Science.gov

Sample records for non-ideal flow patterns

  1. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F.

    2016-08-01

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1-5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  2. Advanced development of diagnostics for non-ideal blast flows. Technical report 1 Apr 89-1 Jun 91

    SciTech Connect

    Modarress, D.; Hoeft, T.

    1992-07-01

    Investigations of non-ideal airblast are performed at the Ernst Mach Institute in a shock tube that simulates a radiation-induced thermal layer. Visualization techniques were adequate for overall study of the flow, but did not provide the detailed data for validation of computer codes. Under this contract three tasks were performed to provide needed data. The first task was to develop a software package for analysis of interferogram fringes. This package translates fringes shift due to the presence of helium into densities over the image area. This package was installed at EMI. The second task was to evaluate and test techniques for direct time-varying measurement of gas species concentration. Absorption spectroscopy of NO2 was selected to be used, but had corrosion problems and was abandoned. As a replacement, filtered Rayleigh scattering from Freon gas was identified. The third task was to fabricate and install a multi-location laser Doppler velocimeter system for the shock tube. This unit was installed in the shock tube and preliminary velocity measurements of flow over a rough surface were made.

  3. Kinetics of osmotic water flow across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Cryopreservation requires quantitatively analytical models to simulate the biophysical responses of biomaterials during cryopreservation. The Mazur model and other improved ones, such as Karlsson model concerning solutions containing cryoprotectants (CPA), are somehow precluded by some minor points, particularly, the assumption of ideal solutions. To avoid the ideal solution assumption, in this study a new method is developed to simulate water transport across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during cooling and thawing. The comparison between osmolalities calculated by the linear freezing-point depression used in this new method and other non-ideal ones is conducted and a good agreement is achieved. In addition, in an ideal case, besides a theoretical agreement, this new approach has been validated by its numerical simulation results. Comparisons between this new approach and the traditional ones with an ideal solution assumption have been conducted based on a spherical hypothetical cell. The main results are (1) the predicted non-ideal intracellular water content is larger than the ideal results; (2) the concentration of CPA solutions is directly proportional to the deviation between the non-ideal and ideal curves. In the end, this study presents a direct description of the degree of subcooling of the protoplasm during dynamic cooling. This study demonstrates that our experimental data-based method is a valid one with clear physical interpretations, convenient expressions and a more extensive application room than traditional ones.

  4. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  5. Steady non-ideal detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Gary

    2009-06-01

    Theories for determining the velocity of detonation (VoD) in highly non-ideal explosives, e.g. commercial explosives used in mining, are discussed. Such explosives have critical charge diameters of several centimetres. An analysis of the interaction between detonations and confining materials along the explosive-confiner interface reveals there a two main types of interaction. In the first (denoted here by case 1) the detonation drives an oblique shock into the confiner. For the second (case 2), a wave propagates in the confiner ahead of the detonation in the explosive. Shock polar interactions are examined for commercial explosives and rocks, which shows that a significant proportion of problems are case 2 in mining. For case 1, numerical simulations show that for a given explosive model there is a unique relationship (valid for all charge diameters and confinements) between the VoD and the curvature of the detonation shock at the charge axis. This relationship is shown to be well predicted by a quasi-one-dimensional type analysis. A simple detonation shock dynamics method which uses this relationships predicts well the VoD even in highly non-ideal cases, provided the explosive is sufficiently confined (usually the case in mining), but which is inaccurate in the limit of an unconfined charge. Preliminary results of a novel variational method for solving the unconfined situation are also discussed. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the coupling mechanisms in case 2 situations, including the influence on diameter effects. It is shown that, in agreement with an approximate theory, the detonation is driven up to VoDs above the confiner's sound speed, and the wave in the confiner weakly pre-compresses the explosive ahead of the detonation front.

  6. Steady Non-Ideal Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, G. J.; Luheshi, M. Y.; Braithwaite, M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2009-12-01

    Highly non-ideal explosives, such as commercial ammonium nitrate based explosives used in mining and blasting, have critical charge diameters of several centimetres and relatively low detonation speeds. Shock polar match analyses between these explosives and confining inert materials give two main types of interactions. For the first type (denoted here by case I), the detonation drives an oblique shock into the confiner. For the second type (case II), a wave propagates in the confiner ahead of the detonation wave in the explosive. In case I, numerical simulations show that for a given explosive model there is a unique relationship (valid for all charge diameters and confinements) between the velocity of detonation (VoD) and the curvature of the detonation shock at the charge axis. This relationship is shown to be well predicted by a quasi-one-dimensional analysis. A simple detonation shock dynamics method which uses this relationship predicts the VoD provided the explosive is sufficiently confined (usually the case in mining), but is inaccurate in the limit of an unconfined charge. For commercial explosives confined by rocks, a significant proportion of problems are case II. Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the coupling mechanisms in these situations. It is found that, in agreement with an approximate theory, the detonation is driven up to VoDs near the confiner's sound speed, and the wave in the confiner weakly pre-compresses the explosive ahead of the detonation front.

  7. Measuring explosive non-ideality

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C

    1999-02-17

    The sonic reaction zone length may be measured by four methods: (1) size effect, (2) detonation front curvature, (3) crystal interface velocity and (4) in-situ gauges. The amount of data decreases exponentially from (1) to (4) with there being almost no gauge data for prompt detonation at steady state. The ease and clarity of obtaining the reaction zone length increases from (1) to (4). The method of getting the reaction zone length, , is described for the four methods. A measure of non-ideality is proposed: the reaction zone length divided by the cylinder radius. N = /R{sub o}. N = 0 for true ideality. It also decreases with increasing radius as it should. For N < 0.10, an equilibrium EOS like the JWL may be used. For N > 0.10, a time-dependent description is essential. The crystal experiment, which measures the particle velocity of an explosive-transparent material interface, is presently rising in importance. We examine the data from three experiments and apply: (1) an impedance correction that transfers the explosive C-J particle velocity to the corresponding value for the interface, and (2) multiplies the interface time by 3/4 to simulate the explosive speed of sound. The result is a reaction zone length comparable to those obtained by other means. A few explosives have reaction zones so small that the change of slope in the particle velocity is easily seen.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Two Dimensional CO2 Adsorption/Desorption in Packed Sorption Beds under Non-Ideal Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, H.; Knox, J. C.; Smith, J. E.; Croomes, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results of CO2 adsorption and desorption in a packed column indicated that the concentration wave front at the center of the packed column differs from those which are close to the wall of column filled with adsorbent material even though the ratio of column diameter to the particle size is greater than 20. The comparison of the experimental results with one dimensional model of packed column shows that in order to simulate the average breakthrough in a packed column a two dimensional (radial and axial) model of packed column is needed. In this paper the mathematical model of a non-slip flow through a packed column with 2 inches in diameter and 18 inches in length filled with 5A zeolite pellets is presented. The comparison of experimental results of CO2 absorption and desorption for the mixed and central breakthrough of the packed column with numerical results is also presented.

  9. Modeling of non-ideal aluminized explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.; Souers, P. C.

    2000-04-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the combustion of Al in a condensed detonation that depends on the pressure and the detonation product gases. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al2O3. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities for HMX/Al composites to within a few percent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives ???

  10. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  11. Modeling of Non-Ideal Aluminized Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, W. Michael; Fried, Laurence E.; Souers, P. Clark

    1999-06-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood (WK) kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the burning of Al in condensed detonation that depends on the surface properties of the Al grains and the detonation product gases. Moreover, we use an exp-6 equation of state for the product fluids that reproduces a wide range experimental shock hugoniot and static compression data. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al_2O_3. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  12. Modeling of non-ideal aluminized explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1999-06-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the combustion of Al in a condensed detonation that depends on the pressure and the detonation product gases. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities for HMX/Al composites to within a few percent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives.

  13. Non-ideal Solution Thermodynamics of Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative description of the non-ideal solution thermodynamics of the cytoplasm of a living mammalian cell is critically necessary in mathematical modeling of cryobiology and desiccation and other fields where the passive osmotic response of a cell plays a role. In the solution thermodynamics osmotic virial equation, the quadratic correction to the linear ideal, dilute solution theory is described by the second osmotic virial coefficient. Herein we report, for the first time, intracellular solution second osmotic virial coefficients for four cell types [TF-1 hematopoietic stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), porcine hepatocytes, and porcine chondrocytes] and further report second osmotic virial coefficients indistinguishable from zero (for the concentration range studied) for human hepatocytes and mouse oocytes. PMID:23840923

  14. Kinetic modeling of non-ideal explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1999-03-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. We model a wide range of ideal and non-ideal composite energetic materials. In addition, we develop an exp-6 equation of state for the product fluids that reproduces a wide range experimental shock Hugoniot and static compression data. For unreacted solids, including solid and liquid Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, we use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent for a wide range of explosives, while obtaining good agreement with estimated reaction zone lengths. The detonation velocity as a function of charge radius is also correctly reproduced.

  15. Evolution of weak shock waves in non-ideal magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Triloki; Gupta, R. K.; Singh, L. P.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the main features of weakly non-linear waves propagating in a compressible, inviscid, non-ideal gas with infinite electrical conductivity modelled by van der Waals equation of state permeated by transverse magnetic field. An asymptotic approach is used to derive the evolution equation, which characterizes the wave phenomena in a high frequency domain. The growth equation of an acceleration wave is derived as a special case. Further, we also discuss the propagation of disturbances in the form of sawtooth profile. The effect of magnetic field and van der Waals parameter on the decay of sawtooth profile is presented. A remarkable difference between planar and nonplanar flows in magnetic case and nonmagnetic case has been drawn. Also the variation in velocity profile between planar and nonplanar flows has been discussed.

  16. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for non-ideal HE: ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Salyer, Terry R; Aslam, Tariq D; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerley, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Linear D{sub n}-{kappa} detonation shock dynamics (DSD) filling forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures involving variations in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. The detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures is considered to be highly nonideal involving long reaction zones ({approx} several cms), low detonation energies and large failure diameters ({approx} 10s-100s cms). A number of experimental programs have been undertaken to understand ANFO detonation properties as a function of the AN properties [1]-[7]. Given the highly heterogeneous nature of ANFO mixtures (typical high explosive (HE) grade AN prills are porous with a range of diameters) a predictive reactive flow simulation of ANFO detonation will present significant challenges. At Los Alamos, a simulation capability has been developed for predicting the propagation of detonation in non-ideal HE and the work conducted on surrounding materials via a combination of a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) approach and a modified programmed burn method known as the pseudo-reaction-zone (or PRZ) method that accounts for the long detonation reaction zone. In the following, linear D{sub n}-{kappa} DSD fitting forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures involving variation in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. A detonation shock dynamics calibration for ANFO consisting of regular porous HE grade AN in a 94/6 wt.% AN to FO mix has been obtained in [7].

  17. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  18. Influence of non-ideality on condensation to aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2009-02-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a complex mixture of water and organic molecules. Its composition is determined by the presence of semi-volatile or non-volatile compounds, their saturation vapor pressure and activity coefficient. The activity coefficient is a non-ideality effect and is a complex function of SOA composition. In a previous publication, the detailed chemical mechanism (DCM) for α-pinene oxidation and subsequent aerosol formation BOREAM was presented. In this work, we investigate with this DCM the impact of non-ideality by simulating smog chamber experiments for α-pinene degradation and aerosol formation and taking the activity coefficient into account of all molecules in the aerosol phase. Several versions of the UNIFAC method are tested for this purpose, and missing parameters for e.g. hydroperoxides and nitrates are inferred from fittings to activity coefficient data generated using the SPARC model. Alternative approaches to deal with these missing parameters are also tested, as well as an activity coefficient calculation method based on Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). It turns out that for most experiments, non-ideality has only a limited impact on the interaction between the organic molecules, and therefore on SOA yields and composition, when water uptake is ignored. The reason is that often, the activity coefficient is on average close to 1 and, specifically for high-VOC experiments, partitioning is not very sensitive on the activity coefficient because the equilibrium is shifted strongly towards condensation. Still, for ozonolysis experiments with low amounts of volatile organic carbon (low-VOC), the UNIFAC parameterization of Raatikainen et al. leads to significantly higher SOA yields (by up to a factor 1.6) compared to the ideal case and to other parameterizations. Water uptake is model dependent, in the order: ideal > UNIFAC-Raatikainen > UNIFAC-Peng > UNIFAC-Hansen ≍ UNIFAC-Magnussen ≍ UNIFAC-Ming. In the absence of salt

  19. Kinetic modeling of non-ideal explosives with CHEETAH

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1998-08-06

    We report an implementation of the Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions. Other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. We model a wide range of ideal and non-ideal composite energetic materials. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent, while obtaining good agreement with estimated reaction zone lengths. The detonation velocity as a function of charge radius is also correctly reproduced.

  20. Can non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics solve the magnetic braking catastrophe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether or not the low ionization fractions in molecular cloud cores can solve the `magnetic braking catastrophe', where magnetic fields prevent the formation of circumstellar discs around young stars. We perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of the gravitational collapse of one solar mass molecular cloud cores, incorporating the effects of ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic resistivity and the Hall effect alongside a self-consistent calculation of the ionization chemistry assuming 0.1 μm grains. When including only ambipolar diffusion or Ohmic resistivity, discs do not form in the presence of strong magnetic fields, similar to the cases using ideal MHD. With the Hall effect included, disc formation depends on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the rotation vector of the gas cloud. When the vectors are aligned, strong magnetic braking occurs and no disc is formed. When the vectors are anti-aligned, a disc with radius of 13 au can form even in strong magnetic when all three non-ideal terms are present, and a disc of 38 au can form when only the Hall effect is present; in both cases, a counter-rotating envelope forms around the first hydrostatic core. For weaker, anti-aligned fields, the Hall effect produces massive discs comparable to those produced in the absence of magnetic fields, suggesting that planet formation via gravitational instability may depend on the sign of the magnetic field in the precursor molecular cloud core.

  1. Stochastic Flux-Freezing for Non-Ideal Hydromagnetic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory

    2009-11-01

    Non-ideal (viscous and resistive) magnetohydrodynamic plasmas are shown to possess stochastic versions of ideal flux-freezing laws. The magnetic field at a point is equal to the average of an infinite ensemble of field-lines advected to that point by the plasma velocity perturbed with a random white-noise (stochastic Lundquist formula). This implies a stochastic Alfv'en theorem, valid for any value of the magnetic Prandtl number. At unit Prandtl number there is also a random version of the generalized Kelvin theorem derived by Bekenstein-Oron for ideal MHD. These stochastic conservation laws are not only consequences of the non-ideal MHD equations, but are in fact equivalent to those equations. Similar results hold for Hall magnetohydrodynamics and the two-fluid plasma model. We argue that flux-conservation remains stochastic for turbulent MHD plasmas in the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers. Infinitely-many field lines are advected to each point by turbulent Richardson diffusion. The reconnection speed for pairs of field lines is the relative velocity of the turbulent fluid at their initial locations. Small-scale turbulent dynamo effect is rigorously related to angular correlation of the individual field vectors before reconnection.

  2. Non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikos

    2009-06-01

    Numerical experiments are performed investigating the non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502 in two setups. In the first setup we consider a three-dimensional rate stick experiment. A booster charge initiates a reaction front leading to a curved detonation wave. The numerical results are compared to theory and experimental evidence. The effects of weak and strong confinement are discussed. The second setup considers the so called ``hockey puck experiment.'' Experimental results show the appearance of a dead zone due to the effect of the geometry. This is captured by the numerical results, which also reveal that the initially spherical detonation is diffracted leading to local detonation failure. The numerical simulations are performed by solving a mathematical model for a three-phase medium based on the Euler equations. The numerical results are obtained using high-resolution shock-capturing methods combined with adaptive mesh refinement.

  3. Model of non-ideal detonation of condensed high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, E. B.; Kostitsin, O. V.; Koval, A. V.; Akhlyustin, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering theory of ideal detonation allows one to describe adequately the detonation of charges with near-critical diameter. For smaller diameters, detonation velocity can differ significantly from an ideal value expected based on equilibrium chemical thermodynamics. This difference is quite evident when using non-ideal explosives; in certain cases, this value can be up to one third of ideal detonation velocity. Numerical simulation of these systems is a very labor-consuming process because one needs to compute the states inside the chemical reaction zone, as well as to obtain data on the equation of state of high-explosive detonation products mixture and on the velocity of chemical reaction; however, these characteristics are poorly studied today. For practical purposes, one can use the detonation shock dynamics model based on interrelation between local velocity of the front and its local curvature. This interrelation depends on both the equation of state of explosion products, and the reaction velocity; but the explicit definition of these characteristics is not needed. In this paper, experimental results are analyzed. They demonstrate interrelation between the local curvature of detonation front and the detonation velocity. Equation of detonation front shape is found. This equation allows us to predict detonation velocity and shape of detonation wave front in arbitrary geometry by integrating ordinary differential equation for the front shape with a boundary condition at the charge edge. The results confirm that the model of detonation shock dynamics can be used to describe detonation processes in non-ideal explosives.

  4. Propagation of exponential shock wave in an axisymmetric rotating non-ideal dusty gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flow behind a strong exponential shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, which has variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocities, is analyzed. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to exponential law. The azimuthal and axial components of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying exponential laws. In the present work, small solid particles are considered as pseudo-fluid with the assumption that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained in the flow-field, and the viscous-stress and heat conduction of the mixture are negligible. Solutions are obtained in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector and compressibility. It is found that the assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, axial component of vorticity vector and compressibility distributions as compared to that of the adiabatic case. To investigate the behavior of the flow variables and the influence on the shock wave propagation by the parameter of non-idealness of the gas overline{b} in the mixture as well as by the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture Kp and by the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas G1 are worked out in detail. It is interesting to note that the shock strength increases with an increase in G1 ; whereas it decreases with an increase in overline{b} . Also, a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  5. Surface wave propagation in non-ideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few per cent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall-diffusion-dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut-off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut-off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut-off is introduced by the Hall diffusion, the fractional ionization of the medium is more important than the plasma compressibility in determining such a cut-off. Therefore, for both compressible as well incompressible medium, the surface modes of shorter wavelength are permitted with increasing ionization in the medium. We discuss the relevance of these results in the context of solar photosphere-chromosphere.

  6. On controlling nonlinear dissipation in high order filter methods for ideal and non-ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The newly developed adaptive numerical dissipation control in spatially high order filter schemes for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations has been recently extended to the ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. These filter schemes are applicable to complex unsteady MHD high-speed shock/shear/turbulence problems. They also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The adaptive numerical dissipation mechanism consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. The numerical dissipation considered consists of high order linear dissipation for the suppression of high frequency oscillation and the nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods for discontinuity capturing. The applicable nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods is very general. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of three commonly used types of nonlinear numerical dissipation for both the ideal and non-ideal MHD.

  7. Inspiratory flow pattern in humans.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Minetti, A E; Mognoni, P

    1984-10-01

    The theoretical estimation of the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration at rest is based on the common assumption that the inspiratory airflow wave is a sine function of time. Different analytical studies have pointed out that from an energetic point of view a rectangular wave is more economical than a sine wave. Visual inspection of inspiratory flow waves recorded during exercise in humans and various animals suggests that a trend toward a rectangular flow wave may be a possible systematic response of the respiratory system. To test this hypothesis, the harmonic content of inspiratory flow waves that were recorded in six healthy subjects at rest, during exercise hyperventilation, and during a maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) maneuver were evaluated by a Fourier analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained on sinusoidal and rectangular models. The dynamic work inherent in the experimental waves and in the sine-wave model was practically the same at rest; during exercise hyperventilation and MVV, the experimental wave was approximately 16-20% more economical than the sinusoidal one. It was concluded that even though at rest the sinusoidal model is a reasonably good approximation of inspiratory flow, during exercise and MVV, a physiological controller is probably operating in humans that can select a more economical inspiratory pattern. Other peculiarities of airflow wave during hyperventilation and some optimization criteria are also discussed.

  8. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  9. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  10. Nonlinear filtering and limiting in high order methods for ideal and non-ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee,H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The various filtering mechanisms and base scheme options of the newly developed adaptive numerical dissipation control in spatially high order filter schemes for the ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations are investigated. These filter schemes are applicable to complex unsteady MHD high-speed shock/shear/turbulence problems. They also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The type of spatial base scheme to be used in conjunction with our filter idea is very general. For example, spectral, compact and non-compact spatially central finite difference schemes are possible candidates. The adaptive numerical dissipation mechanism consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and to leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. The numerical dissipation considered consists of high order linear dissipation for the suppression of high frequency oscillation and the nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods for discontinuity capturing. The applicable nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods is also very general. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of using compact and non-compact central base schemes in conjunction with three commonly used types of nonlinear numerical dissipation for both the ideal and non-ideal MHD. This extended abstract shows the performance of three nonlinear filters in conjunction with a sixth-order non-compact spatial central base scheme. In the final paper, the high order compact spatial central base scheme will be illustrated and compared with the non-compact base scheme. The reason for the investigation of the high order compact spatial central base scheme over the non-compact base scheme is to evaluate if additional accuracy can be gained in regions of

  11. Influence of probe geometry on measurement results of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiefenbacher, Patrick; Kömle, Norbert I.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kargl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The thermal properties of the surface and subsurface layers of planets and planetary objects yield important information that allows us to better understand the thermal evolution of the body itself and its interactions with the environment. Various planetary bodies of our Solar System are covered by so-called regolith, a granular and porous material. On such planetary bodies the dominant heat transfer mechanism is heat conduction via IR radiation and contact points between particles. In this case the energy balance is mainly controlled by the effective thermal conductivity of the top surface layers, which can be directly measured by thermal conductivity probes. A traditionally used method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the needle-probe method. Such probes consist of thin steel needles with an embedded heating wire and temperature sensors. For the evaluation of the thermal conductivity of a specific material the temperature change with time is determined by heating a resistance wire with a well-defined electrical current flowing through it and simultaneously measuring the temperature increase inside the probe over a certain time. For thin needle probes with a large length-to-diameter ratio it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity, while this is not so straightforward for more rugged probes with a larger diameter and thus a smaller length-to-diameter ratio. Due to the geometry of the standard thin needle probes they are mechanically weak and subject to bending when driven into a soil. Therefore, using them for planetary missions can be problematic. In this paper the thermal conductivity values determined by measurements with two non-ideal, ruggedized thermal conductivity sensors, which only differ in length, are compared to each other. Since the theory describing the temperature response of non-ideal sensors is highly complicated, those sensors were calibrated with an ideal reference sensor in various solid and

  12. Simple equations to simulate closed-loop recycling liquid-liquid chromatography: Ideal and non-ideal recycling models.

    PubMed

    Kostanyan, Artak E

    2015-12-04

    The ideal (the column outlet is directly connected to the column inlet) and non-ideal (includes the effects of extra-column dispersion) recycling equilibrium-cell models are used to simulate closed-loop recycling counter-current chromatography (CLR CCC). Simple chromatogram equations for the individual cycles and equations describing the transport and broadening of single peaks and complex chromatograms inside the recycling closed-loop column for ideal and non-ideal recycling models are presented. The extra-column dispersion is included in the theoretical analysis, by replacing the recycling system (connecting lines, pump and valving) by a cascade of Nec perfectly mixed cells. To evaluate extra-column contribution to band broadening, two limiting regimes of recycling are analyzed: plug-flow, Nec→∞, and maximum extra-column dispersion, Nec=1. Comparative analysis of ideal and non-ideal models has shown that when the volume of the recycling system is less than one percent of the column volume, the influence of the extra-column processes on the CLR CCC separation may be neglected.

  13. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The required type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter to accurately resolve all relevant multiscales of complex MHD unsteady high-speed shock/shear/turbulence/combustion problems are not only physical problem dependent, but also vary from one flow region to another. In addition, proper and efficient control of the divergence of the magnetic field (Div(B)) numerical error for high order shock-capturing methods poses extra requirements for the considered type of CPU intensive computations. The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multiresolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filters also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error.

  14. A Unified Theory of Non-Ideal Gas Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi

    1998-01-01

    A non-ideal gas lattice Boltzmann model is directly derived, in an a priori fashion, from the Enskog equation for dense gases. The model is rigorously obtained by a systematic procedure to discretize the Enskog equation (in the presence of an external force) in both phase space and time. The lattice Boltzmann model derived here is thermodynamically consistent and is free of the defects which exist in previous lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases. The existing lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases are analyzed and compared with the model derived here.

  15. Set-valued solutions for non-ideal detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenko, R.; Faria, L. M.; Kasimov, A. R.; Ermolaev, B. S.

    2016-03-01

    The existence and structure of a steady-state gaseous detonation propagating in a packed bed of solid inert particles are analyzed in the one-dimensional approximation by taking into consideration frictional and heat losses between the gas and the particles. A new formulation of the governing equations is introduced that eliminates the difficulties with numerical integration across the sonic singularity in the reactive Euler equations. With the new algorithm, we find that when the sonic point disappears from the flow, there exists a one-parameter family of solutions parameterized by either pressure or temperature at the end of the reaction zone. These solutions (termed "set-valued" here) correspond to a continuous spectrum of the eigenvalue problem that determines the detonation velocity as a function of a loss factor.

  16. Using NMR to Determine the Boiling Point Diagram for a Non-Ideal Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Fritz S.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that enables the student to concentrate on the fundamentals of the non-ideal liquid-vapor equilibrium. Presents typical student data and suggests features which might be added to the experiment. (GS)

  17. Unraveling flow patterns through nonlinear manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Flavia; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    From climatology to biofluidics, the characterization of complex flows relies on computationally expensive kinematic and kinetic measurements. In addition, such big data are difficult to handle in real time, thereby hampering advancements in the area of flow control and distributed sensing. Here, we propose a novel framework for unsupervised characterization of flow patterns through nonlinear manifold learning. Specifically, we apply the isometric feature mapping (Isomap) to experimental video data of the wake past a circular cylinder from steady to turbulent flows. Without direct velocity measurements, we show that manifold topology is intrinsically related to flow regime and that Isomap global coordinates can unravel salient flow features.

  18. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  19. Adaptive Numerical Dissipative Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free of numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multi-resolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filter approaches also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The filter scheme consists of spatially sixth order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme for the inviscid flux derivatives. If necessary, a small amount of high order linear dissipation is used to remove spurious high frequency oscillations. For example, an eighth-order centered linear dissipation (AD8) might be included in conjunction with a spatially sixth-order base scheme. The inviscid difference operator is applied twice for the viscous flux derivatives. After the completion of a full time step of the base scheme step, the solution is adaptively filtered by the product of a 'flow detector' and the 'nonlinear dissipative portion' of a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. In addition, the scheme independent wavelet flow detector can be used in conjunction with spatially compact, spectral or spectral element type of base schemes. The ACM and wavelet filter schemes using the dissipative portion of a second-order shock-capturing scheme with sixth-order spatial central base scheme for both the inviscid and viscous MHD flux

  20. Photoelastic modulator non-idealities in magneto-optical polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandendriessche, Stefaan; Verbiest, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Modifying and detecting the polarization of light is increasingly important in many contexts such as Faraday isolators and electro-optical modulators. In order to control the polarization of light, it is necessary to know the polarization characteristics of the materials used in the applications. To be able to (magneto-)optically characterize novel materials, we designed a setup using a single photoelastic modulator (PEM) to simultaneously detect natural and magnetic circular dichroism and circular birefringence over a large spectral range. We then theoretically analyzed and experimentally characterized the effect of non-idealities in the PEM on the setup and the resulting data. Our results demonstrate an influence of PEM non-idealities on the measured signals, resulting in non-negligible mixing of circular birefringence and circular dichroism signals. Our measurements of the wavelength dependence of these non-idealities reveal larger non-idealities towards shorter wavelengths. These results illustrate the necessity to take PEM non-idealities into account when working with PEMs, especially at shorter wavelengths or when dealing with signals spanning different orders of magnitude. PEM non-idealities, while frequently neglected in experimental setup design and theoretical derivations, are expected to be more complicated and possibly exert a larger influence on obtained results for experimental setups with multiple PEMs.

  1. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Praveen Kumar; Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas is discussed under the action of monochromatic radiation into stellar atmosphere with a constant intensity on unit area. The gas is assumed to be grey and opaque and shock to be transparent. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. To obtain some essential features of the shock propagation, small solid particles are taken as pseudo-fluid and it is assumed that the equilibrium flow condition is maintained in the flow-field. The effects of variation of the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas and the radiation parameter are investigated. It is shown that an increase in the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas and the radiation parameter have decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas the shock strength increases. It is found that an increase in the parameter non-idealness of the gas and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas have opposite behaviour on fluid velocity, pressure and shock strength. Also, it is shown that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables and the shock strength.

  2. A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2009-08-03

    A grid-free variant of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is proposed, named the Isotropic DSMC (I-DSMC) method, that is suitable for simulating collision-dominated dense fluid flows. The I-DSMC algorithm eliminates all grid artifacts from the traditional DSMC algorithm and is Galilean invariant and microscopically isotropic. The stochastic collision rules in I-DSMC are modified to introduce a non-ideal structure factor that gives consistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008)]. The resulting Stochastic Hard Sphere Dynamics (SHSD) fluid is empirically shown to be thermodynamically identical to a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with a linear core pair potential, well-described by the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation. We develop a kinetic theory for the SHSD fluid to obtain estimates for the transport coefficients that are in excellent agreement with particle simulations over a wide range of densities and collision rates. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor against theory based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations. We also study the Brownian motion of a nano-particle suspended in an SHSD fluid and find a long-time power-law tail in its velocity autocorrelation function consistent with hydrodynamic theory and molecular dynamics calculations.

  3. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. Flow Pattern Characterization for a Centrifugal Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Efrén M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a model for characterizing the flow pattern of a centrifugal impeller attending to the severity of the reverse flow. The model assumes 1) a definition of an escaping particle as the one that flows in every operational point from the trailing edge towards the leading edge of the impeller blades, and 2) a characterization of flow where an operational point is said to have a theoretical flow pattern if it is not possible to establish a fully-reversed escaping particle on it. Therefore, the first part of the article is focused on defining an escaping particle for a centrifugal compressor. The model locates over the map of a centrifugal impeller the line that splits the map in two regions: the region on the right hand side, where a theoretical flow pattern can exist, and the region on the left, where a theoretical flow pattern cannot exist. Therefore, the locus of this line marks a frontier where the expected performance of the impeller cannot be sustained as high as expected. The second part of the article uses a high-performance commercial centrifugal impeller wheel for contrasting the model. A qualitative characterization of the surge line, conclusions and discussions are presented.

  5. Patterns and dynamics in transitional shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckerman, Laurette

    2009-11-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in fluid dynamics is surely transition to turbulence. The classic shear flows -- channel, plane Couette and pipe flow -- while linearly stable, undergo sudden transition to 3D turbulence. In recent years, transition has been attacked with an arsenal of weapons from dynamical systems theory, such as low-dimensional chaos, unstable periodic orbits, heteroclinic connections, fractal basin boundaries. At the same time, 3D physical mechanisms such as streamwise vorticity and streaks have supplanted the 2D picture of linear instability long promoted by Squire's theorem. A striking recent discovery by experimentalists at CEA-Saclay is that large-aspect-ratio plane Couette flow near transition actually takes the form of a steady pattern of wide turbulent and laminar bands, with a fixed angle and wavelength. We have been able to reproduce these remarkable flows in numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. Simulations display a rich variety of variants of these patterns, including spatio-temporal intermittency, branching and travelling states, and localized states analogous to spots. Because similar patterns have since also been observed in Taylor-Couette, channel and pipe flow, it appears that they are inevitable intermediate states on the route from turbulent to laminar flow in large aspect-ratio shear flows. In addition to their intrinsic interest, these patterns provide clues to the transition to turbulence.

  6. The impact of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics on binary star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the effect of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on the formation of binary stars using a suite of three-dimensional smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the gravitational collapse of 1 M⊙, rotating, perturbed molecular-cloud cores. Alongside the role of Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, we also examine the effects of magnetic field strength, orientation and amplitude of the density perturbation. When modelling sub-critical cores, ideal MHD models do not collapse whereas non-ideal MHD models collapse to form single protostars. In supercritical ideal MHD models, increasing the magnetic field strength or decreasing the initial-density perturbation amplitude decreases the initial binary separation. Strong magnetic fields initially perpendicular to the rotation axis suppress the formation of binaries and yield discs with magnetic fields ∼10 times stronger than if the magnetic field was initially aligned with the rotation axis. When non-ideal MHD is included, the resulting discs are larger and more massive, and the binary forms on a wider orbit. Small differences in the supercritical cores caused by non-ideal MHD effects are amplified by the binary interaction near periastron. Overall, the non-ideal effects have only a small impact on binary formation and early evolution, with the initial conditions playing the dominant role.

  7. Simple correlation for predicting detonation velocity of ideal and non-ideal explosives.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2009-07-30

    This paper describes a simple method for prediction of detonation velocity of ideal and non-ideal explosives. A non-ideal aluminized and nitrated explosive can have Chapman-Jouguet detonation velocity significantly different from that expected from existing thermodynamic computer codes for equilibrium and steady-state calculations. Detonation velocity of explosives with general formula C(a)H(b)N(c)O(d)Al(e) can be predicted only from values of a, b, c, d, e and a specific structural parameter without using any assumed detonation products, heat of formation and experimental data. Predicted detonation velocities by this procedure for ideal and non-ideal explosives show good agreement with respect to experimental values as compared to computed results of BKWR and BKWS equations of state.

  8. Effect of fluid-colloid interactions on the mobility of a thermophoretic microswimmer in non-ideal fluids.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Sengupta, Ankush; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-07

    Janus colloids propelled by light, e.g., thermophoretic particles, offer promising prospects as artificial microswimmers. However, their swimming behavior and its dependence on fluid properties and fluid-colloid interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the behavior of a thermophoretic Janus colloid in its own temperature gradient using numerical simulations. The dissipative particle dynamics method with energy conservation is used to investigate the behavior in non-ideal and ideal-gas like fluids for different fluid-colloid interactions, boundary conditions, and temperature-controlling strategies. The fluid-colloid interactions appear to have a strong effect on the colloid behavior, since they directly affect heat exchange between the colloid surface and the fluid. The simulation results show that a reduction of the heat exchange at the fluid-colloid interface leads to an enhancement of colloid's thermophoretic mobility. The colloid behavior is found to be different in non-ideal and ideal fluids, suggesting that fluid compressibility plays a significant role. The flow field around the colloid surface is found to be dominated by a source-dipole, in agreement with the recent theoretical and simulation predictions. Finally, different temperature-control strategies do not appear to have a strong effect on the colloid's swimming velocity.

  9. Effect of fluid-colloid interactions on the mobility of a thermophoretic microswimmer in non-ideal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Sengupta, Ankush; Gompper, Gerhard

    Janus colloids propelled by light, e.g., thermophoretic particles, offer promising prospects as artificial microswimmers. However, their swimming behavior and its dependence on fluid properties and fluid-colloid interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the behavior of a thermophoretic Janus colloid in its own temperature gradient using numerical simulations. The dissipative particle dynamics method with energy conservation is used to investigate the behavior in non-ideal and ideal-gas like fluids for different fluid-colloid interactions, boundary conditions, and temperature-controlling strategies. The fluid-colloid interactions appear to have a strong effect on the colloid behavior, since they directly affect heat exchange between the colloid surface and the fluid. The simulation results show that a reduction of the heat exchange at the fluid-colloid interface leads to an enhancement of colloid's thermophoretic mobility. The colloid behavior is found to be different in non-ideal and ideal fluids, suggesting that fluid compressibility plays a significant role. The flow field around the colloid surface is found to be dominated by a source-dipole, in agreement with the recent theoretical and simulation predictions. Finally, different temperature-control strategies do not appear to have a strong effect on the colloid's swimming velocity.

  10. Flow-separation patterns on symmetric forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.

    1986-01-01

    Flow-visualization studies of ogival, parabolic, and conical forebodies were made in a comprehensive investigation of the various types of flow patterns. Schlieren, vapor-screen, oil-flow, and sublimation flow-visualization tests were conducted over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg. to 88 deg., over a Reynolds-number range from 0.3X10(6) to 2.0X10(6) (based on base diameter), and over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 2. The principal effects of angle of attack, Reynolds number, and Mach number on the occurrence of vortices, the position of vortex shedding, the principal surface-flow-separation patterns, the magnitude of surface-flow angles, and the extent of laminar and turbulent flow for symmetric, asymmetric, and wake-like flow-separation regimes are presented. It was found that the two-dimensional cylinder analogy was helpful in a qualitative sense in analyzing both the surface-flow patterns and the external flow field. The oil-flow studies showed three types of primary separation patterns at the higher Reynolds numbers owing to the influence of boundary-layer transition. The effect of angle of attack and Reynolds number is to change the axial location of the onset and extent of the primary transitional and turbulent separation regions. Crossflow inflectional-instability vortices were observed on the windward surface at angles of attack from 5 deg. to 55 deg. Their effect is to promote early transition. At low angles of attack, near 10 deg., an unexpected laminar-separation bubble occurs over the forward half of the forebody. At high angles of attack, at which vortex asymmetry occurs, the results support the proposition that the principal cause of vortex asymmetry is the hydrodynamic instability of the inviscid flow field. On the other hand, boundary-layer asymmetries also occur, especially at transitional Reynolds numbers. The position of asymmetric vortex shedding moves forward with increasing angle of attack and with increasing Reynolds number, and moves

  11. Heterogeneity in a Low-Permeability Formation or Non-Ideal Testing Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Deeds, N. E.; Pickens, J. F.; Distinguin, M.; Delay, J.

    2005-12-01

    Hydraulic testing in packer-isolated wellbore intervals in low-permeability formations is often complicated by non-ideal conditions such as thermal expansion of fluid in the test interval, packer squeeze and borehole closure. Such processes lead to fluid accumulation and pressurization within the wellbore during shut-in, and can exert significant effects on the measured borehole pressure response. Unless these conditions are taken into account during test interpretation, it is possible to make inappropriate conclusions regarding formation heterogeneity (e.g., lateral permeability variations) and/or static pressure levels. We have developed a lumped parameter modeling approach by treating the combined effect of these processes as the equivalent of an additional volume of fluid accumulating within the test interval (in addition to the nominal test-interval volume at the time of shut-in). We postulate that the rate of fluid accumulation can be treated in a simple manner as a constant value for the duration of the test. Thus, the fluid accumulation problem can be recast as the equivalent of a constant injection rate into the packed-off volume within the borehole. We show how this surrogate injection rate can be estimated from the measured pressure data by exploiting the analogy between the pressure response during borehole storage dominated conditions and that of a line-source well with an exponentially varying flow rate. Shut-in test sequences (i.e., shut-in period prior to initiation of a pressure pulse test and shut-in period(s) during pulse test(s)) can then be analyzed as effective constant-rate injection periods. The methodology is demonstrated using data from a recent series of hydraulic tests conducted in support of site characterization activities by ANDRA, the French radioactive waste management agency. In many of these tests, the measured pressure response was fitted to a 2-zone radially composite system model. Although the fit was visually excellent, static

  12. The Representation of Highly Non-Ideal Phase Equilibria Using Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charos, Georgios N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Previous work focused on use of computer graphics in teaching thermodynamic phase equilibria for classes I and II. Extends this work to include the considerably more non-ideal phase behavior shown by classes III, IV, and V. Student and instructor response has been overwhelmingly positive about the approach. (JN)

  13. Magnetogasdynamics shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind a magnetogasdynamics cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric non ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat fluxes in presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assume to be varying and obeying power laws. In order to find the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is taken to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the presence of radiation and conduction, the non-idealness of the gas and the magnetic field on the shock propagation and the flow behind the shock are investigated.

  14. Micromechanics of emergent patterns in plastic flows.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Santidan; Grant, Martin; Samajdar, Indradev; Haldar, Arunansu; Sain, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline solids undergo plastic deformation and subsequently flow when subjected to stresses beyond their elastic limit. In nature most crystalline solids exist in polycrystalline form. Simulating plastic flows in polycrystalline solids has wide ranging applications, from material processing to understanding intermittency of earthquake dynamics. Using phase field crystal (PFC) model we show that in sheared polycrystalline solids the atomic displacement field shows spatio-temporal heterogeneity spanning over several orders of length and time scales, similar to that in amorphous solids. The displacement field also exhibits localized quadrupolar patterns, characteristic of two dislocations of the opposite sign approaching each other. This is a signature of crystallinity at microscopic scale. Polycrystals being halfway between single crystals and amorphous solids, in terms of the degree of structural order, descriptions of solid mechanics at two widely different scales, namely continuum plastic flow and discrete dislocation dynamics turns out to be necessary here.

  15. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  16. Ultrasonic density measurement cell design and simulation of non-ideal effects.

    PubMed

    Higuti, Ricardo Tokio; Buiochi, Flávio; Adamowski, Júlio Cezar; de Espinosa, Francisco Montero

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of a density measurement cell using an unidimensional model composed by acoustic and electroacoustic transmission lines in order to simulate non-ideal effects. The model is implemented using matrix operations, and is used to design the cell considering its geometry, materials used in sensor assembly, range of liquid sample properties and signal analysis techniques. The sensor performance in non-ideal conditions is studied, considering the thicknesses of adhesive and metallization layers, and the effect of residue of liquid sample which can impregnate on the sample chamber surfaces. These layers are taken into account in the model, and their effects are compensated to reduce the error on density measurement. The results show the contribution of residue layer thickness to density error and its behavior when two signal analysis methods are used.

  17. Non-ideal feedforward torque control of wind turbines: Impacts on annual energy production & gross earnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Christoph; Schechner, Korbinian

    2016-09-01

    We discuss non-ideal torque control in wind turbine systems. Most high-level controllers generate a reference torque which is then send to the underlying electrical drive system (generator+inverter) of the wind turbine system to steer the turbine/generator to its optimal operation point (depending on the wind speed). The energy production heavily depends on the mechanical power (i.e. the product of rotational speed and generator torque). However, since torque sensors in the MW range are not available or extremely expensive, the underlying torque control system is implemented as feedforward control and, therefore, is inherently sensitive to parameter variations/uncertainties. Based on real wind data and a wind turbine system model, we discuss causes and impacts of non-ideal feedforward torque control on the energy production and the annual gross earnings.

  18. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang, S.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  19. Assessing the Damaging Potential of Non-Ideal Explosives Based Upon Ammonium Nitrate Fertilizer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    ASSESSING THE DAMAGING POTENTIAL OF NON-IDEAL EXPLOSIVES BASED UPON AMMONIUM NITRATE FERTILIZER Peter J Hubbard Maurice Marshall DERA Fort Halstead...a similar massive bomb this time allegedly based upon a mixture of prilled agricultural ammonium nitrate fertilizer and fuel oil (ANFO) was used in...explosives tested were measured using fibre optic probes in some experiments and ionisation probes in others. An array of pressure gauges was used to

  20. Beyond the second virial coefficient: Sedimentation equilibrium in highly non-ideal solutions.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Germán; Minton, Allen P

    2011-05-01

    The general theory of sedimentation equilibrium (SE), applicable to mixtures of interacting sedimentable solutes at arbitrary concentration, is summarized. Practical techniques for the acquisition of SE data suitable for analysis are described. Experimental measurements and analyses of SE in concentrated protein solutions are reviewed. The method of non-ideal tracer sedimentation equilibrium (NITSE) is described. Experimental studies using NITSE to detect and quantitatively characterize intermolecular interactions in mixtures of dilute tracer species and concentrated proteins or polymers are reviewed.

  1. Exciton-like electromagnetic excitations in non-ideal microcavity supercrystals

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    We study localized photonic excitations in a quasi-two-dimensional non-ideal binary microcavity lattice with use of the virtual crystal approximation. The effect of point defects (vacancies) on the excitation spectrum is investigated by numerical modelling. We obtain the dispersion and the energy gap of the electromagnetic excitations which may be considered as Frenkel exciton-like quasiparticles and analyze the dependence of their density of states on the defect concentrations in a microcavity supercrystal. PMID:25374150

  2. Effects of non-ideal boundary conditions on the vibrations of a slightly curved micro beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarı, Gözde; Pakdemirli, Mehmet

    2012-11-01

    Response of a slightly curved resonant microbeam having non-ideal boundary conditions is investigated. Non-ideal boundary conditions are formulated using perturbation theory. These non-ideal conditions allow for small deflection at the right end of the microbeam. The curvature is taken as a sinusoidal function of the spatial variable. The initial displacement is due to the geometry of the microbeam itself. They are produced intentionally to be curved or made curved by buckling straight beams through compressive axial loads. The model accounts for mid-plane stretching, an applied axial load and an AC harmonic force. The ends of the curved microbeam are on immovable simple supports. Immovable end conditions introduce integral type nonlinearity. The integro-differential equations of motion are solved analytically by means of direct application of the method of multiple scales (a perturbation method). The amplitude and phase modulation equations are derived for the case of primary resonances. The effect of curvature on the vibrations of the microbeam is examined. It is found that the effect of curvature is of softening type. The frequencies and mode shapes obtained are compared with the ideal boundary conditions case and the differences between them are contrasted on frequency response curves.

  3. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  4. Treatment of non-ideality in the SPACCIM multiphase model - Part 1: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusumdar, A. J.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2016-01-01

    Ambient tropospheric deliquesced particles generally comprise a complex mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Dynamic modeling of physical and chemical processes in this complex matrix is challenging. Thus, up-to-date multiphase chemistry models generally do not consider non-ideal solution effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed at presenting further development of the SPACCIM (Spectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model) through treatment of solution non-ideality, which has not been considered before. The present paper firstly describes the model developments including (i) the implementation of solution non-ideality in aqueous-phase reaction kinetics in the SPACCIM framework, (ii) the advancements in the coupling scheme of microphysics and multiphase chemistry and (iii) the required adjustments of the numerical schemes, especially in the sparse linear solver and the calculation of the Jacobian. Secondly, results of sensitivity investigations are outlined, aiming at the evaluation of different activity coefficient modules and the examination of the contributions of different intermolecular forces to the overall activity coefficients. Finally, first results obtained with the new model framework are presented. The SPACCIM parcel model was developed and, so far, applied for the description of aerosol-cloud interactions. To advance SPACCIM also for modeling physical and chemical processes in deliquesced particles, the solution non-ideality has to be taken into account by utilizing activities in reaction terms instead of aqueous concentrations. The main goal of the extended approach was to provide appropriate activity coefficients for solved species. Therefore, an activity coefficient module was incorporated into the kinetic model framework of SPACCIM. Based on an intercomparison of different activity coefficient models and the comparison with experimental data, the AIOMFAC approach was implemented and extended by additional interaction

  5. On the main flow pattern in hydrocyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.C.; Shen, H.Q.; Zhu, G.; Khonsari, M.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the prediction of the main flow pattern in hydrocyclones. The model regards the main body of the cyclone as inviscid and includes provisions for the fluid underflow in cyclones. The governing equations are solved analytically in closed form. To verify the results, a laboratory-scale conically-shaped hydrocyclone was designed, built, and tested. Experimental measurements for axial and tangential velocities are presented with a series of test solely devoted to the effect of underflow. The theoretical and experimental results are shown to be in good agreement. It is concluded that such an inviscid model gives an adequate representation of the main flow field in a cyclone.

  6. Treatment of non-ideality in the multiphase model SPACCIM - Part 1: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusumdar, A. J.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-06-01

    Ambient tropospheric deliquesced particles generally comprise a complex mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Dynamic modeling of physical and chemical processes in this complex matrix is challenging. Thus, up-to-date multiphase chemistry models do generally not consider non-ideal solution effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed at the further development of the SPACCIM model to treat both complex multiphase chemistry and phase transfer processes considering newly non-ideality properties of concentrated aerosol solutions. The present paper describes firstly, the performed model development including (i) the kinetic implementation of the non-ideality in the SPACCIM framework, (ii) the advancements in the coupling scheme of microphysics and multiphase chemistry and (iii) the required adjustments of the numerical schemes, especially in the sparse linear solver and the calculation of the Jacobian. Secondly, results of performed sensitivity investigations are outlined aiming at the evaluation of different activity coefficient modules and the examination of the contributions of different intermolecular forces to the overall activity coefficients. Finally, first results obtained with the new model framework are presented. The main product of the performed model development is the new kinetic model approach SPACCIM-SpactMod, which utilizes activities in reaction terms instead of aqueous concentrations. Based on an intercomparison of different activity coefficient models and the comparison with experimental data, AIOMFAC was selected as base model and extended by additional interaction parameters from literature for mixed organic-inorganic systems. Moreover, the performance and the capability of the applied activity coefficient module were evaluated by means of water activity measurements, literature data and results of other thermodynamic equilibrium models. Comprehensive comparison studies showed that the SpactMod (SPACCIM activity coefficient

  7. Patterns and stability of a whirlpool flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrión, Luis; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.; María López-Herrera, José

    2017-04-01

    This numerical study reveals stable multi-eddy patterns of a steady axisymmetric air–water flow driven by the rotating bottom disk in a vertical sealed cylindrical container. As rotation strength Re increases, eddies emerge, coalesce, separate, and disappear in both air and water. The topological scenario varies with water volume fraction H w according to the results obtained for H w = 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. Interesting features are: (a) zipper-like chains of air and water eddies forming as the interface bends and (b) bubble-ring air eddies existing in the Re ranges specified in the paper. The stability analysis, performed with the help of a novel efficient technique for two-fluid flows, shows that these multi-eddy motions are stable. The shear-layer instability develops as the interface approaches either the top or bottom of the container and some eddies vanish. The physical reasoning behind the eddy formation and the flow instability is provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can have applications in bioreactors.

  8. Numerical modelling of underwater detonation of non-ideal condensed-phase explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    The interest in underwater detonation tests originated from the military, since the expansion and subsequent collapse of the explosive bubble can cause considerable damage to surrounding structures or vessels. In military applications, the explosive is typically represented as a pre-burned material under high pressure, a reasonable assumption due to the short reaction zone lengths, and complete detonation of the unreacted explosive. Hence, numerical simulations of underwater detonation tests have been primarily concerned with the prediction of target loading and the damage incurred rather than the accurate modelling of the underwater detonation process. The mining industry in contrast has adopted the underwater detonation test as a means to experimentally characterise the energy output of their highly non-ideal explosives depending on explosive type and charge configuration. This characterisation requires a good understanding of how the charge shape, pond topography, charge depth, and additional charge confinement affect the energy release, some of which can be successfully quantified with the support of accurate numerical simulations. In this work, we propose a numerical framework which is able to capture the non-ideal explosive behaviour and in addition is capable of capturing both length scales: the reaction zone and the pond domain. The length scale problem is overcome with adaptive mesh refinement, which, along with the explosive model, is validated against experimental data of various TNT underwater detonations. The variety of detonation and bubble behaviour observed in non-ideal detonations is demonstrated in a parameter study over the reactivity of TNT. A representative underwater mining test containing an ammonium-nitrate fuel-oil ratestick charge is carried out to demonstrate that the presented method can be readily applied alongside experimental underwater detonation tests.

  9. Non-ideal Effects in Streaming Bi-Dust Acoustic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, J.; Castro, E.; Martin, P.; Arias, H.

    2006-12-04

    Streaming dust acoustic instabilities in the presence of a dust beam in a weakly non-ideal dusty plasma have been studied considering a new form for the state equation with two kind of grains. Fluctuating charging effects are not considered in this work. Homogeneous dust-acoustic waves (DAWS) are studied for a perturbed plasma in a very low frequency regime, where dusty plasmas support new kind of waves and instabilities due to the dust collective dynamics. In this analysis a fluid model is used and electrons and ions are determined by their Boltzmann factors in order to find an adequate dispersion relation, which has several parameters depending of the state equation constants. In this paper we use the state equation structured by Ree and Hoover using Pade approximant for a hard-sphere gas in the form P = nT 1 + nb{sub 0} (1 + a{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + a{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}/1 - b{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + b{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}) is applied, where b0 is calculated by the second virial term for the hard-core model. This type of equation is more accurate than other expressions and easier to manipulate. Comparisons between the ideal and non ideal cases is performed. Constants a1, a2, b1, b2, are calculated with the Pade method. The onset of the instability and also the growth rates are studied in function of relevant parameters of the system as the radius of the grains and their densities. In our analysis the instability region for non ideal plasma is compared with that of the ideal ones.

  10. NON-IDEAL MHD EFFECTS AND MAGNETIC BRAKING CATASTROPHE IN PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang Hsien

    2011-09-10

    Dense, star-forming cores of molecular clouds are observed to be significantly magnetized. A realistic magnetic field of moderate strength has been shown to suppress, through catastrophic magnetic braking, the formation of a rotationally supported disk (RSD) during the protostellar accretion phase of low-mass star formation in the ideal MHD limit. We address, through two-dimensional (axisymmetric) simulations, the question of whether realistic levels of non-ideal effects, computed with a simplified chemical network including dust grains, can weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable an RSD to form. We find that ambipolar diffusion (AD), the dominant non-ideal MHD effect over most of the density range relevant to disk formation, does not enable disk formation, at least in two dimensions. The reason is that AD allows the magnetic flux that would be dragged into the central stellar object in the ideal MHD limit to pile up instead in a small circumstellar region, where the magnetic field strength (and thus the braking efficiency) is greatly enhanced. We also find that, on the scale of tens of AU or more, a realistic level of Ohmic dissipation does not weaken the magnetic braking enough for an RSD to form, either by itself or in combination with AD. The Hall effect, the least explored of these three non-ideal MHD effects, can spin up the material close to the central object to a significant, supersonic rotation speed, even when the core is initially non-rotating, although the spun-up material remains too sub-Keplerian to form an RSD. The problem of catastrophic magnetic braking that prevents disk formation in dense cores magnetized to realistic levels remains unresolved. Possible resolutions of this problem are discussed.

  11. A mechanistic view of the non-ideal osmotic and motional behavior of intracellular water.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I L; Kanal, K M; Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that essentially all of the water in cells has the same ideal motional and colligative properties as does water in bulk liquid state. This assumption is used in studies of volume regulation, transmembrane movement of solutes and electrical potentials, solute and solution motion, solute solubility and other phenomena. To get at the extent and the source of non-ideally behaved water (an operational term dependent on the measurement method), we studied the motional and colligative properties of water in cells, in solutions of amino acids and glycine peptides whose surface characteristics are known, and in solution of bovine serum albumin, hemoglobin and some synthetic polypeptides. Solutions of individual amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains showed one perturbed water molecule (structured-slowed in motion) per nine square angstroms of hydrophobic surface area. Water molecules adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces form pentagonal structural arrays, as shown by X-ray diffraction studies, that are reported to be disrupted by heat, electric field, hydrostatic pressure and phosphorylation state. Hydrophilic amino acids demonstrated water destructuring (increased motion) that was attributed to dielectric realignment of dipolar water molecules in the electric field between charge groups. In solutions of proteins, several methods indicate the equivalent of 2-8 layers of structured water molecules extending beyond the protein surface, and we have recently demonstrated that induced protein conformational change modifies the extent of non-ideally behaved water. Water self-diffusion rate as measured in three different cell types was about half that of bulk water, indicating that most of the water in these cells was slower in motion than bulk water. In different cell types the extent of osmotically perturbed water ranged from less that half to almost all of the intracellular water. The assumption that essentially all intracellular water

  12. Characterization in bi-parameter space of a non-ideal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, S. L. T.; Batista, A. M.; Baptista, M. S.; Caldas, I. L.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of a non-ideal Duffing oscillator, a system composed of a mass-spring-pendulum driven by a DC motor with limited power supply. To identify new features on Duffing oscillator parameter space due to the limited power supply, we provide an extensive numerical characterization in the bi-parameter space by using Lyapunov exponents. Following this procedure, we identify remarkable new organized distribution of periodic windows, the ones known as Arnold tongues and also shrimp-shaped structures. In addition, we also identify intertwined basins of attraction for coexisting multiple attractors connected with tongues.

  13. Non-Ideal Detonation Properties of Ammonium Nitrate and Activated Carbon Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Atsumi; Echigoya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hidefumi; Ogawa, Terushige; Katoh, Katsumi; Kubota, Shiro; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji

    To obtain a better understanding of detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) and activated carbon (AC) mixtures, steel tube tests with several diameters were carried out for various compositions of powdered AN and AC mixtures and the influence of the charge diameter on the detonation velocity was investigated. The results showed that the detonation velocity increased with the increase of the charge diameter. The experimentally observed values were far below the theoretically predicted values made by the thermodynamic CHEETAH code and they showed so-called non-ideal detonation. The extrapolated detonation velocity of stoichiometric composition to the infinite diameter showed a good agreement with the theoretical value.

  14. Quantification of non-ideal explosion violence with a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    There is significant interest in quantifying the blast violence associated with various nonideal explosions. Such data is essential to evaluate the damage potential of both explosive cookoff and terrorist explosive scenarios. We present a technique designed to measure the source energy associated with a non-ideal, asymmetrical, and three-dimensional explosion. A tube is used to confine and focus energy from a blast event into a one-dimensional, quasi-planar shock front. During propagation along the length of the tube, the wave is allowed to shocksteepen into a more ideal form. Pressure transducers then measure the shock overpressure as a function of the distance from the source. One-dimensional blast scaling theory allows calculation of the source energy from this data. This small-scale test method addresses cost and noise concerns as well as boosting and symmetry issues associated with large-scale, three-dimensional, blast arena tests. Results from both ideal explosives and non-ideal explosives are discussed.

  15. A Novel Calibration-Minimum Method for Prediction of Mole Fraction in Non-Ideal Mixture.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Shojiro; Kaneko, Hiromasa; Funatsu, Kimito

    2017-04-01

    This article proposes a novel concentration prediction model that requires little training data and is useful for rapid process understanding. Process analytical technology is currently popular, especially in the pharmaceutical industry, for enhancement of process understanding and process control. A calibration-free method, iterative optimization technology (IOT), was proposed to predict pure component concentrations, because calibration methods such as partial least squares, require a large number of training samples, leading to high costs. However, IOT cannot be applied to concentration prediction in non-ideal mixtures because its basic equation is derived from the Beer-Lambert law, which cannot be applied to non-ideal mixtures. We proposed a novel method that realizes prediction of pure component concentrations in mixtures from a small number of training samples, assuming that spectral changes arising from molecular interactions can be expressed as a function of concentration. The proposed method is named IOT with virtual molecular interaction spectra (IOT-VIS) because the method takes spectral change as a virtual spectrum x nonlin,i into account. It was confirmed through the two case studies that the predictive accuracy of IOT-VIS was the highest among existing IOT methods.

  16. Compensation of non-ideal beam splitter polarization distortion effect in Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2016-02-01

    A composite optical structure consisting of two quarter-wave plates and a single half-wave plate is proposed for compensating for the polarization distortion induced by a non-ideal beam splitter in a Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the optimal orientations of the optical components within the polarization compensator are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) such that the beam splitter can be treated as a free-space medium and modeled using a unit Mueller matrix accordingly. Two implementations of the proposed polarization controller are presented. In the first case, the compensator is placed in the output arm of Michelson interferometer such that the state of polarization of the interfered output light is equal to that of the input light. However, in this configuration, the polarization effects induced by the beam splitter in the two arms of the interferometer structure cannot be separately addressed. Consequently, in the second case, compensator structures are placed in the Michelson interferometer for compensation on both the scanning and reference beams. The practical feasibility of the proposed approach is introduced by considering a Mueller polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) structure with three polarization controllers in the input, reference and sample arms, respectively. In general, the results presented in this study show that the proposed polarization controller provides an effective and experimentally-straightforward means of compensating for the polarization distortion effects induced by the non-ideal beam splitters in Michelson interferometers and Mueller PS-OCT structures.

  17. Cable dynamics under non-ideal support excitations: Nonlinear dynamic interactions and asymptotic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tieding; Kang, Houjun; Wang, Lianhua; Zhao, Yueyu

    2016-12-01

    Cable dynamics under ideal longitudinal support motions/excitations assumes that the support's mass, stiffness and mechanical energy are infinite. However, for many long/slender support structures, their finite mass and stiffness should be taken into account and the cable-support dynamic interactions should be modelled and evaluated. These moving supports are non-ideal support excitations, deserving a proper coupling analysis. For systems with a large support/cable mass ratio, using the multiple scale method and asymptotic approximations, a cable-support coupled reduced model, with both cable's geometric nonlinearity and cable-support coupling nonlinearity included, is established asymptotically and validated numerically in this paper. Based upon the reduced model, cable's nonlinear responses under non-ideal support excitations(and also the coupled responses) are found, with stability and bifurcation characteristics determined. By finding the modifications caused by the support/cable mass ratio, boundary damping, and internal detuning, full investigations into coupling-induced dynamic effects on the cable are conducted. Finally, the approximate analytical results based on the reduced model are verified by numerical results from the original full model.

  18. Atomic force microscopy analysis of nanoparticles in non-ideal conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles are often measured using atomic force microscopy or other scanning probe microscopy methods. For isolated nanoparticles on flat substrates, this is a relatively easy task. However, in real situations, we often need to analyze nanoparticles on rough substrates or nanoparticles that are not isolated. In this article, we present a simple model for realistic simulations of nanoparticle deposition and we employ this model for modeling nanoparticles on rough substrates. Different modeling conditions (coverage, relaxation after deposition) and convolution with different tip shapes are used to obtain a wide spectrum of virtual AFM nanoparticle images similar to those known from practice. Statistical parameters of nanoparticles are then analyzed using different data processing algorithms in order to show their systematic errors and to estimate uncertainties for atomic force microscopy analysis of nanoparticles under non-ideal conditions. It is shown that the elimination of user influence on the data processing algorithm is a key step for obtaining accurate results while analyzing nanoparticles measured in non-ideal conditions. PMID:21878120

  19. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length.

  20. Air flow patterns in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Howorth, F H

    1980-04-01

    Bacteria-carrying particles and exhaled anaesthetic gases are the two contaminants found in the air flow patterns of operating rooms. Their origin, direction and speed were illustrated by a motion picture using Schlieren photography and smoke tracers. Compared with a conventionally well air conditioned operating theatre, it was shown that a downward flow of clean air reduced the number of bacteria-carrying particles at the wound site by sixty times. The Exflow method of achieving this without the restriction of any side panels or floor obstruction was described. The total body exhaust worn by the surgical team was shown to reduce the bacteria count by a further eleven times. Clinical results show that when both these systems are used together, patient infection was reduced from 9 per cent to between 0.3 per cent and 0.5 per cent, even when no pre-operative antibiotics were used. Anaesthetic gas pollution was measured and shown to be generally 1000 p.p.m. at the head of the patient, in induction, operating and recovery rooms, also in dental and labour rooms. A high volume low pressure active scavenging system was described together with its various attachments including one specially for paediatric scavenging. Results showed a reduction of nitrous oxide pollution to between zero and 3 p.p.m. The economy and cost effectiveness of both these pollution control systems was shown to be good due to the removal of health hazards from patients and theatre staff.

  1. Pattern palette for complex fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandnes, B.

    2012-04-01

    From landslides to oil and gas recovery to the squeeze of a toothpaste tube, flowing complex fluids are everywhere around us in nature and engineering. That is not to say, though, that they are always well understood. The dissipative interactions, through friction and inelastic collisions, often give rise to nonlinear dynamics and complexity manifested in pattern formation on large scales. The images displayed on this poster illustrate the diverse morphologies found in multiphase flows involving wet granular material: Air is injected into a generic mixture of granular material and fluid contained in a 500 µm gap between two parallel glass plates. At low injection rates, friction between the grains - glass beads averaging 100 µm in diameter - dominates the rheology, producing "stick-slip bubbles" and labyrinthine frictional fingering. A transition to various other morphologies, including "corals" and viscous fingers, emerges for increasing injection rate. At sufficiently high granular packing fractions, the material behaves like a deformable, porous solid, and the air rips through in sudden fractures.

  2. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  3. Comparison of non-ideal solution theories for multi-solute solutions in cryobiology and tabulation of required coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Michal W; McGann, Locksley E; Nychka, John A; Elliott, Janet A W

    2014-10-01

    Thermodynamic solution theories allow the prediction of chemical potentials in solutions of known composition. In cryobiology, such models are a critical component of many mathematical models that are used to simulate the biophysical processes occurring in cells and tissues during cryopreservation. A number of solution theories, both thermodynamically ideal and non-ideal, have been proposed for use with cryobiological solutions. In this work, we have evaluated two non-ideal solution theories for predicting water chemical potential (i.e. osmolality) in multi-solute solutions relevant to cryobiology: the Elliott et al. form of the multi-solute osmotic virial equation, and the Kleinhans and Mazur freezing point summation model. These two solution theories require fitting to only single-solute data, although they can make predictions in multi-solute solutions. The predictions of these non-ideal solution theories were compared to predictions made using ideal dilute assumptions and to available literature multi-solute experimental osmometric data. A single, consistent set of literature single-solute solution data was used to fit for the required solute-specific coefficients for each of the non-ideal models. Our results indicate that the two non-ideal solution theories have similar overall performance, and both give more accurate predictions than ideal models. These results can be used to select between the non-ideal models for a specific multi-solute solution, and the updated coefficients provided in this work can be used to make the desired predictions.

  4. Unsaturated Zone Flow Patterns and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers

    2001-10-17

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents the development of an expected-case model for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport that will be described in terms of the representativeness of models of the natural system. The expected-case model will provide an evaluation of the effectiveness of the natural barriers, assess the impact of conservatism in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), and support the development of further models and analyses for public confidence building. The present models used in ''Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation'' (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) 2000 [1532461]) underestimate the natural-barrier performance because of conservative assumptions and parameters and do not adequately address uncertainty and alternative models. The development of an expected case model for the UZ natural barrier addresses issues regarding flow-pattern analysis and modeling that had previously been treated conservatively. This is in line with the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS) philosophy of treating conservatively those aspects of the UZ flow and transport system that are not important for achieving regulatory dose (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153246], Section 1.1.1). The development of an expected case model for the UZ also provides defense-in-depth in areas requiring further analysis of uncertainty and alternative models. In general, the value of the conservative case is to provide a more easily defensible TSPA for behavior of UZ flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This AMR has been prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) 2001 [155051], Section 1.3 - Work Package 4301213UMG). The work scope is to examine the data and current models of flow and transport in the Yucca Mountain UZ to identify models and analyses where conservatism may be reduced and

  5. Analytical and Experimental Performance Evaluation of BLE Neighbor Discovery Process Including Non-Idealities of Real Chipsets

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Diaz de Cerio, David; Hernández, Ángela; Valenzuela, Jose Luis; Valdovinos, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate from a real perspective the performance of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) as a technology that enables fast and reliable discovery of a large number of users/devices in a short period of time. The BLE standard specifies a wide range of configurable parameter values that determine the discovery process and need to be set according to the particular application requirements. Many previous works have been addressed to investigate the discovery process through analytical and simulation models, according to the ideal specification of the standard. However, measurements show that additional scanning gaps appear in the scanning process, which reduce the discovery capabilities. These gaps have been identified in all of the analyzed devices and respond to both regular patterns and variable events associated with the decoding process. We have demonstrated that these non-idealities, which are not taken into account in other studies, have a severe impact on the discovery process performance. Extensive performance evaluation for a varying number of devices and feasible parameter combinations has been done by comparing simulations and experimental measurements. This work also includes a simple mathematical model that closely matches both the standard implementation and the different chipset peculiarities for any possible parameter value specified in the standard and for any number of simultaneous advertising devices under scanner coverage. PMID:28273801

  6. Building a numerical relativistic non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, S. Miranda; Aloy, M. A.; Aloy, Carmen.

    2014-08-01

    Including resistive effects in relativistic magnetized plasmas is a challenging task, that a number of authors have recently tackled employing different methods. From the numerical point of view, the difficulty in including non-ideal terms arises from the fact that, in the limit of very high plasma conductivity (i.e., close to the ideal MHD limit), the system of governing equations becomes stiff, and the standard explicit integrating methods produce instabilities that destroy the numerical solution. To deal with such a difficulty, we have extended the relativistic MHD code MR-GENESIS, to include a number of Implicit Explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX-RK) numerical methods. To validate the implementation of the IMEX-RK schemes, two standard tests are presented in one and two spatial dimensions, covering different conductivity regimes.

  7. Enabling R&D for accurate simulation of non-ideal explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, John Bahram; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schmitt, Robert Gerard

    2010-09-01

    We implemented two numerical simulation capabilities essential to reliably predicting the effect of non-ideal explosives (NXs). To begin to be able to treat the multiple, competing, multi-step reaction paths and slower kinetics of NXs, Sandia's CTH shock physics code was extended to include the TIGER thermochemical equilibrium solver as an in-line routine. To facilitate efficient exploration of reaction pathways that need to be identified for the CTH simulations, we implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS molecular dynamics code the MSST method, which is a reactive molecular dynamics technique for simulating steady shock wave response. Our preliminary demonstrations of these two capabilities serve several purposes: (i) they demonstrate proof-of-principle for our approach; (ii) they provide illustration of the applicability of the new functionality; and (iii) they begin to characterize the use of the new functionality and identify where improvements will be needed for the ultimate capability to meet national security needs. Next steps are discussed.

  8. Redundant imprinting of information in non-ideal environments: Quantum Darwinism via a noisy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Quan, Haitao; Zurek, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism provides an information-theoretic framework for the emergence of the classical world from the quantum substrate. It recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the ``systems of interest'' indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Objectivity, a key property of the classical world, arises via the proliferation of redundant information into the environment where many observers can then intercept it and independently determine the state of the system. While causing a system to decohere, environments that remain nearly invariant under the Hamiltonian dynamics, such as very mixed states, have a diminished ability to transmit information about the system, yet can still acquire redundant information about the system [1,2]. Our results show that Quantum Darwinism is robust with respect to non-ideal initial states of the environment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  9. Non-ideal mixing behaviour of hydrogen bonding in mixtures of protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fumino, Koichi; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Golub, Benjamin; Paschek, Dietmar; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-02-02

    Ionic liquids (ILs) attract interest in science and technology as a result of their unique properties. Binary and ternary mixtures of ILs significantly increase the number of possible cation/anion combinations, resulting in targeted physical and chemical properties. In this work, we study the mixing behaviour of two protic ILs: triethyl ammonium methylsulfonate [Et3 NH][CH3 SO3 ] and triethylammonium triflate [Et3 NH][CF3 SO3 ]. We find a characteristic deviation from ideal mixing by means of low-frequency infrared spectroscopy. By using molecular dynamics simulations, we explain this behaviour as being the result of different strengths of anion/cation hydrogen bonding. This non-ideality of non-random H-bond mixing is also reflected in macroscopic properties such as the viscosity. Mixing suitable ILs may, thus, result in new ILs with targeted physical properties.

  10. Non-ideal assembly of the driving unit affecting shape of load-displacement curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-03-01

    The results of nanoindentation testing strongly rely on load-displacement curves, but an abnormal load-displacement curve with obvious inflection in the unloading portion was commonly observed in previously published papers and the reason is not clear. In this paper, possible reasons involved in a custom-made indentation instrument, such as sensors, control and assembly issues, are analyzed and discussed step by step. Experimental results indicate that non-ideal assembly of the precision driving unit strongly affects the shape of the load-displacement curve and its affecting mechanism is studied by theoretical analysis and finite element simulations. This paper reveals the reason leading to the abnormal load-displacement curve, which is helpful for debugging of indentation instruments and can enhance comparability of indentation results.

  11. Numerical modeling of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in non-ideal multijunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengyang; Lyu, Zheng; Jia, Jieyang; Chen, Yusi; Liu, Yi; Huo, Yijie; Miao, Yu; Harris, James

    2016-03-01

    For solar cells composed of direct bandgap semiconductors such as GaAs, the performance can be significantly improved by utilizing photon recycling and luminescence coupling effects. Accurate modeling with those effects may offer insightful guidance in designing such devices. Previous research has demonstrated different numerical models on photon recycling and luminescent coupling. However, most of those works are based on complicated theoretical derivation and idealized assumptions, which made them hard to implement. In addition, very few works provide method to model both photon recycling and luminescent coupling effects. In this paper, we demonstrate an easy-to-implement but accurate numerical model to simulate those effects in multijunction solar cells. Our numerical model can be incorporated into commonly used equivalent circuit model with high accuracy. The simulation results were compared with experimental data and exhibit good consistency. Our numerical simulation is based on a self-consistent optical-electrical model that includes non-ideal losses in both the single junction and the tandem device. Based on the numerical analysis, we modified the two-diode circuit model by introducing additional current-control-current sources to represent the effects of both photon recycling and luminescence coupling. The effects of photon recycling on the diode equation have been investigated based on detailed-balanced model, accounting for internal optical losses. We also showed the practical limit of performance enhancement of photon recycling and luminescent coupling effects. This work will potentially facilitate the accurate simulation of solar cell with non-ideal effects, and provide more efficient tools for multijunction solar cell design and optimization.

  12. Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

    2006-06-20

    We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

  13. Solute/solvent interaction corrections account for non-ideal freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Chao, H; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L

    1993-02-01

    A new highly accurate curve-fitting technique for looking at freezing-point depression data was proposed by Fullerton et al. (Biochem. Cell Biol., in press). The method involve plotting mass solvent to mass solute ratio (Mw/M(s)) vs. 1/delta T (i.e. the inverse change in freezing point). A measured molecular weight and a solute/solvent interaction parameter (called I value) are inferred from the resultant linear plot. The accuracy of the molecular weight method was first demonstrated with the monomers of ethylene glycol, glycerol, propanol, mannitol, glucose and sucrose to show a mean molecular weight error of 0.02% with root mean square (RMS) error 0.9%. The RMS error (0.9%) is our best estimate of the molecular weight measurement accuracy for the method applied to a monomer. This error is consistent with the experimental precision (approximately 1%) which implies no systematic error. Non-ideality is described with a single constant, I. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers of increasing length (vendor designation 200 to 10,000 Da) were analyzed to show monotonically increasing non-ideality (I values of 0.12 to 3.67) with increasing molecular weight. The measured molecular weights agreed with the end-point titration value for the three smallest polymers (where the number of polymeric units was less than or equal to 7). The method underestimates the vendor molecular weights for longer polymers. This disagreement is assigned to segmental motion (internal entropy) of longer, more flexible, PEG molecules.

  14. A generic model of real-world non-ideal behaviour of FES-induced muscle contractions: simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Cheryl L.; Graham, Geoff M.; Popovic, Milos R.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) applications are frequently evaluated in simulation prior to testing in human subjects. Such simulations are usually based on the typical muscle responses to electrical stimulation, which may result in an overly optimistic assessment of likely real-world performance. We propose a novel method for simulating FES applications that includes non-ideal muscle behaviour during electrical stimulation resulting from muscle fatigue, spasms and tremors. A 'non-idealities' block that can be incorporated into existing FES simulations and provides a realistic estimate of real-world performance is described. An implementation example is included, showing how the non-idealities block can be incorporated into a simulation of electrically stimulated knee extension against gravity for both a proportional-integral-derivative controller and a sliding mode controller. The results presented in this paper illustrate that the real-world performance of a FES system may be vastly different from the performance obtained in simulation using nominal muscle models. We believe that our non-idealities block should be included in future simulations that involve muscle response to FES, as this tool will provide neural engineers with a realistic simulation of the real-world performance of FES systems. This simulation strategy will help engineers and organizations save time and money by preventing premature human testing. The non-idealities block will become available free of charge at www.toronto-fes.ca in late 2011.

  15. Flow in geothermal wells. Part IV. Transition criteria for two-phase flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed considerations justifying the criteria for transitions between flow patterns are presented. The following are covered: transition from bubble to plug (or slug) flow, transition from plug flow to froth flow, transition from froth to annular mist flow, and model comparisons. (MHR)

  16. Effect of compositional heterogeneity on dissolution of non-ideal LNAPL mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, M; Johnston, C D; Bastow, T P; Lekmine, G; Rayner, J L; Nambi, I M; Suresh Kumar, G; Ravi Krishna, R; Davis, G B

    2016-11-01

    The extent of dissolution of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels into groundwater depends greatly on fuel composition. Petroleum fuels can consist of thousands of compounds creating different interactions within the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), thereby affecting the relative dissolution of the components and hence a groundwater plume's composition over long periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the variability in the effective solubilities and activity coefficients for common constituents of gasoline fuels (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) (BTX) in matrices with an extreme range of molar volumes and chemical affinities. Four synthetic mixtures were investigated comprising BTX with the bulk of the NAPL mixtures made up of either, ethylbenzene (an aromatic like BTX with similar molar volume); 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (an aromatic with a greater molar volume); n-hexane (an aliphatic with a low molar volume); and n-decane (an aliphatic with a high molar volume). Equilibrium solubility values for the constituents were under-predicted by Raoult's law by up to 30% (higher experimental concentrations) for the mixture with n-hexane as a filler and over-predicted by up to 12% (lower experimental concentrations) for the aromatic mixtures with ethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as fillers. Application of PP-LFER (poly-parameter linear free energy relationship) model for non-ideal mixtures also resulted in poor correlation between experimentally measured and predicted concentrations, indicating that differences in chemical affinities can be the major cause of deviation from ideal behavior. Synthetic mixtures were compared with the dissolution behavior of fresh and naturally weathered unleaded gasoline. The presence of lighter aliphatic components in the gasoline had a profound effect on estimating effective solubility due to chemical affinity differences (estimated at 0.0055 per percentage increase in the molar proportion of aliphatic) as

  17. Effect of compositional heterogeneity on dissolution of non-ideal LNAPL mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Johnston, C. D.; Bastow, T. P.; Lekmine, G.; Rayner, J. L.; Nambi, I. M.; Suresh Kumar, G.; Ravi Krishna, R.; Davis, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    The extent of dissolution of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels into groundwater depends greatly on fuel composition. Petroleum fuels can consist of thousands of compounds creating different interactions within the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), thereby affecting the relative dissolution of the components and hence a groundwater plume's composition over long periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the variability in the effective solubilities and activity coefficients for common constituents of gasoline fuels (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) (BTX) in matrices with an extreme range of molar volumes and chemical affinities. Four synthetic mixtures were investigated comprising BTX with the bulk of the NAPL mixtures made up of either, ethylbenzene (an aromatic like BTX with similar molar volume); 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (an aromatic with a greater molar volume); n-hexane (an aliphatic with a low molar volume); and n-decane (an aliphatic with a high molar volume). Equilibrium solubility values for the constituents were under-predicted by Raoult's law by up to 30% (higher experimental concentrations) for the mixture with n-hexane as a filler and over-predicted by up to 12% (lower experimental concentrations) for the aromatic mixtures with ethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as fillers. Application of PP-LFER (poly-parameter linear free energy relationship) model for non-ideal mixtures also resulted in poor correlation between experimentally measured and predicted concentrations, indicating that differences in chemical affinities can be the major cause of deviation from ideal behavior. Synthetic mixtures were compared with the dissolution behavior of fresh and naturally weathered unleaded gasoline. The presence of lighter aliphatic components in the gasoline had a profound effect on estimating effective solubility due to chemical affinity differences (estimated at 0.0055 per percentage increase in the molar proportion of aliphatic) as

  18. Spectral Analysis of Non-ideal MRI Modes: The Effect of Hall Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Gopakumar; Pessah, Martin E.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of magnetic field diffusion on the stability of accretion disks is a problem that has attracted considerable interest of late. In particular, the Hall effect has the potential to bring about remarkable changes in the dynamical behavior of disks that are without parallel. In this paper, we conduct a systematic examination of the linear eigenmodes in a weakly magnetized differentially rotating gas with a special focus on Hall diffusion. We first develop a geometrical representation of the eigenmodes and provide a detailed quantitative description of the polarization properties of the oscillatory modes under the combined influence of the Coriolis and Hall effects. We also analyze the effects of magnetic diffusion on the structure of the unstable modes and derive analytical expressions for the kinetic and magnetic stresses and energy densities associated with the non-ideal magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our analysis explicitly demonstrates that, if the dissipative effects are relatively weak, the kinetic stresses and energies make up the dominant contribution to the total stress and energy density when the equilibrium angular momentum and magnetic field vectors are anti-parallel. This is in sharp contrast to what is observed in the case of the ideal or dissipative MRI. We conduct shearing box simulations and find very good agreement with the results derived from linear theory. Because the modes under consideration are also exact solutions of the nonlinear equations, the unconventional nature of the kinetic and magnetic stresses may have significant implications for the nonlinear evolution in some regions of protoplanetary disks.

  19. Effect of non-ideal clamping shape on the resonance frequencies of silicon nanocantilevers.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Samuel; Saya, Daisuke; Mazenq, Laurent; Perisanu, Sorin; Vincent, Pascal; Lazarus, Arnaud; Thomas, Olivier; Nicu, Liviu

    2011-06-17

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of non-ideal clamping shapes on the dynamic behavior of silicon nanocantilevers. We fabricated silicon nanocantilevers using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers by employing stepper ultraviolet (UV) lithography, which permits a resolution of under 100 nm. The nanocantilevers were driven by electrostatic force inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both lateral and out-of-plane resonance frequencies were visually detected with the SEM. Next, we discuss overhanging of the cantilever support and curvature at the clamping point in the silicon nanocantilevers, which generally arises in the fabrication process. We found that the fundamental out-of-plane frequency of a realistically clamped cantilever is always lower than that for a perfectly clamped cantilever, and depends on the cantilever width and the geometry of the clamping point structure. Using simulation with the finite-elements method, we demonstrate that this discrepancy is attributed to the particular geometry of the clamping point (non-zero joining curvatures and a flexible overhanging) that is obtained in the fabrication process. The influence of the material orthotropy is also investigated and is shown to be negligible.

  20. A non-ideal portal frame energy harvester controlled using a pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliuk, I.; Balthazar, J. M.; Tusset, A. M.; Piqueira, J. R. C.; Rodrigues de Pontes, B.; Felix, J. L. P.; Bueno, Á. M.

    2013-09-01

    A model of energy harvester based on a simple portal frame structure is presented. The system is considered to be non-ideal system (NIS) due to interaction with the energy source, a DC motor with limited power supply and the system structure. The nonlinearities present in the piezoelectric material are considered in the piezoelectric coupling mathematical model. The system is a bi-stable Duffing oscillator presenting a chaotic behavior. Analyzing the average power variation, and bifurcation diagrams, the value of the control variable that optimizes power or average value that stabilizes the chaotic system in the periodic orbit is determined. The control sensitivity is determined to parametric errors in the damping and stiffness parameters of the portal frame. The proposed passive control technique uses a simple pendulum to tuned to the vibration of the structure to improve the energy harvesting. The results show that with the implementation of the control strategy it is possible to eliminate the need for active or semi active control, usually more complex. The control also provides a way to regulate the energy captured to a desired operating frequency.

  1. Mathematical study of non-ideal electrostatic correlations in equilibrium electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Alexandre; Joubaud, Rémi; Lelièvre, Tony

    2012-06-01

    We undertake the mathematical analysis of a model describing equilibrium binary electrolytes surrounded by charged solid walls. The problem is formulated in terms of the electrostatic potential and the ionic concentrations which have prescribed spatial mean values. The free energy of the system is decomposed as the difference of the internal energy and entropy functionals. The entropy functional is the sum of an ideal entropy and an excess entropy, the latter taking into account non-ideality due to electrostatic correlations at low ionic concentrations and steric exclusion effects at high ionic concentrations. We derive sufficient conditions to achieve convexity of the entropy functional, yielding a convex-concave free energy functional. Our main result is the existence and uniqueness of the saddle point of the free energy functional and its characterization as a solution of the original model problem. The proof hinges on positive uniform lower bounds for the ionic concentrations and uniform upper bounds for the ionic concentrations and the electrostatic potential. Some numerical experiments are presented in the case where the excess entropy is evaluated using the mean spherical approximation.

  2. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; McQuillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  3. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; Mcquillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  4. Patterns and instability of grannular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Borzsonyi, Tamas; Mcelwaine, Jim N

    2009-01-01

    Dense granular flows are often observed to become unstable and form inhomogeneous structures in nature or industry. Although recently significant advances have been made in understanding simple flows, instabilities are often not understood in detail. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes. These arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding plug-like regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material -- a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  5. Global simulations of protoplanetary disks with net magnetic flux. I. Non-ideal MHD case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Context. The planet-forming region of protoplanetary disks is cold, dense, and therefore weakly ionized. For this reason, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is thought to be mostly absent, and another mechanism has to be found to explain gas accretion. It has been proposed that magnetized winds, launched from the ionized disk surface, could drive accretion in the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. Aims: The efficiency and the impact of these surface winds on the disk structure is still highly uncertain. We present the first global simulations of a weakly ionized disk that exhibits large-scale magnetized winds. We also study the impact of self-organization, which was previously demonstrated only in non-stratified models. Methods: We perform numerical simulations of stratified disks with the PLUTO code. We compute the ionization fraction dynamically, and account for all three non-ideal MHD effects: ohmic and ambipolar diffusions, and the Hall drift. Simplified heating and cooling due to non-thermal radiation is also taken into account in the disk atmosphere. Results: We find that disks can be accreting or not, depending on the configuration of the large-scale magnetic field. Magnetothermal winds, driven both by magnetic acceleration and heating of the atmosphere, are obtained in the accreting case. In some cases, these winds are asymmetric, ejecting predominantly on one side of the disk. The wind mass loss rate depends primarily on the average ratio of magnetic to thermal pressure in the disk midplane. The non-accreting case is characterized by a meridional circulation, with accretion layers at the disk surface and decretion in the midplane. Finally, we observe self-organization, resulting in axisymmetric rings of density and associated pressure "bumps". The underlying mechanism and its impact on observable structures are discussed.

  6. Non-ideal interactions in calcic amphiboles and their bearing on amphibole-plagioclase thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Tim; Blundy, Jon

    1994-05-01

    Amphibole thermodynamics are approximated with the symmetric formalism (regular solution model for within-site non-ideality and a reciprocal solution model for cross-site-terms) in order to formulate improved thermometers for amphibole-plagioclase assemblages. This approximation provides a convenient framework with which to account for composition-dependence of the ideal (mixing-on-sites) equilibrium constants for the equilibria: A) edenite+4quartz=tremolite+albite B) edenite+albite=richterite+anorthite For A and B all possible within-site and cross-site interactions among the species □-K-Na-Ca-Mg-Fe2+-Fe3+-Al-Si on the A, M4, M1, M3, M2 and T1 amphibole crystallographic sites were examined. Of the 36 possible interaction energy terms, application of the symmetric formalism results in a dramatic simplification to eight independent parameters. Plagioclase nonideality is modelled using Darken's quadratic formalism. We have supplemented an experimental data set of 92 amphibole-plagioclase pairs with 215 natural pairs from igneous and metamorphic rocks in which the pressure and temperature of equilibration are well constrained. Regression of the combined dataset yields values for the eight interaction parameters as well as for apparent enthalpy, entropy and volume changes for each reaction. These parameters are used to formulate two new thermometers, which perform well (±40°C) in the range 400 1000°C and 1 15 kbar over a broad range of bulk compositions, including tschermakitic amphiboles from garnet amphibolites which caused problems for the simple thermometer of Blundy and Holland (1990). For silica-saturated rocks both thermometers may be applied: in silica-undersaturated rocks or magmas thermometer B alone can be applied. An improved procedure for estimation of ferric iron in calcic amphiboles is presented in the appendix.

  7. Non-ideal effects of MOS capacitor in a switched capacitor waveform recorder ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yi-Nong

    2016-07-01

    SCAs (Switched Capacitor Arrays) have a wide range of uses, especially in high energy physics, nuclear science and astrophysics experiments. This paper presents a method of using a MOS capacitor as a sampling capacitor to gain larger capacitance with small capacitor area in SCA design. It studies the non-ideal effects of the MOS capacitor and comes up with ways to reduce these adverse effects. A prototype SCA ASIC which uses a MOS capacitor to store the samples has been designed and tested to verify this method. The SCA integrates 32 channels and each has 64 cells and a readout amplifier. The stored voltage is converted to a pair of differential currents (±4 mA max) and multiplexed to the output. All the functionalities have been verified. The power consumption is less than 2 mW/ch. The INL of all the cells in one channel are better than 0.39%. The equivalent input noise of the SCA has been tested to be 2.2 mV with 625 kHz full-scale sine wave as input, sampling at 40 MSPS (Mega-samples per Second) and reading out at 5 MHz. The effective resolution is 8.8 bits considering 1 V dynamic range. The maximum sampling rate reaches up to 50 MSPS and readout rate of 15 MHz to keep noise smaller than 2.5 mV. The test results validate the feasibility of the MOS capacitor. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375100), Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04060606-06) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics

  8. Non-Ideal Properties of Gallium Nitride Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qifeng

    The spectacular development of gallium nitride (GaN) based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in recent years foreshadows a new era for lighting. There are still several non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs that hinder their widespread applications. This dissertation studies these non-ideal properties including the large reverse leakage current, large subthreshold forward leakage current, an undesired parasitic cyan luminescence and high-concentration deep levels in GaInN blue LEDs. This dissertation also studies the thermal properties of GaInN LEDs. Chapter 1 gives a brief introduction of non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs, defects in epitaxially grown GaN devices, and doping problems of p-type GaN materials are discussed. The transient junction temperature measurement technique for GaN based LEDs is introduced. The leakage current of an LED includes the subthreshold forward leakage current and the reverse leakage current. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs affects the reliability, electrostatic discharge resilience, and sub-threshold power consumption. In Chapter 2, the reverse leakage current of a GaInN LED is analyzed by temperaturedependent current-voltage measurements. At low temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to the variable-range-hopping conduction. At high temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to a thermally-assisted multi-step tunneling. The thermal activation energies (95 meV ~ 162 meV), extracted from the Arrhenius plot for the reverse current in the high-temperature range, indicate a thermally activated tunneling process. Additional room-temperature capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements are performed to obtain information on the depletion width and doping concentration of the LED. The average internal electric field is estimated by the C-V measurements. The strong internal electric field enhances the thermal emission of electrons in the

  9. Flow Interference between a Circular (Upstream) and a Square Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Jayalakshmi; R, Ajith Kumar; Kumar, Nithin S.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream circular cylinder and a square cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two circular cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a circular-square configuration is investigated. No such studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the circular-square configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study is very much relevant in the context of possible interference effects occuring in engineering structures such as buildings, heat exchanger tubes etc.

  10. Flow Interference between a Square (Upstream) and a Circular Cylinder: Flow Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nithin S.; R, Ajith Kumar; Mohan, Jayalakshmi

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, flow interference between an upstream square cylinder and a circular cylinder of equal size is studied in tandem arrangement. The main objective of this invesigation is to identify the possible flow patterns at different spacing ratios, L/B where L is the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders and B is the characteristic dimension of the bodies. All the experiments are conducted in a water channel and the test Reynolds number is 2100 (based on B). L/B is varied from 1.0 to 5.0. The flow visualization experiments are videographed and then analyzed frame-by-frame to capture the finer details of the flow patterns. Flow over single square and circular cylinders is analyzed first. Then, flow interference between two square cylinders is investigated. Subsequently, flow over a square-circular configuration is investigated. No such systematic studies are reported so far. Different flow patterns are observed for the square-circular configuration. Additionally, the time of persistence of each flow pattern have been recorded over a sufficiently long period of time to see the most dominant flow pattern. The schedule of occurrence of flow patterns have also been studied during this investigation. This study bears considerable practical relevance in the context of possible interference effects occurring in engineering structures such as buildings, bridges etc.

  11. MEANS FOR VISUALIZING FLUID FLOW PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, F.E.; Palmer, L.D.; Poppendick, H.F.; Winn, G.M.

    1961-05-16

    An apparatus is given for determining both the absolute and relative velocities of a phosphorescent fluid flowing through a transparent conduit. The apparatus includes a source for exciting a narrow trsnsverse band of the fluid to phosphorescence, detecting means such as a camera located downstream from the exciting source to record the shape of the phosphorescent band as it passes, and a timer to measure the time elapsed between operation of the exciting source and operation of the camera.

  12. Design flow automation for variable-shaped beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloecker, Martin; Ballhorn, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    Raster scan pattern generators have been used in the photomask industry for many years. Methods and software tools for data preparation for these pattern generators are well established and have been integrated into design flows with a high degree of automation. But the growing requirements for pattern fidelity have lead to the introduction of 50 kV variable shaped beam pattern generators. Due to their different writing strategy these tools use proprietary data formats and in turn require an optimized data preparation. As a result the existing design flow has to be adopted to account for these requirements. Due to the fact that cycle times have grown severely over the last years the automation of this adopted design flow will not only enhance the design flow quality by avoiding errors during manual operations but will also help to reduce turn-around times. We developed and implemented an automated design flow for a variable shaped beam pattern generator which had to fulfill two conflicting requirements: Well established automated tools originally developed for raster scan pattern generators had to be retained with only slight modifications to avoid the (re)implementation and the concurrent usage of two systems while on the other hand data generation especially during fracturing had to be optimized for a variable shaped beam pattern generator.

  13. Velocity-vorticity patterns in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelz, R.B.; Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S.A.; Shtilman, L.; Levich, E.

    1985-06-10

    Direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is used for the investigation of local helicity fluctuations in plane Poiseuille (channel) and Taylor-Green vortex flows. It is shown that in regions of high dissipation, the cosine of the angle between velocity and vorticity is evenly distributed; in regions of low dissipation, the velocity and vorticity vectors have a tendency to align. It is also shown that near the central part of the channel, velocity and vorticity vectors have a strong tendency to be aligned, while in the buffer region, all angles are nearly equally probable.

  14. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Winkler, G.; Birk, S.

    2016-05-01

    Preferential flow patterns in the subsurface are of great importance for the availability and the quality of water resources. However, knowledge of their spatial structure is still behind their importance, so that understanding the nature of preferential flow patterns is a major issue in subsurface hydrology. Comparing the statistics of river catchment sizes and spring discharges, we found that the morphology of preferential subsurface flow patterns is probably scale invariant and similar to that of dendritic river networks. This result is not limited to karstic aquifers where the occurrence of dendritic structures has been known at least qualitatively for a long time. The scale invariance even seems to be independent of the lithology of the aquifer. However, scale invariance of river patterns seems to be only limited by the continental scale, while scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns breaks down at much smaller scales. The upper limit of scale invariance in subsurface flow patterns is highly variable. We found a range from thousands of square kilometers for limestone aquifers down to less than 1 km2 in the weathered zone and debris accumulations of crystalline rocks.

  15. Self-similar solution of cylindrical shock wave propagation in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic unsteady flow behind a strong cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric dusty gas, which has a variable azimuthal fluid velocity together with a variable axial fluid velocity. The experimental studies and astrophysical observations show that the outer atmosphere of the planets rotates due to rotation of the planets. Macroscopic motion with supersonic speed occurs in an interplanetary atmosphere and shock waves are generated. Thus rotation of planets or stars significantly affect the process taking place in their outer layers, therefore question connected with the explosions in rotating gas atmospheres are of definite astrophysical interest. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The shock Mach number is not infinite, but has a finite value. The azimuthal and axial component of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assume to be vary and obey power laws, and the density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assume to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. Effects of the variation of the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, the mass concentration of solid particles and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas are investigated.

  16. Pattern formation induced by a differential shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucchi, L.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2013-02-01

    Fluid flow advecting one substance while others are immobilized can generate an instability in a homogeneous steady state of a reaction-diffusion-advection system. This differential-flow instability leads to the formation of steady spatial patterns in a moving reference frame. We study the effects of shear flow on this instability by considering two layers of fluid moving independently from each other, but allowing the substances to diffuse along and across the layers. We find that shear flow can generate instabilities even if the average flow velocity is zero for both substances. These instabilities are strongly dependent on which substance is advected by the shear flow. We explain these effects using the results of Taylor dispersion, where an effective diffusivity is enhanced by shear flow.

  17. Flow Patterns During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, M.; Schmidt, C.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding is a relatively new technique for welding that uses a cylindrical pin or nib inserted along the weld seam. The nib (usually threaded) and the shoulder in which it is mounted are rapidly rotated and advanced along the seam. Extreme deformation takes place leaving a fine equiaxed structure in the weld region., The flow of metal during Friction Stir Welding is investigated using a faying surface tracer and a nib frozen in place during welding. It is shown that material is transported by two processes. The first is a wiping of material from the advancing front side of the nib onto a zone of material that rotates and advances with the nib. The material undergoes a helical motion within the rotational zone that both rotates and advances and descends in the wash of the threads on the nib and rises on the outer part of the rotational zone. After one or more rotations, this material is sloughed off in its wake of the nib, primarily on the advancing side. The second process is an entrainment of material from the front retreating side of the nib that fills in between the sloughed off pieces from the advancing side.

  18. NICIL: A Stand Alone Library to Self-Consistently Calculate Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Coefficients in Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Nicil: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library. Nicil is a stand-alone Fortran90 module that calculates the ionisation values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. The module is fully parameterised such that the user can decide which processes to include and decide upon the values of the free parameters, making this a versatile and customisable code. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionisation; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionised. We demonstrate tests of the module, and then describe how to implement it into an existing numerical code.

  19. Accounting for thermodynamic non-ideality in the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data of proteins.

    PubMed

    Scott, David J

    2016-12-01

    Hydrodynamic studies of the solution properties of proteins and other biological macromolecules are often hard to interpret when the sample is present at a reasonably concentrated solution. The reason for this is that solutions exhibit deviations from ideal behaviour which is manifested as thermodynamic non-ideality. The range of concentrations at which this behaviour typically is exhibited is as low as 1-2 mg/ml, well within the range of concentrations used for their analysis by techniques such as small-angle scattering. Here we discuss thermodynamic non-ideality used previously used in the context of light scattering and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation and apply it to the Guinier region of small-angle scattering data. The results show that there is a complementarity between the radially averaged structure factor derived from small-angle X-ray scattering/small-angle neutron scattering studies and the second virial coefficient derived from sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation experiments.

  20. Exact analytical solutions of the forward non-ideal diode equation with series and shunt parasitic resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Conde, Adelmo; García Sánchez, Francisco J.; Muci, Juan

    2000-10-01

    Exact closed form solutions based on the Lambert W-function are presented to express the forward current-voltage characteristics of non-ideal single-exponential diodes containing all possible combinations of series and shunt parasitic resistances. It is shown that these expressions could be useful for carrying out highly accurate computations at speeds almost as fast as those possible when using less precise approximate solutions based on common elementary functions.

  1. Relating Segregation Patterns and Symmetries in Chaotic Granular Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisar, Stephen; Meier, Steven; Lueptow, Richard; Ottino, Julio

    2006-11-01

    Segregation patterns formed by time-periodic flow of polydisperse granular material (varying in particle size) in quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) tumblers capture the symmetries of Poincar'e sections, stroboscopic maps of the underlying flow, derived from a continuum model. The similarities are striking despite the fact that the model contains no information about particle properties. We study this phenomenon experimentally by using mixtures of bidisperse granular material in which the concentration of small particles is varied in quasi-2D tumblers with square and pentagonal cross-sections. Experimental segregation patterns can be connected to the dynamics of the underlying flow by an analysis of periodic points. Patterns vary with small particle concentration based on the location of both elliptic points that characterize islands of regular flow and hyperbolic points that characterize regions of chaotic flow seen in Poincar'e sections. The calculation of the eigenvectors and unstable manifolds of hyperbolic points shows that lobes of segregated small particles stretch from hyperbolic points toward corners of the tumbler, demonstrating the connection between regions of chaotic flow and the shape of the segregation patterns. Furthermore, unstable manifolds map the shape of lobes of segregated particles. Funded by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and NSF.

  2. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  3. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  4. Pattern Dynamics in Taylor Vortex Flow with Double Hourglass Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Richard; Olsen, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    In previous investigations ootnotetextWiener et al., Phys. Rev. E 55, 5489 (1997) & Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999) we have demonstrated experimentally that Taylor vortex flow in an hourglass geometry undergoes a period-doubling cascade to chaotic pattern dynamics that can be controlled by proportional feedback with small perturbations. The hourglass geometry creates a spatial ramp in the Reynolds number. This results in a region of supercritical vortex flow between regions of subcritical structureless flow that provide the pattern with soft boundaries that allow for persistent dynamics. For a range of reduced Reynolds numbers, the Taylor vortex pattern exhibits persistent dynamics consisting of drifting and stretching vortices punctuated with phase slips. Each phase slip corresponds to the generation of a new vortex pair. We are currently investigating the phase dynamics of Tayor vortex flow with a double hourglass geometry which consists of two regions of supercritical flow in which phase slips occur, separated by a narrow region of subcritical flow. Initial results indicate that at some reduced Reynolds numbers there is synchronization between the vortex dynamics in the two regions, both in the temporal occurrence of the phase slips as well as the drift directions of the vortices.

  5. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  6. Deposition patterns and dispersion in reactive channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Hawkins, C.; Jamtveit, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flow of natural fluids is often associated with dispersion of dissolved chemical species and their surface deposition either by precipitation kinetics or aggregation. For most industrial or practical flows, this wall deposition has a detrimental effect that hiders transport by clogging or alters the fluid container; therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of transport in reactive flows and the range of deposition patterns developed. This talk has two main aims. Firstly, it is to present a combined theoretical and numerical approach to explore the diverse yet generic wall morphologies that develop in channel flows either due to precipitation kinetics or aggregation of spherical particles. These deposition patterns range from dendrites to needles and fan-like structures growing against the mean flow direction, and depend strongly on flow perturbations and dispersion properties. The second goal is to revisit classical Taylor's theory of dispersion in turbulent pipe flows and to show that, in fully developed turbulence, it predicts a nontrivial connection between longitudinal dispersion and the turbulent energy spectrum that we can also test and observe in numerical simulations.

  7. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is express in terms of Fourier’s law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under a gravitational field due to heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche Model). The unsteady model of Roche consists of a dusty gas distributed with spherical symmetry around a nucleus having large mass It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the heavy nucleus. The density of the ambient medium is taken to be constant. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effect surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable difference can be found in the distribution of flow variables. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters, the gravitational parameter and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is found that the shock strength is increased with an increase in the value of gravitational parameter. Further, it is investigated that the presence of gravitational field increases the

  8. Flow-driven instabilities during pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, A.; Steinbock, O.; Zykov, V.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2015-06-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a well known model system for the study of biological pattern formation. In the natural environment, aggregating populations of starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells may experience fluid flows that can profoundly change the underlying wave generation process. Here we study the effect of advection on the pattern formation in a colony of homogeneously distributed Dictyostelium discoideum cells described by the standard Martiel-Goldbeter model. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. The evolution of small perturbations in cAMP concentrations is studied analytically in the linear regime and by corresponding numerical simulations. We show that flow can significantly influence the dynamics of the system and lead to a flow-driven instability that initiate downstream traveling cAMP waves. We also show that boundary conditions have a significant effect on the observed patterns and can lead to a new kind of instability.

  9. Turbulent patterns in wall-bounded flows: A Turing instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneville, Paul

    2012-06-01

    In their way to/from turbulence, plane wall-bounded flows display an interesting transitional regime where laminar and turbulent oblique bands alternate, the origin of which is still mysterious. In line with Barkley's recent work about the pipe flow transition involving reaction-diffusion concepts, we consider plane Couette flow in the same perspective and transform Waleffe's classical four-variable model of self-sustaining process into a reaction-diffusion model. We show that, upon fulfillment of a condition on the relative diffusivities of its variables, the featureless turbulent regime becomes unstable against patterning as the result of a Turing instability. A reduced two-variable model helps us to delineate the appropriate region of parameter space. An intrinsic status is therefore given to the pattern's wavelength for the first time. Virtues and limitations of the model are discussed, calling for a microscopic support of the phenomenological approach.

  10. Chemical solver to compute molecule and grain abundances and non-ideal MHD resistivities in prestellar core-collapse calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, P.; Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Commerçon, B.; Vaytet, N.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a detailed chemical network relevant to calculate the conditions that are characteristic of prestellar core collapse. We solve the system of time-dependent differential equations to calculate the equilibrium abundances of molecules and dust grains, with a size distribution given by size-bins for these latter. These abundances are used to compute the different non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities (ambipolar, Ohmic and Hall), needed to carry out simulations of protostellar collapse. For the first time in this context, we take into account the evaporation of the grains, the thermal ionisation of potassium, sodium, and hydrogen at high temperature, and the thermionic emission of grains in the chemical network, and we explore the impact of various cosmic ray ionisation rates. All these processes significantly affect the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, which will modify the dynamics of the collapse. Ambipolar diffusion and Hall effect dominate at low densities, up to nH = 1012 cm-3, after which Ohmic diffusion takes over. We find that the time-scale needed to reach chemical equilibrium is always shorter than the typical dynamical (free fall) one. This allows us to build a large, multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table over a large temperature, density and ionisation rate ranges. This table, which we make accessible to the community, is used during first and second prestellar core collapse calculations to compute the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, yielding a consistent dynamical-chemical description of this process. The multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table and a copy of the code are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A18

  11. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  12. Flow-pattern evolution of the last British Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna L. C.; Clark, Chris D.; Jordan, Colm J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-flow patterns of the last British Ice Sheet from build-up to demise derived from geomorphological evidence. 100 flowsets identified in the subglacial bedform record (drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and ribbed moraine) are combined with ancillary evidence (erratic-transport paths, absolute dates and a semi-independently reconstructed retreat pattern) to define flow patterns, ice divides and ice-sheet margins during build-up, maximum glaciation and retreat. Overprinting and cross-cutting of landform assemblages are used to define the relative chronology of flow patterns and a tentative absolute chronology is presented based on a collation of available dates for ice advance and retreat. The ice-flow configuration of the last British Ice Sheet was not static. Some ice divides were remarkably stable, persisting through multiple stages of the ice-sheet evolution, whereas others were transient features existing for a short time and/or shifting in position 10s km. The 10 reconstructed stages of ice-sheet geometry capture two main modes of operation; first as an integrated ice sheet with a broadly N-S orientated ice divide, and second as a multi-domed ice sheet orientated parallel with the shelf edge. A thick integrated ice sheet developed as ice expanded out of source areas in Scotland to envelop southerly ice caps in northern England and Wales, and connect with the Irish Ice Sheet to the west and the Scandinavian Ice Sheet across the North Sea. Following break-up of ice over the North Sea, ice streaming probably drove mass loss and ice-sheet thinning to create a more complex divide structure, where ice-flow patterns were largely controlled by the form of the underlying topography. Ice surface lowering occurred before separation of, and retreat to, multiple ice centres centred over high ground. We consider this 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-sheet configuration to be the simplest palaeo

  13. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  14. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  15. The steady-state flow pattern past gravitating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormel, C. W.

    2013-02-01

    Gravitating bodies significantly alter the flow pattern (density and velocity) of the gas that attempts to stream past. Still, small protoplanets in the Mars-super-Earth range can only bind limited amounts of nebular gas; until the so-called critical core mass has been reached (˜1-10 M⊕) this gas is in near hydrostatic equilibrium with the nebula. Here we aim for a general description of the flow pattern surrounding these low-mass, embedded planets. Using various simplifying assumptions (subsonic, 2D, inviscid flow, etc.), we reduce the problem to a partial differential equation that we solve numerically as well as approximate analytically. It is found that the boundary between the atmosphere and the nebula gas strongly depends on the value of the disc headwind (deviation from Keplerian rotation). With increasing headwind the atmosphere decreases in size and also becomes more asymmetrical. Using the derived flow pattern for the gas, trajectories of small solid particles, which experience both gas drag and gravitational forces, are integrated numerically. Accretion rates for small particles (dust) are found to be low, as they closely follow the streamlines, which curl away from the planet. However, pebble-size particles achieve large accretion rates, in agreement with previous numerical and analytical works.

  16. Rimming flows and pattern formation inside rapidly rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezhaev, Denis; Dyakova, Veronika; Kozlov, Victor

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of fluid and granular medium in a rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. In a rapidly rotating cylinder liquid and granular medium coat the cylindrical wall under centrifugal force. In the cavity frame gravity field performs rotation and produces oscillatory fluid flow which is responsible for the series of novel effects of pattern formation, namely, axial segregation of heavy particles and pattern formation in the form of sand regular hills extended along the axis of rotation. At least two types of axial segregation are found: a) patterns of spatial period of the same order of magnitude as fluid layer thickness which induced by steady flows generated by inertial waves; b) fine patterns which manifests Gortler - Taylor vortices developing as a consequence of centrifugal instability of viscous boundary layer near the cylindrical wall. Under gravity, intensive fluid shear flow induces partial fluidization of annular layer of granular medium. The oscillatory motion is followed by onset of regular ripples extended along the axis of rotation. The work is supported by Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-11-00476).

  17. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Benzhong; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid–fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate’s affinity to the invading fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms—cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)—responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge—from pore filling to postbridging—are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions. PMID:27559089

  18. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, Ruben; Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the injected fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms-cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)-responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge-from pore-filling to post-bridging-are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions.

  19. Pattern formation and mixing in three-dimensional film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heining, C.; Pollak, T.; Aksel, N.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of inertia on gravity-driven free surface flow over different three-dimensional periodic corrugations is considered analytically, numerically and experimentally. In the case of high bottom amplitudes, compared to the film thickness, the results predict complex free surface structures especially in cases where the topography is not fully flooded by the liquid film. The investigation of the flow field shows a rich variety of pattern formation phenomena depending on the interplay between the geometry of the topography and the inertia of the film. Finally, we show how the complex topographical structure enhances the laminar mixing within the film.

  20. Evoluton of polygonal fracture patterns in lava flows.

    PubMed

    Aydin, A; Degraff, J M

    1988-01-29

    Cooling-induced fractures, also known as columnar joints, divide basaltic lava flows into prismatic columns with polygonal cross sections. The regularity and symmetry of the fracture patterns have long fascinated naturalists. In view of the recent selection of two candidate nuclear waste sites in areas where polygonally fractured volcanic rocks are located, a better understanding of the fracture patterns is required. Field data indicate that the tetragonal networks at flow surfaces evolve systematically to hexagonal networks as the joints grow inward during solidification of lava. This evolution occurs by the gradual change of most orthogonal intersections to nonorthogonal intersections of about 120 degrees. The surface features and intersection geometries of columnar joints show that joint segments at any given level form sequentially yet harmoniously.

  1. Mantle Flow Pattern and Dynamic Topography beneath the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Kirby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The complex tectonic history of the eastern US over the past billion years includes episodes of subduction and rifting associated with two complete cycles of supercontinent assembly and breakup. Both the previous global tomography models (S40RTS, SAVANI, TX2011, GyPSuM, SMEAN) and the analysis of the shear-wave splitting from the broadband seismic stations find a distinct coast-to-inland differentiation pattern in the lithosphere and upper mantle. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) includes a dense linear seismic array from the Atlantic coast of Virginia to the western boarder of Ohio, crossing several different tectonic zones. To derive the regional mantle flow pattern along with its surface expression such as dynamic topography and aid the interpretation of the seismic observations, we are building a new geodynamic model based on ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) that uses buoyancy derived from seismic tomography along with realistic lithosphere and sub-lithosphere structure. At present, we use S40RTS and SAVANI tomography models together with the temperature-dependent viscosity to compute the mantle flow and dynamic topography. Beneath the eastern US, the upper mantle flow in our model is primarily parallel to the trend of the Appalachian belt, which is broadly consistent with the direction of the local shear-wave splitting. The dynamic topography results exhibit a coast-to-inland magnitude differentiation along the MAGIC seismic deployment. The numerical tests also show that both the magnitude and pattern of the dynamic topography are quite sensitive to the density perturbation and rigidity of the lithosphere/sub-lithosphere. Our future work involves using other tomography and viscosity models to obtain the mantle flow pattern as well as the resulting dynamic topography and geoid.

  2. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  3. Pockmark Current Flow Patterns in Belfast Bay, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandel, C. L.; Lippmann, T. C.; Foster, D. L.; Irish, J. D.; Brothers, L.

    2012-12-01

    Pockmarks are large, circular or elongate depressions in the seafloor that are globally distributed in a wide range of geologic settings including shallow, estuarine environments like Belfast Bay, Maine. The primary mechanism of pockmark formation in Belfast Bay is attributed to episodic methane venting of shallow, natural gas in the area. Recent models suggest pockmarks may be further maintained by the reduction or prevention of fine-grained sediment deposition due to inner-pockmark upwelling events induced by near-bed current flow and flow separation over the depressions. Fluid dynamics around these features may be similar to flow around dimples or cavities. In 2011, we tested this hypothesis by deploying two ADCP moorings at the rim and center of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine over a two day period. The sampled pockmarks consist of a circular, shallow (33 m) pockmark and a more elongated, deeper (42 m) pockmark, each with a length-to-depth ratio of 2.8. Time-varying current profiles indicate a complex rotational structure with depth, often exceeding 180°. Multiple upwelling and downwelling events extend throughout the water column with vertical velocities reaching up to 0.02 m/s. The shallow pockmark shows greater temporal and spatial variability in rotational structure that may be attributed to the converging tidal flows entering Belfast Bay. Current flow patterns in the deep pockmark are more directionally consistent with the tide and exhibit greater spatial alignment in the upper water column between the rim and center of the pockmark. Both pockmarks exhibit a counter-clockwise rotational pattern on the rising tide as current flow rotates nearly 100° from surface and into the pockmark. As the tide ebbs, a sub-division of flow is observed with a southerly-directed flow in the upper two-thirds of the water column and a northeasterly-directed flow within 10 m of the bottom. This circulation pattern resembles open cavity (L/D < 6) flow explained by

  4. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Adsorption/Desorption in Packed Sorption Beds Under Ideal and Non-Ideal Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, H.; Knox, J. C.; Smith, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of the wall effect on packed beds in the adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water on molecular sieve 5A of 0.127 cm in radius is examined experimentally and with one-dimensional computer simulations. Experimental results are presented for a 22.5-cm long by 4.5-cm diameter cylindrical column with concentration measurements taken at various radial locations. The set of partial differential equations are solved using finite differences and Newman's method. Comparison of test data with the axial-dispersed, non-isothermal, linear driving force model suggests that a two-dimensional model (submitted to Separation Science and Technology) is required for accurate simulation of the average column breakthrough concentration. Additional comparisons of test data with the model provided information on the interactive effects of carrier gas coadsorption with CO2, as well as CO2-H2O interactions.

  5. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The capability to provide fast and reliable imaging of targets and interfaces in non-accessible probed scenarios is a topic of great scientific interest, and many investigations have shown that Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can provide an efficient technique to conduct this kind of analysis in various applications of geophysical nature and civil engineering. In these cases, the development of an efficient and accurate imaging procedure is strongly dependent on the capability of accounting for the incident field that activates the scattering phenomenon. In this frame, based on a suitable implementation of an electromagnetic (EM) CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), it has been possible to accurately and efficiently model the radiation pattern of real antennas in environments typically considered in GPR surveys [1]. A typical scenario of our interest is constituted by targets hidden in a ground medium, described by certain EM parameters and probed by a movable GPR using interfacial antennas [2]. The transmitting and receiving antennas considered here are Vivaldi ones, but a wide variety of other antennas can be modeled and designed, similar to those ones available in commercial GPR systems. Hence, an advanced version of a well-known microwave tomography approach (MTA) [3] has been implemented, both in the canonical 2D scalar case and in the more realistic 3D vectorial one. Such an approach is able to account for the real distribution of the radiated and scattered EM fields. Comparisons of results obtained by means of a 'conventional' implementation of the MTA, where the antennas are modeled as ideal line sources, and by means of our 'advanced' approach, which instead takes into account the radiation features of the chosen antenna type, have been carried out and discussed. Since the antenna radiation patterns are modified by the probed environment, whose EM features and the possible stratified structure usually are not exactly known, the imaging capabilities of the MTA

  6. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Winkler, Gerfried; Birk, Steffen

    2015-04-01

    The morphology of river networks at the Earth's surface has been addressed in numerous studies. Numerical simulations of fluvial erosion processes and concepts of optimization have provided a rather comprehensive understanding about the scale invariance of river networks. Less is known about the structure of preferential flow patterns in the subsurface because these are only accessible by indirect measurements in most cases. As preferential flow patterns are crucial for all transport processes in the subsurface, unraveling their structure is a major challenge in subsurface hydrology. Transferring the idea of optimization from surface flow to subsurface flow it was recently suggested that preferential subsurface flow patterns should also have a dendritic, scale-invariant structure similar to that of river networks. In this study we analyzed the mean discharges of serval thousand springs with respect to scale invariance. For this purpose we reanalyzed a data set comprising about 17,000 springs from Spain already published in the literature and three new data sets from the Eastern Alps in Austria. We found that the probability density f(Q) of the discharge distribution can be described by a power law with an exponential cutoff, f(Q) ≈ Q-τe- QQc. The scaling exponent τ was found to be about 1.6, which is slightly larger than the exponent τ = 1.5 of river networks. In contrast to rivers, the distributions of the spring discharges are characterized by a significant cutoff at large discharges. This cutoff strongly depends on the lithology of the aquifers, while the scaling exponent τ ˜ 1.6 seems to be universal. The highest cutoff was found for limestones being one of the primary host rocks for karstic aquifers. We found Qc ˜ 6000 l/s for the limestones in the data set from Spain, suggesting a scale-invariant subsurface flow pattern up to catchment sizes of several thousand square kilometers. At the other edge, we found a cutoff at catchment sizes in the order of

  7. Regular patterns in the information flow of local dephasing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    Consider local dephasing processes of a qubit that interacts with a structured reservoir of frequency modes or a thermal bath, with Ohmic-like spectral density (SD). It is known that non-Markovian evolution appears uniquely above a temperature-dependent critical value of the Ohmicity parameter and non-Markovianity can be induced by properly engineering the external environment. In the same scenario, we find regular patterns in the flow of quantum information: Alternate directions appear in correspondence with periodic intervals of the Ohmicity parameter α0. The information flows back into the system over long times at zero temperature for 2 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , where n =0 ,1 ,2 ,..., and at nonvanishing temperatures for 3 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . Under special conditions, backflow of information appears also for nonvanishing, even natural values of the Ohmicity parameter, at zero temperature, and for odd natural values at nonvanishing temperatures. Otherwise, the long-time information flows into the environment. In the transition from vanishing to arbitrary nonvanishing temperature, the long-time backflow of information is stable for 3 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , while it is reversed for 2 +4 n <α0<3 +4 n and 4 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . The patterns in the information flow are not altered if the low-frequency Ohmic-like profiles of the SDs are perturbed with additional factors that consist in arbitrary powers of logarithmic forms. Consequently, the flow of information can be controlled, directed, and reversed over long times by engineering a wide variety of reservoirs that includes and continuously departs from the Ohmic-like structure at low frequencies. Non-Markovianity and recoherence appear according to the same rules along with the backflow of information.

  8. Development of radial optic flow pattern sensitivity at different speeds.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mahesh Raj; Falkenberg, Helle K

    2015-05-01

    The development of sensitivity to radial optic flow discrimination was investigated by measuring motion coherence thresholds (MCTs) in school-aged children at two speeds. A total of 119 child observers aged 6-16years and 24 young adult observers (23.66+/-2.74years) participated. In a 2AFC task observers identified the direction of motion of a 5° radial (expanding vs. contracting) optic flow pattern containing 100 dots with 75% Michelson contrast moving at 1.6°/s and 5.5°/s and. The direction of each dot was drawn from a Gaussian distribution whose standard deviation was either low (similar directions) or high (different directions). Adult observers also identified the direction of motion for translational (rightward vs. leftward) and rotational (clockwise vs. anticlockwise) patterns. Motion coherence thresholds to radial optic flow improved gradually with age (linear regression, p<0.05), with different rates of development at the two speeds. Even at 16years MCTs were higher than that for adults (independent t-tests, p<0.05). Both children and adults had higher sensitivity at 5.5°/s compared to 1.6°/s (paired t-tests, p<0.05). Sensitivity to radial optic flow is still immature at 16years of age, indicating late maturation of higher cortical areas. Differences in sensitivity and rate of development of radial optic flow at the different speeds, suggest that different motion processing mechanisms are involved in processing slow and fast speeds.

  9. Pattern centric OPC flow: a special RET flow with fast turn-around-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tom; Wu, Joanne; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Gary; Wang, Benny; Su, Bo; Cheng, Guojie

    2008-03-01

    Low K1 photolithography process increases the complexity of RET applications in IC designs. As technology node shrinks, pattern density is much denser along with much smaller geometry dimensions. Model-based OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) and post-OPC verification require more complex models and through process window compensated approaches, which significantly increase computational burden. Both lithographical challenges and computational complexity associated with 45nm process and below create a need for advanced capabilities on commercial OPC tools. To answer those challenges, hardware-accelerated OPC solution made a debut to solve runtime bottleneck issues, but they came in with very expensive price tags. As today, there are no explorations on the linkage between design styles and layout pattern OPC reusability. This paper introduces a new OPC flow with pattern-centric approach to leverage OPC knowledge of repeated design cells and patterns to achieve fast full chip OPC convergence, shorter cycle time, better OPC quality, and eventually lead to high manufacturing yields. In this paper, the main concepts of pattern-based OPC flow are demonstrated in 65nm customer memory designs. Pattern-based OPC is a natural extension of Anchor's pattern-centric approaches in DFM (Design for Manufacturing) domain.

  10. Fluid flow patterns in porous media with partially ordered microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsaeidi, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Natural granular porous media found in geosciences applications are disordered at the pore scale, which contributes to the interesting behavior that they exhibit including hydrodynamic dispersion, capillary pressure and wetting behavior, and various types of fingering. Many standard equations and models that have been developed for transport in porous media are based on the assumption of uniform disorder, randomly distributed parameters, and isotropic behavior. However, factors that cause partial ordering (e.g., settling of oblong grains, alignment of elongated particles, or packing structures near a boundary) can lead to anomalous flow behavior relative to the base case, when in turn requires different ways to understand and describe transport. In this work we examine the packing structure and fluid flow patterns in packings of equilateral cylindrical particles that are packed in a tube. The detailed packing structures are obtained experimentally from microCT experiments, and the flow patterns are simulated by numerical solution of the Stokes equations using the finite element method. This research is of interest in chemical engineering because this type of packing is used in catalytic reactors. However, the structures are also interesting from both a fundamental perspective and as prototypes for partially ordered natural materials because the packings undergo a transition from fully disordered internally to highly structured at the wall, and therefore provide insight into differences caused by the ordering.

  11. Stochastic Modeling of Buoyancy driven Gas Flow Pattern: Can Continuum Models describe Channelized Gas Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Samani, S.

    2010-12-01

    The injection of gases into the subsurface has become an important research topic in groundwater remediation technology, e.g. air sparging, and in CCS-technology, e.g. CO2-sequestration into saline aquifers. In both cases risk assessment is based on 2-phase flow modeling assuming that the stochastic gas flow patterns can be described by the continuum approach. As Cinar et al. (2009) have stated: “The fundamental understanding of drainage, as it applies to CO2 sequestration process, is limited primarily by the lack of well characterized experiments that allow a detailed classification of the microscopic flow regimes”. In case of air sparging the two important flow regimes are capillary fingering and viscous fingering. Using pore scale network modeling Ewing and Berkowitz (1998) were able to describe the transition from capillary fingering (= incoherent channelized flow) to viscous fingering (= coherent channelized flow). In order to investigate the stability of buoyancy-driven gas flow and the transition between coherent channelized flow and incoherent channelized flow we conducted high-resolution optical bench scale experiments. Our main results, which are in strong contradiction to the commonly used continuum models (CM) are: (1) Capillary trapping can already occur during injection and at the front of the plume (Lazik and Geistlinger, 2008) (2) Gas clusters or bubbles can be mobile (incoherent gas flow) and immobile (capillary trapping), and (3) Incoherent gas flow can not be described by a generalized Darcy law (Geistlinger et al., 2006, 2009). Glass et al. (2000) conducted CO2-gas injection experiments. Based on their experimental results they also questioned the validity of CM to describe coherent and incoherent gas flow and the validity of homogeneous stability analysis to predict channel width, channel number and channel velocity in heterogeneous porous media. Despite these findings there is an ongoing controversial discussion in the literature about

  12. Two-phase flow patterns in adiabatic and diabatic corrugated plate gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, A.-E.; Kabelac, S.; de Vries, B.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations for two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop can be improved considerably, when they are adapted to specific flow patterns. As plate heat exchangers find increasing application as evaporators and condensers, there is a need for flow pattern maps for corrugated plate gaps. This contribution presents experimental results on flow pattern investigations for such a plate heat exchanger background, using an adiabatic visualisation setup as well as a diabatic setup. Three characteristic flow patterns were observed in the considered range of two-phase flow: bubbly flow, film flow and slug flow. The occurrence of these flow patterns is a function of mass flux, void fraction, fluid properties and plate geometry. Two different plate geometries having a corrugation angle of 27° and 63°, respectively and two different fluids (water/air and R365mfc liquid/vapor) have been analysed. A flow pattern map using the momentum flux is presented.

  13. Gene flow pattern among Aedes aegypti populations in Mexico.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Mercado-Curiel, Ricardo F; Diaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Pérez Ramirez, Gerardo; Black, William C

    2013-03-01

    Patterns of gene flow vary greatly among Aedes aegypti populations throughout Mexico. The populations are panmictic along the Pacific coast, isolated by distance in northeast Mexico, and exhibit moderate gene flow across the Yucatan peninsula. Nine Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, were taken to examine the local patterns of gene flow. Genetic variation was examined in a 387-bp region of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 4 mitochondrial gene (ND4) using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and 3 haplotypes were detected. Cluster analysis on the linearized FST genetic distances failed to group collections in geographic proximity. Regression analysis of linear or road distances on linearized F(ST) indicated that proximal collections were as diverse as distant collections across an approximately 800-km range. The geographical distribution of the Mexican mosquito haplotype frequencies was determined for the ND4 sequences from 524 individuals from Oaxaca (this study) and 2,043 individuals from our previous studies. Herein, we report on yet another pattern dominated by genetic drift among 9 Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compare it to those reported in other regions of Mexico. Molecular analysis of variance showed that there was as much genetic variation among collections 4 km apart as there was among all collections. The numbers of haplotypes and the amount of genetic diversity among the collections from Oaxaca were much lower than detected in previous studies in other regions of Mexico and may reflect the effects of control efforts or adaptations to the altitudinal limits (1,500 m) of the species in Mexico. The geographical distribution of mosquito haplotypes in Mexico is also reported. Furthermore, based on the distribution of the mosquito haplotypes in America, we suggest that mosquito dispersion is very efficient, most likely due to commercial transportation.

  14. Pattern formation during mixing and segregation of flowing granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Shattuck, Mark

    1996-02-01

    Powder mixing plays an important role in a number of industries ranging from pharmaceuticals and food to ceramics and mining. Avalanches provide a mechanism for the stretching and folding needed to mix granular solids. However, unlike fluids, when particles dissimilar in size, density, or shape flow, they can spontaneously demix or segregate. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we track the transport of granular solids in a slowly rotating tube both with and without segregation effects. Compared with experiments in a 2-dimensional rotating disk partially filled with colored particles, the mixing kinematics and the granular pattern formation in a tube are changed by an axial flow instability. From simple physical principles we argue how size and density segregation mechanisms can be made to cancel, allowing good mixing of dissimilar particles, and we show experiments verifying this. Further experiments isolate the axial transport in the slowly rotating tube. Axial transport can appear faster with segregation than without.

  15. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Zhang, Yiran; Wojcik, Ewelina; Sharma, Vivek

    Understanding and controlling the drainage kinetics of thin films is an important problem that underlies the stability, lifetime and rheology of foams and emulsions. We follow the drainage kinetics of vertical foam films using imaging and color science. Interference between light reflected from two surfactant-laden surfaces that are 100 nm - 10 micron apart leads to thickness-dependent iridescent colors in the visible region. Below 50 nm the thin films appear as black. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders (i.e. marginal regeneration) and within thinning films. Finally, we elucidate how buoyancy, capillarity, convection and gravity-driven instabilities and flows, are affected by the choice and concentration of constituents. We find fascinating examples of two-dimensional hydrodynamics and unexplained, if not unprecedented, drainage kinetics.

  16. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Shah, Krupa; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling the drainage kinetics of thin films is an important problem that underlies the stability, lifetime and rheology of foams and emulsions. We follow the drainage kinetics of vertical foam films using imaging and color science. Interference between light reflected from two surfactant-laden surfaces that are 100 nm - 10 micron apart leads to thickness-dependent iridescent colors in the visible region. Below 50 nm the thin films appear as black. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders (i.e. marginal regeneration) and within thinning films. Finally, we elucidate how buoyancy, capillarity, convection and gravity-driven instabilities and flows, are affected by the choice and concentration of constituents. We find fascinating examples of two-dimensional hydrodynamics and unexplained, if not unprecedented, drainage kinetics.

  17. Flow-induced polymer translocation through narrow and patterned channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-08-21

    We consider linear and branched polymers driven through narrow and patterned channels by imposing a Poiseuille flow on the ambient solvent. We establish, by means of scaling arguments, that the translocation probability of dendrimers through the pore is independent of the number of monomers and that it takes place above a viscosity-dependent critical external current. When the channel walls are smooth, the translocation times of linear and branched polymers with the same monomer number are very similar. However, for walls that are decorated with attractive patches, dramatic differences show up: whereas a dendrimer successively docks at the patches and "walks" from one to the next, being carried away by the solvent flow, linear chains spread themselves along the channel wall without achieving translocation within simulation times. Our findings are relevant for, e.g., drug delivery through dendritic carrier molecules in capillary arterioles.

  18. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Foams find use in many applications in daily life, industry and biology. Examples include beverages, firefighting foam, cosmetics, foams for oil recovery and foams formed by pollutants. Foams are collection of bubbles separated by thin liquid films that are stabilized against drainage by the presence of surfactant molecules. Drainage kinetics and stability of the foam are strongly influenced by surfactant type, addition of particles, proteins and polymers. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We experimentally study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders and within thinning films, and study how buoyancy, capillarity and gravity driven instabilities and flows, are affected by variation in bulk and interfacial physicochemical properties dependent on the choice of constituents.

  19. Pattern formation in granular and granular-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Nhat-Hang P.

    Particles and suspensions of particles in fluids are regularly used in many engineering disciplines such as catalysis and reaction engineering, environmental engineering, pharmaceutical engineering, etc. A few issues that are commonly encountered include ensuring homogeneity in pharmaceutical suspensions, predicting particle transport in atmospheric and effluent streams, and manufacturing uniform composite materials. Yet the fundamental study of particle motions in granular media or in highly concentrated granular suspensions has received little attention. Relevant issues of research interest include development of adaptive models that permit wide ranges of particle concentrations, improvement of analyses that allow physical interpretation of particle motions in any medium, of scales ranging from particle size to system size, and accurate validation of theoretical with experimental data. Given the above shortcomings, this dissertation will focus on investigating basic transport behavior of particles in fluids and developing predictive models for granular media and granular suspensions. Emphasis will be given to combining experiments with computations through examples of pattern forming phenomena in a granular medium and a dense granular-fluid system. The background motivation and the objectives of this dissertation are stated in the opening chapter 1. The next three chapters address these objectives in detail. First, chapter 2 presents experimental evidence, descriptions, and characteristics of novel patterns in a dense granular suspension. This is followed by chapter 3 in which a mean-field continuum model is derived to further elucidate the reported patterning phenomena. Chapter 4 uncovers several novel granular patterns experimentally and is concluded with a coarse-grained phenomenological model for granular surface flows. Lastly, chapter 5 closes the dissertation with conclusions and possible future directions. This work provides additional understanding and

  20. Multiple convection patterns and thermohaline flow in an idealized OGCM

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmstorf, S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper investigates how multiple steady states arise in an ocean general circulation model, caused by the fact that many different convection patterns can be stable under the same surface boundary conditions. Two alternative boundary conditions are used in the experiments: classical mixed boundary conditions and a diffusive atmospheric heat balance combined with fixed salt fluxes. In both cases, transitions between different quasi-steady convection patterns can be triggered by briefly adding fresh water at convection sites. Either a large-scale freshwater anomaly is used to completely erase the previous convection pattern or a {open_quotes}surgical{close_quotes} anomaly is added to single grid points to turn off convection there. Under classical mixed-boundary conditions, different convection sites can lead to different overturning rates of deep water. The dynamics of the convection-driven flow is analyzed in some detail. With an energy balance atmosphere, in contrast, the overturning rate is very robust, apparently regulated by a negative thermal feedback. In spite of this, different convection patterns are associated with very different climatic states, since the heat transport of the deep circulation depends strongly on where convection takes place. It is suggested that considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic could be caused by changes in high-latitude convection.

  1. Flow Pattern Identification of Horizontal Two-Phase Refrigerant Flow Using Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-31

    812 × 500 × 546 ~ 2.2 x 108 data points ) to train a neural network. It was proposed that a combina- tion of spatial- and time- averaging together with...For each flow pattern test point (i.e., each heater power and volumetric flow rate combination), 500 tomograms were generated over a sampling period of...running average of εðtÞ was used to determine an acceptable number of data points to estimate hεðtÞi. When the fluctuations in the running average

  2. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  3. Flow pattern analysis of the Baylor total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Meier, D; Wernicke, J T; Orime, Y; Takatani, S; Tasai, K; Damm, G; Naito, K; Mizuguchi, K; Makinouchi, K; Glueck, J

    1994-12-01

    To obtain an optimal design of the left blood chamber of the total artificial heart (TAH), flow visualization studies were performed. Information on velocities in critical areas of the left chamber was gathered using sectional pulsed laser light. The flow patterns on the entire pumping duration were photographed frame by frame. The inflow port, the opposite of the inflow and outflow of the pump (bottom area), and the diaphragm/housing junction were the focal areas. The pump conditions, such as chamber pressure, preload and afterload pressure, pumping rate and roller screw, and displacement were recorded. Major stagnations and a low washout effect were observed in the bottom region. The closing of the inflow valve was irregular. In order to solve this problem, the inflow valve angle was changed 20 degrees. A comparison study showed a better valve closing characteristic, and no stagnation areas were observed with this new valve angle. Various velocity profiles confirmed the results. The valve closing characteristics is described in relationship to back flow.

  4. Regional characteristics of extreme drought patterns in stream flow records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrollahi, N.; Ahmadi, M.; Alaeipour, A.

    2010-12-01

    Global warming has shown dramatic effects on natural systems in some parts of the world. Middle East is one of the locations that is affected by the severe changes in the climate conditions. In this study, the regional characteristics of severe seasonal droughts have been studied by analyzing the extreme value properties of the annual maximum series of river stream flows in the last 30 years. The study region is Karun River located in south western Iran. Karun River is Iran's most effluent, and the only navigable river which is 720 km long. It rises in the Zard Kuh Mountains and continues toward the Persian Gulf. There are a number of dams on the Karun River, with the purpose of generating hydroelectric power and flood control. The area is divided into 10 catchments with daily stream flow records. To investigate the drought periods, the threshold level is defined by percentiles from the flow duration curve. Two different regionalization tools are compared, L-moment diagrams and empirical orthogonal functions. The L-moment and EOF diagrams provided virtually the same conclusions with regard to clustering of catchments, and large scale trends were found in the data which confirms a regional pattern.

  5. Method And Aparatus For Improving Resolution In Spectrometers Processing Output Steps From Non-Ideal Signal Sources

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Momayezi, Michael

    2003-07-01

    A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals generated by non-ideal, nominally single-pole ("N-1P") devices responding to possibly time-varying, pulse-like input signals of finite duration, wherein the goal is to recover the integrated areas of the input signals. Particular applications include processing step-like signals generated by detector systems in response to absorbed radiation or particles and, more particularly, to digitally processing such step-like signals in high resolution, high rate gamma ray (.gamma.-ray) spectrometers with resistive feedback preamplifiers connected to large volume germanium detectors. Superconducting bolometers can be similarly treated. The method comprises attaching a set of one or more filters to the device's (e.g., preamplifier's) output, capturing a correlated multiple output sample from the filter set in response to a detected event, and forming a weighted sum of the sample values to accurately recover the total area (e.g., charge) of the detected event.

  6. The dynamic behavior of a cantilever beam coupled to a non-ideal unbalanced motor through numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, P. J. P.; Silveira, M.; Pontes Junior, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    An excitation force that is not influenced by the system state is said to be an ideal energy source. In real situations, a direct and feedback coupling between the excitation source and the system must always exist at a certain level. This manifestation of the law of conservation of energy is known as the Sommerfeld effect. In the case of obtaining a mathematical model for such a system, additional equations are usually necessary to describe the vibration sources with limited power and its coupling with the mechanical system. In this work, a cantilever beam and a non-ideal DC motor fixed to its free end are analyzed. The motor has an unbalanced mass that provides excitation to the system which is proportional to the current applied to the motor. During the coast up operation of the motor, if the drive power is increased slowly, making the excitation frequency pass through the first natural frequency of the beam, the DC motor speed will remain the same until it suddenly jumps to a much higher value (simultaneously its amplitude jumps to a much lower value) upon exceeding a critical input power. It was found that the Sommerfeld effect depends on some system parameters and the motor operational procedures. These parameters are explored to avoid the resonance capture in the Sommerfeld effect. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are used to help gather insight of this dynamic behavior.

  7. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  8. Iridescent Patterns and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Ewelina; Yilixiati, Subinuer; Abbott-Klostermann, Will; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Liquid foams consist of bubbles separated by thin films. Individual films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of gravitational, viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Understanding and controlling the drainage kinetics of thin films is an important problem that underlies the stability, lifetime and rheology of foams and emulsions. We experimentally follow the drainage kinetics of foam films using imaging & color science. Interference between light reflected from two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 100 nm - 10 micron apart leads to thickness-dependent iridescent colors in the visible region. Below 50 nm the thin films appear as black. We find fascinating examples of two-dimensional hydrodynamics and unexplained, if not unprecedented, drainage kinetics. In particular, we study the origin of marginal regeneration, i. e. the complex flow patterns that originate near the borders of foam films.

  9. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. We conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  10. Measurement and prediction of two-phase flow patterns for new refrigerants inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kattan, N.; Favrat, D.; Thome, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Two-phase flow pattern data were obtained with 12-mm-bore sight glasses for five refrigerants: R-123, R-134a, R-502, R-402A, and R-404A. The existing flow pattern maps of Taitel and Dukler (1976) and Hashizume (1983) poorly represented the data, while, with the exception of mist flows, the VDI map identified the flow patterns successfully. Methods used in horizontal flow boiling correlations to determine the threshold between all wet wall and partially wet wall flows were shown to be unreliable.

  11. Temporal Patterns in Bivalve Excurrent Flow Under Varying Ambient Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavan, S. K.; Webster, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The predator-prey relationship between blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and bivalve clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) is mediated by the transport of metabolites released by the prey (clams) and transported downstream as a passive scalar. This study focuses on how the prey behavior contributes to the information available within the odorant plume. Clams may modify factors such as excurrent flux, flow unsteadiness, and siphon height and diameter. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system has been used to quantify the temporal patterns in the excurrent jet of the bivalve siphon under varying ambient flow conditions. According to a spectral analysis of siphon excurrent velocity time records, there is a low frequency periodic component that could contribute to the mixing of clam metabolites through the generation of persistent jet vorticies. Also, fractal analysis of the velocity time records shows that as the ambient velocity increases the excurrent velocity becomes more correlated and less random. These results suggest that for high ambient flow a low frequency periodicity may be sufficient to promote the mixing and dilution of metabolites. In contrast, for low ambient flow more random siphon excurrent velocity may be required to reduce the amount of information available to predators in the downstream odorant plume.

  12. Effects of parent vessel geometry on intraaneurysmal flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2006-03-01

    This study shows the influence of the upstream parent artery geometry on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms. Patient-specific models of four cerebral aneurysms at four typical locations were constructed from 3D rotational angiography images. Two geometrical models were constructed for each patient, one with the native parent vessel geometry and another with the parent vessel truncated approximately 1cm upstream from the aneurysm. For one aneurysm, two images were used to construct a model as realistic and large as possible - down to the carotid bifurcation - which was cut at seven different locations. Corresponding finite element grids were generated and computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out under pulsatile flow conditions. It was found that truncated models tended to underestimate the wall shear stress in the aneurysm and to shift the impaction zone to the neck when compared with the native geometry. In one aneurysm the parent vessel included a tortuous segment close to the neck that strongly influenced the flow pattern entering the aneurysm. Thus, including longer portions of the parent vessel beyond this segment did not have a substantial effect. Depending on the dominant geometrical features the length of the parent artery needed for an accurate representation of the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics may vary among individuals. In conclusion, failure to properly model the inflow stream determined by the upstream parent artery can significantly influence the results of intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic models. The upstream portion of the parent vessel of cerebral aneurysms should be included in order to accurately represent the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics.

  13. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2012-12-01

    Polydisperse granular materials are ubiquitous in the field of geomorphology. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to address the impact of segregation, stratification and mixing on landscape dynamics and sediment transport. Here, we study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. Not surprisingly, we conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  14. Patterns in groundwater chemistry resulting from groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    Groundwater flow influences hydrochemical patterns because flow reduces mixing by diffusion, carries the chemical imprints of biological and anthropogenic changes in the recharge area, and leaches the aquifer system. Global patterns are mainly dictated by differences in the flux of meteoric water passing through the subsoil. Within individual hydrosomes (water bodies with a specific origin), the following prograde evolution lines (facies sequence) normally develop in the direction of groundwater flow: from strong to no fluctuations in water quality, from polluted to unpolluted, from acidic to basic, from oxic to anoxic-methanogenic, from no to significant base exchange, and from fresh to brackish. This is demonstrated for fresh coastal-dune groundwater in the Netherlands. In this hydrosome, the leaching of calcium carbonate as much as 15m and of adsorbed marine cations (Na+, K+, and Mg2+) as much as 2500m in the flow direction is shown to correspond with about 5000yr of flushing since the beach barrier with dunes developed. Recharge focus areas in the dunes are evidenced by groundwater displaying a lower prograde quality evolution than the surrounding dune groundwater. Artificially recharged Rhine River water in the dunes provides distinct hydrochemical patterns, which display groundwater flow, mixing, and groundwater ages. Résumé Les écoulements souterrains influencent les différents types hydrochimiques, parce que l'écoulement réduit le mélange par diffusion, porte les marques chimiques de changements biologiques et anthropiques dans la zone d'alimentation et lessive le système aquifère. Ces types dans leur ensemble sont surtout déterminés par des différences dans le flux d'eau météorique traversant le sous-sol. Dans les "hydrosomes" (masses d'eau d'origine déterminée), les lignes marquant une évolution prograde (séquence de faciès) se développent normalement dans la direction de l'écoulement souterrain : depuis des fluctuations fortes de la

  15. Dynamics of High Sound-Speed Metal Confiners Driven By Non-Ideal High-Explosive Detonation

    DOE PAGES

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott I.

    2015-01-23

    Here, the results of 14 tests examining the behavior of aluminum (Al) conifners driven by non-ideal ANFO detonation in a cylinder test configuration are presented. In each test, the measured detonation phase velocity is slower than the aluminum sound speed. Thus, in the detonation reference frame, the ow in the Al is both shockless and subsonic. The tests involve: 3-inch inner diameter (ID) cylinders with Al wall thicknesses of 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 1 and 2 inches; a 4-inch ID cylinder with a 1/2-inch Al wall thickness; and 6-inch ID cylinders with Al wall thicknesses of 1/2, 1 and 2 inches.more » The ANFO detonation velocity is seen to increase with increasing wall thickness for both the 3- and 6-inch ID tests, with no limiting velocity reached for the wall thicknesses used. The motion of the outer Al wall due to precursor elastic waves in the Al running ahead of the detonation is also measured at various axial locations along the cylinders. It is found that the magnitude of the outer wall motion due to the precursor elastic waves is small, while the associated wall motion is unsteady and decays in amplitude as the elastic disturbances move further ahead of the detonation front. The variations in the expansion history of the main outer wall motion of the cylinders are presented for increasing wall thickness at fixed ID, and for increasing cylinder inner diameter at a fixed wall thickness. Finally, we also explore the existence of a geometric similarity scaling of the wall expansion history for three geometrically scaled tests (3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1/4- and 1/2-inch walls respectively, 3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1/2- and 1-inch walls and 3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1- and 2-inch walls respectively). We find that the wall velocity histories for each of the three scaled tests, when plotted directly against time relative to start of main motion of the wall, are similar over a certain range of wall velocities without any geometric based rescaling in time

  16. Dynamics of High Sound-Speed Metal Confiners Driven By Non-Ideal High-Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott I.

    2015-01-23

    Here, the results of 14 tests examining the behavior of aluminum (Al) conifners driven by non-ideal ANFO detonation in a cylinder test configuration are presented. In each test, the measured detonation phase velocity is slower than the aluminum sound speed. Thus, in the detonation reference frame, the ow in the Al is both shockless and subsonic. The tests involve: 3-inch inner diameter (ID) cylinders with Al wall thicknesses of 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 1 and 2 inches; a 4-inch ID cylinder with a 1/2-inch Al wall thickness; and 6-inch ID cylinders with Al wall thicknesses of 1/2, 1 and 2 inches. The ANFO detonation velocity is seen to increase with increasing wall thickness for both the 3- and 6-inch ID tests, with no limiting velocity reached for the wall thicknesses used. The motion of the outer Al wall due to precursor elastic waves in the Al running ahead of the detonation is also measured at various axial locations along the cylinders. It is found that the magnitude of the outer wall motion due to the precursor elastic waves is small, while the associated wall motion is unsteady and decays in amplitude as the elastic disturbances move further ahead of the detonation front. The variations in the expansion history of the main outer wall motion of the cylinders are presented for increasing wall thickness at fixed ID, and for increasing cylinder inner diameter at a fixed wall thickness. Finally, we also explore the existence of a geometric similarity scaling of the wall expansion history for three geometrically scaled tests (3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1/4- and 1/2-inch walls respectively, 3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1/2- and 1-inch walls and 3- and 6-inch ID cylinders with 1- and 2-inch walls respectively). We find that the wall velocity histories for each of the three scaled tests, when plotted directly against time relative to start of main motion of the wall, are similar over a certain range of wall velocities without any geometric based rescaling in time. The

  17. Flow patterns and transition characteristics for steam condensation in silicon microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuehu; Fan, Xiaoguang; Lan, Zhong; Hao, Tingting

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the two-phase flow patterns and transition characteristics for steam condensation in silicon microchannels with different cross-sectional geometries. Novel experimental techniques were developed to determine the local heat transfer rate and steam quality by testing the temperature profile of a copper cooler. Flow regime maps for different microchannels during condensation were established in terms of steam mass flux and steam quality. Meanwhile, the correlation for the flow pattern transition was obtained using different geometrical and dimensionless parameters for steam condensation in microchannels. To better understand the flow mechanisms in microchannels, the condensation flow patterns, such as annular flow, droplet flow, injection flow and intermittent flow, were captured and analyzed. The local heat transfer rate showed the nonlinear variations along the axial direction during condensation. The experimental results indicate that the flow patterns and transition characteristics strongly depend on the geometries of microchannels. With the increasing steam mass flux and steam quality, the annular/droplet flow expands and spans over a larger region in the microchannels; otherwise the intermittent flow occupies the microchannels. The dimensionless fitting data also reveal that the effect of surface tension and vapor inertia dominates gravity and viscous force at the specified flow pattern transitional position.

  18. Patterning process exploration of metal 1 layer in 7nm node with 3D patterning flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Ciofi, Ivan; Saad, Yves; Matagne, Philippe; Bachmann, Michael; Oulmane, Mohamed; Gillijns, Werner; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In 7mn node (N7), the logic design requires the critical poly pitch (CPP) of 42-45nm and metal 1 (M1) pitch of 28- 32nm. Such high pattern density pushes the 193 immersion lithography solution toward its limit and also brings extremely complex patterning scenarios. The N7 M1 layer may require a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) with triple litho-etch (LE3) block process. Therefore, the whole patterning process flow requires multiple exposure+etch+deposition processes and each step introduces a particular impact on the pattern profiles and the topography. In this study, we have successfully integrated a simulation tool that enables emulation of the whole patterning flow with realistic process-dependent 3D profile and topology. We use this tool to study the patterning process variations of N7 M1 layer including the overlay control, the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) budget and the lithographic process window (PW). The resulting 3D pattern structure can be used to optimize the process flow, verify design rules, extract parasitics, and most importantly, simulate the electric field and identify hot spots for dielectric reliability. As an example application, we will report extractions of maximum electric field at M1 tipto- tip which is one of the most critical patterning locations and we will demonstrate the potential of this approach for investigating the impact of process variations on dielectric reliability. We will also present simulations of an alternative M1 patterning flow, with a single exposure block using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and analyze its advantages compared to the LE3 block approach.

  19. Analysis of Viking infrared thermal mapping data of Mars. The effects of non-ideal surfaces on the derived thermal properties of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal interia of the surface of Mars varies spatially by a factor of eight. This is attributable to changes in the average particle size of the fine material, the surface elevation, the atmospheric opacity due to dust, and the fraction of the surface covered by rocks and fine material. The effects of these non-ideal properties on the surface temperatures and derived thermal inertias are modeled, along with the the effects of slopes, CO2 condensed onto the surface, and layering of fine material upon solid rock. The non-ideal models are capable of producing thermal behavior similar to that observed by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, including a morning delay in the post-dawn temperature rise and an enhanced cooling in the afternoon relative to any ideal, homogeneous model. The enhanced afternoon cooling observed at the Viking-1 landing site is reproduced by the non-ideal models while that atop Arsia Mons volcano is not, but may be attributed to the observing geometry.

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Caner Yurteri

    2001-08-20

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

  1. Interventional physiology. Part XVI: normal coronary flow velocity patterns: considerations of artifacts, arrhythmias, and anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tron, C; Donohue, T J; Kern, M J

    1995-04-01

    During normal flow velocity recording, various physiologic or technical problems may appear which can produce confusing flow signals. This section of Interventional Physiology reviews the patterns of normal coronary flow velocity and examines several artifacts and other features encountered in clinical practice. Recognition of these variations will help the interventional cardiologist to differentiate between physiologic and pathologic events.

  2. Flow pattern changes influenced by variation of viscosities of a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture flow in a vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Keska, Jerry K.; Hincapie, Juan; Jones, Richard

    2011-02-15

    In the steady-state flow of a heterogeneous mixture such as an air-liquid mixture, the velocity and void fraction are space- and time-dependent parameters. These parameters are the most fundamental in the analysis and description of a multiphase flow. The determination of flow patterns in an objective way is extremely critical, since this is directly related to sudden changes in spatial and temporal changes of the random like characteristic of concentration. Flow patterns can be described by concentration signals in time, amplitude, and frequency domains. Despite the vital importance and countless attempts to solve or incorporate the flow pattern phenomena into multiphase models, it has still been a very challenging topic in the scientific community since the 1940's and has not yet reached a satisfactory solution. This paper reports the experimental results of the impact of fluid viscosity on flow patterns for two-phase flow. Two-phase flow was created in laboratory equipment using air and liquid as phase medium. The liquid properties were changed by using variable concentrations of glycerol in water mixture which generated a wide-range of dynamic viscosities ranging from 1 to 1060 MPa s. The in situ spatial concentration vs. liquid viscosity and airflow velocity of two-phase flow in a vertical ID=50.8 mm pipe were measured using two concomitant computer-aided measurement systems. After acquiring data, the in situ special concentration signals were analyzed in time (spatial concentration and RMS of spatial concentration vs. time), amplitude (PDF and CPDF), and frequency (PSD and CPSD) domains that documented broad flow pattern changes caused by the fluid viscosity and air velocity changes. (author)

  3. Hyporheic flow patterns in relation to large river floodplain attributes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-calibrated models of hyporheic flow have emphasized low-order headwater systems. In many cases, however, hyporheic flow in large lowland river floodplains may be an important contributor to ecosystem services such as maintenance of water quality and habitat. In this study, ...

  4. Patterns of the turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigent, Arnaud; Talioua, Abdessamad; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    We are interested in the study of the transition to turbulence in the Taylor-Couette flow, the flow between two independently rotating coaxial cylinders. Once the geometry is fixed, the flow is controlled by the inner and outer Reynolds numbers and present a large variety of flow regimes. In counter-rotation, the transition is characterized by a succession of more or less turbulent flow regimes: intermittency with turbulent spots, spiral turbulence, featureless turbulence. For larger values of the inner Reynolds number, turbulent Taylor roll re-emerge from the featureless turbulence and remain for very large values of the Reynolds numbers. Bifurcations between different turbulent rolls states are even observed in the ultimate turbulence regime. Nevertheless the transition from the featureless turbulence to the turbulent rolls still requires a detailed study and the mechanism which causes and sustains turbulent spots or turbulent spirals remains unknown. In this study we present new experimental information on the organization of the flow for the different regimes with turbulence. The experiments are conducted in a Taylor-Couette flow with η = 0 . 8 . Stereo-Particle Image Velocimetry measurements and visualizations of the different flow regimes are realized and discussed. This work was supported by the ANR TRANSFLOW - ANR-13-BS09-0025.

  5. Experimental investigation on flow patterns of RP-3 kerosene under sub-critical and supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Active cooling with endothermic hydrocarbon fuel is proved to be one of the most promising approaches to solve the thermal problem for hypersonic aircraft such as scramjet. The flow patterns of two-phase flow inside the cooling channels have a great influence on the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, phase transition processes of RP-3 kerosene flowing inside a square quartz-glass tube were experimentally investigated. Three distinct phase transition phenomena (liquid-gas two phase flow under sub-critical pressures, critical opalescence under critical pressure, and corrugation under supercritical pressures) were identified. The conventional flow patterns of liquid-gas two phase flow, namely bubble flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow are observed under sub-critical pressures. Dense bubble flow and dispersed flow are recognized when pressure is increased towards the critical pressure whilst slug flow, churn flow and annular flow disappear. Under critical pressure, the opalescence phenomenon is observed. Under supercritical pressures, no conventional phase transition characteristics, such as bubbles are observed. But some kind of corrugation appears when RP-3 transfers from liquid to supercritical. The refraction index variation caused by sharp density gradient near the critical temperature is thought to be responsible for this corrugation.

  6. Profound spatial heterogeneity of coronary reserve. Discordance between patterns of resting and maximal myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Austin, R E; Aldea, G S; Coggins, D L; Flynn, A E; Hoffman, J I

    1990-08-01

    We examined the ability of individual regions of the canine left ventricle to increase blood flow relative to baseline rates of perfusion. Regional coronary flow was measured by injecting radioactive microspheres over 90 seconds in seven anesthetized mongrel dogs. Preliminary experiments demonstrated a correlation between the regional distributions of blood flow during asphyxia and pharmacological vasodilatation with adenosine (mean r = 0.75; 192 regions in each of two dogs), both of which resulted in increased coronary flow. Subsequent experiments, during which coronary perfusion pressure was held constant at 80 mm Hg, examined the pattern of blood flow in 384 regions (mean weight, 106 mg) of the left ventricular free wall during resting flow and during maximal coronary flow effected by intracoronary adenosine infusion. We found that resting and maximal flow patterns were completely uncorrelated to each other in a given dog (mean r = 0.06, p = NS; n = 3 dogs). Furthermore, regional coronary reserve, defined as the ratio of maximal to resting flow, ranged from 1.75 (i.e., resting flow was 57% of maximum) to 21.9 (resting flow was 4.5% of maximum). Thus, coronary reserve is spatially heterogeneous and determined by two distinct perfusion patterns: the resting (control) pattern and the maximal perfusion pattern. Normal hearts, therefore, contain small regions that may be relatively more vulnerable to ischemia. This may explain the patchy nature of infarction with hypoxia and at reduced perfusion pressures as well as the difficulty of using global parameters to predict regional ischemia. Despite the wide dispersion of coronary reserve, we found, by autocorrelation analysis, that reserve in neighboring regions (even when separated by a distance of several tissue samples) was significantly correlated. This also applied to patterns of resting myocardial flow. Thus, both resting coronary blood flow and reserve appear to be locally continuous and may define functional

  7. Effect of diastolic flow patterns on the function of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of intraventricular flow patterns on the pumping efficiency and the blood mixing and transport characteristics of the left ventricle. The simulations employ a geometric model of the left ventricle which is derived from contrast computed tomography. A variety of diastolic flow conditions are generated for a fixed ejection fraction in order to delineate the effect of flow patterns on ventricular performance. The simulations indicate that the effect of intraventricular blood flow pattern on the pumping power is physiologically insignificant. However, diastolic flow patterns have a noticeable effect on the blood mixing as well as the residence time of blood cells in the ventricle. The implications of these findings on ventricular function are discussed.

  8. Variability of sap flow on forest hillslopes: patterns and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa

    2013-04-01

    Sap flow in trees is an essential variable in integrated studies of hydrologic fluxes. It gives indication of transpiration rates for single trees and, with a suitable method of upscaling, for whole stands. This information is relevant for hydrologic and climate models, especially for the prediction of change in water fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum under climate change. To this end, we do not only need knowledge concerning the response of sapflow to atmospheric forcing but also an understanding of the main controls on its spatial variability. Our study site consists of several subcatchments of the Attert basin in Luxembourg underlain by schists of the Ardennes massif. Within these subcatchments we measure sap flow in more than 20 trees on a range of forested hillslopes covered by a variety of temperate deciduous tree species such as beech, oak, hornbeam and maple as well as conifers such as firs. Our sap flow sensors are based on the heat pulse velocity method and consist of three needles, one needle acting as the heating device and the other two holding three thermistors each, enabling us to simultaneously measure sap flow velocity at three different depths within the tree. In close proximity to the trees we collect additional data on soil moisture, matric potential and groundwater levels. First results show that the sensor design seems promising for an upscaling of the measured sap flow velocities to sap flow at the tree level. The maximum depth of actively used sapwood as well as the decrease in sap flow velocity with increasing depth in the tree can be determined by way of the three thermistors. Marked differences in sap flow velocity profiles are visible between the different species, resulting in differences in sap flow for trees of similar diameter. We examine the range of tree sap flow values and variation due to species, size class, slope position and exposition and finally relate them to the dynamics of soil moisture conditions with the

  9. Flow regime and deposition pattern of evaporating binary mixture droplet suspended with particles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Duan, Fei

    2016-02-01

    The flow regimes and the deposition pattern have been investigated by changing the ethanol concentration in a water-based binary mixture droplet suspended with alumina nanoparticles. To visualize the flow patterns, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been applied in the binary liquid droplet containing the fluorescent microspheres. Three distinct flow regimes have been revealed in the evaporation. In Regime I, the vortices and chaotic flows are found to carry the particles to the liquid-vapor interface and to promote the formation of particle aggregation. The aggregates move inwards in Regime II as induced by the Marangoni flow along the droplet free surface. Regime III is dominated by the drying of the left water and the capillary flow driving particles radially outward is observed. The relative weightings of Regimes I and II, which are enhanced with an increasing load of ethanol, determine the motion of the nanoparticles and the formation of the final drying pattern.

  10. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic determinants of right coronary artery flow reserve and phasic flow pattern in advanced non-ischemic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graziosi, Pedro; Ianni, Barbara; Ribeiro, Expedito; Perin, Marco; Beck, Leonardo; Meneghetti, Claudio; Mady, Charles; Filho, Eulogio Martinez; Ramires, Jose AF

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with advanced non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NIC), right-sided cardiac disturbances has prognostic implications. Right coronary artery (RCA) flow pattern and flow reserve (CFR) are not well known in this setting. The purpose of this study was to assess, in human advanced NIC, the RCA phasic flow pattern and CFR, also under right-sided cardiac disturbances, and compare with left coronary circulation. As well as to investigate any correlation between the cardiac structural, mechanical and hemodynamic parameters with RCA phasic flow pattern or CFR. Methods Twenty four patients with dilated severe NIC were evaluated non-invasively, even by echocardiography, and also by cardiac catheterization, inclusive with Swan-Ganz catheter. Intracoronary Doppler (Flowire) data was obtained in RCA and left anterior descendent coronary artery (LAD) before and after adenosine. Resting RCA phasic pattern (diastolic/systolic) was compared between subgroups with and without pulmonary hypertension, and with and without right ventricular (RV) dysfunction; and also with LAD. RCA-CFR was compared with LAD, as well as in those subgroups. Pearson's correlation analysis was accomplished among echocardiographic (including LV fractional shortening, mass index, end systolic wall stress) more hemodynamic parameters with RCA phasic flow pattern or RCA-CFR. Results LV fractional shortening and end diastolic diameter were 15.3 ± 3.5 % and 69.4 ± 12.2 mm. Resting RCA phasic pattern had no difference comparing subgroups with vs. without pulmonary hypertension (1.45 vs. 1.29, p = NS) either with vs. without RV dysfunction (1.47 vs. 1.23, p = NS); RCA vs. LAD was 1.35 vs. 2.85 (p < 0.001). It had no significant correlation among any cardiac mechanical or hemodynamic parameter with RCA-CFR or RCA flow pattern. RCA-CFR had no difference compared with LAD (3.38 vs. 3.34, p = NS), as well as in pulmonary hypertension (3.09 vs. 3.10, p = NS) either in RV dysfunction (3.06 vs. 3.22, p

  11. Two-phase flow patterns characteristics analysis based on image and conductance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenya; Jin, Ningde; Wang, Chun; Wang, Jinxiang

    2008-10-01

    In order to study the temporal and spatial evolution characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern, the two-phase flow monitoring system composed of high-speed dynamic camera and Vertical Multi-Electrode Array conductance sensor (VMEA) was utilized to shoot dynamic images and acquire the conductance fluctuating signals of 5 typical vertical gas-liquid two-phase flow patterns in a 125mm i.d. upward pipe. Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) was used to extract four time-varying characteristic parameter indices which represented different flow image texture structures and also Lempel-Ziv complexity of them were calculated. Then the transition of flow structure and flow property were comprehensively analyzed, combining the result derived from image information with recurrence plots (RPs) and Lempel-Ziv complexity of conductance fluctuating signals. The study showed that the line texture structure of RPs enabled to indicate flow pattern characteristics; the flow image texture structure characteristic parameters sequence described the variance of flow structure and dynamical complexity of different flow patterns.

  12. Effect of Groove Pattern of Chemical Mechanical Polishing Pad on Slurry Flow Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Doi, Toshiro K.; Uneda, Michio; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Ohnishi, Osamu; Seshimo, Kiyoshi; Aida, Hideo

    2012-05-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), the slurry flow behavior on the polishing pad is very important both for improving polishing effectiveness and for reducing the slurry consumption. In this study, we aim to evaluate two types of CMP pad that have unique special groove patterns, slurry outflow and inflow pads, for controlling the slurry flow behavior. We describe the effect of the groove patterns on the slurry flow behavior observed using images recorded using a high-speed digital camera. The results of the study indicate several advantages of the proposed pads over the conventional pads from the viewpoint of slurry flow behavior.

  13. Infant-specific gaze patterns in response to radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The focus of a radial optic flow is a valid visual cue used to perceive and control the heading direction of animals. Gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow were measured in human infants (N = 100, 4–18 months) and in adults (N = 20) using an eye-tracking technique. Overall, although the adults showed an advantage in detecting the focus of an expansion flow (representing forward locomotion) against that of a contraction flow (representing backward locomotion), infants younger than 1 year showed an advantage in detecting the focus of a contraction flow. Infants aged between 13 and 18 months showed no significant advantage in detecting the focus in either the expansion or in the contraction flow. The uniqueness of the gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow in infants shows that the visual information necessary to perceive heading direction potentially differs between younger and mature individuals. PMID:27708361

  14. The Dakota aquifer near Pueblo, Colorado; faults and flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Dakota Sandstone and the underlying Purgatoire Formation consisting of the Glencairn Shale and Lytle Sandstone Members form a board outcrop at the southeastern margin of the Canon City Embankment. The two formations form the Dakota aquifer, which supplies water to many domestic, stock, and irrigation wells in addition to a few municipal wells in the 12-township study area. Five large faults and several small faults, all apparently of high angle, are found in the study area. Analysis of water levels and water quality shows that parts of some of these faults restrict the flow of groundwater in the Dakota aquifer. Lithology of the rocks, particularly in the Dakota Sandstone and in the Glencairn Shale Member, is extremely variable. The lithology appears to affect the flow regime, possibly by determining how a particular segment of a fault affects flow. (USGS)

  15. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  16. Children's Brain Responses to Optic Flow Vary by Pattern Type and Motion Speed.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Rick O; Thomas, Amanda L; Fesi, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Structured patterns of global visual motion called optic flow provide crucial information about an observer's speed and direction of self-motion and about the geometry of the environment. Brain and behavioral responses to optic flow undergo considerable postnatal maturation, but relatively little brain imaging evidence describes the time course of development in motion processing systems in early to middle childhood, a time when psychophysical data suggest that there are changes in sensitivity. To fill this gap, electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were recorded in 4- to 8-year-old children who viewed three time-varying optic flow patterns (translation, rotation, and radial expansion/contraction) at three different speeds (2, 4, and 8 deg/s). Modulations of global motion coherence evoked coherent EEG responses at the first harmonic that differed by flow pattern and responses at the third harmonic and dot update rate that varied by speed. Pattern-related responses clustered over right lateral channels while speed-related responses clustered over midline channels. Both children and adults show widespread responses to modulations of motion coherence at the second harmonic that are not selective for pattern or speed. The results suggest that the developing brain segregates the processing of optic flow pattern from speed and that an adult-like pattern of neural responses to optic flow has begun to emerge by early to middle childhood.

  17. Boundary layer flow visualisation patterns on a riblet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. G.

    Boundary layer flow visualization methods, developed at Queen Mary and Westfield College, have been applied to a riblet surface. The results reveal cellular crossflows developing in the grooves between the riblets. These local flor regimes appear to have little direct effect on the flow in the wall layers immediately adjacent to them. Qualitatively, the behavior of the wall layers appears to be that which would be expected if a virtual surface existed at a level slightly above the riblet tops, but a tendency for the origin of longitudinal eddy pairs to become anchored to the top of a riblet is noted.

  18. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  19. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  20. Observations of spatial flow patterns at the coral colony scale on a shallow reef flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hench, James L.; Rosman, Johanna H.

    2013-03-01

    Although small-scale spatial flow variability can affect both larger-scale circulation patterns and biological processes on coral reefs, there are few direct measurements of spatial flow patterns across horizontal scales <100 m. Here flow patterns on a shallow reef flat were measured at scales from a single colony to several adjacent colonies using an array of acoustic Doppler velocimeters on a diver-operated traverse. We observed recirculation zones immediately behind colonies, reduced currents and elevated dissipation rates in turbulent wakes up to 2 colony diameters downstream and enhanced Reynolds stresses in shear layers around wake peripheries. Flow acceleration zones were observed above and between colonies. Coherent flow structures varied with incident flow speeds; recirculation zones were stronger and wakes were more turbulent in faster flows. Low-frequency (<0.03 Hz) flow variations, for which water excursions were large compared with the colony diameters (Keulegan-Carpenter number, KC >1), had similar spatial patterns to wakes, while higher-frequency variations (0.05-0.1 Hz, KC < 1) had no observable spatial structure. On the reef flat, both drag and inertial forces exerted by coral colonies could have significant effects on flow, but within different frequency ranges; drag dominates for low-frequency flow variations and inertial forces dominate for higher-frequency variations, including the wave band. Our scaling analyses suggest that spatial flow patterns at colony and patch scales could have important implications for both physical and biological processes at larger reef scales through their effects on forces exerted on the flow, turbulent mixing, and dispersion.

  1. Flow-Induced Control of Pattern Formation in Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Beta, Carsten

    Since Alan Turing's seminal paper in 1952, the study of spatio-temporal patterns that arise in systems of reacting and diffusing components has grown into an immense and vibrant realm of scientific research. This field includes not only chemical systems but spans many areas of science as diverse as cell and developmental biology, ecology, geosciences, or semiconductor physics. For several decades research in this field has concentrated on the vast variety of patterns that can emerge in reaction-diffusion systems and on the underlying instabilities. In the 1990s, stimulated by the pioneering work of Ott, Grebogi and Yorke, control of pattern formation arose as a new topical focus and gradually developed into an entire new field of research. On the one hand, research interests concentrated on control and suppression of undesired dynamical states, in particular on control of chaos. On the other hand, the design and engineering of particular space-time patterns became a major focus in this field that motivates ongoing scientific effort until today...

  2. On non-linear dynamics and control designs applied to the ideal and non-ideal variants of the Fitzhugh Nagumo (FN) mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarette, Fábio Roberto; Balthazar, José Manoel; Peruzzi, Nelson José; Rafikov, Marat

    2009-03-01

    The Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FH) mathematical model is considered a simplification of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model. This paper analyzes the non-linear dynamics of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) mathematical model, and still presents some modifications in the governing equations of the system in order to transform it into a non-ideal one (taking into account that an energy source has limited power supply). We also developed an optimal linear control design and used Sinhas's theory for the membrane's action potential in order to stabilize the variation of this potential.

  3. Remarks on the derivation of the governing equations for the dynamics of a nonlinear beam to a non ideal shaft coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Fenili, André; Lopes Rebello da Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando Manoel

    2014-12-10

    We derive nonlinear governing equations without assuming that the beam is inextensible. The derivation couples the equations that govern a weak electric motor, which is used to rotate the base of the beam, to those that govern the motion of the beam. The system is considered non-ideal in the sense that the response of the motor to an applied voltage and the motion of the beam must be obtained interactively. The moment that the motor exerts on the base of the beam cannot be determined without solving for the motion of the beam.

  4. Surface Patterning: Controlling Fluid Flow Through Dolphin and Shark Skin Biomimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Lawren; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; McVay, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Dolphin skin is characterized by circumferential ridges, perpendicular to fluid flow, present from the crest of the head until the tail fluke. When observing a cross section of skin, the ridges have a sinusoidal pattern. Sinusoidal grooves have been proven to induce vortices in the cavities that can help control flow separation which can reduce pressure drag. Shark skin, however, is patterned with flexible scales that bristle up to 50 degrees with reversed flow. Both dolphin ridges and shark scales are thought to help control fluid flow and increase swimming efficiency by delaying the separation of the boundary layer. This study investigates how flow characteristics can be altered with bio-inspired surface patterning. A NACA 4412 hydrofoil was entirely patterned with transverse sinusoidal grooves, inspired by dolphin skin but scaled so the cavities on the model have the same Reynolds number as the cavities on a swimming shark. Static tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 100,000 and at varying angles of attack. The results were compared to the smooth hydrofoil case. The flow data was quantified using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The results of this study demonstrated that the patterned hydrofoil experienced greater separation than the smooth hydrofoil. It is hypothesize that this could be remediated if the pattern was placed only after the maximum thickness of the hydrofoil. Funding through NSF REU grant 1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. MotionFlow: Visual Abstraction and Aggregation of Sequential Patterns in Human Motion Tracking Data.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujin; Elmqvist, Niklas; Ramani, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Pattern analysis of human motions, which is useful in many research areas, requires understanding and comparison of different styles of motion patterns. However, working with human motion tracking data to support such analysis poses great challenges. In this paper, we propose MotionFlow, a visual analytics system that provides an effective overview of various motion patterns based on an interactive flow visualization. This visualization formulates a motion sequence as transitions between static poses, and aggregates these sequences into a tree diagram to construct a set of motion patterns. The system also allows the users to directly reflect the context of data and their perception of pose similarities in generating representative pose states. We provide local and global controls over the partition-based clustering process. To support the users in organizing unstructured motion data into pattern groups, we designed a set of interactions that enables searching for similar motion sequences from the data, detailed exploration of data subsets, and creating and modifying the group of motion patterns. To evaluate the usability of MotionFlow, we conducted a user study with six researchers with expertise in gesture-based interaction design. They used MotionFlow to explore and organize unstructured motion tracking data. Results show that the researchers were able to easily learn how to use MotionFlow, and the system effectively supported their pattern analysis activities, including leveraging their perception and domain knowledge.

  6. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of two-phase flow: Effective rheology and flow patterns of particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deubelbeiss, Y.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Connolly, J. A. D.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the mechanical behavior of a two-phase system consisting of rigid grains and an interconnected pore fluid. For this purpose we use 2D direct numerical simulations on the spatial scale of individual grains for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid rheology. By using the stress-strain rate relation we derive scaling laws for effective viscosity of two-phase particle suspensions. We demonstrate that the effective rheology of the assemblage is non-Newtonian only if the fluid has a non-Newtonian rheology. At small fluid fraction, inter-granular strain rates are up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the applied background strain rate. We suggest that this effect explains the experimentally observed change at higher strain rates in rheology, from Newtonian to non-Newtonian aggregate rheology. To establish the conditions at which the fluid-solid aggregate deforms coherently as a consequence of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities we studied flow patterns of particle suspensions and characterized them as a function of fluid fraction, viscosity, density, shape and size of the grains. From initial conditions with homogeneously distributed grains and interstitial fluid above a layer of pure fluid, our results show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates for moderate to large fluid fractions. At large fluid fractions, we observed a transition to a Stokes suspension mode, in which grains do not interact but sink independently. An analytical expression is derived that predicts the transition from Rayleigh-Taylor instability to Stokes suspension mode. The transition is a function of fluid fraction, radius of the grains, height of the interface and initial amplitude. Systematic numerical simulations are in good agreement with the analytical predictions.

  9. Analysis of the polishing slurry flow of chemical mechanical polishing by polishing pad with phyllotactic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yushan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Li, Nan; Duan, Min; Xing, Xue-Ling

    2010-12-01

    In order to make the polishing slurry distribution more uniform over the polishing region, a new kind of polishing pad, which has sunflower seed pattern, has been designed based on the phyllotaxis theory of biology, and the boundary conditions of polishing slurry flow have been established. By the help of computational fluid dynamics software (FLUENT), the flow state of the polishing slurry is simulated and the effects of the phyllotactic parameters of polishing pad on the flow field of polishing slurry are analyzed. The results show that when the polishing slurry is imported from the center of phyllotaxis polishing pad, the slurry flows along the counterclockwise and clockwise spiral grooves of phyllotatic pattern, which make fluid flow divergence around, and the flow field becomes more uniform.

  10. Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Jan; Metternich, Jan B; Nikbin, Nikzad; Kirschning, Andreas; Ley, Steven V

    2014-06-14

    Continuous flow chemistry as a process intensification tool is well known. However, its ability to enable chemists to perform reactions which are not possible in batch is less well studied or understood. Here we present an example, where a new reactivity pattern and extended reaction scope has been achieved by transferring a reaction from batch mode to flow. This new reactivity can be explained by suppressing back mixing and precise control of temperature in a flow reactor set up.

  11. Reconstructing Flow Patterns from Tsunami Deposits with No Visible Sedimentary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, C. L.; Chague-Goff, C.; Goff, J. R.; Wassmer, P.; Gomez, C. A.; Hart, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    High energy coastal events, such as tsunamis, commonly leave sediment deposits in the landscape that may be preserved in the geological record. A set of anomalous sand and silt layers intercalated between soil units was identified alongside an estuary in Okains Bay, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. Okains Bay, comprised of a coastal plain of Holocene progradational dune ridges, was flooded by tsunamis in 1868 and 1960. Previous research has assessed the relationship between tsunami flow patterns and sediment deposits for recent events, and we aim to extend this application to older deposits where flow patterns were not recorded and sedimentary structures are not visually apparent. A multi-proxy approach was used to investigate the sediment deposits at twelve sites along a 2 km length of the estuary margin and map inundation patterns. Measurements of Magnetic Fabric (MF: Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility) were used to determine the flow direction during deposition, alongside stratigraphy and particle size analyses to assess wave energy. Flow direction results were overlaid on a digital elevation model of the study site to interpret flow patterns. Deposits became thinner and particle size decreased with distance from the coast, indicating waning flow energy with distance inland. MF results indicate that inundation occurred via the estuary channel, with primary flow directions oriented perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the channel at each site. On a smaller scale, results showed evidence of current reversal at some sites, with flow directed alternately away from and towards the estuary channel. This is consistent with uprush and backwash patterns observed in tsunami wave sequences. Topographic control of flow patterns is also evident from the data. This research demonstrates a method for investigating older, structurally-degraded deposits and has implications for the reconstruction of paleotsunami inundation from their sedimentary deposits.

  12. Modelling unsaturated flow patterns in green roof substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Anna; Gnecco, Ilaria; Lanza, Luca G.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this research is to examine the unsaturated flow within the green roof substrates realized with high conductivity and coarse grained porous media. In order to base our research on experimental evidences, a monitoring program was carried out at University of Genova (Italy). The green roof experimental site was obtained by retrofitting an existing single-layer vegetated roof built in the sixties into a modern technological system fully equipped with sensors for on-site meteorological, hygrometric and flow rate measurements. The drainage and growing substrates are volcanic material mined, blended and graded by Europomice Srl (Grosseto, Italy). These graded porous media are employed in green roof systems for their low bulk density, high porosity and high hydraulic conductivity. The site is equipped with a meteorological station (for rain data, air temperature and humidity, solar radiation and air pressure), four TDR probes for continuous water content monitoring along a vertical profile and a suitable hydraulic device for continuous outflow monitoring. The SWMS - 2D model that solves the Richards' equation for two-dimensional saturated -unsaturated water flow was used to simulate the hydrologic response of the experimental green roof. The model was calibrated and validated using rain events recorded at the experimental site in a one-year monitoring campaign. The calibration and validation events are selected in order to include events representative of the four seasonal conditions characterized by different antecedent dry weather periods and consequently different initial soil water content distributions. The calibration and validation strategy involved comparing predicted and measured outflow hydrographs. The mechanistic model, here employed to describe the variably saturated flow within the thin stratigraphy of a green roof, is based on a single porosity approach and is demonstrated to suitably describe both the outflow hydrograph and the water content

  13. Fractal patterns in turbulent flow for laden particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, M.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Angilella, J.-R.

    2011-12-01

    We use Kinematic Simulation as a particular kind of synthetic turbulence model to study the preferential accumulation of laden particles with inertia and gravity. Particles are released as a unifrom cloud in the periodic simulation box. We allow particles to settle in synthetic flow and after some times particles concentrate in a particular sub-domain. We study the dimensional properties of these attractors as functions of drift parameter and Stokes number. The attractor's topology varies from curve(D = 1) to fractal plane.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of patterns in laryngeal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N. E.; Artana, G.; Sciamarella, D.

    2009-05-01

    Unsteady airflow is investigated in a channel with a geometry approximating that of the human larynx. The laryngeal flow is simulated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible two-dimensional viscous fluid, and visualized using the Schlieren technique in an experimental setup consisting of a rigid replica of the larynx, with and without ventricular bands. This study shows the spontaneous formation of vortex couples in several regions of the laryngeal profile, and at different stages of the evolution of the starting glottal jet.

  15. Uncertainty estimation of non-ideal analog switches using programmable Josephson voltage standards for mutual inductance measurement in the joule balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Xu, Jinxin; You, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the mutual inductance is one of the key techniques in the joule balance to determine the Planck constant h, where a standard-square-wave compensation method was proposed to accurately measure the dc value of the mutual inductance. With this method, analog switches are used to compose an analog-switch signal generator to synthesize the excitation and compensation voltages. However, the accuracy of the compensation voltage is influenced by the non-ideal behaviors of analog-switches. In this paper, the effect from these non-ideal switches is analyzed in detail and evaluated with the equivalent circuits. A programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) is used to generate a reference compensation voltage to measure the time integration of the voltage waveform generated by the analog-switch signal generator. Moreover, the effect is also evaluated experimentally by comparing the difference between the mutual inductance measured with the analog-switch signal generator and the value determined by the PJVS-analog-switch generator alternately in the same mutual inductance measurement system. The result shows that the impact of analog switches is 1.97  ×  10-7 with an uncertainty of 1.83  ×  10-7 (k  =  1) and confirms that the analog switch method can be used regularly instead of the PJVS in the mutual inductance measurement for the joule balance experiment.

  16. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; de Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings.

  17. Effects of non-idealities and quantization of the center of mass motion on symmetric and asymmetric collective states in a collective state atomic interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Resham; Kim, May E.; Fang, Renpeng; Tu, Yanfei; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of an ensemble of ? non-interacting, identical atoms excited by a laser. In general, the ?-th atom sees a Rabi frequency ?, an initial position dependent laser phase ?, and a motion induced Doppler shift of ?. When ? or ? is distinct for each atom, the system evolves into a superposition of ? intercoupled states, of which there are ? symmetric and ? asymmetric collective states. For a collective state atomic interferometer (COSAIN), we recently proposed, it is important to understand the behavior of all the collective states under various conditions. In this paper, we show how to formulate the properties of these states under various non-idealities, and use this formulation to understand the dynamics thereof. We also consider the effect of treating the center of mass degree of freedom of the atoms quantum mechanically on the description of the collective states, illustrating that it is indeed possible to construct a generalized collective state, as needed for the COSAIN, when each atom is assumed to be in a localized wave packet. The analysis presented in this paper is important for understanding the dynamics of the COSAIN, and will help advance the analysis and optimization of spin squeezing in the presence of practically unavoidable non-idealities as well as in the domain where the center of mass motion of the atoms is quantized.

  18. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  1. A new splitting scheme to the discrete Boltzmann equation for non-ideal gases on non-uniform meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Saumil; Lee, Taehun

    2016-12-01

    We present a novel numerical procedure for solving the discrete Boltzmann equations (DBE) on non-uniform meshes. Our scheme is based on the Strang splitting method where we seek to investigate two-phase flow applications. In this note, we investigate the onset of parasitic currents which arise in many computational two-phase algorithms. To the best of our knowledge, the results presented in this work show, for the first time, a spectral element discontinuous Galerkin (SEDG) discretization of a discrete Boltzmann equation which successfully eliminates parasitic currents on non-uniform meshes. With the hope that this technique can be used for applications in complex geometries, calculations are performed on non-uniform mesh distributions by using high-order (spectral), body-fitting quadrilateral elements. Validation and verification of our work is carried out by comparing results against the classical 2D Young-Laplace law problem for a static drop.

  2. Comparison of flow-controlled calcium and barium carbonate precipitation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuszter, G.; De Wit, A.

    2016-12-01

    Various precipitation patterns can be obtained in flow conditions when injecting a solution of sodium carbonate in a confined geometry initially filled with a solution of either barium or calcium chloride. We compare here the barium and calcium carbonate precipitate structures as a function of initial concentrations and injection flow rate. We show that, in some part of the parameter space, the patterns are similar and feature comparable properties indicating that barium and calcium behave similarly in the related flow-controlled precipitation conditions. For other values of parameters though, the precipitate structures are different indicating that the cohesive and microscopic properties of barium versus calcium carbonate are then important in shaping the pattern in flow conditions.

  3. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  4. Retention time and flow patterns in Lake Marion, South Carolina, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, G.G.; Harvey, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    In 1984, six dye tracer tests were made on Lake Marion to determine flow patterns and retention times under conditions of high and low flow. During the high-flow tests, with an average inflow of about 29,000 cubic feet per second, the approximate travel time through the lake for the peak tracer concentration was 14 days. The retention time was about 20 days. During the low-flow tests, with an average inflow of about 9,000 cubic feet per second, the approximate travel time was 41 days, and the retention time was about 60 days. The primary factors controlling movement of water in the lake are lake inflow and outflow. The tracer cloud moved consistently downstream, slowing as the lake widened. Flow patterns in most of the coves, and in some areas along the northeastern shore, are influenced more by tributary inflow than by factors attributable to water from the main body of the lake.

  5. Forecasting Flows from Target Pattern Instability in Rayleigh-Benard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Balachandra; Perkins, Adam; Schatz, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Using lab experiments combined with numerical simulations, we study systematically how the initial instability of an ordered pattern gradually evolves to a state of spatio-temporal complexity. The experiments begin from a reference pattern of axisymmetric convection rolls (a target pattern) that is reproducibly imposed using an optical technique for actuating fluid flow. For sufficiently large Rayleigh numbers, the axisymmetric pattern loses stability to patterns where the target's bull's-eye shifts off-center. We analyze an experimental ensemble of unstable patterns with nearby initial conditions to extract the spatial structure of the dominant modes and corresponding growth rates. We then test the extent to which a Boussinesq numerical model, in combination with a state estimation algorithm (Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF)), can be used to predict the subsequent evolution of the experimentally observed patterns.

  6. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  7. Transition from time-dependent to stationary flow patterns in the Taylor-Dean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Andereck, C. David

    1991-11-01

    The flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap, the Taylor-Dean system, is investigated for the case in which the outer cylinder rotates while the inner cylinder remains at rest. The initial instability is to a mixed state of both traveling inclined rolls and laminar base flow. At a larger rotation rate, the entire flow becomes time dependent. At a still larger rotation rate, the flow undergoes a subcritical transition to a stationary roll pattern, a process previously observed only in binary fluid mixtures.

  8. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  9. Patterning of cell-instructive hydrogels by hydrodynamic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Steffen; Allazetta, Simone; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2013-06-07

    Microfluidic gradient systems offer a very precise means to probe the response of cells to graded biomolecular signals in vitro, for example to model how morphogen proteins affect cell fate during developmental processes. However, existing gradient makers are designed for non-physiological plastic or glass cell culture substrates that are often limited in maintaining the phenotype and function of difficult-to-culture mammalian cell types, such as stem cells. To address this bottleneck, we combine hydrogel engineering and microfluidics to generate tethered protein gradients on the surface of biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Here we used software-assisted hydrodynamic flow focusing for exposing and rapidly capturing tagged proteins to gels in a step-wise fashion, resulting in immobilized gradients of virtually any desired shape and composition. To render our strategy amenable for high-throughput screening of multifactorial artificial cellular microenvironments, a dedicated microfluidic chip was devised for parallelization and multiplexing, yielding arrays of orthogonally overlapping gradients of up to 4 × 4 proteins. To illustrate the power of the platform for stem cell biology, we assessed how gradients of tethered leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) influence embryonic stem cell (ESC) behavior. ESC responded to LIF gradients in a binary manner, maintaining the pluripotency marker Rex1/Zfp42 and forming self-renewing colonies above a threshold concentration of 85 ng cm(-2). Our concept should be broadly applicable to probe how complex signaling microenvironments influence stem cell fate in culture.

  10. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  11. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  12. Comparison of visualized turbine endwall secondary flows and measured heat transfer patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Various flow visualization techniques were used to define the secondary flows near the endwall in a large heat transfer data. A comparison of the visualized flow patterns and the measured Stanton number distribution was made for cases where the inlet Reynolds number and exit Mach number were matched. Flows were visualized by using neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, by using smoke from oil soaked cigars, and by a few techniques using permanent marker pen ink dots and synthetic wintergreen oil. Details of the horseshoe vortex and secondary flows can be directly compared with heat transfer distribution. Near the cascade entrance there is an obvious correlation between the two sets of data, but well into the passage the effect of secondary flow is not as obvious.

  13. Comparison of visualized turbine endwall secondary flows and measured heat transfer patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Various flow visualization techniques were used to define the seondary flows near the endwall in a large heat transfer data. A comparison of the visualized flow patterns and the measured Stanton number distribution was made for cases where the inlet Reynolds number and exit Mach number were matched. Flows were visualized by using neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, by using smoke from oil soaked cigars, and by a few techniques using permanent marker pen ink dots and synthetic wintergreen oil. Details of the horseshoe vortex and secondary flows can be directly compared with heat transfer distribution. Near the cascade entrance there is an obvious correlation between the two sets of data, but well into the passage the effect of secondary flow is not as obvious. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14435

  14. The internal flow pattern analysis of a tidal power turbine operating on bidirectional generation-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Luo, Y.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    Using tidal energy can reduce environment pollution, save conventional energy and improve energy structure, hence it presents great advantage and is developing potential. Influenced by flood tide and low tide, a fully functional tidal power station needs to experience six operating modes, including bidirectional generation, pumping and sluice; the internal unsteady flow pattern and dynamic characters are very complicated. Based on a bidirectional tidal generator unit, three-dimensional unsteady flows in the flow path were calculated for four typical operating conditions with the pressure pulsation characteristics analyzed. According to the numerical results, the internal flow characteristics in the flow path were discussed. The influence of gravity to the hydraulic performance and flow characteristics were analysed. The results provide a theoretical analysis method of the hydraulic optimization design of the same type unit as well as a direction for stable operation and optimal scheduling of existing tidal power unit.

  15. Lower limits of spin detection efficiency for two-parameter two-qubit (TPTQ) states with non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Nayereh; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a TPTQ state as an input state of a non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors. Minimal spin polarization required to demonstrate spin entanglement according to entanglement witness and CHSH inequality with respect to (w.r.t.) their two free parameters have been found, and we have numerically shown that the entanglement witness is less stringent than the direct tests of Bell's inequality in the form of CHSH in the entangled limits of its free parameters. In addition, the lower limits of spin detection efficiency fulfilling secure cryptographic key against eavesdropping have been derived. Finally, we have considered TPTQ state as an output of spin decoherence channel and the region of ballistic transmission time w.r.t. spin relaxation time and spin dephasing time has been found.

  16. A potential role for isothermal calorimetry in studies of the effects of thermodynamic non-ideality in enzyme-catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Lonhienne, Thierry G A; Winzor, Donald J

    2004-01-01

    Attention is drawn to the feasibility of using isothermal calorimetry for the characterization of enzyme reactions under conditions bearing greater relevance to the crowded biological environment, where kinetic parameters are likely to differ significantly from those obtained by classical enzyme kinetic studies in dilute solution. An outline of the application of isothermal calorimetry to the determination of enzyme kinetic parameters is followed by considerations of the nature and consequences of crowding effects in enzyme catalysis. Some of those effects of thermodynamic non-ideality are then illustrated by means of experimental results from calorimetric studies of the effect of molecular crowding on the kinetics of catalysis by rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase. This review concludes with a discussion of the potential of isothermal calorimetry for the experimental determination of kinetic parameters for enzymes either in biological environments or at least in media that should provide reasonable approximations of the crowded conditions encountered in vivo.

  17. A simple evaluation procedure of the TAN calibration and the influence of non-ideal calibration elements on VNA S-parameter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumper, U.

    2007-06-01

    For the 7-term general TAN (Through-Attenuator-Network) self-calibration method of a four-sampler vector network analyser (VNA), and for all derived calibration methods like TLN, TRL, TRM, TAR, or TMN, it is shown that a very simple evaluation procedure of the seven error terms is possible, even if the Through connection is replaced by a reflectionless network with known transmission. Expressions for the deviations of the measured S-parameters of two-port test objects (d.u.t.s) from the true values, which are caused by deviations of the modeled S-parameters of non-ideal calibration elements ("standards") from their true values, are also presented. Additionally, it is shown that a TAN calibration is also possible in case of unequal reflections of the Network.

  18. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  19. Flow-driven instabilities during aggregation and pattern formation of Dictyostelium Discoideum: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Azam; Steinbock, Oliver; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-03-01

    We report the first experimental verification of the Differential Flow Induced Chemical Instability (DIFICI) in a signaling chemotactic biological population, where a differential flow induces traveling waves in the signaling pattern. The traveling wave speed was observed to be proportional to the flow velocity while the wave period was 7 min, which is comparable to that of starved Dictyostelium cells. Analysis and numerical simulations of the Goldbeter model show that the resulting DIFICI wave patterns appear in the oscillatory regime. In the experiments, we observe that the DIFICI wave pattern disappears after 4-5 h of starvation. We extrapolated the Goldbeter model to the experimental situation. This suggests that the dynamics switches from the oscillatory to the excitable regime as the DIFICI waves disappear in the experiment.

  20. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  1. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  2. Constraining Paleo-Hydrologic Flow Fields from Iron Oxide Cementation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Chan, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fine-grained sandstone in Mesozoic sedimentary red beds of the Colorado Plateau (southwestern United States) contain iron oxides cements (e.g., hematite and goethite) that display spectacular pattern formation, including evenly spaced nodule formation and banding with nested scales spanning about two to three orders of magnitude (Fig. 1). These nodules are commonly referred to as concretions, which are cemented mineral masses. The size of concretions typically ranges from millimeters to centimeters, while the spacing of bands ranges from millimeters to sub-meters. Spatial transition of one pattern to another or one pattern superimposed on another is also observed. Such patterns may embed important information about paleo-environments of sediment diagenesis, especially regarding the fluid migration and geochemical conditions involved. Field evidence indicates that the formation of iron oxide bands in sandstone seems closely related to groundwater flows. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. Using a linear stability analysis, we demonstrate that the pattern transition from nodules to bands results from symmetry breaking triggered by groundwater advection. Nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands tend to form in the presence of persistent water flows. The banding is formed perpendicularly to the flow direction, and the flow rate is expected to be proportional to the square of banding spacing. Therefore, careful mapping of cementation patterns and banding spacing over rock outcrops will allow us to reconstruct a detail map of water flow field for a sandstone aquifer. Concretion nodules formed in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone have been proposed as a terrestrial analogue to hematite spherules detected by the rover Opportunity at the Meridiani Planum site on the

  3. Impact of vegetation die-off on spatial flow patterns over a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Moonen, Pieter; Schoelynck, Jonas; Govers, Gerard; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale die-off of tidal marsh vegetation, caused by global change, is expected to change flow patterns over tidal wetlands, and hence to affect valuable wetland functions such as reduction of shoreline erosion, attenuation of storm surges, and sedimentation in response to sea level rise. This study quantified for the first time the effects of large-scale (4 ha) artificial vegetation removal, as proxy of die-off, on the spatial flow patterns through a tidal marsh channel and over the surrounding marsh platform. After vegetation removal, the flow velocities measured on the platform increased by a factor of 2 to 4, while the channel flow velocities decreased by almost a factor of 3. This was associated with a change in flow directions on the platform, from perpendicular to the channel edges when vegetation was present, to a tendency of more parallel flow to the channel edges when vegetation was absent. Comparison with hydrodynamic model simulations explains that the vegetation-induced friction causes both flow reduction on the vegetated platform and flow acceleration towards the non-vegetated channels. Our findings imply that large-scale vegetation die-off would not only result in decreased platform sedimentation rates, but also in sediment infilling of the channels, which together would lead to further worsening of plant growth conditions and a potentially runaway feedback to permanent vegetation loss.

  4. An Integrated Modeling Analysis of Unsaturated Flow Patterns inFractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2005-03-21

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated zones hasposed a greater challenge to numerical modeling investigations thancomparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature ofunsaturated media as well as the great number of variables impactingunsaturated zone flow. This paper presents an integrated modelingmethodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in theunsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed undergroundrepository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. It takes intoaccount the multiple coupled processes of air, water, heat flow andchemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain s highly heterogeneous,unsaturated fractured tuffs. The modeling approach integrates a widevariety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical fielddata into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modelinganalyses. Modeling results are examined against different types offield-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeologicalconceptual models and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturatedzone. In particular, this integration model provides a much clearerunderstanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through theunsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repositoryperformance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain sflow system is also demonstrated to provide a comprehensive modeling toolfor characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurfacesystems.

  5. Chaotic Flow Patterns from a Deep Plutonic Environment: a Case Study on Natural Magma Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.

    2015-07-01

    This work focuses on the mixing between basalt and granite in a deep plutonic environment. The description of mixing patterns and measurements of fractal dimensions, and the evaluation of geochemical data from a Cambro-Ordovician granitic pluton are summarized and discussed. Different morphologic domains within the pluton reveal concentric fragmented and/or folded layers of granite in a gabbro/granite mixed matrix. This stands in contrast to two predominantly regular gabbroic regions. These regular regions are separated by tightly stretched filament areas, in which mixing is enhanced. Sharp and gradational contacts between granitic and gabbroic domains depict the interplay among frozen flows (mingling) and convection-enhanced diffusion processes (mixing). Measurements of fractal dimensions at different scales and analysis of normalized concentration variance for major elements point towards magma mixing: the compositional variability and flow patterns of the studied pluton have been greatly controlled by a natural chaotic mixing process between a granitic and a basaltic end-member. During the mixing process, coeval fractional crystallization no doubt contributed to increasing the complexity of the system. However, since flow, and therefore mixing, stops with temperature decrease, flow patterns must have retained the predominant morphology and composition of the moment at which both contrasting magmas came together and froze. Flow patterns have been preserved. With further temperature decrease, fractional crystallization took over and hybrid rocks were generated from the fractionation of magmas previously mixed in different proportions.

  6. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  7. Pattern formation and flow control of fine particles by laser-scanning micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Koshioka, M; Misawa, H; Kitamura, N; Masuhara, H

    1991-10-01

    A novel micromanipulation technique is proposed for aligning fine particles on micrometer-scale spatial patterns and for moving the particles continuously along the formed patterns. This technique is based on the repetitive scanning of a focused trapping laser beam. The velocity of the particle flow can be controlled by scan speed and laser power. The origin of the driving force is considered theoretically and experimentally.

  8. Vector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Lai, Simon S M; Yu, Alfred C H

    2014-09-01

    Achieving non-invasive, accurate and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded on three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results indicated that by using three transmit angles and three receive angles (-10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (-10°, 0°, +10°) and of different sizes (dilated diameter: 2.2, 4.4 and 6.3 mm; steady flow rate: 2.5 mL/s). The practical merit of VPI was further illustrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2-Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using a nominal frame rate of 416 fps or 2.4-ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcations (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis.

  9. Identification of microfluidic two-phase flow patterns in lab-on-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao; Halvorsen, Einar

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a capacitive sensor for identification of microfluidic two-phase flow in lab-on-chip devices. With interdigital electrodes and thin insulation layer utilized, this sensor is capable of being integrated with the microsystems easily. Transducing principle and design considerations are presented with respect to the microfluidic gas/liquid flow patterns. Numerical simulation results verify the operational principle. And the factors affecting the performance of the sensor are discussed. Besides, a feasible process flow for the fabrication is also proposed.

  10. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation: Merging Jets and the Ultimate Jet Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey B. Parker and John A. Krommes

    2013-01-30

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. It is shown that for statisti- cally averaged equations of quasigeostrophic turbulence on a beta plane, zonal flows and inhomoge- neous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  11. Fluid flow and pattern selection in dendritic growth - Ground based in situ observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Lu, Deyang; Zhou, Yaohe; Cheng, Gongshan

    1989-02-01

    Model experiments on fluid flow and pattern selection have been done by creating flow in liquid regions close to the growth fronts in dendritic growth of SCN-aceton dilute alloys. The kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth were measured as a function of thermal gradient, growth velocity, and flow velocity. The present paper provides the first study of convection effects on constrained dendritic and cellular growth which focuses on the tip morphology and develops a boundary layer analysis. All of the problems addressed have application to the interpretation of the experimental phenomena arising from solidification and fluid dynamics on earth and in a space laboratory.

  12. Swash zone boundary conditions derived from optical remote sensing of swash zone flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, H. E.; Holman, R. A.; Baldock, T. E.

    2011-06-01

    Optical remote sensing is used to measure flow patterns in the swash zone. Timestack images are analyzed to measure the asymmetry and the relative duration of the inflow into the swash zone. This varies significantly between individual swashes, contrary to the classical analytical swash model for runup induced by bores, which predicts a similar flow pattern for all events. For swash forced by breaking bores, the gradient of the x-t locus of flow reversal varies over a wide range and flow reversal can occur simultaneously across the whole swash zone. This variation of the gradient of the locus of flow reversal in x-t space can be parameterized in terms of a single free variable in recent solutions to the nonlinear shallow water equations, which fully defines the swash boundary inflow condition. Consistent with the theory, the horizontal runup, the swash period, and the swash similarity parameter were observed to be independent of the swash inflow conditions but the flow asymmetry is not. Only a weak correlation was observed between the swash boundary condition and the Iribarren number and beach slope. Conversely, the analysis suggests that the degree of swash-swash interaction does influence the swash boundary condition and the resulting internal flow kinematics. The variation in inflow conditions is expected to influence the magnitudes of the velocity moments within the swash zone and therefore sediment transport rates.

  13. Modelling flow pattern transitions for steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes. [Bubble, slug, churn and dispersed-annular; also existence regions and transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taitel, Y.; Bornea, D.; Dukler, A.E.

    1980-05-01

    Models for predicting flow patterns in steady upward gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes (such as production-well tubing) delineate the transition boundaries between each of the four basic flow patterns for gas-liquid flow in vertical tubes: bubble, slug, churn, and dispersed-annular. Model results suggest that churn flow is the development region for the slug pattern and that bubble flow can exist in small pipes only at high liquid rates, where turbulent dispersion forces are high. Each transition depends on the flow-rate pair, fluid properties, and pipe size, but the nature of the dependence is different for each transition because of differing control mechanisms. The theoretical predictions are in reasonably good agreement with a variety of published flow maps based on experimental data.

  14. Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; McDonald, John P.; Schalla, Ronald; Sweeney, Mark D.; M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett

    2002-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory made in situ flow measurements in groundwater monitoring wells at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to determine the flow direction in an aquifer with a flat water table. Given the total errors in water level elevations, flow directions based on the potentiometric surface are ambiguous at best. The colloidal borescope was used because it allows direct, real time observation of mobile colloidal particles in the open interval of a water well and thus, avoids the use of water level data. The results characterize a complex groundwater flow pattern under several buried waste storage tank farms. The aquifer, artificially high due to large volume liquid discharges to the soil column from Hanford's nuclear production era, is currently receding to original conditions. The aquifer lies in unconsolidated gravel beds overlying an impermeable basalt surface that has a plucked, flood-scoured, scabland structure. The current aquifer thickness is similar to the relief on the basalt basement. Thus the groundwater must flow around the impermeable basalt structures producing a complicated flow pattern under the waste storage unit. The original monitoring network was designed for northwest flow when the water table was held artificially high. Proper locations for new wells are dependent on our knowledge of the flow direction. The results of the colloidal borescope investigation agree with the southerly direction indicated from hydrographs, contaminant trends, other direct flow data and the general concept of a receding aquifer draining off the southern limb of a basalt anticline. Flow in the aquifer is diverted by irregular local structural highs of very low permeability basalt.

  15. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states.

  16. Closed-loop control of flow separation using instantaneous trajectory patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Andreas; Parezanović, Vladimir; Kaiser, Eurika; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    A new sensor technique based on visualized instantaneous trajectory patterns is tested to control flow separation. A smooth ramp mounted inside the test section of a water tunnel produces canonical separation conditions. Pulsed hydrogen bubbles furnish instantaneous trajectory patterns of the underlying dynamical system. The evolution of these patterns feeds machine learning algorithms to determine actions that reduce the separated flow region. Compared to periodic forcing the results show even with less actuator action, a major impact on the separated flow. The controlled flow states contain strongly reduced recirculation zones which remain robust even under adverse conditions. Additionally, the visualization of instantaneous trajectory patterns is shown to have some promising options: The Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) of the controlled dynamical system can be deduced in-time without determination and integration of the instantaneous velocity fields. Additionally, classical procedures to reduce the data dimensionality, as for example the principal component analysis (PCA) and its variants, can be applied directly to the visualizations in order to feed the controller. Funding of the ANR program SepaCoDe and the ANR Chair of Excellence TUCOROM is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  18. Circular flow patterns induced by ciliary activity in reconstituted human bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Khelloufi, Kamel; Gras, Delphine; Chanez, Pascal; Aix Marseille Univ., CNRS, CINaM, Marseille, France Team; Aix Marseille Univ., CNRS, Inserm, LAI, Marseille, France Team

    2016-11-01

    Mucociliary clearance is the transport at the surface of airways of a complex fluid layer, the mucus, moved by the beats of microscopic cilia present on epithelial ciliated cells. We explored the coupling between the spatial organisation and the activity of cilia and the transport of surface fluids on reconstituted cultures of human bronchial epithelium at air-liquid interface, obtained by human biopsies. We reveal the existence of stable local circular surface flow patterns of mucus or Newtonian fluid at the epithelium surface. We find a power law over more than 3 orders of magnitude showing that the average ciliated cell density controls the size of these flow patterns, and, therefore the distance over which mucus can be transported. We show that these circular flow patterns result from the radial linear increase of the local propelling forces (due to ciliary beats) on each flow domain. This linear increase of local forces is induced by a fine self-regulation of both cilia density and orientation of ciliary beats. Local flow domains grow and merge during ciliogenesis to provide macroscopic mucus transport. This is possible only when the viscoelastic mucus continuously exerts a shear stress on beating cilia, revealing a mechanosensitive function of cilia. M. K. Khelloufi thanks the society MedBioMed for financial support. This work was supported by the ANR MUCOCIL project, Grant ANR-13-BSV5-0015 of the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche.

  19. Simulating Regional Groundwater Flow Patterns in South Florida Using Density-Dependent Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S. M.; Stevens, G. T.

    2008-05-01

    Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) is the storage of fresh water in an aquifer via injection during times when water is available, and recovery of the water from the same aquifer via pumping during times when it is needed. ASR is one of the proposed alternatives recommended by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) to help with water supply, storage, and distribution of water in South Florida. To evaluate the numerous design considerations and the variation in aquifer response resulting from CERP ASR, regional density- dependent numerical modeling of the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) in the southern half of Florida is in progress. This modeling incorporates use of two density-dependent numerical codes, SEAWAT and WASH123D, and the synthesis of regional knowledge of the FAS in terms of geologic parameters, groundwater flow patterns, and salinity influences. Several challenges have been discovered in replicating the existing regional groundwater flow patterns, most notably, that in south-central Florida the simulated heads are considerably lower than observed values. Recent model studies of several factors that could affect south Florida regional flow patterns indicate that the inclusion of preferential flow as well as the effects of temperature on groundwater density yield results that are more consistent with observed values. Future work will focus on the investigation of field data to support the application of preferential flow and the addition of groundwater injection and withdrawal including existing and proposed ASR projects.

  20. Flow patterns of larval fish: undulatory swimming in the intermediate flow regime.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrike K; van den Boogaart, Jos G M; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2008-01-01

    Fish larvae, like many adult fish, swim by undulating their body. However, their body size and swimming speeds put them in the intermediate flow regime, where viscous and inertial forces both play an important role in the interaction between fish and water. To study the influence of the relatively high viscous forces compared with adult fish, we mapped the flow around swimming zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae using two-dimensional digital particle image velocimetry (2D-DPIV) in the horizontal and transverse plane of the fish. Fish larvae initiate a swimming bout by bending their body into a C shape. During this initial tail-beat cycle, larvae shed two vortex pairs in the horizontal plane of their wake, one during the preparatory and one during the subsequent propulsive stroke. When they swim ;cyclically' (mean swimming speed does not change significantly between tail beats), fish larvae generate a wide drag wake along their head and anterior body. The flow along the posterior body is dominated by the undulating body movements that cause jet flows into the concave bends of the body wave. Patches of elevated vorticity form around the jets, and travel posteriorly along with the body wave, until they are ultimately shed at the tail near the moment of stroke reversal. Behind the larva, two vortex pairs are formed per tail-beat cycle (the tail beating once left-to-right and then right-to-left) in the horizontal plane of the larval wake. By combining transverse and horizontal cross sections of the wake, we inferred that the wake behind a cyclically swimming zebrafish larva contains two diverging rows of vortex rings to the left and right of the mean path of motion, resembling the wake of steadily swimming adult eels. When the fish larva slows down at the end of a swimming bout, it gradually reduces its tail-beat frequency and amplitude, while the separated boundary layer and drag wake of the anterior body extend posteriorly to envelope the entire larva. This drag wake is

  1. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  2. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshasayanan, K.; Manneville, P.

    2015-06-01

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow-the flow between counter-translating parallel plates-displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond the lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at the cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by this approach are discussed.

  3. Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2008-01-15

    Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

  4. Streaming driven by sessile microbubbles: Explaining flow patterns and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound excitation of bubbles drives powerful steady streaming flows which have found widespread applications in microfluidics, where bubbles are typically of semicircular cross section and attached to walls of the device (sessile). While bubble-driven streaming in bulk fluid is well understood, this practically relevant case presents additional complexity introduced by the wall and contact lines. We develop an asymptotic theory that takes into account the presence of the wall as well as the oscillation dynamics of the bubble, providing a complete description of the streaming flow as a function only of the driving frequency, the bubble size, and the physical properties of the fluid. We show that the coupling between different bubble oscillation modes sustains the experimentally observed streaming flow vortex pattern over a broad range of frequencies, greatly exceeding the widths of individual mode resonances. Above a threshold frequency, we predict, and observe in experiment, reversal of the flow direction. Our analytical theory can be used to guide the design of microfluidic devices, both in situations where robust flow patterns insensitive to parameter changes are desired (e.g. lab-on-a-chip sorters), and in cases where intentional modulation of the flow field appearance is key (e.g. efficient mixers). Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  5. Simulation of tidal flow and circulation patterns in the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Goodwin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional, vertically averaged, computer simulation model of the Loxahatchee River estuary show that under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, water circulation is dominated by freshwater inflow rather than by tidal influence. The model can simulate tidal flow and circulation in the Loxahatchee River estuary under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, but is limited, however, to low-flow and well mixed conditions. Computed patterns of residual water transport show a consistent seaward flow from the northwest fork through the central embayment and out Jupiter Inlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A large residual seaward flow was computed from the North Intracoastal Waterway to the inlet channel. Although the tide produces large flood and ebb flows in the estuary, tide-induced residual transport rates are low in comparison with freshwater-induced residual transport. Model investigations of partly mixed or stratified conditions in the estuary need to await development of systems capable of simulating three-dimensional flow patterns. (Author 's abstract)

  6. An artificial intelligence based improved classification of two-phase flow patterns with feature extracted from acquired images.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, C; Pappa, N

    2017-02-13

    Flow pattern recognition is necessary to select design equations for finding operating details of the process and to perform computational simulations. Visual image processing can be used to automate the interpretation of patterns in two-phase flow. In this paper, an attempt has been made to improve the classification accuracy of the flow pattern of gas/ liquid two- phase flow using fuzzy logic and Support Vector Machine (SVM) with Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The videos of six different types of flow patterns namely, annular flow, bubble flow, churn flow, plug flow, slug flow and stratified flow are recorded for a period and converted to 2D images for processing. The textural and shape features extracted using image processing are applied as inputs to various classification schemes namely fuzzy logic, SVM and SVM with PCA in order to identify the type of flow pattern. The results obtained are compared and it is observed that SVM with features reduced using PCA gives the better classification accuracy and computationally less intensive than other two existing schemes. This study results cover industrial application needs including oil and gas and any other gas-liquid two-phase flows.

  7. MODFLOW 2.0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  8. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2. 1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  9. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2.1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  10. Dual-RiverSonde measurements of two-dimensional river flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Stumpner, P.; Burau, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional river flow patterns have been measured using a pair of RiverSondes in two experiments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta system of central California during April and October 2007. An experiment was conducted at Walnut Grove, California in order to explore the use of dual RiverSondes to measure flow patterns at a location which is important in the study of juvenile fish migration. The data available during the first experiment were limited by low wind, so a second experiment was conducted at Threemile Slough where wind conditions and surface turbulence historically have resulted in abundant data. Both experiments included ADCP near-surface velocity measurements from either manned or unmanned boats. Both experiments showed good comparisons between the RiverSonde and ADCP measurements. The flow conditions at both locations are dominated by tidal effects, with partial flow reversal at Walnut Grove and complete flow reversal at Threemile Slough. Both systems showed complex flow patterns during the flow reversals. Quantitative comparisons between the RiverSondes and an ADCP on a manned boat at Walnut Grove showed mean differences of 4.5 cm/s in the u (eastward) and 7.6 cm/s in the v (northward) components, and RMS differences of 14.7 cm/s in the u component and 21.0 cm/s in the v component. Quantitative comparisons between the RiverSondes and ADCPs on autonomous survey vessels at Threemile Slough showed mean differences of 0.007 cm/s in the u component and 0.5 cm/s in the v component, and RMS differences of 7.9 cm/s in the u component and 13.5 cm/s in the v component after obvious outliers were removed. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  11. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  12. Patterns and age distribution of ground-water flow to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, E.; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of ground-water flow in a generic aquifer system were made to characterize the topology of ground-water flow in the stream subsystem and to evaluate its relation to deeper ground-water flow. The flow models are patterned after hydraulic characteristics of aquifers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and are based on numerical solutions to three-dimensional, steady-state, unconfined flow. The models were used to evaluate the effects of aquifer horizontal-to-vertical hydraulic conductivity ratios, aquifer thickness, and areal recharge rates on flow in the stream subsystem. A particle tracker was used to determine flow paths in a stream subsystem, to establish the relation between ground-water seepage to points along a simulated stream and its source area of flow, and to determine ground-water residence time in stream subsystems. In a geometrically simple aquifer system with accretion, the source area of flow to streams resembles an elongated ellipse that tapers in the downgradient direction. Increased recharge causes an expansion of the stream subsystem. The source area of flow to the stream expands predominantly toward the stream headwaters. Baseflow gain is also increased along the reach of the stream. A thin aquifer restricts ground-water flow and causes the source area of flow to expand near stream headwaters and also shifts the start-of-flow to the drainage basin divide. Increased aquifer anisotropy causes a lateral expansion of the source area of flow to streams. Ground-water seepage to the stream channel originates both from near- and far-recharge locations. The range in the lengths of flow paths that terminate at a point on a stream increase in the downstream direction. Consequently, the age distribution of ground water that seeps into the stream is skewed progressively older with distance downstream. Base flow ia an integration of ground water with varying age and potentially different water quality, depending on the source within the drainage basin

  13. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  14. [An evaluation of the pulmonary venous flow pattern by transesophageal and transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in a normal subject].

    PubMed

    Cottini, E; Giacone, G; Cosentino, M; Rando, G; Vintaloro, G; De Roberto, S

    1994-10-01

    Transesophageal echocardiographic studies have permitted a pulmonary venous flow velocity pattern to be identified which is comparable to that recorder using invasive methods. The pattern consists of 4 stages: an anterograde systolic flow with an early (S1) and late (S2) peak velocity, a diastolic anterograde flow (D) and a retrograde flow liked to atrial contraction (Ar). The aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of pulmonary venous flow velocity using transesophageal and transthoracic colour Doppler echocardiography in normal subjects in an attempt to: 1) determine normal values derived from the pulmonary venous flow pattern which may contribute to future studies; 2) find correlations between the pattern of pulmonary venous flow and a number of physiological, hemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters which take account of the morphological variations of this flow pattern within a normal range; 3) demonstrate the possibility of being able to carry out study using transthoracic colour Doppler echocardiography. The study was carried out in 38 normal subjects aged between 15 and 76 years old (mean 45 +/- 15) who underwent transthoracic and transesophageal colour-Doppler echocardiography. The following parameters were measured: left atrium diameter, diameters and telediastolic and telesystolic volumes of the left ventricle, ejection fraction and systolic percentage shortening of the left ventricle, peak velocity of the mitral flow pattern and the pulmonary venous flow pattern. The results obtained show that: 1) the pattern of pulmonary venous flow alters with ageing causing the prevalence of systolic over diastolic peak velocity; 2) the pulmonary venous flow parameters which appear to be most significant in hemodynamic terms are the peak velocities of the early systolic flow and anterograde diastolic flow and the ratios S1/S2 and S2/D; 3) the echocardiographic parameters most closely correlated with the peak velocity of pulmonary venous flow are the

  15. A study of the Marangoni flow and particle deposition patterns in an evaporating octane droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hua; Larson, Ronald

    2004-03-01

    We investigate flow behavior in an evaporating octane droplet experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments, we for the first time observed a strong recirculatory flow, which we attribute to a Marangoni effect driven by a temperature gradient along the droplet surface due to thermal cooling. A micro-PIV technique is used to map the velocity field in the droplet, including the strong recirculation. An approximated analytical solution of the Marangoni flow is developed using the lubrication assumption and is confirmed to be accurate by an FEM analysis for the flow in the evaporating droplet. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results and good agreement is found. Finally, the particle deposition patterns on the substrate formed at various Marangoni numbers are discussed.

  16. Flow structures and particle deposition patterns in double-bifurcation airway models. Part 1. Air flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, J. K.; Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2001-05-01

    The understanding and quantitative assessment of air flow fields and local micron-particle wall concentrations in tracheobronchial airways are very important for estimating the health risks of inhaled particulate pollutants, developing algebraic transfer functions of global lung deposition models used in dose-response analyses, and/or determining proper drug-aerosol delivery to target sites in the lung. In this paper (Part 1) the theory, model geometries, and air flow results are provided. In a companion paper (Part 2, Comer et al. 2001), the history of particle deposition patterns and comparisons with measured data sets are reported. Decoupling of the naturally dilute particle suspension makes it feasible to present the results in two parts.

  17. Complex Flow Separation Pattern on Transonic Fan Airfoils Revealed by Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. The latest view is that the blade oscillations are triggered by high-frequency changes in the extent of the partially separated area on the airfoil suction side. There is a lack of experimental data describing the separated flow characteristics of modern airfoils for transonic fans.

  18. Consistency of groundwater flow patterns in mountainous topography: Implications for valley bottom water replenishment and for defining groundwater flow boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, L. A.; Allen, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Topographic influences on groundwater flow processes that contribute to baseflow and mountain block recharge (MBR) are conceptually investigated using three-dimensional numerical models of saturated groundwater flow. Model domains for conceptual and real topographies are developed as "mountain groundwatershed units" (MGUs) to represent regional-scale watershed systems. Results indicate regularity in groundwater flow patterns that reflect consistency of prominent topographic features, providing a basis for conceptualizing three-dimensional groundwater flow. Baseflow is generated mainly from recharge within the watershed area. MBR is produced primarily from recharge that is focused across triangular facets near the mountain front (˜73%-97% of total MBR), with additional contributions originating within the watershed (up to ˜27% of MBR). MBR contributions originating from recharge near the highest-elevation watershed boundaries are minimal but are greater for topography with less stream incision. With orographic influences, more MBR originates within the watershed. MBR rates are relatively consistent between models because of similarities in mountain front topography, while baseflow is variable. Gains and losses to systems via cross-watershed groundwater flux, generated because of topographic differences between adjacent watersheds, cause baseflow to vary by up to ˜10% but do not significantly influence MBR. In data-sparse regions such as mountains, a basic numerical modeling approach, using the MGU concept with topography data and mapped watershed boundaries, can be used to develop site-specific conceptual models to constrain water budgets, to delineate recharge areas, and to guide further investigation and data collection.

  19. Cryptic Species? Patterns of Maternal and Paternal Gene Flow in Eight Neotropical Bats

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Elizabeth L.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of sequence divergence at mitochondrial loci are frequently used in phylogeographic analysis and species delimitation though single marker systems cannot assess bi-parental gene flow. In this investigation I compare the phylogeographic patterns revealed through the maternally inherited mitochondrial COI region and the paternally inherited 7th intron region of the Dby gene on the Y-chromosome in eight common Neotropical bat species. These species are diverse and include members of two families from the feeding guilds of sanguivores, nectarivores, frugivores, carnivores and insectivores. In each case, the currently recognized taxon is comprised of distinct, substantially divergent intraspecific mitochondrial lineages suggesting cryptic species complexes. In Chrotopterus auritus, and Saccopteryx bilineata I observed congruent patterns of divergence in both genetic regions suggesting a cessation of gene flow between intraspecific groups. This evidence supports the existence of cryptic species complexes which meet the criteria of the genetic species concept. In Glossophaga soricina two intraspecific groups with largely sympatric South American ranges show evidence for incomplete lineage sorting or frequent hybridization while a third group with a Central American distribution appears to diverge congruently at both loci suggesting speciation. Within Desmodus rotundus and Trachops cirrhosus the paternally inherited region was monomorphic and thus does not support or refute the potential for cryptic speciation. In Uroderma bilobatum, Micronycteris megalotis and Platyrrhinus helleri the gene regions show conflicting patterns of divergence and I cannot exclude ongoing gene flow between intraspecific groups. This analysis provides a comprehensive comparison across taxa and employs both maternally and paternally inherited gene regions to validate patterns of gene flow. I present evidence for previously unrecognized species meeting the criteria of the genetic species

  20. Generalized quantum efficiency analysis for non-ideal solar cells: Case of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Hages, Charles J.; Carter, Nathaniel J.; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-01-07

    Detailed quantum efficiency (QE) analysis of a nanoparticle-based Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) solar cell has been conducted to understand photogenerated carrier collection in the device. Specifically, voltage-dependent analysis has been considered to characterize both diffusion limitations and recombination limitations to carrier collection. Application of a generalized QE model and corresponding experimental and analytical procedures are presented to account for non-ideal device behavior, with specific consideration of photogenerated charge trapping, finite absorber thickness, back-surface recombination, and recombination of photogenerated carriers via interface, space-charge-region limited, and/or band tail limited recombination mechanisms. Analysis of diffusion limited collection results in extraction of the minority carrier diffusion length, mobility, back surface recombination velocity, and absorption coefficient. Additionally, forward bias QE measurements afford analysis of the dominant recombination mechanism for photogenerated carriers. For the analyzed CZTSe device, diffusion limitations are not expected to play a significant role in carrier collection in forward bias. However, voltage-dependent carrier collection, previously identified to contribute to open-circuit voltage limitations, is attributed to high recombination rates via band tail states/potential fluctuations in forward bias. A consideration of the assumptions commonly applied to diffusion length, band gap, and band tail extraction is also discussed.

  1. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates.

  2. Pattern Formation in Diffusion Flames Embedded in von Karman Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha

    2006-01-01

    Pattern formation is observed in nature in many so-called excitable systems that can support wave propagation. It is well-known in the field of combustion that premixed flames can exhibit patterns through differential diffusion mechanism between heat and mass. However, in the case of diffusion flames where fuel and oxidizer are separated initially there have been only a few observations of pattern formation. It is generally perceived that since diffusion flames do not possess an inherent propagation speed they are static and do not form patterns. But in diffusion flames close to their extinction local quenching can occur and produce flame edges which can propagate along stoichiometric surfaces. Recently, we reported experimental observations of rotating spiral flame edges during near-limit combustion of a downward-facing polymethylmethacrylate disk spinning in quiescent air. These spiral flames, though short-lived, exhibited many similarities to patterns commonly found in quiescent excitable media including compound tip meandering motion. Flame disks that grow or shrink with time depending on the rotational speed and in-depth heat loss history of the fuel disk have also been reported. One of the limitations of studying flame patterns with solid fuels is that steady-state conditions cannot be achieved in air at normal atmospheric pressure for experimentally reasonable fuel thickness. As a means to reproduce the flame patterns observed earlier with solid fuels, but under steady-state conditions, we have designed and built a rotating, porous-disk burner through which gaseous fuels can be injected and burned as diffusion flames. The rotating porous disk generates a flow of air toward the disk by a viscous pumping action, generating what is called the von K rm n boundary layer which is of constant thickness over the entire burner disk. In this note we present a map of the various dynamic flame patterns observed during the combustion of methane in air as a function of

  3. Spatial and temporal patterns of debris flow deposition in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of debris-flow occurrence were investigated in 125 headwater basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Time since the previous debris-flows was established using dendrochronology, and recurrence interval estimates ranged from 98 to 357 years. Tributary basins with larger drainage areas had a greater abundance of potential landslide source areas and a greater frequency of scouring events compared to smaller basins. The flux rate of material delivered to the confluence with a larger river influenced the development of small-scale debris-flow fans. Fans at the mouths of tributary basins with smaller drainage areas had a higher likelihood of being eroded by the mainstem river in the interval between debris-flows, compared to bigger basins that had larger, more persistent fans. Valley floor width of the receiving channel also influenced fan development because it limited the space available to accommodate fan formation. Of 63 recent debris-flows, 52% delivered sediment and wood directly to the mainstem river, 30% were deposited on an existing fan before reaching the mainstem, and 18% were deposited within the confines of the tributary valley before reaching the confluence. Spatial variation in the location of past and present depositional surfaces indicated that sequential debris-flow deposits did not consistently form in the same place. Instead of being spatially deterministic, results of this study suggest that temporally variable and stochastic factors may be important for predicting the runout length of debris-flows.

  4. Assessment of the debris-flow susceptibility in tropical mountains using clast distribution patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho Faria Lima Lopes, Laís; de Almeida Prado Bacellar, Luís; Amorim Castro, Paulo de Tarso

    2016-12-01

    Channel morphometric parameters and clast distribution patterns in selected basins of the Ferriferous Quadrangle tropical mountains, Brazil, were analyzed in order to assess susceptibility to debris flows. Median bed surface clast size (D50) in the main stream channel of these basins shows a coarsening downstream trend with drainage areas of up to 6 km2, which is attributed to debris flow dominated-channels by some authors. The composition and roundness of the bed load, clast sand, and the presence of allochthonous large boulders throughout the channels also suggest the occurrence of past debris flow in the region. Luminescence Optically Stimulated (LOE) dating points out that debris flow could have occurred as a consequence of climate changes in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene and it can now be triggered by deforestation or extreme rainfall events. There has not been any record of past debris flow in the study area, or in other mountainous regions of Brazil where debris flows have recently occurred. Thus, the adopted approach can be useful to assess debris flow susceptibility in this and other similar areas.

  5. Local adaptation, patterns of selection, and gene flow in the Californian serpentine sunflower (Helianthus exilis).

    PubMed

    Sambatti, Julianno B M; Rice, Kevin J

    2006-04-01

    The traditional view of the species as the fundamental unit of evolution has been challenged by observations that in heterogeneous environments, gene flow may be too restricted to overcome the effects of local selection. Whether a species evolves as a cohesive unit depends critically on the dynamic balance between homogenizing gene flow among populations and potentially disruptive local adaptation. To examine this evolutionary balance between "global" gene flow and local selection, we studied northern Californian populations of Helianthus exilis, the serpentine sunflower, within a mosaic of contrasting serpentine and nonserpentine areas that differ considerably in soil chemistry and water availability. Local adaptation to riparian and serpentine habitats was studied in Helianthus exilis along with an analysis of gene flow patterns among populations within these habitats. Local adaptation was assessed in H. exilis during 2002 and 2003 using reciprocal transplant experiments at multiple locations within serpentine and riparian habitats. Effects of competition and germination date on the expression of local adaptation were also examined within the reciprocal transplant experiments. Local adaptation was detected in both years at the local site level and at the level of habitat. The analysis of the transplanted populations indicated that the patterns of selection differed considerably between riparian and serpentine sites. Differential survivorship occurred in serpentine habitats, whereas selection on reproductive output predominated in riparian habitats. Local adaptation was expressed only in the absence of competition. Local adaptation in terms of survivorship was most strongly expressed in treatments with delayed seed germination. Microsatellite markers were used to quantify population genetic parameters and examine the patterns of gene flow among sampled populations. Analysis of molecular markers revealed a system of population patches that freely exchange genes

  6. The impact of traffic-flow patterns on air quality in urban street canyons.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Prashant; Gokhale, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different urban traffic-flow patterns on pollutant dispersion in different winds in a real asymmetric street canyon. Free-flow traffic causes more turbulence in the canyon facilitating more dispersion and a reduction in pedestrian level concentration. The comparison of with and without a vehicle-induced-turbulence revealed that when winds were perpendicular, the free-flow traffic reduced the concentration by 73% on the windward side with a minor increase of 17% on the leeward side, whereas for parallel winds, it reduced the concentration by 51% and 29%. The congested-flow traffic increased the concentrations on the leeward side by 47% when winds were perpendicular posing a higher risk to health, whereas reduced it by 17-42% for parallel winds. The urban air quality and public health can, therefore, be improved by improving the traffic-flow patterns in street canyons as vehicle-induced turbulence has been shown to contribute significantly to dispersion.

  7. Intraventricular flow patterns and stasis in the LVAD-assisted heart.

    PubMed

    Wong, K; Samaroo, G; Ling, I; Dembitsky, W; Adamson, R; del Álamo, J C; May-Newman, K

    2014-04-11

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support disrupts the natural blood flow path through the heart, introducing flow patterns associated with thrombosis, especially in the presence of medical devices. The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the flow patterns in the left ventricle (LV) of the LVAD-assisted heart, with a focus on alterations in vortex development and stasis. Particle image velocimetry of a LVAD-supported LV model was performed in a mock circulatory loop. In the Pre-LVAD flow condition, a vortex ring initiating from the LV base migrated toward the apex during diastole and remained in the LV by the end of ejection. During LVAD support, vortex formation was relatively unchanged although vortex circulation and kinetic energy increased with LVAD speed, particularly in systole. However, as pulsatility decreased and aortic valve opening ceased, a region of fluid stasis formed near the left ventricular outflow tract. These findings suggest that LVAD support does not substantially alter vortex dynamics unless cardiac function is minimal. The altered blood flow introduced by the LVAD results in stasis adjacent to the LV outflow tract, which increases the risk of thrombus formation in the heart.

  8. Analogs in the wintertime 500 mb height field. [recurrent flow patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutzler, D. S.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    Lorenz (1969) has considered the possibility that an atmospheric circulation pattern might recur, taking into account the definition of a pair of analogous flows or 'analogs'. The present investigation is concerned with a search of time series of Northern Hemisphere wintertime geopotential heights for possible analogs. Attention is given to data and analysis procedure, analog quality, and error growth rates. The obtained results imply that the found analogs are not a useful tool for forecasting the evolution of the midlatitude flow on time scales of several days. It is pointed out, however, that the negative results should not be extended to other applications of analog forecasting.

  9. Preliminary simulated tidal flow and circulation patterns in Hillsborough Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of channel dredging and island construction on tidal flow and circulation in Hillsborough Bay, Fla., due to the Tampa Harbor Deepening Project is being investigated using a two-dimensional, finite-difference numerical model. Preliminary model results are presented as a series of maps showing tidal flood, tidal ebb, and circulation patterns in the bay for predredging and postdredging conditions. Complex circulation patterns occur near the bay mouth in an area where there is (1) a change in thalweg alinement of the bay, (2) an intersection of three major ship channels, and (3) submergent and emergent dredged material located adjacent to each of the channels. (USGS)

  10. 4D flow MRI assessment of right atrial flow patterns in the normal heart – influence of caval vein arrangement and implications for the patent foramen ovale

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Jehill D.; Kakarla, Jayant; Keavney, Bernard; O’Sullivan, John J.; Ford, Gary A.; Blamire, Andrew M.; Hollingsworth, Kieren G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate atrial flow patterns in the normal adult heart, to explore whether caval vein arrangement and patency of the foramen ovale (PFO) may be associated with flow pattern. Materials and Methods Time-resolved, three-dimensional velocity encoded magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow) was employed to assess atrial flow patterns in thirteen healthy subjects (6 male, 40 years, range 25–50) and thirteen subjects (6 male, 40 years, range 21–50) with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale (CS-PFO). Right atrial flow was defined as vortical, helico-vortical, helical and multiple vortices. Time-averaged and peak systolic and diastolic flows in the caval and pulmonary veins and their anatomical arrangement were compared. Results A spectrum of right atrial flow was observed across the four defined categories. The right atrial flow patterns were strongly associated with the relative position of the caval veins. Right atrial flow patterns other than vortical were more common (p = 0.015) and the separation between the superior and inferior vena cava greater (10±5mm versus 3±3mm, p = 0.002) in the CS-PFO group. In the left atrium all subjects except one had counter-clockwise vortical flow. Vortex size varied and was associated with left lower pulmonary vein flow (systolic r = 0.61, p = 0.001, diastolic r = 0.63 p = 0.002). A diastolic vortex was less common and time-averaged left atrial velocity was greater in the CS-PFO group (17±2cm/sec versus 15±1, p = 0.048). One CS-PFO subject demonstrated vortical retrograde flow in the descending aortic arch; all other subjects had laminar descending aortic flow. Conclusion Right atrial flow patterns in the normal heart are heterogeneous and are associated with the relative position of the caval veins. Patterns, other than ‘typical’ vortical flow, are more prevalent in the right atrium of those with cryptogenic stroke in the context of PFO. Left atrial flow patterns are more homogenous in normal hearts and show a

  11. Analysis of flow patterns in a patient-specific aortic dissection model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Tan, F P P; Riga, C V; Bicknell, C D; Hamady, M S; Gibbs, R G J; Wood, N B; Xu, X Y

    2010-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most common acute catastrophic event affecting the thoracic aorta. The majority of patients presenting with an uncomplicated type B dissection are treated medically, but 25% of these patients develop subsequent aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta. This study aimed at gaining more detailed knowledge of the flow phenomena associated with this condition. Morphological features and flow patterns in a dissected aortic segment of a presurgery type B dissection patient were analyzed based on computed tomography images acquired from the patient. Computational simulations of blood flow in the patient-specific model were performed by employing a correlation-based transitional version of Menter's hybrid k-epsilon/k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model implemented in ANSYS CFX 11. Our results show that the dissected aorta is dominated by locally highly disturbed, and possibly turbulent, flow with strong recirculation. A significant proportion (about 80%) of the aortic flow enters the false lumen, which may further increase the dilatation of the aorta. High values of wall shear stress have been found around the tear on the true lumen wall, perhaps increasing the likelihood of expanding the tear. Turbulence intensity in the tear region reaches a maximum of 70% at midsystolic deceleration phase. Incorporating the non-Newtonian behavior of blood into the same transitional flow model has yielded a slightly lower peak wall shear stress and higher maximum turbulence intensity without causing discernible changes to the distribution patterns. Comparisons between the laminar and turbulent flow simulations show a qualitatively similar distribution of wall shear stress but a significantly higher magnitude with the transitional turbulence model.

  12. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  13. Electrode configurations inside an electrostatic precipitator and their impact on collection efficiency and flow pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Cheng, Lu; Shen, Xinjun; Li, Shuran; Yan, Keping

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) units have wide application in lots industries processes as gas filtration devices. Regarding their high efficiency, further improvement is still required. Wide ESP (plate-to-plate distance greater than 400 mm) is one of a promising way to improve existing ESP due to its ability to reduce equipment investment significantly. However, its large-scale application has been limited because it may potentially lead to collection efficiency reduction. This article focuses on the study of two major effects when several different electrode configurations are applied. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow pattern inside ESP and particle collection efficiency were investigated by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) respectively. Results suggested that the collection efficiency of wide ESP is rather complicated and highly related to inner gas flow pattern.

  14. Gravitational gradients and blood flow patterns in specialized arboreal (Ahaetulla nasuta) and terrestrial (Crotalus adamanteus) snakes.

    PubMed

    Young, B A; Wassersug, R J; Pinder, A

    1997-01-01

    Blood pressure and blood flow patterns were recorded from the carotid artery and aortae of a thick-bodied terrestrial snake (Crotalus adamanteus) and a thin-bodied arboreal species (Ahaetulla nasuta) anesthetized with ketamine hydrochloride. Hemodynamic stress induced by rotation resulted in pronounced changes in the blood flow patterns and pressure in C. adamanteus: rotation of A. nasuta produced changes of a similar type, but of a much lower magnitude. The markedly different responses of these two species, the baroreceptor reflexes of which were disrupted, suggest that morphological factors--such as differential gross cardiac displacement, or variation in the interaortic foramen--in addition to physiological factors, are important in determining a snake's ability to withstand hemodynamic stress.

  15. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  16. Effects of refraction by means flow velocity gradients on the standing wave pattern in three-dimensional, rectangular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of a mean vortical flow on the connection between the standing wave pattern in a rectangular three dimensional waveguide and the corresponding duct axial impedance was determined analytically. The solution was derived using a perturbation scheme valid for low mean flow Mach numbers and plane wave sound frequencies. The results show that deviations of the standing wave pattern due to refraction by the mean flow gradients are small.

  17. Film flows and self-organized patterns of 2D-localized structures

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Films flowing down an inclined plane are considered. An unconventional perturbation approach is discussed. It yields the most general evolution equation for film thickness and the least restrictive conditions for its validity. Results of numerical simulations of the dissipative-dispersive evolution equation indicate that novel, more complex type of spatiotemporal patterns can exist for strange attractors of nonequilibrium systems. It is suggested that real-life experiments satisfying the validity conditions of this theory are possible.

  18. PROCESS FLOW FOR CLASSIFICATION AND CLUSTERING OF FRUIT FLY GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Heffel, Andreas; Stadler, Peter F.; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Kauer, Gerhard; Kuska, Jens-Peer

    2009-01-01

    The rapidly growing collection of fruit fly embryo images makes automated Image Segmentation and classification an indispensable requirement for a large-scale analysis of in situ hybridization (ISH) – gene expression patterns (GEP). We present here such an automated process flow for Segmenting, Classification, and Clustering large-scale sets of Drosophila melanogaster GEP that is capable of dealing with most of the complications implicated in the images. PMID:20046820

  19. Pattern formation in the flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Hegseth, John J.; Andereck, C. David; Wesfreid, Jose E.

    1988-11-01

    Flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap is subject to several types of centrifugal instabilities which lead to the formation of a variety of spatial patterns. An experimental investigation has shown that there are five distinct branches of primary instabilities occurring in the system and that four codimension-2 points are easily reached. Theoretical predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  20. Analysing flow patterns in degraded peat soils using TiO2 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Dye tracing is a valuable method for studying the flow patterns in soils. However, limited information is available on water flow and solute transport pathways in dark colored peat soils because the frequently used Brilliant Blue FCF dye does not visibly stain the soil. In this study, we were aiming at testing the suitability of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer for dark peat soils. The objectives were to quantify the physical properties of different degraded peat soils and visualize the flow patterns. Soil samples were collected from two low-lying fen sites, where the top soil was highly degraded, while lower horizons were less decomposed. Dye tracer experiments were conducted at both sites by applying a TiO2 suspension (10 g/l) with a pulse of 40 mm. Soil profiles were prepared for photo documentation the following day. It was found that the physical and hydraulic properties of peat were significantly influenced by the degree of peat decomposition and degradation. Higher decomposed and degraded peat soils had a higher bulk density, lower organic matter content and lower porosity. Moreover, higher decomposition and degradation resulted in a lower saturated hydraulic conductivity as long as investigated samples originated from the same site. In addition, degraded peat soils showed less anisotropy than un-degraded peat. It turned out that TiO2 is a suitable dye tracer to visualize the flow paths in peat soils. Although dye patterns differed within the same plot and between different plots, most of the flow patterns indicated a preferential flow situation. The distribution of TiO2 in the soil profile, as analyzed from 5 by 5 cm grid cells, compared to the distribution of bromide, which was applied along with the dye confirming the suitability of the dye tracer. Un-decomposed plant structures, such as wood branches and leaves, were identified as the major preferential flow path in un-degraded peat. For degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm

  1. Architectural adaptation and protein expression patterns of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis biofilms under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Mangalappalli-Illathu, Anil K; Lawrence, John R; Swerhone, George D W; Korber, Darren R

    2008-03-31

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a significant biofilm-forming pathogen. The influence of a 10-fold difference in nutrient laminar flow velocity on the dynamics of Salmonella Enteritidis biofilm formation and protein expression profiles were compared in order to ascertain how flow velocity influenced biofilm structure and function. Low-flow (0.007 cm s(-1)) biofilms consisted of diffusely-arranged microcolonies which grew until merging by approximately 72 h. High-flow (0.07 cm s(-1)) biofilms were significantly thicker (36+/-3 microm (arithmetic mean+/-standard error; n=225) versus 16+/-2 microm for low-flow biofilms at 120 h) and consisted of large bacterial mounds interspersed by water channels. Lectin-binding analysis of biofilm exopolymers revealed a significantly higher (P<0.05) proportion of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) in low-flow biofilms (55.2%), relative to only 1.2% in high-flow biofilms. Alternatively, the proportions of alpha-L-fucose and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc2)-N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc) polymer-conjugates were significantly higher (P<0.05) in high-flow biofilms (69.1% and 29.6%, respectively) than low-flow biofilms (33.1% and 11.7%, respectively). Despite an apparent flow rate-based physiologic effect on biofilm structure and exopolymer composition, no major shift in whole-cell protein expression patterns was seen between 168 h-old low-flow and high-flow biofilms, and notably did not include any response involving the stress response proteins, DnaK, SodB, and Tpx. Proteins involved in degradation and energy metabolism (PduA, GapA, GpmA, Pgk, and RpiA), RNA and protein biosynthesis (Tsf, TufA, and RpoZ), cell processes (Crr, MalE, and PtsH), and adaptation (GrcA), and some hypothetical proteins (YcbL and YnaF) became up-regulated in both biofilm systems relative to a 168 h-old planktonic cell control. Our results indicate that Salmonella Enteritidis biofilms altered their structure and extracellular glycoconjugate composition

  2. Effect of Static Deformation on Basic Flow Patterns in Thermocapillary-Driven Free Liquid Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Linhao; Ikebukuro, Koichi; Katsuta, Takeshi; Kaneko, Toshihiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Pettit, Donald R.

    2017-02-01

    A series of terrestrial, parabolic-flight and on-orbit experiments on thermocapillary-driven flows in free liquid films are carried out. We focus on the basic flow patterns induced in the film formed in a rectangular hole by varying the film volume in order to make a comparison with the results of the fluid physics experiments under microgravity conditions conducted by one of the authors, Pettit, on the International Space Station. The free liquid film is formed in a rectangular hole of O(0.1 mm) in thickness under a designated temperature difference between the end walls. The temperature dependence of the surface tension results in a non-uniform surface tension distribution over the free surfaces. A liquid generally has a negative temperature coefficient of surface tension; i.e., the fluid over a free surface is driven from a higher-temperature region to a lower-temperature region. In the case of a thin free liquid film with two free surfaces, however, an unusual flow pattern is realized. That is, the fluid seems to be driven toward the heated region from a colder region. In order to understand the physical mechanism of this behavior in the free liquid film, a series of on-orbit and ground experiments were conducted. We indicate several flow patterns in the film and corresponding film profiles as well as the surface temperature distribution. We also try to illustrate the cross-sectional flow structures in the thin free liquid film with two free surfaces.

  3. Effect of Static Deformation on Basic Flow Patterns in Thermocapillary-Driven Free Liquid Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Linhao; Ikebukuro, Koichi; Katsuta, Takeshi; Kaneko, Toshihiro; Ueno, Ichiro; Pettit, Donald R.

    2016-11-01

    A series of terrestrial, parabolic-flight and on-orbit experiments on thermocapillary-driven flows in free liquid films are carried out. We focus on the basic flow patterns induced in the film formed in a rectangular hole by varying the film volume in order to make a comparison with the results of the fluid physics experiments under microgravity conditions conducted by one of the authors, Pettit, on the International Space Station. The free liquid film is formed in a rectangular hole of O(0.1 mm) in thickness under a designated temperature difference between the end walls. The temperature dependence of the surface tension results in a non-uniform surface tension distribution over the free surfaces. A liquid generally has a negative temperature coefficient of surface tension; i.e., the fluid over a free surface is driven from a higher-temperature region to a lower-temperature region. In the case of a thin free liquid film with two free surfaces, however, an unusual flow pattern is realized. That is, the fluid seems to be driven toward the heated region from a colder region. In order to understand the physical mechanism of this behavior in the free liquid film, a series of on-orbit and ground experiments were conducted. We indicate several flow patterns in the film and corresponding film profiles as well as the surface temperature distribution. We also try to illustrate the cross-sectional flow structures in the thin free liquid film with two free surfaces.

  4. Two-dimensional surface river flow patterns measured with paired RiverSondes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Two RiverSondes were operated simultaneously in close proximity in order to provide a two-dimensional map of river surface velocity. The initial test was carried out at Threemile Slough in central California. The two radars were installed about 135 m apart on the same bank of the channel. Each radar used a 3-yagi antenna array and determined signal directions using direction finding. The slough is approximately 200 m wide, and each radar processed data out to about 300 m, with a range resolution of 15 m and an angular resolution of 1 degree. Overlapping radial vector data from the two radars were combined to produce total current vectors at a grid spacing of 10 m, with updates every 5 minutes. The river flow in the region, which has a maximum velocity of about 0.8 m/s, is tidally driven with flow reversals every 6 hours, and complex flow patterns were seen during flow reversal. The system performed well with minimal mutual interference. The ability to provide continuous, non-contact two-dimensional river surface flow measurements will be useful in several unique settings, such as studies of flow at river junctions where impacts to juvenile fish migration are significant. Additional field experiments are planned this year on the Sacramento River. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  5. Two-dimensional surface river flow patterns measured with paired RiverSondes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    Two RiverSondes were operated simultaneously in close proximity in order to provide a two-dimensional map of river surface velocity. The initial test was carried out at Threemile Slough in central California. The two radars were installed about 135 m apart on the same bank of the channel. Each radar used a 3-yagi antenna array and determined signal directions using direction finding. The slough is approximately 200 m wide, and each radar processed data out to about 300 m, with a range resolution of 15 m and an angular resolution of 1 degree. Overlapping radial vector data from the two radars were combined to produce total current vectors at a grid spacing of 10 m, with updates every 5 minutes. The river flow in the region, which has a maximum velocity of about 0.8 m/s, is tidally driven with flow reversals every 6 hours, and complex flow patterns were seen during flow reversal. The system performed well with minimal mutual interference. The ability to provide continuous, non-contact two-dimensional river surface flow measurements will be useful in several unique settings, such as studies of flow at river junctions where impacts to juvenile fish migration are significant. Additional field experiments are planned this year on the Sacramento River. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  6. Patterns of steady axisymmetric supersonic compression flows with a Mach disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounko, Yu. P.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a numerical simulation of steady axisymmetric supersonic flows in convergent conical ducts and in overexpanded jets are presented. The characteristic feature of these compression flows is the formation of an initial longitudinally curved shock wave with intensity increasing downstream and toward the flow axis, which is finalized by the generation of a central Mach disk. Computations have demonstrated patterns of an irregular interaction of these shocks followed by the formation of a triple-shock configuration, including a reflected shock and a shear layer with entropy varying across the layer. The formation of triple-shock configurations is analogous to the configurations known for the steady inviscid two-dimensional flows where the irregular reflection of a wedge-generated shock from a wall with Mach stem formation occurs. Either a single triple-shock Mach configuration occurs or a triple-shock configuration corresponding to the von Neumann paradox condition is formed at the considered flow Mach numbers and initial angles of deflection to the axis of the flow behind the longitudinally curved shock wave.

  7. Design of a High Viscosity Couette Flow Facility for Patterned Surface Drag Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tyler; Lang, Amy

    2009-11-01

    Direct drag measurements can be difficult to obtain with low viscosity fluids such as air or water. In this facility, mineral oil is used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of experimental models. A mounted conveyor creates a flow within a plexiglass tank. The experimental model of a flat or patterned surface is suspended above a moving belt. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile is created. PIV measurements are used to determine the exact velocities and the Reynolds numbers for each experiment. The model is suspended by bars that connect to the pillow block housing of each bearing. Drag is measured by a force gauge connected to linear roller bearings that slide along steel rods. The patterned surfaces, initially consisting of 2-D cavities, are embedded in a plexiglass plate so as to keep the total surface area constant for each experiment. First, the drag across a flat plate is measured and compared to theoretical values for laminar Couette flow. The drag for patterned surfaces is then measured and compared to a flat plate.

  8. Two-phase flow pattern recognition in a varying section based on void fraction and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kerret, F.; Benito, I.; Béguin, C.; Pelletier, D.; Etienne, S.

    2016-11-01

    In a hydroelectric turbine, the air injected during operation has an impact on the yield of the machine leading to important losses of energy. To understand those losses and be able to reduce them, a first step is to understand the pattern of the two-phase flows and describe their characteristics in the turbine. Those two-phase flows can be bubbly, intermittent, or annular, with different types of intermittent flow possible. Two-phase flow patterns are well defined in classical geometries such as cylinders with reliable descriptions available [5]. But, there is a critical lack of knowledge for flow patterns in other geometries. In our present work we take interest into a geometry that is a pipe with periodical changes of the section and realize a flow pattern map. To realize this map, we measure the pressure variations and void fraction fluctuations while changing the flow rates of water and air in our test section. We then use our physical understanding of the phenomena to analyze data and identify different flow patterns, characterize them, and build a new flow pattern map.

  9. Affinity flow fractionation of cells via transient interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Suman; Singh, Rishi; Hanewich-Hollatz, Mikhail; Shen, Chong; Lee, Chia-Hua; Dorfman, David M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-07-01

    Flow fractionation of cells using physical fields to achieve lateral displacement finds wide applications, but its extension to surface molecule-specific separation requires labeling. Here we demonstrate affinity flow fractionation (AFF) where weak, short-range interactions with asymmetric molecular patterns laterally displace cells in a continuous, label-free process. We show that AFF can directly draw neutrophils out of a continuously flowing stream of blood with an unprecedented 400,000-fold depletion of red blood cells, with the sorted cells being highly viable, unactivated, and functionally intact. The lack of background erythrocytes enabled the use of AFF for direct enumeration of neutrophils by a downstream detector, which could distinguish the activation state of neutrophils in blood. The compatibility of AFF with capillary microfluidics and its ability to directly separate cells with high purity and minimal sample preparation will facilitate the design of simple and portable devices for point-of-care diagnostics and quick, cost-effective laboratory analysis.

  10. Blood flow patterns in an anatomically realistic coronary vessel: influence of three different reconstruction methods.

    PubMed

    Berthier, B; Bouzerar, R; Legallais, C

    2002-10-01

    Many clinical studies suggest that local blood flow patterns are involved in the location and development of atherosclerosis. In coronary diseases, this assumption should be corroborated by quantitative information on local hemodynamic parameters such as pressure, velocity or wall shear stress. Nowadays, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms coupled to realistic 3-D reconstructions of such vessels make these data accessible. Nevertheless, they should be carefully analysed to avoid misinterpretations when the physiological parameters are not all considered. As an example, we propose here to compare the flow patterns calculated in a coronary vessel reconstructed by three different methods. In the three cases, the vessel trajectory respected the physiology. In the simplest reconstruction, the coronary was modelled by a tube of constant diameter while in the most complex one, the cross-sections corresponded to the reality. We showed that local pressures, wall shear rates and velocity profiles were severely affected by the geometrical modifications. In the constant cross-section vessel, the flow resembled to that of Poiseuille in a straight tube. On the contrary, velocity and shear rate exhibited sudden local variations in the more realistic vessels. As an example, velocity could be multiplied by 5 as compared to Poiseuille's flow and area of very low wall shear rates appeared. The results obtained with the most complex model clearly outlined that, in addition to a proper description of the vessel trajectory, the section area changes should be carefully taken into account, confirming assumptions already highlighted before the rise of commercially available and efficient CFD softwares.

  11. Apatite-Melt Partitioning at 1 Bar: An Assessment of Apatite-Melt Exchange Equilibria Resulting from Non-Ideal Mixing of F and Cl in Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Ustunisik, G.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    The mineral apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] is present in a wide range of planetary materials. Due to the presence of volatiles within its crystal structure (X-site), many recent studies have attempted to use apatite to constrain the volatile contents of planetary magmas and mantle sources. In order to use the volatile contents of apatite to precisely determine the abundances of volatiles in coexisting silicate melt or fluids, thermodynamic models for the apatite solid solution and for the apatite components in multi-component silicate melts and fluids are required. Although some thermodynamic models for apatite have been developed, they are incomplete. Furthermore, no mixing model is available for all of the apatite components in silicate melts or fluids, especially for F and Cl components. Several experimental studies have investigated the apatite-melt and apatite-fluid partitioning behavior of F, Cl, and OH in terrestrial and planetary systems, which have determined that apatite-melt partitioning of volatiles are best described as exchange equilibria similar to Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and silicate melt. However, McCubbin et al. recently reported that the exchange coefficients may vary in portions of apatite compositional space where F, Cl, and OH do not mix ideally in apatite. In particular, solution calorimetry data of apatite compositions along the F-Cl join exhibit substantial excess enthalpies of mixing. In the present study, we conducted apatite-melt partitioning experiments in evacuated, sealed silica-glass tubes at approximately 1 bar and 950-1050 degrees Centigrade on a synthetic Martian basalt composition equivalent to the basaltic shergottite Queen Alexandria Range (QUE) 94201. These experiments were conducted dry, at low pressure, to assess the effects of temperature and apatite composition on the partitioning behavior of F and Cl between apatite and basaltic melt along the F-Cl apatite binary join, where there is non-ideal mixing of F and Cl

  12. Patterns and rates of ground-water flow on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Modica, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Increased ground-water contamination from human activities on Long Island has prompted studies to define the pattern and rate of ground-water movement. A two-dimensional, fine-mesh, finite-element model consisting of 11,969 nodes and 22,880 elements was constructed to represent ground-water flow along a north-south section through central Long Island. The model represents average hydrologic conditions within a corridor approximately 15 miles wide. The model solves discrete approximations of both the potential and stream functions. The resulting flownet depicts flow paths and defines the vertical distribution of flow within the section. Ground-water flow rates decrease with depth. Sixty-two percent of the water flows no deeper than the upper glacial (water-table) aquifer, 38 percent enters the underlying Magothy aquifer, and only 3.1 percent enters the Lloyd aquifer. The limiting streamlines for flow to the Magothy and Lloyd aquifers indicate that aquifer recharge areas are narrow east-west bands through the center of the island. The recharge area of the Magothy aquifer is only 5.4 miles wide; that of the Lloyd aquifer is less than 0.5 miles. The distribution of ground-water traveltime and a flownet are calculated from model results; both are useful in the investigation of contaminant transport or the chemical evolution of ground water within the flow system. A major discontinuity in traveltime occurs across the streamline which separates the flow subsystems of the two confined aquifers. Water that reaches the Lloyd aquifer attains traveltimes as high as 10,000 years, whereas water that has not penetrated deeper than the Magothy aquifer attains traveltimes of only 2,000 years. The finite-element approach used in this study is particularly suited to ground-water systems that have complex hydrostratigraphy and cross-sectional symmetry.

  13. Flow-pattern analysis of artificial heart valves using high-speed camera and PIV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Hyuk; Seo, Soo W.; Min, Byong Goo

    1995-05-01

    Artificial heart valve is one of the most important artificial organs which have been implanted to many patients. The most serious problems related to the artificial heart valve prothesis are thrombosis and hemolysis. In vivo experiment to test against this problem is complex and hard work. Nowadays the request for in vitro artificial heart valve testing system is increasing. Several papers have announced us that the flow pattern of artificial heart valve is highly correlated with thrombosis and hemolysis. LDA is a usual method to get flow pattern, which is difficult to operate, is expensive and has narrow measure region. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) can solve these problems. Because the flow speed of valve is too high to catch particles by CCD camera and high-speed camera (Hyspeed; Holland-Photonics) was used. The estimated max flow speed was 5 m/sec and max trackable length is 0.5 cm, so the shutter speed was determined as 1000 frames per sec. Several image processing techniques (blurring, segmentation, morphology, etc.) were used for the preprocessing. Particle tracking algorithm and 2D interpolation technique which were necessary in making gridrized velocity profile, were applied to this PIV program. By using Single- Pulse Multi-Frame particle tracking algorithm, some problems of PIV can be solved. To eliminate particles which penetrate the sheeted plane and to determine the direction of particle paths are these. 1D relaxation formula is modified to interpolate 2D field. Parachute artificial heart valve which was developed by Scoul National University and Bjork-Shiely valve was testified. For each valve, different flow pattern, velocity profile, wall shear stress, turbulence intensity profile and mean velocity were obtained. Those parameters were compared with the result of in vivo experiment. In this experiment we can conclude wall shear stress is not high enough to generate hemolysis and higher turbulence intensity to make more hemolysis. For further

  14. Fluid flow pattern in upflow reactors of anerobic treatment of beet sugar factory wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Heertjes, P.M.; Kuijvenhaven, L.J.; Van Der Meer, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Residence-time-distribution experiments for the fluid in a 30-m cubed pilot plant and a 200-m cubed prototype upflow reactor were performed by means of continuous injection of an LiCl solution as a tracer in the influent of the reactor and measurement of the response of this stimulus on several locations in the reactor and in the effluent. In a similar way as described in an article published earlier, models have been developed by use of the measured data of the fluid flow pattern which consisted of regions of ideal mixing, plug flow, dead space, and short circuiting. It appeared that the fluid flow patterns in the two reactors were to a large extent analogous. For the pilot plant, three-mixer models appeared to be appropriate while for the prototype reactor two-mixer models have been found. This difference was a result of the difference in the heights of the sludge beds in the reactor: 2-3 m in the pilot plant and only 0.4 m in the prototype reactor, a result of too small an amount of sludge. Another difference was that, due to a large amount of mud in the prototype reactor, a region of dead space occurred in the models for the fluid flow pattern in this reactor. The dimensions of the prototype reactor have been chosen according to several recommendations obtained from work with the pilot plant, (e.g., scale-up should be done by increasing the cross section of the reactor; one influent point should be applied per 5 m squared bottom surface). The results presented here clearly show the value of these recommendations. (Refs. 7).

  15. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-07-07

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 x 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  16. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid setup monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network. PMID:19494426

  17. Pattern formation of Dictystelium discoideum in the presence of laminar flow and cAMP pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Azam; Steinbock, Oliver; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d) amobae undergo starvation-induced multicellular development in which single cells aggregate chemotactically towards cAMP signals emitted periodically from an aggregation center. We are investigating spatiotemporal pattern formation of D.d. cells under the presence of a laminar flow. Starved cells are loaded into a straight millifluidic device with an external flow and cell response to the signaling molecule cAMP is monitored indirectly using dark-field microscopy. The observed contraction waves develop simultaneously over the entire channel, are propagating only in flow direction, and have curved wave fronts resembling the parabolic flow profile. The wave dynamics analysis shows that the wave velocity is locked to the flow velocity and yields a wave period of T0 6 min, which matches the typical oscillation period of extracellular cAMP in spatial homogeneous, well-stirred systems. We apply a small cAMP perturbation at the inlet region of the channel and observe the spatiotemporal response of the cells as the pulse is propagating down the channel. The results show that D.d. cells are in the oscillatory regime and the system can be forced within resonance tongue. We compared our results with analytical and numerical analysis of Goldbeter model.

  18. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China.

  19. A clinical study on velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow in canine heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Wakao, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated methods of determining the velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow (PVF) in dogs and then investigated the relationship of the patterns to cardiac functions in heartworm disease (HD) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The results revealed that there was a good correlation between PVF patterns determined by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and TTE in animals lying on their left sides. The measurement of S and D wave velocities (PVS and PVD) by TTE was shown to allow clinical determination of the velocity patterns of PVF in dogs. The HD groups showed significant increases in PVS and PVD, and S and D wave time-velocity integrals (S-TVI and D-TVI) of the right cranial lobe PVF, when compared with the normal group, as determined by TTE (P<0.05). In contrast, the HD groups produced significant decreases in PVD and D-TVI of the right caudal lobe PVF compared with the normal group (P<0.05), and a significant increase in the ratio of S-TVI to (S-TVI + D-TVI) (P<0.05). It is, therefore, suggested that measurement of the velocity patterns of the right cranial and caudal lobe PVF could be one method of assessing the stages of obstructive lesions in the pulmonary artery.

  20. Flow uncertainty from hurricane rain forecasted patterns obtained using a modified multivariable radar tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzo P, G. A.; Marquez, O.

    2012-04-01

    Different cities around Central and North American countries suffer from lack of spatial data as well as from hurricane induced floods. This paper extends a technique to project radar information into neighbor regions where the radar doesn't reach. To be able to use the precipitation patterns obtained from these projections in a flood forecasting system, it is required to know the uncertainty of such patterns. This is even more important when the region is prone to hurricanes. The hurricanes are highly dynamic and complex phenomena that commonly spread its influence in cyclic patterns. This work explores the use of projected spatial patterns of the hurricane Arlene (Category 2) from day 29 to 30 June in the basin of the Santa Catarina River in Mexico. The tracking is done by displacing the precipitation patterns in space using a data driven model (e.g. Neural Netwok). The decay of mass in the projection of hurricane event was calculated with a multivariable mixture of experts' model, using the cumulative change in mass of the whole radar information at previous time steps. A comparative analysis between the statistical distribution from a hydrological model and the built hurricane reconstructed patterns was performed. The HEC-HMS and HEC_RAS model was used for the analysis of the hydrology of the region and the uncertainty associated with the use of each possible projected result. Hourly simulations of the model during june 29th till july 1st were evaluated. The technique presented is very useful to identify possible sensitivity patterns from the hurricane behaviors as well as the most important ranges of flows expected in the hurricane event.

  1. Two-dimensional intraventricular flow pattern visualization using the image-based computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-10-31

    The image-based computational fluid dynamics (IB-CFD) technique, as the combination of medical images and the CFD method, is utilized in this research to analyze the left ventricle (LV) hemodynamics. The research primarily aims to propose a semi-automated technique utilizing some freely available and commercial software packages in order to simulate the LV hemodynamics using the IB-CFD technique. In this research, moreover, two different physiological time-resolved 2D models of a patient-specific LV with two different types of aortic and mitral valves, including the orifice-type valves and integrated with rigid leaflets, are adopted to visualize the process of developing intraventricular vortex formation and propagation. The blood flow pattern over the whole cardiac cycle of two models is also compared to investigate the effect of utilizing different valve types in the process of the intraventricular vortex formation. Numerical findings indicate that the model with integrated valves can predict more complex intraventricular flow that can match better the physiological flow pattern in comparison to the orifice-type model.

  2. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination.

  3. Patterning of ultrathin polymethylmethacrylate films by in-situ photodirecting of the Marangoni flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elashnikov, Roman; Fitl, Premysl; Svorcik, Vaclav; Lyutakov, Oleksiy

    2017-02-01

    Laser heating and Marangoni flow result in the formation of surface structures with different geometries and shape on thin polymer films. By laser beam irradiation combined with a sample movement the solid polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) films are heated and undergo phase transition which leads to a material flow. Since the laser beam has a non-linear distribution of energy, the PMMA film is heated inhomogeneously and a surface tension gradient in a lateral direction is introduced. During this procedure additional phenomena such as "reversible" or cyclic polymer flow also take place. The careful choice of experimental conditions enables the preparation of patterns with sophisticated geometries and with hierarchical pattern organization. Depending on initial PMMA film thickness and speed of the sample movement line arrays are created, which can subsequently be transformed into the crimped lines or system of circular holes. In addition, the introduction of a constant acceleration in the sample movement or a laser beam distortion enables the preparation of regularly crimped lines, ordered hexagonal holes or overlapped plates.

  4. Common patterns of energy flow and biomass distribution on weighted food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Feng, Yuanjing

    2014-07-01

    Weights of edges and nodes on food webs which are available from the empirical data hide much information about energy flows and biomass distributions in ecosystem. We define a set of variables related to weights for each species i, including the throughflow Ti, the total biomass Xi, and the dissipated flow Di (output to the environment) to uncover the following common patterns in 19 empirical weighted food webs: (1) DGBD distributions (Discrete version of a Generalized Beta Distribution), a kind of deformed Zipf's law, of energy flow and storage biomass; (2) The allometric scaling law Ti∝Xiα, which can be viewed as the counterpart of the Kleiber's 3/4 law at the population level; (3) The dissipation law Di∝Tiβ; and (4) The gravity law, including univariate version f∝( and bivariate approvement f∝Tiγ1Tjγ2. These patterns are very common and significant in all collected webs, as a result, some remarkable regularities are hidden in weights.

  5. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  6. Modeling of heavy-gas effects on airfoil flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic models were constructed for a calorically imperfect gas and for a non-ideal gas. These were incorporated into a quasi one dimensional flow solver to develop an understanding of the differences in flow behavior between the new models and the perfect gas model. The models were also incorporated into a two dimensional flow solver to investigate their effects on transonic airfoil flows. Specifically, the calculations simulated airfoil testing in a proposed high Reynolds number heavy gas test facility. The results indicate that the non-idealities caused significant differences in the flow field, but that matching of an appropriate non-dimensional parameter led to flows similar to those in air.

  7. Application of chaos theory in identification of two-phase flow patterns and transitions in a small, horizontal, rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1996-02-01

    Various measurement tools of chaos theory were applied to analyze two-phase pressure signals with the objective to identify and interpret flow pattern transitions for two-phase flows in a small, horizontal rectangular channel. These measurement tools included power spectral density function, autocorrelation function, pseudo-phase-plane trajectory, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimensions. It was demonstrated that the randomlike pressure fluctuations characteristic of two-phase flow in small rectangular channels are chaotic in nature. As such, they are governed by a high-order deterministic system. The correlation dimension is potentially a new approach for identification of certain two-phase flow patterns and transitions.

  8. Gas–liquid two-phase flow patterns in rectangular polymeric microchannels: effect of surface wetting properties

    PubMed Central

    Huh, D; Kuo, C-H; Grotberg, J B

    2010-01-01

    Here we map gas–liquid two-phase flow regimes observed in polymeric microchannels with different wetting properties. We utilized video and confocal microscopy to examine two-phase flow patterns produced by parallel injection of air and water through a Y-shaped junction into a rectangular microchannel made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We observed seven flow regimes in microchannels with hydrophobic walls, whereas only two flow patterns were identified in hydrophilic microchannels. Our study demonstrates that surface wettability has a profound influence on the spatial distribution of air and water moving in microchannels. PMID:20126421

  9. Vortex shedding patterns, their competition, and chaos in flow past inline oscillating rectangular cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Dixit, Harish N.; Tatavarti, Rao; Govindarajan, Rama

    2011-11-01

    Different vortex shedding patterns arising in the flow past inline oscillating rectangular cylinders, at a Reynolds number of 200 is studied numerically in two-dimensions. The S-II mode of symmetric shedding, discovered in 2006, as well as the Couder-Basdevant mode [J. Fluid Mech. 173, 225-251 (1986)], seen in experiments earlier, are found numerically for the first time. Besides, a new mode of symmetric shedding, named here as S-III, is also reported. Chaotic flow in the wake of a circular cylinder, recently reported by Perdikaris et al. [Phys. Fluids 21(10), 101705 (2009)] is also seen in flow past the rectangular geometries here, and we show that this is indeed due to mode competition, between antisymmetric and symmetric modes of vortex shedding, in the sense of Ciliberto & Gollub [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 922 (1984)]. A global and reliable parameter has been constructed to ``quantify'' this chaos. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used to solve for the flow. The Naval Physical and Oceanic Labs, Kochi are gratefully acknowledged for a grant which enabled this work to begin.

  10. Inertia-induced dendriticlike patterns in lifting Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, Pedro H. A.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2017-01-01

    The lifting Hele-Shaw cell problem is a variant of the classical constant-gap Hele-Shaw situation in which the cell gap width is time dependent. Experiments on Newtonian fluid flows in lifting Hele-Shaw cells with large lifting velocities reveal the development of dendriticlike fingered structures that compete among themselves. The usual Darcy law description of the problem, where inertial effects are neglected, has not been able to explain the origin of these competing sidebranched patterns. In this work we use a generalized Darcy law and a perturbative mode-coupling theory to investigate the impact of inertia on the pattern-forming dynamics of the system. Two main results are deduced: Inertia induces a mechanism for finger sidebranching formation and favors the intensification of finger competition events.

  11. A scenario-based study on information flow and collaboration patterns in disaster management.

    PubMed

    Sagun, Aysu; Bouchlaghem, Dino; Anumba, Chimay J

    2009-04-01

    Disaster management (DM) is a continuous, highly collaborative process involving governments, DM organisations, responders, the construction sector, and the general public. Most research approaches to DM include the development of information and communication technologies (ICT) to support the collaboration process rather than the creation of a collaboration process to provide information flows and patterns. An Intelligent Disaster Collaboration System (IDCS) is introduced in this paper as a conceptual model to integrate ICT into DM and the mitigation process and to enhance collaboration. The framework is applicable to the collaboration process at the local, regional and national levels. Within this context, the deployment of ICT tools in DM is explored and scenario-based case studies on flooding and terrorism--examples of natural and human-induced disasters, respectively--are presented. Conclusions are drawn regarding the differences found in collaboration patterns and ICT used during natural and human-induced disasters and the differences between currently available ICT and proposed ICT.

  12. Hydrochemical facies and ground-water flow patterns in northern part of Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William

    1966-01-01

    Flow patterns of fresh ground water shown on maps and in cross sections have been deduced from available water-level data. These patterns are controlled by the distribution of the higher landmasses and by the depth to either bedrock or to the salt-water interface. The mapping of hydrochemical facies shows that at shallow depths within the Coastal Plain (less than about 200 ft) the calcium-magnesium cation facies generally predominates. The bicarbonate anion facies occurs within more of the shallow Coastal Plain sediments than does the sulfate or the chloride facies. In deeper formations, the sodium chloride character predominates. The lower dissolved-solids content of the ground water in New Jersey indicates less upward vertical leakage than in Maryland and Virginia, where the shallow formations contain solutions of higher concentration.

  13. Broad-scale patterns of invertebrate richness and community composition in temporary rivers: effects of flow intermittence

    EPA Science Inventory

    A central goal in ecology is to identify general relationships between environmental drivers and community patterns. In this study, we investigated the relationships between aquatic invertebrate communities and river flow intermittence across multiple continents. Particularly, we...

  14. Flow patterns in a slurry-bubble-column reactor under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Toselane, B.A.; Brown, D.M.; Zou, B.S.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    The gas and liquid radioactive tracer response curves obtained in an industrial bubble column reactor of height to diameter ratio of 10 are analyzed and the suitability of the axial dispersion model for interpretation of the results is discussed. The relationship between the tracer concentration distribution and measured detector response of the soluble gas tracer (Ar-41) is possibly dominated by the dissolved gas. The one dimensional axial dispersion model cannot match all the experimental observations well and the flow pattern of the undissolved gas cannot be determined with certainty.

  15. Coastal marsh degradation: modeling the influence of vegetation die-off patterns on flow and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, Lennert; Wang, Chen; Kirwan, Matthew; Belluco, Enrica; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Temmerman, Stijn

    2014-05-01

    erosion, which may explain their lower surface elevation. Therefore the establishment of marsh plants will be unfavorable. So far, however, this hypothesis has not been verified. In order to investigate the influence of these different types of pool patterns on spatial flow and sedimentation patterns, we used an existing hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (Delft3D) that has been calibrated and validated against field data on tidal marsh flow and sedimentation. The model reproduces the bio-geomorphologic effects of complete vegetation removal, but different pool patterns have not been studied until now. By simulating different pool patterns, we are able to verify our hypothesis regarding elevation changes and marsh recovery potential in degraded marsh pools. This highlights the importance of bio-geomorphologic feedbacks for marsh degradation and recovery.

  16. Flow patterns in linear state of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a rotating nanofluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Bhadauria, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we study the flow patterns of a rotating, horizontal layer of a Newtonian nanofluid. The nanofluid layer incorporates the effect of Brownian motion along with thermophoresis. In order to find the expressions for streamlines, isotherms, and iso-nanohalines, a minimal representation of the truncated Fourier series of two terms, has been used. The results obtained imply that the magnitude of the streamlines, and the contours of the isotherms and the iso-nanohalines, turn flatter and concentrated near the boundaries for large value of Ra cr , indicating a delay in the onset of convection.

  17. The golden-mean surface pattern to enhance flow mixing in micro-channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, J F; Liu, Y; Xu, Y S

    2009-04-01

    Mixing of analytes and reagents in microfluidic devices is often crucial to the effective functioning of lab-on-a-chip. It is possible to affect the mixing in microfluidics by intelligently controlling the thermodynamic and chemical properties of the substrate surface. Numerous studies have shown that the phase behavior of mixtures is significantly affected by surface properties of microfluidics. For example, the phase separation between the fluids can be affected by heterogeneous patterns on the substrate. The patterned substrate can offer an effective means to control fluid behavior and in turn to enhance mixing. The golden mean is a ratio that is present in the growth patterns of many biological systems--the spiral formed by a shell or the curve of a fern, for example. The golden mean or golden section was derived by the ancient Greeks. Like "pi" the golden mean ratio is an irrational number 1.618, or (square root{5} + 1) / 2. It was found that the golden mean was an optimum ratio in natural convection heat transfer problem (Liu and Phan-Thien, Numer Heat Transf 37:613-630, 2000). In this study, we numerically studied the effect of optimum surface pattern on mixing in a micro channel and found that the flow oscillation and chaotic mixing were enhanced apparently when the ratio of hydrophobic and hydrophilic boundary follows the golden mean.

  18. Using patterns of debris flow erosion and deposition in the Icelandic Westfjords to delineate hazard zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, S. J.; Decaulne, A.; Balme, M. R.; Murray, J. B.; Towner, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    Debris flows pose a significant risk to infrastructure and people; hence the aim of this study is to better understand the behaviour of debris flows by studying examples from above the town of Ísafjörður in north-western Iceland. Debris flow is a recognised hazard in the region [1], but above Ísafjörður occurs with particularly high regularity [2] and can involve large volumes of debris. We have used airborne laser altimeter (LiDAR) and differential GPS data to produce isopach maps of flows that occurred in 1999, 2007 and 2008 above Ísafjörður and in adjacent valleys. Compared to observations from the literature, e.g. [3-5], these flows start depositing at unusually high slope gradients (up to 45°). However the larger flows are also unusually mobile compared to typical hill-slope debris flows [4], but they are not as mobile as channelized flows [6]. This means that for a given volume their run-out distance is much greater than expected and hence more likely to reach the town. The volumes for the flows were calculated in two ways: firstly we were able to take the difference between the surfaces before (LiDAR) and after (dGPS) three small flows that occurred in 2008. Secondly, for flows prior to our 2008 LiDAR survey, we interpolated the pre-flow surface based on surrounding topography and measured differences from our post-flow surveys. The second method therefore has a tendency to over-estimate the flow volumes. The scheme for dGPS surveying involved obtaining numerous cross sections and taking long profiles along the channel and adjacent levees. Based on the volumes that we have calculated using these more accurate methods, we have increased the value of volume estimates for recorded historic debris flows reported by [2] and have revised the local denudation rate to 45 mm per 100 yr. Using the isopach maps and associated field observations we have found a relationship between slope and deposition volume, where the runout and pattern of deposition is a

  19. Pattern formation of a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow in the amoeboid organism Physarum plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroyasu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Ito, Masami

    1999-01-01

    The amoeboid organism, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, moves by forming a spatiotemporal pattern of contraction oscillators. This biological system can be regarded as a reaction-diffusion system with spatial interaction via active flow of protoplasmic sol in the cell. We present a reaction-diffusion system with self-consistent flow on the basis of the physiological evidence that the flow is determined by contraction patterns in the plasmodium. Such a coupling of reaction, diffusion, and advection is characteristic of biological systems, and is expected to be related to control mechanisms of amoeboid behavior. Using weakly nonlinear analysis, we show that the envelope dynamics obeys the complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation when a bifurcation occurs at finite wave number. The flow term affects the nonlinear term of the CGL equation through the critical wave number squared. A physiological role of pattern formation with the flow is discussed.

  20. Characterization of flow pattern transitions for horizontal liquid-liquid pipe flows by using multi-scale distribution entropy in coupled 3D phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Zong, Yan-Bo; Wang, Hong-Mei; Yan, Cong; Gao, Zhong-Ke; Jin, Ning-De

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal oil-water two-phase flows often exist in many industrial processes. Uncovering the dynamic mechanism of the flow pattern transition is of great significance for modeling the flow parameters. In this study we propose a method called multi-scale distribution entropy (MSDE) in a coupled 3D phase space, and use it to characterize the flow pattern transitions in horizontal oil-water two-phase flows. Firstly, the proposed MSDE is validated with Lorenz system and ARFIMA processes. Interestingly, it is found that the MSDE is dramatically associated with the cross-correlations of the coupled time series. Then, through conducting the experiment of horizontal oil-water two-phase flows, the upstream and downstream flow information is collected using a conductance cross-correlation velocity probe. The coupled cross-correlated signals are investigated using the MSDE method, and the results indicate that the MSDE is an effective tool uncovering the complex dynamic behaviors of flow pattern transitions.

  1. Computational Analysis of Intra-Ventricular Flow Pattern Under Partial and Full Support of BJUT-II VAD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu

    2017-02-27

    BACKGROUND Partial support, as a novel support mode, has been widely applied in clinical practice and widely studied. However, the precise mechanism of partial support of LVAD in the intra-ventricular flow pattern is unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this study, a patient-specific left ventricular geometric model was reconstructed based on CT data. The intra-ventricular flow pattern under 3 simulated conditions - "heart failure", "partial support", and "full support" - were simulated by using fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The blood flow pattern, wall shear stress (WSS), time-average wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and relative residence time (RRT) were calculated to evaluate the hemodynamic effects. RESULTS The results demonstrate that the intra-ventricular flow pattern is significantly changed by the support level of BJUT-II VAD. The intra-ventricular vortex was enhanced under partial support and was eliminated under full support, and the high OSI and RRT regions changed from the septum wall to the cardiac apex. CONCLUSIONS In brief, the support level of the BJUT-II VAD has significant effects on the intra-ventricular flow pattern. The partial support mode of BJUT-II VAD can enhance the intra-ventricular vortex, while the distribution of high OSI and RRT moved from the septum wall to the cardiac apex. Hence, the partial support mode of BJUT-II VAD can provide more benefit for intra-ventricular flow pattern.

  2. Computational Analysis of Intra-Ventricular Flow Pattern Under Partial and Full Support of BJUT-II VAD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Background Partial support, as a novel support mode, has been widely applied in clinical practice and widely studied. However, the precise mechanism of partial support of LVAD in the intra-ventricular flow pattern is unclear. Material/Methods In this study, a patient-specific left ventricular geometric model was reconstructed based on CT data. The intra-ventricular flow pattern under 3 simulated conditions – “heart failure”, “partial support”, and “full support” – were simulated by using fluid-structure interaction (FSI). The blood flow pattern, wall shear stress (WSS), time-average wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and relative residence time (RRT) were calculated to evaluate the hemodynamic effects. Results The results demonstrate that the intra-ventricular flow pattern is significantly changed by the support level of BJUT-II VAD. The intra-ventricular vortex was enhanced under partial support and was eliminated under full support, and the high OSI and RRT regions changed from the septum wall to the cardiac apex. Conclusions In brief, the support level of the BJUT-II VAD has significant effects on the intra-ventricular flow pattern. The partial support mode of BJUT-II VAD can enhance the intra-ventricular vortex, while the distribution of high OSI and RRT moved from the septum wall to the cardiac apex. Hence, the partial support mode of BJUT-II VAD can provide more benefit for intra-ventricular flow pattern. PMID:28239142

  3. Flow Field and Nutrient Dynamics Control Over Formation of Parallel Vegetation Patterns in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, V.; Cheng, Y.; Stieglitz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern formation in vegetated communities reflects the underlying mechanisms governing resource utilization and distribution across the landscape. An example of a patterned ecosystem is the Florida Everglades, which is characterized by parallel and slightly elevated peat "ridges" separated by deeper water "slough" communities (R&S). Ridges are dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaiscence). These patterns are thought to be aligned with and develop in response to the historic surface water flow direction, though the precise mechanisms which lead to their formation are poorly understood. Over the years this R&S habitat has degraded in areas where the natural flow regime, hydroperiod, and water depths have been impacted by human development. Managing and restoring this habitat has been an objective of the U.S. Federal and Florida State governments since the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was authorized in 2000. It is imperative, however, to develop a mechanistic understanding of ridge-slough formation before the potential benefits of hydrologic forecasts associated with CERP can be evaluated. Recently, Cheng et al (see Cheng et al, session NG14) employed a simple 2D advection-diffusion model developed by Rietkerk et al (2004) to describe for the first time, the formation of parallel stripes from hydrologic interactions. To simulate parallel stripes, Cheng et al retained the basic equations of the Rietkerk model but allowed for constant advection of water and nutrient in one direction to simulate slope conditions, with evapotranspiration driven advection of water and nutrient perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. We employ this modeling framework and parameterize the model with Everglades field data to simulate ridge-slough formation. In this model, the relatively higher rates of evapotranspiration on the ridges compared to the sloughs create hydraulic gradients which carry dissolved nutrients from the sloughs to the faster growing ridges. With

  4. Induced-charge electro-osmosis around metal and Janus spheres in water: Patterns of flow and breaking symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lazo, Israel; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-11-01

    We establish experimentally the flow patterns of induced-charge electro-osmosis around immobilized metallic spheres in aqueous electrolyte. The ac field modifies local electrolyte concentration and causes quadrupolar flows with inward velocities being smaller than the outward ones. At high fields, the flow becomes irregular, with vortices smaller than the size of the sphere. Janus metallodielectric spheres create dipolar flows and pump the fluid from the dielectric toward the metallic part. The experimentally determined far-field flows decay with distance as r-3.

  5. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R.

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  6. Patterns of Gene Flow between Crop and Wild Carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; Ramsey, Adam J.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Simon, Philipp W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for cultivation and understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene flow for wild relatives of crop species. Moreover, the comparison of genetic markers with different modes of inheritance, or transmission, such as those of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, can inform the relative risk of transgene escape via pollen versus seed. Here we investigate patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in two regions of the United States. We employed 15 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and one polymorphic chloroplast marker. Further, we utilized both conventional population genetic metrics along with Shannon diversity indices as the latter have been proposed to be more sensitive to allele frequency changes and differentiation. We found that populations in both regions that were proximal to crop fields showed lower levels of differentiation to the crops than populations that were located farther away. We also found that Shannon measures were more sensitive to differences in both genetic diversity and differentiation in our study. Finally, we found indirect evidence of paternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and accompanying lower than expected levels of chloroplast genetic structure amongst populations as might be expected if chloroplast DNA genes flow through both seed and pollen. Our findings of substantial gene flow for both nuclear and chloroplast markers demonstrate the efficiency of both pollen and seed to transfer genetic information amongst populations of carrot. PMID:27603516

  7. Swarming in viscous fluids: Three-dimensional patterns in swimmer- and force-induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2016-04-01

    We derive a three-dimensional theory of self-propelled particle swarming in a viscous fluid environment. Our model predicts emergent collective behavior that depends critically on fluid opacity, mechanism of self-propulsion, and type of particle-particle interaction. In "clear fluids" swimmers have full knowledge of their surroundings and can adjust their velocities with respect to the lab frame, while in "opaque fluids" they control their velocities only in relation to the local fluid flow. We also show that "social" interactions that affect only a particle's propensity to swim towards or away from neighbors induces a flow field that is qualitatively different from the long-ranged flow fields generated by direct "physical" interactions. The latter can be short-ranged but lead to much longer-ranged fluid-mediated hydrodynamic forces, effectively amplifying the range over which particles interact. These different fluid flows conspire to profoundly affect swarm morphology, kinetically stabilizing or destabilizing swarm configurations that would arise in the absence of fluid. Depending upon the overall interaction potential, the mechanism of swimming ( e.g., pushers or pullers), and the degree of fluid opaqueness, we discover a number of new collective three-dimensional patterns including flocks with prolate or oblate shapes, recirculating pelotonlike structures, and jetlike fluid flows that entrain particles mediating their escape from the center of mill-like structures. Our results reveal how the interplay among general physical elements influence fluid-mediated interactions and the self-organization, mobility, and stability of new three-dimensional swarms and suggest how they might be used to kinetically control their collective behavior.

  8. Magma flow pattern in dykes of the Azores revealed by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, M. A.; Geoffroy, L.; Pozzi, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The localization of magma melting areas at the lithosphere bottom in extensional volcanic domains is poorly understood. Large polygenetic volcanoes of long duration and their associated magma chambers suggest that melting at depth may be focused at specific points within the mantle. To validate the hypothesis that the magma feeding a mafic crust, comes from permanent localized crustal reservoirs, it is necessary to map the fossilized magma flow within the crustal planar intrusions. Using the AMS, we obtain magmatic flow vectors from 34 alkaline basaltic dykes from São Jorge, São Miguel and Santa Maria islands in the Azores Archipelago, a hot-spot related triple junction. The dykes contain titanomagnetite showing a wide spectrum of solid solution ranging from Ti-rich to Ti-poor compositions with vestiges of maghemitization. Most of the dykes exhibit a normal magnetic fabric. The orientation of the magnetic lineation k1 axis is more variable than that of the k3 axis, which is generally well grouped. The dykes of São Jorge and São Miguel show a predominance of subhorizontal magmatic flows. In Santa Maria the deduced flow pattern is less systematic changing from subhorizontal in the southern part of the island to oblique in north. These results suggest that the ascent of magma beneath the islands of Azores is predominantly over localized melting sources and then collected within shallow magma chambers. According to this concept, dykes in the upper levels of the crust propagate laterally away from these magma chambers thus feeding the lava flows observed at the surface.

  9. Patterns of Gene Flow between Crop and Wild Carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; Ramsey, Adam J; Iorizzo, Massimo; Simon, Philipp W

    2016-01-01

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for cultivation and understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene flow for wild relatives of crop species. Moreover, the comparison of genetic markers with different modes of inheritance, or transmission, such as those of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, can inform the relative risk of transgene escape via pollen versus seed. Here we investigate patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in two regions of the United States. We employed 15 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and one polymorphic chloroplast marker. Further, we utilized both conventional population genetic metrics along with Shannon diversity indices as the latter have been proposed to be more sensitive to allele frequency changes and differentiation. We found that populations in both regions that were proximal to crop fields showed lower levels of differentiation to the crops than populations that were located farther away. We also found that Shannon measures were more sensitive to differences in both genetic diversity and differentiation in our study. Finally, we found indirect evidence of paternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and accompanying lower than expected levels of chloroplast genetic structure amongst populations as might be expected if chloroplast DNA genes flow through both seed and pollen. Our findings of substantial gene flow for both nuclear and chloroplast markers demonstrate the efficiency of both pollen and seed to transfer genetic information amongst populations of carrot.

  10. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  11. Flow-pattern Guided Fabrication of High-density Barcode Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lisa S; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-06

    Antibody microarray as a well-developed technology is currently challenged by a few other established or emerging high-throughput technologies. In this report, we renovate the antibody microarray technology by using a novel approach for manufacturing and by introducing new features. The fabrication of our high-density antibody microarray is accomplished through perpendicularly oriented flow-patterning of single stranded DNAs and subsequent conversion mediated by DNA-antibody conjugates. This protocol outlines the critical steps in flow-patterning DNA, producing and purifying DNA-antibody conjugates, and assessing the quality of the fabricated microarray. The uniformity and sensitivity are comparable with conventional microarrays, while our microarray fabrication does not require the assistance of an array printer and can be performed in most research laboratories. The other major advantage is that the size of our microarray units is 10 times smaller than that of printed arrays, offering the unique capability of analyzing functional proteins from single cells when interfacing with generic microchip designs. This barcode technology can be widely employed in biomarker detection, cell signaling studies, tissue engineering, and a variety of clinical applications.

  12. Imaging wet granules with different flow patterns by electrical capacitance tomography and microwave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. G.; Zhang, J. L.; Ramli, M. F.; Mao, M. X.; Ye, J. M.; Yang, W. Q.; Wu, Z. P.

    2016-11-01

    The moisture content of granules in fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating processes can typically be between 1%~25%, resulting in the change of permittivity and conductivity during the processes. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used for this purpose, but has a limit because too much water can cause a problem in capacitance measurement. Considering that microwave tomography (MWT) has a wide range of frequency (1~2.5 GHz) and can be used to measure materials with high permittivity and conductivity, the objective of this research is to combine ECT and MWT together to investigate the solids concentration with different moisture content and different flow patterns. The measurement results show that both ECT and MWT are functions of moisture content as well as flow patterns, and their measurements are complementary to each other. This is the first time that these two tomography modalities have been combined together and applied to image the complex solids distribution. The obtained information may be used for the process control of fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating to improve operation efficiency.

  13. Genetic architecture and genomic patterns of gene flow between hybridizing species of Picea

    PubMed Central

    De La Torre, A; Ingvarsson, P K; Aitken, S N

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid zones provide an opportunity to study the effects of selection and gene flow in natural settings. We employed nuclear microsatellites (single sequence repeat (SSR)) and candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) to characterize the genetic architecture and patterns of interspecific gene flow in the Picea glauca × P. engelmannii hybrid zone across a broad latitudinal (40–60 degrees) and elevational (350–3500 m) range in western North America. Our results revealed a wide and complex hybrid zone with broad ancestry levels and low interspecific heterozygosity, shaped by asymmetric advanced-generation introgression, and low reproductive barriers between parental species. The clinal variation based on geographic variables, lack of concordance in clines among loci and the width of the hybrid zone points towards the maintenance of species integrity through environmental selection. Congruency between geographic and genomic clines suggests that loci with narrow clines are under strong selection, favoring either one parental species (directional selection) or their hybrids (overdominance) as a result of strong associations with climatic variables such as precipitation as snow and mean annual temperature. Cline movement due to past demographic events (evidenced by allelic richness and heterozygosity shifts from the average cline center) may explain the asymmetry in introgression and predominance of P. engelmannii found in this study. These results provide insights into the genetic architecture and fine-scale patterns of admixture, and identify loci that may be involved in reproductive barriers between the species. PMID:25806545

  14. Effects of cohesion on the flow patterns of granular materials in spouted beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Runru; Li, Shuiqing; Yao, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Two-dimensional spouted bed, capable to provide both dilute granular gas and dense granular solid flow patterns in one system, was selected as a prototypical system for studying granular materials. Effects of liquid cohesion on such kind of complex granular patterns were studied using particle image velocimetry. It is seen that the addition of liquid oils by a small fraction of 10-3-10-2 causes a remarkable narrowing (about 15%) of the spout area. In the dense annulus, as the liquid fraction increases, the downward particle velocity gradually decreases and approaches a minimum where, at a microscopic grain scale, the liquid bridge reaches spherical regimes with a maximum capillarity. Viscous lubrication effect is observed at a much higher fraction but is really weak with respect to the capillary effect. In the dilute spout, in contrast to the dry grains, the wet grains have a lightly smaller acceleration in the initial 1/3 of the spout, but have a dramatically higher acceleration in the rest of the spout. We attribute the former to the additional work needed to overcome interparticle cohesion during particle entrainment at the spout-annulus interface. Then, using mass and momentum balances, the latter is explained by the relative higher drag force resulting from both higher gas velocities and higher voidages due to spout narrowing in the wet system. The experimental findings will provide useful data for the validation of discrete element simulation of cohesive granular-fluid flows.

  15. Exploring Learners' Sequential Behavioral Patterns, Flow Experience, and Learning Performance in an Anti-Phishing Educational Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Kuo, Cian-Yu; Hou, Huei-Tse; Lin, Yu-Yan

    2017-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to provide a game-based anti-phishing lesson to 110 elementary school students in Taiwan, explore their learning behavioral patterns, and investigate the effects of the flow states on their learning behavioral patterns and learning achievement. The study recorded behaviour logs, and applied a pre- and post-test on…

  16. Subglacial conditions and ice-flow patterns reconstructed from petrographic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, Ewelina; Szuman, Izabela

    2010-05-01

    Usually the petrographic composition of sediments give a basis to distinguish sediments horizons and correlate them. In this study clasts petrography contributes to reconstruction of subglacial conditions as well. Together with till fabric analysis and geomorphological facts it can also give a valuable evidence for ice-flow patterns. The study concerns the Great Poland region, located in central-western Poland. The research area extnents are 53.149 °N and 51.849 °N paralells and 15.899 °E and 18.249 °E meridians. The area lies within the range of the Last Glacial Maximum phase (in Poland known as the Leszno Phase) and the Poznan Phase, which is the succeeding stage of the Weichselian Ice Sheet in Poland. The purpose of the study was twofold. Firstly, the authors aimed at revealing and reconstructing the vertical diversity of subglacial dynamics. Secondly it was intended to distinguish lower-scale flowline patterns within the major ice streams as well. A set of data was acquired from subglacial tills deposited by an active ice sheet sole (deformation and lodgement till). The data set included results of: lithofacies analysis results, till fabric measurements (a-axes of at least 30 elongated clasts), clasts-compositional data derived from 5-10 mm gravels and grain-size distribution obtained with wet and dry (mechanical) sieving techniques. Changes in the petrographic composition of gravels were investigated in two ways. At first, in parallel profiles, to detect a spatial tendency in the petrographic composition. The latter way concerned vertical profiles within subglacial till horizons with the purpose of revealing some trends induced by vertical changes of subglacial conditions. Subsequently all the textural features were associated with geomorphic traces, demonstrated by subglacial channels and other glacial lineations, obtained from Digital Elevation Model, in order to distinguish ice-flow patterns. The clasts petrography analysed in vertical profiles revealed

  17. Experimental analysis of the flow pattern of a pump turbine model in pump mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Mark; Senn, Florian; Jaberg, Helmut; Gehrer, Arno; Sallaberger, Manfred; Widmer, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Reversible pump turbines are the only means to store primary energy in an highly efficient way. Within a short time their operation can be switched between the different operational regimes thus enhancing the stabilization of the electric grid. These qualities in combination with the operation even at off-design conditions offer a high flexibility to the energy market. However, pump turbines pass through operational regimes where their behaviour becomes unstable. One of these effects occurs when the flowrate is decreased continuously down to a minimum. This point is the physical limitation of the pump operation and is very difficult to predict properly by numerical design without a model test. The purpose of the present study is to identify the fluid mechanical phenomena leading to the occurrence of instabilities of pump turbines in pump mode. A reduced scale model of a ANDRITZ pump turbine was installed on a 4-quadrant test rig for the experimental investigation of unstable conditions in pump mode. The performed measurements are based on the IEC60193-standard. Characteristic measurements at a single guide vane opening were carried out to get a detailed insight into the instabilities in pump mode. The interaction between runner and guide vane was analysed by Particle Image Velocimetry. Furthermore, high-speed visualizations of the suction side part load flow and the suction recirculation were performed. Like never before the flow pattern in the draft tube cone became visible with the help of a high-speed camera by intentionally caused cavitation effects which allow a qualitative view on the flow pattern in the draft tube cone. Suction recirculation is observed in form of single vortices separating from each runner blade and stretching into the draft tube against the main flow direction. To find an explanation for the flow phenomena responsible for the appearance of the unstable head curve also characteristic velocity distributions on the pressure side were combined

  18. Effects of Vessel Compliance on Flow Pattern in Porcine Epicardial Right Coronary Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Choy, Jenny Susana; Svendsen, Mark; Sinha, Anjan Kumar; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2009-01-01

    The compliance of the vessel wall affects hemodynamic parameters which may alter the permeability of the vessel wall. Based on experimental measurements, the present study established a finite element (FE) model in the proximal elastic vessel segments of epicardial right coronary arterial (RCA) tree obtained from computed tomography. The motion of elastic vessel wall was measured by an impedance catheter and the inlet boundary condition was measured by an ultrasound flow probe. The Galerkin FE method was used to solve the Navier-Stokes and Continuity equations, where the convective term in the Navier-Stokes equation was changed in the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework to incorporate the motion due to vessel compliance. Various hemodynamic parameters (e.g., wall shear stress-WSS, WSS spatial gradient-WSSG, oscillatory shear index-OSI) were analyzed in the model. The motion due to vessel compliance affects the time-averaged WSSG more strongly than WSS at bifurcations. The decrease of WSSG at flow divider in elastic bifurcations, as compared to rigid bifurcations, implies that the vessel compliance decreases the permeability of vessel wall and may be atheroprotective. The model can be used to predict coronary flow pattern in subject-specific anatomy as determined by noninvasive imaging. PMID:19195659

  19. Optoelectric patterning: Effect of electrode material and thickness on laser-induced AC electrothermal flow.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Khor, Jian-Wei; Clayton, Katherine N; Williams, Stuart J; Pan, Xudong; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara; Wereley, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP) is an emerging optoelectric technique that takes advantage of laser-induced AC electrothermal flow and particle-electrode interactions to trap and translate particles. The electrothermal flow in REP is driven by the temperature rise induced by the laser absorption in the thin electrode layer. In previous REP applications 350-700 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layers have been used as electrodes. In this study, we show that ITO is an inefficient electrode choice as more than 92% of the irradiated laser on the ITO electrodes is transmitted without absorption. Using theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches, we demonstrate that for a given laser power the temperature rise is controlled by both the electrode material and its thickness. A 25-nm thick Ti electrode creates an electrothermal flow of the same speed as a 700-nm thick ITO electrode while requiring only 14% of the laser power used by ITO. These results represent an important step in the design of low-cost portable REP systems by lowering the material cost and power consumption of the system.

  20. Coupled Effects of Hyporheic Flow Structure and Metabolic Pattern on Reach-scale Nutrient Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Bolster, D.; Tank, J. L.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Co-injections of conservative tracers and nutrients are commonly used to assess net reach-scale nutrient transformation rates and benthic/hyporheic uptake parameters. However, little information is available on spatial metabolic patterns in the benthic and hyporheic regions. Based on observations from real systems, we used particle tracking simulations to explore the effects of localized metabolism on estimates of reach-scale nutrient uptake rates. Metabolism locally depletes nutrient concentrations relative to conservative tracers, causing their concentration profiles of injected nutrients and conservative tracers to diverge. At slow rates of hyporheic exchange relative to rates of metabolism, overall hyporheic nutrient uptake is limited by delivery from the stream, and effective reach-scale nutrient uptake parameters will be controlled by the hyporheic exchange rate. At high rates of hyporheic exchange relative to rates of metabolism, the injected tracer can propagate beyond regions of high microbial activity, which commonly occur near the streambed surface. In this case, the injected tracer may not adequately capture timescales of nutrient replenishment in the most bioactive regions. Reach-scale nutrients uptake rate increases with increasing heterogeneity in local metabolic patterns, altering the shape of breakthrough curves downstream. More observations of hyporheic rates and metabolic patterns are needed to understand how flow heterogeneity and reaction heterogeneity interact to control nutrient dynamics at reach-scale.

  1. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V., Oliver C.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  2. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V, Oliver C

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities.

  3. Functional morphology and patterns of blood flow in the heart of Python regius.

    PubMed

    Starck, J Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Brightness-modulated ultrasonography, continuous-wave Doppler, and pulsed-wave Doppler-echocardiography were used to analyze the functional morphology of the undisturbed heart of ball pythons. In particular, the action of the muscular ridge and the atrio-ventricular valves are key features to understand how patterns of blood flow emerge from structures directing blood into the various chambers of the heart. A step-by-step image analysis of echocardiographs shows that during ventricular diastole, the atrio-ventricular valves block the interventricular canals so that blood from the right atrium first fills the cavum venosum, and blood from the left atrium fills the cavum arteriosum. During diastole, blood from the cavum venosum crosses the muscular ridge into the cavum pulmonale. During middle to late systole the muscular ridge closes, thus prohibiting further blood flow into the cavum pulmonale. At the same time, the atrio-ventricular valves open the interventricular canal and allow blood from the cavum arteriosum to flow into the cavum venosum. In the late phase of ventricular systole, all blood from the cavum pulmonale is pressed into the pulmonary trunk; all blood from the cavum venosum is pressed into both aortas. Quantitative measures of blood flow volume showed that resting snakes bypass the pulmonary circulation and shunt about twice the blood volume into the systemic circulation as into the pulmonary circulation. When digesting, the oxygen demand of snakes increased tremendously. This is associated with shunting more blood into the pulmonary circulation. The results of this study allow the presentation of a detailed functional model of the python heart. They are also the basis for a functional hypothesis of how shunting is achieved. Further, it was shown that shunting is an active regulation process in response to changing demands of the organism (here, oxygen demand). Finally, the results of this study support earlier reports about a dual pressure

  4. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  5. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l-1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  6. Influence of anatomical dominance and hypertension on coronary conduit arterial and microcirculatory flow patterns: a multiscale modeling study.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-07-01

    Coronary hemodynamics are known to be affected by intravascular and extravascular factors that vary regionally and transmurally between the perfusion territories of left and right coronary arteries. However, despite clinical evidence that left coronary arterial dominance portends greater cardiovascular risk, relatively little is known about the effects of left or right dominance on regional conduit arterial and microcirculatory blood flow patterns, particularly in the presence of systemic or pulmonary hypertension. We addressed this issue using a multiscale numerical model of the human coronary circulation situated in a closed-loop cardiovascular model. The coronary model represented left or right dominant anatomies and accounted for transmural and regional differences in vascular properties and extravascular compression. Regional coronary flow dynamics of the two anatomical variants were compared under normotensive conditions, raised systemic or pulmonary pressures with maintained flow demand, and after accounting for adaptations known to occur in acute and chronic hypertensive states. Key findings were that 1) right coronary arterial flow patterns were strongly influenced by dominance and systemic/pulmonary hypertension; 2) dominance had minor effects on left coronary arterial and all microvascular flow patterns (aside from mean circumflex flow); 3) although systemic hypertension favorably increased perfusion pressure, this benefit varied regionally and transmurally and was offset by increased left ventricular and septal flow demands; and 4) pulmonary hypertension had a substantial negative effect on right ventricular and septal flows, which was exacerbated by greater metabolic demands. These findings highlight the importance of interactions between coronary arterial dominance and hypertension in modulating coronary hemodynamics.

  7. Influence of urbanization pattern on stream flow of a peri-urban catchment under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste A. O.

    2015-04-01

    The demand for better life quality and lower living costs created a great pressure on peri-urban areas, leading to significant land-use changes. The complexity of mixed land-use patterns, however, presents a challenge to understand the hydrological pathways and streamflow response involved in such changes. This study assesses the impact of a actively changing Portuguese peri-urban area on catchment hydrology. It focuses on quantifying streamflow delivery from contributing areas, of different land-use arrangement and the seasonal influence of the Mediterranean climate on stream discharge. The study focuses on Ribeira dos Covões a small (6 km2) peri-urban catchment on the outskirts of Coimbra, one of the main cities in central Portugal. Between 1958 and 2012 the urban area of the catchment expanded from 8% to 40%, mostly at the expense of agriculture (down from 48% to 4%), with woodland now accounting for the remaining 56% of the catchment area. The urban area comprises contrasting urban settings, associated with older discontinuous arrangement of buildings and urban structures and low population density (<25 inhabitants/km), and recent well-defined urban cores dominated by apartment blocks and high population density (9900 inhabitants/km). The hydrological response of the catchment has been monitored since 2007 by a flume installed at the outlet. In 2009, five rainfall gauges and eight additional water level recorders were installed upstream, to assess the hydrological response of different sub-catchments, characterized by distinct urban patterns and either limestone or sandstone lithologies. Annual runoff coefficients range between 14% and 22%. Changes in annual baseflow index (36-39% of annual rainfall) have been small with urbanization (from 34% to 40%) during the monitoring period itself. Annual runoff coefficients were lowest (14-7%) on catchments >80% woodland and highest (29% on sandstone; 18% on limestone) in the most urbanized (49-53% urban) sub

  8. Three-dimensional flow structure and patterns of bed shear stress in an evolving compound meander bend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, Frank; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Compound meander bends with multiple lobes of maximum curvature are common in actively evolving lowland rivers. Interaction among spatial patterns of mean flow, turbulence, bed morphology, bank failures and channel migration in compound bends is poorly understood. In this paper, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of the three-dimensional (3D) flow velocities in a compound bend are examined to evaluate the influence of channel curvature and hydrologic variability on the structure of flow within the bend. Flow structure at various flow stages is related to changes in bed morphology over the study timeframe. Increases in local curvature within the upstream lobe of the bend reduce outer bank velocities at morphologically significant flows, creating a region that protects the bank from high momentum flow and high bed shear stresses. The dimensionless radius of curvature in the upstream lobe is one-third less than that of the downstream lobe, with average bank erosion rates less than half of the erosion rates for the downstream lobe. Higher bank erosion rates within the downstream lobe correspond to the shift in a core of high velocity and bed shear stresses toward the outer bank as flow moves through the two lobes. These erosion patterns provide a mechanism for continued migration of the downstream lobe in the near future. Bed material size distributions within the bend correspond to spatial patterns of bed shear stress magnitudes, indicating that bed material sorting within the bend is governed by bed shear stress. Results suggest that patterns of flow, sediment entrainment, and planform evolution in compound meander bends are more complex than in simple meander bends. Moreover, interactions among local influences on the flow, such as woody debris, local topographic steering, and locally high curvature, tend to cause compound bends to evolve toward increasing planform complexity over time rather than stable configurations.

  9. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  10. Porous Flow and Diffusion of Water in the Mantle Wedge: Melting and Hydration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    It is widely accepted that melting at volcanic arcs is primarily triggered by fluxing the mantle wedge from the dehydrating subducting slab. However, there is less concensus regarding how water moves into and within the mantle wedge. There are at least four possible mechanisms for water migration in the wedge: buoyant porous flow, diffusion through mineral crystals, advection of hydrated minerals, and compositionally buoyant diapers. The latter two mechanisms require at least one of the first two to occur to get water from the slab into the wedge before they can function. Using geodynamic models of mantle flow in a simplified subduction setting, we explore the implications of diffusion and porous flow of water in the wedge, particularly as they would affect the time for recycling water through the subduction factory and the predicted pattern of basalt hydration across the arc. The slab is assumed to dehydrate in a continuous fashion as the solubility of water in subducted oceanic crust decreases with temperature and pressure and the water then enters the wedge via one of the two transport mechanisms. Diffusion is controlled by temperature and by which minerals are present. Although olivine dominates the mantle mineral fraction, pyroxenes may control the diffusion of water in the wedge as the diffusivity of pyroxene is one or more orders of magnitude greater than olivine. Even assuming the faster diffusion rate of orthopyroxene in the models, diffusion can only be an important transport mechanism when subduction rates are slower than ~3 cm/yr. Flux melting occurs in the wedge above where the slab is ~100-160 km deep with the maximum above where the slab is ~120 km deep. Models including porous flow can result in melting at higher subduction rates provided the permeability of the mantle is greater than 10-17 m2. The true magnitude of the permeability likely varies with the corresponding porosity created by the free phase. With porous flow, melting occurs 20-30 km

  11. Ditch network sustains functional connectivity and influences patterns of gene flow in an intensive agricultural landscape

    PubMed Central

    Favre-Bac, L; Mony, C; Ernoult, A; Burel, F; Arnaud, J-F

    2016-01-01

    In intensive agricultural landscapes, plant species previously relying on semi-natural habitats may persist as metapopulations within landscape linear elements. Maintenance of populations' connectivity through pollen and seed dispersal is a key factor in species persistence in the face of substantial habitat loss. The goals of this study were to investigate the potential corridor role of ditches and to identify the landscape components that significantly impact patterns of gene flow among remnant populations. Using microsatellite loci, we explored the spatial genetic structure of two hydrochorous wetland plants exhibiting contrasting local abundance and different habitat requirements: the rare and regionally protected Oenanthe aquatica and the more commonly distributed Lycopus europaeus, in an 83 km2 agricultural lowland located in northern France. Both species exhibited a significant spatial genetic structure, along with substantial levels of genetic differentiation, especially for L. europaeus, which also expressed high levels of inbreeding. Isolation-by-distance analysis revealed enhanced gene flow along ditches, indicating their key role in effective seed and pollen dispersal. Our data also suggested that the configuration of the ditch network and the landscape elements significantly affected population genetic structure, with (i) species-specific scale effects on the genetic neighborhood and (ii) detrimental impact of human ditch management on genetic diversity, especially for O. aquatica. Altogether, these findings highlighted the key role of ditches in the maintenance of plant biodiversity in intensive agricultural landscapes with few remnant wetland habitats. PMID:26486611

  12. Phosphorus Flow Patterns in the Chaohu Watershed from 1978 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Songyan; Yuan, Zengwei

    2015-12-15

    Understanding historical patterns of phosphorus (P) cycling is critical for sustainable P management and eutrophication mitigation in watersheds. This study built a bottom-up model using the substance flow analysis approach to quantify P cycling in the Chaohu watershed during 1978-2012. We found that P flows have been intensified, with a 5-fold increase of annual P inputs to sustain the expanding intensive agriculture. Annually, most P inputs (75%) were stored within the watershed, which caused accelerating buildup of legacy P in cultivated land (from 4.9 Gg to 6.5 × 10(2) Gg), uncultivated land (from 2.1 Gg to 1.3 × 10(2) Gg) and surface water (from 3.7 Gg to 2.6 × 10(2) Gg) during 1978-2012. The main legacy P sources include fertilizer application for cultivated land, phosphogypsum abandonment for uncultivated land, respectively. The animal husbandry contributed about 63-66% of total P inputs to surface water. The contribution of animal food-P increased greatly during 1978-2012, from 7% to 24% and from 1% to 8% for urban and rural residents, respectively. This work demonstrates principle for the buildup of legacy P at the watershed-scale, and advances the knowledge of sustainable P management, such as improving agricultural technologies to reduce fertilizer application.

  13. Reorganization of ice sheet flow patterns in Arctic Canada and the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsnider, Kurt A.; Miller, Gifford H.

    2010-07-01

    Evidence for the evolution of Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) basal thermal regime patterns during successive glaciations is poorly preserved in the geologic record. Here we explore a new approach to constrain the distribution of cold-based ice across central Baffin Island in the eastern Canadian Arctic over many glacial-interglacial cycles by combining till geochemistry and cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) data. Parts of the landscaped with geomorphic evidence for limited glacial erosion are covered by till characterized by high chemical index of alteration (CIA) values and CRN concentrations requiring complicated burial-exposure histories. Till from regions scoured by glacial erosion have CIA values indistinguishable from local bedrock and CRN concentrations that can be explained by simple exposure following deglaciation. CRN modeling results based on these constraints suggest that the weathered tills were deposited by 1.9 to 1.2 Ma, and by that time the fiorded Baffin Island coastline must have developed close to its modern configuration as piracy of ice flow by the most efficient fiord systems resulted in a major shift in the basal thermal regime across the northeastern LIS. The resultant concentration of ice flow in fewer outlet systems may help explain the cause of the mid-Pleistocene transition from 41- to 100-kyr glacial cycles.

  14. Swarming in viscous fluids: three-dimensional patterns in swimmer- and force-induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; D'Orsogna, Maria R.; Chou, Tom

    Mathematical models of self-propelled interacting particles have reproduced various fascinating ``swarming'' patterns observed in natural and artificial systems. The formulation of such models usually ignores the influence of the surrounding medium in which the particles swarm. Here we develop from first principles a three-dimensional theory of swarming particles in a viscous fluid environment and investigate how the hydrodynamic coupling among the particles may affect their collective behavior. Specifically, we examine the hydrodynamic coupling among self-propelled particles interacting through ``social'' or ``mechanical'' forces. We discover that new patterns arise as a consequence of different interactions and self-propulsion mechanisms. Examples include flocks with prolate or oblate shapes, intermittent mills, recirculating peloton-like structures, and jet-like fluid flows that kinetically destabilize mill-like structures. Our results reveal possible mechanisms for three-dimensional swarms to kinetically control their collective behaviors in fluids. Supported by NSF DMS 1021818 & 1021850, ARO W1911NF-14-1-0472, ARO MURI W1911NF-11-10332.

  15. Fast Gas Replacement in Plasma Process Chamber by Improving Gas Flow Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Sadaharu; Goto, Tetsuya; Akutsu, Isao; Ohyama, Kenji; Ito, Takashi; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2009-01-01

    The precise and high-speed alteration of various gas species is important for realizing precise and well-controlled multiprocesses in a single plasma process chamber with high throughput. The gas replacement times in the replacement of N2 by Ar and that of H2 by Ar are measured in a microwave excited high-density and low electron-temperature plasma process chamber at various working pressures and gas flow rates, incorporating a new gas flow control system, which can avoid overshoot of the gas pressure in the chamber immediately after the valve operation, and a gradational lead screw booster pump, which can maintain excellent pumping capability for various gas species including lightweight gases such as H2 in a wide pressure region from 10-1 to 104 Pa. Furthermore, to control the gas flow pattern in the chamber, upper ceramic shower plates, which have thousands of very fine gas injection holes (numbers of 1200 and 2400) formed with optimized allocation on the plates, are adopted, while the conventional gas supply method in the microwave-excited plasma chamber uses many holes only opened at the sidewall of the chamber (gas ring). It has been confirmed that, in the replacement of N2 by Ar, a short replacement time of approximately 1 s in the cases of 133 and 13.3 Pa and approximately 3 s in the case of 4 Pa can be achieved when the upper shower plate has 2400 holes, while a replacement time longer than approximately 10 s is required for all pressure cases where the gas ring is used. In addition, thanks to the excellent pumping capability of the gradational lead screw booster pump for lightweight gases, it has also been confirmed that the replacement time of H2 by Ar is almost the same as that of N2 by Ar.

  16. Formation of localized sand patterns downstream from a vertical cylinder under steady flows: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzerais, Anthony; Jarno, Armelle; Ezersky, Alexander; Marin, François

    2016-11-01

    The generation of localized, spatially periodic patterns on a sandy bottom is experimentally and theoretically studied. Tests are performed in a hydrodynamic flume where patterns are produced downstream from a vertical cylinder under a steady current. It is found that patterns appear as a result of a subcritical instability of the water-sand bottom interface. A dependence of the area shape occupied by the patterns on the flow velocity and the cylinder diameter is investigated. It is shown that the patterns' characteristics can be explained using the Swift-Hohenberg equation. Numerical simulations point out that for a correct description of the patterns, an additional term which takes into account the impact of vortices on the sandy bottom in the wake of a cylinder must be added in the Swift-Hohenberg equation.

  17. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  18. High-reproducibility, flexible conductive patterns fabricated with silver nanowire by drop or fit-to-flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yu; Tao, Yuxiao; Wang, Liuyang; Wang, Biaobing; Yang, Zhenguo; Tai, Yanlong

    2013-03-01

    An unusual strategy was designed to fabricate conductive patterns with high reproducibility for flexible electronics by drop or fit-to-flow method. Silver nanowire (SNW) ink with surface tension of 36.9 mN/m and viscosity of 13.8 mPa s at 20°C was prepared and characterized using a field emission transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analyzer, scanning electron microscope, and four-point probe. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern as template was fabricated by spin coating (500 rpm), baking at 80°C for 3 h, and laser cutting. The prepared SNW ink can flow along the trench of the PDMS pattern spontaneously, especially after plasma treatment with oxygen, and show a low resistivity of 12.9 μΩ cm after sintering at 125°C for 30 min. In addition, an antenna pattern was also prepared to prove the feasibility of the approach.

  19. High-reproducibility, flexible conductive patterns fabricated with silver nanowire by drop or fit-to-flow method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An unusual strategy was designed to fabricate conductive patterns with high reproducibility for flexible electronics by drop or fit-to-flow method. Silver nanowire (SNW) ink with surface tension of 36.9 mN/m and viscosity of 13.8 mPa s at 20°C was prepared and characterized using a field emission transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analyzer, scanning electron microscope, and four-point probe. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern as template was fabricated by spin coating (500 rpm), baking at 80°C for 3 h, and laser cutting. The prepared SNW ink can flow along the trench of the PDMS pattern spontaneously, especially after plasma treatment with oxygen, and show a low resistivity of 12.9 μΩ cm after sintering at 125°C for 30 min. In addition, an antenna pattern was also prepared to prove the feasibility of the approach. PMID:23537333

  20. Visualizing Patterns of Drug Prescriptions with EventFlow: A Pilot Study of Asthma Medications in the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    asthmatics within the Military Health System (MHS). Visualizing the patterns of asthma medication use surrounding a LABA prescription is a quick way to...display and summarize time- point and interval data. EventFlow groups individuals that share the same sequence of medications and displays the... sequence patterns in the dataset, and on the right a scrollable timeline browser shows all the individual records. The top sequence in the overview

  1. Visualizing Patterns of Drug Prescriptions with EventFlow: A Pilot Study of Asthma Medications in the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    patterns of asthma medication use surrounding a LABA prescription is a quick way to detect possible sub-optimal use for further evaluation. Analysis of 100...MHS). Visualizing the patterns of asthma medication use surrounding a LABA prescription is a quick way to detect possible sub-optimal use for...visualization of temporal sequences of point events (i.e., events with a single timestamp) LifeLines2 1 and LifeFlow 1 . While those tools have

  2. Interpreting the spatio-temporal patterns of sea turtle strandings: Going with the flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; Mooreside, P.; Crowder, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of specific mortality sources is crucial for management of species that are vulnerable to human interactions. Beachcast carcasses represent an unknown fraction of at-sea mortalities. While a variety of physical (e.g., water temperature) and biological (e.g., decomposition) factors as well as the distribution of animals and their mortality sources likely affect the probability of carcass stranding, physical oceanography plays a major role in where and when carcasses strand. Here, we evaluate the influence of nearshore physical oceanographic and wind regimes on sea turtle strandings to decipher seasonal trends and make qualitative predictions about stranding patterns along oceanfront beaches. We use results from oceanic drift-bottle experiments to check our predictions and provide an upper limit on stranding proportions. We compare predicted current regimes from a 3D physical oceanographic model to spatial and temporal locations of both sea turtle carcass strandings and drift bottle landfalls. Drift bottle return rates suggest an upper limit for the proportion of sea turtle carcasses that strand (about 20%). In the South Atlantic Bight, seasonal development of along-shelf flow coincides with increased numbers of strandings of both turtles and drift bottles in late spring and early summer. The model also predicts net offshore flow of surface waters during winter - the season with the fewest relative strandings. The drift bottle data provide a reasonable upper bound on how likely carcasses are to reach land from points offshore and bound the general timeframe for stranding post-mortem (< two weeks). Our findings suggest that marine turtle strandings follow a seasonal regime predictable from physical oceanography and mimicked by drift bottle experiments. Managers can use these findings to reevaluate incidental strandings limits and fishery takes for both nearshore and offshore mortality sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Solids flow pattern in the exit region of a CFB -- Furnace influence of exit geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, F.; Leckner, B.; Vrager, A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of the exit geometry on the flow pattern in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser was studied in a cold 1/9 scale model of the Chalmers 12 MW CFB boiler. The model, which is made of transparent perspex, was operated according to the simplified scaling laws proposed by Glicksman et al. (1993). 12 different exit configurations were compared at different fluidization velocities. Two bed materials were used: iron and steel. In order to verify the scaling laws, vertical pressure and density profiles, net solids flux and pressure fluctuations measured in the model were compared with corresponding results from the 12 MW boiler. The exit configurations were evaluated by comparing the net solids fluxes and the vertical pressure and density profiles of the riser. The overall flow behavior of the scale-model was found to be similar to that of the boiler: A dense bottom bed, a splash zone and a transport zone could be identified. The dynamics (in-bed pressure fluctuations) of the bottom bed were in agreement with those of the boiler. Differences between net solids fluxes during operation with different exits were in some cases of an order of magnitude. However, there were almost no difference in solids flux between an abrupt exit, an extended exit (such as that of the boiler) and an enhanced extension. A decrease in the net solids flux (increase in the internal back-mixing) could be obtained by inserting obstacles in the upper part of the riser, and an increase in the net solids flux was achieved by narrowing the duct from the riser to the cyclone inlet (increasing the average velocity in the duct). The original configuration of the duct with an inclined bottom results in back-mixing from the duct to the furnace, thereby reducing the net (external) solids flux.

  4. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal mineral-fluid equilibria in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-H-O-Cl at elevated temperatures and pressures: Implications for hydrothermal mass transfer in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-H-O-Cl using the GEM-Selektor Gibbs free energy minimization code. Combination of non-ideal mixing properties in solids with multicomponent aqueous fluids represents a substantial improvement and it provides increased accuracy over existing modeling strategies. Application to the 10-component system allows us to link fluid composition and speciation with whole-rock mineralogy, mass and volume changes. We have simulated granite-fluid interaction over a wide range of conditions (200-600 °C, 100 MPa, 0-5 m Cl and fluid/rock ratios of 10-2-104) in order to explore composition of magmatic fluids of variable salinity, temperature effects on fluid composition and speciation and to simulate several paths of alteration zoning. At low fluid/rock ratios (f/r) the fluid composition is buffered by the silicate-oxide assemblage and remains close to invariant. This behavior extends to a f/r of 0.1 which exceeds the amount of exsolved magmatic fluids controlled by water solubility in silicate melts. With increasing peraluminosity of the parental granite, the Na-, K- and Fe-bearing fluids become more acidic and the oxidation state increases as a consequence of hydrogen and ferrous iron transfer to the fluid. With decreasing temperature, saline fluids become more Ca- and Na-rich, change from weakly acidic to alkaline, and become significantly more oxidizing. Large variations in Ca/Fe and Ca/Mg ratios in the fluid are a potential geothermometer. The mineral assemblage changes from cordierite-biotite granites through two-mica granites to chlorite-, epidote- and zeolite-bearing rocks. We have carried out three rock-titration simulations: (1) reaction with the 2 m NaCl fluid leads to albitization, chloritization and desilication, reproducing essential features observed in episyenites, (2) infiltration of a high-temperature fluid into the granite at 400 °C leads to hydrolytic

  6. Evaluation of flow patterns and elongated bubble characteristics during the flow boiling of halocarbon refrigerants in a micro-scale channel

    SciTech Connect

    Arcanjo, Alexandre Alves; Tibirica, Cristiano Bigonha; Ribatski, Gherhardt

    2010-09-15

    In the present study, quasi-diabatic two-phase flow pattern visualizations and measurements of elongated bubble velocity, frequency and length were performed. The tests were run for R134a and R245fa evaporating in a stainless steel tube with diameter of 2.32 mm, mass velocities ranging from 50 to 600 kg/m{sup 2} s and saturation temperatures of 22 C, 31 C and 41 C. The tube was heated by applying a direct DC current to its surface. Images from a high-speed video-camera (8000 frames/s) obtained through a transparent tube just downstream the heated sections were used to identify the following flow patterns: bubbly, elongated bubbles, churn and annular flows. The visualized flow patterns were compared against the predictions provided by Barnea et al. (1983), Felcar et al. (2007), Revellin and Thome (2007) and Ong and Thome (2009). From this comparison, it was found that the methods proposed by Felcar et al. (2007) and Ong and Thome (2009) predicted relatively well the present database. Additionally, elongated bubble velocities, frequencies and lengths were determined based on the analysis of high-speed videos. Results suggested that the elongated bubble velocity depends on mass velocity, vapor quality and saturation temperature. The bubble velocity increases with increasing mass velocity and vapor quality and decreases with increasing saturation temperature. Additionally, bubble velocity was correlated as linear functions of the two-phase superficial velocity. (author)

  7. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  8. Pore-scale and continuum modeling of gas flow pattern obtained by high-resolution optical bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Lazik, Detlef; Krauss, Gunnar; Vogel, Hans-JöRg

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution optical bench-scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate local gas flow pattern and integral flow properties caused by point-like gas injection into water-saturated glass beads. The main goal of this study was to test the validity of the continuum approach for two-fluid flow in macroscopic homogeneous media. Analyzing the steady state experimental gas flow pattern that satisfies the necessary coherence condition by image processing and calibrating the optical gas distribution by the gravimetrical gas saturation, it was found that a pulse-like function yields the best fit for the lateral gas saturation profile. This strange behavior of a relatively sharp saturation transition is in contradiction to the widely anticipated picture of a smooth Gaussian-like transition, which is obtained by the continuum approach. This transition is caused by the channelized flow structure, and it turns out that only a narrow range of capillary pressure is realized by the system, whereas the continuum approach assumes that within the representative elementary volume the whole spectrum of capillary pressures can be realized. It was found that the stochastical hypothesis proposed by Selker et al. (2007) that bridges pore scale and continuum scale is supported by the experiments. In order to study channelized gas flow on the pore scale, a variational treatment, which minimizes the free energy of an undulating capillary, was carried out. On the basis of thermodynamical arguments the geometric form of a microcapillary, macrochannel formation and a length-scale-dependent transition in gas flow pattern from coherent to incoherent flow are discussed.

  9. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Siegwarth, James D.

    2001-01-01

    This CD is a companion to NASA/TP-2001-210380. It contains digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in QuickTime format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson Video Codec for compression.

  10. Motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface: flow patterns and loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Lin, J.-C.; Unal, M. F.; Rockwell, D.

    The flow structure and loading due to combined translatory and sinusoidal motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface are characterized using a cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry and simultaneous force measurements. The instantaneous patterns of vorticity and streamline topology are interpreted as a function of degree of submergence beneath the free-surface. The relative magnitudes of the peak vorticity and the circulation of vortices formed from the upper and lower surfaces of the cylinder, as well as vortex formation from the free-surface, are remarkably affected by the nominal submergence. The corresponding streamline topology, interpreted in terms of foci, saddle points, and multiple separation and reattachment points also exhibit substantial changes with submergence. All of these features affect the instantaneous loading of the cylinder. Calculation of instantaneous moments of vorticity and the incremental changes in these moments during the cylinder motion allow identification of those vortices that contribute most substantially to the instantaneous lift and drag. Furthermore, the calculated moments are in general accord with the time integrals of the measured lift and drag acting on the cylinder for sufficiently large submergence.

  11. Membrane fouling and dialysate flow pattern in an internal filtration-enhancing dialyzer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Hiwatari, Michihito; Kohori, Fukashi; Sakai, Kiyotaka; Fukuda, Makoto; Hiyoshi, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    For efficient removal of large molecular weight solutes by dialysis, several types of internal filtration-enhancing dialyzers (IFEDs) are commercially available. However, in a pressure-driven membrane separation process (i.e., filtration), membrane fouling caused by adhesion of plasma proteins is a severe problem. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of internal filtration on membrane fouling based on the membrane's pure-water permeability, diffusive permeability, and sieving coefficient. Hemodialysis experiments were performed with two different dialyzers, IFEDs and non-IFEDs. Local membrane fouling in each dialyzer was evaluated by measuring the pure-water permeability, the diffusive permeability, and the sieving coefficient of native membranes and membranes treated with bovine blood. The effects of packing ratio on dialysate flow pattern were also evaluated by measuring the time required for an ion tracer to reach electrodes placed in the dialyzers. In the IFED, membrane fouling caused by protein adhesion is increased because of enhanced internal filtration only at the early stage of dialysis, and this fouling tends to occur only near the dialysate outlet port. However, enhanced internal filtration has little effect on measured membrane transfer parameters.

  12. Prey specialization may influence patterns of gene flow in wolves of the Canadian Northwest.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E; Nagy, J A; Larter, N C; Strobeck, C

    2001-12-01

    This study characterizes population genetic structure among grey wolves (Canis lupus) in northwestern Canada, and discusses potential physical and biological determinants of this structure. Four hundred and ninety-one grey wolves, from nine regions in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia, were genotyped using nine microsatellite loci. Results indicate that wolf gene flow is reduced significantly across the Mackenzie River, most likely due to the north-south migration patterns of the barren-ground caribou herds that flank it. Furthermore, although Banks and Victoria Island wolves are genetically similar, they are distinct from mainland wolf populations across the Amundsen Gulf. However, low-level island-mainland wolf migration may occur in conjunction with the movements of the Dolphin-Union caribou herd. Whereas previous authors have examined isolation-by-distance in wolves, this study is the first to demonstrate correlations between genetic structure of wolf populations and the presence of topographical barriers between them. Perhaps most interesting is the possibility that these barriers reflect prey specialization by wolves in different regions.

  13. Pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a swept circulation-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Wood, Norman J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure distributions and photographs of oil flow patterns are presented for a circulation control wing. The model was an aspect ratio four semispan wing mounted on the side wall of the NASA Ames Transonic Wind Tunnel. The airfoil was a 20 percent thick ellipse, modified with circular leading and trailing edges of 4 percent radius, and had a 25.4 cm constant chord. This configuration does not represent a specific wing design, but is generic. A full span, tangetial, rearward blowing, circulation control slot was incorporated ahead of the trailing edge on the upper surface. The wing was tested at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.75 at sweep angle of 0 to 45 deg with internal to external pressure ratios of 1.0 to 3.0. Lift and pitching momemt coefficients were obtained from measured pressure distributions at five span stations. When the conventional corrections resulting from sweep angle are applied to the lift and moment of circulation control sections, no additional corrections are necessary to account for changes in blowing efficiency. This is demonstrated for an aft sweep angle of 45 deg. An empirical technique for estimating the downwash distribution of a swept wing was validated.

  14. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  15. Surgical management of Chiari I malformation based on different cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tao; Zhao, HaiJun; Zhao, XinGang; Liang, Cong; Wang, YinQian; Gai, QiFei

    2017-02-09

    Chiari I malformation has been shown to present different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction (CVJ). Posterior fossa decompression is the first-line treatment for symptomatic Chiari I malformation. However, there is still controversy on the indication and selection of decompression procedures. This research aims to investigate the clinical indications, outcomes, and complications of the decompression procedures as alternative treatments for Chiari I malformation, based on the different CSF flow patterns at the cranial-vertebral junction. In this study, 126 Chiari I malformation patients treated with the two decompression procedures were analyzed. According to the preoperative findings obtained by using cine phase-contrast MRI (cine PC-MRI), the abnormal CSF flow dynamics at the CVJ in Chiari I malformation was classified into three patterns. After a preoperative evaluation and an intraoperative ultrasound after craniectomy, the two procedures were alternatively selected to treat the Chiari I malformation. The indication and selection of the two surgical procedures, as well as their outcomes and complications, are reported in detail in this work. Forty-eight patients underwent subdural decompression (SDD), and 78 received subarachnoid manipulation (SAM). Ninety patients were diagnosed as having Chiari I malformation with a syrinx. Two weeks after the operation, the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (mJOA) scores increased from the preoperative value of 10.67 ± 1.61 to 12.74 ± 2.01 (P < 0.01). The mean duration of follow-up was 24.8 months; the mJOA scores increased from the postoperative value of 12.74 ± 2.01 to 12.79 ± 1.91 at the end of follow-up (P = 0.48). More complications occurred in the patients who underwent SAM than in those who received SDD (SAM 11 of 78 (9.5%) vs SDD 2 of 48 (3.5%)). The abnormal CSF flow dynamics at the CVJ in Chiari I malformation can be classified into three patterns. A SAM

  16. Stability of Buoyancy-Driven Gas Flow: Visualization of Coherent and Incoherent Gas Flow Patterns and Capillary Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Samani, S.; Pohlert, M.; Jia, R.; Lazik, D.

    2009-12-01

    There are several mechanisms by which the CO2 can be stored: (1) In hydrodynamic trapping, the buoyant CO2 remains as a mobile fluid but is prevented from flowing back to the surface by an impermeable cap rock. (2) In solution trapping, CO2 dissolves into the brine, possibly enhanced by gravity instabilities due to the larger density of the brine-CO2 liquid mixture. (3) In mineral trapping, geochemical binding to the rock due to mineral precipitation. (4) In capillary trapping, the CO2 phase is disconnected into a coherent, mobile phase and an incoherent, immobile (trapped) phase. Recent analytical and numerical investigations [Juanes et al., 2006, 2009; Hesse et al., 2007 ] of buoyant-driven CO2-plume along a sloped aquifer are based on the following conceptual process model: (1) During the injection period, the less wetting CO2 displaces the more wetting brine in a drainage-like process. It is assumed that no capillary trapping occurs and that the CO2-network is coherent and driven both by the injection pressure and the buoyant pressure. Because of this coherence assumption a generalized Darcy-law can be used for the dynamics of the mobile, gaseous CO2-phase. (2) After injection the buoyant CO2 migrates laterally and upward, and water displaces CO2 at the trailing edge of the plume in an imbibition-like process. During this process, there are several physical mechanisms by which the water can displace the CO2 [Lenormand et al., 1983]. In addition to piston-type displacement, core-annular flow (also called: cooperative pore-body filling) may occur, i.e. the wetting phase moves along the walls and under certain conditions the CO2-core flow becomes unstable (snap-off). For water wet rocks, snap-off is the dominant mechanism [Al-Futaisi and Patzek, 2003; Valvatne and Blunt, 2004]. There seems to be consensus that the capillary trapping mechanism has a huge impact on the migration and distribution of CO2 which, in turn, affects the effectiveness of the other

  17. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  18. A summary of measured hydraulic data for the series of steady and unsteady flow experiments over patterned roughness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Dannie L.; Flynn, Kathleen M.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes and makes available to other investigators the measured hydraulic data collected during a series of experiments designed to study the effect of patterned bed roughness on steady and unsteady open-channel flow. The patterned effect of the roughness was obtained by clear-cut mowing of designated areas of an otherwise fairly dense coverage of coastal Bermuda grass approximately 250 mm high. All experiments were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility during the period of October 7 through December 12, 1974. Data from 18 steady flow experiments and 10 unsteady flow experiments are summarized. Measured data included are ground-surface elevations, grass heights and densities, water-surface elevations and point velocities for all experiments. Additional tables of water-surface elevations and measured point velocities are included for the clear-cut areas for most experiments. One complete set of average water-surface elevations and one complete set of measured point velocities are tabulated for each steady flow experiment. Time series data, on a 2-minute time interval, are tabulated for both water-surface elevations and point velocities for each unsteady flow experiment. All data collected, including individual records of water-surface elevations for the steady flow experiments, have been stored on computer disk storage and can be retrieved using the computer programs listed in the attachment to this report. (Kosco-USGS)

  19. Effects of lung disease on the three-dimensional structure and air flow pattern in the human airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Moortele, Tristan; Nemes, Andras; Wendt, Christine; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    The morphological features of the airway tree directly affect the air flow features during breathing, which determines the gas exchange and inhaled particle transport. Lung disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in this study, affects the structural features of the lungs, which in turn negatively affects the air flow through the airways. Here bronchial tree air volume geometries are segmented from Computed Tomography (CT) scans of healthy and diseased subjects. Geometrical analysis of the airway centerlines and corresponding cross-sectional areas provide insight into the specific effects of COPD on the airway structure. These geometries are also used to 3D print anatomically accurate, patient specific flow models. Three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields within these models are acquired using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The three-dimensional flow fields provide insight into the change in flow patterns and features. Additionally, particle trajectories are determined using the velocity fields, to identify the fate of therapeutic and harmful inhaled aerosols. Correlation between disease-specific and patient-specific anatomical features with dysfunctional airflow patterns can be achieved by combining geometrical and flow analysis.

  20. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix.

  1. The effect of flow pattern around a bubble rising near a vertical wall, on the wall to liquid heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvankar, Pramod; Dabiri, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase flow is an effective means for heat removal due to the enhanced convective effect caused by bubbly flow and the usually high latent heat of vaporization of the liquid phase. We present a numerical study of the effect of flow patterns around a single bubble rising in shear flow near a vertical wall, on the wall-to-liquid heat transfer. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a frame of reference moving with the bubble, by using the front tracking method for interface tracking. Our simulations reveal an enhancement of heat transfer downstream of the bubble, and a less pronounced diminishment of heat transfer upstream of the bubble. We observe that in the range of 5 <= Re <= 40 for Reynolds number based on shear and bubble diameter, heat transfer first increases, attains a maximum and decreases as Re increases. The optimum Re depends on the Archimedes number. The heat transfer enhancement is attributed to flow reversal happening in a confined region of the shear flow, in the presence of a bubble. The analytical solution of 2 - D inviscid shear flow over a cylinder near a wall is used to identify two parameters of flow reversal namely 'reversal height' and 'reversal width'. These parameters are then used to qualitatively explain what we observe in 3 - D simulations.

  2. Use of flow-duration curves to evaluate effects of urbanization on streamflow patterns on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prince, Keith R.

    1981-01-01

    Streamflow patterns on Long Island, N.Y., have been changing over the last three decades in response to eastward population growth and urbanization. Flow-duration curves for nine streams in Nassau and Suffolk Counties indicate that, during this time, streams in urbanized areas have had increased peak flows and decreased base flows, whereas streams in sparsely populated areas have shown little or no change. The increase in peak flows reflects the greater volume of storm runoff from impermeable surfaces such as roads, parking lots, and roofs. The decrease in base flows results from the lowering of groundwater levels, principally by sanitary sewerage and extensive pumping for public water supply. At East Meadow Brook, in a sewered, densely populated area of Nassau County, peak flows (1-percent duration) increased by 41% during 1946-74, and base flows (98-percent duration) decreased by 99%. In contrast, peak and base flows of Carmans River, in a largely undisturbed, rural area of Suffolk County, showed fluctuations no greater than 19% during the same period. (USGS)

  3. The global metabolic transition: Regional patterns and trends of global material flows, 1950-2010.

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, Anke; Mayer, Andreas; Gingrich, Simone; Eisenmenger, Nina; Loy, Christian; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-05-01

    Since the World War II, many economies have transitioned from an agrarian, biomass-based to an industrial, minerals-based metabolic regime. Since 1950, world population grew by factor 2.7 and global material consumption by factor 3.7-71 Gigatonnes per year in 2010. The expansion of the resource base required by human societies is associated with growing pressure on the environment and infringement on the habitats of other species. In order to achieve a sustainability transition, we require a better understanding of the currently ongoing metabolic transition and its potential inertia. In this article, we present a long-term global material flow dataset covering material extraction, trade, and consumption of 177 individual countries between 1950 and 2010. We trace patterns and trends in material flows for six major geographic and economic country groupings and world regions (Western Industrial, the (Former) Soviet Union and its allies, Asia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa) as well as their contribution to the emergence of a global metabolic profile during a period of rapid industrialization and globalization. Global average material use increased from 5.0 to 10.3 tons per capita and year (t/cap/a) between 1950 and 2010. Regional metabolic rates range from 4.5 t/cap/a in Sub-Saharan Africa to 14.8 t/cap/a in the Western Industrial grouping. While we can observe a stabilization of the industrial metabolic profile composed of relatively equal shares of biomass, fossil energy carriers, and construction minerals, we note differences in the degree to which other regions are gravitating toward a similar form of material use. Since 2000, Asia has overtaken the Western Industrial grouping in terms of its share in global resource use although not in terms of its per capita material consumption. We find that at a sub-global level, the roles of the world regions have changed. There are, however, no signs yet that

  4. The global metabolic transition: Regional patterns and trends of global material flows, 1950–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schaffartzik, Anke; Mayer, Andreas; Gingrich, Simone; Eisenmenger, Nina; Loy, Christian; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-01-01

    Since the World War II, many economies have transitioned from an agrarian, biomass-based to an industrial, minerals-based metabolic regime. Since 1950, world population grew by factor 2.7 and global material consumption by factor 3.7–71 Gigatonnes per year in 2010. The expansion of the resource base required by human societies is associated with growing pressure on the environment and infringement on the habitats of other species. In order to achieve a sustainability transition, we require a better understanding of the currently ongoing metabolic transition and its potential inertia. In this article, we present a long-term global material flow dataset covering material extraction, trade, and consumption of 177 individual countries between 1950 and 2010. We trace patterns and trends in material flows for six major geographic and economic country groupings and world regions (Western Industrial, the (Former) Soviet Union and its allies, Asia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa) as well as their contribution to the emergence of a global metabolic profile during a period of rapid industrialization and globalization. Global average material use increased from 5.0 to 10.3 tons per capita and year (t/cap/a) between 1950 and 2010. Regional metabolic rates range from 4.5 t/cap/a in Sub-Saharan Africa to 14.8 t/cap/a in the Western Industrial grouping. While we can observe a stabilization of the industrial metabolic profile composed of relatively equal shares of biomass, fossil energy carriers, and construction minerals, we note differences in the degree to which other regions are gravitating toward a similar form of material use. Since 2000, Asia has overtaken the Western Industrial grouping in terms of its share in global resource use although not in terms of its per capita material consumption. We find that at a sub-global level, the roles of the world regions have changed. There are, however, no signs yet

  5. Physics and (patho)physiology in confined flows: from colloidal patterns to cytoplasmic rheology and sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss a few problems that involve the interaction of fluids and solids in confined spaces. (i) Jamming in pressure-driven suspension flows that show a transition from Stokes flows to Darcy flows as the solids start to lock, as in evaporative patterning in colloids (e.g. coffee stain formation) .(ii) Jamming and clogging of red blood cells, as in sickle-cell pathophysiology, with implications for other diseases that involve jamming. (iii) The mechanical response of crowded networks of filaments bathed in a fluid, as in the cytoskeleton, that can be described by poroelasticity theory. In each case, I will show how simple theories of multiphase flow and deformation can be used to explain a range of experimental observations, while failing to account for others, along with some thoughts on how to improve them.

  6. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  7. Relation of electrochemical potentials and iron content to ground-water flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, William; Barnes, Ivan

    1965-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop means of measuring oxidation potentials in aquifer systems and to use the measured values in interpreting the behavior of iron in ground water. Anne Arundel County, Md., was selected as the area of study because of the wide range of concentration of iron-nearly zero to about 35 ppm-in the ground water and the rather complete information on the geology and hydrology. The regional geology consists of coastal plain sediments ranging in age from Early Cretaceous through the Recent. Most of the pH and oxidation-potential measurements were made in nonmarine Cretaceous deposits, only a few in the marine Eocene. Iron-bearing minerals in the area are primarily hematite or limonite and glauconite with a small amount of pyrite. Equipment was developed that permits the measurement of oxidation potentials by use of saturated calomel and platinum electrodes in ground-water samples uncontaminated by oxygen of the atmosphere. Measured Eh values range from about +700 mv to -40 mv. Approximately 2 to 3 hours are required to measure a stable or nearly stable oxidation potential. The mineralogy and organic content of the deposits and the ground-water flow pattern are the primary controls on the oxidation potential and pH of the water. A correlation exists between the oxidation potential and the concentration of iron in ground water; the higher concentrations occur in waters with the lowest values of Eh. The concentration of iron in the water tested shows little correlation with the pH of the water. The highest oxidation potentials were measured in water produced from shallow wells and those wells in recharge areas. The lowest potentials were measured farthest downgradient in water associated with gray and green sediments. The Eh values measured in the field are between values predicted from the solubility of Fe(OH)2(c) and values predicted from the solubility of hematite.

  8. Modulated patterns in a reduced model of a transitional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaume, C.; Knobloch, E.; Chini, G. P.; Julien, K.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a close relative of plane Couette flow called Waleffe flow in which the fluid is confined between two free-slip walls and the flow driven by a sinusoidal force. We use a reduced model of such flows constructed elsewhere to compute stationary exact coherent structures in this flow in periodic domains with a large spanwise period. The computations reveal the emergence of stationary states exhibiting strong amplitude and wavelength modulation in the spanwise direction. These modulated states lie on branches exhibiting complex dependence on the Reynolds number but no homoclinic snaking.

  9. False Lumen Flow Patterns and their Relation with Morphological and Biomechanical Characteristics of Chronic Aortic Dissections. Computational Model Compared with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Patrick; Pineda, Victor; Cuellar, Hug; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Aortic wall stiffness, tear size and location and the presence of abdominal side branches arising from the false lumen (FL) are key properties potentially involved in FL enlargement in chronic aortic dissections (ADs). We hypothesize that temporal variations on FL flow patterns, as measured in a cross-section by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), could be used to infer integrated information on these features. In 33 patients with chronic descending AD, instantaneous flow profiles were quantified in the FL at diaphragm level by PC-MRI. We used a lumped-parameter model to assess the changes in flow profiles induced by wall stiffness, tear size/location, and the presence of abdominal side branches arising from the FL. Four characteristic FL flow patterns were identified in 31/33 patients (94%) based on the direction of flow in systole and diastole: BA = systolic biphasic flow and primarily diastolic antegrade flow (n = 6); BR = systolic biphasic flow and primarily diastolic retrograde flow (n = 14); MA = systolic monophasic flow and primarily diastolic antegrade flow (n = 9); MR = systolic monophasic flow and primarily diastolic retrograde flow (n = 2). In the computational model, the temporal variation of flow directions within the FL was highly dependent on the position of assessment along the aorta. FL flow patterns (especially at the level of the diaphragm) showed their characteristic patterns due to variations in the cumulative size and the spatial distribution of the communicating tears, and the incidence of visceral side branches originating from the FL. Changes in wall stiffness did not change the temporal variation of the flows whereas it importantly determined intraluminal pressures. FL flow patterns implicitly codify morphological information on key determinants of aortic expansion in ADs. This data might be taken into consideration in the imaging protocol to define the predictive value of FL flows. PMID:28125720

  10. Flow patterns in a rotating horizontal cylinder partially filled with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Victor; Polezhaev, Denis

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of an annular layer of low-viscosity liquid inside a rapidly rotating horizontal cylinder is experimentally studied. Under gravity, the liquid performs forced azimuthal oscillations in the cavity frame. We examined the stability of the two-dimensional azimuthal flow and discovered two novel types of axisymmetric liquid flows. First, a large-scale axially symmetric flow is excited near the end walls. The inertial modes generated in the corner regions are proven to be responsible for such a flow. Second, a small-scale flow in the form of the Taylor-Gortler vortices appears due to the centrifugal instability of the oscillatory liquid flow. The spatial period of the vortices is in qualitative agreement with the data obtained in the experimental and numerical studies of cellular flow in librating containers.

  11. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  12. Heat flow patterns of the North American continent: A discussion of the DNAG Geothermal Map of North America

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Steele, John L.; Carter, Larry C.

    1990-01-01

    The large and small-scale geothermal features of the North American continent and surrounding ocean areas illustrated on the new 1:5,000,000 DNAG Geothermal Map of North America are summarized. Sources for the data included on the map are given. The types of data included are heat flow sites coded by value, contours of heat flow with a color fill, areas of major groundwater effects on regional heat flow, the top-of-geopressure in the Gulf Coast region, temperature on the Dakota aquifer in the midcontinent, location of major hot springs and geothermal systems, and major center of Quaternary and Holocene volcanism. The large scale heat flow pattern that is well known for the conterminous United States and Canada of normal heat flow east of the Cordillera and generally high heat flow west of the front of the Cordillera dominates the continental portion of the map. However, details of the heat flow variations are also seen and are discussed briefly in this and the accompanying papers.

  13. Study of secondary-flow patterns in an annular cascade of turbine nozzle blades with vortex design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlik, Harold E; Allen, Hubert W; Herzig, Howard Z

    1953-01-01

    In order to increase understanding of the origin of losses in a turbine, the secondary-flow components in the boundary layers and the blade wakes of an annular cascade of turbine nozzle blades (vortex design) was investigated. A detailed study was made of the total-pressure contours and, particularly, of the inner-wall loss cores downstream of the blades. The inner-wall loss core associated with a blade of the turbine-nozzle cascade is largely the accumulation of low-momentum fluids originating elsewhere in the cascade. This accumulation is effected by a secondary-flow mechanism which acts to transport the low-momentum fluids across the channels on the walls and radially in the blade wakes and boundary layers. The patterns of secondary flow were determined by use of hydrogen sulfide traces, paint, flow fences, and total pressure surveys. At one flow condition investigated, the radial transport of low-momentum fluid in the blade wake and on the suction surface near the trailing edge accounted for 65 percent of the loss core; 30 percent resulted from flow in the thickened boundary layer on the suction surface and 35 percent from flow in the blade wake.

  14. Three-phase theory of city traffic: Moving synchronized flow patterns in under-saturated city traffic at signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2014-03-01

    Three-phase traffic flow theory of city traffic has been developed. Based on simulations of a stochastic microscopic traffic flow model, features of moving synchronized flow patterns (MSP) have been studied, which are responsible for a random time-delayed breakdown of a green-wave (GW) organized in a city. A possibility of GW control leading to the prevention of GW breakdown has been demonstrated. A diagram of traffic breakdown in under-saturated traffic (transition from under- to over-saturated city traffic) at the signal has been found; the diagram presents regions of the average arrival flow rate, within which traffic breakdown can occur, in dependence of parameters of the time-function of the arrival flow rate or/and signal parameters. Physical reasons for a crucial difference between results of classical theory of city traffic and three-phase theory are explained. In particular, we have found that under-saturated traffic at the signal can exist during a long time interval, when the average arrival flow rate is larger than the capacity of the classical theory; the classical capacity is equal to a minimum capacity in three-phase theory. Within a range of the average arrival flow rate between the minimum and maximum signal capacities, under-saturated traffic is in a metastable state with respect to traffic breakdown. We have distinguished the following possible causes for the metastability of under-saturated traffic: (i) The arrival flow rate during the green phase is larger than the saturation flow rate. (ii) The length of the upstream front of a queue at the signal is a finite value. (iii) The outflow rate from a MSP (the rate of MSP discharge) is larger than the saturation flow rate.

  15. Pattern-forming instabilities in nematic liquid crystals under oscillatory Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, O S; Krekhov, A P; Kramer, L

    2005-09-01

    We consider instabilities, either homogeneous or periodic in space, which develop in a nematic liquid crystal layer under rectilinear oscillatory Couette flow for planar surface alignment of the director perpendicular to the flow plane. On the basis of a numerical and analytical linear stability analysis we determine the critical amplitude of the oscillatory flow, the wave number, and the symmetry of the destabilizing mode and present a comprehensive phase diagram of the flow instabilities. In particular it is found that by varying the frequency of the Couette flow the instability changes its temporal symmetry. This transition is shown to be related to the inertia effects of the nematic fluid, which become more important with increasing flow frequency. We also show that an electric field applied perpendicularly to the nematic layer can induce an exchange of instabilities with different spatial and temporal symmetries. The theoretical results are compared with experiments, when available.

  16. Visualization of flow pattern and thermal image analysis of enhanced heat transfer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. D.; Oyakawa, K.; Kubo, I.

    2009-02-01

    Experimental studies on flow visualization and heat transfer measurements of finned surface in a narrow duct were carried out to understand the flow behavior and its effect on heat transfer. In this experiment, short rectangular fins were attached to a surface (endwall) with having inclination angle of 20° and exposed to air flow. Several flow visualization results reveal that horse shoe vortex was formed just at the front of the fin whereas the main longitudinal vortex was formed by the side top edge of the fin. Some important features of the vortex structure, size and flow reattachment positions were noticed from the smoke flow visualization. Detailed heat transfer distributions were discussed from the thermal image. Nusselt number shows that the finned surface achieved average heat transfer enhancement at a factor of four times than that of without fins.

  17. Change in pulmonary mechanics and the effect on breathing pattern of high flow oxygen therapy in stable hypercapnic COPD.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Lara; Fasano, Luca; Corcione, Nadia; Comellini, Vittoria; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Brandao, Maria; Bottone, Damiano; Calderini, Edoardo; Navalesi, Paolo; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    : We studied the effects of high flow oxygen therapy (HFOT) versus non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on inspiratory effort, as assessed by measuring transdiaphragmatic pressure, breathing pattern and gas exchange. Fourteen patients with hypercapnic COPD underwent five 30-min trials: HFOT at two flow rates, both with open and closed mouth, and NIV, applied in random order. After each trial standard oxygen therapy was reinstituted for 10 min. Compared with baseline, HFOT and NIV significantly improved breathing pattern, although to different extents, and reduced inspiratory effort; however, arterial carbon dioxide oxygen tension decreased but not significantly. These results indicate a possible role for HFOT in the long-term management of patients with stable hypercapnic COPD.

  18. Flow-through synthesis on Teflon-patterned paper to produce peptide arrays for cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Deiss, Frédérique; Matochko, Wadim L; Govindasamy, Natasha; Lin, Edith Y; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-16

    A simple method is described for the patterned deposition of Teflon on paper to create an integrated platform for parallel organic synthesis and cell-based assays. Solvent-repelling barriers made of Teflon-impregnated paper confine organic solvents to specific zones of the patterned array and allow for 96 parallel flow-through syntheses on paper. The confinement and flow-through mixing significantly improves the peptide yield and simplifies the automation of this synthesis. The synthesis of 100 peptides ranging from 7 to 14 amino acids in length gave over 60% purity for the majority of the peptides (>95% yield per coupling/deprotection cycle). The resulting peptide arrays were used in cell-based screening to identify 14 potent bioactive peptides that support the adhesion or proliferation of breast cancer cells in a 3D environment. In the future, this technology could be used for the screening of more complex phenotypic responses, such as cell migration or differentiation.

  19. Geophysical controls of aquifer-river exchange flow patterns in a UK lowland meandering river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, Rebwar; Krause, Stefan; Rivett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of fine particles (clay and silt) and organic matters in alluvial sediments can substantially reduce the permeability of streambed sediments and extend towards the wider floodplain. The resulting hydraulic conductivity patterns within the streambed and floodplain have been shown to control both location as well as intensity of hyporheic exchange in many lowland rivers. The aim of the study is to investigate the variability in streambed permeability fields in an unprecedented spatial resolution and quantify the impacts on controlling hyporheic exchange fluxes in the River Tern, a UK lowland meandering stream. Geophysical surveys were conducted deploying Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in conjunction with geological information derived from core logs and bank exposures for mapping shallow subsurface structural heterogeneity. The GPR survey deployed a pulse EKKO pro equipped with a shielded 250 MHz antenna. For the floodplain survey, GPR profiles of 12 NE-SW and 6 NW- SE orientation profiles were taken creating a raster of approximately 10 m. The riparian terrestrial GPR surveys were accompanied by a longitudinal in channel GPR survey for which the antenna was deployed on a floating device. At locations identified to be representative for the range of streambed hydrofacies identified by GPR in investigated stream reach, multi-level mini-piezometer networks were installed in the streambed for monitoring groundwater-surface water exchange fluxes, and conducting dilution tracer tests for quantification of residence time distributions at the aquifer-river interface. Quasi-three-dimensional GPR profiles from closely spaced grids of 2D GPR data of floodplain deposits indicated a range of different radar facies and helped to delineate the type and extend of high and low conductive materials. The results of longitudinal GPR survey along a 240 m section of the river channel revealed that areas rich in low conductivity layers such as organic peat and clay lenses

  20. Constraints on the Pattern of Hydraulic Properties, Groundwater Flow, and Transport at Upland-Estuary Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, G.; Ruppel, C.

    2001-05-01

    The patterns of groundwater flux from uplands to adjacent water bodies in the coastal zone depend on both the spatial and temporal characteristics of coastal aquifer systems. In this study, we integrate hydrologic measurements and non-invasive environmental geophysics in an effort to constrain the groundwater flux from terrestrial uplands into adjacent tidal creeks and salt marshes near an island-estuary margin in the South Atlantic Bight. Aquifer testing and parameter estimation conducted at both the laboratory (grain size analyses and falling-head permeameter tests) and field (pumping tests and analyses of natural tidal pumping) scales provide independent constraints on hydraulic properties of the unconfined surficial aquifer systems at two focus sites. The analyses reveal a decrease in hydraulic conductivity of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude ( ~10-8 to ~10-4 m s-1) across the upland-estuary margin. The extent and variability of reduced permeability at the aquifer boundary may lead to localized areas of focused groundwater flux into the adjacent estuary and a variable distribution of subsurface salinity. Geophysical surveys (e.g., two-dimensional DC resistivity, terrain conductivity), borehole conductivity measurements, and geochemical analyses of groundwater samples confirm the existence of variable subsurface salinity regimes between the two different sites in the same tidal watershed. Based on the observed distribution of hydraulic properties and subsurface salinity near the island-estuary interface, we suggest that the combined effects of a low permeability clogging layer and tidal fluctuations may lead to a more diffuse region of freshwater discharge into the adjacent tidal creek-salt marsh complex. Using water level fluctuations monitored over a 32-day period, we calculate the frequency-dependent admittance between well levels and observed forcing functions. The results show that the aquifer acts as a low-pass filter for tidally forced perturbations and

  1. An Analysis of Conceptual Flow Patterns and Structures in the Physics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to characterize the conceptual flow processes occurring in whole-class dialogic discussions with a high level of interanimation; in the present case, of a high-school class learning about image creation on plane mirrors. Using detailed chains of interaction and conceptual flow discourse maps--both developed for…

  2. Hyporheic flow patterns in relation to large river floodplain attributes Journal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-calibrated models of hyporheic flow have emphasized low-order headwater systems. In many cases, however, hyporheic flow in large lowland river floodplains may be an important contributor to ecosystem services such as maintenance of water quality and habitat. In this study, ...

  3. Linking rainfall-induced landslides with debris flows runout patterns towards catchment scale hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; McArdell, Brian; Or, Dani

    2017-03-01

    Debris flows and landslides induced by heavy rainfall represent an ubiquitous and destructive natural hazard in steep mountainous regions. For debris flows initiated by shallow landslides, the prediction of the resulting pathways and associated hazard is often hindered by uncertainty in determining initiation locations, volumes and mechanical state of the mobilized debris (and by model parameterization). We propose a framework for linking a simplified physically-based debris flow runout model with a novel Landslide Hydro-mechanical Triggering (LHT) model to obtain a coupled landslide-debris flow susceptibility and hazard assessment. We first compared the simplified debris flow model of Perla (1980) with a state-of-the art continuum-based model (RAMMS) and with an empirical model of Rickenmann (1999) at the catchment scale. The results indicate that predicted runout distances by the Perla model are in reasonable agreement with inventory measurements and with the other models. Predictions of localized shallow landslides by LHT model provides information on water content of released mass. To incorporate effects of water content and flow viscosity as provided by LHT on debris flow runout, we adapted the Perla model. The proposed integral link between landslide triggering susceptibility quantified by LHT and subsequent debris flow runout hazard calculation using the adapted Perla model provides a spatially and temporally resolved framework for real-time hazard assessment at the catchment scale or along critical infrastructure (roads, railroad lines).

  4. A Study of the Flow Patterns of Expanding Impurity Aerosol Following a Disruption Event in a Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Rudrodip

    The current study focuses on the adiabatic expansion of aerosol impurity in the post-disruption and thermal quench scenario inside the vacuum chamber of a fusion reactor. A pulsed electrothermal plasma (ET) capillary source has been used as a source term simulating the surface ablation of the divertor or other interior critical components of a tokamak fusion reactor under hard disruption-like conditions. The capillary source generates particulates from wall evaporation by depositing transient radiant high heat flux onto the inner liner of the capillary. The particulates form a plasma jet moving towards the capillary exit at high speed and high pressure. The first chapter discusses briefly the relevance of the study pertaining to the impurities in a fusion reactor based on the work available in the form of published literature. The second chapter discusses briefly the operating principle of a pulsed electrothermal plasma source (PEPS), the virtual integration of PEPS with 1-D electrothermal plasma flow solver ETFLOW and the use of capillary plasma sources in various industrial applications. The third chapter discusses about primitive computational work, backed by the data from actual electrothermal source experiments from the in-house facility "PIPE" (Plasma Interactions with Propellants Experiment), that shows the supersonic bulk flow patterns for the temperature, density, pressure, bulk velocity and the flow Mach number of the impurity particulates as they get ejected as a high-pressure, high-temperature and hyper-velocity jet from the simulated source term. It also shows the uniform steady-state subsonic expansion of bulk aerosol inside the expansion chamber. The fourth chapter discusses scaling laws in 1-D for the aforesaid bulk plasma parameters for ranges of axial length traversed by the flow, so that one can retrieve the flow parameters at some preferred locations. The fifth chapter discusses the effect of temperature and the non--linearity of the adiabatic

  5. Characterization of blood flow rate in dental pulp by speckle patterns of backscattered light from an in vivo tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Sergey K.; Chistyakova, Galina G.; Terekh, Alex S.; Smirnov, Alex V.; Salimi Zadeh, Mehrnush M.; Barun, Vladimir V.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental data on the hemodynamics of dental pulp at different stages of caries treatment are given. Observations of speckle patterns in backscattered laser light are used as a measurement method to qualitatively characterize changes in blood flow rate through the dental pulp. The measurements were made by the author-designed experimental setup. Theoretical estimations showed that stationary reflected light from an in vivo tooth contains a negligibly small information body on changes in the pulpal blood flow due to the shadowing of the pulp by optically thick enamel and dentin. Therefore, the temporal variations in the speckle patterns are the only possible way that can provide monitoring of blood conditions in the pulp by using backscattered light. Various statistical characteristics of the random reflected light fields are studied as indicators of blood flow rate changes. There were selected five statistical parameters of backscattered speckle images that give self-consistent data on these changes. The parameters include four combinations of integrals of the Fourier transforms of the observed temporal variations as well as the speckle image contrast. The selected parameters are shown to qualitatively agree with general considerations on the effects of reduced or increased blood flow rates on the selected integral quantities.

  6. Patterns of hybridization and asymmetrical gene flow in hybrid zones of the rare Eucalyptus aggregata and common E. rubida

    PubMed Central

    Field, D L; Ayre, D J; Whelan, R J; Young, A G

    2011-01-01

    The patterns of hybridization and asymmetrical gene flow among species are important for understanding the processes that maintain distinct species. We examined the potential for asymmetrical gene flow in sympatric populations of Eucalyptus aggregata and Eucalyptus rubida, both long-lived trees of southern Australia. A total of 421 adults from three hybrid zones were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. We used genealogical assignments, admixture analysis and analyses of spatial genetic structure and spatial distribution of individuals, to assess patterns of interspecific gene flow within populations. A high number of admixed individuals were detected (13.9–40% of individuals), with hybrid populations consisting of F1 and F2 hybrids and backcrosses in both parental directions. Across the three sites, admixture proportions were skewed towards the E. aggregata genetic cluster (x=0.56–0.65), indicating that backcrossing towards E. aggregata is more frequent. Estimates of long-term migration rates also indicate asymmetric gene flow, with higher migration rates from E. aggregata to hybrids compared with E. rubida. Taken together, these results indicate a greater genetic input from E. aggregata into the hybrid populations. This asymmetry probably reflects differences in style lengths (E. rubida: ∼7 mm, E. aggregata: ∼4 mm), which can prevent pollen tubes of smaller-flowered species from fertilizing larger-flowered species. However, analyses of fine-scale genetic structure suggest that localized seed dispersal (<40 m) and greater clustering between hybrid and E. aggregata individuals may also contribute to directional gene flow. Our study highlights that floral traits and the spatial distributions of individuals can be useful predictors of the directionality of interspecific gene flow in plant populations. PMID:21063438

  7. Hyporheic flow and dissolved oxygen distribution in fish nests: The effects of open channel velocity, permeability patterns, and groundwater upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Ford, Aimee E.; Kaufman, Matthew H.; Kessler, Adam J.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Many fish lay their eggs in nests, or redds, which they construct in sediment. The viability of eggs depends on many factors, particularly their oxygenation. Because dissolved oxygen is typically saturated within the stream channel, the dissolved oxygen distribution within the redd depends on whether or not hyporheic flow and transport occur within the sediment. We conducted a series of flume and numerical flow and age transport modeling experiments with the aim of understanding the effects of salmonid redds on the hyporheic transport of young oxygenated water. Hyporheic flow was visualized directly through dye injections. Dissolved oxygen throughout the fish nest was measured using a planar optode. Experiments were conducted at various open channel flow velocities in order to understand their effect on dissolved oxygen, and computational simulations considered various sediment textures and ambient groundwater upwelling rates to add process-level insight. We found that, as also shown by previous studies, the redd topography induces multiscale hyporheic flow that effectively flushes the egg pocket location with younger presumably oxygenated water; older water upwells and forms anoxic zones. This pattern persists even at the lowest channel flow rates and at small upwelling velocities of older ambient groundwater which splits the multiscale hyporheic flow cells into isolated pockets. Large groundwater upwelling rates can shut down all the hyporheic flushing. The relatively coarse texture of the redd further promotes hyporheic flushing of the redd sediment with oxygenated water. Thus, redd morphology and sediment texture optimally combine to induce hyporheic exchange flow that delivers young oxygenated water to the egg pocket.

  8. Fluid Flow Patterns During Production from Gas Hydrates in the Laboratory compared to Field Settings: LARS vs. Mallik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, B.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.; Abendroth, S.; Spangenberg, E.; Thaler, J.; Schicks, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GFZ's LArge Reservoir Simulator LARS allows for the simulation of the 2008 Mallik gas hydrate production test and the comparison of fluid flow patterns and their driving forces. Do we see the gas flow pattern described for Mallik [Uddin, M. et al., J. Can. Petrol Tech, 50, 70-89, 2011] in a pilot scale test? If so, what are the driving forces? LARS has a network of temperature sensors and an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) enabling a good spatial resolution of gas hydrate occurrences, water and gas distribution, and changes in temperature in the sample. A gas flow meter and a water trap record fluid flow patterns and a backpressure valve has controlled the depressurization equivalent to the three pressure stages (7.0 - 5.0 - 4.2 MPa) applied in the Mallik field test. The environmental temperature (284 K) and confining pressure (13 MPa) have been constant. The depressurization induced immediate endothermic gas hydrate dissociation until re-establishment of the stability conditions by a consequent temperature decrease. Slight gas hydrate dissociation continued at the top and upper lateral border due to the constant heat input from the environment. Here transport pathways were short and permeability higher due to lower gas hydrate saturation. At pressures of 7.0 and 5.0 MPa the LARS tests showed high water flow rates and short irregular spikes of gas production. The gas flow patterns at 4.2 MPa and 3.0MPa resembled those of the Mallik test. In LARS the initial gas surges overlap with times of hydrate instability while water content and lengths of pathways had increased. Water production was at a minimum. A rapidly formed continuous gas phase caused the initial gas surges and only after gas hydrate dissociation decreased to a minimum the single gas bubbles get trapped before slowly coalescing again. In LARS, where pathways were short and no additional water was added, a transport of microbubbles is unlikely to cause a gas surge as suggested for Mallik.

  9. Abnormal resting regional cerebral blood flow patterns and their correlates in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.; Tant, S.R.; Robinson, L.; Prakash, R.

    1988-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured under resting conditions in 108 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients and a matched group of normal controls with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Forty-six patients were free of all medication for two weeks. There were no significant differences in CBF to the two hemispheres. The patients showed a comparatively reduced anteroposterior (AP) gradient for CBF. Though there were no differences in frontal flow, the patients had higher flow to several postcentral brain regions, bilaterally. Cerebral blood flow in the patients correlated inversely with age and positively with carbon dioxide level. Women had higher flow than men. Duration of the illness was the only significant predictor of the reduced AP gradient in patients. Higher left temporal and right parietal flow were found to be the best discriminators between patients and controls. Mean hemispheric flow to both hemispheres and several brain regions correlated with the total score and the item, unusual thought content, of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. There were no differences in regional CBF between medicated and unmedicated patients.

  10. Potential reversal and the effects of flow pattern on galvanic corrosion of lead.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Roger B; Edwards, Marc

    2012-10-16

    Simplistic conventional models predict that a greater mass of lead will be released from lead pipes exposed to higher velocity and flow durations. However, if galvanic Pb-Cu connections are present, or if a highly protective Pb(IV) scale can be formed, reduced flow can markedly increase the mass of lead release to water and resultant consumer exposure. Three chemical mechanisms were identified that can reduce lead release at higher flow including (1) formation of Pb(IV), (2) potential reversal of Pb:Cu couples, after which galvanic corrosion sacrifices copper and lead is protected, and (3) reduced formation of corrosive microenvironments at lead surfaces in galvanic couples. Potential reversal occurred only in the presence of free chlorine with continuous flow, and it did not occur with chloramine, with intermittent flow, or if orthophosphate was present. For both disinfectants, electrochemical measurements supported a mass balance of lead release demonstrating that a greater total mass of lead release occurred with intermittent flow than with continuous flow.

  11. Flow patterns of precipitation and soil water beneath forest canopies: An experimental approach to assessing water flow heterogeneity with high resolution measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Filipzik, Janett; Grauer, Christoph; Schelhorn, Danny; Weckmüller, Josef; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2015-04-01

    Due to the mechanisms of interception, stemflow and canopy throughfall, precipitation reaches a forest soil surface in an altered temporal and spatial distribution. It is characterized by a strong heterogeneity. The retention of water by canopies is contrasted by the formation of dynamic hotspots, which channel rain water down to the soil: canopy dripping points and stemflow. This poster introduces a new experimental site established within the collaborative research center of AquaDiva, where we aim to investigate the flow paths of water from the top of the canopy through the soil below the main rooting zone in an intensive field study. The study site, sized one hectare, is located in Thuringia in an unmanaged Central European beech forest on limestone, and complemented by measurements in an adjacent grassland site. A soil moisture sensor network (SoilNet) has been established for monitoring soil water content at high temporal (3 min interval) and spatial (420 sensors per ha) resolution. During field campaigns in spring and early summer, the spatial distribution of net precipitation is measured. Vegetation properties and soil physical and scientific characteristics have been surveyed. Using this setup, we plan to determine, whether and during which conditions spatial patterns of net precipitation persist in soil moisture and fluxes. Using the high-resolution soil water content data we aim to discover flow dynamics and thus identify preferential flow paths in the soil. Geostatistical analysis will yield information about spatial distribution and the relationship of above- and subsurface flow patterns and impact factors. In this poster we will present first results of net precipitation composition and statistical characteristics of throughfall and soil moisture data.

  12. Correlation of esophageal pressure-flow analysis findings with bolus transit patterns on videofluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Omari, T I; Szczesniak, M M; Maclean, J; Myers, J C; Rommel, N; Cock, C; Cook, I J

    2016-01-01

    Pressure-flow analysis quantifies the interactions between bolus transport and pressure generation. We undertook a pilot study to assess the interrelationships between pressure-flow metrics and fluoroscopically determined bolus clearance and bolus transport across the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). We hypothesized that findings of abnormal pressure-flow metrics would correlate with impaired bolus clearance and reduced flow across the EGJ. Videofluoroscopic images, impedance, and pressure were recorded simultaneously in nine patients with dysphagia (62-82 years, seven male) tested with liquid barium boluses. A 3.6 mm diameter solid-state catheter with 25 × 1 cm pressure/12 × 2 cm impedance was utilized. Swallowed bolus clearance was assessed using a validated 7-point radiological bolus transport scale. The cumulative period of bolus flow across the EGJ was also fluoroscopically measured (EGJ flow time). Pressure only parameters included the length of breaks in the 20 mmHg iso-contour and the 4 second integrated EGJ relaxation pressure (IRP4s). Pressure-flow metrics were calculated for the distal esophagus, these were: time from nadir impedance to peak pressure (TNadImp to PeakP) to quantify bolus flow timing; pressure flow index (PFI) to integrate bolus pressurization and flow timing; and impedance ratio (IR) to assess bolus clearance. When compared with controls, patients had longer peristaltic breaks, higher IRs, and higher residual EGJ relaxation pressures (break length of 8 [2, 13] vs. 2 [0, 2] cm, P = 0.027; IR 0.5 ± 0.1 vs. 0.3 ± 0.0, P = 0.019; IRP4s 11 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 1 mmHg, P = 0.070). There was a significant positive correlation between higher bolus transport scores and longer peristaltic breaks (Spearman correlation r = 0.895, P < 0.001) and with higher IRs (r = 0.661, P < 0.05). Diminished EGJ flow times correlated with a shorter TNadImp to PeakP (r = -0.733, P < 0.05) and a higher IR (r = -0.750, P < 0.05). Longer peristaltic breaks and higher IR

  13. Vacuum-assisted Fluid Flow in Microchannels to Pattern Substrates and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Anil B.; Kung, Frank H.; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Substrate and cell patterning are widely used techniques in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This paper describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. Our method builds upon a previous vacuum-assisted method used for micromolding (Jeon, Choi et al. 1999) and successfully patterned collagen-I, fibronectin and Sal-1 substrates on glass and polystyrene surfaces, filling microchannels with lengths up to 120 mm and covering areas up to 13 × 10 mm2. Vacuum-patterned substrates were subsequently used to culture mammalian PC12 and fibroblast cells and amphibian neurons. Cells were also patterned directly by injecting cell suspensions into microchannels using vacuum. Fibroblast and neuronal cells patterned using vacuum showed normal growth and minimal cell death indicating no adverse effects of vacuum on cells. Our method fills reversibly sealed PDMS microchannels. This enables the user to remove the PDMS microchannel cast and access the patterned biomaterial or cells for further experimental purposes. Overall, this is a straightforward technique that has broad applicability for cell biology. PMID:24989641

  14. Vacuum-assisted fluid flow in microchannels to pattern substrates and cells.

    PubMed

    Shrirao, Anil B; Kung, Frank H; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2014-09-01

    Substrate and cell patterning are widely used techniques in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This paper describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. Our method builds upon a previous vacuum-assisted method used for micromolding (Jeon et al 1999 Adv. Mater 11 946) and successfully patterned collagen-I, fibronectin and Sal-1 substrates on glass and polystyrene surfaces, filling microchannels with lengths up to 120 mm and covering areas up to 13 × 10 mm(2). Vacuum-patterned substrates were subsequently used to culture mammalian PC12 and fibroblast cells and amphibian neurons. Cells were also patterned directly by injecting cell suspensions into microchannels using vacuum. Fibroblast and neuronal cells patterned using vacuum showed normal growth and minimal cell death indicating no adverse effects of vacuum on cells. Our method fills reversibly sealed PDMS microchannels. This enables the user to remove the PDMS microchannel cast and access the patterned biomaterial or cells for further experimental purposes. Overall, this is a straightforward technique that has broad applicability for cell biology.

  15. Self-aligned double patterning compliant routing with in-design physical verification flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jhih-Rong; Jawandha, Harshdeep; Atkar, Prasad; Walimbe, Atul; Baidya, Bikram; Rizzo, Olivier; Pan, David Z.

    2013-03-01

    Among double patterning techniques, Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) has the advantage of good mask overlay control, which has made SADP a popular double patterning method for sub-32nm technology nodes. However, SADP process places several limitations on design flexibility. This work exploits an alternative post routing approach that has the flexibility to resolve lithography violations without the overhead of repeated rule checking. In addition, it allows for successive refinement in the definition of lithographic violations as the process node matures, and implementation of fixes as localized ECO (Engineering Change Order) operations without needing to reroute the complete design.

  16. Shaken not stirred —On internal flow patterns in oscillating sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. M.; Legendre, D.; Mugele, F.

    2012-05-01

    We use numerical (volume of fluid) simulations to study the flow in an oscillating sessile drop immersed in an ambient immiscible fluid. The drop is excited by a sinusoidal variation of the contact angle at variable frequency. We identify the eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of the drops and analyze the internal flow fields by following the trajectories of tracer particles. The flow fields display an oscillatory component as well as a time-averaged mean component. The latter is oriented upward along the surface of the drop from the contact line towards the apex and downward along the symmetry axis. It vanishes at high and low frequencies and displays a broad maximum around f=200-300 Hz. We show that the frequency dependence of the mean flow can be described in terms of Stokes drift driven by capillary waves that originate from the contact line, in agreement with recent experiments (Mugele F. et al., Lab Chip, 11 (2011) 2011).

  17. Cerebral blood flow studied by Xenon-133 inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of /sup 133/Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid /sup 133/Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group.

  18. An Analysis of Groundwater Flow Patterns in a Constructed Treatment Wetland Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Difference Ground-Water Flow Model, more commonly referred to as MODFLOW . It was developed in the early 1980’s by the U.S. Geological Survey to... MODFLOW has been upgraded many times since then and in 1990s MODFLOW became the most widely used groundwater flow modeling suite. In MODFLOW 2000...hydraulic system to be simulated (Harbaugh, 2006). MODFLOW is a deterministic and numeric type of modeling suite using the finite differences method to

  19. Heat flow pattern at the Chicxulub impact crater, northern Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Cardeña, J. M.; Campos-Enríquez, J. O.; Unsworth, M.

    2016-02-01

    Along an east-west profile crossing the Chicxulub impact structure in northern Yucatán, México, Curie depths were obtained from statistical-spectral analysis of a grid of aeromagnetic data (256 km wide and 600 km long). These depths were corrected for flight height and depth to the sea floor to determine the geothermal gradient, assuming a temperature of 580 °C for the Curie temperature. Heat flow was then calculated from the geothermal gradients using a value of 2.67 W/m-K for the mean crustal thermal conductivity. The results show a conspicuous heat flow high above on the impact basin. In this location, the heat flow is 80 mW/m2 approximately. Available offshore estimates of the depth to the crustal magnetic source bases, on the northern Yucatán platform, and onshore heat flow determination on 8 shallow bore holes, and in a 1511 m deep one, support the existence of this major high heat flow anomaly associated with the impact crater. This high heat flow might be related to the impact through: (1) an uplift of the crystalline basement rocks in the center of the crater; and (2) impact induced radioactive element concentration into the crust below the impact structure. Higher thermal conductivities at the lower crust might also play a key role. Available seismological and thermal property data are compatible with these mechanisms.

  20. Measurement of Flow Pattern Within a Rotating Stall Cell in an Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Braunscheidel, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    Effective active control of rotating stall in axial compressors requires detailed understanding of flow instabilities associated with this compressor regime. Newly designed miniature high frequency response total and static pressure probes as well as commercial thermoanemometric probes are suitable tools for this task. However, during the rotating stall cycle the probes are subjected to flow direction changes that are far larger than the range of probe incidence acceptance, and therefore probe data without a proper correction would misrepresent unsteady variations of flow parameters. A methodology, based on ensemble averaging, is proposed to circumvent this problem. In this approach the ensemble averaged signals acquired for various probe setting angles are segmented, and only the sections for probe setting angles close to the actual flow angle are used for signal recombination. The methodology was verified by excellent agreement between velocity distributions obtained from pressure probe data, and data measured with thermoanemometric probes. Vector plots of unsteady flow behavior during the rotating stall regime indicate reversed flow within the rotating stall cell that spreads over to adjacent rotor blade channels. Results of this study confirmed that the NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor (LSAC) while in a rotating stall regime at rotor design speed exhibits one stall cell that rotates at a speed equal to 50.6 percent of the rotor shaft speed.

  1. Internal flow patterns on heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop oscillating heat-pipe with check valves using ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuwakietkumjohn, N.; Rittidech, S.

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the internal flow patterns and heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop oscillating heat-pipe with check valves (CLOHP/CV). The ratio of number of check valves to meandering turns was 0.2. Ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture were used as working fluids with a filling ratio of 50% by total volume of tube. The CLOHP/CV was made of a glass tube with an inside diameter of 2.4 mm. The evaporator section was 50 mm and 100 mm in length and there were 10 meandering turns. An inclination angle of 90 from horizontal axis was established. The evaporator section was heated by an electric heater and the condenser section was cooled by distilled water. Temperature at the evaporator section was controlled at 85 C, 105 C and 125 C. The inlet and outlet temperatures were measured. A digital camera and video camera were used to observe the flow patterns at the evaporator. The silver nano-ethanol mixture gave higher heat flux than ethanol. When the temperature at the evaporator section was increased from 85 C to 105 C and 125 C. It was found that, the flow patterns occurred as annular flow + slug flow, slug flow + bubble flow and dispersed bubble flow + bubble flow respectively. The main regime of each flow pattern can be determined from the flow pattern map ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture. Each of the two working fluids gave corresponding flow patterns. (author)

  2. Temperature Relaxation in Non-Ideal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Dirk O.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2001-10-01

    The equilibration process of multi-temperature plasmas, i.e., the energy transfer between electrons and ions, is investigated for the case of hot electrons and cold ions. Such non-equilibrium plasmas occur in various experiments, including the creation and heating of plasmas with short-pulse lasers and intense ion beams. Temperature separation occurs since these drivers couple almost entirely to the electrons. The standard approach to the equilibration rates goes back to the early works of Landau and Spitzer. However, this approach is only valid for systems where the Coulomb logarithm is larger than three, which clearly fails for strongly coupled plasmas. We first generalize this approach by considering hyperbolic orbits for the particle trajectories. Then we calculate the energy transfer rates using a quantal kinetic equation of the Boltzmann type which allows an exact (T-matrix) treatment of close collisions. On this basis, we demonstrate the importance of hyperbolic orbits, quantum defraction effects on the scattering cross section, a correct treatment of the distribution, dynamic screening effects, and the influence of the plasma composition.

  3. The Geometry of Non-Ideal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    Arnold showed that the Euler equations of an ideal fluid describe geodesies on the Lie algebra of incompressible vector fields. We generalize this to fluids with dissipation and Gaussian random forcing. The dynamics is determined by the structure constants of a Lie algebra, along with inner products defining kinetic energy, Ohmic dissipation and the covariance of the forces. This allows us to construct tractable toy models for fluid mechanics with a finite number of degrees of freedom. We solve one of them to show how symmetries can be broken spontaneously.In another direction, we derive a deterministic equation that describes the most likely path connecting two points in the phase space of a randomly forced system: this is a WKB approximation to the Fokker-Plank-Kramer equation, analogous to the instantons of quantum theory. Applied to hydrodynamics, we derive a PDE system for Navier-Stokes instantons.

  4. Improving flow patterns and spillage characteristics of a box-type commercial kitchen hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Han, Meng-Ji; Priyambodo, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    A conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood and its improved version (termed the "IQV commercial kitchen hood") were studied using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique and tracer-gas (sulfur hexafluoride) detection methods. The laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique qualitatively revealed the flow field of the hood and the areas apt for leakages of hood containment. The tracer-gas concentration detection method measured the quantitative leakage levels of the hood containment. The oil mists that were generated in the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood leaked significantly into the environment from the areas near the front edges of ceiling and side walls. Around these areas, the boundary-layer separation occurred, inducing highly unsteady and turbulent recirculating flow, and leading to spillages of hood containment due to inappropriate aerodynamic design at the front edges of the ceiling and side walls. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood showed that the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face attained very large values on an order of magnitude about 10(3)-10(4) ppb. By combining the backward-offset narrow suction slot, deflection plates, and quarter-circular arcs at the hood entrance, the IQV commercial kitchen hood presented a flow field containing four backward-inclined cyclone flow structures. The oil mists generated by cooking were coherently confined in these upward-rising cyclone flow structures and finally exhausted through the narrow suction slot. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the IQV commercial kitchen hood showed that the order of magnitude of the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face is negligibly small--only about 10(0) ppb across the whole hood face.

  5. A numerical study of diurnally varying surface temperature on flow patterns and pollutant dispersion in street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zijing; Dong, Jingliang; Xiao, Yimin; Tu, Jiyuan

    2015-03-01

    The impacts of the diurnal variation of surface temperature on street canyon flow pattern and pollutant dispersion are investigated based on a two-dimensional street canyon model under different thermal stratifications. Uneven distributed street temperature conditions and a user-defined wall function representing the heat transfer between the air and the street canyon are integrated into the current numerical model. The prediction accuracy of this model is successfully validated against a published wind tunnel experiment. Then, a series of numerical simulations representing four time scenarios (Morning, Afternoon, Noon and Night) are performed at different Bulk Richardson number (Rb). The results demonstrate that uneven distributed street temperature conditions significantly alters street canyon flow structure and pollutant dispersion characteristics compared with conventional uniform street temperature assumption, especially for the morning event. Moreover, air flow patterns and pollutant dispersion are greatly influenced by diurnal variation of surface temperature under unstable stratification conditions. Furthermore, the residual pollutant in near-ground-zone decreases as Rb increases in noon, afternoon and night events under all studied stability conditions.

  6. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  7. Cerebral Blood Flow, Heart Rate, and Blood Pressure Patterns during the Tilt Test in Common Orthostatic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The head-up tilt test is widely used for evaluation of orthostatic intolerance. Although orthostatic symptoms usually reflect cerebral hypoperfusion, the cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) profile in orthostatic syndromes is not well described. This study evaluated CBFv and cardiovascular patterns associated with the tilt test in common orthostatic syndromes. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed the tilt test of patients with history of orthostatic intolerance. The following signals were recorded: ECG, blood pressure, CBFv using transcranial Doppler, respiratory signals, and end tidal CO2. Results. Data from 744 patients were analyzed. Characteristic pattern associated with a particular orthostatic syndrome can be grouped into abnormalities predominantly affecting blood pressure (orthostatic hypotension, orthostatic hypertension syndrome, vasomotor oscillations, and neurally mediated syncope—cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed), cerebral blood flow (orthostatic hypoperfusion syndrome, primary cerebral autoregulatory failure), and heart rate (tachycardia syndromes: postural tachycardia syndrome, paroxysmal sinus tachycardia, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia). Psychogenic pseudosyncope is associated with stable CBFv. Conclusions. The tilt test is useful add-on in diagnosis of several orthostatic syndromes. However diagnostic criteria for several syndromes had to be modified to allow unambiguous pattern classification. CBFv monitoring in addition to blood pressure and heart rate may increase diagnostic yield of the tilt test. PMID:27525257

  8. Tracing Nitrogen Sources in Forested Catchments Under Varying Flow Conditions: Seasonal and Event Scale Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Kendall, C.

    2004-12-01

    Our ability to assess how stream nutrient concentrations respond to biogeochemical transformations and stream flow dynamics is often limited by datasets that do not include all flow conditions that occur over event, monthly, seasonal, and yearly time scales. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA, nitrate, DOC (dissolved organic carbon), and major ion concentrations were measured on samples collected over a wide range of flow conditions from summer 2002 through summer 2004. Nutrient flushing occurred at the W-9 catchment and high-frequency sampling revealed critical insights into seasonal and event-scale controls on nutrient concentrations. In this seasonally snow-covered catchment, the earliest stage of snowmelt introduced nitrogen directly to the stream from the snowpack. As snowmelt progressed, the source of stream nitrate shifted to flushing of soil nitrate along shallow subsurface flow paths. In the growing season, nitrogen flushing to streams varied with antecedent moisture conditions. More nitrogen was available to flush to streams when antecedent moisture was lowest, and mobile nitrogen stores in the landscape regenerated under baseflow conditions on times scales as short as 7 days. Leaf fall was another critical time when coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlled nutrient fluxes. With the input of labile organic carbon from freshly decomposing leaves, nitrate concentrations declined sharply in response to in-stream immobilization or denitrification. These high-resolution hydrochemical data from multiple flow regimes are identifying "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nutrient fluxes in streams.

  9. Color-coded Doppler imaging of systolic flow patterns in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tencate, F J; Mayala, A P; Vletter, W B; Roelandt, J

    1985-01-01

    We studied 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by color Doppler echocardiography (Group I: 6 patients with outflow obstruction, and Group II: 5 patients without outflow obstruction) to assess systolic structure and function as observed by cross-sectional echocardiography in relation to the flow dynamics. The structure and function included systolic anterior motion of mitral valve (SAM), midsystolic aortic valve closure (AoC), systolic cavity obliteration and the presence and timing of mitral incompetence. Their occurrence and timing was related to presence of aortic systolic flow and presence of turbulence. While all patients in Group I had SAM and turbulence, none of the patients in Group II had SAM nor turbulence. Early mitral incompetence appearing before SAM and turbulence, occurred in all patients of Group I and in none of Group II. Midsystolic aortic valve closure was only present in Group I and blood flow was unilaterally directed so that only 60% of aortic cross-sectional area showed blood flow. We conclude that mitral incompetence in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in early systole is common when outflow gradient is present and is independent of mitral incompetence of mid- and late systole. During SAM, turbulence in the subaortic area and mid and late mitral incompetence occurred simultaneously. The midsystolic aortic valve closure was related to the unilaterally directed blood flow through the aortic cross-sectional area.

  10. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux (on CD-ROM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, N. T.; Siegwarth, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    One reason for NASA's interest in cryogenic two-phase flow with low mass and heat flux is the need to design spacecraft heat exchangers used for vaporizing cryogenic propellants. The CD-ROM provides digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in (QuickTime9Trademark) format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson(Trademark) Video Codec for compression. Experiments were conducted to obtain data on the two-phase (liquid and vapor) flow behavior of cryogenic nitrogen and hydrogen under low mass and heat flux conditions. Tests were performed in normal gravity with a 1.5 degree up flow configuration. View ports in the apparatus permitted visual observation of the two-phase flow patterns. Computer codes to predict flow patterns were developed from theoretical/empirical models reported in the literature. Predictions from the computer codes were compared with experimental flow pattern observations. Results are presented employing the traditional two-dimensional flow pattern map format using the liquid and gas superficial velocities as coordinates. In general, the agreement between the experimental results and the analytical predictive methods is reasonably good. Small regions of the flow pattern maps are identified where the models are deficient as a result of neglecting phase change phenomena. Certain regions of the maps were beyond the range of the experiments and could not be completely validated. Areas that could benefit from further work include modeling of the transition from separated flow, collection of additional data in the bubble and annular flow regimes, and collection of experimental data at other inclination angles, tube diameters and high heat flux.

  11. Fluid Flow Patterns and 1D Gas Hydrate Saturation Profile in Yuan-An Ridge, Offshore Southwest Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Chi, W.

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of gas hydrate in the area offshore southwest Taiwan has made good progress over the last decade. The observation suggests that large amount of gas hydrates may exist at this region. However, how the gas hydrates form and dissolve are still not clear. To better understand the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and dissociation, we first derived some basic physical parameters in the region, particularly the fluid flow rates and their patterns in a prospect site called Yuan-An Ridge offshore SW Taiwan. Previously we used geothermal gradient patterns to derive 1D vertical fluid flow models by analyzing the Peclet numbers. And we found active upward fluid flow with rates ranging from 14.3 cm/y to 24.78 cm/y in Yuan-An Ridge. For this study, we modeled the 2D temperature field of Yuan-An Ridge with finite element method in Matlab, which also gives similar upward fluid migration patterns even after topographic effect correction. In the near future, we will study a model of 1D hydrate saturation profile by using a one-dimentional numerical procedure developed by Gaurav Bhatnagar, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University. This simulation delineates the accumulation of gas hydrates in marine sediments due to upward and downward fluxes of methane over time. We will apply the previous results as the input parameters for this generalization simulation of the flux in the hydrate-bearing sediments. The results might lead to better understanding of the distribution of gas hydrate in Yuan-An Ridge, which can be verify by a proposed drilling program in the future.

  12. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  13. Local Three-dimensional Flow and Sediment Patterns as an Evidence of Pool-riffle Self-maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Vahidi, E.; Bayat, E.; Saco, P. M.; de Almeida, G. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    For decades pool-riffle morphodynamics has been described based on the cross- sectional averaged flow characteristics, using episodic shifts in higher shear stress or velocities from the riffles to the pools (i.e. reversal conditions) as an indication of the long term self-maintenance of the structures. Recently more attention has been paid to three-dimensional flow features and sediment transport characteristics, but this has been done in a compartmentalised way, with studies either focusing on one or the other aspect. In this study, we present for the first time a three-dimensional analysis of sediment transport processes as an indication of self-maintenance mechanisms due to erosion and aggradation in pools and riffles. We do that by first reconstructing from experimental data the 3-D flow patterns in a typical pool-riffle sequence and computing bed shear stress distribution and near-bed streamlines for low and high flow conditions. We then use these 3-D features to complement a one-year dataset from an unsteady fractional sediment transport and bed evolution model applied to an existing stream. Local instantaneous bedload transport is obtained using the bed shear stress distribution corresponding to the flow condition (low or high) and assumed to follow the streamlines for that flow condition (low or high). Streamlines laterally contract and expand on pools and riffles, respectively, but in a different way during low and high flow condition. We apply the streamtube concept to compute instantaneous local rates of sediment transport in pools and contiguous downstream riffles and compute reversal conditions and identify self-maintenance episodes. Comparison with reversal episodes identified using cross- sectional average values reveal that when considering the 3-D effects stronger reversal episodes were detected, but the actual number of episodes increased only slightly (8%). Most reversal episodes occurred in the streamtubes that originated near the centre of the

  14. A novel, low cost, disposable, pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump for cardiac surgery that provides a physiological flow pattern.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Daniel E; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Toomasian, John M; Merz, Scott I

    2008-01-01

    Research is underway to develop a novel, low cost, disposable pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) for cardiac surgery that provides a physiological flow pattern. This is believed to offer reduced morbidity and risk exposure within this population. The PRVP will have a durable design suitable for use in short- to mid-length prolonged support after surgery without changing pumps. The design is based on proprietary MC3 technology which provides variable pumping volume per stroke, thereby allowing the pump to respond to hemodynamic status changes of the patient. The novel pump design also possesses safety advantages that prevent retrograde flow, and maintain safe circuit pressures upon occlusion of the inlet and outlet tubing. The design is ideal for simple, safe and natural flow support. Computational methods have been developed that predict output for pump chambers of varying geometry. A scaled chamber and pump head (diameter = 4 in) were prototyped to demonstrate target performance for pediatrics (2 L/min at 100 rpm). A novel means of creating a pulsatile flow and pressure output at constant RPM was developed and demonstrated to create significant surplus hydraulic energy (>10%) in a simplified mock patient circuit.

  15. Effect of advanced and delayed rotation on the dominant flow pattern and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uksul, Esra; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    During a flapping cycle of an insect, complex time dependent flows are produced as the wing reciprocates, producing a maximum lift at the stroke reversals. By flipping the wing rapidly at the end of each stroke, the insect modulates the flow around the wing and hence the aerodynamic forces necessary to hover. The duration and starting point of the flip play an important role in determining the amount of lift produced. To understand and tailor the effect of wing kinematics on the aerodynamic performance we focussed on the vortex dynamics of the flow field. Phase-averaged data from particle image velocimetry was used to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in rotation during a stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The period of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Vortex detection methods like the λ2 and Γ2 criteria are used to determine the effect of a delay or early rotation on the trajectories, size, shape and location of the prominent vortical structures. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the influence of the phase-shifts on the dominant mode structure and the related time-scales.

  16. Traffic flow pattern and meteorology at two distinct urban junctions with impacts on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Sharad

    2011-04-01

    Traffic during operation at a junction undergoes different flow conditions and modal events which result into dynamic fleet characteristics generating more emissions and stronger vehicle-induced heat and wakes generating obscure dispersion. Traffic in a manner operated at junctions often creates pockets of higher concentrations the locations of which shift as a result of the combine effects of traffic dynamics and random airflow. This research examined the impacts of traffic dynamics and meteorology on the levels and locations of higher concentrations of pollutant CO, NO 2 and PM within the influence of signalized traffic intersection and a conventional two-lane roundabout in a response to varying flow conditions and emissions resulted from the traffic operations. Three line source dispersion models have been used to determine the impact on air quality. Emissions have been calculated for different scenarios developed from different combinations of semi-empirical and field based time and space-mean speeds and lane-width based density when traffic undergoes free, interrupted and congested-flow conditions during operation. It has been found that the locations of highest concentrations within the domain change as traffic with different modal share encounters different flow conditions at different times of a day.

  17. Patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for farming and breeding as well as understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene...

  18. Effect of Riser Geometry Structure on Local Flow Pattern in a Rectangular Circulating Fluidized Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chen; Wang, Qinhui; Luo, Zhongyang; Zhang, Ximei; Cheng, Leming; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    By using a high-speed video camera and particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, the local flow properties of the solid-gas two phases flow were studied in a plexiglass rectangular CFB cold model with the a riser of 1.5×0.864×4.9m3. Measurements were carried out with transparent spherical glass bead between 0.1-0.425mm as bed materials and cold air as flow medium. The experimental results showed that the secondary air has an important influence on the particle velocity distribution. Because of the secondary air penetrating effect, the particle lateral movement was acute. In the dilute region, the outlet and the comer effect induced the defluxion of the particles movement and the core-annular distribution was broken. The closer to the outlet, the stronger the lateral velocity is. The obstruct of hanging screen reduced the furnace outlet effects between the hanging screen and the front wall, where the particle movement in the area was controlled by the gas flow and the constrain of the wall. High particle concentration areas were formed in the junction between the screen and the front wall and in the comer between the wall and the front wall.

  19. Fluid fluxes from petrological record: links to mineral-fluid thermodynamics and implications for flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow through the Earth's lithosphere is an inevitable consequence of fluid production during sediment compaction, prograde metamorphic reactions, and magmatic degassing, in settings ranging from subducting zones, continental crust underplating to shallow magma chambers. In addition, high buoyancy and low viscosity of aqueous fluid in a rock environment make flow universally viable and efficient. Fluids are not preserved in their pathways and much of their evidence including chemical composition is often retrieved from mineral mode, chemical, or isotopic variations. Several important links, advantages and artifacts arising from dimensional consistency and from correlations with mineral-fluid thermodynamics are worthy to revisit. The magnitude of fluid-rock interaction is measured by the fluid-rock ratio (mfl3 mr-3) or a time-integrated fluid flux (mfl3 mr-2). These two measures differ by mr, the characteristic distance of alteration or front propagation, parallel to the flow direction. As a consequence, the fluid-rock ratios depend on spatial relationships between flow direction, temperature- and pressure-gradient orientation, and alteration zone or vein geometry. The reservoir ratios, which are required in mass-balance or phase-equilibrium calculations, can still be unambiguously defined when the above variables are scaled to the flow direction. Gradients in mole amounts of reaction progress or mineral precipitated, n, per unit temperature or pressure are directly related to standard reaction enthalpy and volume, respectively. The effects of pressure are commonly assumed to be negligible. Systematic evaluation of mineral solubilities, however, reveals that (i) dn/dT is nearly identical for a variety of phases and from subduction to collisional geotherms but minerals dissolving into charged species exhibit higher solubilities, therefore, yield greater reaction progress and lower fluid fluxes along low-dT /dzgeotherms; (ii) during lateral (isobaric) flow, dn

  20. Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Preferential Flow Occurrence in the Shale Hills Catchment: From the Hillslope to the Catchment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding temporal and spatial patterns of preferential flow (PF) occurrence is important in revealing hillslope and catchment hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Quantitative assessment of the frequency and control of PF occurrence in the field, however, has been limited, especially at the landscape scale of hillslope and catchment. By using 5.5-years' (2007-2012) real-time soil moisture at 10 sites response to 323 precipitation events, we tested the temporal consistency of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale in the forested Shale Hills Catchment; and by using 25 additional sites with at least 1-year data (2011-2012), we evaluated the spatial patterns of PF occurrence across the catchment. To explore the potential effects of PF occurrence on catchment hydrology, wavelet analysis was performed on the recorded time series of hydrological signals (i.e., precipitation, soil moisture, catchment discharge). Considerable temporal consistence was observed in both the frequency and the main controls of PF occurrence at the hillslope scale, which was attributed largely to the statistical stability of precipitation pattern over the monitoring period and the relatively stable subsurface preferential pathways. Preferential flow tended to occur more often in response to intense rainfall events, and favored the conditions at dry hilltop or wet valley floor sites. When upscaling to the entire catchment, topographic control on the PF occurrence was amplified remarkably, leading to the identification of a subsurface PF network in the catchment. Higher frequency of PF occurrence was observed at the valley floor (average 48%), hilltop (average 46%), and swales/hillslopes near the stream (average 40%), while the hillslopes in the eastern part of the catchment were least likely to experience PF (0-20%). No clear relationship, however, was observed between terrain attributes and PF occurrence, because the initiation and persistency of PF in this catchment was controlled

  1. Explaining spatial patterns of sap flow: day-to-day shifts in relevance of site- and tree-specific controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Sibylle K.; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2015-04-01

    Transpiration is a key process in the hydrological cycle and a sound understanding and quantification of transpiration is essential for management decisions and for hydrological and climatological modelling. To assess transpiration at the tree scale sap flow velocity is commonly measured. Besides atmospheric conditions and soil moisture state, tree-specific characteristics such as species, size or social status control sap flow of individual trees. Within forest stands, properties such as species composition, basal area or stem number also affect sap flow via competition or facilitation mechanisms. Finally, sap flow patterns might also be influenced by landscape-scale characteristics such as geology, slope position or aspect because they affect water and energy availability; however, so far little is known about these larger-scale controls. We studied the relative importance of various tree- and site-specific characteristics with linear statistical models for daily sap velocity observations on 38 trees at 12 locations in mixed beech and oak forests in a catchment in Luxemburg. The temporal variation of the predictors' importance for sap velocity patterns was then related to hydro-meteorological conditions. Results indicate that a combination of tree- and site-specific controls influence sap velocity patterns, namely tree species, tree diameter, stand basal area, geology and aspect. The temporal dynamics of these controls are related to hydro-meteorological conditions, with tree-specific controls dominating when the atmospheric gradient is strong, i.e. the vapour pressure deficit is large, leading to higher sap velocities, whereas landscape-scale site characteristics are more important during weak atmospheric gradients. The importance of individual predictors also varies between spring and summer, probably due to different soil moisture and atmospheric conditions of the two periods. We conclude that both tree- and site-specific characteristics control sap velocity

  2. Morphologies and flow patterns in quenching of lamellar systems with shear.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aiguo; Gonnella, G; Lamura, A

    2006-07-01

    We study the behavior of a fluid quenched from the disordered into the lamellar phase under the action of a shear flow. The dynamics of the system is described by Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with the pressure tensor and the chemical potential derived by the Brazovskii free energy. Our simulations are based on a mixed numerical method with the lattice Boltzmann equation and a finite difference scheme for Navier-Stokes and order parameter equations, respectively. We focus on cases where banded flows are observed with two different slopes for the component of velocity in the direction of the applied flow. Close to the walls the system reaches a lamellar order with very few defects, and the slope of the horizontal velocity is higher than the imposed shear rate. In the middle of the system the local shear rate is lower than the imposed one, and the system looks like a mixture of tilted lamellae, droplets, and small elongated domains. We refer to this as a region with a shear-induced structures (SIS) configuration. The local behavior of the stress shows that the system with the coexisting lamellar and SIS regions is in mechanical equilibrium. This phenomenon occurs, at fixed viscosity, for shear rates under a certain threshold; when the imposed shear rate is sufficiently large, lamellar order develops in the whole system. Effects of different viscosities have been also considered. The SIS region is observed only at low enough viscosity. We compare the above scenario with the usual one of shear banding. In particular, we do not find evidence for a plateau of the stress at varying imposed shear rates in the region with banded flow. We interpret our results as due to a tendency of the lamellar system to oppose the presence of the applied flow.

  3. Family Communication Patterns and the Flow of Information in the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, L. David

    A study extended and elaborated the coorientation model as a basis for reinterpreting Steven H. Chaffee and Jack M. McLeod's (1970) construct of family communication patterns. Melvin L. Kohn's (1977) theory of the influence of life experiences (e.g., conditions of employment) on parenting values argues that socio-orientation might better be…

  4. Improving double patterning flow by analyzing the diffractive orders in the pupil plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeggaoui, N.; Farys, V.; Besacier, M.; Li, Q.; Yesilada, E.; Trouiller, Y.

    2011-04-01

    To print sub 22nm node features, current lithography technology faces some tool limitations. One possible solution to overcome these problems is to use the double patterning technique (DPT). The principle of the double patterning technique is pitch splitting where two adjacent features must be assigned opposite masks (colors) corresponding to different exposures if their pitch is less than a predefined minimum coloring pitch. However, certain design orientations for which pattern features separated by more than the minimum coloring pitch cannot be imaged with either of the two exposures. In these directions, the contrast and the process window are degraded because constructive interferences between diffractive orders in the pupil plane are not sufficient. The 22nm and 16nm nodes require the use of very coherent sources that will be generated using SMO (source mask cooptimization). Such pixelized sources while helpful in improving the contrast for selected configurations, can lead to degrade it for configurations which have not been counted for during the SMO process. Therefore, we analyze the diffractive orders interactions in the pupil plane in order to detect these limited orientations in the design and thus propose a new double patterning decomposition algorithm to enlarge the process window and the contrast of each mask.

  5. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER FLOW PATTERNS AROUND A DUAL-SCREENED GROUNDWATER CIRCULATION WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dual-screened groundwater circulation wells (GCWs) can be used to remove contaminant mass and to mix reagents in situ. GCWs are so named because they force water in a circular pattern between injection and extraction screens. The radial extent, flux and direction of the effective...

  6. Clogging pattern in vertical-flow constructed wetlands: insight from a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hua, G F; Zhu, W; Zhao, L F; Huang, J Y

    2010-08-15

    Substrate clogging caused by the accumulation of the particulate solids is the worst operational problem for vertical-flow constructed wetlands (VFCW). In this paper, the effects of particulate solids distribution and their accumulation in the substrate with different gravel sizes were investigated. The results demonstrated that the clogging layer can be considered as two parts: one is the blanket-like deposition layer, and the other is the upper substrate clogging layer. Furthermore, the clogging process shall be partitioned as three stages of puncture phase for the pollutants; the formation of the blanket-like deposition layer; and the formation and compaction phase to the whole clogging layer. With reference to the clogging mechanism, it is believed that the particulate solids (< 100 microm) were absorbed firstly by electrostatic forces and van der Waals' forces. This is followed by the "bridging" made by the accumulated solids which act as a "sieve", thus further restricting larger particulate solids to flow through.

  7. [Characters of infiltration and preferential flow of black soil in Northeast China under different tillage patterns].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Liang, Ai-Zhen; Shen, Yan; Shi, Xiu-Huan; Luo, Jin-Ming; Yang, Xue-Ming

    2008-07-01

    By using dye tracer and double-ring infiltrometer techniques, the characters of infiltration and preferential flow of black soil under no-tillage (NT) and fall moldboard plow (MP) were compared after six years continuous management. The results showed that the infiltration rate was higher under NT than under MP. When the infiltration reached steady, the infiltration rate and accumulative infiltration capacity under NT were 1.35 and 1.44 times as high as those under MP, respectively. The penetration depth of methylene blue reached a depth of 43 cm in NT soil, being 16 cm deeper than that in MP soil. Comparing with MP soil, NT soil had better development of pore structure and more biological pores, and presented better preferential flow character, which were of importance for water infiltration and soil and water conservation.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that strea