin-mediated decrease of glucose production is blunted while insulin's effect on stimulating lipogenesis is maintained. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathogenic paradox. Primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to palmitate for twenty hours. To establish the physiological relevance of the in vitro findings, we also studied insulin-resistant Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats. While insulin-receptor phosphorylation was unaffected, activation of Akt and inactivation of the downstream targets Glycogen synthase kinase 3α (Gsk3α and Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) was inhibited in palmitate-exposed cells. Accordingly, dose-response curves for insulin-mediated suppression of the FoxO1-induced gluconeogenic genes and for de novo glucose production were right shifted, and insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis were impaired. In contrast, similar to findings in human T2D, the ability of insulin to induce triglyceride (TG) accumulation and transcription of the enzymes that catalyze de novo lipogenesis and TG assembly was unaffected. Insulin-induction of these genes could, however, be blocked by inhibition of the atypical PKCs (aPKCs). The activity of the Akt-inactivating Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was increased in the insulin-resistant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PP2A by specific inhibitors increased insulin-stimulated activation of Akt and phosphorylation of FoxO1 and Gsk3α. Finally, PP2A mRNA levels were increased in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, while PP2A activity was increased in liver and muscle tissue in insulin-resistant ZDF rats. In conclusion, our findings indicate that FFAs may cause a selective impairment of insulin action upon hepatic glucose metabolism by increasing PP2A activity. PMID:22087313

  8. Flow induced protein nucleation: Insulin oligomerization under shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Andrew; Azadani, Ali; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2007-11-01

    A large number of diseases are associated with protein aggregation and misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and human prion diseases such as Creutzveld-Jakob disease. Characteristic of these diseases is the presence of amyloid fibrils and their precursors, oligomers and protofibrils. Considerable evidence exists that a shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals is essential for conventional therapeutic preparations and drug delivery systems. By studying the nucleation and growth of insulin fibrils in a well-defined flow system, we expect to identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics and which lead to protein destabilization. The present flow system consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and is driven by rotation of the floor. Preliminary results indicate that a continuous shearing flow can accelerate the aggregation process. The interfacial shear viscosity was found to drastically increase during aggregation and appears to be a useful parameter to probe protein oligomerization and the effects of flow.

  9. Role of the insulin/Tor signaling network in starvation-induced programmed cell death in Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, T L; McCall, K

    2012-06-01

    Amino-acid starvation leads to an inhibition of cellular proliferation and the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in the Drosophila ovary. Disruption of insulin signaling has been shown to inhibit the progression of oogenesis, but it is unclear whether this phenotype mimics starvation. Here, we investigate whether the insulin-mediated phosphoinositide kinase-3 pathway regulates PCD in mid oogenesis. We reasoned that under well-fed conditions, disruption of positive components of the insulin signaling pathway within the germline would mimic starvation and produce degenerating egg chambers. Surprisingly, mutants did not mimic starvation but instead produced many abnormal egg chambers in which the somatic follicle cells disappeared and the germline persisted. These abnormal egg chambers did not show an induction of caspases and lysosomes like that observed in wild-type (WT) degenerating egg chambers. Egg chambers from insulin signaling mutants were resistant to starvation-induced PCD, indicating that a complete block in insulin-signaling prevents the proper response to starvation. However, target of rapamycin (Tor) mutants did show a phenotype that mimicked WT starvation-induced PCD, indicating an insulin independent regulation of PCD via Tor signaling. These results suggest that inhibition of the insulin signaling pathway is not sufficient to regulate starvation-induced PCD in mid oogenesis. Furthermore, starvation-induced PCD is regulated by Tor signaling converging with the canonical insulin signaling pathway.

  10. Insulin-induced tyrosine dephosphorylation of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase requires active phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D.

    PubMed Central

    Ouwens, D M; Mikkers, H M; van der Zon, G C; Stein-Gerlach, M; Ullrich, A; Maassen, J A

    1996-01-01

    Insulin stimulation of fibroblasts rapidly induces the tyrosine dephosphorylation of proteins of 68 kDa and 125 kDa, in addition to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor beta-chain, insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2, and Shc. Using specific antibodies, the 68 kDa and 125 kDa proteins were identified as paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) respectively. We have examined whether dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires interaction of the cells with the extracellular matrix. For this, cells were grown on poly(L-lysine) plates, and the tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin was increased by addition of lysophosphatidic acid. Under these conditions, insulin still induced the complete dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin, indicating that this process can occur independently of the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix proteins. We also studied whether dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin results from the action of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. It was found that phenylarsine oxide, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, prevented the insulin-induced dephosphorylation of pp125FAK and paxillin. Furthermore, this insulin-induced dephosphorylation was also impaired in cells expressing a dominant-negative mutant of phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1D (PTP 1D). Thus we have identified paxillin as a target for dephosphorylation by insulin. In addition, we have obtained evidence that the insulin-mediated dephosphorylation of paxillin and pp125FAK requires active PTP 1D. PMID:8809054

  11. [Differentiation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-secreting cells induced by regenerating pancreatic extract].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Wang, Dianliang; Zeng, Hongyan; Wang, Lieming; Sun, Jinwei; Zhang, Zhen; Dong, Shasha

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the natural biological inducer, rat regenerating pancreatic extract (RPE), was used to induce human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) into insulin-secreting cells. We excised 60% of rat pancreas in order to stimulate pancreatic regeneration. RPE was extracted and used to induce hAMSCs at a final concentration of 20 microg/mL. The experiment methods used were as follows: morphological-identification, dithizone staining, immumofluorescence analysis, reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose. The results show that the cell morphology of passge3 hAMSCs changed significantly after the induction of RPE, resulting in cluster shape after induction for 15 days. Dithizone staining showed that there were scarlet cell masses in RPE-treated culture. Immumofluorescence analysis indicated that induced cells were insulin-positive expression. RT-PCR showed the positive expression of human islet-related genes Pdx1 and insulin in the induced cells. The result of insulin secretion stimulated by high glucose indicated that insulin increasingly secreted and then kept stable with prolongation of high glucose stimulation. In conclusion, hAMSCs had the potential to differentiate into insulin-secreting cells induced by RPE in vitro. PMID:22667123

  12. Antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance and postprandial hormonal dysregulation independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Rickels, Michael R; Grudziak, Joanna; Fuller, Carissa; Nguyen, Huong-Lan; Rickels, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications that have revolutionized the treatment of mental illness have become stigmatized by metabolic side effects, including obesity and diabetes. It remains controversial whether the defects are treatment induced or disease related. Although the mechanisms underlying these metabolic defects are not understood, it is assumed that the initiating pathophysiology is weight gain, secondary to centrally mediated increases in appetite. To determine if the AAPs have detrimental metabolic effects independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease, we administered olanzapine, aripiprazole, or placebo for 9 days to healthy subjects (n = 10, each group) under controlled in-patient conditions while maintaining activity levels. Prior to and after the interventions, we conducted a meal challenge and a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal. We found that olanzapine, an AAP highly associated with weight gain, causes significant elevations in postprandial insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and glucagon coincident with insulin resistance compared with placebo. Aripiprazole, an AAP considered metabolically sparing, induces insulin resistance but has no effect on postprandial hormones. Importantly, the metabolic changes occur in the absence of weight gain, increases in food intake and hunger, or psychiatric disease, suggesting that AAPs exert direct effects on tissues independent of mechanisms regulating eating behavior.

  13. Quantum dots induce charge-specific amyloid-like fibrillation of insulin at physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Poly, Simon; Shemetov, Anton; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Agglomeration of some proteins may give rise to aggregates that have been identified as the main cause of amyloid diseases. For example, fibrillation of insulin is related to diabetes mellitus. Quantum dots (QDs) are of special interest as tagging agents for diagnostic and therapeutic studies due to their broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, and high photostability. In this study, PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of human insulin under physiological conditions, this process being dependent on the variation of the surface charge of the nanoparticles (NPs) used. Circular dichroism (CD), protein secondary structure analysis, thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique have been used for comparative analysis of different stages of the fibrillation process. In particular, insulin secondary structure remodelling accompanied by a considerable increase in the rate of amyloid fiber formation have been observed after insulin was mixed with PEGylated QDs. Nanoparticles may significantly influence the rate of protein fibrillation and induce new mechanisms of amyloid diseases, as well as offer opportunities for their treatment.

  14. Signaling cascade of insulin-induced stimulation of L-dopa uptake in renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Andrea; Musolino, Patricia L; Villar, Marcelo; Nowicki, Susana

    2008-12-01

    The inward l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) transport supplies renal proximal tubule cells (PTCs) with the precursor for dopamine synthesis. We have previously described insulin-induced stimulation of L-dopa uptake into PTCs. In the present paper we examined insulin-related signaling pathways involved in the increase of l-dopa transport into isolated rat PTCs. Insulin (50-500 microU/ml) increased L-dopa uptake by PTCs, reaching the maximal increment (60% over the control) at 200 microU/ml. At this concentration, insulin also increased insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Both effects were abrogated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein (5 microM). In line, inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase by pervanadate (0.2-100 microM) caused a concentration-dependent increase in both the uptake of L-dopa (up to 400%) and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. A synergistic effect between pervanadate and insulin on L-dopa uptake was observed only when threshold (0.2 microM), but not maximal (5 microM), concentrations of pervanadate were assayed. Insulin-induced stimulation of L-dopa uptake was also abolished by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; 100 nM wortmannin, and 25 microM LY-294002) and protein kinase C (PKC; 1 microM RO-318220). Insulin-induced activation of PKC-zeta was confirmed in vitro by its translocation from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, and in vivo by immunohistochemistry studies. Insulin caused a wortmannin-sensitive increase in Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) phosphorylation and a dose-dependent translocation of Akt/PKB to the membrane fraction. Our findings suggest that insulin activates PKC-zeta, and Akt/PKB downstream of PI3K, and that these pathways contribute to the insulin-induced increase of L-dopa uptake into PTCs. PMID:18842830

  15. Western-style diet induces insulin insensitivity and hyperactivity in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Marwitz, Shannon E; Woodie, Lauren N; Blythe, Sarah N

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents has increased rapidly over the past 30 years, as has the incidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In 2012, it was found that overweight children have a twofold higher chance of developing ADHD than their normal weight counterparts. Previous work has documented learning and memory impairments linked to consumption of an energy-dense diet in rats, but the relationship between diet and ADHD-like behaviors has yet to be explored using animal models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the role of diet in the etiology of attention and hyperactivity disorders using a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or a Western-style diet (WSD) for ten weeks, and specific physiological and behavioral effects were examined. Tail blood samples were collected to measure fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in order to assess insulin insensitivity. Rats also performed several behavioral tasks, including the open field task, novel object recognition test, and attentional set-shifting task. Rats exposed to a WSD had significantly higher fasting insulin levels than controls, but both groups had similar glucose levels. The quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) indicated the development of insulin resistance in WSD rats. Performance in the open field test indicated that WSD induced pronounced hyperactivity and impulsivity. Further, control diet animals were able to discriminate between old and novel objects, but the WSD animals were significantly impaired in object recognition. However, regardless of dietary condition, rats were able to perform the attentional set-shifting paradigm. While WSD impaired episodic memory and induced hyperactivity, attentional set-shifting capabilities are unaffected. With the increasing prevalence of both obesity and ADHD, understanding the potential links between the two conditions is of clinical

  16. Resveratrol prevents high-fructose corn syrup-induced vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Babacanoglu, C; Yildirim, N; Sadi, G; Pektas, M B; Akar, F

    2013-10-01

    Dietary intake of fructose and sucrose can cause development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The consequences of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a commonly consumed form of fructose and glucose, have poorly been examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether HFCS intake (10% and 20% beverages for 12 weeks) impacts vascular reactivity to insulin and endothelin-1 in conjunction with insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA/proteins levels in aorta of rats. At challenge, we tested the effectiveness of resveratrol (28-30 mg/kg body weight/day) on outcomes of HFCS feeding. HFCS (20%) diet feeding increased plasma triglyceride, VLDL, cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels, but not body weights of rats. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation to insulin (10⁻⁹ to 3×10⁻⁶ M), and enhanced contraction to endothelin-1 (10⁻¹¹ to 10⁻⁸ M) were associated with decreased expression of IRS-1 and eNOS mRNA and protein, but increased expression of iNOS, in aortas of rats fed with HFCS. Resveratrol supplementation restored many features of HFCS-induced disturbances, probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. In conclusion, dietary HFCS causes vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction through attenuating IRS-1 and eNOS expressions as well as increasing iNOS in rats. Resveratrol has capability to recover HFCS-induced disturbances. PMID:23872130

  17. Resveratrol prevents high-fructose corn syrup-induced vascular insulin resistance and dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Babacanoglu, C; Yildirim, N; Sadi, G; Pektas, M B; Akar, F

    2013-10-01

    Dietary intake of fructose and sucrose can cause development of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The consequences of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), a commonly consumed form of fructose and glucose, have poorly been examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether HFCS intake (10% and 20% beverages for 12 weeks) impacts vascular reactivity to insulin and endothelin-1 in conjunction with insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA/proteins levels in aorta of rats. At challenge, we tested the effectiveness of resveratrol (28-30 mg/kg body weight/day) on outcomes of HFCS feeding. HFCS (20%) diet feeding increased plasma triglyceride, VLDL, cholesterol, insulin and glucose levels, but not body weights of rats. Impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation to insulin (10⁻⁹ to 3×10⁻⁶ M), and enhanced contraction to endothelin-1 (10⁻¹¹ to 10⁻⁸ M) were associated with decreased expression of IRS-1 and eNOS mRNA and protein, but increased expression of iNOS, in aortas of rats fed with HFCS. Resveratrol supplementation restored many features of HFCS-induced disturbances, probably by regulating eNOS and iNOS production. In conclusion, dietary HFCS causes vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction through attenuating IRS-1 and eNOS expressions as well as increasing iNOS in rats. Resveratrol has capability to recover HFCS-induced disturbances.

  18. Prolonged exposure to insulin induces mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress through increasing mitochondrial cholesterol content in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Yang, Xuefeng; Guo, Huailan; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2012-05-01

    We addressed the link between excessive exposure to insulin and mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress in this study and found that prolonged exposure to insulin increased mitochondrial cholesterol in cultured hepatocytes and in mice and stimulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide ratio in cultured hepatocytes. Exposure of isolated hepatic mitochondria to cholesterol alone promoted ROS emission. The oxidative stress induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin was prevented by inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin. We further found that prolonged exposure to insulin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and the increased ROS production came from mitochondrial respiration complex I. Finally, we observed that prolonged exposure to insulin decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together our results demonstrate that excess exposure to insulin causes mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress through cholesterol synthesis in hepatocytes.

  19. The inhibition effects of insulin on BMP2-induced muscle heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yannan; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Han, Jin; Shi, Chunying; Liu, Jianzhou; Miao, Qi; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play an important role in regulating osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation. But the diffuse of BMPs into muscle tissues around bone injury sites often leads to heterotopic ossification, which has been regarded as one of major side-effects of BMP implementation in bone defect patients. It raises great demands for exploring effective methods that preventing BMP-induced heterotopic ossification while not interrupting the osteoinductive activity of BMPs for in situ bone defect repair. Here we found insulin, a positive regulator for bone regeneration, inhibited BMP2-induced muscle heterotopic ossification by suppressing the expression of bone transcription factor Osterix. By analyzing downstream molecules of insulin pathway, we found AKT/mTOR/GSK3 signaling was responsible for the inhibition of insulin on BMP2-induced ossification, and GSK3 inhibitor SB216763 attenuated BMP2-induced muscle heterotopic ossification. The data might shed light on developing effective clinical therapy for inhibiting muscle heterotopic ossification when BMPs were used bone defect repair. PMID:25132600

  20. Polydatin supplementation ameliorates diet-induced development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Tan, Yingying; Zhang, Nan; Yao, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains to be elucidated, and the currently available treatments are not entirely effective. Polydatin, a stilbenoid compound derived from the rhizome of Polygonum cuspidatum, has previously been demonstrated to possess hepatoprotective effects. The present study aimed to determine the effects of polydatin supplementation on hepatic fat accumulation and injury in rats fed a high-fat diet. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of polydatin were examined. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups and received one of four treatment regimes for 12 weeks: Control diet, control diet supplemented with polydatin, high-fat diet, or high-fat diet supplemented with polydatin. Polydatin was supplemented in the drinking water at a concentration of 0.3% (wt/vol). The results of the present study showed that long-term high-fat feeding resulted in fatty liver in rats, which was manifested by excessive hepatic neutral fat accumulation and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Polydatin supplementation alleviated the hepatic pathological changes, and attenuated the insulin resistance, as shown by an improved homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance values and a glucose tolerance test. Polydatin supplementation also corrected abnormal leptin and adiponectin levels. Specifically, polydatin supplementation enhanced insulin sensitivity in the liver, as shown by improved insulin receptor substrate 2 expression levels and Akt phosphorylation in the rat liver, following high-fat diet feeding. The results of the present study suggest that polydatin protects rats against high-fat feeding-induced insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Polydatin may be an effective hepatoprotective agent and a potential candidate for the prevention of fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. PMID:25333896

  1. Amyloid-β induces hepatic insulin resistance by activating JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jingxia; Hu, Yanan; Liu, Yang; Zhai, Qiwei

    2012-06-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and experimental studies suggest that AD exacerbates T2DM, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. This study aims to investigate whether amyloid-β (Aβ), a key player in AD pathogenesis, contributes to the development of insulin resistance, as well as the underlying mechanism. We find that plasma Aβ40/42 levels are increased in patients with hyperglycemia. APPswe/PSEN1dE9 transgenic AD model mice with increased plasma Aβ40/42 levels show impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, Aβ impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and cultured hepatocytes. Aβ can upregulate suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1, a well-known insulin signaling inhibitor. Knockdown of SOCS-1 alleviates Aβ-induced impairment of insulin signaling. Moreover, JAK2/STAT3 is activated by Aβ, and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling attenuates Aβ-induced upregulation of SOCS-1 and insulin resistance in hepatocytes. Our results demonstrate that Aβ induces hepatic insulin resistance by activating JAK2/STAT3/SOCS-1 signaling pathway and have implications toward resolving insulin resistance and T2DM.

  2. Deficiency of the Tumor Promoter Gene wip1 Induces Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Armata, Heather L.; Chamberland, Sally; Watts, Lauren; Ko, Hwi Jin; Lee, Yongjin; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing health care issue, and prediabetes has been established as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is characterized by deregulated glucose control, and elucidating pathways which govern this process is critical. We have identified the wild-type (WT) p53-inducible phosphatase (WIP1) phosphatase as a regulator of glucose homeostasis. Initial characterization of insulin signaling in WIP1 knockout (WIP1KO) murine embryo fibroblasts demonstrated reduced insulin-mediated Ak mouse transforming activation. In order to assess the role of WIP1 in glucose homeostasis, we performed metabolic analysis on mice on a low-fat chow diet (LFD) and high fat diet (HFD). We observed increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines in WIP1KO murine embryo fibroblasts, and WIP1KO mice fed a LFD and a HFD. WIP1KO mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin intolerance on a LFD and HFD. However, the effects of WIP1 deficiency cause different metabolic defects in mice on a LFD and a HFD. WIP1KO mice on a LFD develop hepatic insulin resistance, whereas this is not observed in HFD-fed mice. Mouse body weights and food consumption increase slightly over time in LFD-fed WT and WIP1KO mice. Leptin levels are increased in LFD-fed WIP1KO mice, compared with WT. In contrast, HFD-fed WIP1KO mice are resistant to HFD-induced obesity, have decreased levels of food consumption, and decreased leptin levels compared with HFD-WT mice. WIP1 has been shown to regulate the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway, loss of which leads to increased inflammation. We propose that this increased inflammation triggers insulin resistance in WIP1KO mice on LFD and HFD. PMID:25379953

  3. Spironolactone prevents chlorthalidone-induced sympathetic activation and insulin resistance in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Prafull; Price, Angela; Wang, Zhongyun; Arbique, Debbie; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Auchus, Richard J; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies from our laboratory indicate that chlorthalidone triggers persistent activation of the sympathetic nervous system and promotes insulin resistance in hypertensive patients, independent of serum potassium. Mechanisms underlying these adverse effects of chlorthalidone remain unknown, but increasing evidence in rodents suggests the role of angiotensin and aldosterone excess in inducing both sympathetic overactivity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, we conducted studies in 17 subjects with untreated stage 1 hypertension, measuring sympathetic nerve activity at baseline and after 12 weeks of chlorthalidone alone (25 mg/d), chlorthalidone plus spironolactone, and chlorthalidone plus irbesartan, using randomized crossover design. We found that chlorthalidone alone decreased 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure from 135±3/84±2 to 124±2/78±2 mm Hg and significantly increased sympathetic nerve activity from baseline (from 41±3 versus 49±4 bursts per minute; P<0.01). The addition of spironolactone to chlorthalidone returned sympathetic nerve activity value to baseline (42±3 bursts per minute; P>0.05), whereas the addition of irbesartan failed to alter the sympathetic nerve activity response to chlorthalidone in the same subjects (52±2 bursts per minute; P<0.01) despite a similar reduction in ambulatory blood pressure (121±2/75±2 and 121±2/75±2 mm Hg, respectively). Chlorthalidone alone also increased indices of insulin resistance, which was not observed when used in combination with spironolactone. In conclusion, our study demonstrates beneficial effects of spironolactone in attenuating both chlorthalidone-induced sympathetic activation and insulin resistance in humans, independent of blood pressure reduction. Because sympathetic overactivity and insulin resistance contribute to the poor prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease, combination therapy of chlorthalidone with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may constitute a preferable

  4. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  5. Long-term insulin treatment restores cardioprotection induced by sufentanil postconditioning in diabetic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwen; Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Bingqing; Zhao, Xianya; Chen, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Sufentanil, a commonly used opioid analgesic, could mimic ischemia postconditioning to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, but this effect might be hindered in diabetic animals by inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation. Also, diabetes can abrogate the cardioprotection of sevoflurane (an inhaled anesthetic) against ischemia reperfusion injury, and short-term insulin treatment does not restore protection by sevoflurane postconditioning. We hypothesized that long-term insulin treatment might restore the cardioprotective effect of sufentanil postconditioning in diabetic rats via phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Streptozotocin (55 mg/kg)-induced diabetic rats received insulin (Novolin N, 6–8 u/d) for two days or two weeks, then were exposed to 30-min ischemia and 120-min reperfusion. Sufentanil postconditioning was performed 5 min before the onset of reperfusion. Controls included non-diabetic rats, sham surgery for ischemia/reperfusion, and sufentanil vehicle. Infarct size, cardiac troponin I, and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β were examined. Sufentanil postconditioning reduced infarct size by 46% in non-diabetic rats (P < 0.001), but diabetes prevented this protective effect. Two-day insulin treatment was not effective, but two-week treatment reduced infarct size by 45% (P < 0.001), reduced cardiac troponin I by 33% (P < 0.001), and increased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β levels (P < 0.001) in the diabetic sufentanil postconditioning group. In conclusion, sufentanil-induced cardioprotection was restored by long-term insulin treatment. The underlying mechanism may be increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. PMID:26748398

  6. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. Material/Methods A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. Results In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. Conclusions The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27572949

  7. The Insulin-Like Proteins dILPs-2/5 Determine Diapause Inducibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; O’Connor, Michael B.; Costa, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Diapause is an actively induced dormancy that has evolved in Metazoa to resist environmental stresses. In temperate regions, many diapausing insects overwinter at low temperatures by blocking embryonic, larval or adult development. Despite its Afro-tropical origin, Drosophila melanogaster migrated to temperate regions of Asia and Europe where females overwinter as adults by arresting gonadal development (reproductive diapause) at temperatures <13°C. Recent work in D. melanogaster has implicated the developmental hormones dILPs-2 and/or dILP3, and dILP5, homologues of vertebrate insulin/insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), in reproductive arrest. However, polymorphisms in timeless (tim) and couch potato (cpo) dramatically affect diapause inducibility and these dILP experiments could not exclude this common genetic variation contributing to the diapause phenotype. Here, we apply an extensive genetic dissection of the insulin signaling pathway which allows us to see both enhancements and reductions in egg development that are independent of tim and cpo variations. We show that a number of manipulations dramatically enhance diapause to ~100%. These include ablating, or reducing the excitability of the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) that express dILPs-2,3,5 employing the dilp2,3,5-/- triple mutant, desensitizing insulin signaling using a chico mutation, or inhibiting dILP2 and 5 in the hemolymph by over-expressing Imaginal Morphogenesis Protein-Late 2 (Imp-L2). In addition, triple mutant dilp2,3,5-/- females maintain high levels of diapause even when temperatures are raised in adulthood to 19°C. However at 22°C, these females all show egg development revealing that the effects are conditional on temperature and not a general female sterility. In contrast, over-expression of dilps-2/5 or enhancing IPC excitability, led to levels of ovarian arrest that approached zero, underscoring dILPs-2 and 5 as key antagonists of diapause. PMID:27689881

  8. Probiotic supplementation prevents high-fat, overfeeding-induced, insulin resistance in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hulston, Carl J.; Churnside, Amelia A.; Venables, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether probiotic supplementation (Lactobacillus casei Shirota [LcS]) prevents diet-induced insulin resistance in humans. Seventeen healthy individuals were randomised to probiotic (n = 8) or control (n = 9) groups. The probiotic group consumed an LcS-fermented milk drink twice daily for 4 weeks whereas the control group received no supplementation. Subjects maintained their normal diet for the first 3 weeks of the study, after which they consumed a high-fat (65% energy) high-energy (+50% kcal) diet for 7 days. Whole body insulin sensitivity was assessed via an oral glucose tolerance test conducted before and after overfeeding. Body mass increased by 0.6 ± 0.2 kg in the control group (p < 0.05) and 0.3 ± 0.2 kg in the probiotic group (p > 0.05). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations increased following 7 days of overeating (control group only; 5.3 ± 0.1 vs. 5.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L, p < 0.05) whereas fasting serum insulin concentrations were maintained in both groups. Glucose AUC increased by 10% (from 817 ± 45 to 899 ± 39 mmol/L/120 min, p < 0.05) and whole body insulin sensitivity decreased by 27% (from 5.3 ± 1.4 to 3.9 ± 0.9, p < 0.05) in the control group, whereas normal insulin sensitivity was maintained in the probiotic group (4.4 ± 0.8 and 4.5 ± 0.9 before and after overeating, respectively, p > 0.05). These results suggest that probiotic supplementation may be useful in the prevention of diet-induced metabolic diseases such as type II diabetes. PMID:25630516

  9. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  10. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 induce pronounced hypertrophy of skeletal myofibers in tissue culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Karlisch, Patricia; Shansky, Janet

    1990-01-01

    Skeletal myofibers differentiated from primary avian myoblasts in tissue culture can be maintained in positive nitrogen balance in a serum-free medium for at least 6 to 7 days when embedded in a three dimensional collagen gel matrix. The myofibers are metabolically sensitive to physiological concentrations of insulin but these concentrations do not stimulate cell growth. Higher insulin concentrations stimulate both cell hyperplasia and myofiber hypertrophy. Cell growth results from a long term 42 percent increase in total protein synthesis and a 38 percent increase in protein degradation. Myofiber diameters increase by 71 to 98 percent after 6 to 7 days in insulin-containing medium. Insulin-like growth factor-1 but not insulin-like growth factor-2, at 250 ng/ml, is as effective as insulin in stimulating cell hyperplasia and myofiber hypertrophy. This model system provides a new method for studying the long-term anabolic effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factors on myofiber hypertrophy under defined tissue culture conditions.

  11. Lifestyle-induced metabolic inflexibility and accelerated ageing syndrome: insulin resistance, friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Alistair VW; Bell, Jimmy D; Guy, Geoffrey W

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome may have its origins in thriftiness, insulin resistance and one of the most ancient of all signalling systems, redox. Thriftiness results from an evolutionarily-driven propensity to minimise energy expenditure. This has to be balanced with the need to resist the oxidative stress from cellular signalling and pathogen resistance, giving rise to something we call 'redox-thriftiness'. This is based on the notion that mitochondria may be able to both amplify membrane-derived redox growth signals as well as negatively regulate them, resulting in an increased ATP/ROS ratio. We suggest that 'redox-thriftiness' leads to insulin resistance, which has the effect of both protecting the individual cell from excessive growth/inflammatory stress, while ensuring energy is channelled to the brain, the immune system, and for storage. We also suggest that fine tuning of redox-thriftiness is achieved by hormetic (mild stress) signals that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and resistance to oxidative stress, which improves metabolic flexibility. However, in a non-hormetic environment with excessive calories, the protective nature of this system may lead to escalating insulin resistance and rising oxidative stress due to metabolic inflexibility and mitochondrial overload. Thus, the mitochondrially-associated resistance to oxidative stress (and metabolic flexibility) may determine insulin resistance. Genetically and environmentally determined mitochondrial function may define a 'tipping point' where protective insulin resistance tips over to inflammatory insulin resistance. Many hormetic factors may induce mild mitochondrial stress and biogenesis, including exercise, fasting, temperature extremes, unsaturated fats, polyphenols, alcohol, and even metformin and statins. Without hormesis, a proposed redox-thriftiness tipping point might lead to a feed forward insulin resistance cycle in the presence of excess calories. We therefore suggest that as oxidative stress

  12. High-fat diet induces hepatic insulin resistance and impairment of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Patil, Ishan Y; Jiang, Tianyi; Sancheti, Harsh; Walsh, John P; Stiles, Bangyan L; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which may affect brain synaptic plasticity through impairment of insulin-sensitive processes underlying neuronal survival, learning, and memory. The experimental model consisted of 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice fed either a normal chow diet (control group) or a HFD (60% of calorie from fat; HFD group) for 12 weeks. This model was characterized as a function of time in terms of body weight, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, and plasma triglycerides. IRS-1/Akt pathway was assessed in primary hepatocytes and brain homogenates. The effect of HFD in brain was assessed by electrophysiology, input/output responses and long-term potentiation. HFD-fed mice exhibited a significant increase in body weight, higher fasting glucose- and insulin levels in plasma, lower glucose tolerance, and higher HOMA-IR values. In liver, HFD elicited (a) a significant decrease of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) phosphorylation on Tyr608 and increase of Ser307 phosphorylation, indicative of IRS-1 inactivation; (b) these changes were accompanied by inflammatory responses in terms of increases in the expression of NFκB and iNOS and activation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK; (c) primary hepatocytes from mice fed a HFD showed decreased cellular oxygen consumption rates (indicative of mitochondrial functional impairment); this can be ascribed partly to a decreased expression of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis. In brain, HFD feeding elicited (a) an inactivation of the IRS-1 and, consequentially, (b) a decreased expression and plasma membrane localization of the insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/GLUT4; (c) a suppression of the ERK/CREB pathway, and (d) a substantial decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of hippocampus (indicative of impaired synaptic plasticity). It may be surmised that 12 weeks fed with HFD induce a systemic insulin resistance that impacts

  13. Urtica dioica modulates hippocampal insulin signaling and recognition memory deficit in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Gupta, Sahil; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been associated with functional abnormalities in the hippocampus and performance of cognitive function. Urtica dioica (UD) has been used in the treatment of diabetes. In our previous report we observed that UD extract attenuate diabetes mediated associative and spatial memory dysfunction. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of UD extract on mouse model of diabetes-induced recognition memory deficit and explore the possible mechanism behind it. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p. consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (ROSI) (5 mg/kg, oral) administration for 8 weeks. STZ induced diabetic mice showed significant decrease in hippocampal insulin signaling and translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) to neuronal membrane resulting in cognitive dysfunction and hypolocomotion. UD treatment effectively improved hippocampal insulin signaling, glucose tolerance and recognition memory performance in diabetic mice, which was comparable to ROSI. Further, diabetes mediated oxidative stress and inflammation was reversed by chronic UD or ROSI administration. UD leaves extract acts via insulin signaling pathway and might prove to be effective for the diabetes mediated central nervous system complications. PMID:26767366

  14. Transgenic overexpression of VEGF-C induces weight gain and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Sinem; Hollmén, Maija; Yoon, Sun-Young; Alkan, H. Furkan; Alitalo, Kari; Wolfrum, Christian; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Obesity comprises great risks for human health, contributing to the development of other diseases such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Previously, obese patients were found to have elevated serum levels of VEGF-C, which correlated with worsening of lipid parameters. We recently identified that neutralization of VEGF-C and -D in the subcutaneous adipose tissue during the development of obesity improves metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity in mice. To test the hypothesis that VEGF-C plays a role in the promotion of the metabolic disease, we used K14-VEGF-C mice that overexpress human VEGF-C under control of the keratin-14 promoter in the skin and monitored metabolic parameters over time. K14-VEGF-C mice had high levels of VEGF-C in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and gained more weight than wildtype littermates, became insulin resistant and had increased ectopic lipid accumulation at 20 weeks of age on regular mouse chow. The metabolic differences persisted under high-fat diet induced obesity. These results indicate that elevated VEGF-C levels contribute to metabolic deterioration and the development of insulin resistance, and that blockade of VEGF-C in obesity represents a suitable approach to alleviate the development of insulin resistance. PMID:27511834

  15. Transgenic overexpression of VEGF-C induces weight gain and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Sinem; Hollmén, Maija; Yoon, Sun-Young; Alkan, H Furkan; Alitalo, Kari; Wolfrum, Christian; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Obesity comprises great risks for human health, contributing to the development of other diseases such as metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Previously, obese patients were found to have elevated serum levels of VEGF-C, which correlated with worsening of lipid parameters. We recently identified that neutralization of VEGF-C and -D in the subcutaneous adipose tissue during the development of obesity improves metabolic parameters and insulin sensitivity in mice. To test the hypothesis that VEGF-C plays a role in the promotion of the metabolic disease, we used K14-VEGF-C mice that overexpress human VEGF-C under control of the keratin-14 promoter in the skin and monitored metabolic parameters over time. K14-VEGF-C mice had high levels of VEGF-C in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and gained more weight than wildtype littermates, became insulin resistant and had increased ectopic lipid accumulation at 20 weeks of age on regular mouse chow. The metabolic differences persisted under high-fat diet induced obesity. These results indicate that elevated VEGF-C levels contribute to metabolic deterioration and the development of insulin resistance, and that blockade of VEGF-C in obesity represents a suitable approach to alleviate the development of insulin resistance. PMID:27511834

  16. Decreased pituitary response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in young lean male patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Cizmarova, E; Huckova, M; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Koska, J

    2006-07-01

    Essential hypertension is associated with changes in central catecholaminergic pathways which might also be reflected in the pituitary response to stress stimuli. The aim of this study was to determine whether the response of pituitary hormones, cortisol, plasma renin activity, aldosterone and catecholamines to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is changed in hypertension. We studied 22 young lean male patients with newly diagnosed untreated essential hypertension and 19 healthy normotensive, age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls. All subjects underwent an insulin tolerance test (0.1 IU insulin/kg body weight intravenously) with blood sampling before and 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90 min after insulin administration. Increased baseline levels of norepinephrine (P<0.05), increased response of norepinephrine (P<0.001) and decreased response of growth hormone (P<0.001), prolactin (P<0.001), adrenocorticotropic hormone (P<0.05) and cortisol (P<0.001) were found in hypertensive patients when compared to normotensive controls. Increased norepinephrine levels and a decreased pituitary response to metabolic stress stimuli may represent another manifestation of chronically increased sympathetic tone in early hypertension. PMID:16617309

  17. Site-specific covalent modifications of human insulin by catechol estrogens: Reactivity and induced structural and functional changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Ming-Chun; Fang, Chieh-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Liang, Huei-Chen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Proteins, covalently modified by catechol estrogens (CEs), were identified recently from the blood serum of diabetic patients and referred to as estrogenized proteins. Estrogenization of circulating insulin may occur and affect its molecular functioning. Here, the chemical reactivity of CEs towards specific amino acid residues of proteins and the structural and functional changes induced by the estrogenization of insulin were studied using cyclic voltammetry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and bioassays. Our results indicate that CEs, namely, 2- and 4-hydroxyl estrogens, were thermodynamically and kinetically more reactive than the catechol moiety. Upon co-incubation, intact insulin formed a substantial number of adducts with one or multiple CEs via covalent conjugation at its Cys 7 in the A or B chain, as well as at His10 or Lys29 in the B chain. Such conjugation was coupled with the cleavage of inter-chain disulfide linkages. Estrogenization on these sites may block the receptor-binding pockets of insulin. Insulin signaling and glucose uptake levels were lower in MCF-7 cells treated with modified insulin than in cells treated with native insulin. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that insulin molecules are susceptible to active estrogenization, and that such modification may alter the action of insulin.

  18. Site-specific covalent modifications of human insulin by catechol estrogens: Reactivity and induced structural and functional changes

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming-Chun; Fang, Chieh-Ming; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Liang, Huei-Chen; Wang, Tzu-Fan; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chen, Chiao-Chen; Tai, Jung-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Proteins, covalently modified by catechol estrogens (CEs), were identified recently from the blood serum of diabetic patients and referred to as estrogenized proteins. Estrogenization of circulating insulin may occur and affect its molecular functioning. Here, the chemical reactivity of CEs towards specific amino acid residues of proteins and the structural and functional changes induced by the estrogenization of insulin were studied using cyclic voltammetry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular modeling, and bioassays. Our results indicate that CEs, namely, 2- and 4-hydroxyl estrogens, were thermodynamically and kinetically more reactive than the catechol moiety. Upon co-incubation, intact insulin formed a substantial number of adducts with one or multiple CEs via covalent conjugation at its Cys 7 in the A or B chain, as well as at His10 or Lys29 in the B chain. Such conjugation was coupled with the cleavage of inter-chain disulfide linkages. Estrogenization on these sites may block the receptor-binding pockets of insulin. Insulin signaling and glucose uptake levels were lower in MCF-7 cells treated with modified insulin than in cells treated with native insulin. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that insulin molecules are susceptible to active estrogenization, and that such modification may alter the action of insulin. PMID:27353345

  19. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity in human adipocytes is strongly correlated with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and is a target of insulin-induced oxidative inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangdong; Hardy, V Elise; Joseph, Jeffrey I; Jabbour, Serge; Mahadev, Kalyankar; Zhu, Li; Goldstein, Barry J

    2003-06-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), in particular PTP1B, have been shown to modulate insulin signal transduction in liver and skeletal muscle in animal models; however, their role in human adipose tissue remains unclear. The uptake of (14)C-D-glucose in response to 10 or 100 nmol/L insulin was measured in isolated subcutaneous adipocytes from subjects with a mean age of 44 years (range, 26 to 58) and mean body mass index (BMI) of 35.6 (range, 29.7 to 45.5). The endogenous activity of total PTPases and specifically of PTP1B in immunoprecipitates was measured in cell lysates under an inert atmosphere with and without added reducing agents. Using nonlinear regression analysis, higher BMI was significantly correlated with lower adipocyte glucose uptake (r = 0.73, P =.01) and with increased endogenous total PTPase activity (r = 0.64, P =.04). Correlation with waist circumference gave similar results. The endogenous total PTPase activity also strongly correlated with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (R =.89, P <.0001); however, the activity of PTP1B was unrelated to the level of glucose uptake. Consistent with the insulin-stimulated oxidative inhibition of thiol-dependent PTPases reported for 3T3-L1 adipocytes and hepatoma cells, treatment of human adipocytes with 100 nmol/L insulin for 5 minutes lowered endogenous PTPase activity to 37% of control (P <.001), which was increased 25% by subsequent treatment with dithiothreitol in vitro. Cellular treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor that blocks the cellular generation of H(2)O(2) and reduces the insulin-induced reduction of cellular PTPase activity, also diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by 82% (P =.001). These data suggest that total cellular PTPase activity, but not the activity of PTP1B, is higher in more obese subjects and is negatively associated with insulin-stimulated glucose transport. The insulin-stimulated oxidative inhibition of PTPases may also have an important

  20. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity. PMID:27000941

  1. Saturated and unsaturated fat induce hepatic insulin resistance independently of TLR-4 signaling and ceramide synthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galbo, Thomas; Perry, Rachel J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, João-Paulo G; Alves, Tiago C; Kahn, Mario; Guigni, Blas A; Serr, Julie; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2013-07-30

    Hepatic insulin resistance is a principal component of type 2 diabetes, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for its pathogenesis remain unknown. Recent studies have suggested that saturated fatty acids induce hepatic insulin resistance through activation of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) receptor in the liver, which in turn transcriptionally activates hepatic ceramide synthesis leading to inhibition of insulin signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that TLR-4 receptor signaling is not directly required for saturated or unsaturated fat-induced hepatic insulin resistance in both TLR-4 antisense oligonucleotide treated and TLR-4 knockout mice, and that ceramide accumulation is not dependent on TLR-4 signaling or a primary event in hepatic steatosis and impairment of insulin signaling. Further, we show that both saturated and unsaturated fats lead to hepatic accumulation of diacylglycerols, activation of PKCε, and impairment of insulin-stimulated IRS-2 signaling. These data demonstrate that saturated fat-induced insulin resistance is independent of TLR-4 activation and ceramides.

  2. Hepatitis C virus induced insulin resistance impairs response to anti viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    El-Zayadi, Abdel-Rahman; Anis, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important risk factor for insulin resistance (IR). The latter is the pathogenic foundation underlying metabolic syndrome, steatosis and cirrhosis, and possibly hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors ultimately leads to the development of IR. Obesity is considered a major risk factor, with dysregulation of levels of secreted adipokines from distended adipose tissue playing a major role in IR. HCV-induced IR may be due to the HCV core protein inducing proteasomal degradation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2, blocking intracellular insulin signaling. The latter is mediated by increased levels of both tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOC-3). IR, through different mechanisms, plays a role in the development of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and even HCC. In addition, IR has a role in impairing TNF signaling cascade, which in turn blocks STAT-1 translocation and interferon stimulated genes production avoiding the antiviral effect of interferon. PMID:22294824

  3. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  4. Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract attenuates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  5. Myocardin and pdx-1 synergistically induce hMSCs to differentiate into insulin secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Ting; Sun, Fang-Xing

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported as an attractive source for the generation of transplantable surrogate β cells. The objective of this study was to investigate a new method to induce the differentiation of hMSCs into insulin secretion cells and to explore its molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated in vitro differentiation of hMSCs by overexpression of myocardin and pdx-1. Differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantificational real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms were evaluated by chip assay, CO-IP and Luciferase assay. This study reported a new method to induce the differentiation of hMSCs into insulin secretion cells. The method is cotransduction of myocardin and pdx-1 for 7days. At the same time, we find myocardin and pdx-1 can form a complex to promote the transactivities of insulin by affecting the formation of the pdx-1/myocardin/SRF/CArG complex both in vitro and in vitro. The present study provided a simple and faithful in vitro model for further investigating the cell replacement therapy for diabetes.

  6. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  7. Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract attenuates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue.

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  9. Chronic caffeine intake decreases circulating catecholamines and prevents diet-induced insulin resistance and hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Conde, Silvia V; Nunes da Silva, Tiago; Gonzalez, Constancio; Mota Carmo, Miguel; Monteiro, Emilia C; Guarino, Maria P

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that long-term caffeine intake prevents the development of insulin resistance and hypertension in two pathological animal models: the high-fat (HF) and the high-sucrose (HSu) diet rat. We used six groups of animals: control; caffeine-treated (Caff; 1 g/l in drinking water during 15 d); HF; caffeine-treated HF (HFCaff); HSu; caffeine-treated HSu (HSuCaff). Insulin sensitivity was assessed using the insulin tolerance test. Blood pressure, weight gain, visceral fat, hepatic glutathione, plasma caffeine, insulin and NO, and serum NEFA and catecholamines were measured. Caffeine reversed insulin resistance and hypertension induced by both the HF and HSu diets. In the HF-fed animals caffeine treatment restored fasting insulin levels to control values and reversed increased weight gain and visceral fat mass. In the HSu group, caffeine reversed fasting hyperglycaemia and restored NEFA to control values. There were no changes either in plasma NO or in hepatic glutathione levels. In contrast, caffeine totally prevented the increase in serum catecholamines induced by HF and HSu diets. To test the hypothesis that inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system prevents the development of diet-induced insulin resistance we administered carvedilol, an antagonist of β1, β2 and also α1 adrenoceptors, to HF and HSu rats. Carvedilol treatment fully prevented diet-induced insulin resistance and hypertension, mimicking the effect of caffeine. We concluded that long-term caffeine intake prevented the development of insulin resistance and hypertension in HF and HSu models and that this effect was related to a decrease in circulating catecholamines.

  10. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  11. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  12. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Gu, Tieguang; Yamahara, Johji; Li, Yuhao

    2014-06-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  13. High sugar-induced insulin resistance in Drosophila relies on the lipocalin Neural Lazarillo.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Matthieu Y; Léopold, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) plays a central role in matching energy needs with uptake and storage, participating in functions as diverse as metabolic homeostasis, growth, reproduction and ageing. In mammals, this pleiotropy of action relies in part on a dichotomy of action of insulin, IGF-I and their respective membrane-bound receptors. In organisms with simpler IIS, this functional separation is questionable. In Drosophila IIS consists of several insulin-like peptides called Dilps, activating a unique membrane receptor and its downstream signaling cascade. During larval development, IIS is involved in metabolic homeostasis and growth. We have used feeding conditions (high sugar diet, HSD) that induce an important change in metabolic homeostasis to monitor possible effects on growth. Unexpectedly we observed that HSD-fed animals exhibited severe growth inhibition as a consequence of peripheral Dilp resistance. Dilp-resistant animals present several metabolic disorders similar to those observed in type II diabetes (T2D) patients. By exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in Drosophila Dilp resistance, we found a major role for the lipocalin Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a target of JNK signaling. NLaz expression is strongly increased upon HSD and animals heterozygous for an NLaz null mutation are fully protected from HSD-induced Dilp resistance. NLaz is a secreted protein homologous to the Retinol-Binding Protein 4 involved in the onset of T2D in human and mice. These results indicate that insulin resistance shares common molecular mechanisms in flies and human and that Drosophila could emerge as a powerful genetic system to study some aspects of this complex syndrome.

  14. High Sugar-Induced Insulin Resistance in Drosophila Relies on the Lipocalin Neural Lazarillo

    PubMed Central

    Pasco, Matthieu Y.; Léopold, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) plays a central role in matching energy needs with uptake and storage, participating in functions as diverse as metabolic homeostasis, growth, reproduction and ageing. In mammals, this pleiotropy of action relies in part on a dichotomy of action of insulin, IGF-I and their respective membrane-bound receptors. In organisms with simpler IIS, this functional separation is questionable. In Drosophila IIS consists of several insulin-like peptides called Dilps, activating a unique membrane receptor and its downstream signaling cascade. During larval development, IIS is involved in metabolic homeostasis and growth. We have used feeding conditions (high sugar diet, HSD) that induce an important change in metabolic homeostasis to monitor possible effects on growth. Unexpectedly we observed that HSD-fed animals exhibited severe growth inhibition as a consequence of peripheral Dilp resistance. Dilp-resistant animals present several metabolic disorders similar to those observed in type II diabetes (T2D) patients. By exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in Drosophila Dilp resistance, we found a major role for the lipocalin Neural Lazarillo (NLaz), a target of JNK signaling. NLaz expression is strongly increased upon HSD and animals heterozygous for an NLaz null mutation are fully protected from HSD-induced Dilp resistance. NLaz is a secreted protein homologous to the Retinol-Binding Protein 4 involved in the onset of T2D in human and mice. These results indicate that insulin resistance shares common molecular mechanisms in flies and human and that Drosophila could emerge as a powerful genetic system to study some aspects of this complex syndrome. PMID:22567167

  15. Role of Protein Farnesylation in Burn-Induced Metabolic Derangements and Insulin Resistance in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomokazu; Kramer, Joshua; Yu, Yong-Ming; Fischman, Alan J.; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Kaneki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic derangements, including insulin resistance and hyperlactatemia, are a major complication of major trauma (e.g., burn injury) and affect the prognosis of burn patients. Protein farnesylation, a posttranslational lipid modification of cysteine residues, has been emerging as a potential component of inflammatory response in sepsis. However, farnesylation has not yet been studied in major trauma. To study a role of farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic aberration, we examined the effects of farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibitor, FTI-277, on burn-induced insulin resistance and metabolic alterations in mouse skeletal muscle. Methods A full thickness burn (30% total body surface area) was produced under anesthesia in male C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. After the mice were treated with FTI-277 (5 mg/kg/day, IP) or vehicle for 3 days, muscle insulin signaling, metabolic alterations and inflammatory gene expression were evaluated. Results Burn increased FTase expression and farnesylated proteins in mouse muscle compared with sham-burn at 3 days after burn. Simultaneously, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, Akt and GSK-3β was decreased. Protein expression of PTP-1B (a negative regulator of IR-IRS-1 signaling), PTEN (a negative regulator of Akt-mediated signaling), protein degradation and lactate release by muscle, and plasma lactate levels were increased by burn. Burn-induced impaired insulin signaling and metabolic dysfunction were associated with increased inflammatory gene expression. These burn-induced alterations were reversed or ameliorated by FTI-277. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that burn increased FTase expression and protein farnesylation along with insulin resistance, metabolic alterations and inflammatory response in mouse skeletal muscle, all of which were prevented by FTI-277 treatment. These results indicate that increased protein farnesylation plays a pivotal role in burn-induced

  16. Topiramate-Induced Modulation of Hepatic Molecular Mechanisms: An Aspect for Its Anti-Insulin Resistant Effect

    PubMed Central

    El-Abhar, Hanan S.; Schaalan, Mona F.

    2012-01-01

    Topiramate is an antiepileptic drug known to ameliorate insulin resistance besides reducing body weight. Albeit liver plays a fundamental role in regulation of overall insulin resistance, yet the effect of topiramate on this organ is controversial and is not fully investigated. The current work aimed to study the potential hepatic molecular mechanistic cassette of the anti-insulin resistance effect of topiramate. To this end, male Wistar rats were fed high fat/high fructose diet (HFFD) for 10 weeks to induce obese, insulin resistant, hyperglycemic animals, but with no overt diabetes. Two HFFD-groups received oral topiramate, 40 or 100 mg/kg, for two weeks. Topiramate, on the hepatic molecular level, has opposed the high fat/high fructose diet effect, where it significantly increased adiponectin receptors, GLUT2, and tyrosine kinase activity, while decreased insulin receptor isoforms. Besides, it improved the altered glucose homeostasis and lipid profile, lowered the ALT level, caused subtle, yet significant decrease in TNF-α, and boosted adiponectin in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, topiramate decreased liver weight/, visceral fat weight/, and epididymal fat weight/body weight ratios. The study proved that insulin-resistance has an effect on hepatic molecular level and that the topiramate-mediated insulin sensitivity is ensued partly by modulation of hepatic insulin receptor isoforms, activation of tyrosine kinase, induction of GLUT2 and elevation of adiponectin receptors, as well as their ligand, adiponectin, besides its known improving effect on glucose tolerance and lipid homeostasis. PMID:22649556

  17. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  18. Somatotropic, lactotropic and adrenocortical responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rovensky, Jozef; Bakosová, Jana; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Jezová, Daniela; Vigas, Milan

    2002-06-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms have been suggested to play an important role in the onset and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary functions in RA patients by measurement of hormone responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin-hypoglycemia (Actrapid HM 0.1 IU/kg, i.v. as a bolus) was induced in 17 male patients and in 11 age-, gender-, and weight-matched healthy subjects. Concentrations of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and cortisol were analyzed in plasma. PRL release after thyreoliberin stimulation (TRH, 200 g, i.v.) was determined in 21 patients with active forms of RA and in 12 control subjects to evaluate pituitary lactotropic response. In RA patients, basal concentrations of glucose, GH, PRL, and cortisol were in the normal range and they were comparable to those in the control group. Stress of hypoglycemia induced significant elevation of GH, PRL, and cortisol concentrations in all groups. Cortisol responses to hypoglycemia were comparable in patients and in control subjects. GH release during hypoglycemia was increased (p < 0.05) and PRL response was attenuated (p < 0.05) in RA patients versus control subjects. After TRH administration, PRL response was the same in patients as in healthy subjects. In conclusion, the present study revealed an altered hypothalamic-pituitary function in patients with RA, namely, an enhanced somatotropic and reduced lactotropic activation in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Basal hormone levels and cortisol release during hypoglycemia were similar to those in healthy subjects. PMID:12114282

  19. The Neuroprotective Role of Insulin Against MPP(+) -Induced Parkinson's Disease in Differentiated SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging that primarily caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). Retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (SH-SY5Y+RA) have been broadly utilized in studies of mechanisms of the pathogenesis underlying 1-Methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+))-induced PD models. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective mechanisms of insulin on MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity on SH-SY5Y+RA cells. Recent studies suggest that insulin has a protective effect against oxidative stress but not been elucidated for PD. In this study, pretreatment of insulin prevented the cell death in a dose dependent manner and lowered nitric oxide (NO) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx induced by MPP(+). Insulin also elevated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and insulin signaling pathways in dopaminergic neuron through activating PI3K/Akt/GSK-3 survival pathways which in turn inhibits MPP(+)-induced iNOS and ERK activation, and Bax to Bcl-2 ratio. These results suggest that insulin has a protective effect on MPP(+)-neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y+RA cells.

  20. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  1. Withaferin A protects against palmitic acid-induced endothelial insulin resistance and dysfunction through suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Batumalaie, Kalaivani; Amin, Muhammad Arif; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid Abdul; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways via reactive oxygen species (ROS) by free fatty acids (FFA) in obesity gives rise to insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Withaferin A (WA), possesses both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and therefore would be a good strategy to suppress palmitic acid (PA)-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and hence, insulin resistance and dysfunction in the endothelium. Effect of WA on PA-induced insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was determined by evaluating insulin signaling mechanisms whilst effect of this drug on PA-induced endothelial dysfunction was determined in acetylcholine-mediated relaxation in isolated rat aortic preparations. WA significantly inhibited ROS production and inflammation induced by PA. Furthermore, WA significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-6 production in endothelial cells by specifically suppressing IKKβ/NF-κβ phosphorylation. WA inhibited inflammation-stimulated IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and improved the impaired insulin PI3-K signaling, and restored the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production triggered by PA. WA also decreased endothelin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 levels, and restored the impaired endothelium-mediated vasodilation in isolated aortic preparations. These findings suggest that WA inhibited both ROS production and inflammation to restore impaired insulin resistance in cultured endothelial cells and improve endothelial dysfunction in rat aortic rings. PMID:27250532

  2. The role of insulin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damages in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2014-06-01

    Exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can easily penetrate into biological membranes and enhance the formation of other reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present study, we have investigated the neuroprotective effects of insulin on H2O2-induced toxicity of retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. To measure the changes in the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells at different concentrations of H2O2 for 24 h, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based assay was used and a 100 µM H2O2 was selected to establish a model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Further assays showed that 24 h of 100 µM H2O2-induced significant changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), nitric oxide (NO), ROS, and calcium ion (Ca2+) in neuronal cells, but insulin can effectively diminish the H2O2-induced oxidative damages to these cells. Moreover, cells treated with insulin increased H2O2-induced suppression of glutathione levels and exerted an apparent suppressive effect on oxidative products. The results of insulin treatment with SH-SY5Y cells increased the Bcl-2 levels and decreased the Akt levels. The treatment of insulin had played a protective effect on H2O2-induced oxidative stress related to the Akt/Bcl-2 pathways.

  3. High fat diet induces central obesity, insulin resistance and microvascular dysfunction in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rute R S; Villela, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Souza, Maria das Graças C; Boa, Beatriz C S; Cyrino, Fátima Z G A; Silva, Simone V; Lisboa, Patricia C; Moura, Egberto G; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Bouskela, Eliete

    2011-11-01

    Microvascular dysfunction is an early finding in obesity possibly related to co-morbidities like diabetes and hypertension. Therefore we have investigated changes on microvascular function, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance tests (GTT and ITT) on male hamsters fed either with high fat (HFD, n=20) or standard (Control, n=21) diet during 16 weeks. Total body fat and protein content were determined by carcass analysis, aorta eNOS and iNOS expression by immunoblotting assay and mean blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) by an arterial catheter. Microvascular reactivity in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, functional capillary density (FCD), capillary recruitment induced by a hyperinsulinemic status and macromolecular permeability after 30 min ischemia was assessed on either cheek pouch or cremaster muscle preparations. Compared to Control, HFD animals have shown increased visceral fat (6.0 ± 0.8 vs. 13.8 ± 0.6g/100g BW), impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation, decreased FCD (11.3 ± 1.3 vs. 6.8 ± 1.2/field) and capillary recruitment during hyperinsulinemia and increased macromolecular permeability after ischemia/reperfusion (86.4 ± 5.2 vs.105.2 ± 5.1 leaks/cm(2)), iNOS expression and insulin resistance. MAP, HR, endothelial independent vasodilatation and eNOS expression were not different between groups. Our results have shown that HFD elicits an increase on visceral fat deposition, microvascular dysfunction and insulin resistance in hamsters.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I/somatomedin C: a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    McMorris, F.A.; Smith, T.M.; DeSalvo, S.; Furlanetto, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Cell cultures established from cerebrum of 1-day-old rats were used to investigate hormonal regulation of the development of oligodendrocytes, which synthesize myelin in the central nervous system. The number of oligodendrocytes that developed was preferentially increased by insulin, or by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), also known as somatomedin C. High concentrations of insulin were required for substantial induction of oligodendrocyte development, whereas only 3.3 ng of IGF-I per ml was needed for a 2-fold increase in oligodendrocyte numbers. At an IGF-I concentration of 100 ng/ml, oligodendrocyte numbers were increased 6-fold in cultures grown in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, or up to 60-fold in cultures maintained in serum-free medium. IGF-I produced less than a 2-fold increase in the number of nonoligodendroglial cells in the same cultures. Type I IGF receptors were identified on oligodendrocytes and on a putative oligodendrocyte precursor cell population identified by using mouse monoclonal antibody A2B5. Radioligand binding assays were done. These results indicate that IGF-I is a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development and suggest a possible mechanism based on IGF deficiency for the hypomyelination that results from early postnatal malnutrition.

  5. Genetic inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases improves hepatic insulin resistance induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rongya; Xiong, Xiwen; Harris, Robert A; White, Morris F; Dong, Xiaocheng C

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK1-4) play a critical role in the inhibition of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex especially when blood glucose levels are low and pyruvate can be conserved for gluconeogenesis. Under diabetic conditions, the Pdk genes, particularly Pdk4, are often induced, and the elevation of the Pdk4 gene expression has been implicated in the increased gluconeogenesis in the liver and the decreased glucose utilization in the peripheral tissues. However, there is no direct evidence yet to show to what extent that the dysregulation of hepatic Pdk genes attributes to hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in vivo. To address this question, we crossed Pdk2 or Pdk4 null mice with a diabetic model that is deficient in hepatic insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (Irs1/2). Metabolic analyses reveal that deletion of the Pdk4 gene had better improvement in hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance than knockout of the Pdk2 gene whereas the Pdk2 gene deletion showed better insulin tolerance as compared to the Pdk4 gene inactivation on the Irs1/2 knockout genetic background. To examine the specific hepatic effects of Pdks on diabetes, we also knocked down the Pdk2 or Pdk4 gene using specific shRNAs. The data also indicate that the Pdk4 gene knockdown led to better glucose tolerance than the Pdk2 gene knockdown. In conclusion, our data suggest that hepatic Pdk4 may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:23940800

  6. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    PubMed

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies. PMID:24875531

  7. TM-25659-Induced Activation of FGF21 Level Decreases Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Skeletal Muscle via GCN2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong Gab; Yi, Sang-A; Choi, Sung-E; Kang, Yup; Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Ja Young; Bae, Myung Ae; Ahn, Jin Hee; Jeong, Hana; Hwang, Eun Sook; Lee, Kwan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The TAZ activator 2-butyl-5-methyl-6-(pyridine-3-yl)-3-[2′-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl]-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine] (TM-25659) inhibits adipocyte differentiation by interacting with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. TM-25659 was previously shown to decrease weight gain in a high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. However, the fundamental mechanisms underlying the effects of TM-25659 remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of TM-25659 on skeletal muscle functions in C2 myotubes and C57BL/6J mice. We studied the molecular mechanisms underlying the contribution of TM-25659 to palmitate (PA)-induced insulin resistance in C2 myotubes. TM-25659 improved PA-induced insulin resistance and inflammation in C2 myotubes. In addition, TM-25659 increased FGF21 mRNA expression, protein levels, and FGF21 secretion in C2 myotubes via activation of GCN2 pathways (GCN2-phosphoeIF2α-ATF4 and FGF21). This beneficial effect of TM-25659 was diminished by FGF21 siRNA. C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF diet for 30 weeks. The HF-diet group was randomly divided into two groups for the next 14 days: the HF-diet and HF-diet + TM-25659 groups. The HF diet + TM-25659-treated mice showed improvements in their fasting blood glucose levels, insulin sensitivity, insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, and inflammation, but neither body weight nor food intake was affected. The HF diet + TM-25659-treated mice also exhibited increased expression of both FGF21 mRNA and protein. These data indicate that TM-25659 may be beneficial for treating insulin resistance by inducing FGF21 in models of PA-induced insulin resistance and HF diet-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26537193

  8. Chlorogenic Acid Improves High Fat Diet-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chlorogenic acid (CGA), the most abundant component in coffee, has exhibited many biological activities. The objective of this study is to assess preventive and therapeutic effects of CGA on obesity and obesity-related liver steatosis and insulin resistance. Methods Two sets of experiments were conducted. In set 1, 6-week old C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular chow or high-fat diet (HFD) for 15 weeks with twice intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of CGA (100 mg/kg) or DMSO (carrier solution) per week. In set 2, obese mice (average 50 g) were treated by CGA (100 mg/kg, IP, twice weekly) or DMSO for 6 weeks. Body weight, body composition and food intake were monitored. Blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels were measured at end of the study. Hepatic lipid accumulation and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Additionally, genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation were analyzed by real time PCR. Results CGA significantly blocked the development of diet-induced obesity but did not affect body weight in obese mice. CGA treatment curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Quantitative PCR analysis shows that CGA treatment suppressed hepatic expression Pparγ, Cd36, Fabp4, and Mgat1 gene. CGA treatment also attenuated inflammation in the liver and white adipose tissue accompanied by a decrease in mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and Tnfa, Mcp-1 and Ccr2 encoding inflammatory proteins. Conclusion Our study provides direct evidence in support of CGA as a potent compound in preventing diet-induced obesity and obesity-related metabolic syndrome. Our results suggest that drinking coffee is beneficial in maintaining metabolic homeostasis when on a high fat diet. PMID:25248334

  9. Morin attenuates hepatic insulin resistance in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Wannasiri, Supaporn; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-06-01

    Morin is a natural bioflavonoid that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of morin on insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Obesity was induced in ICR mice by feeding a HFD (60 % kcal from fat) for 12 weeks. After the first 6 weeks, obese mice were treated with morin (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) once daily for further 6 weeks. Blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were then measured. Liver was excised, subjected to histopathology, glycogen determination, and gene and protein expression analysis. Morin administration reduced blood glucose, serum insulin, leptin, malondialdehyde, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels and increased serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, there was a reduction in serum lipid and liver triglyceride levels. Liver histology indicated that morin limited accumulation of lipid droplets. Interestingly, morin reduced expression of hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and up-regulated hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) expression. Morin also stimulated glycogen storage and suppressed phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) protein expression. Furthermore, hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) expression were increased after morin treatment. These findings indicate that morin has a positive effect in the HFD-induced obesity condition by suppressing lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress activities.

  10. Nobiletin improves obesity and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sil; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Choi, Sun-Sil; Choi, Bong-Keun; Yonezawa, Takayuki; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Nobiletin (NOB) is a polymethoxylated flavone present in citrus fruits and has been reported to have antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. However, little is known about the effects of NOB on obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined the effects of NOB on obesity and insulin resistance, and the underlying mechanisms, in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Obese mice were fed a HFD for 8 weeks and then treated without (HFD control group) or with NOB at 10 or 100mg/kg. NOB decreased body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight and plasma triglyceride. Plasma glucose levels tended to decrease compared with the HFD group and improved plasma adiponectin levels and glucose tolerance. Furthermore, NOB altered the expression levels of several lipid metabolism-related and adipokine genes. NOB increased the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, PPAR-α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, uncoupling protein-2 and adiponectin, and decreased the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in WAT. NOB also up-regulated glucose transporter-4 protein expression and Akt phosphorylation and suppressed IκBα degradation in WAT. Taken together, these results suggest that NOB improves adiposity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. These effects may be elicited by regulating the expression of lipid metabolism-related and adipokine genes, and by regulating the expression of inflammatory makers and activity of the insulin signaling pathway.

  11. Serum estradiol but not gonadotropin levels decrease acutely after insulin-induced hypoglycemia in cycling women.

    PubMed

    Bing-You, R G; Spratt, D I

    1992-10-01

    Although corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) acutely suppresses gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in animal models, its effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in humans is not well defined. To further evaluate the acute effects of adrenal axis activation on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in humans, we employed a model of insulin-induced hypoglycemia to stimulate endogenous CRH secretion in eight cycling women. Serum samples were obtained immediately before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, and 120 min following iv insulin (0.15 U/kg) or saline injection. To ensure that the degree of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation in our subjects was similar to that observed in severely ill patients with hypogonadotropism, serum cortisol (F) levels were also measured in a group of acutely ill patients selected to have hypogonadotropism. All women experienced symptomatic hypoglycemia after insulin injection. Differences between serum F levels in hypoglycemic vs. control sessions were evident at 30 min (P < 0.01) and maximum at 120 min (P < 0.0001) after insulin injection. Serum estradiol levels were significantly lower following hypoglycemia than during control sessions (P < 0.001). In contrast, serum LH and FSH levels were not significantly different between control and hypoglycemic sessions. Peak serum F levels in these hypoglycemic women were similar to F levels in critically ill patients with hypogonadotropism. These results demonstrate that stress and/or hypoglycemia can acutely decrease circulating estradiol levels. In addition, these data suggest that endogenous CRH does not play a major role in acute suppression of GnRH (over 2 h) in humans. Further studies are required to identify longer term effects of CRH on GnRH secretion which may be present in hypothalamic amenorrhea or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism of critical illness.

  12. Liver lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guoxun

    2007-09-28

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) plays key roles in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis, and cataplerosis. Experiments were designed to examine the effects of endogenous lipid molecules from rat livers on the expression of PEPCK-C gene in primary rat hepatocytes. The lipid extracts prepared from livers of Zucker fatty, lean, and Wistar rats induced the expression levels of PEPCK-C transcripts. Insulin-mediated reduction of PEPCK-C gene expression was attenuated by the same treatment. The lipid extracts induced the relative luciferase activity of reporter gene constructs that contain a 2.2-kb 5' promoter fragment of PEPCK-C gene, but not the construct that contains only the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of its mRNA. The estimated half life of PEPCK-C transcripts in the presence of the lipid extract is the same as that in the absence of it. My results demonstrate for the first time that endogenous lipid molecules induce PEPCK-C gene transcription and attenuate insulin action in liver.

  13. Insulin signalling mediates the response to male-induced harm in female Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sepil, Irem; Carazo, Pau; Perry, Jennifer C; Wigby, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Genetic manipulations in nutrient-sensing pathways are known to both extend lifespan and modify responses to environmental stressors (e.g., starvation, oxidative and thermal stresses), suggesting that similar mechanisms regulate lifespan and stress resistance. However, despite being a key factor reducing female lifespan and affecting female fitness, male-induced harm has rarely been considered as a stressor mediated by nutrient sensing pathways. We explored whether a lifespan-extending manipulation also modifies female resistance to male-induced harm. To do so, we used long-lived female Drosophila melanogaster that had their insulin signalling pathway downregulated by genetically ablating the median neurosecretory cells (mNSC). We varied the level of exposure to males for control and ablated females and tested for interacting effects on female lifespan and fitness. As expected, we found that lifespan significantly declined with exposure to males. However, mNSC-ablated females maintained significantly increased lifespan across all male exposure treatments. Furthermore, lifespan extension and relative fitness of mNSC-ablated females were maximized under intermediate exposure to males, and minimized under low and high exposure to males. Overall, our results suggest that wild-type levels of insulin signalling reduce female susceptibility to male-induced harm under intense sexual conflict, and may also protect females when mating opportunities are sub-optimally low. PMID:27457757

  14. Insulin signalling mediates the response to male-induced harm in female Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sepil, Irem; Carazo, Pau; Perry, Jennifer C.; Wigby, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Genetic manipulations in nutrient-sensing pathways are known to both extend lifespan and modify responses to environmental stressors (e.g., starvation, oxidative and thermal stresses), suggesting that similar mechanisms regulate lifespan and stress resistance. However, despite being a key factor reducing female lifespan and affecting female fitness, male-induced harm has rarely been considered as a stressor mediated by nutrient sensing pathways. We explored whether a lifespan-extending manipulation also modifies female resistance to male-induced harm. To do so, we used long-lived female Drosophila melanogaster that had their insulin signalling pathway downregulated by genetically ablating the median neurosecretory cells (mNSC). We varied the level of exposure to males for control and ablated females and tested for interacting effects on female lifespan and fitness. As expected, we found that lifespan significantly declined with exposure to males. However, mNSC-ablated females maintained significantly increased lifespan across all male exposure treatments. Furthermore, lifespan extension and relative fitness of mNSC-ablated females were maximized under intermediate exposure to males, and minimized under low and high exposure to males. Overall, our results suggest that wild-type levels of insulin signalling reduce female susceptibility to male-induced harm under intense sexual conflict, and may also protect females when mating opportunities are sub-optimally low. PMID:27457757

  15. High fat diet-induced TGF-β/Gbb signaling provokes insulin resistance through the tribbles expression

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Moonyoung; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Yu, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance are hallmarks of obesity-induced type 2 diabetes, which is often caused by a high-fat diet (HFD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HFD-induced insulin resistance have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we established a Drosophila model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HFD-induced diabetes. HFD model flies recapitulate mammalian diabetic phenotypes including elevated triglyceride and circulating glucose levels, as well as insulin resistance. Expression of glass bottom boat (gbb), a Drosophila homolog of mammalian transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), is elevated under HFD conditions. Furthermore, overexpression of gbb in the fat body produced obese and insulin-resistant phenotypes similar to those of HFD-fed flies, whereas inhibition of Gbb signaling significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic phenotypes. We also discovered that tribbles, a negative regulator of AKT, is a target gene of Gbb signaling in the fat body. Overexpression of tribbles in flies in the fat body phenocopied the metabolic defects associated with HFD conditions or Gbb overexpression, whereas tribbles knockdown rescued these metabolic phenotypes. These results indicate that HFD-induced TGF-β/Gbb signaling provokes insulin resistance by increasing tribbles expression. PMID:27484164

  16. High fat diet-induced TGF-β/Gbb signaling provokes insulin resistance through the tribbles expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Moonyoung; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Yu, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance are hallmarks of obesity-induced type 2 diabetes, which is often caused by a high-fat diet (HFD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HFD-induced insulin resistance have not been elucidated in detail. In this study, we established a Drosophila model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HFD-induced diabetes. HFD model flies recapitulate mammalian diabetic phenotypes including elevated triglyceride and circulating glucose levels, as well as insulin resistance. Expression of glass bottom boat (gbb), a Drosophila homolog of mammalian transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), is elevated under HFD conditions. Furthermore, overexpression of gbb in the fat body produced obese and insulin-resistant phenotypes similar to those of HFD-fed flies, whereas inhibition of Gbb signaling significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic phenotypes. We also discovered that tribbles, a negative regulator of AKT, is a target gene of Gbb signaling in the fat body. Overexpression of tribbles in flies in the fat body phenocopied the metabolic defects associated with HFD conditions or Gbb overexpression, whereas tribbles knockdown rescued these metabolic phenotypes. These results indicate that HFD-induced TGF-β/Gbb signaling provokes insulin resistance by increasing tribbles expression. PMID:27484164

  17. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression: Importance of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Sampson, Sanford R. . E-mail: sampsos@mail.biu.ac.il

    2007-01-05

    Protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) is a key molecule in insulin signaling essential for insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that insulin rapidly stimulates PKC{delta} activity and increases PKC{delta} protein and RNA levels, and that the SP-1 transcription factor is involved in insulin-induced transcription of the PKC{delta} gene. Activation of SP-1 involves serine phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. In this study we examined the possibility that PKC{alpha} might be involved in serine phosphorylation and activation of SP-1. We found that insulin rapidly phosphorylates and translocates SP-1. In the cytoplasm, SP-1 was constitutively associated with PKC{alpha}, and insulin stimulation caused these proteins to dissociate. In contrast, in the nucleus insulin induced an increase in association between PKC{alpha} and SP-1. PKC{alpha} inhibition blocked insulin-induced serine phosphorylation of SP-1 and its association with PKC{alpha} in the nucleus. Inhibition of PKC{alpha} also reduced the insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. We also attempted to determine if another transcription factor might be involved in regulation of PKC{delta} expression. We earlier showed that insulin did not affect nuclear NF{kappa}B levels. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B, however, increased insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Surprisingly, this inhibition reduced the insulin-induced increase in cytoplasmic and nuclear PKC{alpha} RNA and protein. Inhibition of PKC{delta} reduced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation as well as NF{kappa}B activation. Thus, PKC{alpha} regulates insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression levels and this regulation involves activation of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B.

  18. Beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on insulin signaling cascade, dyslipidemia, and body adiposity of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Banin, R M; Hirata, B K S; Andrade, I S; Zemdegs, J C S; Clemente, A P G; Dornellas, A P S; Boldarine, V T; Estadella, D; Albuquerque, K T; Oyama, L M; Ribeiro, E B; Telles, M M

    2014-09-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) has been indicated as an efficient medicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. It remains unclear if its effects are due to an improvement of the insulin signaling cascade, especially in obese subjects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of GbE on insulin tolerance, food intake, body adiposity, lipid profile, fasting insulin, and muscle levels of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP-1B), and protein kinase B (Akt), as well as Akt phosphorylation, in diet-induced obese rats. Rats were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal fat diet (NFD) for 8 weeks. After that, the HFD group was divided into two groups: rats gavaged with a saline vehicle (HFD+V), and rats gavaged with 500 mg/kg of GbE diluted in the saline vehicle (HFD+Gb). NFD rats were gavaged with the saline vehicle only. At the end of the treatment, the rats were anesthetized, insulin was injected into the portal vein, and after 90s, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed. The quantification of IRS-1, Akt, and Akt phosphorylation was performed using Western blotting. Serum levels of fasting insulin and glucose, triacylglycerols and total cholesterol, and LDL and HDL fractions were measured. An insulin tolerance test was also performed. Ingestion of a hyperlipidic diet promoted loss of insulin sensitivity and also resulted in a significant increase in body adiposity, plasma triacylglycerol, and glucose levels. In addition, GbE treatment significantly reduced food intake and body adiposity while it protected against hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in diet-induced obesity rats. It also enhanced insulin sensitivity in comparison to HFD+V rats, while it restored insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, increased IRS-1, and reduced PTP-1B levels in gastrocnemius muscle. The present findings suggest that G. biloba might be efficient in preventing and treating obesity-induced insulin signaling impairment.

  19. Diabetic state, high plasma insulin and angiotensin II combine to augment endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction via ETA receptors and ERK

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T; Nogami, T; Taguchi, K; Matsumoto, T; Kamata, K

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mechanisms associated with the enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in hyperinsulinaemic diabetes have been examined using the rat aorta. Functions for angiotensin II, endothelin-1 receptor expression and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) have been investigated. Experimental approach: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were infused with angiotensin II or, following insulin treatment, were treated with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Contractions of aortic strips with or without endothelium, in response to endothelin-1 and angiotensin II, were examined in vitro. Aortic ETA receptors and ERK/MEK expression were measured by western blotting. Key results: Insulin-treated diabetic rats exhibited increases in plasma insulin, angiotensin II and endothelin-1. The systolic blood pressure and endothelin-1-induced contractile responses in aortae in vitro were enhanced in insulin-treated diabetic rats and blunted by chronic losartan administration. LY294002 (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) and/or PD98059 (MEK inhibitor) diminished the enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in aortae from insulin-treated diabetic rats. ETA and ETB receptors, ERK-1/2 and MEK-1/2 protein expression and endothelin-1-stimulated ERK phosphorylation were all increased in aortae from insulin-treated diabetic rats. Such increases were blunted by chronic losartan administration. Endothelin-1-induced contraction was significantly higher in aortae from angiotensin II-infused diabetic rats. angiotensin II-infusion increased ERK phosphorylation, but the expression of endothelin receptors and ERK/MEK proteins remained unchanged. Conclusions and implications: These results suggest that the combination of high plasma angiotensin II and insulin with a diabetic state induced enhancement of endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction, ETA receptor expression and ERK expression/activity in the aorta. Losartan improved both the diabetes

  20. IRS1Ser³⁰⁷ phosphorylation does not mediate mTORC1-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Herrema, Hilde; Lee, Jaemin; Zhou, Yingjiang; Copps, Kyle D; White, Morris F; Ozcan, Umut

    2014-01-10

    Increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity has been suggested to play important roles in development of insulin resistance in obesity. mTORC1 hyperactivity also increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which in turn contributes to development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Increased IRS1 phosphorylation at Ser307 in vitro is correlated with mTORC1- and ER stress-induced insulin resistance. This phosphorylation site correlates strongly with impaired insulin receptor signaling in diabetic mice and humans. In contrast, evidence from knock-in mice suggests that phosphorylation of IRS1 at Ser307 is actually required to maintain insulin sensitivity. To study the involvement of IRS1(Ser307) phosphorylation in mTORC1-mediated glucose intolerance and insulin sensitivity in vivo, we investigated the effects of liver specific TSC1 depletion in IRS1(Ser307Ala) mice and controls. Our results demonstrate that blockade of IRS1(Ser307) phosphorylation in vivo does not prevent mTORC1-mediated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. PMID:24333417

  1. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, J.J.; Greenberg, A.S.; Chang, M.K.; Londos, C.

    1987-05-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase), from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from /sup 32/P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the /sup 32/P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase.

  2. MicroRNA-29a induces insulin resistance by targeting PPARδ in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, YUEHUA; GU, PINGQING; SHI, WEIJIE; LI, JINGYUN; HAO, QUN; CAO, XIAOMEI; LU, QIN; ZENG, YU

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) induces metabolic syndrome, which is often characterized by insulin resistance (IR), in adults. Previous research has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play a role in the target genes involved in this process, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we examined miRNA profiles using samples of skeletal muscles from both IUGR and control rat offspring whose mothers were fed either a protein-restricted diet or a diet which involved normal amounts of protein during pregnancy, respectively. miR-29a was found to be upregulated in the skeletal muscles of IUGR offspring. The luciferase reporter assay confirmed the direct interaction between miR-29a and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ). Overexpression of miR-29a in the skeletal muscle cell line C2C12 suppressed the expression of its target gene PPARδ, which, in turn, influenced the expression of its coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Thus, PPARδ/PGC-1α-dependent signals together reduced insulin-dependent glucose uptake and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Overexpression of miR-29a also caused a decrease in levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), the most important glucose transporter in skeletal muscle, which partially induced a decrease insulin-dependent glucose uptake. These findings provide evidence for a novel micro-RNA-mediated mechanism of PPARδ regulation, and we also noted the IR-promoting actions of miR-29a in skeletal muscles of IUGR. PMID:26936652

  3. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase plasma glucose via reactive oxygen species-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Wang, Changlin; Ma, Xiao; He, Hongjuan; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2015-10-01

    There have been few reports about the possible toxic effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles on the endocrine system. We explored the endocrine effects of oral administration to mice of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0, 64 and 320 mg kg(-1) body weight per day to control, low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively, 7 days per week for 14 weeks). TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), and their physiological distribution was investigated by inductively coupled plasma. Biochemical analyzes included plasma glucose, insulin, heart blood triglycerides (TG), free fatty acid (FFA), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6 and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related markers (total SOD, GSH and MDA). Phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, JNK1, and p38 MAPK were analyzed by western blotting. Increased titanium levels were found in the liver, spleen, small intestine, kidney and pancreas. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose significantly increased whereas there was no difference in plasma insulin secretion. Increased ROS levels were found in serum and the liver, as evidenced by reduced total SOD activity and GSH level and increased MDA content. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles induced insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver, shown by increased phosphorylation of IRS1 (Ser307) and reduced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). The pathway by which TiO2 nanoparticles increase ROS-induced IR were included in the inflammatory response and phosphokinase, as shown by increased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased phosphorylation of JNK1 and p38 MAPK in liver. These results show that oral administration of TiO2 nanoparticles increases ROS, resulting in IR and increasing plasma glucose in mice.

  4. Rosuvastatin Treatment Affects Both Basal and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion in INS-1 832/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salunkhe, Vishal A.; Elvstam, Olof; Eliasson, Lena; Wendt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a member of the statin family. Like the other statins it is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Rosuvastatin lowers the cholesterol levels by inhibiting the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) in the cholesterol producing mevalonate pathway. It has been recognized that apart from their beneficial lipid lowering effects, statins also exhibit diabetogenic properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these remain unresolved. To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on insulin secretion, we treated INS-1 832/13 cells with varying doses (20 nM to 20 μM) of rosuvastatin for 48 h. At concentrations of 2 μM and above basal insulin secretion was significantly increased. Using diazoxide we could determine that rosuvastatin did not increase basal insulin secretion by corrupting the KATP channels. Glucose-induced insulin secretion on the other hand seemed to be affected differently at different rosuvastatin concentrations. Rosuvastatin treatment (20 μM) for 24–48 h inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which lead to reduced depolarization-induced exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. At lower concentrations of rosuvastatin (≤ 2 μM) the stimulus-secretion coupling pathway was intact downstream of the KATP channels as assessed by the patch clamp technique. However, a reduction in glucose-induced insulin secretion could be observed with rosuvastatin concentrations as low as 200 nM. The inhibitory effects of rosuvastatin on glucose-induced insulin secretion could be reversed with mevalonate, but not squalene, indicating that rosuvastatin affects insulin secretion through its effects on the mevalonate pathway, but not through the reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that rosuvastatin has the potential to increase basal insulin secretion and reduce glucose-induced insulin secretion. The latter is possibly an unavoidable

  5. Rosuvastatin Treatment Affects Both Basal and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion in INS-1 832/13 Cells.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal A; Elvstam, Olof; Eliasson, Lena; Wendt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a member of the statin family. Like the other statins it is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Rosuvastatin lowers the cholesterol levels by inhibiting the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) in the cholesterol producing mevalonate pathway. It has been recognized that apart from their beneficial lipid lowering effects, statins also exhibit diabetogenic properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these remain unresolved. To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on insulin secretion, we treated INS-1 832/13 cells with varying doses (20 nM to 20 μM) of rosuvastatin for 48 h. At concentrations of 2 μM and above basal insulin secretion was significantly increased. Using diazoxide we could determine that rosuvastatin did not increase basal insulin secretion by corrupting the KATP channels. Glucose-induced insulin secretion on the other hand seemed to be affected differently at different rosuvastatin concentrations. Rosuvastatin treatment (20 μM) for 24-48 h inhibited voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which lead to reduced depolarization-induced exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. At lower concentrations of rosuvastatin (≤ 2 μM) the stimulus-secretion coupling pathway was intact downstream of the KATP channels as assessed by the patch clamp technique. However, a reduction in glucose-induced insulin secretion could be observed with rosuvastatin concentrations as low as 200 nM. The inhibitory effects of rosuvastatin on glucose-induced insulin secretion could be reversed with mevalonate, but not squalene, indicating that rosuvastatin affects insulin secretion through its effects on the mevalonate pathway, but not through the reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that rosuvastatin has the potential to increase basal insulin secretion and reduce glucose-induced insulin secretion. The latter is possibly an unavoidable

  6. Role of Muscle c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase 1 in Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Kennedy, Norman J.; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity caused by feeding of a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with an increased activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Activated JNK1 is implicated in the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Significantly, Jnk1−/− mice are protected against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that an ablation of the Jnk1 gene in skeletal muscle does not influence HFD-induced obesity. However, muscle-specific JNK1-deficient (MKO) mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity compared with control wild-type (MWT) mice. Thus, insulin-stimulated AKT activation is suppressed in muscle, liver, and adipose tissue of HFD-fed MWT mice but is suppressed only in the liver and adipose tissue of MKO mice. These data demonstrate that JNK1 in muscle contributes to peripheral insulin resistance in response to diet-induced obesity. PMID:19841069

  7. Role of muscle c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 in obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Kennedy, Norman J; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    Obesity caused by feeding of a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with an increased activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Activated JNK1 is implicated in the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Significantly, Jnk1(-)(/)(-) mice are protected against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that an ablation of the Jnk1 gene in skeletal muscle does not influence HFD-induced obesity. However, muscle-specific JNK1-deficient (M(KO)) mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity compared with control wild-type (M(WT)) mice. Thus, insulin-stimulated AKT activation is suppressed in muscle, liver, and adipose tissue of HFD-fed M(WT) mice but is suppressed only in the liver and adipose tissue of M(KO) mice. These data demonstrate that JNK1 in muscle contributes to peripheral insulin resistance in response to diet-induced obesity.

  8. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, José A G; Sanchez-Andrés, Juan V; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat

    1999-01-01

    The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 μm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50% inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic β-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) ‘primed’ vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) ‘reserved pool’ vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase. PMID:10523416

  9. The Protective Effects of Insulin and Natural Honey against Hippocampal Cell Death in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj; Barzegar Ganji, Hossein; Pourheidar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and honey as antioxidants to prevent the hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We selected sixty Wister rats (5 groups of 12 animals each), including the control group (C), and four diabetic groups (control (D) and 3 groups treated with insulin (I), honey (H), and insulin plus honey (I + H)). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (IP, 60 mg/kg). Six weeks after the induction of diabetes, the group I received insulin (3-4 U/kg/day, SC), group H received honey (5 mg/kg/day, IP), and group I + H received a combination of the above at the same dose. Groups C and D received normal saline. Two weeks after treatment, rats were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Neuronal cell death in the hippocampal region was examined using trypan blue assay, “H & E” staining, and TUNEL assay. Cell viability assessment showed significantly lower number of living cells in group D than in group C. Besides, the mean number of living cells was significantly higher in group I, H, and I + H compared to group D. Therefore, it can be concluded that the treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin, honey, and a combination of insulin and honey can prevent neuronal cell death in different hippocampal areas of the studied samples. PMID:24745031

  10. The protective effects of insulin and natural honey against hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj; Barzegar Ganji, Hossein; Pourheidar, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and honey as antioxidants to prevent the hippocampal cell death in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. We selected sixty Wister rats (5 groups of 12 animals each), including the control group (C), and four diabetic groups (control (D) and 3 groups treated with insulin (I), honey (H), and insulin plus honey (I + H)). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (IP, 60 mg/kg). Six weeks after the induction of diabetes, the group I received insulin (3-4 U/kg/day, SC), group H received honey (5 mg/kg/day, IP), and group I + H received a combination of the above at the same dose. Groups C and D received normal saline. Two weeks after treatment, rats were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Neuronal cell death in the hippocampal region was examined using trypan blue assay, "H & E" staining, and TUNEL assay. Cell viability assessment showed significantly lower number of living cells in group D than in group C. Besides, the mean number of living cells was significantly higher in group I, H, and I + H compared to group D. Therefore, it can be concluded that the treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin, honey, and a combination of insulin and honey can prevent neuronal cell death in different hippocampal areas of the studied samples. PMID:24745031

  11. N-Acetylneuraminic Acid Supplementation Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yida, Zhang; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ismail, Maznah; Ismail, Norsharina; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Wong, Waiteng; Altine Adamu, Hadiza; Md Zamri, Nur Diyana; Ideris, Aini; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2015-01-01

    N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a biomarker of cardiometabolic diseases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary Neu5Ac may improve cardiometabolic indices. A high fat diet (HFD) + Neu5Ac (50 or 400 mg/kg BW/day) was fed to rats and compared with HFD + simvastatin (10 mg/kg BW/day) or HFD alone for 12 weeks. Weights and serum biochemicals (lipid profile, oral glucose tolerance test, leptin, adiponectin, and insulin) were measured, and mRNA levels of insulin signaling genes were determined. The results indicated that low and high doses of sialic acid (SA) improved metabolic indices, although only the oral glucose tolerance test, serum triglycerides, leptin, and adiponectin were significantly better than those in the HFD and HFD + simvastatin groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the results showed that only high-dose SA significantly affected the transcription of hepatic and adipose tissue insulin signaling genes. The data suggested that SA prevented HFD-induced insulin resistance in rats after 12 weeks of administration through nontranscriptionally mediated biochemical changes that may have differentially sialylated glycoprotein structures at a low dose. At higher doses, SA induced transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes. These effects suggest that low and high doses of SA may produce similar metabolic outcomes in relation to insulin sensitivity through multiple mechanisms. These findings are worth studying further. PMID:26688813

  12. Effect of simulated microgravity on endocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in physically fit men.

    PubMed

    Ksinantova, L; Koska, J; Kvetnansky, R; Marko, M; Hamar, D; Vigas, M

    2002-03-01

    Adaptation to microgravity is associated with alteration in some endocrine functions. In the present longitudinal study, the counterregulatory hormonal response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia (ITT, 0.1 IU/kg short acting insulin i. v.) was evaluated under simulated microgravity conditions in 15 physically fit subjects. ITT was performed at the beginning of the investigation, and again after completion of 6 weeks of endurance training and after a subsequent period of 4 days of head-down bed rest at a backward tilt of 6 degrees from the horizontal. Endurance training showed a significant increase in maximal aerobic capacity in previously well-trained subjects (increase by 12 %), as well as on attenuation of counterregulatory response of epinephrine to hypoglycemia. After 4 days of bed rest, basal concentrations of plasma norepinephrine was diminished (p < 0.002) and plasma renin activity was enhanced (p < 0.02). After bed rest, decreased responses of the two catecholamines (norepinephrine, p < 0.001; epinephrine, p < 0.001), growth hormone (p < 0.001), and cortisol (p < 0.05) were observed. Response of plasma renin activity after bed rest was increased (p < 0.01). This longitudinal study indicated that 4 days of bed rest in endurance-trained subjects induced increased response of PRA to hypoglycemia and attenuation of other counterregulatory neuroendocrine responses. PMID:11972306

  13. Insulin-like 3-induced rat preantral follicular growth is mediated by growth differentiation factor 9.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Kim, Ji Young; Liu, Jia-yin; Tsang, Benjamin K

    2014-01-01

    The communication of somatic cells and oocytes by intrafollicular paracrine factors is essential for follicular growth in the ovary. Insulin-like 3 (INSL3) is a theca cell-secreted paracrine factor. Androgens and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), an oocyte-derived growth factor, are essential for follicular development. Using a rat preantral follicle culture model, we examined in the present study the influence of INSL3 on preantral follicular growth and the molecular mechanisms involved. We have observed that the receptor for INSL3, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2), was exclusively expressed in oocytes. Recombinant INSL3 stimulated Gdf9 expression, preantral follicular growth, and testosterone synthesis in vitro. Inhibition of the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway (with cAMP antagonist, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer) attenuated INSL3-induced Gdf9 expression and preantral follicular growth. Moreover, knocking down Gdf9 expression (with small interfering RNA) or inhibiting GDF9 signaling (with SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase receptor 5 inhibitor, or specific inhibitor of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3) or androgen action (with flutamide, an androgen receptor antagonist) suppressed INSL3-induced preantral follicular growth. In addition, LH and DHT regulated the expression of Insl3 mRNA in preantral follicles. These observations suggest that INSL3 is a key theca cell-derived growth factor for preantral follicle and that its action is mediated by GDF9.

  14. Effects of insulin and IGF-I on growth hormone- induced STAT5 activation in 3T3-F442A adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growth hormone (GH) and insulin signaling pathways are known important regulators of adipose homeostasis. The cross-talk between GH and insulin signaling pathways in mature adipocytes is poorly understood. Methods In the present study, the impact of insulin on GH-mediated signaling in differentiated 3T3-F442A adipocytes and primary mice adipocytes was examined. Results Insulin alone did not induce STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, but enhanced GH-induced STAT5 activation. This effect was more pronounced when insulin was added 20 min prior to GH treatment. The above results were further confirmed by in vivo study, showing that insulin pretreatment potentiated GH- induced STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation in visceral adipose tissues of C57/BL6 mice. In addition, our in vitro results showed that IGF-I had similar potentiating effect as insulin on GH-induced STAT5 activation. In vitro, insulin and IGF-I had an additive effect on GH- induced MAPK activation. Conclusion These results indicate that both insulin and IGF-I specifically potentiated GH mediated STAT5 activation in mature adipose cells. These findings suggest that insulin and GH, usually with antagonistic functions, might act synergistically to regulate some specific functions in mature adipocytes. PMID:23631823

  15. Insulin induces the release of vasodilator compounds from platelets by a nitric oxide-G kinase-VAMP-3-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Schrader, Jürgen; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2004-02-01

    Insulin-induced vasodilatation is sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitors. However, insulin is unable to relax isolated arteries or to activate endothelial NOS in endothelial cells. Since insulin can enhance platelet endothelial NOS activity, we determined whether insulin-induced vasodilatation can be attributed to a NO-dependent, platelet-mediated process. Insulin failed to relax endothelium-intact rings of porcine coronary artery. The supernatant from insulin-stimulated human platelets induced complete relaxation, which was prevented by preincubation of platelets with a NOS inhibitor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, NS 2028, or the G kinase inhibitor, KT 5823, and was abolished by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. Insulin induced the release of adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), adenosine, and serotonin from platelet-dense granules in a NO-dependent manner. This response was not detected using insulin-stimulated platelets from endothelial NOS-/- mice, although a NO donor elicited ATP release. Insulin-induced ATP release from human platelets correlated with the association of syntaxin 2 with the vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 but was not associated with the activation of alphaIIbbeta3 integrin. Thus, insulin elicits the release of vasoactive concentrations of ATP and adenosine from human platelets via a NO-G kinase-dependent signaling cascade. The mechanism of dense granule secretion involves the G kinase-dependent association of syntaxin 2 with vesicle-associated membrane protein 3.

  16. Insulin Induces the Release of Vasodilator Compounds From Platelets by a Nitric Oxide–G Kinase–VAMP-3–dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Schrader, Jürgen; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-induced vasodilatation is sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitors. However, insulin is unable to relax isolated arteries or to activate endothelial NOS in endothelial cells. Since insulin can enhance platelet endothelial NOS activity, we determined whether insulin-induced vasodilatation can be attributed to a NO-dependent, platelet-mediated process. Insulin failed to relax endothelium-intact rings of porcine coronary artery. The supernatant from insulin-stimulated human platelets induced complete relaxation, which was prevented by preincubation of platelets with a NOS inhibitor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, NS 2028, or the G kinase inhibitor, KT 5823, and was abolished by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. Insulin induced the release of adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), adenosine, and serotonin from platelet-dense granules in a NO-dependent manner. This response was not detected using insulin-stimulated platelets from endothelial NOS−/− mice, although a NO donor elicited ATP release. Insulin-induced ATP release from human platelets correlated with the association of syntaxin 2 with the vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 but was not associated with the activation of αIIbβ3 integrin. Thus, insulin elicits the release of vasoactive concentrations of ATP and adenosine from human platelets via a NO–G kinase–dependent signaling cascade. The mechanism of dense granule secretion involves the G kinase–dependent association of syntaxin 2 with vesicle-associated membrane protein 3. PMID:14744991

  17. Proteomic analysis of the palmitate-induced myotube secretome reveals involvement of the annexin A1-formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) pathway in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Dayea; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Ghim, Jaewang; Park, Soyeon; Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Jaeyoon; Hwang, Daehee; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Elevated levels of the free fatty acid palmitate are found in the plasma of obese patients and induce insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle secretes myokines as extracellular signaling mediators in response to pathophysiological conditions. Here, we identified and characterized the skeletal muscle secretome in response to palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified 36 secretory proteins modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that palmitate-induced insulin resistance induced cellular stress and modulated secretory events. We found that the decrease in the level of annexin A1, a secretory protein, depended on palmitate, and that annexin A1 and its receptor, formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist, played a protective role in the palmitate-induced insulin resistance of L6 myotubes through PKC-θ modulation. In mice fed with a high-fat diet, treatment with the formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist improved systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, we identified myokine candidates modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance and found that the annexin A1- formyl peptide receptor 2 pathway mediated the insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, as well as systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25616869

  18. Low intensity exercise prevents disturbances in rat cardiac insulin signaling and endothelial nitric oxide synthase induced by high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Stanišić, Jelena; Korićanac, Goran; Ćulafić, Tijana; Romić, Snježana; Stojiljković, Mojca; Kostić, Milan; Pantelić, Marija; Tepavčević, Snežana

    2016-01-15

    Increase in fructose consumption together with decrease in physical activity contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and consequently cardiovascular diseases. The current study examined the preventive role of exercise on defects in cardiac insulin signaling and function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in fructose fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, sedentary fructose (received 10% fructose for 9 weeks) and exercise fructose (additionally exposed to low intensity exercise) groups. Concentration of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and visceral adipose tissue weight were determined to estimate metabolic syndrome development. Expression and/or phosphorylation of cardiac insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and eNOS were evaluated. Fructose overload increased visceral adipose tissue, insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment index. Exercise managed to decrease visceral adiposity and insulin level and to increase insulin sensitivity. Fructose diet increased level of cardiac PTP1B and pIRS1 (Ser307), while levels of IR and ERK1/2, as well as pIRS1 (Tyr 632), pAkt (Ser473, Thr308) and pERK1/2 were decreased. These disturbances were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. Exercise managed to prevent most of the disturbances in insulin signaling caused by fructose diet (except phosphorylation of IRS1 at Tyr 632 and phosphorylation and protein expression of ERK1/2) and consequently restored function of eNOS. Low intensity exercise could be considered as efficient treatment of cardiac insulin resistance induced by fructose diet.

  19. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    PubMed

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea. PMID:25406018

  20. Long-term niacin treatment induces insulin resistance and adrenergic responsiveness in adipocytes by adaptive downregulation of phosphodiesterase 3B.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Mattijs M; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Pronk, Amanda C M; van Klinken, Jan-Bert; Boon, Mariëtte R; Havekes, Louis M; Rensen, Patrick C N; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Harmelen, Vanessa

    2014-04-01

    The lipid-lowering effect of niacin has been attributed to the inhibition of cAMP production in adipocytes, thereby inhibiting intracellular lipolysis and release of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) to the circulation. However, long-term niacin treatment leads to a normalization of plasma NEFA levels and induces insulin resistance, for which the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The current study addressed the effects of long-term niacin treatment on insulin-mediated inhibition of adipocyte lipolysis and focused on the regulation of cAMP levels. APOE*3-Leiden.CETP transgenic mice treated with niacin for 15 wk were subjected to an insulin tolerance test and showed whole body insulin resistance. Similarly, adipocytes isolated from niacin-treated mice were insulin resistant and, interestingly, exhibited an increased response to cAMP stimulation by 8Br-cAMP, β1- and β2-adrenergic stimulation. Gene expression analysis of the insulin and β-adrenergic pathways in adipose tissue indicated that all genes were downregulated, including the gene encoding the cAMP-degrading enzyme phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B). In line with this, we showed that insulin induced a lower PDE3B response in adipocytes isolated from niacin-treated mice. Inhibiting PDE3B with cilostazol increased lipolytic responsiveness to cAMP stimulation in adipocytes. These data show that long-term niacin treatment leads to a downregulation of PDE3B in adipocytes, which could explain part of the observed insulin resistance and the increased responsiveness to cAMP stimulation.

  1. Effect of long-term olanzapine treatment on meal-induced insulin sensitization and on gastrointestinal peptides in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Csaba; Kovács, Diána; Kiss, Rita; Sári, Réka; Németh, József; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Peitl, Barna

    2015-12-01

    Meal-induced insulin sensitization (MIS), an endogenous adaptive mechanism is activated post-prandially. Reduced MIS leads to diabetes, but its activation improves insulin sensitivity. MIS is preserved to single olanzapine administration, therefore we aimed to investigate the chronic effect of olanzapine on fasted-state insulin sensitivity and on MIS in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Daily food and water intake, stool and urine production and body weight were determined. The MIS was characterized by a rapid insulin sensitivity test. Fasting hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were determined by a hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic glucose clamping supplemented with radiotracer technique. Fasted and post-prandial blood samples were obtained for plasma insulin, leptin, ghrelin, amylin, GLP-1, GIP, PYY and PP determination. Adiposity was characterized by weighing intra-abdominal and inguinal fat pads. Olanzapine caused hepatic insulin resistance and a reduced metabolic clearance rate of insulin, but the MIS retained its function. Body weight and adiposity were enhanced, but olanzapine failed to increase food intake. Fasting insulin and leptin were elevated and the post-prandial reduction in ghrelin level was inhibited by olanzapine.The MIS remained functionally intact after long-term olanzapine treatment. Altered insulin, leptin and ghrelin levels indicate olanzapine-induced metabolic derangements. Pharmacological activation of MIS could potentially be exploited to treat or prevent olanzapine-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26349558

  2. RGC32 deficiency protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-Bing; Luan, Jun-Na; Ye, Jianping; Chen, Shi-You

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is an important independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and many other chronic diseases. Adipose tissue inflammation is a critical link between obesity and insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and a contributor to disease susceptibility and progression. The objective of this study was to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. WT and RGC32 knockout (Rgc32(-/-) (Rgcc)) mice were fed normal chow or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Metabolic, biochemical, and histologic analyses were performed. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were used to study the role of RGC32 in adipocytes in vitro. Rgc32(-/-) mice fed with HFD exhibited a lean phenotype with reduced epididymal fat weight compared with WT controls. Blood biochemical analysis and insulin tolerance test showed that RGC32 deficiency improved HFD-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Although it had no effect on adipocyte differentiation, RGC32 deficiency ameliorated adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Moreover, Rgc32(-/-) induced browning of adipose tissues and increased energy expenditure. Our data indicated that RGC32 plays an important role in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, and thus it may serve as a potential novel drug target for developing therapeutics to treat obesity and metabolic disorders.

  3. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Randall H; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L; Kim, Jason K

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

  4. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  5. Relaxation response induces temporal transcriptome changes in energy metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Manoj K; Dusek, Jeffery A; Chang, Bei-Hung; Joseph, Marie G; Denninger, John W; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Libermann, Towia A

    2013-01-01

    The relaxation response (RR) is the counterpart of the stress response. Millennia-old practices evoking the RR include meditation, yoga and repetitive prayer. Although RR elicitation is an effective therapeutic intervention that counteracts the adverse clinical effects of stress in disorders including hypertension, anxiety, insomnia and aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms that explain these clinical benefits remain undetermined. To assess rapid time-dependent (temporal) genomic changes during one session of RR practice among healthy practitioners with years of RR practice and also in novices before and after 8 weeks of RR training, we measured the transcriptome in peripheral blood prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after listening to an RR-eliciting or a health education CD. Both short-term and long-term practitioners evoked significant temporal gene expression changes with greater significance in the latter as compared to novices. RR practice enhanced expression of genes associated with energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, insulin secretion and telomere maintenance, and reduced expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress-related pathways. Interactive network analyses of RR-affected pathways identified mitochondrial ATP synthase and insulin (INS) as top upregulated critical molecules (focus hubs) and NF-κB pathway genes as top downregulated focus hubs. Our results for the first time indicate that RR elicitation, particularly after long-term practice, may evoke its downstream health benefits by improving mitochondrial energy production and utilization and thus promoting mitochondrial resiliency through upregulation of ATPase and insulin function. Mitochondrial resiliency might also be promoted by RR-induced downregulation of NF-κB-associated upstream and downstream targets that mitigates stress. PMID:23650531

  6. Diuretics Prevent Thiazolidinedione-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy without Compromising Insulin-Sensitizing Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg+/−) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (PpargP465L/+). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity. PMID:24287404

  7. Loss of Oncostatin M Signaling in Adipocytes Induces Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Elks, Carrie M; Zhao, Peng; Grant, Ryan W; Hang, Hardy; Bailey, Jennifer L; Burk, David H; McNulty, Margaret A; Mynatt, Randall L; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2016-08-12

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional gp130 cytokine. Although OSM is produced in adipose tissue, it is not produced by adipocytes. OSM expression is significantly induced in adipose tissue from obese mice and humans. The OSM-specific receptor, OSM receptor β (OSMR), is expressed in adipocytes, but its function remains largely unknown. To better understand the effects of OSM in adipose tissue, we knocked down Osmr expression in adipocytes in vitro using siRNA. In vivo, we generated a mouse line lacking Osmr in adiponectin-expressing cells (OSMR(FKO) mice). The effects of OSM on gene expression were also assessed in vitro and in vivo OSM exerts proinflammatory effects on cultured adipocytes that are partially rescued by Osmr knockdown. Osm expression is significantly increased in adipose tissue T cells of high fat-fed mice. In addition, adipocyte Osmr expression is increased following high fat feeding. OSMR(FKO) mice exhibit increased insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation and have increased lean mass, femoral length, and bone volume. Also, OSMR(FKO) mice exhibit increased expression of Osm, the T cell markers Cd4 and Cd8, and the macrophage markers F4/80 and Cd11c Interestingly, the same proinflammatory genes induced by OSM in adipocytes are induced in the adipose tissue of the OSMR(FKO) mouse, suggesting that increased expression of proinflammatory genes in adipose tissue arises both from adipocytes and other cell types. These findings suggest that adipocyte OSMR signaling is involved in the regulation of adipose tissue homeostasis and that, in obesity, OSMR ablation may exacerbate insulin resistance by promoting adipose tissue inflammation.

  8. Loss of Oncostatin M Signaling in Adipocytes Induces Insulin Resistance and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Elks, Carrie M; Zhao, Peng; Grant, Ryan W; Hang, Hardy; Bailey, Jennifer L; Burk, David H; McNulty, Margaret A; Mynatt, Randall L; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2016-08-12

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional gp130 cytokine. Although OSM is produced in adipose tissue, it is not produced by adipocytes. OSM expression is significantly induced in adipose tissue from obese mice and humans. The OSM-specific receptor, OSM receptor β (OSMR), is expressed in adipocytes, but its function remains largely unknown. To better understand the effects of OSM in adipose tissue, we knocked down Osmr expression in adipocytes in vitro using siRNA. In vivo, we generated a mouse line lacking Osmr in adiponectin-expressing cells (OSMR(FKO) mice). The effects of OSM on gene expression were also assessed in vitro and in vivo OSM exerts proinflammatory effects on cultured adipocytes that are partially rescued by Osmr knockdown. Osm expression is significantly increased in adipose tissue T cells of high fat-fed mice. In addition, adipocyte Osmr expression is increased following high fat feeding. OSMR(FKO) mice exhibit increased insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation and have increased lean mass, femoral length, and bone volume. Also, OSMR(FKO) mice exhibit increased expression of Osm, the T cell markers Cd4 and Cd8, and the macrophage markers F4/80 and Cd11c Interestingly, the same proinflammatory genes induced by OSM in adipocytes are induced in the adipose tissue of the OSMR(FKO) mouse, suggesting that increased expression of proinflammatory genes in adipose tissue arises both from adipocytes and other cell types. These findings suggest that adipocyte OSMR signaling is involved in the regulation of adipose tissue homeostasis and that, in obesity, OSMR ablation may exacerbate insulin resistance by promoting adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:27325693

  9. Insulin withdrawal-induced cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells as a model of autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kim, Seong Who; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2009-02-01

    The term "autophagic cell death" was coined to describe a form of cell death associated with the massive formation of autophagic vacuoles without signs of apoptosis. However, questions about the actual role of autophagy and its molecular basis in cell death remain to be elucidated. We recently reported that adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells undergo autophagic cell death following insulin withdrawal. Insulin-deprived HCN cells exhibit morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy, including accumulation of Beclin 1 and the type II form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) without evidence of apoptosis. Suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 reduces cell death, whereas promotion of autophagy with rapamycin augments cell death in insulin-deficient HCN cells. These data reveal a causative role of autophagy in insulin withdrawal-induced HCN cell death. HCN cells have intact apoptotic capability despite the lack of apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. Our study demonstrates that autophagy is the default cell death mechanism in insulin-deficient HCN cells, and provides a genuine model of autophagic cell death in apoptosis-intact cells. Novel insight into molecular mechanisms of this underappreciated form of programmed cell death should facilitate the development of therapeutic methods to cope with human diseases caused by dysregulated cell death.

  10. Detrimental Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on τ Pathology Are Independent of Insulin Resistance in τ Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leboucher, Antoine; Laurent, Cyril; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-José; Burnouf, Sylvie; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Breton, Christophe; Pigny, Pascal; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Staels, Bart; Hamdane, Malika; Tailleux, Anne; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-01-01

    The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin resistance. The effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on τ pathology remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated effects of a high-fat diet, given at an early pathological stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like τ pathology. We found that early and progressive obesity potentiated spatial learning deficits as well as hippocampal τ pathology at a later stage. Surprisingly, THY-Tau22 mice did not exhibit peripheral insulin resistance. Further, pathological worsening occurred while hippocampal insulin signaling was upregulated. Together, our data demonstrate that DIO worsens τ phosphorylation and learning abilities in τ transgenic mice independently from peripheral/central insulin resistance. PMID:23250356

  11. Carotid Body Denervation Prevents the Development of Insulin Resistance and Hypertension Induced by Hypercaloric Diets

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria J.; Sacramento, Joana F.; Gonzalez, Constancio; Guarino, Maria P.; Monteiro, Emília C.; Conde, Sílvia V.

    2013-01-01

    Increased sympathetic activity is a well-known pathophysiological mechanism in insulin resistance (IR) and hypertension (HT). The carotid bodies (CB) are peripheral chemoreceptors that classically respond to hypoxia by increasing chemosensory activity in the carotid sinus nerve (CSN), causing hyperventilation and activation of the sympathoadrenal system. Besides its role in the control of ventilation, the CB has been proposed as a glucose sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis. However, to date no studies have anticipated its role in the development of IR. Herein, we propose that CB overstimulation is involved in the etiology of IR and HT, core metabolic and hemodynamic disturbances of highly prevalent diseases like the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and obstructive sleep apnoea. We demonstrate that CB activity is increased in IR animal models and that CSN resection prevents CB overactivation and diet-induced IR and HT. Moreover, we show that insulin triggers CB, highlighting a new role for hyperinsulinemia as a stimulus for CB overactivation. We propose that CB is implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic and hemodynamic disturbances through sympathoadrenal overactivation and may represent a novel therapeutic target in these diseases. PMID:23530003

  12. Body position and the neuroendocrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Z; Penesova, A; Jezova, D; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Macho, L; Koska, J

    2003-10-01

    Changes in body fluid distribution are known to influence neuroendocrine function. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that changes in plasma volume affect the counterregulatory neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia. The tests were performed in 12 subjects in two situations: 'head-up' (+60 degrees head-up tilt standing for 30 min and hypoglycemia in sitting position afterwards) and 'leg-up' (leg-up position for 30 min and hypoglycemia in leg-up position afterwards) in a random order. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia was adjusted to 2.7 mmol/l for 15 min by glucose infusion. Plasma volume was greater by 2.2% (p < 0.001) in leg-up and lower by 9.6% (p < 0.001) in head-up position compared to the basal value in sitting position. Head-up position was associated with increases in ACTH, aldosterone, norepinephrine levels and plasma renin activity (p < 0.01). Leg-up position resulted in decreases in plasma growth hormone and epinephrine concentrations (p < 0.05). Except epinephrine, the neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia, if any, was mild. Hypoglycemia failed to activate ACTH release after head-up position. Body fluid redistribution did not modify hormonal changes during insulin hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggest that body position and accompanying plasma volume changes do not appear to affect neuroendocrine and counterregulatory responses to moderate, short duration hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. PMID:15764080

  13. Insulin secretion enhancing activity of roselle calyx extract in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wisetmuen, Eamruthai; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Yutanawiboonchai, Wiboonchai; Itharat, Arunporn

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: Our recent study revealed the antihyperglycemic activity of an ethanolic extract of roselle calyxes (Hibiscus sabdariffa) in diabetic rats. The present study had, therefore, an objective to investigate the mechanism underlying this activity. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were induced to be diabetes by intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). Normal rats as well as diabetic rats were administered with the ethanolic extract of H. sabdariffa calyxes (HS-EE) at 0.1 and 1.0 g/kg/day, respectively, for 6 weeks. Then, blood glucose and insulin levels, at basal and glucose-stimulated secretions, were measured. The pancreas was dissected to examine histologically. Results: HS-EE 1.0 g/kg/day significantly decreased the blood glucose level by 38 ± 12% in diabetic rats but not in normal rats. In normal rats, treatment with 1.0 g/kg HS-EE increased the basal insulin level significantly as compared with control normal rats (1.28 ± 0.25 and 0.55 ± 0.05 ng/ml, respectively). Interestingly, diabetic rats treated with 1.0 g/kg HS-EE also showed a significant increase in basal insulin level as compared with the control diabetic rats (0.30 ± 0.05 and 0.15 ± 0.01 ng/ml, respectively). Concerning microscopic histological examination, HS-EE 1.0 g/kg significantly increased the number of islets of Langerhans in both normal rats (1.2 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 0.1 islet number/10 low-power fields (LPF) for control and HS-EE treated group, respectively) and diabetic rats (1.0 ± 0.3 and 3.9 ± 0.6 islet number/10 LPF for control and HS-EE treated group, respectively). Conclusion: The antidiabetic activity of HS-EE may be partially mediated via the stimulating effect on insulin secretion. PMID:23798879

  14. The impairment of retention induced by insulin in mice may be mediated by a reduction in central cholinergic activity.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1995-05-01

    Immediate posttraining intraperitoneal injection of nonconvulsive doses of insulin (2-20 IU/kg) significantly impaired retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve showed a U-shaped form. However, of the doses tested, only 8 IU/kg was effective. Insulin did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, indicating that the actions of insulin on retention performance were not due to nonspecific proactive effects on response latencies. The impairing effects of insulin (8 IU/kg) on retention were time-dependent, which suggests that insulin impaired memory storage. The simultaneous administration of glucose (10-1000 mg/kg) antagonized, in a dose-related manner, the actions of insulin (8 IU/kg) on retention, suggesting that the hormone may have produced a hypoglycemic response leading to a decrease in CNS glucose availability with a subsequent memory impairment. Low subeffective doses of atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or mecamylamine (5 mg/kg), but not methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), given immediately after training but 10 min before an ineffective dose of insulin (4 IU/kg), interacted with and impaired retention. The central anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 or 70 micrograms/kg), but not its quaternary analog neostigmine (35 or 70 micrograms/kg), prevented the memory impairment induced by insulin (8 IU/kg). Considered together, these findings are consistent with the view that a decrease in the CNS glucose availability impairs the synthesis and/or release of acetylcholine in brain regions critically involved in memory storage. PMID:7670835

  15. The control of hyperglycemia by a novel trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation in alloxan induced type I diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Sarbashri; Ghosh, Arjun; Bhattacharya, Suman; Maiti, Smarajit; Khan, Gausal A.; Sinha, Asru K

    2016-01-01

    A trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation was made by incubating insulin for 2 h at 23 °C with previously boiled cow milk at 100 °C that was coagulated with 0.6 M acetic acid. The precipitate was resuspended in the same volume of milk. The immunoblot analysis of the suspended proteins treated with 200 ng of trypsin/ml for 3 h demonstrated that the 80.1% of the insulin in the suspension survived the proteolytic degradation compared to 0% of the hormone survived in the control. The feeding of 0.4 ml (0.08 unit of insulin) of the resuspended proteins followed by 0.2 ml of the same protein to alloxan induced diabetic mice maximally decreased the blood glucose level from 508 ± 10 mg/dl to 130 ± 10 mg/dl in 7 h with simultaneous increase of the basal plasma concentration of insulin from 3 ± 1.1 μunits/ml to 18 ± 1.5 μunits/ml. In control experiment the absence of insulin in the identical milk suspension produced no hypoglycemic effect suggesting milk was not responsible for the hypoglycemic effect of milk-insulin complex. Coming out of insulin-casein complex from the intestinal gut to the circulation was spontaneous and facilitated diffusion transportation which was found from Gibbs free energy reaction. PMID:27226415

  16. The control of hyperglycemia by a novel trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation in alloxan induced type I diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Bank, Sarbashri; Ghosh, Arjun; Bhattacharya, Suman; Maiti, Smarajit; Khan, Gausal A; Sinha, Asru K

    2016-01-01

    A trypsin resistant oral insulin preparation was made by incubating insulin for 2 h at 23 °C with previously boiled cow milk at 100 °C that was coagulated with 0.6 M acetic acid. The precipitate was resuspended in the same volume of milk. The immunoblot analysis of the suspended proteins treated with 200 ng of trypsin/ml for 3 h demonstrated that the 80.1% of the insulin in the suspension survived the proteolytic degradation compared to 0% of the hormone survived in the control. The feeding of 0.4 ml (0.08 unit of insulin) of the resuspended proteins followed by 0.2 ml of the same protein to alloxan induced diabetic mice maximally decreased the blood glucose level from 508 ± 10 mg/dl to 130 ± 10 mg/dl in 7 h with simultaneous increase of the basal plasma concentration of insulin from 3 ± 1.1 μunits/ml to 18 ± 1.5 μunits/ml. In control experiment the absence of insulin in the identical milk suspension produced no hypoglycemic effect suggesting milk was not responsible for the hypoglycemic effect of milk-insulin complex. Coming out of insulin-casein complex from the intestinal gut to the circulation was spontaneous and facilitated diffusion transportation which was found from Gibbs free energy reaction.

  17. The impairment of retention induced by insulin in mice may be mediated by a reduction in central cholinergic activity.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1995-05-01

    Immediate posttraining intraperitoneal injection of nonconvulsive doses of insulin (2-20 IU/kg) significantly impaired retention of male Swiss mice tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve showed a U-shaped form. However, of the doses tested, only 8 IU/kg was effective. Insulin did not affect response latencies in mice not given the footshock on the training trial, indicating that the actions of insulin on retention performance were not due to nonspecific proactive effects on response latencies. The impairing effects of insulin (8 IU/kg) on retention were time-dependent, which suggests that insulin impaired memory storage. The simultaneous administration of glucose (10-1000 mg/kg) antagonized, in a dose-related manner, the actions of insulin (8 IU/kg) on retention, suggesting that the hormone may have produced a hypoglycemic response leading to a decrease in CNS glucose availability with a subsequent memory impairment. Low subeffective doses of atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or mecamylamine (5 mg/kg), but not methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), given immediately after training but 10 min before an ineffective dose of insulin (4 IU/kg), interacted with and impaired retention. The central anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 or 70 micrograms/kg), but not its quaternary analog neostigmine (35 or 70 micrograms/kg), prevented the memory impairment induced by insulin (8 IU/kg). Considered together, these findings are consistent with the view that a decrease in the CNS glucose availability impairs the synthesis and/or release of acetylcholine in brain regions critically involved in memory storage.

  18. Effect of naringenin on brain insulin signaling and cognitive functions in ICV-STZ induced dementia model of rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Lu, Yongliang; Hu, Bin; Yu, Huarong

    2014-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that severe abnormalities in brain glucose/energy metabolism and insulin signaling have been documented to take a pivotal role in early sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathology. It has been reported that naringenin (NAR), derived from citrus aurantium, exhibits antioxidant potential and protects the brain against neurodegeneration. The current study was designed to further investigate the protective effect of the NAR on neurodegeneration in a rat model of AD induced by an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ), and to determine whether this neuroprotective effect was associated with brain insulin signaling. Rats were injected bilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg), while sham rats received the same volume of vehicle and then supplemented with NAR (25, 50 mg, 100 mg/kg, respectively) for 3 weeks. The ICV-STZ injected rats did not have elevated blood glucose levels. 21 days following ICV-STZ injection, rats treated with NAR had better learning and memory performance in the Morris water maze test compared with rats treated with saline. We demonstrated that NAR increased the mRNA expression of INS and INSR in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In addition, NAR reversed ICV-STZ induced Tau hyper-phosphorylation in both hippocampus and cerebral cortex through downregulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity, a key kinase in the insulin signaling. Brain levels of Abeta, which were elevated in ICV-STZ rats, were significantly reduced in NAR-treated rats via upregulation of insulin degrading enzyme. These effects were mediated by increased insulin and insulin receptors expression in the brain, suggesting that insulin sensitizer agents might have therapeutic efficacy in early AD.

  19. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Masakazu; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CTLA-4Ig completely alleviates HFD-induced insulin resistance. •CTLA-4Ig reduces epididymal and subcutaneous fat tissue weight and adipocyte size. •CTLA-4Ig alters ATM polarization from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2. •CTLA-4Ig may lead to a novel anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent. •We identified the mechanism of the novel favorable effects of CTLA-4lg. -- Abstract: It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  20. HPMC supplementation reduces abdominal fat content, intestinal permeability, inflammation, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous non-fermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in diet induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high fat (HF) diet supplemented with either HPMC or insoluble fiber. DIO C57BL/6J m...

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by altering adipose tissue glycolytic and inflammatory function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. In this study, we dissected mechanisms mediating anti-inflammatory and anti-lipogenic actions of EPA, using histology/ immunohistochemistry, transcriptomi...

  2. Anesthetic agents modulate ECoG potentiation after spreading depression, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Thays Kallyne Marinho; E Silva-Gondim, Mariana Barros; Rodrigues, Marcelo Cairrão Araújo; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-04-10

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is characterized by reversible reduction of spontaneous and evoked electrical activity of the cerebral cortex. Experimental evidence suggests that CSD may modulate neural excitability and synaptic activity, with possible implications for long-term potentiation. Systemic factors like anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia can influence CSD propagation. In this study, we examined whether the post-CSD ECoG potentiation can be modulated by anesthetics and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. We found that awake adult rats displayed increased ECoG potentiation after CSD, as compared with rats under urethane+chloralose anesthesia or tribromoethanol anesthesia. In anesthetized rats, insulin-induced hypoglycemia did not modulate ECoG potentiation. Comparison of two cortical recording regions in awake rats revealed a similarly significant (p<0.05) potentiation effect in both regions, whereas in the anesthetized groups the potentiation was significant only in the recording region nearer to the stimulating point. Our data suggest that urethane+chloralose and tribromoethanol anesthesia modulate the post-CSD potentiation of spontaneous electrical activity in the adult rat cortex, and insulin-induced hypoglycemia does not modify this effect. Data may help to gain a better understanding of excitability-dependent mechanisms underlying CSD-related neurological diseases. PMID:25681772

  3. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4(-/-) mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4(-/-) mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  4. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  5. Intranasal insulin protects against substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal loss and alleviates motor deficits induced by 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Y; Lin, S; Wright, C; Shen, J; Carter, K; Bhatt, A; Fan, L-W

    2016-03-24

    Protection of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic (DA) neurons by neurotrophic factors (NTFs) is one of the promising strategies in Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy. A major clinical challenge for NTF-based therapy is that NTFs need to be delivered into the brain via invasive means, which often shows limited delivery efficiency. The nose to brain pathway is a non-invasive brain drug delivery approach developed in recent years. Of particular interest is the finding that intranasal insulin improves cognitive functions in Alzheimer's patients. In vitro, insulin has been shown to protect neurons against various insults. Therefore, the current study was designed to test whether intranasal insulin could afford neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-based rat PD model. 6-OHDA was injected into the right side of striatum to induce a progressive DA neuronal lesion in the ipsilateral SN pars compact (SNc). Recombinant human insulin was applied intranasally to rats starting from 24h post lesion, once per day, for 2 weeks. A battery of motor behavioral tests was conducted on day 8 and 15. The number of DA neurons in the SNc was estimated by stereological counting. Our results showed that 6-OHDA injection led to significant motor deficits and 53% of DA neuron loss in the ipsilateral side of injection. Treatment with insulin significantly ameliorated 6-OHDA-induced motor impairments, as shown by improved locomotor activity, tapered/ledged beam-walking performance, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, initial steps, as well as methamphetamine-induced rotational behavior. Consistent with behavioral improvements, insulin treatment provided a potent protection of DA neurons in the SNc against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity, as shown by a 74.8% increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons compared to the vehicle group. Intranasal insulin treatment did not affect body weight and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, our study showed that intranasal insulin provided strong

  6. The Mechanism by Which Safflower Yellow Decreases Body Fat Mass and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in HFD-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huijuan; Wang, Xiangqing; Pan, Hui; Dai, Yufei; Li, Naishi; Wang, Linjie; Yang, Hongbo; Gong, Fengying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Safflower yellow (SY) is the main effective ingredient of Carthamus tinctorius L. It has been reported that SY plays an important role in anti-inflammation, anti-platelet aggregation, and inhibiting thrombus formation. In present study, we try to investigate the effects of SY on body weight, body fat mass, insulin sensitivity in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Methods: HFD-induced obese male ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with SY (120 mg kg−1) daily. Eight weeks later, intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test (IPITT), and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) were performed, and body weight, body fat mass, serum insulin levels were measured. The expression of glucose and lipid metabolic related genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) were determined by RT-qPCR and western blot technologies. Results: The administration obese mice with SY significantly reduced the body fat mass of HFD-induced obese mice (P < 0.05). IPITT test showed that the insulin sensitivity of SY treated obese mice were evidently improved. The mRNA levels of insulin signaling pathway related genes including insulin receptor substrate 1(IRS1), PKB protein kinase (AKT), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and forkhead box protein O1(FOXO1) in mesenteric WAT of SY treated mice were significantly increased to 1.9- , 2.8- , 3.3- , and 5.9-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice, respectively (P < 0.05). The protein levels of AKT and GSK3β were also significantly increased to 3.0 and 5.2-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice, respectively (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, both the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorgamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α) in inguinal subcutaneous WAT of SY group were notably increased to 2.5 and 3.0-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice (P < 0.05). Conclusions: SY significantly reduce the body fat mass, fasting blood glucose and increase insulin sensitivity of HFD-induced obese mice. The

  7. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols prevent palmitate-induced renal epithelial mesenchymal transition by alleviating dipeptidyl peptidase-4-mediated insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Ning; Wang, Chau-Jong; Yang, Yi-Sun; Lin, Chih-Li; Peng, Chiung-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy has a significant socioeconomic impact, but its mechanism is unclear and needs to be examined. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols (HPE) inhibited high glucose-induced angiotensin II receptor-1 (AT-1), thus attenuating renal epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently, we reported HPE inhibited dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4, the enzyme degrades type 1 glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1)), which mediated insulin resistance signals leading to EMT. Since free fatty acids can realistically bring about insulin resistance, using the palmitate-stimulated cell model in contrast with type 2 diabetic rats, in this study we examined if insulin resistance causes renal EMT, and the preventive effect of HPE. Our findings reveal that palmitate hindered 30% of glucose uptake. Treatment with 1 mg mL(-1) of HPE and the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin completely recovered insulin sensitivity and palmitate-induced signal cascades. HPE inhibited DPP-4 activity without altering the levels of DPP-4 and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). HPE decreased palmitate-induced phosphorylation of Ser307 of insulin receptor substrate-1 (pIRS-1 (S307)), AT-1 and vimentin, while increasing phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (pPI3K). IRS-1 knockdown revealed its essential role in mediating downstream AT-1 and EMT. In type 2 diabetic rats, it suggests that HPE concomitantly decreased the protein levels of DPP-4, AT-1, vimentin, and fibronectin, but reversed the in vivo compensation of GLP-1R. In conclusion, HPE improves insulin sensitivity by attenuating DPP-4 and the downstream signals, thus decreasing AT-1-mediated tubular-interstitial EMT. HPE could be an adjuvant to prevent diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26514092

  8. L-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-03-10

    Increase in the concentration of plasma L-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged L-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged L-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued L-cysteine-induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, L-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. L-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N'-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in L-cysteine-treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to L-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D.

  9. l-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the concentration of plasma l-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged l-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged l-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued l-cysteine–induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, l-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. l-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N′-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in l-cysteine–treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to l-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D. PMID:25713368

  10. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  11. Laminin 411 acts as a potent inducer of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an incurable metabolic disease constituting a major threat to human health. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise in the treatment of DM. The development of an efficient IPC induction system is a crucial step for the clinical application of IPCs for DM. Laminin 411 is a key component of the basement membrane and is involved in the regulation of cell differentiation; however, little is known about a role of laminin 411 in the regulation of IPC differentiation from human MSCs. Methods MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) and expanded in an in vitro culture system. UC-MSCs were then cultured in the IPC induction and differentiation medium in the presence of laminin 411. Flow cytometry, Quantitative realtime PCR, immunofluorescence staining, ELISA, Western blotting and other techniques were applied to determine IPC generation, insulin expression and related mechanisms. To evaluate potential therapeutic efficacy of IPCs induced from UC-MSCs, a type-1 diabetes (T1DM) rat model was generated using streptozotocin. Blood glucose, insulin levels, and survival of rats were monitored periodically following intravenous injection of the tested cells. Results Laminin 411 markedly induced the expression of the genes Foxa2 and Sox17, markers for pancreatic precursor cells, efficiently induced IPC differentiation from MSCs, and up-regulated insulin expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the expression of the genes known to govern insulin expression including Pdx1 and Ngn3 was markedly induced by laminin 411, which suggests that Pdx1 and Ngn3 signaling pathways are involved in laminin 411 induced-insulin expression machinery. More importantly, administration of laminin 411-induced IPCs rapidly and significantly down-regulated fasting blood glucose levels, significantly reduced the HbA1c concentration and markedly improved the symptoms and survival of

  12. Obesity-induced DNA hypermethylation of the adiponectin gene mediates insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, A. Young; Park, Yoon Jeong; Pan, Xuebo; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Bassas, Abdulelah F.; Sallam, Reem M.; Park, Kyong Soo; Alfadda, Assim A.; Xu, Aimin; Kim, Jae Bum

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin plays a key role in the regulation of the whole-body energy homeostasis by modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Although obesity-induced reduction of adiponectin expression is primarily ascribed to a transcriptional regulation failure, the underlying mechanisms are largely undefined. Here we show that DNA hypermethylation of a particular region of the adiponectin promoter suppresses adiponectin expression through epigenetic control and, in turn, exacerbates metabolic diseases in obesity. Obesity-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokines promote DNMT1 expression and its enzymatic activity. Activated DNMT1 selectively methylates and stimulates compact chromatin structure in the adiponectin promoter, impeding adiponectin expression. Suppressing DNMT1 activity with a DNMT inhibitor resulted in the amelioration of obesity-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in an adiponectin-dependent manner. These findings suggest a critical role of adiponectin gene epigenetic control by DNMT1 in governing energy homeostasis, implying that modulating DNMT1 activity represents a new strategy for the treatment of obesity-related diseases. PMID:26139044

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-I and more potent variants restore growth of diabetic rats without inducing all characteristic insulin effects.

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, F M; Knowles, S E; Owens, P C; Chandler, C S; Francis, G L; Ballard, F J

    1993-01-01

    The effects of graded doses of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and two variants which bind poorly to IGF-binding proteins were investigated in 160 g streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The two variants were the truncated form, des(1-3)IGF-I, and another with arginine at residue 3 and an N-terminal extension, termed LR3-IGF-I. The peptides were infused via mini-osmotic pumps. Reference groups received either vehicle or insulin (30 i.u. per day). Treatment led to a marked dose-dependent increase in growth rate and nitrogen balance. The highest dose (695 micrograms/day) of IGF-I increased body weight by 48.1 +/- 1.7 g/7 days, compared with 11.0 +/- 2.8 g/7 days for the vehicle-treated group. The two variants were 2.5-3 times more potent than IGF-I in restoring growth. The insulin-treated group gained more weight (64.5 +/- 1.6 g/7 days), but the added gain was fat (92.5 +/- 4.8 g of fat/kg carcass wet wt., compared with 32.2 +/- 2.1 for all other groups) rather than protein. All peptides increased muscle protein-synthesis rates and RNA levels by up to 50%, with IGF-I the least potent. These high doses of IGFs did not decrease either the glucosuria or the daily excretion rate of N tau-methyl-histidine (N tau-MH). On the other hand, insulin treatment markedly decreased both glucosuria (from 82.7 +/- 5.4 to 4.5 +/- 3.3 mmol/day) and N tau-MH excretion (from 9.3 +/- 0.3 to 7.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/day per kg). This experiment shows that, although IGF-I and variants can restore growth in diabetic rats, other insulin-dependent metabolic processes in liver, muscle and adipose tissue are not restored. PMID:7683875

  14. Ubc13 haploinsufficiency protects against age-related insulin resistance and high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Erina; Fukushima, Toru; Harada, Norio; Reed, John C.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation that leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes via Toll-like Receptor (TLR) and TNF-family cytokine receptor (TNFR) signaling pathways. Ubc13 is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme responsible for non-canonical K63-linked polyubiquitination of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-family adapter proteins involved in TLR and TNFR pathways. However, the relationship between Ubc13 and metabolic disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Ubc13 in insulin resistance and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We compared wild-type (WT) and Ubc13 haploinsufficient (ubc13+/−) mice under normal diet (ND) and HFD, since homozygous knockout mice (ubc13−/−) are embryonic lethal. Male and female ubc13+/− mice were protected against age-related insulin resistance under ND and HFD compared to WT mice. Interestingly, only female ubc13+/− mice were protected against HFD-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. Moreover, only female HFD-fed ubc13+/− mice showed lower expression of inflammatory cytokines that was secondary to reduction in weight gain not present in the other groups. In summary, our results indicate that suppression of Ubc13 activity may play a metabolic role independent of its inflammatory function. Thus, Ubc13 could represent a therapeutic target for insulin resistance, diet-induced obesity, and associated metabolic dysfunctions. PMID:27796312

  15. Sweet taste of saccharin induces weight gain without increasing caloric intake, not related to insulin-resistance in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Melo Batista, Bruna Aparecida; Neves, Alice Magagnin; de Matos Feijó, Fernanda; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Marques Ribeiro, Maria Flávia; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that saccharin can induce weight gain when compared with sucrose in Wistar rats despite similar total caloric intake. We now question whether it could be due to the sweet taste of saccharin per se. We also aimed to address if this weight gain is associated with insulin-resistance and to increases in gut peptides such as leptin and PYY in the fasting state. In a 14 week experiment, 16 male Wistar rats received either saccharin-sweetened yogurt or non-sweetened yogurt daily in addition to chow and water ad lib. We measured daily food intake and weight gain weekly. At the end of the experiment, we evaluated fasting leptin, glucose, insulin, PYY and determined insulin resistance through HOMA-IR. Cumulative weight gain and food intake were evaluated through linear mixed models. Results showed that saccharin induced greater weight gain when compared with non-sweetened control (p = 0.027) despite a similar total caloric intake. There were no differences in HOMA-IR, fasting leptin or PYY levels between groups. We conclude that saccharin sweet taste can induce mild weight gain in Wistar rats without increasing total caloric intake. This weight gain was not related with insulin-resistance nor changes in fasting leptin or PYY in Wistar rats.

  16. Osteocalcin induces growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 system by promoting testosterone synthesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Li, K

    2014-10-01

    Osteocalcin has been shown to enhance testosterone production in men. In the present study, we investigated the effects of osteocalcin on testosterone and on induction of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis. Osteocalcin injection stimulated growth, which could be inhibited by castration. In addition, osteocalcin induced testosterone secretion in testes both in vivo and in vitro. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we showed that growth hormone expression was significantly increased in the pituitary after osteocalcin injection (p<0.05). Growth hormone expression in CLU401 mouse pituitary cells was also significantly stimulated (p<0.05) by osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells. Osteocalcin injection also promoted hepatic expression of growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 (p<0.05), as demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Similarly, osteocalcin-induced MA-10 cells promoted growth hormone receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 expression in NCTC1469 cells. These results suggest that the growth-stimulating activities of osteocalcin are mediated by testicular testosterone secretion, and thus provide valuable information regarding the regulatory effects of osteocalcin expression on the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis via reproductive activities.

  17. Streptozotocin-induced insulin deficiency leads to development of behavioral deficits in rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Ahmed, Saara; Tabassum, Saiqa; Memon, Zahida; Ikram, Mehwish; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic disorders in humans that develops due to diminished production of insulin (type I) or resistance to its effect (type II and gestational). The present study was designed to determine the neuropsychological deficits produced following streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats. Rats were made diabetic by the intra-peritoneal administration of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) which induces type-1 diabetes by the destruction "β-cells" of pancreas. Body weight, food and water intake was monitored daily. Open field test (OFT) model, forced swim test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM) model were performed for the evaluation of ambulation, depression-like symptoms and memory effects, respectively. After 10 days of diabetes induction the exploratory activity of rats was monitored by OFT while depression-like symptoms and memory effects in rats were analyzed by FST and MWM. Results showed that there was no significant effect of STZ-induced diabetes on body weight but food and water intake of STZ-induced diabetic rats was significantly increased. Exploratory activity was significantly decreased and short-term and long-term memory was significantly impaired while the depression-like symptoms was significantly increased in STZ diabetic rats. Thus, it may be suggested that STZ-induced diabetes alters the brain functions and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of certain behavioral deficits like depression, impaired learning and memory functions related to diabetes. This finding may be of relevance in the pathophysiology and in the clinical picture, which could be related to an altered brain serotonin metabolism and neurotransmission and may possibly be related to neuropsychiatric disorders in diabetic patients.

  18. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Ying; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yishu; Su, Xuejin; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Lihong; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper A.; Li, Yan; Li, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Background The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations. Methods hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 106 differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice. Results The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ) positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo. Conclusions IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation. PMID:26756576

  19. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  20. Resveratrol supplementation restores high-fat diet-induced insulin secretion dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial function in islet

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wen; Zheng, Juan; Zhang, Hao-hao; Hu, Xiang; Zeng, Tian-shu; Hu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a natural compound, is known for its effects on energy homeostasis. Here we investigated the effects of RSV and possible mechanism in insulin secretion of high-fat diet rats. Rats were randomly divided into three groups as follows: NC group (animals were fed ad libitum with normal chow for 8 weeks), HF group (animals were fed ad libitum with high-fat diet for 8 weeks), and HFR group (animals were treated with high-fat diet and administered with RSV for 8 weeks). Insulin secretion ability of rats was assessed by hyperglycemic clamp. Mitochondrial biogenesis genes, mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, reactive oxidative species (ROS), and several mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities were evaluated in islet. We found that HF group rats clearly showed low insulin secretion and mitochondrial complex dysfunction. Expression of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog- 1 (SIRT1) and related mitochondrial biogenesis were significantly decreased. However, RSV administration group (HFR) showed a marked potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This effect was associated with elevated SIRT1 protein expression and antioxidant enzyme activities, resulting in increased mitochondrial respiratory chain activities and decreased ROS level. This study suggests that RSV may increase islet mitochondrial complex activities and antioxidant function to restore insulin secretion dysfunction induced by high-fat diet. PMID:25228148

  1. Insulin-induced alterations in the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination of membrane proteins of the toad bladder epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.N.; Slatin, S.L.; Cobb, M.H.; Reich, I.M.

    1981-11-01

    Insulin-stimulated sodium transport in the toad urinary bladder consists of two components, a brief element of rapid onset that is independent of protein synthesis, and a sustained increase, slower in onset, that is dependent upon RNA and protein synthesis. The mucosal epithelium of the toad bladder was labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination (125I) following 15 min and 3 h exposure to insulin. The membrane of ''mitochondria-rich'' and ''granular'' mucosal cells from these tissues were analyzed by electrophoresis in SDS-urea. Compared to untreated tissues, membranes of ''granular'' mucosal cells from tissues exposed to insulin for 15 min contained a band (Mr . 15,000) with significantly increased labeling. Bladders exposed to insulin for 3 h showed no consistent increase in labeling. These data suggest that there are differences in the conformation of apical membrane proteins during the two phases of hormone-induced sodium transport. The technique may also offer an opportunity to identify ''effector'' proteins mediating this and other insulin responses.

  2. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masakazu; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-08-16

    It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  3. Insulin Restores an Altered Corneal Epithelium Circadian Rhythm in Mice with Streptozotocin-induced Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Fang; Xue, Yunxia; Dong, Dong; Liu, Jun; Fu, Ting; Xiao, Chengju; Wang, Hanqing; Lin, Cuipei; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Jiajun; Yang, Yabing; Wang, Zhaorui; Pan, Hongwei; Chen, Jiansu; Li, Yangqiu; Cai, Dongqing; Li, Zhijie

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of corneal epithelial lesions and delayed wound repair, as well as their association with diabetes mellitus, are critical issues for clinical ophthalmologists. To test whether the diabetic condition alters the circadian rhythm in a mouse cornea and whether insulin can synchronise the corneal clock, we studied the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the mitosis of epithelial cells, the recruitment of leukocytes to the cornea, and the expression of main core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry1, and Rev-erbα) in the corneal epithelium. We also assessed the possible effect of insulin on these modifications. Diabetes downregulated Clock, Bmal1, and Per2 expression, upregulated Cry1 and Rev-erbα expression, reduced corneal epithelial mitosis, and increased leukocyte (neutrophils and γδ T-cells) recruitment to the cornea. Early treatments with insulin partially restored the altered rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. In conclusion, insulin-dependent diabetes altered the normal rhythmicity of the cornea, and insulin administration had a beneficial effect on restoring normal rhythmicity in the diabetic cornea. PMID:27611469

  4. Secretome Analysis of Lipid-Induced Insulin Resistance in Skeletal Muscle Cells by a Combined Experimental and Bioinformatics Workflow.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Cox, Juergen; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Meissner, Felix; Mann, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ that produces so-called myokines, regulating energy metabolism via autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine actions; however, the nature and extent of the muscle secretome has not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, in principle, allows an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of cellular secretomes; however, the distinction of bona fide secreted proteins from proteins released upon lysis of a small fraction of dying cells remains challenging. Here we applied highly sensitive MS and streamlined bioinformatics to analyze the secretome of lipid-induced insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells. Our workflow identified 1073 putative secreted proteins including 32 growth factors, 25 cytokines, and 29 metalloproteinases. In addition to previously reported proteins, we report hundreds of novel ones. Intriguingly, ∼40% of the secreted proteins were regulated under insulin-resistant conditions, including a protein family with signal peptide and EGF-like domain structure that had not yet been associated with insulin resistance. Finally, we report that secretion of IGF and IGF-binding proteins was down-regulated under insulin-resistant conditions. Our study demonstrates an efficient combined experimental and bioinformatics workflow to identify putative secreted proteins from insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells, which could easily be adapted to other cellular models.

  5. Insulin potentiates the therapeutic effect of memantine against central STZ-induced spatial learning and memory deficit.

    PubMed

    Bahramian, Abbas; Rastegar, Karim; Namavar, Mohammad Reza; Moosavi, Maryam

    2016-09-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder. Memantine has been approved for moderate to severe AD, but evidence indicates that it does not modify disease progression. Recently insulin has been found to exert some beneficial effects on cognition. This study aimed to compare the protective effects of memantine and insulin in an animal model of memory deficit. It also evaluated the effects of combination therapy of these drugs. Adult male Sprague-Dawely rats approximately 8-10 weeks old were used. The canules were implanted bilaterally into lateral ventricles. STZ was administered on days 1 and 3 (3mg/kg in divided doses) and Memantine (5 or 10mg/kg/ip) or/and Insulin (3 or 6mU/icv) were started from day 4 and continued till day 13. The animal's learning and memory capability was assessed on days 14-16 using Morris water maze. On day 17 a visible platform test was done to assess the animals' visuomotor ability. After completion of behavioral studies the brain sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for routine histological evaluation. The results show that memantine in doses 5 and 10mg/kg improved memory at day 3 of training and memantine 5mg/kg was more potent than memantine 10mg/kg. Insulin in dose 3mU, but not 6 mU, reversed STZ-induced memory deficit from day 2 of training. When insulin was added to memantine, it increased the potency of memantine 5mg/kg in preventing a memory deficit, but surprisingly was not successful in impeding STZ-induced amnesia, in combination with memantine 10mg/kg. This research work revealed that insulin act more efficiently than memantine in reversing STZ-induced memory impairment. Additionally combination of insulin and memantine seems to act better than memantine alone, providing that a dose adjustment has been done. This study suggests considering the combination therapy of memantine and insulin in dementia and AD. PMID:27233828

  6. PINK1 alleviates palmitate induced insulin resistance in HepG2 cells by suppressing ROS mediated MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Cang, Xiaomin; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Pingli; Wu, Xue; Yan, Jin; Chen, Jinfeng; Wu, Gang; Jin, Yan; Xu, Feng; Su, Jianbin; Wan, Chunhua; Wang, Xueqin

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is an important pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies have shown that knockdown of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) causes oxidative stress and mitophagy. In db/db mice, PINK1 protein level is down-regulated. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which PINK1 modulates IR in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced stress. In our study, PINK1 expression decreased during palmitate (PA) induced IR in HepG2 cells and the hepatic tissues of high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Additionally, free fatty acids (FFAs) could increase ROS and suppress insulin signaling pathway, which was indicated by reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In addition, insulin induced glucose uptake decreased and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), two key gluconeogenic enzymes, was up-regulated after PA treatment. Intriguingly, PINK1 overexpression could lead to opposite results. Moreover, PA induced hepatic IR through C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, which were rescued by PINK1 overexpression. In summary, our results demonstrate that PINK1 promoted hepatic IR via JNK and ERK pathway in PA treated HepG2 cells, implying a novel molecular target for the therapy of diabetes. PMID:27423393

  7. PINK1 alleviates palmitate induced insulin resistance in HepG2 cells by suppressing ROS mediated MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Cang, Xiaomin; Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Pingli; Wu, Xue; Yan, Jin; Chen, Jinfeng; Wu, Gang; Jin, Yan; Xu, Feng; Su, Jianbin; Wan, Chunhua; Wang, Xueqin

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is an important pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Studies have shown that knockdown of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) causes oxidative stress and mitophagy. In db/db mice, PINK1 protein level is down-regulated. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which PINK1 modulates IR in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced stress. In our study, PINK1 expression decreased during palmitate (PA) induced IR in HepG2 cells and the hepatic tissues of high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Additionally, free fatty acids (FFAs) could increase ROS and suppress insulin signaling pathway, which was indicated by reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In addition, insulin induced glucose uptake decreased and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), two key gluconeogenic enzymes, was up-regulated after PA treatment. Intriguingly, PINK1 overexpression could lead to opposite results. Moreover, PA induced hepatic IR through C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, which were rescued by PINK1 overexpression. In summary, our results demonstrate that PINK1 promoted hepatic IR via JNK and ERK pathway in PA treated HepG2 cells, implying a novel molecular target for the therapy of diabetes.

  8. Insulin signaling genes modulate nicotine-induced behavioral responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Seth A; Ronan, Elizabeth A; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Insulin signaling has been suggested to modulate nicotine dependence, but the underlying genetic evidence has been lacking. Here, we used the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, to investigate whether genetic alterations in the insulin signaling pathway affect behavioral responses to nicotine. For this, we challenged drug-naive C. elegans with an acute dose of nicotine (100 μmol/l) while recording changes in their locomotion speed. Although nicotine treatment stimulated locomotion speed in wild-type C. elegans, the same treatment reduced locomotion speed in mutants defective in insulin signaling. This phenotype could be suppressed by mutations in daf-16, a gene encoding a FOXO transcription factor that acts downstream of insulin signaling. Our data suggest that insulin signaling genes, daf-2, age-1, pdk-1, akt-1, and akt-2, modulate behavioral responses to nicotine in C. elegans, indicating a genetic link between nicotine behavior and insulin signaling.

  9. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining “normal” GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26918849

  10. Biological Characterization of Gene Response to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Mouse Retina.

    PubMed

    Emery, Martine; Nanchen, Natacha; Preitner, Frédéric; Ibberson, Mark; Roduit, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the most important metabolic substrate of the retina and maintenance of normoglycemia is an essential challenge for diabetic patients. Chronic, exaggerated, glycemic excursions could lead to cardiovascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. We recently showed that hypoglycemia induced retinal cell death in mouse via caspase 3 activation and glutathione (GSH) decrease. Ex vivo experiments in 661W photoreceptor cells confirmed the low-glucose induction of death via superoxide production and activation of caspase 3, which was concomitant with a decrease of GSH content. We evaluate herein retinal gene expression 4 h and 48 h after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Microarray analysis demonstrated clusters of genes whose expression was modified by hypoglycemia and we discuss the potential implication of those genes in retinal cell death. In addition, we identify by gene set enrichment analysis, three important pathways, including lysosomal function, GSH metabolism and apoptotic pathways. Then we tested the effect of recurrent hypoglycemia (three successive 4h periods of hypoglycemia spaced by 48 h recovery) on retinal cell death. Interestingly, exposure to multiple hypoglycemic events prevented GSH decrease and retinal cell death, or adapted the retina to external stress by restoring GSH level comparable to control situation. We hypothesize that scavenger GSH is a key compound in this apoptotic process, and maintaining "normal" GSH level, as well as a strict glycemic control, represents a therapeutic challenge in order to avoid side effects of diabetes, especially diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-02-15

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPARγ, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ► PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin

  12. Muscle-specific vascular endothelial growth factor deletion induces muscle capillary rarefaction creating muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Jeffrey S; Lantier, Louise; Hasenour, Clinton M; James, Freyja D; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H

    2013-02-01

    Muscle insulin resistance is associated with a reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) action and muscle capillary density. We tested the hypothesis that muscle capillary rarefaction critically contributes to the etiology of muscle insulin resistance in chow-fed mice with skeletal and cardiac muscle VEGF deletion (mVEGF(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (mVEGF(+/+)) on a C57BL/6 background. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had an ~60% and ~50% decrease in capillaries in skeletal and cardiac muscle, respectively. The mVEGF(-/-) mice had augmented fasting glucose turnover. Insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disappearance was blunted in mVEGF(-/-) mice. The reduced peripheral glucose utilization during insulin stimulation was due to diminished in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscle insulin action and signaling. The decreased insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was independent of defects in insulin action at the myocyte, suggesting that the impairment in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake was due to poor muscle perfusion. The deletion of VEGF in cardiac muscle did not affect cardiac output. These studies emphasize the importance for novel therapeutic approaches that target the vasculature in the treatment of insulin-resistant muscle. PMID:23002035

  13. Adenoviral vector-mediated insulin gene transfer in the mouse pancreas corrects streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, A L; Auricchio, A; Yu, Q C; Wilson, J; Raper, S E

    2001-10-01

    Therapy for type 1 diabetes consists of tight blood glucose (BG) control to minimize complications. Current treatment relies on multiple insulin injections or an insulin pump placement, beta-cell or whole pancreas transplantation. All approaches have significant limitations and have led to the realization that novel treatment strategies are needed. Pancreatic acinar cells have features that make them a good target for insulin gene transfer. They are not subject to autoimmune attack, a problem with pancreas or islets transplantation, they are avidly transduced by recombinant adenoviral vectors, and capable of exporting a variety of peptides into the portal circulation. Recombinant adenoviral vectors were engineered to express either wild-type or furin-modified human insulin cDNA (AdCMVhInsM). Immunodeficient mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin and injected intrapancreatically with the vectors. BG and blood insulin levels have normalized after administration of AdCMVhInsM. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy showed the presence of insulin in acinar cells throughout the pancreas and localization of insulin molecules to acinar cell vesicles. The data clearly establish a relationship between intrapancreatic vector administration, decreased BG and elevated blood insulin levels. The findings support the use of pancreatic acinar cells to express and secrete insulin into the blood stream. PMID:11593361

  14. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  15. [Psychological aspects of remission induced by intensive insulin therapy in type I diabetes. A retrospective study of 44 patients].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, O; Kolopp, M; Kahn, J P; Floquet, B; Goudot, C; Beyel, P; Drouin, P; Debry, G

    1991-01-01

    The psychological consequences of induced remission of type 1 diabetes, have not yet been investigated thoroughly. We studied the psychological status of 44 patients (16 women, 28 men), age 21 years +/- 8 months (mean +/- SD), whose remission lasted 12 +/- 9 months. Patients' psychological reactions were analyzed retrospectively, using a 20 items standardized questionnaire, investigating 3 successive periods: 1) initial intensive insulin therapy; 2) remission; 3) permanent insulin therapy. 8% of the subjects only considered the remission phase useless, whereas 49% expressed a positive appraisal. Hope was predominant feeling, 25% of the patients believing in a completed recovery of diabetes. Perceived therapeutic constraints were, in decreasing order: regimen, way of life's regularity, self monitoring of blood glucose. When starting permanent insulin therapy, opposite answers were given: 49% negative feelings, 33% positive feelings and 18% ambivalent feelings. During this period, insulin injections represented the major therapeutic constraint, followed by self monitoring of blood glucose. To summarize, induced remission does not appear to be psychologically harmful and is considered useful by a large majority of patients. Effective psychological support has to be offered to help those patients to cope with their irrational hopes of healing and to dampen their deception at the end of the remission period. PMID:1752345

  16. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  17. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism.

  18. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  19. Fish oil and argan oil intake differently modulate insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in a rat model of dietary-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Samane, Samira; Christon, Raymond; Dombrowski, Luce; Turcotte, Stéphane; Charrouf, Zoubida; Lavigne, Charles; Levy, Emile; Bachelard, Hélène; Amarouch, Hamid; Marette, André; Haddad, Pierre Selim

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the potential metabolic benefits of fish oil (FO) or vegetable argan oil (AO) intake in a dietary model of obesity-linked insulin resistance. Rats were fed a standard chow diet (controls), a high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, or an HFHS diet in which 6% of the fat was replaced by either FO or AO feeding, respectively. The HFHS diet increased adipose tissue weight and insulin resistance as revealed by increased fasting glucose and exaggerated glycemic and insulin responses to a glucose tolerance test (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test). Fish oil feeding prevented fat accretion, reduced fasting glycemia, and normalized glycemic or insulin responses to intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test as compared with HFHS diet. Unlike FO consumption, AO intake failed to prevent obesity, yet restored fasting glycemia back to chow-fed control values. Insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in adipose tissues, skeletal muscles, and liver was greatly attenuated in HFHS rats as compared with chow-fed controls. High-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced insulin resistance was also confirmed in isolated hepatocytes. Fish oil intake prevented insulin resistance by improving or fully restoring insulin signaling responses in all tissues and isolated hepatocytes. Argan oil intake also improved insulin-dependent phosphorylations of Akt and Erk; and in adipose tissue, these responses were increased even beyond values observed in chow-fed controls. Taken together, these results strongly support the beneficial action of FO on diet-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, an effect likely explained by the ability of FO to prevent HFHS-induced adiposity. Our data also show for the first time that AO can improve some of the metabolic and insulin signaling abnormalities associated with HFHS feeding.

  20. Pathogenesis of NIDDM--a disease of deficient insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Turner, R C; Matthews, D R; Clark, A; O'Rahilly, S; Rudenski, A S; Levy, J

    1988-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a familial disease and studies of both Caucasian and Japanese families have raised the possibility that a major susceptibility gene is involved. The majority of patients have both beta cell dysfunction and impaired insulin sensitivity but studies of relatives of Type 2 diabetic patients suggest that beta cell dysfunction is an early feature of the disease. Impaired insulin sensitivity, from acromegaly, Cushing's disease or steroid therapy, induces diabetes only in a small proportion of the population, and they may be those who have an inherited cell defect. We postulate that a single beta cell defect gene, on its own, may be insufficient to cause overt diabetes and would lead to life-long glucose intolerance unless associated with other defects such as impaired insulin sensitivity. The nature of such a postulated beta cell defect is uncertain. Whilst it has been reported to be specific to glucose, and not to non-glucose stimuli, this feature may be secondary to hyperglycaemia. The occurrence of islet amyloid in 70-90% of Type 2 diabetic patients, and rarely in the normal population, raises the possibility that amyloid deposition causing disruption of the islet is a factor which might affect beta cell function. Amyloid formation may be a primary abnormality or could be secondary to beta cell dysfunction induced by hyperglycaemia. A major susceptibility gene might predispose a proportion, perhaps 10-15%, of a Caucasian population towards diabetes. The subsequent development of diabetes in a particular patient is likely to depend on many factors including other genetic factors, a sedentary life style and obesity. In different populations different genetic influences may operate, including abnormalities of insulin receptor genes and glucose transporter genes, which may allow a beta cell abnormality to become expressed clinically. PMID:3075895

  1. Comparative Study of Protective Effects of Salbutamol and Beclomethasone against Insulin Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity on Isolated Tracheal Smooth Muscle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mahjabeen; Tayyaba Khan, Bushra; Bakhtiar, Salman; Anwar, Mohammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational insulin was withdrawn from the market due to its potential to produce airway hyper-reactivity and bronchoconstriction. So the present study was designed to explore the acute effects of insulin on airway reactivity of guinea pigs and protective effects of salbutamol and beclomethasone against insulin induced airway hyper-responsiveness on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig. Effects of varying concentrations of insulin (10-7 to 10-3 M), insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol (10-7 M) and beclomethasone (10-6 M) were studied on isolated tracheal tissue of guinea pig by constructing cumulative concentration response curves. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle contractions were recorded on four channel oscillograph. The mean ± SEM of maximum amplitudes of contraction with increasing concentrations of insulin, insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol and beclomethasone were 35 ± 1.13 mm, 14.55 ± 0.62 mm and 22 ± 1.154 mm respectively. Although salbutamol and beclomethasone both had a profound inhibitory effect on insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity, yet salbutamol is more efficacious than beclomethasone. So we suggest that pretreatment of inhaled insulin with salbutamol may be preferred over beclomethasone in amelioration of its potential respiratory adverse effects such as bronchoconstriction. PMID:25901165

  2. Thrombospondin 1 mediates high-fat diet-induced muscle fibrosis and insulin resistance in male mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mayumi; Jiang, Yibin; Barnes, Richard H; Tokunaga, Masakuni; Martinez-Santibañez, Gabriel; Geletka, Lynn; Lumeng, Carey N; Buchner, David A; Chun, Tae-Hwa

    2013-12-01

    Thrombospondin 1 (THBS1 or TSP-1) is a circulating glycoprotein highly expressed in hypertrophic visceral adipose tissues of humans and mice. High-fat diet (HFD) feeding induces the robust increase of circulating THBS1 in the early stages of HFD challenge. The loss of Thbs1 protects male mice from diet-induced weight gain and adipocyte hypertrophy. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp study has demonstrated that Thbs1-null mice are protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance. Tissue-specific glucose uptake study has revealed that the insulin-sensitive phenotype of Thbs1-null mice is mostly mediated by skeletal muscles. Further assessments of the muscle phenotype using RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR, and histological studies have demonstrated that Thbs1-null skeletal muscles are protected from the HFD-dependent induction of Col3a1 and Col6a1, coupled with a new collagen deposition. At the same time, the Thbs1-null mice display a better circadian rhythm and higher amplitude of energy expenditure with a browning phenotype in sc adipose tissues. These results suggest that THBS1, which circulates in response to a HFD, may induce insulin resistance and fibrotic tissue damage in skeletal muscles as well as the de-browning of sc adipose tissues in the early stages of a HFD challenge. Our study may shed new light on the pathogenic role played by a circulating extracellular matrix protein in the cross talk between adipose tissues and skeletal muscles during obesity progression. PMID:24140711

  3. Insulin-induced cortical actin remodeling promotes GLUT4 insertion at muscle cell membrane ruffles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Peter; Khayat, Zayna A.; Huang, Carol; Patel, Nish; Ueyama, Atsunori; Klip, Amira

    2001-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake by recruiting glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) from an intracellular compartment to the cell surface; this phenomenon is defective in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the involvement of actin filaments in GLUT4 translocation and their possible defects in insulin resistance, using L6 myotubes expressing myc-tagged GLUT4. Insulin caused membrane ruffling, a dynamic distortion of the myotube dorsal surface. Fluorescence microscopy and immunogold staining of surface GLUT4myc coupled to backscatter electron microscopy revealed a high density of this protein in membrane ruffles. The t-SNAREs syntaxin4 and SNAP-23 were also abundant in these regions. Below the membrane, GLUT4 and the vesicular protein VAMP2, but not VAMP3, colocalized with the actin structures supporting the membrane ruffles. GLUT4myc externalization and membrane ruffles were reduced by jasplakinolide and by swinholide-A, drugs that affect actin filament stability and prevent actin branching, respectively. Insulin resistance generated by prolonged (24 hours) exposure of myotubes to high glucose and insulin diminished the acute insulin-dependent remodeling of cortical actin and GLUT4myc translocation, reminiscent of the effect of swinholide-A. We propose that GLUT4 vesicle incorporation into the plasma membrane involves insulin-dependent cortical actin remodeling and that defective actin remodeling contributes to insulin resistance. PMID:11489930

  4. Use of aglepristone for the treatment of P4 induced insulin resistance in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bresciani, Carla; Callegari, Daniela; Di Ianni, Francesco; Morini, Giorgio; Parmigiani, Enrico; Bianchi, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) in dogs is suspected when hyperglycemia is present despite administration of insulin doses greater than 1.0 to 1.5 UI/kg. IR is caused by increases in counter regulatory hormones concentrations (glucagon, glucocorticoids, catecholamines and growth hormone). This study was conducted to investigate the use of aglepristone (RU 46534), a P4 receptor antagonist, for the treatment of IR diabetes mellitus in bitches during the luteal phase. All animals were treated with porcine insulin zinc suspension (Caninsulin) and aglepristone (Alizin) 10 mg/kg subcutaneously at day 1, 2, 9 and 17 from diagnosis. At day 5, no significant variation in glycemia was shown. At day 12 and 20, serum glucose concentrations were significant lower (p < 0.05). From day 12 the insulin dose was reduced to 0.8 IU BID. Insulin was reduced in the following weeks and glycemia was controlled. PMID:24378588

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626 restores insulin secretion through enhancing autophagy in high fat diet-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Liu, Jian; Yu, Xiaoxing

    2016-02-12

    Autophagy is cellular machinery for maintenance of β-cell function and mass. The current study aimed to investigate the regulatory effects of MK-626, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on insulin secretion through the activation of autophagy in high fat diet-induced obese mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a rodent diet containing 45 kcal% fat for 16 weeks to induce obesity and then were received either vehicle or MK-626 (3 mg/kg/day) orally during the final 4 weeks. Mouse islets were isolated. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine-protein kinase mTOR and levels of light chain 3B I (LC3B I), LC3B II, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1/p62) and autophagy-related protein-7 (Atg7) were examined by Western blotting. Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) level and insulin secretion were measured by ELISA. GLP-1 level in plasma was decreased in obese mice, which was elevated by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor MK-626. In the islets of obese mice, phosphorylation of mTOR, ratio of LC3B I and LC3B II, and level of p62 were elevated and the expression of Atg7 and insulin secretion were reduced compared to those of C57BL/6 mice. However, such effects were reversed by MK-626. Autophagy activator rapamycin stimulated insulin secretion in obese mice but autophagy inhibitor chloroquine treatment inhibited insulin secretion in obese mice administrated by MK-626. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of MK-626 were inhibited by GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39. The present study reveals the activation of autophagy to mediate the anti-diabetic effect of GLP-1.

  6. Chronic intrarenal insulin replacement reverses diabetes mellitus-induced natriuresis and diuresis.

    PubMed

    Manhiani, M Marlina; Duggan, A Daniel; Wilson, Hunter; Brands, Michael W

    2012-02-01

    We showed recently that sustained natriuresis in type 1 diabetic dogs was attributed to the decrease in insulin rather than the hyperglycemia alone. The sodium-retaining action of insulin appeared to require hyperglycemia, and it completely reversed the diabetic natriuresis and diuresis. This study tested whether the sodium-retaining effect was attributed to direct intrarenal actions of insulin. Alloxan-treated dogs (D; n=7) were maintained normoglycemic using 24-h/d IV insulin replacement. After control measurements, IV insulin was decreased to begin a 6-day diabetic period. Blood glucose increased from 84±6 mg/dL to an average of 428 mg/dL on days 5 and 6, sodium excretion increased from 74±8 to 98±7 meq/d over the 6 days, and urine volume increased from 1645±83 to 2198±170 mL/d. Dir dogs (n=7) were subjected to the same diabetic regimen, but, in addition, insulin was infused continuously into the renal artery at 0.3 mU/kg per minute during the 6-day period. This did not affect plasma insulin. Blood glucose increased from 94±10 mg/dL to an average of 380 mg/dL on days 5 and 6, but sodium excretion averaged 76±5 and 69±8 meq/d during control and diabetes mellitus, respectively. The diuresis also was prevented. Glomerular filtration rate increased only in Dir dogs, and there was no change in mean arterial pressure in either group. This intrarenal insulin infusion had no effect on sodium or volume excretion in normal dogs. Intrarenal insulin replacement in diabetic dogs caused a sustained increase in tubular reabsorption that completely reversed diabetic natriuresis. Insulin plus glucose may work to prevent salt wasting in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Streptozotocin Aggravated Osteopathology and Insulin Induced Osteogenesis Through Co-treatment with Fluoride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Yagang; Wang, Yan; Mao, Weixian; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Hui

    2015-12-01

    The role of insulin in the mechanism underlying the excessive fluoride that causes skeletal lesion was studied. The in vitro bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) collected from Kunming mice were exposed to varying concentrations of fluoride with or without insulin. The cell viability and early differentiation of BMSC co-treated with fluoride and insulin were measured by using cell counting kit-8 and Gomori modified calcium-cobalt method, respectively. We further investigated the in vivo effects of varying dose of fluoride on rats co-treated with streptozotocin (STZ). Wistar rats were divided into six groups which included normal control, 10 mg fluoride/kg day group, 20 mg fluoride/kg day group, STZ control, STZ+10 mg fluoride/kg day group, and STZ+20 mg fluoride/kg day group. The rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) by gavage with water at doses 10 and 20 mg fluoride/kg day for 2 months. In a period of one month, half of rats in every group were treated with streptozotocin (STZ) once through intraperitoneal injection at 52 mg/kg body weight. The serum glucose, HbA1c, and insulin were determined. Bone mineral content and insulin release were assessed. The results showed insulin combined with fluoride stimulated BMSC cell viability in vitro. The bone mineral content reduced in rats treated with higher dose of fluoride and decreased immensely in rat co-treated with fluoride and STZ. Similarly, a combination treatment of a high dose of fluoride and STZ decreased insulin sensitivity and activity. To sum up, these data indicated fluoride influenced insulin release, activity, and sensitivity. Furthermore, the insulin state in vivo interfered in the osteogenesis in turn and implied there was a close relation between insulin and bone pathogenesis in the mechanism of fluoride toxicity.

  8. Targeted overexpression of inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase in adipose tissue increases fat deposition but protects against diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuqing; Guo, Xin; Li, Honggui; Xu, Hang; Halim, Vera; Zhang, Weiyu; Wang, Huan; Fan, Yang-Yi; Ong, Kuok Teong; Woo, Shih-Lung; Chapkin, Robert S; Mashek, Douglas G; Chen, Yanming; Dong, Hui; Lu, Fuer; Wei, Lai; Wu, Chaodong

    2012-06-15

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the dissociation of fat deposition, the inflammatory response, and insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. As a regulatory enzyme of glycolysis, inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (iPFK2, encoded by PFKFB3) protects against diet-induced adipose tissue inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance independently of adiposity. Using aP2-PFKFB3 transgenic (Tg) mice, we explored the ability of targeted adipocyte PFKFB3/iPFK2 overexpression to modulate diet-induced inflammatory responses and insulin resistance arising from fat deposition in both adipose and liver tissues. Compared with wild-type littermates (controls) on a high fat diet (HFD), Tg mice exhibited increased adiposity, decreased adipose inflammatory response, and improved insulin sensitivity. In a parallel pattern, HFD-fed Tg mice showed increased hepatic steatosis, decreased liver inflammatory response, and improved liver insulin sensitivity compared with controls. In both adipose and liver tissues, increased fat deposition was associated with lipid profile alterations characterized by an increase in palmitoleate. Additionally, plasma lipid profiles also displayed an increase in palmitoleate in HFD-Tg mice compared with controls. In cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, overexpression of PFKFB3/iPFK2 recapitulated metabolic and inflammatory changes observed in adipose tissue of Tg mice. Upon treatment with conditioned medium from iPFK2-overexpressing adipocytes, mouse primary hepatocytes displayed metabolic and inflammatory responses that were similar to those observed in livers of Tg mice. Together, these data demonstrate a unique role for PFKFB3/iPFK2 in adipocytes with regard to diet-induced inflammatory responses in both adipose and liver tissues.

  9. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  10. Loss of intestinal GATA4 prevents diet-induced obesity and promotes insulin sensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Jay V.; Chandak, Prakash G.; Obrowsky, Sascha; Pfeifer, Thomas; Diwoky, Clemens; Uellen, Andreas; Sattler, Wolfgang; Stollberger, Rudolf; Hoefler, Gerald; Heinemann, Akos; Battle, Michele; Duncan, Stephen; Kratky, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of small intestinal gene expression controls plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels, which are major determinants of metabolic diseases. GATA4, a zinc finger domain transcription factor, is critical for jejunal identity, and intestinal GATA4 deficiency leads to a jejunoileal transition. Although intestinal GATA4 ablation is known to misregulate jejunal gene expression, its pathophysiological impact on various components of metabolic syndrome remains unknown. Here, we used intestine-specific GATA4 knockout (GATA4iKO) mice to dissect the contribution of GATA4 on obesity development. We challenged adult GATA4iKO mice and control littermates with a Western-type diet (WTD) for 20 wk. Our findings show that WTD-fed GATA4iKO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Accordingly, plasma TG and TC levels are markedly decreased. Intestinal lipid absorption in GATA4iKO mice was strongly reduced, whereas luminal lipolysis was unaffected. GATA4iKO mice displayed a greater glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release on normal chow and even after long-term challenge with WTD remained glucose sensitive. In summary, our findings show that the absence of intestinal GATA4 has a beneficial effect on decreasing intestinal lipid absorption causing resistance to hyperlipidemia and obesity. In addition, we show that increased GLP-1 release in GATA4iKO mice decreases the risk for development of insulin resistance. PMID:21177287

  11. Zingiber mioga reduces weight gain, insulin resistance and hepatic gluconeogenesis in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    LEE, DA-HYE; AHN, JIYUN; JANG, YOUNG JIN; HA, TAE-YOUL; JUNG, CHANG HWA

    2016-01-01

    Zingiber mioga is a perennial herb belonging to the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) that is used medicinally to treat cough and rheumatism in China and consumed throughout Japan. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga following extraction with distilled water or 70% ethanol. In 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells, Z. mioga water extract (ZMW) markedly inhibited adipogenesis, whereas the ethanol extract had no effect. In addition, we conducted ZMW feeding experiments (0.25 or 0.5% ZMW) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice to examine the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga in vivo. Body weight and serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels significantly decreased in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Notably, ZMW decreased liver weight but not adipose tissue weight. Furthermore, insulin resistance and hepatic mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and G6Pase, were improved in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Furthermore, ZMW treatment decreased hepatic lipogenic gene expression; however, it did not alter adipogenesis in fat tissue, suggesting that ZMW inhibits hepatosteatosis through the suppression of lipogenesis. ZMW improved HFD-induced hepatic inflammation. Collectively, the present findings suggest that ZMW may serve as a new and promising strategy for the treatment of hepatosteatosis. PMID:27347064

  12. Intestinal Insulin Signaling Encodes Two Different Molecular Mechanisms for the Shortened Longevity Induced by Graphene Oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been shown to cause multiple toxicities in various organisms. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for GO-induced shortened longevity are still unclear. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible involvement of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Mutation of daf-2, age-1, akt-1, or akt-2 gene induced a resistant property of nematodes to GO toxicity, while mutation of daf-16 gene led to a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity, suggesting that GO may dysregulate the functions of DAF-2/IGF-1 receptor, AGE-1, AKT-1 and AKT-2-mediated kinase cascade, and DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. Genetic interaction analysis suggested the involvement of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the control of GO toxicity on longevity. Moreover, intestinal RNA interference (RNAi) analysis demonstrated that GO reduced longevity by affecting the functions of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the intestine. DAF-16 could also regulate GO toxicity on longevity by functioning upstream of SOD-3, which encodes an antioxidation system that prevents the accumulation of oxidative stress. Therefore, intestinal insulin signaling may encode two different molecular mechanisms responsible for the GO toxicity in inducing the shortened longevity. Our results highlight the key role of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity in organisms.

  13. Intestinal Insulin Signaling Encodes Two Different Molecular Mechanisms for the Shortened Longevity Induced by Graphene Oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunli; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been shown to cause multiple toxicities in various organisms. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for GO-induced shortened longevity are still unclear. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible involvement of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Mutation of daf-2, age-1, akt-1, or akt-2 gene induced a resistant property of nematodes to GO toxicity, while mutation of daf-16 gene led to a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity, suggesting that GO may dysregulate the functions of DAF-2/IGF-1 receptor, AGE-1, AKT-1 and AKT-2-mediated kinase cascade, and DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. Genetic interaction analysis suggested the involvement of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the control of GO toxicity on longevity. Moreover, intestinal RNA interference (RNAi) analysis demonstrated that GO reduced longevity by affecting the functions of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the intestine. DAF-16 could also regulate GO toxicity on longevity by functioning upstream of SOD-3, which encodes an antioxidation system that prevents the accumulation of oxidative stress. Therefore, intestinal insulin signaling may encode two different molecular mechanisms responsible for the GO toxicity in inducing the shortened longevity. Our results highlight the key role of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity in organisms. PMID:27040644

  14. Cichoric Acid Reverses Insulin Resistance and Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in the Glucosamine-Induced HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di; Wang, Yutang; Du, Qingwei; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Xuebo

    2015-12-30

    Cichoric acid, a caffeic acid derivative found in Echinacea purpurea, basil, and chicory, has been reported to have bioactive effects, such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and preventing insulin resistance. In this study, to explore the effects of CA on regulating insulin resistance and chronic inflammatory responses, the insulin resistance model was constructed by glucosamine in HepG2 cells. CA stimulated glucosamine-mediated glucose uptake by stimulating translocation of the glucose transporter 2. Moreover, the production of reactive oxygen, the expression of COX-2 and iNOS, and the mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were attenuated. Furthermore, CA was verified to promote glucosamine-mediated glucose uptake and inhibited inflammation through PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK signaling pathways in HepG2 cells. These results implied that CA could increase glucose uptake, improve insulin resistance, and attenuate glucosamine-induced inflammation, suggesting that CA is a potential natural nutraceutical with antidiabetic properties and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26592089

  15. Nedd4 haploinsufficient mice display moderate insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, and protection against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Jing; Ferry, Robert J; Diao, Shiyong; Xue, Bingzhong; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2015-04-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4 (Nedd4) is the prototypical protein in the Nedd4 ubiquitin ligase (E3) family, which governs ubiquitin-dependent endocytosis and/or degradation of plasma membrane proteins. Loss of Nedd4 results in embryonic or neonatal lethality in mice and reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling in embryonic fibroblasts. To delineate the roles of Nedd4 in vivo, we examined the phenotypes of heterozygous knockout mice using a high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFDIO) model. We observed that Nedd4+/- mice are moderately insulin resistant but paradoxically protected against HFDIO. After high-fat diet feeding, Nedd4+/- mice showed less body weight gain, less fat mass, and smaller adipocytes vs the wild type. Despite ameliorated HFDIO, Nedd4+/- mice did not manifest improvement in glucose tolerance vs the wild type in both genders. Nedd4+/- male, but not female, mice displayed significantly lower fasting blood glucose levels and serum insulin levels. Under obesogenic conditions, Nedd4+/- mice displayed elevated stimulated lipolytic activity, primarily through a β2-adrenergic receptor. Combined, these data support novel complex roles for Nedd4 in metabolic regulation involving altered insulin and β-adrenergic signaling pathways.

  16. Two weeks of metformin treatment induces AMPK-dependent enhancement of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse soleus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Treebak, Jonas T.; Schjerling, Peter; Goodyear, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Metformin-induced activation of the 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been associated with enhanced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, but so far no direct causality has been examined. We hypothesized that an effect of in vivo metformin treatment on glucose uptake in mouse skeletal muscles is dependent on AMPK signaling. Oral doses of metformin or saline treatment were given to muscle-specific kinase dead (KD) AMPKα2 mice and wild-type (WT) littermates either once or chronically for 2 wk. Soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles were used for measurements of glucose transport and Western blot analyses. Chronic treatment with metformin enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in soleus muscles of WT (∼45%, P < 0.01) but not of AMPK KD mice. Insulin signaling at the level of Akt protein expression or Thr308 and Ser473 phosphorylation was not changed by metformin treatment. Insulin signaling at the level of Akt and TBC1D4 protein expression as well as Akt Thr308/Ser473 and TBC1D4 Thr642/Ser711 phosphorylation were not changed by metformin treatment. Also, protein expressions of Rab4, GLUT4, and hexokinase II were unaltered after treatment. The acute metformin treatment did not affect glucose uptake in muscle of either of the genotypes. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence for a role of AMPK in potentiating the effect of insulin on glucose uptake in soleus muscle in response to chronic metformin treatment. PMID:24644243

  17. Effect of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Blockade on Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Chow, Yu-Hua; Gill, Sean E.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 is increased in different models of acute lung injury, and is an important determinant of survival and proliferation in many cells. We previously demonstrated that treatment of mice with IGF-1 receptor–blocking antibody (A12) improved early survival in bleomycin-induced lung injury. We have now examined whether administration of A12 improved markers of lung injury in hyperoxia model of lung injury. C57BL/6 mice underwent intraperitoneal administration of A12 or control antibody (keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]), then were exposed to 95% hyperoxia for 88–90 hours. Mice were killed and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis. Hyperoxia caused a significant increase in IGF levels in BAL and lung lysates. Peripheral blood neutrophils expressed IGF-1R at baseline and after hyperoxia. BAL neutrophils from hyperoxia-treated mice and patients with acute lung injury also expressed cell surface IGF-1R. A12-treated mice had significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) count in BAL compared with KLH control mice (P = 0.02). BAL from A12-treated mice demonstrated decreased PMN chemotactic activity compared with BAL from KLH-treated mice. Pretreatment of PMNs with A12 decreased their chemotactic response to BAL from hyperoxia-exposed mice. Furthermore, IGF-1 induced a dose-dependent chemotaxis of PMNs. There were no differences in other chemotactic cytokines in BAL, including CXCL1 and CXCL2. In summary, IGF blockade decreased PMN recruitment to the alveolar space in a mouse model of hyperoxia. Furthermore, the decrease in BAL PMNs was at least partially due to a direct effect of A12 on PMN chemotaxis. PMID:22493012

  18. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptides (TXM) reverse auranofin induced apoptosis and restore insulin secretion in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Khomsky, Lena; Trus, Michael; Aisner, Yonatan; Niv, Masha Y; Benhar, Moran; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-04-01

    The thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system (TrxR/Trx1) plays a major role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Disruption of the TrxR-Trx1 system keeps Trx1 in the oxidized state leading to cell death through activation of the ASK1-Trx1 apoptotic pathway. The potential mechanism and ability of tri- and tetra-oligopeptides derived from the canonical -CxxC- motif of the Trx1-active site to mimic and enhance Trx1 cellular activity was examined. The Trx mimetics peptides (TXM) protected insulinoma INS 832/13 cells from oxidative stress induced by selectively inhibiting TrxR with auranofin (AuF). TXM reversed the AuF-effects preventing apoptosis, and increasing cell-viability. The TXM peptides were effective in inhibiting AuF-induced MAPK, JNK and p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, in correlation with preventing caspase-3 cleavage and thereby PARP-1 dissociation. The ability to form a disulfide-bridge-like conformation was estimated from molecular dynamics simulations. The TXM peptides restored insulin secretion and displayed Trx1 denitrosylase activity. Their potency was 10-100-fold higher than redox reagents like NAC, AD4, or ascorbic acid. Unable to reverse ERK1/2 phosphorylation, TXM-CB3 (NAc-Cys-Pro-Cys amide) appeared to function in part, through inhibiting ASK1-Trx dissociation. These highly effective anti-apoptotic effects of Trx1 mimetic peptides exhibited in INS 832/13 cells could become valuable in treating adverse oxidative-stress related disorders such as diabetes. PMID:23327993

  19. Alpha-lipoic acid attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced insulin resistance by improving mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lin; Zhu, Yiwei; Gao, Wenwen; Du, Xiliang; Zhang, Min; Peng, Zhicheng; Fu, Shoupeng; Li, Xiaobing; Zhe, Wang; Li, Xinwei; Liu, Guowen

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) has been reported to have beneficial effects for improving insulin sensitivity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the beneficial effects remains poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are considered causal factors that induce insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated the effect of ALA on the modulation of insulin resistance in ER-stressed HepG2 cells, and we explored the potential mechanism of this effect. HepG2 cells were incubated with tunicamycin (Tun) for 6h to establish an ER stress cell model. Tun treatment induced ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Interestingly, ALA had no significant effect on ER stress signals. Pretreatment of the ER stress cell model with ALA for 24h improved insulin sensitivity, restored the expression levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and increased intracellular ATP production. Moreover, ALA augmented the β-oxidation capacity of the mitochondria. Importantly, ALA treatment could decrease oligomycin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and then improved insulin resistance. Taken together, our data suggest that ALA prevents ER stress-induced insulin resistance by enhancing mitochondrial function.

  20. A mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract improves fructose consumption-induced insulin resistance in rats: modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and glucose transporter-4

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng; Yao, Ling; Lin, Xuemei; Gu, Tieguang; Rong, Xianglu; Batey, Robert; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the processing of apple for juice, cider or wine preparation. Rosemary is a herb commonly used as spice and flavoring agent in food processing. Evidence suggests that both apple pomace and rosemary have rich bioactive molecules with numerous metabolic effects. To provide more information for using apple pomace and rosemary as functional foods for management of metabolism-associated disorders, the present study investigated the insulin-sensitizing effect of a mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract (AR). The results showed that treatment with AR (500 mg/kg, daily, by gavage) for 5 weeks attenuated chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in fasting plasma insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index in rats. Mechanistically, AR suppressed fructose-induced acceleration of the clearance of plasma non-esterified fatty acids during oral glucose tolerance test, and decreased excessive triglyceride accumulation and the increased Oil Red O staining area in the gastrocnemius. Furthermore, AR restored fructose-induced overexpression of sarcolemmal CD36 that is known to contribute to etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake, and downregulation of sarcolemmal glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 that is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter. Thus, these results demonstrate that AR improves fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats via modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and GLUT-4. PMID:27725859

  1. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Ghareeb, Doaa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) "NS" or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  2. Nigella sativa Relieves the Altered Insulin Receptor Signaling in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed with a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    El-Zeftawy, Marwa; Taha, Nabil; Mandour, Abdel Wahab

    2016-01-01

    The black cumin (Nigella sativa) “NS” or the black seeds have many pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In this work, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed with a high-fat diet were treated daily with NS oil (NSO) in order to study the effect on the blood glucose, lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, and the gene expression of some insulin receptor-induced signaling molecules. This treatment was combined also with some drugs (metformin and glimepiride) and the insulin receptor inhibitor I-OMe-AG538. The administration of NSO significantly induced the gene expression of insulin receptor compared to rats that did not receive NSO. Also, it upregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and phosphoinositide-3 kinase, whereas the expression of ADAM-17 was downregulated. The expression of ADAM-17 is corroborated by the analysis of TIMP-3 content. In addition, the NSO significantly reduced blood glucose level, components of the lipid profile, oxidative stress parameters, serum insulin/insulin receptor ratio, and the tumor necrosis factor-α, confirming that NSO has an antidiabetic activity. Thus, the daily NSO treatment in our rat model indicates that NSO has a potential in the management of diabetes as well as improvement of insulin-induced signaling. PMID:27579151

  3. Dose-Dependent Response of Personal Glucose Meters to Nicotinamide Coenzymes: Applications to Point-of-Care Diagnostics of Many Non-Glucose Targets in a Single Step.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Wang, Miao; Basu, Ananda; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We report a discovery that personal glucose meters (PGMs) can give a dose-dependent response to nicotinamide coenzymes, such as the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). We have developed methods that take advantage of this discovery to perform one-step homogeneous assays of many non-glucose targets that are difficult to recognize by DNAzymes, aptamers, or antibodies, and without the need for conjugation and multiple steps of sample dilution, separation, or fluid manipulation. The methods are based on the target-induced consumption or production of NADH through cascade enzymatic reactions. Simultaneous monitoring of the glucose and L-lactate levels in human plasma from patients with diabetes is demonstrated and the results are comparable to those from current standard test methods. Since a large number of commercially available enzymatic assay kits utilize NADH in their detection, this discovery will allow the transformation of almost all of these clinical lab tests into POC tests that use a PGM.

  4. Relapsing insulin-induced lipoatrophy, cured by prolonged low-dose oral prednisone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Circumscript, progressing lipoatrophy at the insulin injection sites is an unexplained, however rare condition in diabetes mellitus. Case presentation We report a case of severe localised lipoatrophy developing during insulin pump-treatment (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion) with the insulin analogue lispro (Humalog®) in a woman with type-1 diabetes mellitus. After 11 months of progressing lipoatrophy at two spots on the abdomen, low-dose prednisone (5-10 mg) p.o. was given at breakfast for 8 months, whereby the atrophic lesions centripetally re-filled with subcutaneous fat tissue (confirmed by MRI) despite ongoing use of insulin lispro. However, 4 weeks after cessation of prednisone, lipoatrophy relapsed, but resolved after another 2 months of low-dose prednisone. No further relapse was noted during 12 months of follow-up on insulin-pump therapy with Humalog®. Conclusion Consistent with an assumed inflammatory nature of the condition, low-dose oral prednisone appeared to have cured the lipoatrophic reaction in our patient. Our observation suggests a temporary intolerance of the subcutaneous fat tissue to insulin lispro (Humalog®), triggered by an unknown endogenous mechanism. PMID:22145998

  5. Insulin catalyzes the curcumin-induced wound healing: An in vitro model for gingival repair

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neetu; Ranjan, Vishal; Zaidi, Deeba; Shyam, Hari; Singh, Aparna; Lodha, Divya; Sharma, Ramesh; Verma, Umesh; Dixit, Jaya; Balapure, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) play a major role in the maintenance and repair of gingival connective tissue. The mitogen insulin with IGFs etc. synergizes in facilitating wound repair. Although curcumin (CUR) and insulin regulate apoptosis, their impact as a combination on hGF in wound repair remains unknown. Our study consists of: 1) analysis of insulin-mediated mitogenesis on CUR-treated hGF cells, and 2) development of an in vitro model of wound healing. Materials and Methods: Apoptotic rate in CUR-treated hGF cells with and without insulin was observed by AnnexinV/PI staining, nuclear morphological analysis, FACS and DNA fragmentation studies. Using hGF confluent cultures, wounds were mechanically created in vitro and incubated with the ligands for 48 h in 0.2% fetal bovine serum DMEM. Results: CUR alone showed dose-dependent (1–50 μM) effects on hGF. Insulin (1 μg/ml) supplementation substantially enhanced cell survival through up-regulation of mitogenesis/anti-apoptotic elements. Conclusions: The in vitro model for gingival wound healing establishes that insulin significantly enhanced wound filling faster than CUR-treated hGF cells over 48 h. This reinforces the pivotal role of insulin in supporting CUR-mediated wound repair. The findings have significant bearing in metabolic dysfunctions, e.g. diabetes, atherosclerosis, etc., especially under Indian situations. PMID:23087505

  6. Fas (CD95) expression in myeloid cells promotes obesity-induced muscle insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wueest, Stephan; Mueller, Rouven; Blüher, Matthias; Item, Flurin; Chin, Annie S H; Wiedemann, Michael S F; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Kovtonyuk, Larisa; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Schoenle, Eugen J; Manz, Markus G; Konrad, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver has been implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yet, the contribution of inflammatory cells to the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. In a large cohort of obese human individuals, blood monocyte Fas (CD95) expression correlated with systemic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To test a causal role for myeloid cell Fas expression in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, we generated myeloid/haematopoietic cell-specific Fas-depleted mice. Myeloid/haematopoietic Fas deficiency prevented the development of glucose intolerance in high fat-fed mice, in ob/ob mice, and in mice acutely challenged by LPS. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated preservation of muscle insulin responsiveness with no effect on adipose tissue or liver. Studies using neutralizing antibodies demonstrated a role for TNFα as mediator between myeloid Fas and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, supported by significant correlations between monocyte Fas expression and circulating TNFα in humans. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an unanticipated crosstalk between myeloid cells and skeletal muscle in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24203314

  7. Glucose delays the insulin-induced increase in thyroid hormone-mediated signaling in adipose of prolong-fasted elephant seal pups.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Viscarra, Jose A; Jaques, John T; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-03-15

    Prolonged food deprivation in mammals typically reduces glucose, insulin, and thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations, as well as tissue deiodinase (DI) content and activity, which, collectively, suppress metabolism. However, in elephant seal pups, prolonged fasting does not suppress TH levels; it is associated with upregulation of adipose TH-mediated cellular mechanisms and adipose-specific insulin resistance. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox and the effects of glucose and insulin on TH-mediated signaling in an insulin-resistant tissue are not well defined. To address our hypothesis that insulin increases adipose TH signaling in pups during extended fasting, we assessed the changes in TH-associated genes in response to an insulin infusion in early- and late-fasted pups. In late fasting, insulin increased DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 mRNA expression by 566%, 44%, and 267% at 60 min postinfusion, respectively, with levels decreasing by 120 min. Additionally, we performed a glucose challenge in late-fasted pups to differentiate between insulin- and glucose-mediated effects on TH signaling. In contrast to the insulin-induced effects, glucose infusion did not increase the expressions of DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 until 120 min, suggesting that glucose delays the onset of the insulin-induced effects. The data also suggest that fasting duration increases the sensitivity of adipose TH-mediated mechanisms to insulin, some of which may be mediated by increased glucose. These responses appear to be unique among mammals and to have evolved in elephant seals to facilitate their adaptation to tolerate an extreme physiological condition. PMID:26739649

  8. Glucose delays the insulin-induced increase in thyroid hormone-mediated signaling in adipose of prolong-fasted elephant seal pups.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Viscarra, Jose A; Jaques, John T; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-03-15

    Prolonged food deprivation in mammals typically reduces glucose, insulin, and thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations, as well as tissue deiodinase (DI) content and activity, which, collectively, suppress metabolism. However, in elephant seal pups, prolonged fasting does not suppress TH levels; it is associated with upregulation of adipose TH-mediated cellular mechanisms and adipose-specific insulin resistance. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox and the effects of glucose and insulin on TH-mediated signaling in an insulin-resistant tissue are not well defined. To address our hypothesis that insulin increases adipose TH signaling in pups during extended fasting, we assessed the changes in TH-associated genes in response to an insulin infusion in early- and late-fasted pups. In late fasting, insulin increased DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 mRNA expression by 566%, 44%, and 267% at 60 min postinfusion, respectively, with levels decreasing by 120 min. Additionally, we performed a glucose challenge in late-fasted pups to differentiate between insulin- and glucose-mediated effects on TH signaling. In contrast to the insulin-induced effects, glucose infusion did not increase the expressions of DI1, DI2, and THrβ-1 until 120 min, suggesting that glucose delays the onset of the insulin-induced effects. The data also suggest that fasting duration increases the sensitivity of adipose TH-mediated mechanisms to insulin, some of which may be mediated by increased glucose. These responses appear to be unique among mammals and to have evolved in elephant seals to facilitate their adaptation to tolerate an extreme physiological condition.

  9. Critical role of the transient activation of p38 MAPK in the etiology of skeletal muscle insulin resistance induced by low-level in vitro oxidant stress

    PubMed Central

    Diamond-Stanic, Maggie K.; Marchionne, Elizabeth M.; Teachey, Mary K.; Durazo, David E.; Kim, John S.; Henriksen, Erik J.

    2011-01-01

    Increased cellular exposure to oxidants may contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the primary site of insulin-dependent glucose disposal in the body; however, the effects of oxidative stress on insulin signaling and glucose transport activity in mammalian skeletal muscle are not well understood. We therefore studied the effects of a low-level in vitro oxidant stress (30–40 μM H2O2) on basal and insulin-stimulated (5 mU/ml) glucose transport activity and insulin signaling at 2, 4, and 6 hr in isolated rat soleus muscle. H2O2 increased basal glucose transport activity at 2 and 4 hr, but not at 6 hr. This lowlevel oxidant stress significantly impaired insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity at all time points, and was associated with inhibition of insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt Ser473 and GSK-3β Ser9. In the presence of insulin, H2O2 decreased total protein expression of IRS-1 at 6 hr and IRS-2 at 4 and 6 hr. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182 was transiently increased by H2O2 in the presence and absence of insulin at 2 and 4 hr, but not at 6 hr. Selective inhibition of p38 MAPK with A304000 partially rescued the H2O2-induced reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity. These results indicate that direct in vitro exposure of isolated mammalian skeletal muscle to a low-level oxidant stress impairs distal insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity, at least in part, due to a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism. PMID:21241662

  10. Myeloid Heme Oxygenase-1 Haploinsufficiency Reduces High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance by Affecting Adipose Macrophage Infiltration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun-Yuan; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Chau, Lee-Young

    2012-01-01

    Increased adipose tissue macrophages contribute to obesity-induced metabolic syndrome. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme with potent anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic activities in macrophages. However, the role of macrophage HO-1 on obesity-induced adipose inflammation and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Here we show that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding in C57BL/6J mice induced HO-1 expression in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly the stromal vascular fraction. When the irradiated C57BL/6J mice reconstituted with wild-type or HO-1+/− bone marrow were fed with HFD for over 24 weeks, the HO-1+/− chimeras were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance and this was associated with reduced adipose macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis, suggesting that HO-1 affects myeloid cell migration toward adipose tissue during obesity. In vivo and in vitro migration assays revealed that HO-1+/− macrophages exhibited an impaired migration response. Chemoattractant-induced phosphorylation of p38 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) declined faster in HO-1+/− macrophages. Further experiments demonstrated that carbon monoxide and bilirubin, the byproducts derived from heme degradation by HO-1, enhanced macrophage migration by increasing phosphorylation of p38 and FAK, respectively. These data disclose a novel role of hematopoietic cell HO-1 in promoting adipose macrophage infiltration and the development of insulin resistance during obesity. PMID:22761690

  11. High-fat diet-induced β-cell proliferation occurs prior to insulin resistance in C57Bl/6J male mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosser, Rockann E.; Maulis, Matthew F.; Moullé, Valentine S.; Dunn, Jennifer C.; Carboneau, Bethany A.; Arasi, Kavin; Pappan, Kirk; Poitout, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Both short- (1 wk) and long-term (2–12 mo) high-fat diet (HFD) studies reveal enhanced β-cell mass due to increased β-cell proliferation. β-Cell proliferation following HFD has been postulated to occur in response to insulin resistance; however, whether HFD can induce β-cell proliferation independent of insulin resistance has been controversial. To examine the kinetics of HFD-induced β-cell proliferation and its correlation with insulin resistance, we placed 8-wk-old male C57Bl/6J mice on HFD for different lengths of time and assayed the following: glucose tolerance, insulin secretion in response to glucose, insulin tolerance, β-cell mass, and β-cell proliferation. We found that β-cell proliferation was significantly increased after only 3 days of HFD feeding, weeks before an increase in β-cell mass or peripheral insulin resistance was detected. These results were confirmed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps and measurements of α-hydroxybutyrate, a plasma biomarker of insulin resistance in humans. An increase in expression of key islet-proliferative genes was found in isolated islets from 1-wk HFD-fed mice compared with chow diet (CD)-fed mice. These data indicate that short-term HFD feeding enhances β-cell proliferation before insulin resistance becomes apparent. PMID:25628421

  12. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia: role of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Allegra, V; Luisetto, G; Mengozzi, G; Martimbianco, L; Vasile, A

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the role and mechanism of action of calcitriol on glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia, 17 patients with severe chronic renal failure were studied. Glucose metabolism was investigated by the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) before and after treatment for 21 days with 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol and 500 mg/day of calcium (C+Ca) (6 cases) or 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol alone (C) (11 cases). After these evaluations the patients on C+Ca were shifted to C and 6 patients on C were shifted to C+Ca, and IVGTT was repeated 21 days after the shift. For each test plasma glucose (G), immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide (C-p) were measured at -30, 0, 2, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 min, and baseline plasma values of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3, C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTH-C), intact parathyroid hormone (PTH-I), calcitonin, and serum values of total and ionized calcium were dosed. Also, glucose constant decay (K-G), insulin response (IRI area), C-p production (C-p area), insulinogenic index (IGI) and insulin resistance index (RI) were calculated. A historical group of 21 healthy volunteers formed the normal controls. 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3 plasma levels in uremic patients before treatment were significantly lower than normal range. As compared to controls, uremic patients showed significantly lower K-G, IRI area and IGI values and significantly higher RI values. After treatment with C or C+Ca, the insulin response improved significantly at 2 and 5 min and G decrement was more marked at 30, 45 and 60 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Insulin induces a transcriptional activation of epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin, by a PI3K-dependent mechanism: Identification of a specific insulin-responsive promoter element

    SciTech Connect

    Ornskov, Dorthe; Nexo, Ebba; Sorensen, Boe S. . E-mail: boess@as.aaa.dk

    2007-03-23

    Previously we have shown that insulin-stimulation of RT4 bladder cancer cells leads to increased proliferation, which require HER1 activation, and is accompanied by increased mRNA expression of the EGF-ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), amphiregulin (AR), and epiregulin (EPI) [D. Ornskov, E. Nexo, B.S. Sorensen, Insulin-induced proliferation of bladder cancer cells is mediated through activation of the epidermal growth factor system, FEBS J. 273 (2006) 5479-5489]. In the present paper, we have investigated the molecular mechanism leading to this insulin-induced expression. We monitored the decay of mRNA after inhibiting transcription with Actinomycin D and demonstrated that the insulin-mediated increase was not caused by enhanced mRNA stability. In untreated cells, HB-EGF mRNA was the least stable, whereas AR and EPI mRNA decayed with slower kinetics. However, promoter analysis of HB-EGF and EPI demonstrated that insulin stimulated transcription. Studies on the EPI promoter identified the insulin-responsive element to be located in the region -564 to -365 bp. This region contains potential binding sites for the transcription factors SP1, AP1, and NF-{kappa}B. Interestingly, all three transcription factors can be activated by PI3K. We demonstrate that the insulin-induced expression of HB-EGF, AR, and EPI mRNA is completely prevented by the specific PI3K inhibitor Wortmannin, suggesting an involvement of the PI3K.

  14. Effects of acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on haemostasis, fibrinolysis and haemorheology in insulin-dependent diabetic patients and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B M; Quin, J D; Rumley, A; Lennie, S E; Small, M; MacCuish, A C; Lowe, G D

    1991-05-01

    1. The effects of acute hypoglycaemia on haemostasis, fibrinolysis, blood viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation were examined after acute insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in six normal male subjects and in six male patients with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes. In the control subjects hypoglycaemia caused a significant increase in the concentration of von Willebrand factor, with no change in the concentrations of fibrinogen and cross-linked fibrin degradation products. Fibrinolysis was enhanced, as indicated by significant increases in tissue plasminogen activator concentration and the fibrin plate lysis area, with a fall in plasminogen-activator inhibitor activity, suggesting complex formation. Whole-blood and plasma viscosity increased significantly after hypoglycaemia, but there was no significant change in erythrocyte aggregation tendency. 2. In diabetic patients the increase in the concentration of von Willebrand factor was significantly greater than in the control group (analysis of variance, P less than 0.02). The basal concentration of tissue plasminogen activator was reduced at 3.7 +/- 0.7 mg/l (mean +/- SEM) in the diabetic group compared with 8.5 +/- 1.3 mg/l in the control group (Student's t-test, P less than 0.01), but thereafter the increase in response to hypoglycaemia was similar. The changes in the other variables were not significantly different from the changes in the control group. 3. During acute hypoglycaemia in poorly controlled diabetic patients there is promotion of haemostasis with a greater increase in the concentration of von Willebrand factor, which, in association with the increase in viscosity, might reduce perfusion in diabetic microangiopathy, leading to aggravation of the microvascular complications of diabetes.

  15. An extract of Urtica dioica L. mitigates obesity induced insulin resistance in mice skeletal muscle via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A).

    PubMed

    Obanda, Diana N; Ribnicky, David; Yu, Yongmei; Stephens, Jacqueline; Cefalu, William T

    2016-01-01

    The leaf extract of Urtica dioica L. (UT) has been reported to improve glucose homeostasis in vivo, but definitive studies on efficacy and mechanism of action are lacking. We investigated the effects of UT on obesity- induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups: low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD supplemented with UT. Body weight, body composition, plasma glucose and plasma insulin were monitored. Skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, ceramide accumulation and the post translational modification and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is activated by ceramides and dephosphorylates Akt. C2C12 myotubes exposed to excess free fatty acids with or without UT were also evaluated for insulin signaling and modulation of PP2A. The HFD induced insulin resistance, increased fasting plasma glucose, enhanced ceramide accumulation and PP2A activity in skeletal muscle. Supplementation with UT improved plasma glucose homeostasis and enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity without affecting body weight and body composition. In myotubes, UT attenuated the ability of FFAs to induce insulin resistance and PP2A hyperactivity without affecting ceramide accumulation and PP2A expression. UT decreased PP2A activity through posttranslational modification that was accompanied by a reduction in Akt dephosphorylation. PMID:26916435

  16. An extract of Urtica dioica L. mitigates obesity induced insulin resistance in mice skeletal muscle via protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)

    PubMed Central

    Obanda, Diana N.; Ribnicky, David; Yu, Yongmei; Stephens, Jacqueline; Cefalu, William T.

    2016-01-01

    The leaf extract of Urtica dioica L. (UT) has been reported to improve glucose homeostasis in vivo, but definitive studies on efficacy and mechanism of action are lacking. We investigated the effects of UT on obesity- induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups: low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) and HFD supplemented with UT. Body weight, body composition, plasma glucose and plasma insulin were monitored. Skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was analyzed for insulin sensitivity, ceramide accumulation and the post translational modification and activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). PP2A is activated by ceramides and dephosphorylates Akt. C2C12 myotubes exposed to excess free fatty acids with or without UT were also evaluated for insulin signaling and modulation of PP2A. The HFD induced insulin resistance, increased fasting plasma glucose, enhanced ceramide accumulation and PP2A activity in skeletal muscle. Supplementation with UT improved plasma glucose homeostasis and enhanced skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity without affecting body weight and body composition. In myotubes, UT attenuated the ability of FFAs to induce insulin resistance and PP2A hyperactivity without affecting ceramide accumulation and PP2A expression. UT decreased PP2A activity through posttranslational modification that was accompanied by a reduction in Akt dephosphorylation. PMID:26916435

  17. CD11b regulates obesity-induced insulin resistance via limiting alternative activation and proliferation of adipose tissue macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxing; Yang, Qian; Xu, Chunliang; Cao, Jianchang; Jiang, Menghui; Chen, Qing; Cao, Gang; Han, Yanyan; Li, Fengying; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Li; Shi, Yufang; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated inflammation is accompanied by the accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which is believed to predispose obese individuals to insulin resistance. CD11b (integrin αM) is highly expressed on monocytes and macrophages and is critical for their migration and function. We found here that high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance was significantly reduced in CD11b-deficient mice. Interestingly, the recruitment of monocytes to adipose tissue is impaired when CD11b is deficient, although the cellularity of ATMs in CD11b-deficient mice is higher than that in wild-type mice. We further found that the increase in ATMs is caused mainly by their vigorous proliferation in the absence of CD11b. Moreover, the proliferation and alternative activation of ATMs are regulated by the IL-4/STAT6 axis, which is inhibited by CD11b through the activity of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, CD11b plays a critical role in obesity-induced insulin resistance by limiting the proliferation and alternative activation of ATMs. PMID:26669445

  18. Chronic Sleep Disruption Alters Gut Microbiota, Induces Systemic and Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Carreras, Alba; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A.; Leone, Vanessa; Peris, Eduard; Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Hubert, Nathaniel; Farré, Ramon; Chang, Eugene B.; Gozal, David

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) commonly occurs in human populations, and although it does not involve circadian shifts or sleep deprivation, it markedly alters feeding behaviors ultimately promoting obesity and insulin resistance. These symptoms are known to be related to the host gut microbiota. Mice were exposed to SF for 4 weeks and then allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiota were obtained prospectively, and conventionalization experiments were performed in germ-free mice. Adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and inflammation, as well as circulating measures of inflammation, were assayed. Effect of fecal water on colonic epithelial permeability was also examined. Chronic SF-induced increased food intake and reversible gut microbiota changes characterized by the preferential growth of highly fermentative members of Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae and a decrease of Lactobacillaceae families. These lead to systemic and visceral white adipose tissue inflammation in addition to altered insulin sensitivity in mice, most likely via enhanced colonic epithelium barrier disruption. Conventionalization of germ-free mice with SF-derived microbiota confirmed these findings. Thus, SF-induced metabolic alterations may be mediated, in part, by concurrent changes in gut microbiota, thereby opening the way for gut microbiome-targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing the major end-organ morbidities of chronic SF. PMID:27739530

  19. Curcumin rescues high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin sensitivity in mice through regulating SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Zhang, Binfeng; Qi, Meng; Huang, Wendong; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and its major co-morbidity, type 2 diabetes, have reached an alarming epidemic prevalence without an effective treatment available. It has been demonstrated that inhibition of SREBP pathway may be a useful strategy to treat obesity with type 2 diabetes. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acid and triglyceride. In current study, we identified a small molecule, curcumin, inhibited the SREBP expression in vitro. The inhibition of SREBP by curcumin decreased the biosynthesis of cholesterol and fatty acid. In vivo, curcumin ameliorated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Consistently, curcumin regulates SREBPs target genes and metabolism associated genes in liver or adipose tissues, which may directly contribute to the lower lipid level and improvement of insulin resistance. Take together, curcumin, a major active component of Curcuma longa could be a potential leading compound for development of drugs for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27208389

  20. Defective NOD2 peptidoglycan sensing promotes diet-induced inflammation, dysbiosis, and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Denou, Emmanuel; Lolmède, Karine; Garidou, Lucile; Pomie, Celine; Chabo, Chantal; Lau, Trevor C; Fullerton, Morgan D; Nigro, Giulia; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Luche, Elodie; Garret, Céline; Serino, Matteo; Amar, Jacques; Courtney, Michael; Cavallari, Joseph F; Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Barra, Nicole G; Foley, Kevin P; McPhee, Joseph B; Duggan, Brittany M; O'Neill, Hayley M; Lee, Amanda J; Sansonetti, Philippe; Ashkar, Ali A; Khan, Waliul I; Surette, Michael G; Bouloumié, Anne; Steinberg, Gregory R; Burcelin, Rémy; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors link metabolite and bacteria-derived inflammation to insulin resistance during obesity. We demonstrate that NOD2 detection of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PGN) regulates metabolic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. An obesity-promoting high-fat diet (HFD) increased NOD2 in hepatocytes and adipocytes, and NOD2−/− mice have increased adipose tissue and liver inflammation and exacerbated insulin resistance during a HFD. This effect is independent of altered adiposity or NOD2 in hematopoietic-derived immune cells. Instead, increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance in NOD2−/− mice is associated with increased commensal bacterial translocation from the gut into adipose tissue and liver. An intact PGN-NOD2 sensing system regulated gut mucosal bacterial colonization and a metabolic tissue dysbiosis that is a potential trigger for increased metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. Gut dysbiosis in HFD-fed NOD2−/− mice is an independent and transmissible factor that contributes to metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance when transferred to WT, germ-free mice. These findings warrant scrutiny of bacterial component detection, dysbiosis, and protective immune responses in the links between inflammatory gut and metabolic diseases, including diabetes. PMID:25666722

  1. 12/15-Lipoxygenase Is Required for the Early Onset of High Fat Diet-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Dorothy D.; Miles, Philip D.; Chapman, Justin; Ofrecio, Jachelle M.; Almazan, Felicidad; Thapar, Divya; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent understanding that insulin resistance is an inflammatory condition necessitates searching for genes that regulate inflammation in insulin sensitive tissues. 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15LO) regulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and is implicated in the early development of diet-induced atherosclerosis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that 12/15LO is involved in the onset of high fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Cells over-expressing 12/15LO secreted two potent chemokines, MCP-1 and osteopontin, implicated in the development of insulin resistance. We assessed adipose tissue inflammation and whole body insulin resistance in wild type (WT) and 12/15LO knockout (KO) mice after 2–4 weeks on HFD. In adipose tissue from WT mice, HFD resulted in recruitment of CD11b+, F4/80+ macrophages and elevated protein levels of the inflammatory markers IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFNγ, Cxcl1 and TNFα. Remarkably, adipose tissue from HFD-fed 12/15LO KO mice was not infiltrated by macrophages and did not display any increase in the inflammatory markers compared to adipose tissue from normal chow-fed mice. WT mice developed severe whole body (hepatic and skeletal muscle) insulin resistance after HFD, as measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. In contrast, 12/15LO KO mice exhibited no HFD-induced change in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate or hepatic glucose output during clamp studies. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in muscle tissue from HFD-fed mice was significantly greater in 12/15LO KO mice than in WT mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that 12/15LO mediates early stages of adipose tissue inflammation and whole body insulin resistance induced by high fat feeding. PMID:19787041

  2. Cellular and molecular players in adipose tissue inflammation in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Jongsoon

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident immune cells play a major role in the regulation of this obesity-induced inflammation. The roles that adipose tissue (AT)-resident immune cells play have been particularly extensively studied. AT contains most types of immune cells and obesity increases their numbers and activation levels, particularly in AT macrophages (ATMs). Other pro-inflammatory cells found in AT include neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, DCs, and mast cells. However, AT also contains anti-inflammatory cells that counter the pro-inflammatory immune cells that are responsible for the obesity-induced inflammation in this tissue. These anti-inflammatory cells include regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs), Th2 CD4 T cells, and eosinophils. Hence, AT inflammation is shaped by the regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cell homeostasis, and obesity skews this balance towards a more pro-inflammatory status. Recent genetic studies revealed several molecules that participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review, the cellular and molecular players that participate in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance are discussed, with particular attention being placed on the roles of the cellular players in these pathogeneses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease.

  3. Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I induces its own specific carrier protein in hypophysectomized and diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Hauri, C; Waldvogel, M; Futo, E; Häsler, H; Binz, K; Guler, H P; Schmid, C; Froesch, E R

    1989-01-01

    The physiology of the specific serum binding proteins which constitute the main storage pool for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in mammals is still incompletely understood. We have, therefore, investigated the regulation of these proteins in (i) hypophysectomized (hypox) rats infused with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) or recombinant human IGF 1 (rhIGF I) and (ii) streptozotocin-diabetic rats infused with insulin or rhIGF I. The main carrier protein, a GH-dependent complex of apparent molecular mass 200 kDa, contains N-glycosylated IGF-binding subunits (42, 45, and 49 kDa) that differ in their glycosyl but not in their protein moiety. These subunits are lacking in hypox and diabetic rats. They are induced by GH and insulin, respectively, and appear in the 200-kDa complex. Infusion of rhIGF I induces the subunits in both states; however, only in diabetic, not in hypox, rats do they form the 200-kDa complex. Glycosylated carrier protein subunits do not appear before 8 hr of rhIGF I infusion. During that period, hypox rats may become severely hypoglycemic. After 16 hr, glycosylated subunits are clearly induced, and blood sugar values are normal. We conclude: (i) The N-glycosylated subunits of the 200-kDa complex reflect the IGF I status. (ii) IGF I may mediate the induction of these subunits by GH. (iii) Significant association to the 200-kDa complex occurs only in the presence of GH. It is likely that GH, but not IGF I, induces a component, which itself does not bind IGF, but associates with the glycosylated IGF-binding subunits. (iv) The glycosylated subunits protect against IGF-induced hypoglycemia and may be involved in tissue-specific targeting of IGFs. Images PMID:2471192

  4. Effect of taurine supplementation on hyperhomocysteinemia and markers of oxidative stress in high fructose diet induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High intake of dietary fructose is accused of being responsible for the development of the insulin resistance (IR) syndrome. Concern has arisen because of the realization that fructose, at elevated concentrations, can promote metabolic changes that are potentially deleterious. Among these changes is IR which manifests as a decreased biological response to normal levels of plasma insulin. Methods Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were carried out, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA) was calculated, homocysteine (Hcy), lipid concentrations and markers of oxidative stress were measured in male Wistar rats weighing 170-190 g. The rats were divided into four groups, kept on either control diet or high fructose diet (HFD), and simultaneously supplemented with 300 mg/kg/day taurine via intra-peritoneal (i.p.) route for 35 days. Results Fructose-fed rats showed significantly impaired glucose tolerance, impaired insulin sensitivity, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), lower total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lower paraoxonase (PON) activity, and higher nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration, when compared to rats fed on control diet. Supplementing the fructose-fed rats with taurine has ameliorated the rise in HOMA by 56%, triglycerides (TGs) by 22.5%, total cholesterol (T-Chol) by 11%, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 21.4%. Taurine also abolished any significant difference of TAC, PON activity and NOx concentration among treated and control groups. TAC positively correlated with PON in both rats fed on the HFD and those received taurine in addition to the HFD. Fructose-fed rats showed 34.7% increase in Hcy level. Taurine administration failed to prevent the observed HHcy in the current dosage and duration. Conclusion Our results indicate that HFD could induce IR which could further result in metabolic syndrome (MS), and that taurine has a protective role against the metabolic

  5. A Sexual Shift Induced by Silencing of a Single Insulin-Like Gene in Crayfish: Ovarian Upregulation and Testicular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Ohad; Manor, Rivka; Weil, Simy; Gafni, Ohad; Linial, Assaf; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Ventura, Tomer; Sagi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    In sequential hermaphrodites, intersexuality occurs naturally, usually as a transition state during sexual re-differentiation processes. In crustaceans, male sexual differentiation is controlled by the male-specific androgenic gland (AG). An AG-specific insulin-like gene, previously identified in the red-claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (designated Cq-IAG), was found in this study to be the prominent transcript in an AG cDNA subtractive library. In C. quadricarinatus, sexual plasticity is exhibited by intersex individuals in the form of an active male reproductive system and male secondary sex characters, along with a constantly arrested ovary. This intersexuality was exploited to follow changes caused by single gene silencing, accomplished via dsRNA injection. Cq-IAG silencing induced dramatic sex-related alterations, including male feature feminization, a reduction in sperm production, extensive testicular degeneration, expression of the vitellogenin gene, and accumulation of yolk proteins in the developing oocytes. Upon silencing of the gene, AG cells hypertrophied, possibly to compensate for low hormone levels, as reflected in the poor production of the insulin-like hormone (and revealed by immunohistochemistry). These results demonstrate both the functionality of Cq-IAG as an androgenic hormone-encoding gene and the dependence of male gonad viability on the Cq-IAG product. This study is the first to provide evidence that silencing an insulin-like gene in intersex C. quadricarinatus feminizes male-related phenotypes. These findings, moreover, contribute to the understanding of the regulation of sexual shifts, whether naturally occurring in sequential hermaphrodites or abnormally induced by endocrine disruptors found in the environment, and offer insight into an unusual gender-related link to the evolution of insulins. PMID:21151555

  6. Early-onset obesity dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces asthma-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinger, Katharina; Kasper, Philipp; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Vohlen, Christina; Jobst, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg; Alejandre Alcázar, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but the molecular mechanisms linking both remain elusive. Since obesity leads to chronic low-grade inflammation and affects metabolic signaling we hypothesized that postnatal hyperalimentation (pHA) induced by maternal high-fat-diet during lactation leads to early-onset obesity and dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling, resulting in metabolic programming of asthma-like disease in adult mice. Offspring with pHA showed at postnatal day 21 (P21): (1) early-onset obesity, greater fat-mass, increased expression of IL-1β, IL-23, and Tnf-α, greater serum leptin and reduced glucose tolerance than Control (Ctrl); (2) less STAT3/AMPKα-activation, greater SOCS3 expression and reduced AKT/GSK3β-activation in the lung, indicative of leptin resistance and insulin signaling, respectively; (3) increased lung mRNA of IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and Tnf-α. At P70 body weight, fat-mass, and cytokine mRNA expression were similar in the pHA and Ctrl, but serum leptin and IL-6 were greater, and insulin signaling and glucose tolerance impaired. Peribronchial elastic fiber content, bronchial smooth muscle layer, and deposition of connective tissue were not different after pHA. Despite unaltered bronchial structure mice after pHA exhibited significantly increased airway reactivity. Our study does not only demonstrate that early-onset obesity transiently activates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces airway hyperreactivity in mice, but also provides new insights into metabolic programming of childhood obesity-related asthma. PMID:27087690

  7. mTOR-Independent autophagy inducer trehalose rescues against insulin resistance-induced myocardial contractile anomalies: Role of p38 MAPK and Foxo1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiurong; Ren, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with cardiovascular diseases although the precise mechanisms remain elusive. Akt2, a critical member of the Akt family, plays an essential role in insulin signaling. This study was designed to examine the effect of trehalose, an mTOR-independent autophagy inducer, on myocardial function in an Akt2 knockout-induced insulin resistance model. Adult WT and Akt2 knockout (Akt2(-/-)) mice were administered trehalose (1mg/g/day, i.p.) for two days and were then given 2% trehalose in drinking water for two more months. Echocardiographic and myocardial mechanics, intracellular Ca(2+) properties, glucose tolerance, and autophagy were assessed. Apoptosis and ER stress were evaluated using TUNEL staining, Caspase 3 assay and Western blot. Autophagy and autophagy flux were examined with a focus on p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), Forkhead box O (Foxo1) and Akt. Akt2 ablation impaired glucose tolerance, myocardial geometry and function accompanied with pronounced apoptosis, ER stress and dampened autophagy, the effects of which were ameliorated by trehalose treatment. Inhibition of lysosomal activity using bafilomycin A1 negated trehalose-induced induction of autophagy (LC3B-II and p62). Moreover, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Foxo1 were upregulated in Akt2(-/-) mice, the effect of which was attenuated by trehalose. Phosphorylation of Akt was suppressed in Akt2(-/-) mice and was unaffected by trehalose. In vitro findings revealed that the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin and the Foxo1 inhibitor (through phosphorylation) AS1842856 effectively masked trehalose-offered beneficial cardiomyocyte contractile response against Akt2 ablation. These data suggest that trehalose may rescue against insulin resistance-induced myocardial contractile defect and apoptosis, via autophagy associated with dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Foxo1 without affecting phosphorylation of Akt. PMID:27363949

  8. Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise-Induced Redox Signaling Is Associated with Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lewan; Stepto, Nigel K.; Shaw, Christopher S.; Serpiello, Fabio R.; Anderson, Mitchell; Hare, David L.; Levinger, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity and aging are associated with increased oxidative stress, activation of stress and mitogen activated protein kinases (SAPK), and the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. In contrast, acute exercise also increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet is reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of metabolic disease. This study explored this paradox by investigating the effect of a single session of high-intensity interval-exercise (HIIE) on redox status, muscle SAPK and insulin protein signaling in eleven middle-aged obese men. Methods: Participants completed a 2 h hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp at rest, and 60 min after HIIE (4 × 4 mins at 95% HRpeak; 2 min recovery periods), separated by 1–3 weeks. Results: Irrespective of exercise-induced changes to redox status, insulin stimulation both at rest and after HIIE similarly increased plasma superoxide dismutase activity, plasma catalase activity, and skeletal muscle 4-HNE; and significantly decreased plasma TBARS and hydrogen peroxide. The SAPK signaling pathways of p38 MAPK, NF-κB p65, and JNK, and the distal insulin signaling protein AS160Ser588, were activated with insulin stimulation at rest and to a greater extent with insulin stimulation after a prior bout of HIIE. Higher insulin sensitivity after HIIE was associated with higher insulin-stimulated SOD activity, JNK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB phosphorylation (r = 0.63, r = 0.71, r = 0.72, r = 0.71; p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion:These findings support a role for redox homeostasis and SAPK signaling in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake which may contribute to the enhancement of insulin sensitivity in obese men 3 h after HIIE.

  9. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:24939733

  10. Acute High-Intensity Interval Exercise-Induced Redox Signaling Is Associated with Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lewan; Stepto, Nigel K.; Shaw, Christopher S.; Serpiello, Fabio R.; Anderson, Mitchell; Hare, David L.; Levinger, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity and aging are associated with increased oxidative stress, activation of stress and mitogen activated protein kinases (SAPK), and the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. In contrast, acute exercise also increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet is reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of metabolic disease. This study explored this paradox by investigating the effect of a single session of high-intensity interval-exercise (HIIE) on redox status, muscle SAPK and insulin protein signaling in eleven middle-aged obese men. Methods: Participants completed a 2 h hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp at rest, and 60 min after HIIE (4 × 4 mins at 95% HRpeak; 2 min recovery periods), separated by 1–3 weeks. Results: Irrespective of exercise-induced changes to redox status, insulin stimulation both at rest and after HIIE similarly increased plasma superoxide dismutase activity, plasma catalase activity, and skeletal muscle 4-HNE; and significantly decreased plasma TBARS and hydrogen peroxide. The SAPK signaling pathways of p38 MAPK, NF-κB p65, and JNK, and the distal insulin signaling protein AS160Ser588, were activated with insulin stimulation at rest and to a greater extent with insulin stimulation after a prior bout of HIIE. Higher insulin sensitivity after HIIE was associated with higher insulin-stimulated SOD activity, JNK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB phosphorylation (r = 0.63, r = 0.71, r = 0.72, r = 0.71; p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion:These findings support a role for redox homeostasis and SAPK signaling in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake which may contribute to the enhancement of insulin sensitivity in obese men 3 h after HIIE. PMID:27695421

  11. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance.

  12. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9−/−) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography–determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:27051864

  13. Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine-induced mitochondrial fission and mitophagy cause decreased insulin secretion from β-cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Mei-Chen; Chen, Ming-Hong; Lee, Wen-Sen; Lu, Chin-I; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Shu-Huei; Lee, Horng-Mo

    2015-11-15

    Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine-conjugated bovine serum albumin (CML-BSA) is a major component of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We hypothesised that AGEs reduce insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells by damaging mitochondrial functions and inducing mitophagy. Mitochondrial morphology and the occurrence of autophagy were examined in pancreatic islets of diabetic db/db mice and in the cultured CML-BSA-treated insulinoma cell line RIN-m5F. In addition, the effects of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on mitochondria in AGE-damaged tissues were evaluated. The diabetic db/db mouse exhibited an increase in the number of autophagosomes in damaged mitochondria and receptor for AGEs (RAGE). Treatment of db/db mice with ALA for 12 wk increased the number of mitochondria with well-organized cristae and fewer autophagosomes. Treatment of RIN-m5F cells with CML-BSA increased the level of RAGE protein and autophagosome formation, caused mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased insulin secretion. CML-BSA also reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, increased ROS and lipid peroxide production, and caused mitochondrial DNA deletions. Elevated fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) level and mitochondrial fragmentation demonstrated the unbalance of mitochondrial fusion and fission in CML-BSA-treated cells. Additionally, increased levels of Parkin and PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 protein suggest that fragmented mitochondria were associated with increased mitophagic activity, and ALA attenuated the CML-BSA-induced mitophage formation. Our study demonstrated that CML-BSA induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mitophagy in pancreatic β-cells. The findings from this study suggest that increased concentration of AGEs may damage β-cells and reduce insulin secretion.

  14. Increased GIP signaling induces adipose inflammation via a HIF-1α-dependent pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Okahara, Fumiaki; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut hormone secreted in response to dietary fat and glucose. The blood GIP level is elevated in obesity and diabetes. GIP stimulates proinflammatory gene expression and impairs insulin sensitivity in cultured adipocytes. In obesity, hypoxia within adipose tissue can induce inflammation. The aims of this study were 1) to examine the proinflammatory effect of increased GIP signaling in adipose tissues in vivo and 2) to clarify the association between GIP and hypoxic signaling in adipose tissue inflammation. We administered GIP intraperitoneally to misty (lean) and db/db (obese) mice and examined adipose tissue inflammation and insulin sensitivity. We also examined the effects of GIP and hypoxia on expression of the GIP receptor (GIPR) gene and proinflammatory genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GIP administration increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and increased blood glucose in db/db mice. GIPR and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expressions were positively correlated in the adipose tissue in mice. GIPR expression increased dramatically in differentiated adipocytes. GIP treatment of adipocytes increased MCP-1 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. Adipocytes cultured either with RAW 264 macrophages or under hypoxia expressed more GIPR and HIF-1α, and GIP treatment increased gene expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and IL-6. HIF-1α gene silencing diminished both macrophage- and hypoxia-induced GIPR expression and GIP-induced IL-6 expression in adipocytes. Thus, increased GIP signaling plays a significant role in adipose tissue inflammation and thereby insulin resistance in obese mice, and HIF-1α may contribute to this process. PMID:25537494

  15. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  16. Combined contributions of over-secreted glucagon-like peptide 1 and suppressed insulin secretion to hyperglycemia induced by gatifloxacin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yunli; Wang, Xinting; Liu, Can; Yao, Dan; Hu, Mengyue; Li, Jia; Hu, Nan; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidences have showed that gatifloxacin causes dysglycemia in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Our preliminary study demonstrated that gatifloxacin stimulated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal cells. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release and dysglycemia in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and explore the possible mechanisms. Oral administration of gatifloxacin (100 mg/kg/day and 200 mg/kg/day) for 3 and 12 days led to marked elevation of GLP-1 levels, accompanied by significant decrease in insulin levels and increase in plasma glucose. Similar results were found in normal rats treated with 3-day gatifloxacin. Gatifloxacin-stimulated GLP-1 release was further confirmed in NCI-H716 cells, which was abolished by diazoxide, a K{sub ATP} channel opener. QT-PCR analysis showed that gatifloxacin also upregulated expression of proglucagon and prohormone convertase 3 mRNA. To clarify the contradiction on elevated GLP-1 without insulinotropic effect, effects of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin on insulin release were investigated using INS-1 cells. We found that short exposure (2 h) to GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion and biosynthesis, whereas long exposure (24 h and 48 h) to high level of GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. Moreover, we also confirmed gatifloxacin acutely stimulated insulin secretion while chronically inhibited insulin biosynthesis. All the results gave an inference that gatifloxacin stimulated over-secretion of GLP-1, in turn, high levels of GLP-1 and gatifloxacin synergistically impaired insulin release, worsening hyperglycemia. -- Highlights: ► Gatifloxacin induced hyperglycemia both in diabetic rats and normal rats. ► Gatifloxacin enhanced GLP-1 secretion but inhibited insulin secretion in rats. ► Long-term exposure to high GLP-1 inhibited insulin secretion and biosynthesis. ► GLP-1 over-secretion may be

  17. Phycocyanin ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in mice: Involved in insulin signaling pathway and GK expression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yu; Ren, Zhiheng; Wang, Jianhui; Yang, Xuegan

    2016-03-01

    The therapeutic potential and molecular mechanism of phycocyanin from Spirulina on alloxan-induced diabetes mice was investigated. In the experiment, 4-week treatment of phycocyanin at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight in alloxan-induced diabetes mice resulted in improved metrics in comparison with alloxan-induced diabetes group. These metrics include blood glucose levels, glycosylated serum protein (GSP), glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) and fasting serum insulin (FINS) levels. As its molecular mode of action, phycocyanin leads to the increase of IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the decrease of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, also accompany with increased level of Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 in the liver and pancreas in diabetic mice. In addition, phycocyanin treatment enhanced the glucokinase (GK) level in the liver and pancreas, and the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) level in the liver in diabetic mice. The results suggest that phycocyanin ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in mice by activating insulin signaling pathway and GK expression in pancreas and liver in diabetic mice. PMID:26827782

  18. In vivo and in vitro glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion in the mouse: pattern and role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and amplification signals in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude; Nenquin, Myriam; Stiernet, Patrick; Ahren, Bo

    2006-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying biphasic insulin secretion have not been completely elucidated. We compared the pattern of plasma insulin changes during hyperglycemic clamps in mice to that of glucose-induced insulin secretion and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) changes in perifused mouse islets. Anesthetized mice were infused with glucose to clamp blood glucose at 8.5 (baseline), 11.1, 16.7, or 30 mmol/l. A first-phase insulin response consistently peaked at 1 min, and a slowly ascending second phase occurred at 16.7 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in vivo is thus biphasic, with a similarly increasing second phase in the mouse as in humans. In vitro, square-wave stimulation from a baseline of 3 mmol/l glucose induced similar biphasic insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)](c) increases, with sustained and flat second phases. The glucose dependency (3-30 mmol/l) of both changes was sigmoidal with, however, a shift to the right of the relation for insulin secretion compared with that for [Ca(2+)](c). The maximum [Ca(2+)](c) increase was achieved by glucose concentrations, causing half-maximum insulin secretion. Because this was true for both phases, we propose that contrary to current concepts, amplifying signals are also implicated in first-phase glucose-induced insulin secretion. To mimic in vivo conditions, islets were stimulated with high glucose after being initially perifused with 8.5 instead of 3.0 mmol/l glucose. First-phase insulin secretion induced by glucose at 11.1, 16.7, and 30 mmol/l was decreased by approximately 50%, an inhibition that could not be explained by commensurate decreases in [Ca(2+)](c) or in the pool of readily releasable granules. Also unexpected was the gradually ascending pattern of the second phase, now similar to that in vivo. These observations indicated that variations in prestimulatory glucose can secondarily affect the magnitude and pattern of subsequent glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  19. Effects of salicylic acid-induced wine rich in anthocyanins on metabolic parameters and adipose insulin signaling in high-fructose fed rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Lanzi, Cecilia; de Rosas, Inés; Perdicaro, Diahann J; Ponce, María Teresa; Martinez, Liliana; Miatello, Roberto M; Cavagnaro, Bruno; Vazquez Prieto, Marcela A

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of Syrah red wine treated with salicylic acid (RW SA) and its control red wine (RW) on metabolic parameters, systolic blood pressure and adipose tissue insulin signaling in high-fructose (F) fed rats. Grape treated with SA increased the anthocyanin (ANTs) levels in RW. F induced increased systolic blood pressure, dislipidemia and insulin resistance (HOMA:IR). F rats treated with RW significantly prevented these alterations while RW SA partially attenuated triglycerides levels and HOMA:IR without modifications in HDL cholesterol levels. F impaired the adipose tissue response to insulin. Supplementation with RW and RW SA partially attenuated these alterations. Rats supplemented with RW SA had lesser beneficial effects on metabolic alterations than control RW, while both RW and RW SA attenuated altered adipose response to insulin. More studies are necessary to deeply evaluate the effect on SA-induced RW rich in ANTs levels on metabolic alterations associated to MetS.

  20. Insulin deficiency induces rat renal mesangial cell dysfunction via activation of IGF-1/IGF-1R pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ya-li; Shen, Yang; Ni, Jun; Shao, De-cui; Miao, Nai-jun; Xu, Jin-lan; Zhou, Li; Xue, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-xia; Lu, Li-min

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes and the major cause of end-stage renal disease. In this study we investigated the insulin deficiency (ID) induced changes in renal mesangial cells (MCs) and in the kidney of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Cultured rat renal MCs were incubated in ID media. Cell proliferation was analyzed using BrdU incorporation assay. The expression of insulin receptor (IR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), phosphorylated IGF-1R, fibronectin, and collagen IV was determined with Western blot analysis. STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with an IGF-1R antagonist picropodophyllin (PPP, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 8 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, plasma and kidneys were collected. IGF-1 levels in renal cortex were measured with RT-PCR or ELISA. The morphological changes in the kidneys were also examined. Results: Incubation in ID media significantly increased cell proliferation, the synthesis of fibronectin and collagen IV, and the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and phosphorylated IGF-1R in renal MCs. Pretreatment of the cells with PPP (50 nmol/L) blocked ID-induced increases in cell proliferation and the synthesis of fibronectin and collagen IV; knockdown of IGF-1R showed a similar effect as PPP did. In contrast, treatment of the cells with IGF-1 (50 ng/mL) exacerbated ID-induced increases in cell proliferation. In the kidneys of diabetic rats, the expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R and phosphorylated IGF-1R were significantly elevated. Treatment of diabetic rats with PPP did not lower the blood glucose levels, but significantly suppressed the expression of TGF-β, fibronectin and collagen IV in the kidneys, the plasma levels of urinary nitrogen and creatinine, and the urinary protein excretion. Conclusion: Insulin deficiency increases the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R in renal MCs and the kidney of diabetic rats, which contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID

  1. Physical activity-induced improvements in markers of insulin resistance in overweight and obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Connie L; Moran, Kelsey; Preedom, Stephanie; Brock, David W

    2011-05-01

    Childhood obesity is a significant, worldwide, public health problem. Coinciding with the increasing prevalence of obesity in youth, Type 2 diabetes has emerged as a critical health condition in this population. In the U.S. alone, approximately 215,000 U.S. youth under the age of 20 were diagnosed with diabetes, with the majority of 10-19 years old diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Additionally, the exact number of youth that may have Type 2 diabetes yet remain undiagnosed is unknown. Increasing physical activity to encourage weight loss among youth may reduce the incidence of Type 2 diabetes in youth; however, several recent studies reported positive associations between physical activity and components of Type 2 diabetes without weight loss in youth. These findings support previous studies in adults which observed physical activity-induced improvements in insulin dynamics without changes in body fat. The purpose of this review was to identify studies which examined the effect of physical activity without dietary intervention on markers of insulin resistance in overweight and obese youth. These studies provide strong evidence that physical activity alone, without dietary intervention, can have a positive, significant impact on insulin resistance risk and potentially prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese youth. The studies reviewed provide support for future interventions to shift the focus from reducing obesity to increasing physical activity for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in obese youth.

  2. Consumption of Clarified Grapefruit Juice Ameliorates High-Fat Diet Induced Insulin Resistance and Weight Gain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chudnovskiy, Rostislav; Thompson, Airlia; Tharp, Kevin; Hellerstein, Marc; Napoli, Joseph L.; Stahl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    To determine the metabolic effects of grapefruit juice consumption we established a model in which C57Bl/6 mice drank 25–50% sweetened GFJ, clarified of larger insoluble particles by centrifugation (cGFJ), ad libitum as their sole source of liquid or isocaloric and sweetened water. cGFJ and control groups consumed similar amounts of liquids and calories. Mice fed a high-fat diet and cGFJ experienced a 18.4% decrease in weight, a 13–17% decrease in fasting blood glucose, a three-fold decrease in fasting serum insulin, and a 38% decrease in liver triacylglycerol values, compared to controls. Mice fed a low-fat diet that drank cGFJ experienced a two-fold decrease in fasting insulin, but not the other outcomes observed with the high-fat diet. cGFJ consumption decreased blood glucose to a similar extent as the commonly used anti-diabetic drug metformin. Introduction of cGFJ after onset of diet-induced obesity also reduced weight and blood glucose. A bioactive compound in cGFJ, naringin, reduced blood glucose and improved insulin tolerance, but did not ameliorate weight gain. These data from a well-controlled animal study indicate that GFJ contains more than one health-promoting neutraceutical, and warrant further studies of GFJ effects in the context of obesity and/or the western diet. PMID:25296035

  3. Effect of Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) on fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Nasreen; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Feroz, Zeeshan

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major threat to present and future generations. The role of herbal medication has emerged as a safe alternative to currently available medication due to its decreased potential to produce side effects, hence effect of Carthamus tinctorius was observed on fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits. Thirty five healthy male rabbits were divided into 5 groups with 7 rabbits in each (Normal control, diabetic control, diabetic treated with glibenclamide, diabetic treated with Carthamus tinctorius extract at doses of 200 and 300mg/kg of body weight). Drug and extract were given orally for 30 days and the values for blood glucose levels were observed after 15(th) and 30(th) day of treatment by using standard reagent kits provided by Human Germany. While insulin levels were checked at the end of the study by using Architect i1000 by Abbott Diagnostics USA. Animals were also observed for any gross toxicity during the study. Results revealed that Carthamus tinctorius has significant hypoglycemic effect at 200mg/kg and 300mg/kg doses as compared to diabetic control group. Insulin levels were significantly increased in Glibenclamide treated as well as Carthamus tinctorius treated groups as compared to diabetic control.

  4. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Diet Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance, Modulating Mitochondrial Respiratory Uncoupling in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bergamo, Paolo; De Filippo, Chiara; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Gifuni, Giorgio; Putti, Rosalba; Moni, Bottu Heleena; Canani, Roberto Berni; Meli, Rosaria; Mollica, Maria Pina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Omega (ω)-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are dietary compounds able to attenuate insulin resistance. Anyway, the precise actions of ω-3PUFAs in skeletal muscle are overlooked. We hypothesized that PUFAs, modulating mitochondrial function and efficiency, would ameliorate pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant signs of nutritionally induced obesity. Study Design To this aim, rats were fed a control diet (CD) or isocaloric high fat diets containing either ω-3 PUFA (FD) or lard (LD) for 6 weeks. Results FD rats showed lower weight, lipid gain and energy efficiency compared to LD-fed animals, showing higher energy expenditure and O2 consumption/CO2 production. Serum lipid profile and pro-inflammatory parameters in FD-fed animals were reduced compared to LD. Accordingly, FD rats exhibited a higher glucose tolerance revealed by an improved glucose and insulin tolerance tests compared to LD, accompanied by a restoration of insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. PUFAs increased lipid oxidation and reduced energy efficiency in subsarcolemmal mitochondria, and increase AMPK activation, reducing both endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress. Increased mitochondrial respiration was related to an increased mitochondriogenesis in FD skeletal muscle, as shown by the increase in PGC1-α and -β. Conclusions our data strengthened the association of high dietary ω3-PUFA intake with reduced mitochondrial energy efficiency in the skeletal muscle. PMID:26901315

  5. Astaxanthin prevents and reverses diet-induced insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in mice: A comparison with vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Zhuge, Fen; Zhan, Lili; Nagata, Naoto; Tsutsui, Akemi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kaneko, Shuichi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) could be caused by excessive hepatic lipid accumulation and peroxidation. Vitamin E has become a standard treatment for NASH. However, astaxanthin, an antioxidant carotenoid, inhibits lipid peroxidation more potently than vitamin E. Here, we compared the effects of astaxanthin and vitamin E in NASH. We first demonstrated that astaxanthin ameliorated hepatic steatosis in both genetically (ob/ob) and high-fat-diet-induced obese mice. In a lipotoxic model of NASH: mice fed a high-cholesterol and high-fat diet, astaxanthin alleviated excessive hepatic lipid accumulation and peroxidation, increased the proportion of M1-type macrophages/Kupffer cells, and activated stellate cells to improve hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Moreover, astaxanthin caused an M2-dominant shift in macrophages/Kupffer cells and a subsequent reduction in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recruitment in the liver, which contributed to improved insulin resistance and hepatic inflammation. Importantly, astaxanthin reversed insulin resistance, as well as hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, in pre-existing NASH. Overall, astaxanthin was more effective at both preventing and treating NASH compared with vitamin E in mice. Furthermore, astaxanthin improved hepatic steatosis and tended to ameliorate the progression of NASH in biopsy-proven human subjects. These results suggest that astaxanthin might be a novel and promising treatment for NASH. PMID:26603489

  6. Reversion of steatosis by SREBP-1c antisense oligonucleotide did not improve hepatic insulin action in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Vitto, M F; Luz, G; Luciano, T F; Marques, S O; Souza, D R; Pinho, R A; Lira, F S; Cintra, D E; De Souza, C T

    2012-11-01

    The literature has associated hepatic insulin action with NAFLD. In this sense, treatments to revert steatosis and improve hepatic insulin action become important. Our group has demonstrated that inhibition of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins-1c (SREBP-1c) reverses hepatic steatosis. However, insulin signals after NAFLD reversion require better investigation. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the reversal of NAFLD by SREBP-1c inhibitor results in improvement in the hepatic insulin signal in obesity mice. After installation/achievement of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, Swiss mice were divided into 3 groups: i) Lean, ii) D-IHS, diet-induced hepatic steatosis [no treatment with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)], and iii) RD-IHS, reversion of diet-induced hepatic steatosis (treated with ASO). The mice were treated with ASO SREBP-1c as previously described by our group. After ASO treatment, one set of animals was anesthetized and used for in vivo test, and another mice set was anesthetized and used for histology and Western blot analysis. Reversion of diet-induced hepatic steatosis did not change blood glucose, glucose decay constant (k(ITT)), body weight, or serum insulin levels. In addition, results showed that the protocol did not improve insulin pathway signaling, as confirmed by the absence of changes in IR, IRS1, Akt and Foxo1 phosphorylation in hepatic tissue. In parallel, no alterations were observed in proinflammatory molecules. Thus, our results suggest that the inhibition of SREBP-1c reverts steatosis, but without improving insulin hepatic resistance.

  7. Mutational analysis of VAMP domains implicated in Ca2+-induced insulin exocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Regazzi, R; Sadoul, K; Meda, P; Kelly, R B; Halban, P A; Wollheim, C B

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) and cellubrevin are associated with the membrane of insulin-containing secretory granules and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing synaptic-like vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells. We found that a point mutation in VAMP-2 preventing targeting to synaptic vesicles also impairs the localization on insulin-containing secretory granules, suggesting a similar requirement for vesicular targeting. Tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment of permeabilized HIT-T15 cells leads to the proteolytic cleavage of VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and causes the inhibition of Ca2+-triggered insulin exocytosis. Transient transfection of HIT-T15 cells with VAMP-1, VAMP-2 or cellubrevin made resistant to the proteolytic action of TeTx by amino acid replacements in the cleavage site restored Ca2+-stimulated secretion. Wild-type VAMP-2, wild-type cellubrevin or a mutant of VAMP-2 resistant to TeTx but not targeted to secretory granules were unable to rescue Ca2+-evoked insulin release. The transmembrane domain and the N-terminal region of VAMP-2 were not essential for the recovery of stimulated exocytosis, but deletions preventing the binding to SNAP-25 and/or to syntaxin I rendered the protein inactive in the reconstitution assay. Mutations of putative phosphorylation sites or of negatively charged amino acids in the SNARE motif recognized by clostridial toxins had no effect on the ability of VAMP-2 to mediate Ca2+-triggered secretion. We conclude that: (i) both VAMP-2 and cellubrevin can participate in the exocytosis of insulin; (ii) the interaction of VAMP-2 with syntaxin and SNAP-25 is required for docking and/or fusion of secretory granules with the plasma membrane; and (iii) the phosphorylation of VAMP-2 is not essential for Ca2+-stimulated insulin exocytosis. Images PMID:9003771

  8. Metal induced conformational changes in human insulin: crystal structures of Sr2+, Ni2+ and Cu2+ complexes of human insulin.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Nagampalli Raghavendra Sashi; Pattabhi, Vasantha; Rajan, S S

    2011-05-01

    Crystal structures of Sr(2+), Ni(2+) and Cu(2+) of human insulin complexes have been determined. The structures of Sr(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes are similar to Zn(2+) insulin and are in T6 conformation. (All the six monomers in the insulin hexamer are in Tensed conformation (T), which means the first eight residues of B-chain are in an extended conformation). Cu(2+) complex, though it assumes T6 conformation, has more structural differences due to lowering of crystal symmetry and space group shift from H3 (Hexagonal crystal system) to P3 (Trigonal crystal system) and a doubling of the c axis. 2Ni(2+) human insulin when compared to 4Ni(2+) Arg insulin suggests that terminal modifications may be responsible for additional metal binding. All the three metals have been shown to have a role in diabetes and hence may be therapeutically useful. PMID:21171943

  9. Structure-function studies of PANDER, an islet specific cytokine inducing cell death of insulin-secreting beta cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jichun; Gao, Zhiyong; Robert, Claudia E; Burkhardt, Brant R; Gaweska, Helena; Wagner, Amary; Wu, Jianmei; Greene, Scott R; Young, Robert A; Wolf, Bryan A

    2005-08-30

    PANDER (pancreatic derived factor, FAM3B) is a novel cytokine, present in insulin secretory granules, that induces apoptosis of alpha and beta cells of mouse, rat, and human islets in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and may be implicated in diabetes. PANDER has the predicted secondary structure of 4 alpha-helical bundles with an up-up-down-down topology, and two disulfide bonds. Eleven mutated PANDERs were constructed and expressed in beta-TC3 cells to identify the essential region of PANDER involved in beta-cell death. Beta-cell function was assessed by assays of cell viability and insulin secretion. Based on quantitative real-time RT-PCR all mutant PANDERs had similar mRNA expression levels in beta-TC3 cells. Immunoblotting showed that ten of eleven mutant PANDER proteins were synthesized and detected in beta-TC3 cells. A mutant PANDER with no signal peptide, however, was not expressed. Truncation of helix D alone caused a 40-50% decrease in PANDER's activity, while truncation of both helices C and D resulted in a 75% loss of activity. In contrast, truncation of the N-terminus of PANDER (helix A, the loop between helices A and B, and the first two cysteines) had no effect on PANDER-induced beta-cell death. The third and fourth cysteines of PANDER, C91 and C229, were shown to form one disulfide bond and be functionally important. Finally, the region between Cys91 and Phe152 constitutes the active part of PANDER, based on the demonstration that mutants with truncation of helix B or C caused decreased beta-cell death and did not inhibit insulin secretion, as compared to wild-type PANDER. Hence, helices B and C and the second disulfide bond of PANDER are essential for PANDER-induced beta-cell death.

  10. MsrA Overexpression Targeted to the Mitochondria, but Not Cytosol, Preserves Insulin Sensitivity in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Hunnicut, JennaLynn; Liu, Yuhong; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that oxidative stress plays an integral role in the processes by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes. We previously identified that mice lacking the protein oxidation repair enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) are particularly prone to obesity-induced insulin resistance suggesting an unrecognized role for this protein in metabolic regulation. The goals of this study were to test whether increasing the expression of MsrA in mice can protect against obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and to elucidate the potential underlying mechanisms. Mice with increased levels of MsrA in the mitochondria (TgMito MsrA) or in the cytosol (TgCyto MsrA) were fed a high fat/high sugar diet and parameters of glucose homeostasis were monitored. Mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis and mitochondrial energy utilization were assessed. TgMito MsrA, but not TgCyto MsrA, mice remain insulin sensitive after high fat feeding, though these mice are not protected from obesity. This metabolically healthy obese phenotype of TgMito MsrA mice is not associated with changes in mitochondrial number or biogenesis or with a reduction of proteostatic stress in the mitochondria. However, our data suggest that increased mitochondrial MsrA can alter metabolic homeostasis under diet-induced obesity by activating AMPK signaling, thereby defining a potential mechanism by which this genetic alteration can prevent insulin resistance without affecting obesity. Our data suggest that identification of targets that maintain and regulate the integrity of the mitochondrial proteome, particular against oxidative damage, may play essential roles in the protection against metabolic disease.

  11. MsrA Overexpression Targeted to the Mitochondria, but Not Cytosol, Preserves Insulin Sensitivity in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hunnicut, JennaLynn; Liu, Yuhong; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that oxidative stress plays an integral role in the processes by which obesity causes type 2 diabetes. We previously identified that mice lacking the protein oxidation repair enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) are particularly prone to obesity-induced insulin resistance suggesting an unrecognized role for this protein in metabolic regulation. The goals of this study were to test whether increasing the expression of MsrA in mice can protect against obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction and to elucidate the potential underlying mechanisms. Mice with increased levels of MsrA in the mitochondria (TgMito MsrA) or in the cytosol (TgCyto MsrA) were fed a high fat/high sugar diet and parameters of glucose homeostasis were monitored. Mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis and mitochondrial energy utilization were assessed. TgMito MsrA, but not TgCyto MsrA, mice remain insulin sensitive after high fat feeding, though these mice are not protected from obesity. This metabolically healthy obese phenotype of TgMito MsrA mice is not associated with changes in mitochondrial number or biogenesis or with a reduction of proteostatic stress in the mitochondria. However, our data suggest that increased mitochondrial MsrA can alter metabolic homeostasis under diet-induced obesity by activating AMPK signaling, thereby defining a potential mechanism by which this genetic alteration can prevent insulin resistance without affecting obesity. Our data suggest that identification of targets that maintain and regulate the integrity of the mitochondrial proteome, particular against oxidative damage, may play essential roles in the protection against metabolic disease. PMID:26448611

  12. Reduced AMPKα2 protein expression restores glucose-induced insulin secretion in islets from calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Esméria C; Ribeiro, Rosane A; Vanzela, Emerielle C; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C

    2016-02-01

    In a state of caloric restriction (CR), improved insulin action was associated with the activation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). Here, we verified whether AMPK was involved in impaired β-cell function in islets from rats subjected to CR for 21 days. Eight-week-old male rats were distributed into a control (CTL) group that was fed an isocaloric diet ad libitum or a CR group that received 60% of the food consumed by the CTL group. From days 18-21, CTL and CR rats were treated with sense (CTLS and CRS) or antisense (CTLAS and CRAS) AMPKα2 oligonucleotides. Caloric restriction was associated with decreased body weight, perigonadal fat pads and insulinaemia, while higher glucose tolerance was observed in CRS rats. Antisense treatment normalized insulinaemia and glucose tolerance in CRAS rats and increased cholesterolaemia in CRAS and CTLAS groups. These effects were associated with reduced pAMPK/AMPK protein expression in the liver of rats treated with antisense oligonucleotides. Additionally, CRS islets showed higher pAMPK/AMPK content and lower glucose-induced insulin release. As expected, antisense oligonucleotides against AMPKα2 efficiently reduced pAMPK/AMPK protein in CRAS and CTLAS islets. The lower AMPK content in CRAS islets normalized the insulin secretion in islets exposed to 16.7 mM glucose. In addition, CTLAS islets presented higher insulin secretion at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose. These findings support the hypothesis that higher AMPK protein expression is involved in impaired β-cell function in islets from rats subjected to CR for 21 days. PMID:27102713

  13. Cashew apple extract inhibition of fat storage and insulin resistance in the diet-induced obesity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beejmohun, Vickram; Mignon, Cyril; Mazollier, Aude; Peytavy-Izard, Marie; Pallet, Dominique; Dornier, Manuel; Chapal, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The cashew apple is an unvalued by-product from the cashew nut industry, of which millions of tonnes are simply discarded globally. Interestingly, however, cashew apple nutrients may have beneficial effects for health even if these are still poorly described. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of a hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple (cashew apple extract; CAE; Cashewin(™)) on obesity and diabetes, in two experimental designs using the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. First, in the preventive design, mice were treated orally with the CAE at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight from the first day under a high-fat diet (HFD) and during 8 weeks thereafter. Second, in the curative design, the animals were first maintained under the HFD for 4 weeks and then treated with the CAE for a further 4 weeks under the same regimen. For both experimental designs, body weight, peri-epididymal adipose tissue, liver weight, food consumption, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance were assessed. In both designs, the CAE significantly reduced body-weight gain and fat storage in both the peri-epididymal adipose tissue and the liver for mice under the HFD. This was achieved without modifying their energy consumption. Furthermore, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) of the DIO mice were significantly lowered compared with the control group. Thus, a well-designed hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple could provide an attractive nutritional food ingredient to help support the management of body weight and associated metabolic parameters such as blood glucose and insulin levels.

  14. Cashew apple extract inhibition of fat storage and insulin resistance in the diet-induced obesity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beejmohun, Vickram; Mignon, Cyril; Mazollier, Aude; Peytavy-Izard, Marie; Pallet, Dominique; Dornier, Manuel; Chapal, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The cashew apple is an unvalued by-product from the cashew nut industry, of which millions of tonnes are simply discarded globally. Interestingly, however, cashew apple nutrients may have beneficial effects for health even if these are still poorly described. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of a hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple (cashew apple extract; CAE; Cashewin(™)) on obesity and diabetes, in two experimental designs using the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. First, in the preventive design, mice were treated orally with the CAE at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight from the first day under a high-fat diet (HFD) and during 8 weeks thereafter. Second, in the curative design, the animals were first maintained under the HFD for 4 weeks and then treated with the CAE for a further 4 weeks under the same regimen. For both experimental designs, body weight, peri-epididymal adipose tissue, liver weight, food consumption, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance were assessed. In both designs, the CAE significantly reduced body-weight gain and fat storage in both the peri-epididymal adipose tissue and the liver for mice under the HFD. This was achieved without modifying their energy consumption. Furthermore, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) of the DIO mice were significantly lowered compared with the control group. Thus, a well-designed hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple could provide an attractive nutritional food ingredient to help support the management of body weight and associated metabolic parameters such as blood glucose and insulin levels. PMID:26688724

  15. Exercise and dietary change ameliorate high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance via mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ju Yong; Shin, Ki Ok; Woo, Jinhee; Woo, Sang Heon; Jang, Ki Soeng; Lee, Yul Hyo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise and dietary change on obesity and insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels in skeletal muscles of obese rats. [Methods] Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into CO (Normal diet) and HF (High Fat diet) groups in order to induce obesity for 15 weeks. The rats were then subdivided into CO, COT (CO + Training), HF, HFT (HF + Training), HFND (Dietary change), and HFNDT (HFND + Training) groups (10 rats / group). The training groups underwent moderate-intensity treadmill exercise for 8 weeks, after which soleus muscles were excised and analyzed. Data was statistically analyzed by independent t-test and One-way ANOVA tests with a 0.05 significance level. [Results] Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and HOMA-IR in the HF group were significantly higher, as compared with other groups (p <.05). Protein levels of insulin receptor subunit-1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, and p-Akt were significantly higher in the HFT, HFND, and HFNDT groups, as compared with HF group. In addition, the protein levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 were significantly decreased by exercise and dietary change (p <.05). However, mTORC2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were significantly increased (p <.05). [Conclusion] In summary, despite the negative impact of continuous high fat intake, regular exercise and dietary change showed a positive effect on insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels. PMID:27508151

  16. Field trial on glucose-induced insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein and Estonian Red dairy cows in two herds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to insulin is considered to be one of the factors controlling lipid metabolism post partum. The objective of this study was to compare glucose-induced blood insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein (EH, n = 14) and Estonian Red (ER, n = 14) cows. Methods The study was carried out using the glucose tolerance test (GTT) performed at 31 ± 1.9 days post partum during negative energy balance. Blood samples were obtained at -15, -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min relative to infusion of 0.15 g/kg BW glucose and analysed for glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Applying the MIXED Procedure with the SAS System the basal concentration of cholesterol, and basal concentration and concentrations at post-infusion time points for other metabolites, area under the curve (AUC) for glucose and insulin, clearance rate (CR) for glucose, and maximum increase from basal concentration for glucose and insulin were compared between breeds. Results There was a breed effect on blood NEFA (P < 0.05) and a time effect on all metabolites concentration (P < 0.01). The following differences were observed in EH compared to ER: lower blood insulin concentration 5 min after glucose infusion (P < 0.05), higher glucose concentration 20 (P < 0.01) and 30 min (P < 0.05) after infusion, and higher NEFA concentration before (P < 0.01) and 5 min after infusion (P < 0.05). Blood TG concentration in ER remained stable, while in EH there was a decrease from the basal level to the 40th min nadir (P < 0.01), followed by an increase to the 60th min postinfusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion Our results imply that glucose-induced changes in insulin concentration and metabolite responses to insulin differ between EH and ER dairy cows. PMID:20089161

  17. Chronic caffeine intake reverses age-induced insulin resistance in the rat: effect on skeletal muscle Glut4 transporters and AMPK activity.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Maria P; Ribeiro, Maria J; Sacramento, Joana F; Conde, Sílvia V

    2013-10-01

    The role of caffeine consumption on insulin action is still under debate. The hypothesis that chronic caffeine intake reverses aging-induced insulin resistance in the rat was tested in this work. The mechanism by which caffeine restores insulin sensitivity was also investigated. Six groups of rats were used: 3 months old (3 M), 3 months old caffeine-treated (3MCaf), 12 months old (12 M), 12 months old caffeine-treated (12MCaf), 24 months old (24 M), and 24 months old caffeine-treated (24MCaf). Caffeine was administered in drinking water (1 g/l) during 15 days. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by means of the insulin tolerance test. Blood pressure, body weight, visceral and total fat, fasting glycemia and insulinemia, plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), cortisol, nitric oxide, and catecholamines were monitored. Skeletal muscle Glut4 and 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein expression and activity were also assessed. Aged rats exhibited diminished insulin sensitivity accompanied by hyperinsulinemia and normoglycemia, increased visceral and total fat, decreased TAC and plasma catecholamines, and also decreased skeletal muscle Glut4 and AMPK protein expression. Chronic caffeine intake restored insulin sensitivity and regularized circulating insulin and NEFA in both aging models. Caffeine neither modified skeletal muscle AMPK expression nor activity in aged rats; however, it decreased visceral and total fat in 12 M rats and it restored skeletal muscle Glut4 expression to control values in 24 M rats. We concluded that chronic caffeine intake reverses aging-induced insulin resistance in rats by decreasing NEFA production and also by increasing Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle.

  18. Ghrelin receptor regulates HFCS-induced adipose inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is the most commonly used sweetener in the United States. Some studies show that HFCS consumption correlates with obesity and insulin resistance, while other studies are in disagreement. Owing to conflicting and insufficient scientific evidence, the safety of HFCS con...

  19. Insulin-like growth factor I interfaces with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated synaptic plasticity to modulate aspects of exercise-induced cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Vaynman, S; Akhavan, M; Ying, Z; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2006-07-01

    The ability of exercise to benefit neuronal and cognitive plasticity is well recognized. This study reveals that the effects of exercise on brain neuronal and cognitive plasticity are in part modulated by a central source of insulin-like growth factor-I. Exercise selectively increased insulin-like growth factor-I expression without affecting insulin-like growth factor-II expression in the rat hippocampus. To determine the role that insulin-like growth factor-I holds in mediating exercise-induced neuronal and cognitive enhancement, a specific antibody against the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor was used to block the action of insulin-like growth factor-I in the hippocampus during a 5-day voluntary exercise period. A two-trial-per-day Morris water maze was performed for five consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial 2 days later. Blocking hippocampal insulin-like growth factor-I receptors did not significantly attenuate the ability of exercise to enhance learning acquisition, but abolished the effect of exercise on augmenting recall. Blocking the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor significantly reversed the exercise-induced increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein, suggesting that the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I may be partially accomplished by modulating the precursor to the mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor. A molecular analysis revealed that exercise significantly elevated proteins downstream to brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation important for synaptic function, i.e. synapsin I, and signal transduction cascades associated with memory processes, i.e. phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase II. Blocking the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor abolished these exercise-induced increases. Our results illustrate a possible mechanism by which insulin-like growth factor-I interfaces

  20. High glucose induces suppression of insulin signalling and apoptosis via upregulation of endogenous IL-1beta and suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 in mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Venieratos, Panagiotis D; Drossopoulou, Garyfalia I; Kapodistria, Katerina D; Tsilibary, Effie C; Kitsiou, Paraskevi V

    2010-05-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and inflammatory cytokines disrupt and/or attenuate signal transduction pathways that promote normal beta-cell survival, leading to the destruction of endocrine pancreas in type 2 diabetes. There is convincing evidence that autocrine insulin signalling exerts protective anti-apoptotic effects on beta cells. Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) were induced by several cytokines and inhibit insulin-initiated signal transduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high glucose can influence endogenous interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and SOCS expression thus affecting insulin signalling and survival in insulin-producing mouse pancreatic beta cells (betaTC-6). Results showed that prolonged exposure of betaTC-6 cells to increased glucose concentrations resulted in significant inhibition of insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), and insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) as well as PI3-kinase activation. These changes were accompanied by impaired activation of the anti-apoptotic signalling protein Akt and annulment of Akt-mediated suppression of the Forkhead family of transcription factors (FoxO) activation. Glucose-induced attenuation of IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling was associated with increased IL-1beta expression. Enhanced endogenous IL-1beta specifically induced mRNA and protein expression of SOCS-1 in betaTC-6 cells. Inhibition of SOCS-1 expression by SOCS-1-specific small interfering RNA restored IRS-2/PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation suppressed by high glucose. The upregulation of endogenous cytokine signalling and FoxO activation were accompanied by enhanced caspase-3 activation and increased susceptibility of cells to apoptosis. These results indicated that glucose-induced endogenous IL-1beta expression increased betaTC-6 cells apoptosis by inhibiting, at least in part, IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling through SOCS-1 upregulation.

  1. Modulating serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT) expression and activity unveils a crucial role in lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Maria L; Coghlan, Matthew; Hundal, Harinder S

    2009-02-01

    Saturated fatty acids, such as palmitate, promote accumulation of ceramide, which impairs activation and signalling of PKB (protein kinase B; also known as Akt) to important end points such as glucose transport. SPT (serine palmitoyl transferase) is a key enzyme regulating ceramide synthesis from palmitate and represents a potential molecular target in curbing lipid-induced insulin resistance. In the present study we explore the effects of palmitate upon insulin action in L6 muscle cells in which SPT expression/activity has been decreased by shRNA (small-hairpin RNA) or sustained incubation with myriocin, an SPT inhibitor. Incubation of L6 myotubes with palmitate (for 16 h) increases intramyocellular ceramide and reduces insulin-stimulated PKB activation and glucose uptake. PKB inhibition was not associated with impaired IRS (insulin receptor substrate) signalling and was ameliorated by short-term treatment with myriocin. Silencing SPT expression (approximately 90%) by shRNA or chronic cell incubation with myriocin (for 7 days) markedly suppressed SPT activity and palmitate-driven ceramide synthesis; however, challenging these muscle cells with palmitate still inhibited the hormonal activation of PKB. This inhibition was associated with reduced IRS1/p85-PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) coupling that arises from diverting palmitate towards greater DAG (diacylglycerol) synthesis, which elevates IRS1 serine phosphorylation via activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs (protein kinase Cs). Treatment of SPT-shRNA cells or those treated chronically with myriocin with PKC inhibitors antagonized palmitate-induced loss in insulin signalling. The findings of the present study indicate that SPT plays a crucial role in desensitizing muscle cells to insulin in response to incubation with palmitate. While short-term inhibition of SPT ameliorates palmitate/ceramide-induced insulin resistance, sustained loss/reduction in SPT expression/activity promotes greater partitioning of palmitate

  2. VAMP-2 and cellubrevin are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and are essential for Ca(2+)-but not for GTP gamma S-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Regazzi, R; Wollheim, C B; Lang, J; Theler, J M; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Sadoul, K; Weller, U; Palmer, M; Thorens, B

    1995-01-01

    VAMP proteins are important components of the machinery controlling docking and/or fusion of secretory vesicles with their target membrane. We investigated the expression of VAMP proteins in pancreatic beta-cells and their implication in the exocytosis of insulin. cDNA cloning revealed that VAMP-2 and cellubrevin, but not VAMP-1, are expressed in rat pancreatic islets and that their sequence is identical to that isolated from rat brain. Pancreatic beta-cells contain secretory granules that store and secrete insulin as well as synaptic-like microvesicles carrying gamma-aminobutyric acid. After subcellular fractionation on continuous sucrose gradients, VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were found to be associated with both types of secretory vesicle. The association of VAMP-2 with insulin-containing granules was confirmed by confocal microscopy of primary cultures of rat pancreatic beta-cells. Pretreatment of streptolysin-O permeabilized insulin-secreting cells with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins selectively cleaved VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and abolished Ca(2+)-induced insulin release (IC50 approximately 15 nM). By contrast, the pretreatment with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins did not prevent GTP gamma S-stimulated insulin secretion. Taken together, our results show that pancreatic beta-cells express VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and that one or both of these proteins selectively control Ca(2+)-mediated insulin secretion. Images PMID:7796801

  3. The influence of exercise-induced oxidative stress on binding and degradation of 125I-insulin by the receptors on erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, L; Karolkiewicz, J; Deskur, E; Rychlewski, T; Konys, L; Stankiewicz, K

    1998-09-01

    In the present work we investigated the influence of oxidative stress induced by strenuous exercise on the affinity of a specific insulin receptors on human erythrocytes. 13 male members of the national basketball staff performed a maximal treadmill exercise test. In the blood samples collected before and directly after the test acid-base equilibrium parameters, lactic acid concentrations, glucose and insulin serum levels as well as 125I-insulin binding and degradation by receptor on erythrocytes were measured. As markers of oxidative stress, plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels (TBARS) and red blood cells glutathione content (GSH) were determined. After the exercise test TBARS levels increased significantly and GSH concentrations decreased indicating that oxidative stress occurred. Binding of 125I-insulin to the receptors on erythrocytes decreased significantly during the test, while there was only insignificant reduction in 125I-insulin degradation. Correlation analysis and multiple linear regression revealed that changes in insulin degradation by receptors on erythrocytes during exhaustive exercise are determined by oxidative stress, probably via oxidation of sulfhydryl groups of certain enzymes. The affinity of receptors for insulin seems to depend mainly on glucose concentrations.

  4. MyomiRs as Markers of Insulin Resistance and Decreased Myogenesis in Skeletal Muscle of Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Flávia de Toledo; de Mendonça, Mariana; Martins, Amanda Roque; Gindro, Ana Flávia; Cogliati, Bruno; Curi, Rui; Rodrigues, Alice Cristina

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) feeding causes insulin resistance (IR) in skeletal muscle of mice, which affects skeletal muscle metabolism and function. The involvement of muscle-specific microRNAs in the evolution of skeletal muscle IR during 4, 8, and 12 weeks in HFD-induced obese mice was investigated. After 4 weeks in HFD, mice were obese, hyperglycemic, and hyperinsulinemic; however, their muscles were responsive to insulin stimuli. Expressions of MyomiRs (miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206) measured in soleus muscles were not different from those found in control mice. After 8 weeks of HFD feeding, glucose uptake was lower in skeletal muscle from obese mice compared to control mice, and we observed a significant decrease in miR-1a in soleus muscle when compared to HFD for 4 weeks. miR-1a expression continued to decay within time. After 12 weeks of HFD, miR-133a expression was upregulated when compared to the control group. Expression of miR-1a was negatively correlated with glycemia and positively correlated with the constant rate of plasma glucose disappearance. Pioglitazone treatment could not reverse decreases of miR-1a levels induced by HFD. Targets of myomiRs involved in insulin-growth factor (IGF)-1 pathway, such as Igf-1, Irs-1, Rheb, and follistatin, were reduced after 12 weeks in HFD and Mtor increased, when compared to the control or HFD for 4 or 8 weeks. These findings suggest for the first time that miR-1 may be a marker of the development of IR in skeletal muscle. Evidence was also presented that impairment in myomiRs expression contributes to decreased myogenesis and skeletal muscle growth reported in diabetes. PMID:27445979

  5. 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorate palmitate-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in mouse C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yin; Wang, John; Lin, Yi-Chin; Li, Chien-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Liu, Te-Chung; Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Liu, Kai-Li

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major site of insulin action. Intramuscular lipid accumulation results in inflammation, which has a strong correlation with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on palmitic acid (PA)-induced inflammatory responses and IR in C2C12 myotubes. Our data demonstrated that these three test 18-carbon PUFAs can inhibit PA-induced interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and IR as evidenced by increases in phosphorylated AKT and the 160-kD AKT substrate, mRNA and plasma membrane protein expression of glucose transporter 4, and glucose uptake. Moreover, the 18-carbon PUFAs blocked the effects of PA on activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Of note, supplementation with GLA-rich borage oil decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and hindered the activation of MAPKs, PKC-θ and NF-κB in the skeletal muscles of diabetic mice. The 18-carbon PUFAs did not reverse PA-induced inflammation or IR in C2C12 myotubes transfected with a constitutively active mutant IκB kinase-β plasmid, which suggests the importance of the inhibition of NF-κB activation by the 18-carbon PUFAs. Moreover, blockade of AMPK activation by short hairpin RNA annulled the inhibitory effects of the 18-carbon PUFAs on PA-induced IR but not inflammation. Our findings suggest that the 18-carbon PUFAs may be useful in the management of PA-induced inflammation and IR in myotubes. PMID:25687616

  6. Albert Renold Memorial Lecture: Molecular Background of Nutritionally Induced Insulin Resistance Leading to Type 2 Diabetes – From Animal Models to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shafrir, Eleazar

    2001-01-01

    Albert Renold strived to gain insight into the abnormalities of human diabetes by defining the pathophysiology of the disease peculiar to a given animal. He investigated the Israeli desert-derived spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus), which became obese on fat-rich seed diet. After a few months hyperplasia and hypertrophy of β-cells occurred leading to a sudden rupture, insulin loss and ketosis. Spiny mice were low insulin responders, which is probably a characteristic of certain desert animals, protecting against insulin oversecretion when placed on an abundant diet. We have compared the response to overstimulation of several mutant diabetic species and nutritionally induced nonmutant animals when placed on affluent diet. Some endowed with resilient β-cells sustain long-lasting oversecretion, compensating for the insulin resistance, without lapsing into overt diabetes. Some with labile beta cells exhibit apoptosis and lose their capacity of coping with insulin resistance after a relatively short period. The wide spectrum of response to insulin resistance among different diabetes prone species seems to represent the varying response of human beta cells among the populations. In search for the molecular background of insulin resistance resulting from overnutrition we have studied the Israeli desert gerbil Psammomys obesus (sand rat), which progresses through hyperinsulinemia, followed by hyperglycemia and irreversible beta cell loss. Insulin resistance was found to be the outcome of reduced activation of muscle insulin receptor tyrosine kinase by insulin, in association with diminished GLUT4 protein and DNA content and overexpression of PKC isoenzymes, notably of PKCε. This overexpression and translocation to the membrane was discernible even prior to hyperinsulinemia and may reflect the propensity to diabetes in nondiabetic species and represent a marker for preventive action. By promoting the phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues on certain proteins of the

  7. Ameliorative effect of vanadyl(IV)-ascorbate complex on high-fat high-sucrose diet-induced hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Xu, Jie; Guo, Yongli; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2015-10-01

    There is mounting evidence demonstrating causative links between hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance, the core pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using a combinational approach, we synthesized a vanadium-antioxidant (i.e., l-ascorbic acid) complex and examined its effect on insulin resistance and oxidative stress. This study was designed to examine whether vanadyl(IV)-ascorbate complex (VOAsc) would reduce oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in high-fat high-sucrose diet (HFSD)-induced type 2 diabetes in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFSD for 12 weeks to induce insulin resistance, rendering them diabetic. Diabetic mice were treated with rosiglitazone, sodium l-ascorbate, or VOAsc. At the end of treatment, fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index, and serum adipocytokine levels were measured. Serum levels of nitric oxide (NO) parameters were also determined. The liver was isolated and used for determination of malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, and catalase levels, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. VOAsc groups exhibited significant reductions in serum adipocytokine and NO levels, and oxidative stress parameters compared to the corresponding values in the untreated diabetic mice. The results indicated that VOAsc is non-toxic. In conclusion, we identified VOAsc as a potentially effective adjunct therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Urotensin II-induced insulin resistance is mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the effects of urotensin II (UII) on hepatic insulin resistance in HepG2 cells and the potential mechanisms involved. METHODS: Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were cultured with or without exogenous UII for 24 h, in the presence or absence of 100 nmol/L insulin for the last 30 min. Glucose levels were detected by the glucose-oxidase method and glycogen synthesis was analyzed by glycogen colorimetric/fluorometric assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected with a multimode reader using a 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. The protein expression and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), insulin signal essential molecules such as insulin receptor substrate -1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and glucose transporter-2 (Glut 2), and NADPH oxidase subunits such as gp91phox, p67phox, p47phox, p40phox, and p22phox were evaluated by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure to 100 nmol/L UII reduced the insulin-induced glucose consumption (P < 0.05) and glycogen content (P < 0.01) in HepG2 cells compared with cells without UII. UII also abolished insulin-stimulated protein expression (P < 0.01) and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.05), associated with down-regulation of Akt (P < 0.05) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05) phosphorylation levels, and the expression of Glut 2 (P < 0.001), indicating an insulin-resistance state in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, UII enhanced the phosphorylation of JNK (P < 0.05), while the activity of JNK, insulin signaling, such as total protein of IRS-1 (P < 0.001), phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.001) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05), and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.001) could be reversed by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Besides, UII markedly improved ROS generation (P < 0.05) and NADPH oxidase subunit expression (P < 0.05). However, the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could decrease UII-induced ROS production (P < 0.05), JNK phosphorylation (P < 0

  9. Cinnamon intake alleviates the combined effects of dietary-induced insulin resistance and acute stress on brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Poulet, Laurent; Anderson, Richard A; Roussel, Anne-Marie; Canini, Frédéric; Batandier, Cécile

    2016-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), which is a leading cause of the metabolic syndrome, results in early brain function alterations which may alter brain mitochondrial functioning. Previously, we demonstrated that rats fed a control diet and submitted to an acute restraint stress exhibited a delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of dietary and emotional stressors as found in western way of life. We studied, in rats submitted or not to an acute stress, the effects of diet-induced IR on brain mitochondria, using a high fat/high fructose diet (HF(2)), as an IR inducer, with addition or not of cinnamon as an insulin sensitizer. We measured Ca(2+) retention capacity, respiration, ROS production, enzymatic activities and cell signaling activation. Under stress, HF(2) diet dramatically decreased the amount of Ca(2+) required to open the mPTP (13%) suggesting an adverse effect on mitochondrial survival. Cinnamon added to the diet corrected this negative effect and resulted in a partial recovery (30%). The effects related to cinnamon addition to the diet could be due to its antioxidant properties or to the observed modulation of PI3K-AKT-GSK3β and MAPK-P38 pathways or to a combination of both. These data suggest a protective effect of cinnamon on brain mitochondria against the negative impact of an HF(2) diet. Cinnamon could be beneficial to counteract deleterious dietary effects in stressed conditions. PMID:26878796

  10. Proinsulin-producing, hyperglycemia-induced adipose tissue macrophages underlie insulin resistance in high fat-fed diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Buras, Eric Dale; Yang, Lina; Saha, Pradip; Kim, Jongoh; Mehta, Pooja; Yang, Yisheng; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Kojima, Hideto; Chen, Wenhao; Smith, C Wayne; Chan, Lawrence

    2015-08-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of obese type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has been shown to lead to ATM accumulation in rodents; however, the impact of hyperglycemia on ATM dynamics in HFD-fed type 2 diabetic models has not been studied. We previously showed that hyperglycemia induces the appearance of proinsulin (PI)-producing proinflammatory bone marrow (BM)-derived cells (PI-BMDCs) in rodents. We fed a 60% HFD to C57BL6/J mice to produce an obese type 2 diabetes model. Absent in chow-fed animals, PI-BMDCs account for 60% of the ATMs in the type 2 diabetic mice. The PI-ATM subset expresses TNF-α and other inflammatory markers, and is highly enriched within crownlike structures (CLSs). We found that amelioration of hyperglycemia by different hypoglycemic agents forestalled PI-producing ATM accumulation and adipose inflammation in these animals. We developed a diphtheria toxin receptor-based strategy to selectively ablate PI-BMDCs among ATMs. Application of the maneuver in HFD-fed type 2 diabetic mice was found to lead to near total disappearance of complex CLSs and reversal of insulin resistance and hepatosteatosis in these animals. In sum, we have identified a novel ATM subset in type 2 diabetic rodents that underlies systemic insulin resistance. PMID:25953849

  11. Mitigation of Insulin Resistance by Mangiferin in a Rat Model of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome Is Associated with Modulation of CD36 Redistribution in the Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Pan, Yongquan; Chonan, Ritsu; Batey, Robert; Rong, Xianglu; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is one of the prominent active components responsible for the antidiabetic property of many traditional herbs, but its underlying mechanisms of action remain unclear. CD36 in skeletal muscle is known to contribute to the etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake. This study investigated the effect of mangiferin on insulin resistance. The results showed that treatment of Wistar-Kyoto rats with mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) for 7 weeks inhibited chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in plasma insulin concentrations at the baseline and during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. It also suppressed the increases in fasted plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index. Mechanistically, mangiferin neither affected intakes of fructose and chow, and the increase in epididymal and perirenal fat, nor attenuated fructose-induced hypertension. In contrast, mangiferin attenuated fructose-induced acceleration of plasma NEFA clearance during OGTT, and tended to decrease excessive triglyceride accumulation in gastrocnemius. Immunofluorescence staining and subsequent rating of CD36-expressing fibers in gastrocnemius revealed that mangiferin restored fructose-stimulated sarcolemmal CD36 overexpression and decreased intracellular CD36 distribution. In addition, the effects of mangiferin on the parameters associated with insulin resistance and abnormal fatty acid metabolism were absent in the spontaneously hypertensive rats carrying numerous nonfunctional mutations in the CD36 gene. Thus, these results suggest that mangiferin treatment mitigates insulin resistance in a rat model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome by modulating sarcolemmal and intracellular CD36 redistribution in the skeletal muscle.

  12. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  13. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1--insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 cascade regulates stress-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Elzi, David J; Lai, Yanlai; Song, Meihua; Hakala, Kevin; Weintraub, Susan T; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2012-07-24

    Cellular senescence is widely believed to play a key role in tumor suppression, but the molecular pathways that regulate senescence are only incompletely understood. By using a secretome proteomics approach, we identified insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as a secreted mediator of breast cancer senescence upon chemotherapeutic drug treatment. The senescence-inducing activity of IGFBP3 is inhibited by tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated proteolysis, which is counteracted by plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), another secreted mediator of senescence. We demonstrate that IGFBP3 is a critical downstream target of PAI-1-induced senescence. These results suggest a role for an extracellular cascade of secreted proteins in the regulation of cellular senescence.

  14. A novel insulin mimetic vanadium-flavonol complex: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation in STZ-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy

    2013-05-01

    Since 1985, when Heyliger et al., first demonstrated a serendipitous discovery that oral administration of 0.8 mg/ml of sodium orthovanadate in drinking water to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in normoglycemia, numerous extensive studies have been pursued on the anti-diabetic and insulinomimetic actions of vanadium. The acceptance of vanadium compounds as promising therapeutic antidiabetic agents has been slowed due to the concern for chronic toxicity associated with vanadium accumulation. In order to circumvent the toxic effects of vanadium, we have taken up a combinational approach wherein a novel vanadium-flavonol complex was synthesized, characterized and its toxic as well as insulin mimetic potential was evaluated in STZ-induced experimental diabetes in rats. The results indicate that the complex is non-toxic and possess anti-diabetic activity.

  15. Insulin, insulin analogues and diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, Ernst; Kimmerle, Renate; Meyer-Schwickerath, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    Insulin is absolutely vital for living beings. It is not only involved in metabolism, but also in the regulation of growth factors, e.g. IGF-1. In this review we address the role insulin has in the natural evolution of diabetic retinopathy. On the one hand, chronic deficiency of insulin and IGF-1 at the retina is thought to cause capillary degeneration, with subsequent ischaemia. On the other hand, acute abundance of (exogenously administered) insulin and IGF-1 enhances ischaemia-induced VEGF expression. A critical ratio of tissue VEGF-susceptibility: VEGF-availability triggers vascular proliferation (i.e. of micro-aneurysms and/or abnormal vessels). The patent-protected insulin analogues Lispro, Glulisine, Aspart, Glargine and Detemir are artificial insulin derivatives with altered biological responses compared to natural insulin (e.g. divergent insulin and /or IGF-1 receptor-binding characteristics, signalling patterns, and mitogenicity). Their safety profiles concerning diabetic retinopathy remain to be established by randomised controlled trials. Anecdotal reports and circumstantial evidence suggest that Lispro and Glargine might worsen diabetic retinopathy.

  16. Fagopyrum tataricum (buckwheat) improved high-glucose-induced insulin resistance in mouse hepatocytes and diabetes in fructose-rich diet-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Chen; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Shen, Siou-Ru; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Wu, She-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Fagopyrum tataricum (buckwheat) is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Taiwan. This study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and anti-insulin resistance effects of 75% ethanol extracts of buckwheat (EEB) in FL83B hepatocytes by high-glucose (33 mM) induction and in C57BL/6 mice by fructose-rich diet (FRD; 60%) induction. The active compounds of EEB (100 μg/mL; 50 mg/kg bw), quercetin (6 μg/mL; 3 mg/kg bw), and rutin (23 μg/mL; 11.5 mg/kg bw) were also employed to treat FL83B hepatocytes and animal. Results indicated that EEB, rutin, and quercetin + rutin significantly improved 2-NBDG uptake via promoting Akt phosphorylation and preventing PPARγ degradation caused by high-glucose induction for 48 h in FL83B hepatocytes. We also found that EEB could elevate hepatic antioxidant enzymes activities to attenuate insulin resistance as well as its antioxidation caused by rutin and quercetin. Finally, EEB also inhibited increases in blood glucose and insulin levels of C57BL/6 mice induced by FRD.

  17. Increase in visceral fat per se does not induce insulin resistance in the canine model

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana V.B.; Woolcott, Orison O.; Iyer, Malini S.; Kabir, Morvarid; Ionut, Viorica; Stefanovski, Darko; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Szczepaniak, Lidia S.; Szczepaniak, Edward W.; Asare-Bediako, Isaac; Paszkiewicz, Rebecca L.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Kim, Stella P.; Kirkman, Erlinda L.; Rios, Hernan C.; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Wu, Qiang; Ader, Marilyn; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a selective increase of visceral adipose tissue content will result in insulin resistance. Design and Methods Sympathetic denervation of the omental fat was performed under general inhalant anesthesia by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine in the omental fat of lean mongrel dogs (n=11). In the conscious animal, whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed by the minimal model (SI) and the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (SICLAMP). Changes in abdominal fat were monitored by magnetic resonance. All assessments were determined before (Wk0) and 2 weeks (Wk2) after denervation. Data are medians (upper and lower interquartile). Results Denervation of omental fat resulted in increased percentage (and content) of visceral fat [Wk0: 10.2% (8.5−11.4); Wk2: 12.4% (10.4−13.6); P<0.01]. Abdominal subcutaneous fat remained unchanged. However, we found no changes in SI [Wk0: 4.7 (mU/L)−1•min−1 (3.1−8.8); Wk2: 5.3 (mU/L)−1•min−1 (4.5−7.2); P=0.59] or SICLAMP [Wk0: 42.0 ×10.4 dL•kg−1•min−1•(mU/L)−1 (41.0−51.0); Wk2: 40.0 ×10.4 dL•kg−1•min−1•(mU/L)−1 (34.0−52.0); P=0.67]. Conclusions Despite a selective increase in visceral adiposity in dogs, insulin sensitivityin vivo does not change, which argues against the concept that accumulation of visceral adipose tissue contributes to insulin resistance. PMID:25322680

  18. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  19. Caloric Restriction Induces Changes in Insulin and Body Weight Measurements That Are Inversely Associated with Subsequent Weight Regain

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Monica H. T.; Holst, Claus; Astrup, Arne; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Jebb, Susan A.; Kafatos, Anthony; Kunesova, Marie; Larsen, Thomas M.; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.; van Baak, Marleen A.; Saris, Wim H. M.; McNicholas, Paul D.; Mutch, David M.; DiOGenes, on behalf of

    2012-01-01

    Background Successful weight maintenance following weight loss is challenging for many people. Identifying predictors of longer-term success will help target clinical resources more effectively. To date, focus has been predominantly on the identification of predictors of weight loss. The goal of the current study was to determine if changes in anthropometric and clinical parameters during acute weight loss are associated with subsequent weight regain. Methodology The study consisted of an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) followed by a 6-month weight maintenance phase. Anthropometric and clinical parameters were analyzed before and after the LCD in the 285 participants (112 men, 173 women) who regained weight during the weight maintenance phase. Mixed model ANOVA, Spearman correlation, and linear regression were used to study the relationships between clinical measurements and weight regain. Principal Findings Gender differences were observed for body weight and several clinical parameters at both baseline and during the LCD-induced weight loss phase. LCD-induced changes in BMI (Spearman’s ρ = 0.22, p = 0.0002) were inversely associated with weight regain in both men and women. LCD-induced changes in fasting insulin (ρ = 0.18, p = 0.0043) and HOMA-IR (ρ = 0.19, p = 0.0023) were also associated independently with weight regain in both genders. The aforementioned associations remained statistically significant in regression models taking account of variables known to independently influence body weight. Conclusions/Significance LCD-induced changes in BMI, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR are inversely associated with weight regain in the 6-month period following weight loss. PMID:22905179

  20. Insulin Resistance Prevents AMPK-induced Tau Dephosphorylation through Akt-mediated Increase in AMPKSer-485 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bhumsoo; Figueroa-Romero, Claudia; Pacut, Crystal; Backus, Carey; Feldman, Eva L

    2015-07-31

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance (IR) is the central feature of MetS. Recent studies suggest that MetS is a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved fuel-sensing enzyme and a key player in regulating energy metabolism. In this report, we examined the role of IR on the regulation of AMPK phosphorylation and AMPK-mediated Tau phosphorylation. We found that AMPK(Ser-485), but not AMPK(Thr-172), phosphorylation is increased in the cortex of db/db and high fat diet-fed obese mice, two mouse models of IR. In vitro, treatment of human cortical stem cell line (HK-5320) and primary mouse embryonic cortical neurons with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), induced AMPK phosphorylation at both Thr-172 and Ser-485. AMPK activation also triggered Tau dephosphorylation. When IR was mimicked in vitro by chronically treating the cells with insulin, AICAR specifically induced AMPK(Ser-485), but not AMPK(Thr-172), hyperphosphorylation whereas AICAR-induced Tau dephosphorylation was inhibited. IR also resulted in the overactivation of Akt by AICAR treatment; however, preventing Akt overactivation during IR prevented AMPK(Ser-485) hyperphosphorylation and restored AMPK-mediated Tau dephosphorylation. Transfection of AMPK(S485A) mutant caused similar results. Therefore, our results suggest the following mechanism for the adverse effect of IR on AD pathology: IR → chronic overactivation of Akt → AMPK(Ser-485) hyperphosphorylation → inhibition of AMPK-mediated Tau dephosphorylation. Together, our results show for the first time a possible contribution of IR-induced AMPK(Ser-485) phosphorylation to the increased risk of AD in obesity and diabetes.

  1. Estimation of glucose utilization in a type 2 diabetes mellitus patient on insulin analogs with tumor hypoglycemia induced by IGF-II.

    PubMed

    Chode, Suresh; Albert, Stewart G; Shoemaker, James D; Green, Aileen L

    2016-02-01

    We present a 38-year-old male patient with insulin requiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) who had fasting hypoglycemia caused by a non-pancreatic-islet-cell mesenchymal tumor producing IGF-II. The evaluation was confounded in that there was pre-existing DM being treated with insulin analogs. Insulin levels were assessed with an immunoassay with cross reactivity with the insulin analogs. An 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scan localized the 19.7×18.0×17.8cm retroperitoneal mass. A 3.25kg tumor was resected. Post-operatively insulin treatment was resumed and circulating IGF-II levels returned to normal. The maximum standardized uptake values of FDG (SUVmax) along with a steady state glucose infusion of 17.5g/h were used to determine the components of glucose utilization due to IGF-II induced muscle glucose uptake (utilization, 62%) whereas the tumor itself was responsible for approximately 22% of measurable glucose uptake. Whereas tumor induced hypoglycemia has been ascribed to preferential glucose utilization by the tumor, the predominant hypoglycemic effect was due to hormonal IGF-II induced total body glucose uptake. PMID:26774399

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): A saturated fatty acid-induced myokine with insulin-desensitizing properties in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ordelheide, Anna-Maria; Gommer, Nadja; Böhm, Anja; Hermann, Carina; Thielker, Inga; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) are important metabolic signals that acutely enhance fatty acid oxidation, thermogenesis, energy expenditure, and insulin secretion. However, if chronically elevated, they provoke inflammation, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure. Moreover, FFAs act via multiple signaling pathways as very potent regulators of gene expression. In human skeletal muscle cells differentiated in vitro (myotubes), we have shown in previous studies that the expression of CSF3, the gene encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), is markedly induced upon FFA treatment and exercise. Methods and results We now report that CSF3 is induced in human myotubes by saturated, but not unsaturated, FFAs via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent and -independent pathways including activation of Rel-A, AP-1, C/EBPα, Src, and stress kinases. Furthermore, we show that human adipocytes and myotubes treated with G-CSF become insulin-resistant. In line with this, a functional polymorphism in the CSF3 gene affects adipose tissue- and whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in human subjects with elevated plasma FFA concentrations. Conclusion G-CSF emerges as a new player in FFA-induced insulin resistance and thus may be of interest as a target for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27069870

  3. Portal Vein Glucose Sensors Do Not Play a Major Role in Modulating Physiological Responses to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paolo; Porcellati, Francesca; Lucidi, Paola; Busciantella Ricci, Natalia; Candeloro, Paola; Cioli, Patrizia; Santeusanio, Fausto; Bolli, Geremia B.; Fanelli, Carmine G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Experimental data from animal studies indicate that portal vein glucose sensors play a key role in the responses to slow-fall hypoglycemia. However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to examine in humans the potential role of portal vein glucose sensors in physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia mimicking the slow fall of insulin-treated diabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Ten nondiabetic subjects were studied on two different occasions during intravenous insulin (2 mU · kg−1 · min−1) plus variable glucose for 160 minutes. In both studies, after 60 min of normal plasma glucose concentrations, hypoglycemia (47 mg/dl) was induced slowly (60 min) and maintained for 60 min. Hypoglycemia was preceded by the ingestion of either oral placebo or glucose (28 g) given at 30 min. RESULTS—Plasma glucose and insulin were not different with either placebo or glucose (P > 0.2). Similarly, counterregulatory hormones, substrates, and symptoms were not different with either placebo or glucose. The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo. CONCLUSIONS—In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia. PMID:18852332

  4. Sunflower Oil Supplementation Has Proinflammatory Effects and Does Not Reverse Insulin Resistance in Obesity Induced by High-Fat Diet in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Laureane Nunes; Martins, Amanda Roque; Neto, José César Rosa; do Amaral, Cátia Lira; Crisma, Amanda Rabello; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; de Lima Júnior, Edson Alves; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Curi, Rui

    2012-01-01

    High consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as sunflower oil has been associated to beneficial effects in plasma lipid profile, but its role on inflammation and insulin resistance is not fully elucidated yet. We evaluated the effect of sunflower oil supplementation on inflammatory state and insulin resistance condition in HFD-induced obese mice. C57BL/6 male mice (8 weeks) were divided in four groups: (a) control diet (CD), (b) HFD, (c) CD supplemented with n-6 (CD + n-6), and (d) HFD supplemented with n-6 (HFD + n-6). CD + n-6 and HFD + n-6 were supplemented with sunflower oil by oral gavage at 2 g/Kg of body weight, three times per week. CD and HFD were supplemented with water instead at the same dose. HFD induced whole and muscle-specific insulin resistance associated with increased inflammatory markers in insulin-sensitive tissues and macrophage cells. Sunflower oil supplementation was not efficient in preventing or reducing these parameters. In addition, the supplementation increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages and tissues. Lipid profile, on the other hand, was improved with the sunflower oil supplementation in animals fed HFD. In conclusion, sunflower oil supplementation improves lipid profile, but it does not prevent or attenuate insulin resistance and inflammation induced by HFD in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:22988427

  5. Omega-3 fatty acids attenuate constitutive and insulin-induced CD36 expression through a suppression of PPAR α/γ activity in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Salerni, Sara; Schiavone, Deborah; Glatz, Jan F; Geng, Yong-Jian; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2011-09-01

    Microvascular dysfunction occurs in insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinaemia. Enhanced uptake of free fatty acids (FFA) and oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) may lead to oxidative stress and microvascular dysfunction interacting with CD36, a PPARα/γ-regulated scavenger receptor and long-chain FFA transporter. We investigated CD36 expression and CD36-mediated oxLDL uptake before and after insulin treatment in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs), ± different types of fatty acids (FA), including palmitic, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Insulin (10(-8) and 10(-7) M) time-dependently increased DiI-oxLDL uptake and CD36 surface expression (by 30 ± 13%, p<0.05 vs. untreated control after 24 hours incubation), as assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry, an effect that was potentiated by the PI3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin and reverted by the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 and the PPARα/γ antagonist GW9662. A ≥ 24 hour exposure to 50 μM DHA or EPA, but not other FA, blunted both the constitutive (by 23 ± 3% and 29 ± 2%, respectively, p<0.05 for both) and insulin-induced CD36 expressions (by 45 ± 27 % and 12 ± 3 %, respectively, p<0.05 for both), along with insulin-induced uptake of DiI-oxLDL and the downregulation of phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (P-eNOS). At gel shift assays, DHA reverted insulin-induced basal and oxLDL-stimulated transactivation of PPRE and DNA binding of PPARα/γ and NF-κB. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids blunt the increased CD36 expression and activity promoted by high concentrations of insulin. Such mechanisms may be the basis for the use of omega-3 fatty acids in diabetic microvasculopathy. PMID:21727988

  6. Effect of troxerutin on insulin signaling molecules in the gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Sathish; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2014-10-01

    Troxerutin is a trihydroxyethylated derivative of the flavonoid, rutin. It has been reported to possess the hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperlipidemic activities. Troxerutin treatment reduced the blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels in high-cholesterol-induced insulin-resistant mice and in type-2 diabetic patients. However, the mechanism by which it exhibits antidiabetic property was unknown. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effect of troxerutin on insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscle of high fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic rats. Wistar male albino rats were selected and divided into five groups. Group I: Control. Group II: High fat and sucrose-induced type-2 diabetic rats. Group III: Type-2 diabetic rats treated with troxerutin (150 mg/kg body weight/day orally). Group IV: Type-2 diabetic rats treated with metformin (50 mg/kg body weight/day orally). Group V: Normal rats treated with troxerutin (150 mg/kg body weight/day orally). After 30 days of treatment, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, serum lipid profile, and the levels of insulin signaling molecules, glycogen, glucose uptake, and oxidation in gastrocnemius muscle were assessed. Diabetic rats showed impairment in insulin signaling molecules (IR, p-IRS-1(Tyr632), p-Akt(Ser473), β-arrestin-2, c-Src, p-AS160(Thr642), and GLUT4 proteins), glycogen concentration, glucose uptake, and oxidation. Oral administration of troxerutin showed near normal levels of blood glucose, serum insulin, lipid profile, and insulin signaling molecules as well as GLUT4 proteins in type-2 diabetic rats. It is concluded from the present study that troxerutin may play a significant role in the management of type-2 diabetes mellitus, by improving the insulin signaling molecules and glucose utilization in the skeletal muscle.

  7. Muscle expression of a malonyl-CoA-insensitive carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 protects mice against high-fat/high-sucrose diet-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Vavrova, Eliska; Lenoir, Véronique; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Denis, Raphaël G; Castel, Julien; Esnous, Catherine; Dyck, Jason R B; Luquet, Serge; Metzger, Daniel; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Prip-Buus, Carina

    2016-09-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (mFAO) has been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1) is a key regulatory enzyme of mFAO whose activity is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, a lipogenic intermediate. Whereas increasing CPT1 activity in vitro has been shown to exert a protective effect against lipid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells, only a few studies have addressed this issue in vivo. We thus examined whether a direct modulation of muscle CPT1/malonyl-CoA partnership is detrimental or beneficial for insulin sensitivity in the context of diet-induced obesity. By using a Cre-LoxP recombination approach, we generated mice with skeletal muscle-specific and inducible expression of a mutated CPT1 form (CPT1mt) that is active but insensitive to malonyl-CoA inhibition. When fed control chow, homozygous CPT1mt transgenic (dbTg) mice exhibited decreased CPT1 sensitivity to malonyl-CoA inhibition in isolated muscle mitochondria, which was sufficient to substantially increase ex vivo muscle mFAO capacity and whole body fatty acid utilization in vivo. Moreover, dbTg mice were less prone to high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced insulin resistance and muscle lipotoxicity despite similar body weight gain, adiposity, and muscle malonyl-CoA content. Interestingly, these CPT1mt-protective effects in dbTg-HFHS mice were associated with preserved muscle insulin signaling, increased muscle glycogen content, and upregulation of key genes involved in muscle glucose metabolism. These beneficial effects of muscle CPT1mt expression suggest that a direct modulation of the malonyl-CoA/CPT1 partnership in skeletal muscle could represent a potential strategy to prevent obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27507552

  8. Microcystin-LR induces dysfunction of insulin secretion in rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells: Implications for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyan; Shi, Kun; Su, Xiaomei; Xie, Liqiang; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-08-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are the most frequent cyanobacterial toxins observed in freshwater systems. Accumulating evidence suggests that MCs pose a serious threat to public health. However, the contributions of the exposure of MCs to the occurrence of human diseases remain largely unknown. This study provides the evidence of the effects of MC-LR on pancreatic β-cell function through the exposure of rat insulinoma (INS-1) cells to 0, 10, 20, or 40μM MC-LR for 72h and explores the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that exposure to MC-LR for 72h suppresses cell viability, disturbs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and decreases the expression of insulin protein. Moreover, MC-LR disrupts the cell cycle distribution and increases cell apoptosis at 20 or 40μM for 72h, respectively, indicating that the β-cell mass would be decreased by MC-LR exposure. A transcriptomic analysis revealed several key genes (e.g., Pdx-1, Neurod1, and Abcc8) involved in insulin secretion are significantly differentially expressed in INS-1 cells in response to MC-LR exposure. In addition, several signal transduction pathways associated with diabetes (e.g., type 1 and 2 diabetes) were also identified compared with the control cells. We recommend that MC be considered as a new environmental factor that promotes diabetes development. The identified key genes or pathways may potentially contribute to the future therapies in the environmental contaminants induced β-cell damage. PMID:27107231

  9. Diminished anabolic signaling response to insulin induced by intramuscular lipid accumulation is associated with inflammation in aging but not obesity.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Donato A; McDonald, Devin J; Rice, Nicholas P; Haran, Prashanth H; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Fielding, Roger A

    2016-04-01

    The loss of skeletal muscle mass is observed in many pathophysiological conditions, including aging and obesity. The loss of muscle mass and function with aging is defined as sarcopenia and is characterized by a mismatch between skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown. Characteristic metabolic features of both aging and obesity are increases in intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content in muscle. IMCL accumulation may play a mechanistic role in the development of anabolic resistance and the progression of muscle atrophy in aging and obesity. In the present study, aged and high-fat fed mice were used to determine mechanisms leading to muscle loss. We hypothesized the accumulation of bioactive lipids in skeletal muscle, such as ceramide or diacylglycerols, leads to insulin resistance with aging and obesity and the inability to activate protein synthesis, contributing to skeletal muscle loss. We report a positive association between bioactive lipid accumulation and the loss of lean mass and muscle strength. Obese and aged animals had significantly higher storage of ceramide and diacylglycerol compared with young. Furthermore, there was an attenuated insulin response in components of the mTOR anabolic signaling pathway. We also observed differential increases in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the phosphorylation of IκBα with aging and obesity. These data challenge the accepted role of increased inflammation in obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, we have now established IκBα with a novel function in aging-associated muscle loss that may be independent of its previously understood role as an NF-κB inhibitor.

  10. Insulin receptor signaling activated by penta-O-galloyl-α-D: -glucopyranose induces p53 and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanyan; Evans, Susan C; Soans, Eroica; Malki, Ahmed; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yan; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2011-09-01

    p53 is essential for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction while insulin receptor (IR) signaling is important for cell metabolism and proliferation and found upregulated in cancers. While IR has recently been found to be involved in apoptosis, p53 induction or apoptosis mediated through IR signaling activation has never been documented. Here, we report that the IR signaling pathway, particularly the IR-MEK pathway, mediates biological and biochemical changes in p53 and apoptosis in tumor cells. Specifically, natural compound penta-O-galloyl-α-D: -glucopyranose (α-PGG), a previously characterized IR signaling activator, induced apoptosis in RKO cells without significantly affecting its normal counterpart FHC cells. α-PGG induced apoptosis in RKO cells through p53, Bax and caspase 3. Importantly, α-PGG's ability to elevate p53 was diminished by IR inhibitor and IR-siRNA, suggesting a non-conventional role of IR as being involved in p53 induction. Further studies revealed that α-PGG activated MEK, a downstream signaling factor of IR. Blocking MEK significantly suppressed α-PGG-induced p53 and Bax elevation. All these results suggested that α-PGG induced p53, Bax, and apoptosis through the IR-MEK signaling pathway. The unique activity of α-PGG, a novel IR phosphorylation and apoptosis inducer, may offer a new therapeutic strategy for eliciting apoptotic signal and inhibiting cancer growth.

  11. High insulin-induced down-regulation of Erk-1/IGF-1R/FGFR-1 signaling is required for oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis of adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Cervelli, Valerio; Arcuri, Gaetano; Gentile, Pietro; Doldo, Elena; Bielli, Alessandra; Bonanno, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2014-12-01

    Homeostasis of adipose tissue requires highly coordinated response between circulating factors and cell population. Human adult adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) display multiple differentiation properties and are sensitive to insulin stimulation. Insulin resistance and high level of circulating insulin characterize patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity. At physiological concentration, insulin promoted proliferation and survival of ASCs in vitro, whereas high insulin level induced their dose-dependent proliferative arrest and apoptosis. Insulin-induced apoptotic commitment depended on the down-regulation of Erk-1, insulin growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR-1)-mediated signaling. Specific inhibition of Erk-1/2, IGF-1R, and FGFR activity promoted ASC apoptosis but did not increase insulin effects, whereas EGFR and ErbB2 inhibition potentiated insulin-induced apoptosis. FGFRs and EGFR inhibition reduced ASC adipogenic differentiation, whereas Erk-1/2 and IGF-1R inhibition was ineffective. Insulin-induced apoptosis associated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and inhibition of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) activity prevented ASC apoptosis. Moreover, specific inhibition of Erk-1/2, IGF-1R, and FGFR-1 activity promoted ROS generation and this effect was not cumulative with that of insulin alone. Our data indicate that insulin concentration is a critical regulatory switch between proliferation and survival of ASCs. High insulin level-induced apoptotic machinery involves Nox4-generated oxidative stress and the down-regulation of a complex receptor signaling, partially distinct from that influencing adipogenic differentiation of ASCs.

  12. The effect of insulin-loaded linear poly(ethylene glycol)-brush-like poly(l-lysine) block copolymer on renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury through downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fei; Tang, Xiangyuan; Li, Xin; Xia, Wenquan; Liu, Daojun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effect of insulin-loaded linear poly(ethylene glycol)-brush-like poly(l-lysine) block copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(poly(ethylenediamine l-glutamate)-g-poly(l-lysine)) (PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) on renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced lung injury through downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) as compared to free insulin. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 30 U/kg insulin or insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) complex, and then subjected to 45 minutes of ischemia and 24 hours of reperfusion. The blood and lungs were collected, the level of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were measured, and the dry/wet lung ratios, the activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase, the content of methane dicarboxylic aldehyde and tumor necrosis factor-α, and the expression of HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in pulmonary tissues. Both insulin and insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) preconditioning improved the recovery of renal function, reduced pulmonary oxidative stress injury, restrained inflammatory damage, and downregulated the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF as compared to ischemia/reperfusion group, while insulin/PEG-b-(PELG-g-PLL) significantly improved this effect. PMID:27175073

  13. Meal-induced 24-hour profile of circulating glycated insulin in type 2 diabetic subjects measured by a novel radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, John R; McKillop, Aine M; Mooney, Mark H; Flatt, Peter R; Bell, Patrick M; O'harte, Finbarr P M

    2003-05-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for glycated insulin in the insulin-resistant state of type 2 diabetes. We measured 24-hour profiles of plasma glycated insulin, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA), to evaluate the effects of meal stimulation and intermittent fasting on circulating concentrations of plasma glycated insulin in type 2 diabetes. Patients (n = 6; hemoglobin A(1c) [HbA(1c)], 7.2% +/- 0.6%; fasting plasma glucose, 7.4 +/- 0.7 mmol/L; body mass index [BMI], 35.7 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2); age, 56.3 +/- 4.4 years) were admitted for 24 hours and received a standardized meal regimen. Half-hourly venous samples were taken for plasma glycated insulin, glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations between 8 am and midnight and 2-hourly overnight. The mean plasma glycated insulin concentration over 24 hours was 27.8 +/- 1.2 pmol/L with a mean ratio of insulin:glycated insulin of 11:1. Circulating glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glycated insulin followed a basal and meal-related pattern with most prominent increments following breakfast, lunch, and evening meal, respectively. The mean concentrations of glycated insulin during the morning, afternoon, evening, and night-time periods were 24.4 +/- 2.5, 28.7 +/- 2.3, 31.1 +/- 2.1, and 26.2 +/- 1.5 pmol/L, respectively, giving significantly higher molar ratios of insulin:glycated insulin of 18.0:1, 14.2:1, and 12.7:1 compared with 7.0:1 at night (P <.01 to P <.001). These data demonstrate that glycated insulin circulates at relatively high concentrations in type 2 diabetes with a diurnal pattern of basal and meal-stimulated release. A higher proportion of glycated insulin circulates at night suggestive of differences in metabolic clearance compared with native insulin.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor II mediates epidermal growth factor-induced mitogenesis in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Steller, M A; Delgado, C H; Zou, Z

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that activation of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor plays a major role in the control of cellular proliferation of many cell types. We studied the mitogenic effects of IGF-I, IGF-II, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on growth-arrested HT-3 cells, a human cervical cancer cell line. All three growth factors promoted dose-dependent increases in cell proliferation. In untransformed cells, EGF usually requires stimulation by a "progression" factor such as IGF-I, IGF-II, or insulin (in supraphysiologic concentrations) in order to exert a mitogenic effect. Accordingly, we investigated whether an autocrine pathway involving IGF-I or IGF-II participated in the EGF-induced mitogenesis of HT-3 cells. With the RNase protection assay, IGF-I mRNA was not detected. However, IGF-II mRNA increased in a time-dependent manner following EGF stimulation. The EGF-induced mitogenesis was abrogated in a dose-dependent manner by IGF-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5), which binds to IGF-II and neutralizes it. An antisense oligonucleotide to IGF-II also inhibited the proliferative response to EGF. In addition, prolonged, but not short-term, stimulation with EGF resulted in autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor, and coincubations with both EGF and IGFBP-5 attenuated this effect. These data demonstrate that autocrine secretion of IGF-II in HT-3 cervical cancer cells can participate in EGF-induced mitogenesis and suggest that autocrine signals involving the IGF-I receptor occur "downstream" of competence growth factor receptors such as the EGF receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8618825

  15. Anti-CD44 antibody treatment lowers hyperglycemia and improves insulin resistance, adipose inflammation, and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Keiichi; Toda, Kyoko; Morinaga, Shojiroh; Yamada, Satoru; Butte, Atul J

    2015-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease affecting >370 million people worldwide. It is characterized by obesity-induced insulin resistance, and growing evidence has indicated that this causative link between obesity and insulin resistance is associated with visceral adipose tissue inflammation. However, using anti-inflammatory drugs to treat insulin resistance and T2D is not a common practice. We recently applied a bioinformatics methodology to open public data and found that CD44 plays a critical role in the development of adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. In this report, we examined the role of CD44 in T2D by administering daily injections of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a high-fat-diet mouse model. Four weeks of therapy with CD44 mAb suppressed visceral adipose tissue inflammation compared with controls and reduced fasting blood glucose levels, weight gain, liver steatosis, and insulin resistance to levels comparable to or better than therapy with the drugs metformin and pioglitazone. These findings suggest that CD44 mAb may be useful as a prototype drug for therapy of T2D by breaking the links between obesity and insulin resistance.

  16. Stevioside ameliorates high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation by downregulating the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiquan; Xue, Liqiong; Guo, Cuicui; Han, Bing; Pan, Chunming; Zhao, Shuangxia; Song, Huaidong; Ma, Qinyun

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stevioside ameliorates high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stevioside alleviates the adipose tissue inflammation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stevioside reduces macrophages infiltration into the adipose tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stevioside suppresses the activation of NF-{kappa}B in the adipose tissue. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence suggests that adipose tissue is the main source of pro-inflammatory molecules that predispose individuals to insulin resistance. Stevioside (SVS) is a widely used sweetener with multiple beneficial effects for diabetic patients. In this study, we investigated the effect of SVS on insulin resistance and the pro-inflammatory state of adipose tissue in mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Oral administration of SVS for 1 month had no effect on body weight, but it significantly improved fasting glucose, basal insulin levels, glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, these changes were accompanied with decreased expression levels of several inflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue, including TNF-{alpha}, IL6, IL10, IL1{beta}, KC, MIP-1{alpha}, CD11b and CD14. Moreover, macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue was remarkably reduced by SVS. Finally, SVS significantly suppressed the nuclear factor-kappa b (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggested that SVS may ameliorate insulin resistance in HFD-fed mice by attenuating adipose tissue inflammation and inhibiting the NF-{kappa}B pathway.

  17. On the function and fate of chloride ions in amyloidogenic self-assembly of insulin in an acidic environment: salt-induced condensation of fibrils.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Viktoria; Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2015-02-24

    Formation of amyloid fibrils is often facilitated in the presence of specific charge-compensating ions. Dissolved sodium chloride is known to accelerate insulin fibrillation at low pH that has been attributed to the shielding of electrostatic repulsion between positively charged insulin molecules by chloride ions. However, the subsequent fate of Cl(-) anions; that is, possible entrapment within elongating fibrils or escape into the bulk solvent, remains unclear. Here, we show that, while the presence of NaCl at the onset of insulin aggregation induces structural variants of amyloid with distinct fingerprint infrared features, a delayed addition of salt to fibrils that have been already formed in its absence and under quiescent conditions triggers a "condensation effect": amyloid superstructures with strong chiroptical properties are formed. Chloride ions appear to stabilize these superstructures in a manner similar to stabilization of DNA condensates by polyvalent cations. The concentration of residual chloride ions trapped within bovine insulin fibrils grown in 0.1 M NaCl, at pD 1.9, and rinsed extensively with water afterward is less than 1 anion per 16 insulin monomers (as estimated using ion chromatography) implying absence of defined solvent-sequestered nesting sites for chloride counterions. Our results have been discussed in the context of mechanisms of insulin aggregation.

  18. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  19. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule.

  20. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Misako; Mori, Nobuko; Iramina, Chizuru; Yasutake, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI) diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine) to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and malic enzyme (ME), in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule. PMID:27597985

  1. Insulin and phorbol myristic acetate induce ornithine decarboxylase in Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S A; Esau, B; Koontz, J W

    1988-11-01

    Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells respond to insulin or to tumor promoting phorbol esters with an increase in ornithine decarboxylase enzyme activity. This occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner with both types of agonist. We report here that the increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity with optimal concentrations of both agonists is additive. Furthermore, the initial increase is dependent on continued RNA and protein synthesis. We also find that both of these agonists cause an increase in mRNA coding for ornithine decarboxylase in a time- and dose-dependent manner which suggests that the increase in enzyme activity can be accounted for by the increase in transcript levels. The difference in the time course of induction by the agonists, the additivity of induction by the two agonists, the differential sensitivity of induction to cycloheximide and RNA synthesis inhibitors, and the observation that phorbol myristic acetate causes a further increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity and transcript levels in cells already maximally induced by insulin suggest that these two agonists act through separate mechanisms.

  2. Anti-obesity and anti-insulin resistance effects of tomato vinegar beverage in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon-Il; Lee, Jin; Choi, Ra-Yeong; Lee, Hae-In; Lee, Ju-Hye; Jeong, Yong-Ki; Kim, Myung-Joo; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2014-07-25

    This study investigated the mechanism of processed tomato vinegar beverage (TVB)-mediated anti-obesity and anti-insulin resistance effects in high-fat diet (HF)-induced obese mice. Oral administration of TVB (14 mL kg(-1) body weight) to HF-fed mice for 6 weeks effectively reduced the body and visceral fat weight and significantly lowered plasma free fatty acid, triglyceride and hepatic triglyceride levels. TVB significantly increased fecal triglyceride excretion, both phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α protein levels in the liver, which were associated with increased fatty acid β-oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activities in HF-fed mice. TVB improved glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and HOMA-IR levels in the HF + TVB group compared to the HF group. Additionally, TVB significantly increased glucokinase activity and decreased glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver, which enhanced glucose metabolism in obese mice. These results suggest that TVB prevents visceral obesity and insulin resistance via AMPK/PPARα-mediated fatty acid and glucose oxidation. PMID:24867606

  3. Control of metabolic adaptation to fasting by dILP6-induced insulin signaling in Drosophila oenocytes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debamita; Katewa, Subhash D; Qi, Yanyan; Jackson, Susan A; Kapahi, Pankaj; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-12-16

    Metabolic adaptation to changing dietary conditions is critical to maintain homeostasis of the internal milieu. In metazoans, this adaptation is achieved by a combination of tissue-autonomous metabolic adjustments and endocrine signals that coordinate the mobilization, turnover, and storage of nutrients across tissues. To understand metabolic adaptation comprehensively, detailed insight into these tissue interactions is necessary. Here we characterize the tissue-specific response to fasting in adult flies and identify an endocrine interaction between the fat body and liver-like oenocytes that regulates the mobilization of lipid stores. Using tissue-specific expression profiling, we confirm that oenocytes in adult flies play a central role in the metabolic adaptation to fasting. Furthermore, we find that fat body-derived Drosophila insulin-like peptide 6 (dILP6) induces lipid uptake in oenocytes, promoting lipid turnover during fasting and increasing starvation tolerance of the animal. Selective activation of insulin/IGF signaling in oenocytes by a fat body-derived peptide represents a previously unidentified regulatory principle in the control of metabolic adaptation and starvation tolerance. PMID:25472843

  4. Control of metabolic adaptation to fasting by dILP6-induced insulin signaling in Drosophila oenocytes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debamita; Katewa, Subhash D; Qi, Yanyan; Jackson, Susan A; Kapahi, Pankaj; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-12-16

    Metabolic adaptation to changing dietary conditions is critical to maintain homeostasis of the internal milieu. In metazoans, this adaptation is achieved by a combination of tissue-autonomous metabolic adjustments and endocrine signals that coordinate the mobilization, turnover, and storage of nutrients across tissues. To understand metabolic adaptation comprehensively, detailed insight into these tissue interactions is necessary. Here we characterize the tissue-specific response to fasting in adult flies and identify an endocrine interaction between the fat body and liver-like oenocytes that regulates the mobilization of lipid stores. Using tissue-specific expression profiling, we confirm that oenocytes in adult flies play a central role in the metabolic adaptation to fasting. Furthermore, we find that fat body-derived Drosophila insulin-like peptide 6 (dILP6) induces lipid uptake in oenocytes, promoting lipid turnover during fasting and increasing starvation tolerance of the animal. Selective activation of insulin/IGF signaling in oenocytes by a fat body-derived peptide represents a previously unidentified regulatory principle in the control of metabolic adaptation and starvation tolerance.

  5. Tinospora crispa Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by High Fat Diet in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Abu, Mohd Nazri; Samat, Suhana; Kamarapani, Norathirah; Nor Hussein, Fuzina; Wan Ismail, Wan Iryani; Hassan, Hamzah Fansuri

    2015-01-01

    The antidiabetic properties of Tinospora crispa, a local herb that has been used in traditional Malay medicine and rich in antioxidant, were explored based on obesity-linked insulin resistance condition. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely, the normal control (NC) which received standard rodent diet, the high fat diet (HFD) which received high fat diet only, the high fat diet treated with T. crispa (HFDTC), and the high fat diet treated with orlistat (HFDO). After sixteen weeks of treatment, blood and organs were harvested for analyses. Results showed that T. crispa significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the body weight (41.14 ± 1.40%), adiposity index serum levels (4.910 ± 0.80%), aspartate aminotransferase (AST: 161 ± 4.71 U/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT: 100.95 ± 3.10 U/L), total cholesterol (TC: 18.55 ± 0.26 mmol/L), triglycerides (TG: 3.70 ± 0.11 mmol/L), blood glucose (8.50 ± 0.30 mmo/L), resistin (0.74 ± 0.20 ng/mL), and leptin (17.428 ± 1.50 ng/mL) hormones in HFDTC group. The insulin (1.65 ± 0.07 pg/mL) and C-peptide (136.48 pmol/L) hormones were slightly decreased but within normal range. The histological results showed unharmed and intact liver tissues in HFDTC group. As a conclusion, T. crispa ameliorates insulin resistance-associated with obesity in Wistar rats fed with high fat diet. PMID:25821506

  6. Tinospora crispa Ameliorates Insulin Resistance Induced by High Fat Diet in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kamarapani, Norathirah; Nor Hussein, Fuzina; Wan Ismail, Wan Iryani; Hassan, Hamzah Fansuri

    2015-01-01

    The antidiabetic properties of Tinospora crispa, a local herb that has been used in traditional Malay medicine and rich in antioxidant, were explored based on obesity-linked insulin resistance condition. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely, the normal control (NC) which received standard rodent diet, the high fat diet (HFD) which received high fat diet only, the high fat diet treated with T. crispa (HFDTC), and the high fat diet treated with orlistat (HFDO). After sixteen weeks of treatment, blood and organs were harvested for analyses. Results showed that T. crispa significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the body weight (41.14 ± 1.40%), adiposity index serum levels (4.910 ± 0.80%), aspartate aminotransferase (AST: 161 ± 4.71 U/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT: 100.95 ± 3.10 U/L), total cholesterol (TC: 18.55 ± 0.26 mmol/L), triglycerides (TG: 3.70 ± 0.11 mmol/L), blood glucose (8.50 ± 0.30 mmo/L), resistin (0.74 ± 0.20 ng/mL), and leptin (17.428 ± 1.50 ng/mL) hormones in HFDTC group. The insulin (1.65 ± 0.07 pg/mL) and C-peptide (136.48 pmol/L) hormones were slightly decreased but within normal range. The histological results showed unharmed and intact liver tissues in HFDTC group. As a conclusion, T. crispa ameliorates insulin resistance-associated with obesity in Wistar rats fed with high fat diet. PMID:25821506

  7. New mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance: make no bones about it.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Heather A; Kahn, C Ronald

    2012-11-01

    Glucocorticoids are a powerful tool used to treat a range of human illnesses, including autoimmune diseases and cancer, and to prevent rejection following organ transplantation. While lifesaving for many, they come with a steep price, often leading to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In this issue of the JCI, Brennan-Speranza and colleagues provide evidence that the osteoblast-derived peptide osteocalcin is one of the drivers of the metabolic derangements associated with glucocorticoid therapy. This novel mechanism could open up new avenues for the treatment of these disorders. PMID:23093783

  8. New mechanisms of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance: make no bones about it

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Heather A.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a powerful tool used to treat a range of human illnesses, including autoimmune diseases and cancer, and to prevent rejection following organ transplantation. While lifesaving for many, they come with a steep price, often leading to obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In this issue of the JCI, Brennan-Speranza and colleagues provide evidence that the osteoblast-derived peptide osteocalcin is one of the drivers of the metabolic derangements associated with glucocorticoid therapy. This novel mechanism could open up new avenues for the treatment of these disorders. PMID:23093783

  9. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1, and MafA is Essential for Glucose-Induced Insulin Transcription in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Francesco S; Gu, Guoqiang; Foti, Daniela Patrizia; Brunetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called "enhanceosomes" on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS) gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  10. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Ayumi; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Masuda, Katsuhisa; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki; Seino, Susumu; Ogawa, Wataru; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-03-13

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets.

  11. Dietary sardine protein lowers insulin resistance, leptin and TNF-α and beneficially affects adipose tissue oxidative stress in rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madani, Zohra; Louchami, Karim; Sener, Abdullah; Malaisse, Willy J; Ait Yahia, Dalila

    2012-02-01

    The present study aims at exploring the effects of sardine protein on insulin resistance, plasma lipid profile, as well as oxidative and inflammatory status in rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome. Rats were fed sardine protein (S) or casein (C) diets supplemented or not with high-fructose (HF) for 2 months. Rats fed the HF diets had greater body weight and adiposity and lower food intake as compared to control rats. Increased plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1C, triacylglycerols, free fatty acids and impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance was observed in HF-fed rats. Moreover, a decline in adipose tissues antioxidant status and a rise in lipid peroxidation and plasma TNF-α and fibrinogen were noted. Rats fed sardine protein diets exhibited lower food intake and fat mass than those fed casein diets. Sardine protein diets diminished plasma insulin and insulin resistance. Plasma triacylglycerol and free fatty acids were also lower, while those of α-tocopherol, taurine and calcium were enhanced as compared to casein diets. Moreover, S-HF diet significantly decreased plasma glucose and HbA1C. Sardine protein consumption lowered hydroperoxide levels in perirenal and brown adipose tissues. The S-HF diet, as compared to C-HF diet decreased epididymal hydroperoxides. Feeding sardine protein diets decreased brown adipose tissue carbonyls and increased glutathione peroxidase activity. Perirenal and epididymal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and brown catalase activity were significantly greater in S-HF group than in C-HF group. Sardine protein diets also prevented hyperleptinemia and reduced inflammatory status in comparison with rats fed casein diets. Taken together, these results support the beneficial effect of sardine protein in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome on such variables as hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and oxidative and inflammatory status, suggesting the possible use of sardine protein as a protective

  12. Simvastatin Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor in Bile Duct Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin; Hong, Eun Mi; Jang, Ju Ah; Park, Se Woo; Koh, Dong Hee; Choi, Min Ho; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kae, Sea Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Statins act as antineoplastic agents through the inhibition of cell proliferation. This study sought to demonstrate the effects of statins on extrahepatic bile duct cancer cell apoptosis and to document the changes in protein expression involved in tumor growth and suppression. Methods Human extrahepatic bile duct cancer cells were cultured. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were performed to determine the effect of statins on cell proliferation. Apoptosis was measured by a cell death detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and caspase-3 activity assay, and flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of cells in each phase of the cell cycle. The protein expression of Bax, Bcl-2, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and Akt was measured by Western blot analysis. Results Simvastatin suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 phase cell cycle arrest in bile duct cancer cells. Furthermore, it induced apoptosis via caspase-3 activation, downregulated the expression of the Bcl-2 protein, and enhanced the expression of the Bax protein. Moreover, simvastatin suppressed the expression of the IGF-1 receptor and IGF-1-induced ERK/Akt activation. Conclusions Simvastatin induces apoptosis in bile duct cancer cells, which suggests that it could be an antineoplastic agent for bile duct cancer. PMID:26470769

  13. Yin Yang 1 deficiency in skeletal muscle protects against rapamycin-induced diabetic-like symptoms through activation of insulin/IGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Blättler, Sharon M; Cunningham, John T; Verdeguer, Francisco; Chim, Helen; Haas, Wilhelm; Liu, Huifei; Romanino, Klaas; Rüegg, Markus A; Gygi, Steven P; Shi, Yang; Puigserver, Pere

    2012-04-01

    Rapamycin and its derivatives are mTOR inhibitors used in tissue transplantation and cancer therapy. A percentage of patients treated with these inhibitors develop diabetic-like symptoms, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. We show here that chronic rapamycin treatment in mice led to insulin resistance with suppression of insulin/IGF signaling and genes associated within this pathway, such as Igf1-2, Irs1-2, and Akt1-3. Importantly, skeletal muscle-specific YY1 knockout mice were protected from rapamycin-induced diabetic-like symptoms. This protection was caused by hyperactivation of insulin/IGF signaling with increased gene expression in this cascade that, in contrast to wild-type mice, was not suppressed by rapamycin. Mechanistically, rapamycin induced YY1 dephosphorylation and recruitment to promoters of insulin/IGF genes, which promoted interaction with the polycomb protein-2 corepressor. This was associated with H3K27 trimethylation leading to decreased gene expression and insulin signaling. These results have implications for rapamycin action in human diseases and biological processes such as longevity. PMID:22482732

  14. Heart rate, body temperature and physical activity are variously affected during insulin treatment in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Howarth, F C; Jacobson, M; Shafiullah, M; Ljubisavljevic, M; Adeghate, E

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of cardiovascular complications including impaired cardiac muscle function. The effects of insulin treatment on heart rate, body temperature and physical activity in the alloxan (ALX)-induced diabetic rat were investigated using in vivo biotelemetry techniques. The electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature were recorded in vivo with a biotelemetry system for 10 days before ALX treatment, for 20 days following administration of ALX (120 mg/kg) and thereafter, for 15 days whilst rats received daily insulin. Heart rate declined rapidly after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX heart rate was 321+/-9 beats per minute, falling to 285+/-12 beats per minute 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 331+/-10 beats per minute 5-10 days after commencement of insulin. Heart rate variability declined and PQ, QRS and QT intervals were prolonged after administration of ALX. Physical activity and body temperature declined after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX body temperature was 37.6+/-0.1 °C, falling to 37.3+/-0.1 °C 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 37.8+/-0.1 °C 5-10 days after commencement insulin. ALX-induced diabetes is associated with disturbances in heart rhythm, physical activity and body temperature that are variously affected during insulin treatment.

  15. Effect of coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum L.) ethanol extract on insulin release from pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Saeidi, Ali; Molanaei, Saadat; Sadeghipour, Alireza; Bahar, Massih; Bahar, Kamal

    2009-03-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds have been used to treat indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. In the present study, an ethanol extract of the seeds was investigated for effects on insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood samples were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus before and 1.5, 3 and 5 h after administration of the seed extract. Serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase method. To determine the insulin releasing activity, after extract treatment the animals were anaesthetized by diethyl ether, the pancreas was excised, fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin for sectioning. Pancreatic sections of 5 microm were processed for examination of insulin-releasing activity using an immunocytochemistry kit. The results showed that administration of the ethanol extract (200 and 250 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significant reduction in serum glucose. Administration of streptozotocin decreased the number of beta cells with insulin secretory activity in comparison with intact rats, but treatment with the coriander seed extract (200 mg/kg) increased significantly the activity of the beta cells in comparison with the diabetic control rats. The extract decreased serum glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and increased insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas.

  16. Maternal high-fat diet induces insulin resistance and deterioration of pancreatic β-cell function in adult offspring with sex differences in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Hisashi; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Sakaki, Yuka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Inoue, Tomoaki; Hirata, Eiichi; Takei, Ryoko; Ikeda, Noriko; Fujii, Masakazu; Fukuda, Kei; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-05-15

    Intrauterine environment may influence the health of postnatal offspring. There have been many studies on the effects of maternal high-fat diet (HFD) on diabetes and glucose metabolism in offspring. Here, we investigated the effects in male and female offspring. C57/BL6J mice were bred and fed either control diet (CD) or HFD from conception to weaning, and offspring were fed CD or HFD from 6 to 20 wk. At 20 wk, maternal HFD induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in offspring. Additionally, liver triacylglycerol content, adipose tissue mass, and inflammation increased in maternal HFD. In contrast, extending previous observations, insulin secretion at glucose tolerance test, islet area, insulin content, and PDX-1 mRNA levels in isolated islets were lower in maternal HFD in males, whereas they were higher in females. Oxidative stress in islets increased in maternal HFD in males, whereas there were no differences in females. Plasma estradiol levels were lower in males than in females and decreased in offspring fed HFD and also decreased by maternal HFD, suggesting that females may be protected from insulin deficiency by inhibiting oxidative stress. In conclusion, maternal HFD induced insulin resistance and deterioration of pancreatic β-cell function, with marked sex differences in adult offspring accompanied by adipose tissue inflammation and liver steatosis. Additionally, our results demonstrate that potential mechanisms underlying sex differences in pancreatic β-cell function may be related partially to increases in oxidative stress in male islets and decreased plasma estradiol levels in males.

  17. HPMC supplementation reduces fatty liver, intestinal permeability, and insulin resistance with altered hepatic gene expression in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous nonfermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on global hepatic gene profiles, steatosis and insulin resistance in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. DIO C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF diet supplemented with either ...

  18. Cdk5 inhibitory peptide (CIP) inhibits Cdk5/p25 activity induced by high glucose in pancreatic beta cells and recovers insulin secretion from p25 damage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Li, Congyu; Hu, Ya-Fang; Cao, Li; Wang, Hui; Li, Bo; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Bao, Li; Luo, Hong-Yan; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D; Pant, Harish C

    2013-01-01

    Cdk5/p25 hyperactivity has been demonstrated to lead to neuron apoptosis and degenerations. Chronic exposure to high glucose (HG) results in hyperactivity of Cdk5 and reduced insulin secretion. Here, we set out to determine whether abnormal upregulation of Cdk5/p25 activity may be induced in a pancreatic beta cell line, Min6 cells. We first confirmed that p25 were induced in overexpressed p35 cells treated with HG and increased time course dependence. Next, we showed that no p25 was detected under short time HG stimulation (4-12 hrs), however was detectable in the long exposure in HG cells (24 hrs and 48 hrs). Cdk5 activity in the above cells was much higher than low glucose treated cells and resulted in more than 50% inhibition of insulin secretion. We confirmed these results by overexpression of p25 in Min6 cells. As in cortical neurons, CIP, a small peptide, inhibited Cdk5/p25 activity and restored insulin secretion. The same results were detected in co-infection of dominant negative Cdk5 (DNCdk5) with p25. CIP also reduced beta cells apoptosis induced by Cdk5/p25. These studies indicate that Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation deregulates insulin secretion and induces cell death in pancreatic beta cells and suggests that CIP may serve as a therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24039692

  19. Effect of Alkaloids from Nelumbinis Plumula against Insulin Resistance of High-Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Guo, Zebin; Zeng, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of total alkaloids from Nelumbinis Plumula (NPA) on insulin resistance (IR) of high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Rats were fed with HFD for 8 weeks to induce NAFLD. Then, the effect of NPA on ameliorating IR in HFD-induced NAFLD was evaluated. Fasting serum insulin was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for insulin following the manufacturer's protocol. Some inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined using ELISA kits to assess the inflammatory burden in rats. The results showed that HFD could induce a significant increase in blood glucose and IR in rats. However, rats treated with NPA (400 or 600 mg/kg) showed improved IR and reduction in serum inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Further investigation indicated that NPA could inhibit IR by restoring the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and suppressing the expression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. The present results supported the view that the pathogenesis of NAFLD was complex with inflammation, together with increasing serum glucose and IR. Also, JNK and IRS phosphorylation were suggested for their involvement in the modulating of IR during NAFLD progression. Therefore, NPA may serve as a potential natural remedy against IR in NAFLD. PMID:27761469

  20. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) But Not Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) Reverses Trans-10, Cis-12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid Induced Insulin Resistance in Mice1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: t10, c12-Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) induces insulin resistance and fatty liver in mice which can be reversed by fish oils. We determined if it is eicospentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) or docoshexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) that reverses these adverse effects of CLA. Research Design and M...

  1. Requirement of JIP1-mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation for obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Standen, Claire L; Jung, Dae Young; Gray, Susan; Ong, Helena; Flavell, Richard A; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2010-10-01

    The c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) interacting protein 1