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Sample records for non-ideal flow patterns

  1. Reactive flow modeling of small scale detonation failure experiments for a baseline non-ideal explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittell, David E.; Cummock, Nick R.; Son, Steven F.

    2016-08-01

    Small scale characterization experiments using only 1-5 g of a baseline ammonium nitrate plus fuel oil (ANFO) explosive are discussed and simulated using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. There exists a strong need for the small scale characterization of non-ideal explosives in order to adequately survey the wide parameter space in sample composition, density, and microstructure of these materials. However, it is largely unknown in the scientific community whether any useful or meaningful result may be obtained from detonation failure, and whether a minimum sample size or level of confinement exists for the experiments. In this work, it is shown that the parameters of an ignition and growth rate law may be calibrated using the small scale data, which is obtained from a 35 GHz microwave interferometer. Calibration is feasible when the samples are heavily confined and overdriven; this conclusion is supported with detailed simulation output, including pressure and reaction contours inside the ANFO samples. The resulting shock wave velocity is most likely a combined chemical-mechanical response, and simulations of these experiments require an accurate unreacted equation of state (EOS) in addition to the calibrated reaction rate. Other experiments are proposed to gain further insight into the detonation failure data, as well as to help discriminate between the role of the EOS and reaction rate in predicting the measured outcome.

  2. Mechanisms for non-ideal flow in low-power arc-heated supersonic nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Kang; Pan, Wen-Xia; Meng, Xian; Wang, Hai-Xing

    2015-08-01

    The flow in a low-powered arc gas heater combined with a supersonic nozzle of throat diameter less than 1 mm is quite complicated and difficult to describe in quantitative detail. Experiments on arc-heated supersonic jet thrusters of monatomic gases argon and helium have been carried out and their performance measured. The flow characteristics are analyzed with the help of numerical simulation. Results show that the viscous effect is the most important factor causing the large difference between ideal and real performance. A large outer section of the exit flow is slow-moving. This is especially pronounced in helium, where 70 % of the exit area of the nozzle might be in subsonic flow. Friction forces can be much larger than the net thrust, reaching several times higher in helium, resulting in very low efficiencies. Other factors causing the differences between ideal and real flow include: complex flow in the throat region, electric arc extending to the nozzle expansion section, heat transfer to the inlet gas and from the hot plasma, and environmental pressure in the vacuum chamber. It is recognized that the ordinary concepts of supersonic nozzle flow must be greatly modified when dealing with such complicated situations. The general concepts presented in this paper could be helpful in guiding the design and operation of this equipment.

  3. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for Multiscale Non-ideal MHD Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    Low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous MHD flows has been constructed. Several variants of the filter approach that cater to different flow types are proposed. These filters provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field (Delta . B) numerical error in the sense that no standard divergence cleaning is required. For certain 2-D MHD test problems, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields of these filter schemes has been achieved.

  4. Advanced development of diagnostics for non-ideal blast flows. Technical report 1 Apr 89-1 Jun 91

    SciTech Connect

    Modarress, D.; Hoeft, T.

    1992-07-01

    Investigations of non-ideal airblast are performed at the Ernst Mach Institute in a shock tube that simulates a radiation-induced thermal layer. Visualization techniques were adequate for overall study of the flow, but did not provide the detailed data for validation of computer codes. Under this contract three tasks were performed to provide needed data. The first task was to develop a software package for analysis of interferogram fringes. This package translates fringes shift due to the presence of helium into densities over the image area. This package was installed at EMI. The second task was to evaluate and test techniques for direct time-varying measurement of gas species concentration. Absorption spectroscopy of NO2 was selected to be used, but had corrosion problems and was abandoned. As a replacement, filtered Rayleigh scattering from Freon gas was identified. The third task was to fabricate and install a multi-location laser Doppler velocimeter system for the shock tube. This unit was installed in the shock tube and preliminary velocity measurements of flow over a rough surface were made.

  5. Using a tracer technique to identify the extent of non-ideal flows in the continuous mixing of non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, D.; Ein-Mozaffari, F.; Mehrvar, M.

    2013-05-01

    The identification of non-ideal flows in a continuous-flow mixing of non-Newtonian fluids is a challenging task for various chemical industries: plastic manufacturing, water and wastewater treatment, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Non-ideal flows such as channelling, recirculation, and dead zones significantly affect the performance of continuous-flow mixing systems. Therefore, the main objective of this paper was to develop an identification protocol to measure non-ideal flows in the continuous-flow mixing system. The extent of non-ideal flows was quantified using a dynamic model that incorporated channelling, recirculation, and dead volume in the mixing vessel. To estimate the dynamic model parameters, the system was excited using a frequency-modulated random binary input by injecting the saline solution (as a tracer) into the fresh feed stream prior to being pumped into the mixing vessel. The injection of the tracer was controlled by a computer-controlled on-off solenoid valve. Using the trace technique, the extent of channelling and the effective mixed volume were successfully determined and used as mixing quality criteria. Such identification procedures can be applied at various areas of chemical engineering in order to improve the mixing quality.

  6. Kinetics of osmotic water flow across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Cryopreservation requires quantitatively analytical models to simulate the biophysical responses of biomaterials during cryopreservation. The Mazur model and other improved ones, such as Karlsson model concerning solutions containing cryoprotectants (CPA), are somehow precluded by some minor points, particularly, the assumption of ideal solutions. To avoid the ideal solution assumption, in this study a new method is developed to simulate water transport across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during cooling and thawing. The comparison between osmolalities calculated by the linear freezing-point depression used in this new method and other non-ideal ones is conducted and a good agreement is achieved. In addition, in an ideal case, besides a theoretical agreement, this new approach has been validated by its numerical simulation results. Comparisons between this new approach and the traditional ones with an ideal solution assumption have been conducted based on a spherical hypothetical cell. The main results are (1) the predicted non-ideal intracellular water content is larger than the ideal results; (2) the concentration of CPA solutions is directly proportional to the deviation between the non-ideal and ideal curves. In the end, this study presents a direct description of the degree of subcooling of the protoplasm during dynamic cooling. This study demonstrates that our experimental data-based method is a valid one with clear physical interpretations, convenient expressions and a more extensive application room than traditional ones. PMID:20654609

  7. Kinetics of osmotic water flow across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lindong; Li, Weizhong; Zuo, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Cryopreservation requires quantitatively analytical models to simulate the biophysical responses of biomaterials during cryopreservation. The Mazur model and other improved ones, such as Karlsson model concerning solutions containing cryoprotectants (CPA), are somehow precluded by some minor points, particularly, the assumption of ideal solutions. To avoid the ideal solution assumption, in this study a new method is developed to simulate water transport across cell membranes in non-ideal solutions during cooling and thawing. The comparison between osmolalities calculated by the linear freezing-point depression used in this new method and other non-ideal ones is conducted and a good agreement is achieved. In addition, in an ideal case, besides a theoretical agreement, this new approach has been validated by its numerical simulation results. Comparisons between this new approach and the traditional ones with an ideal solution assumption have been conducted based on a spherical hypothetical cell. The main results are (1) the predicted non-ideal intracellular water content is larger than the ideal results; (2) the concentration of CPA solutions is directly proportional to the deviation between the non-ideal and ideal curves. In the end, this study presents a direct description of the degree of subcooling of the protoplasm during dynamic cooling. This study demonstrates that our experimental data-based method is a valid one with clear physical interpretations, convenient expressions and a more extensive application room than traditional ones.

  8. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  9. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of axial and radial flow membrane chromatography: mechanisms of non-ideality and validation of the zonal rate model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pranay; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Lin, Min; Vogel, Jens H; Haynes, Charles; von Lieres, Eric

    2013-08-30

    Membrane chromatography (MC) is increasingly being used as a purification platform for large biomolecules due to higher operational flow rates. The zonal rate model (ZRM) has previously been applied to accurately characterize the hydrodynamic behavior in commercial MC capsules at different configurations and scales. Explorations of capsule size, geometry and operating conditions using the model and experiment were used to identify possible causes of inhomogeneous flow and their contributions to band broadening. In the present study, the hydrodynamics within membrane chromatography capsules are more rigorously investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The CFD models are defined according to precisely measured capsule geometries in order to avoid the estimation of geometry related model parameters. In addition to validating the assumptions and hypotheses regarding non-ideal flow mechanisms encoded in the ZRM, we show that CFD simulations can be used to mechanistically understand and predict non-binding breakthrough curves without need for estimation of any parameters. When applied to a small-scale axial flow MC capsules, CFD simulations identify non-ideal flows in the distribution (hold-up) volumes upstream and downstream of the membrane stack as the major source of band broadening. For the large-scale radial flow capsule, the CFD model quantitatively predicts breakthrough data using binding parameters independently determined using the small-scale axial flow capsule, identifying structural irregularities within the membrane pleats as an important source of band broadening. The modeling and parameter determination scheme described here therefore facilitates a holistic mechanistic-based method for model based scale-up, obviating the need of performing expensive large-scale experiments under binding conditions. As the CFD model described provides a rich mechanistic analysis of membrane chromatography systems and the ability to explore operational space, but

  10. Tandem pulsed acousto-optics: obtaining the tagged light fraction from modulated non-ideal speckle patterns.

    PubMed

    Resink, S G; Steenbergen, W

    2016-01-21

    Recently we presented novel methods for acousto-optic (AO) imaging of biological tissues, taking (1) the mean square difference of speckle patterns (subtraction method) or (2) the contrast of the summation of speckle patterns (summation method) acquired from nanosecond pulses of coherent light, fired at different ultrasound phases. In this study we relate the two methods both analytically and experimentally. We experimentally show that these two methods are nearly identical provided that the maximum achievable speckle contrast is determined correctly. We show with simulations that after correction the outcome is independent of experimental detection parameters. This makes the AO methods in this study reliable, allowing quantifying speckle observations in terms of the ultrasonically tagged fractions of light. The use of tandem nanosecond pulses in one burst of ultrasound overcomes the challenge of tissue dynamics. PMID:26682957

  11. Measuring flow in non-ideal conditions for short-term projects: Uncertainties associated with the use of stage-discharge rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgand, François; Lellouche, Guillaume; Appelboom, T. W.

    2013-10-01

    The vast majority of hydrological stations are set up such that discharge can be estimated from the sole measurement of water height or stage above a local datum. Hydraulics laws show that in the right conditions there may be a unique and stable relationship between stage and discharge, which can be described by a rating curve. For short-term projects where there may be little choice for station location and time to construct a detailed rating curve, conditions for the use of rating curves may be less than ideal, potentially yielding high uncertainties on hydrologic measurements. This article evaluates uncertainties induced on instantaneous flow rates and cumulative annual flow volumes by the use of one-segmented rating curves in small streams. Uncertainty distributions were obtained by simulating rating curves calculated from random sampling of reference flow and stage data obtained with Doppler flowmeters. Factors tested included the number of manual gauged points, the type of rating curve (power vs polynomial), the use or not of the observed stage-of-zero flow, the spread of gauged points along flow range, and the measurement errors during gauging. Results could vary widely depending on the scenarios tested and sometimes yielded very high uncertainties. The best scenario yielded significant uncertainties on annual cumulative flow volume included between -13% and +14% for the low gradient streams and between -5% and +7% for the higher gradient streams, and for 22 manual gauged points per year. Our results show that, even in the best scenario, very significant uncertainty can result from using one-segmented rating curve in non-ideal situations in the field.

  12. Measuring explosive non-ideality

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C

    1999-02-17

    The sonic reaction zone length may be measured by four methods: (1) size effect, (2) detonation front curvature, (3) crystal interface velocity and (4) in-situ gauges. The amount of data decreases exponentially from (1) to (4) with there being almost no gauge data for prompt detonation at steady state. The ease and clarity of obtaining the reaction zone length increases from (1) to (4). The method of getting the reaction zone length, , is described for the four methods. A measure of non-ideality is proposed: the reaction zone length divided by the cylinder radius. N = /R{sub o}. N = 0 for true ideality. It also decreases with increasing radius as it should. For N < 0.10, an equilibrium EOS like the JWL may be used. For N > 0.10, a time-dependent description is essential. The crystal experiment, which measures the particle velocity of an explosive-transparent material interface, is presently rising in importance. We examine the data from three experiments and apply: (1) an impedance correction that transfers the explosive C-J particle velocity to the corresponding value for the interface, and (2) multiplies the interface time by 3/4 to simulate the explosive speed of sound. The result is a reaction zone length comparable to those obtained by other means. A few explosives have reaction zones so small that the change of slope in the particle velocity is easily seen.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Two Dimensional CO2 Adsorption/Desorption in Packed Sorption Beds under Non-Ideal Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, H.; Knox, J. C.; Smith, J. E.; Croomes, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The experimental results of CO2 adsorption and desorption in a packed column indicated that the concentration wave front at the center of the packed column differs from those which are close to the wall of column filled with adsorbent material even though the ratio of column diameter to the particle size is greater than 20. The comparison of the experimental results with one dimensional model of packed column shows that in order to simulate the average breakthrough in a packed column a two dimensional (radial and axial) model of packed column is needed. In this paper the mathematical model of a non-slip flow through a packed column with 2 inches in diameter and 18 inches in length filled with 5A zeolite pellets is presented. The comparison of experimental results of CO2 absorption and desorption for the mixed and central breakthrough of the packed column with numerical results is also presented.

  14. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  15. Modeling of non-ideal aluminized explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1999-06-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. Within the context of WK theory, we study the chemical interaction between Al and HMX detonation products in non-ideal explosives. We develop a kinetic rate law for the combustion of Al in a condensed detonation that depends on the pressure and the detonation product gases. We use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state of the solid and liquid Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities for HMX/Al composites to within a few percent for a wide range of aluminum content. We discuss the uncertainties in our model and the implications of our results on the modeling of other non-ideal explosives.

  16. Kinetic modeling of non-ideal explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1999-03-01

    We have implemented a Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions, while other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. We model a wide range of ideal and non-ideal composite energetic materials. In addition, we develop an exp-6 equation of state for the product fluids that reproduces a wide range experimental shock Hugoniot and static compression data. For unreacted solids, including solid and liquid Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, we use a Murnaghan form for the equation of state. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent for a wide range of explosives, while obtaining good agreement with estimated reaction zone lengths. The detonation velocity as a function of charge radius is also correctly reproduced.

  17. Calibration of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kömle, N. I.; Macher, W.; Kargl, G.; Bentley, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    A popular method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the transient hot needle method. It allows the thermal conductivity of a solid or granular material to be evaluated simply by combining a temperature measurement with a well-defined electrical current flowing through a resistance wire enclosed in a long and thin needle. Standard laboratory sensors that are typically used in laboratory work consist of very thin steel needles with a large length-to-diameter ratio. This type of needle is convenient since it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity of a soft granular material from a simple temperature measurement. However, such a geometry often results in a mechanically weak sensor, which can bend or fail when inserted into a material that is harder than expected. For deploying such a sensor on a planetary surface, with often unknown soil properties, it is necessary to construct more rugged sensors. These requirements can lead to a design which differs substantially from the ideal geometry, and additional care must be taken in the calibration and data analysis. In this paper we present the performance of a prototype thermal conductivity sensor designed for planetary missions. The thermal conductivity of a suite of solid and granular materials was measured both by a standard needle sensor and by several customized sensors with non-ideal geometry. We thus obtained a calibration curve for the non-ideal sensors. The theory describing the temperature response of a sensor with such unfavorable length-to-diameter ratio is complicated and highly nonlinear. However, our measurements reveal that over a wide range of thermal conductivities there is an almost linear relationship between the result obtained by the standard sensor and the result derived from the customized, non-ideal sensors. This allows for the measurement of thermal conductivity values for harder soils, which are not easily accessible when using standard needle sensors.

  18. Calibration of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kömle, N. I.; Macher, W.; Kargl, G.; Bentley, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    A popular method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the transient heated needle method. It allows to evaluate the thermal conductivity of a solid or granular material to be evaluated simply by combining a temperature measurement with a well-defined electrical current flowing through a resistance wire enclosed in a long and thin needle. Standard laboratory sensors that are typically used in laboratory work consist of very thin steel needles with a large length-to-diameter ratio. This type of needles is convenient since it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity of a soft granular material from a simple temperature measurement. However, such a geometry often results in a mechanically weak sensor, which can bend or fail when inserted into a material that is harder than expected. For deploying such a sensor on a planetary surface, with often unknown soil properties, it is necessary to construct more rugged sensors. These requirements can lead to a design which differs substantially from the ideal geometry, and additional care must be taken in the calibration and data analysis. In this paper we present the performance of a prototype thermal conductivity sensor designed for planetary missions. The thermal conductivity of a suite of solid and granular materials was measured both by a standard needle sensor and by several customized sensors with non-ideal geometry. We thus obtained a calibration curve for the non-ideal sensors. The theory describing the temperature response of a sensor with such unfavorable length-to-diameter ratio is complicated and highly nonlinear. However, our measurements reveal that over a wide range of thermal conductivities there is an almost linear relationship between the result obtained by the standard sensor and the result derived from the customized, non-ideal sensors. This allows to measure thermal conductivity values for harder soils, which are not easily accessible when using standard needle

  19. Effect of solution non-ideality on erythrocyte volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Levin, R L; Cravalho, E G; Huggins, C E

    1977-03-01

    A non-ideal, hydrated, non-dilute pseudo-binary salt-protein-water solution model of the erythrocyte intracellular solution is presented to describe the osmotic behavior of human erythrocytes. Existing experimental activity data for salts and proteins in aqueous solutions are used to formulate van Laar type expressions for the solvent and solute activity coefficients. Reasonable estimates can therefore be made of the non-ideality of the erythrocyte intracellular solution over a wide range of osmolalities. Solution non-ideality is shown to affect significantly the degree of solute polarization within the erythrocyte intracellular solution during freezing. However, the non-ideality has very little effect upon the amount of water retained within erythrocytes cooled at sub-zero temperatures. PMID:16250333

  20. Detonation Failure Characterization of Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesheski, Robert; Son, Steven; Groven, Lori

    2011-06-01

    Non-ideal explosives are currently poorly characterized, which limits the modeling of them. Current characterization requires large-scale testing to obtain detonation wave characterization for analysis due to the relatively thick reaction zones. Use of a microwave interferometer applied to small-scale confined experiments is being implemented to allow for time resolved characterization of a failing detonation. The microwave interferometer measures the failing detonation wave in a tube, and this experiment only requires small amounts of non-ideal explosives. A non-ideal explosive is initiated with a booster charge and a measurement of the failure distance and a continuous position-time trace of the detonation front location can be obtained. Initial tests have been performed that show this method is feasible using an ammonium perchlorate (AP) composite propellant as a model non-ideal explosive. Future work will apply this approach to non-ideal explosives. Successful results of this method would allow for the calibration of detonation models for many different non-ideal explosives. This project was funded by the Department of Homeland Security through the Center of Excellence for Explosive Detection, Mitigation, and Response under award number 080409/0002251.

  1. Detonation shock dynamics calibration for non-ideal HE: ANFO

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Salyer, Terry R; Aslam, Tariq D; Kiyanda, Charles B; Morris, John S; Zimmerley, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Linear D{sub n}-{kappa} detonation shock dynamics (DSD) filling forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures involving variations in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. The detonation of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) mixtures is considered to be highly nonideal involving long reaction zones ({approx} several cms), low detonation energies and large failure diameters ({approx} 10s-100s cms). A number of experimental programs have been undertaken to understand ANFO detonation properties as a function of the AN properties [1]-[7]. Given the highly heterogeneous nature of ANFO mixtures (typical high explosive (HE) grade AN prills are porous with a range of diameters) a predictive reactive flow simulation of ANFO detonation will present significant challenges. At Los Alamos, a simulation capability has been developed for predicting the propagation of detonation in non-ideal HE and the work conducted on surrounding materials via a combination of a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) approach and a modified programmed burn method known as the pseudo-reaction-zone (or PRZ) method that accounts for the long detonation reaction zone. In the following, linear D{sub n}-{kappa} DSD fitting forms are obtained for four ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures involving variation in the ammonium nitrate prill properties and ANFO stoichiometries. A detonation shock dynamics calibration for ANFO consisting of regular porous HE grade AN in a 94/6 wt.% AN to FO mix has been obtained in [7].

  2. NON-IDEALITY IN H PERMEATION THROUGH PLATE MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Ted B. Flanagan, T; D. Wang, D

    2006-07-13

    Under the commonly employed experimental conditions of a significant upstream concentration of H and c{sub H} {approx} 0 downstream, expressions are given for obtaining the concentration-independent D*{sub H} from the concentration dependent D{sub H} employing the known non-ideality. A procedure is given for determining the concentration profile for a given upstream concentration for an alloy where the non-ideality is known as a function of H concentration. For the Pd{sub 0.81}Ag{sub 0.19} alloy (423 K) the nonideality, f(r)<1 decreases the flux but for alloys where the non-ideality is in the opposite direction, f(r)>1, the flux will be greater which would be an advantage for the experimental purification of H{sub 2}.

  3. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  4. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    The gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks (PPDs), particularly the level of turbulence as well as their global structure and evolution, are of crucial importance to many aspects of planet formation. Magnetic field is widely believed to play a crucial role in the gas dynamics, mainly via the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) or the magneto-centrifugal wind (MCW). In PPDs, however, these mechanisms are strongly affected by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects, including Ohmic resistivity, Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD), due to the weak ionization level in PPDs. While Ohmic resistivity has been routinely included in the study of PPD gas dynamics, the Hall effects and AD have been largely ignored, even though they play an equally, if not more, important role. In this thesis, the effect of AD is thoroughly explored via numerical simulations and the results are applied to estimate the effectiveness of the MRI in PPDs. The simulations show that MRI can always operate in the presence of AD for appropriate magnetic field strength and geometry. Stronger AD requires weaker magnetic field, and the most favorable field geometry involves the presence of both net vertical and net toroidal magnetic fluxes. Applying these results to PPDs, together with the results in the literature on the effect of Ohmic resistivity and the Hall term, a new theoretical framework is proposed to make optimistic estimates of the MRI-driven accretion rate. It is found that the MRI inevitably becomes inefficient in driving rapid accretion in the inner regions (˜ 1 AU) of PPDs. It becomes more efficient in the outer disk ( ≳ 15 AU), especially assisted by the presence of tiny grains. The fact that MRI becomes inefficient at the inner PPDs makes the MCW scenario a promising alternative. By performing vertically stratified shearing-box simulations of PPDs that simultaneously include the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and AD in a self-consistent manner, it is found that in the

  5. Explosive Non-Ideality and LiF Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souers, P. Clark

    1999-06-01

    A non-ideality parameter is proposed that is the sonic reaction zone length divided by the radius of the part. This parameter is derived for the four major kinetic experiments: Size (Diameter) Effect, detonation front curvature, LiF experiment and gauge measurement. The parameter is zero for an ideal explosive and rises to 0.4 for HANFO. A value greater than about 0.1 requires the use of an explicit time- dependent code package. The parameter shows increasing non-ideality with decreasing radius. Crystal, generally lithium fluoride, experiments are added to the kinetic data base. The explosive reaction zone is obtained from the interface particle velocity by an impedance transformation followed by a correction for the explosive sound speed. A pressing need is to convert the usual 1-D LiF gunshots to compare with older 2-D cylinder data.

  6. Blast wave stability in a non-ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktitorov, Vladimir

    1999-06-01

    Problem of stability of a selfsimilar blast wave in a non-ideal gas is considered. Small non-radial blast wave perturbations are expanded to spherical harmonics components of expansion being represented in a selfsimilar form (The perturbation front amplitudes are supposed to be power functions of time with power exponent being complex number). The spherical and cylindrical blast waves are considered in the unified manner. The adiabatic exponent of the non-ideal gas is supposed to be a function of the gas density. The blast wave in that gas is selfsimilar just like that is in the case of the ideal gas. So the selfsimilar approach to the blast wave stability problem is used that was previously used in the case of blast wave in ideal gas (Ref.1-3). We considered gas adiabatic exponent to be a simple one-parameter analytical function of density the value of parameter defining the level of gas non-ideality: from ideal gas to non- compressing liquid. For each level of non-ideality the stability problem is solved both for spherical and cylindrical blast waves. The instability region is determined in the space of parameters of the problem: harmonic number and parameters of gas equation of state. The crytical values of parameters of equation of state are calculated. The results are calculated numerically in the general case of arbitrary gas adiabatic exponent γ and harmonic number n and analytically in some special cases: n=1, n>>1, and (γ-1) << 1. 1. V.Ktitorov, Voprosy Atomnoi Nauki i Tekhniki (Atomic science and techn. issues), Ser.TPF, No2, p.28, (1984); 2. D.Ryu and E.T.Vishniac, Astr.J, 313, p.820 (1987); 3. V.Ktitorov, Khimich. Fizika (Chem Phys Issues) V.14, No 2-3, p.169, (1995);

  7. Kinetic modeling of non-ideal explosives with CHEETAH

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Howard, W M; Souers, P C

    1998-08-06

    We report an implementation of the Wood-Kirkwood kinetic detonation model based on multi-species equations of state and multiple reaction rate laws. Finite rate laws are used for the slowest chemical reactions. Other reactions are given infinite rates and are kept in constant thermodynamic equilibrium. We model a wide range of ideal and non-ideal composite energetic materials. We find that we can replicate experimental detonation velocities to within a few per cent, while obtaining good agreement with estimated reaction zone lengths. The detonation velocity as a function of charge radius is also correctly reproduced.

  8. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-01

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  9. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  10. High Order Filter Methods for the Non-ideal Compressible MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    The generalization of a class of low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous gas dynamic flows to compressible MHD equations for structured curvilinear grids has been achieved. The new scheme is shown to provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field numerical error. Standard divergence cleaning is not required by the present filter approach. For certain non-ideal MHD test cases, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields has been achieved.

  11. The production of non-ideal plasmas by meteoroid impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, A.; Close, S.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary dust particles originating primarily from comets and asteroids, called meteoroids, routinely impact spacecraft with velocities up to 72 km/s. Most meteoroids possess enough energy to ionize and vaporize themselves as well as a significant portion of the satellite material upon impact, forming a plasma in the impact crater that rapidly expands out into the surrounding vacuum. The associated electrical effects and potential for damage to satellite electronics through these processes remains largely unknown. Numerous spacecraft have experienced electrical anomalies correlated with meteoroid showers and meteoroid scale momentum transfer events. This area of spacecraft engineering requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics that occur upon formation and expansion of the plasma that results from an impact. We present a series of computational simulations of meteoroid impacts on spacecraft, with particular attention paid to the formation of the plasma in the crater. The simulations use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics method that includes non-ideal plasma physics such as ion-electron energy transfer and a non-ideal Saha equation. If the projectile has a speed above the acoustic speeds of the target material (typically less than 10 km/s), a shock wave will form. We find the plasma in the post shock region momentarily has a density greater than the solid-state density of the target material and has an ion temperature much greater than the electron temperature. We calculate ion temperatures ranging from 1 to 40 eV, depending on impact speed, and thus the plasma has an ion-ion coupling parameter that approaches and sometimes exceeds unity. The degree of ionization is also strongly influenced by non-ideal effects. Multiple charge states are predicted to exist at the forefront of the expanding plume coming from the crater. The plasma density, composition, and temperature within the crater strongly affect the initial conditions of the expansion

  12. Non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikos

    2009-06-01

    Numerical experiments are performed investigating the non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502 in two setups. In the first setup we consider a three-dimensional rate stick experiment. A booster charge initiates a reaction front leading to a curved detonation wave. The numerical results are compared to theory and experimental evidence. The effects of weak and strong confinement are discussed. The second setup considers the so called ``hockey puck experiment.'' Experimental results show the appearance of a dead zone due to the effect of the geometry. This is captured by the numerical results, which also reveal that the initially spherical detonation is diffracted leading to local detonation failure. The numerical simulations are performed by solving a mathematical model for a three-phase medium based on the Euler equations. The numerical results are obtained using high-resolution shock-capturing methods combined with adaptive mesh refinement.

  13. Suicide intervention and non-ideal Kantian theory.

    PubMed

    Cholbi, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Philosophical discussions of the morality of suicide have tended to focus on its justifiability from an agent's point of view rather than on the justifiability of attempts by others to intervene so as to preserve it. This paper addresses questions of suicide intervention within a broadly Kantian perspective. In such a perspective, a chief task is to determine the motives underlying most suicidal behaviour. Kant wrongly characterizes this motive as one of self-love or the pursuit of happiness. Psychiatric and scientifc evidence suggests that suicide is instead motivated by nihilistic disenchantment with the possibility of happiness which, at its apex, results in the loss of the individual's conception of her practical identity. Because of this, methods of intervention that appeal to agents' happiness, while morally benign, will prove ineffective in forestalling suicide. At the same time, more aggressive methods violate the Kantian concern for autonomy. This apparent dilemma can be resolved by seeing suicide intervention as an action undertaken in non-ideal circumstances, where otherwise unjustified manipulation, coercion, or paternalism are morally permitted. PMID:12747359

  14. Surface wave propagation in non-ideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few per cent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall-diffusion-dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut-off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut-off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut-off is introduced by the Hall diffusion, the fractional ionization of the medium is more important than the plasma compressibility in determining such a cut-off. Therefore, for both compressible as well incompressible medium, the surface modes of shorter wavelength are permitted with increasing ionization in the medium. We discuss the relevance of these results in the context of solar photosphere-chromosphere.

  15. Suicide intervention and non-ideal Kantian theory.

    PubMed

    Cholbi, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Philosophical discussions of the morality of suicide have tended to focus on its justifiability from an agent's point of view rather than on the justifiability of attempts by others to intervene so as to preserve it. This paper addresses questions of suicide intervention within a broadly Kantian perspective. In such a perspective, a chief task is to determine the motives underlying most suicidal behaviour. Kant wrongly characterizes this motive as one of self-love or the pursuit of happiness. Psychiatric and scientifc evidence suggests that suicide is instead motivated by nihilistic disenchantment with the possibility of happiness which, at its apex, results in the loss of the individual's conception of her practical identity. Because of this, methods of intervention that appeal to agents' happiness, while morally benign, will prove ineffective in forestalling suicide. At the same time, more aggressive methods violate the Kantian concern for autonomy. This apparent dilemma can be resolved by seeing suicide intervention as an action undertaken in non-ideal circumstances, where otherwise unjustified manipulation, coercion, or paternalism are morally permitted.

  16. On controlling nonlinear dissipation in high order filter methods for ideal and non-ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The newly developed adaptive numerical dissipation control in spatially high order filter schemes for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations has been recently extended to the ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. These filter schemes are applicable to complex unsteady MHD high-speed shock/shear/turbulence problems. They also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The adaptive numerical dissipation mechanism consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. The numerical dissipation considered consists of high order linear dissipation for the suppression of high frequency oscillation and the nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods for discontinuity capturing. The applicable nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods is very general. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of three commonly used types of nonlinear numerical dissipation for both the ideal and non-ideal MHD.

  17. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2016-07-12

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  18. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  19. Diameter effect and detonation front curvature of ideal and non-ideal explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, F. W.; Abernathy, R. L.; Leone, M. G.; Banks, M. L.

    2000-04-01

    Diameter effect and detonation front curvature data are presented for several representative ideal and non-ideal explosives, including cast TNT, Tritonal, urea nitrate (UN), ANFO, and two variants of ammonium nitrate (AN)/solid fuel explosives. The ideal vs. non-ideal detonation characteristics of these various explosives are compared and contrasted with respect to particle size and chemical composition.

  20. The Behavior of PCM/PM Receivers in Non-Ideal Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a performance evaluation of residual carrier commuication systems that employ a PCM/PM modulation technique operating over non-ideal channels. The non-ideal channels under investigation include data asymmetry, an unbalanced data stream (i.e., transition density deviates from 0.5) and InterSymbol Interference (ISI).

  1. Nonlinear filtering and limiting in high order methods for ideal and non-ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee,H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The various filtering mechanisms and base scheme options of the newly developed adaptive numerical dissipation control in spatially high order filter schemes for the ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations are investigated. These filter schemes are applicable to complex unsteady MHD high-speed shock/shear/turbulence problems. They also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The type of spatial base scheme to be used in conjunction with our filter idea is very general. For example, spectral, compact and non-compact spatially central finite difference schemes are possible candidates. The adaptive numerical dissipation mechanism consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and to leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. The numerical dissipation considered consists of high order linear dissipation for the suppression of high frequency oscillation and the nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods for discontinuity capturing. The applicable nonlinear dissipative portion of high-resolution shock-capturing methods is also very general. The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of using compact and non-compact central base schemes in conjunction with three commonly used types of nonlinear numerical dissipation for both the ideal and non-ideal MHD. This extended abstract shows the performance of three nonlinear filters in conjunction with a sixth-order non-compact spatial central base scheme. In the final paper, the high order compact spatial central base scheme will be illustrated and compared with the non-compact base scheme. The reason for the investigation of the high order compact spatial central base scheme over the non-compact base scheme is to evaluate if additional accuracy can be gained in regions of

  2. Influence of probe geometry on measurement results of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiefenbacher, Patrick; Kömle, Norbert I.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kargl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The thermal properties of the surface and subsurface layers of planets and planetary objects yield important information that allows us to better understand the thermal evolution of the body itself and its interactions with the environment. Various planetary bodies of our Solar System are covered by so-called regolith, a granular and porous material. On such planetary bodies the dominant heat transfer mechanism is heat conduction via IR radiation and contact points between particles. In this case the energy balance is mainly controlled by the effective thermal conductivity of the top surface layers, which can be directly measured by thermal conductivity probes. A traditionally used method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the needle-probe method. Such probes consist of thin steel needles with an embedded heating wire and temperature sensors. For the evaluation of the thermal conductivity of a specific material the temperature change with time is determined by heating a resistance wire with a well-defined electrical current flowing through it and simultaneously measuring the temperature increase inside the probe over a certain time. For thin needle probes with a large length-to-diameter ratio it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity, while this is not so straightforward for more rugged probes with a larger diameter and thus a smaller length-to-diameter ratio. Due to the geometry of the standard thin needle probes they are mechanically weak and subject to bending when driven into a soil. Therefore, using them for planetary missions can be problematic. In this paper the thermal conductivity values determined by measurements with two non-ideal, ruggedized thermal conductivity sensors, which only differ in length, are compared to each other. Since the theory describing the temperature response of non-ideal sensors is highly complicated, those sensors were calibrated with an ideal reference sensor in various solid and

  3. Simple equations to simulate closed-loop recycling liquid-liquid chromatography: Ideal and non-ideal recycling models.

    PubMed

    Kostanyan, Artak E

    2015-12-01

    The ideal (the column outlet is directly connected to the column inlet) and non-ideal (includes the effects of extra-column dispersion) recycling equilibrium-cell models are used to simulate closed-loop recycling counter-current chromatography (CLR CCC). Simple chromatogram equations for the individual cycles and equations describing the transport and broadening of single peaks and complex chromatograms inside the recycling closed-loop column for ideal and non-ideal recycling models are presented. The extra-column dispersion is included in the theoretical analysis, by replacing the recycling system (connecting lines, pump and valving) by a cascade of Nec perfectly mixed cells. To evaluate extra-column contribution to band broadening, two limiting regimes of recycling are analyzed: plug-flow, Nec→∞, and maximum extra-column dispersion, Nec=1. Comparative analysis of ideal and non-ideal models has shown that when the volume of the recycling system is less than one percent of the column volume, the influence of the extra-column processes on the CLR CCC separation may be neglected.

  4. Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2005-01-01

    The required type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter to accurately resolve all relevant multiscales of complex MHD unsteady high-speed shock/shear/turbulence/combustion problems are not only physical problem dependent, but also vary from one flow region to another. In addition, proper and efficient control of the divergence of the magnetic field (Div(B)) numerical error for high order shock-capturing methods poses extra requirements for the considered type of CPU intensive computations. The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free from numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multiresolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filters also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error.

  5. A Unified Theory of Non-Ideal Gas Lattice Boltzmann Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Li-Shi

    1998-01-01

    A non-ideal gas lattice Boltzmann model is directly derived, in an a priori fashion, from the Enskog equation for dense gases. The model is rigorously obtained by a systematic procedure to discretize the Enskog equation (in the presence of an external force) in both phase space and time. The lattice Boltzmann model derived here is thermodynamically consistent and is free of the defects which exist in previous lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases. The existing lattice Boltzmann models for non-ideal gases are analyzed and compared with the model derived here.

  6. Set-valued solutions for non-ideal detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenko, R.; Faria, L. M.; Kasimov, A. R.; Ermolaev, B. S.

    2016-03-01

    The existence and structure of a steady-state gaseous detonation propagating in a packed bed of solid inert particles are analyzed in the one-dimensional approximation by taking into consideration frictional and heat losses between the gas and the particles. A new formulation of the governing equations is introduced that eliminates the difficulties with numerical integration across the sonic singularity in the reactive Euler equations. With the new algorithm, we find that when the sonic point disappears from the flow, there exists a one-parameter family of solutions parameterized by either pressure or temperature at the end of the reaction zone. These solutions (termed "set-valued" here) correspond to a continuous spectrum of the eigenvalue problem that determines the detonation velocity as a function of a loss factor.

  7. Using NMR to Determine the Boiling Point Diagram for a Non-Ideal Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Fritz S.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that enables the student to concentrate on the fundamentals of the non-ideal liquid-vapor equilibrium. Presents typical student data and suggests features which might be added to the experiment. (GS)

  8. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  9. Adaptive Numerical Dissipative Control in High Order Schemes for Multi-D Non-Ideal MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2004-01-01

    The goal is to extend our adaptive numerical dissipation control in high order filter schemes and our new divergence-free methods for ideal MHD to non-ideal MHD that include viscosity and resistivity. The key idea consists of automatic detection of different flow features as distinct sensors to signal the appropriate type and amount of numerical dissipation/filter where needed and leave the rest of the region free of numerical dissipation contamination. These scheme-independent detectors are capable of distinguishing shocks/shears, flame sheets, turbulent fluctuations and spurious high-frequency oscillations. The detection algorithm is based on an artificial compression method (ACM) (for shocks/shears), and redundant multi-resolution wavelets (WAV) (for the above types of flow feature). These filter approaches also provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of Div(B) numerical error. The filter scheme consists of spatially sixth order or higher non-dissipative spatial difference operators as the base scheme for the inviscid flux derivatives. If necessary, a small amount of high order linear dissipation is used to remove spurious high frequency oscillations. For example, an eighth-order centered linear dissipation (AD8) might be included in conjunction with a spatially sixth-order base scheme. The inviscid difference operator is applied twice for the viscous flux derivatives. After the completion of a full time step of the base scheme step, the solution is adaptively filtered by the product of a 'flow detector' and the 'nonlinear dissipative portion' of a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme. In addition, the scheme independent wavelet flow detector can be used in conjunction with spatially compact, spectral or spectral element type of base schemes. The ACM and wavelet filter schemes using the dissipative portion of a second-order shock-capturing scheme with sixth-order spatial central base scheme for both the inviscid and viscous MHD flux

  10. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a mixture of a non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the action of monochromatic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Praveen Kumar; Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Cylindrical shock wave in a dusty gas is discussed under the action of monochromatic radiation into stellar atmosphere with a constant intensity on unit area. The gas is assumed to be grey and opaque and shock to be transparent. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles. To obtain some essential features of the shock propagation, small solid particles are taken as pseudo-fluid and it is assumed that the equilibrium flow condition is maintained in the flow-field. The effects of variation of the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas and the radiation parameter are investigated. It is shown that an increase in the parameters of the non-idealness of the gas and the radiation parameter have decaying effect on the shock waves; whereas with an increase in the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas the shock strength increases. It is found that an increase in the parameter non-idealness of the gas and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas have opposite behaviour on fluid velocity, pressure and shock strength. Also, it is shown that an increase in the radiation parameter has effect to decrease the flow variables and the shock strength.

  11. A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Alder, B J; Garcia, A L

    2009-08-03

    A grid-free variant of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is proposed, named the Isotropic DSMC (I-DSMC) method, that is suitable for simulating collision-dominated dense fluid flows. The I-DSMC algorithm eliminates all grid artifacts from the traditional DSMC algorithm and is Galilean invariant and microscopically isotropic. The stochastic collision rules in I-DSMC are modified to introduce a non-ideal structure factor that gives consistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008)]. The resulting Stochastic Hard Sphere Dynamics (SHSD) fluid is empirically shown to be thermodynamically identical to a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with a linear core pair potential, well-described by the hypernetted chain (HNC) approximation. We develop a kinetic theory for the SHSD fluid to obtain estimates for the transport coefficients that are in excellent agreement with particle simulations over a wide range of densities and collision rates. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor against theory based on the Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations. We also study the Brownian motion of a nano-particle suspended in an SHSD fluid and find a long-time power-law tail in its velocity autocorrelation function consistent with hydrodynamic theory and molecular dynamics calculations.

  12. Magnetogasdynamic spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes, in the presence of a spatially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to power law. The radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model and the heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law for heat conduction. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. It is shown that an increase of the gravitational parameter or the Alfven-Mach number or the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas decreases the compressibility of the gas in the flow-field behind the shock, and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is formed at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas under gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of a flare produced shock in the solar wind, central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion etc. The solutions obtained can be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  13. Medical ethics and more: ideal theories, non-ideal theories and conscientious objection.

    PubMed

    Luna, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Doing 'good medical ethics' requires acknowledgment that it is often practised in non-ideal circumstances! In this article I present the distinction between ideal theory (IT) and non-ideal theory (NIT). I show how IT may not be the best solution to tackle problems in non-ideal contexts. I sketch a NIT framework as a useful tool for bioethics and medical ethics and explain how NITs can contribute to policy design in non-ideal circumstances. Different NITs can coexist and be evaluated vis-à-vis the IT. Additionally, I address what an individual doctor ought to do in this non-ideal context with the view that knowledge of NITs can facilitate the decision-making process. NITs help conceptualise problems faced in the context of non-compliance and scarcity in a better and more realistic way. Deciding which policy is optimal in such contexts may influence physicians' decisions regarding their patients. Thus, this analysis-usually identified only with policy making-may also be relevant to medical ethics. Finally, I recognise that this is merely a first step in an unexplored but fundamental theoretical area and that more work needs to be done.

  14. Flow Pattern Phenomena in Two-Phase Flow in Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Simon, William E.

    2004-02-01

    Space transportation systems require high-performance thermal protection and fluid management techniques for systems ranging from cryogenic fluid management devices to primary structures and propulsion systems exposed to extremely high temperatures, as well as for other space systems such as cooling or environment control for advanced space suits and integrated circuits. Although considerable developmental effort is being expended to bring potentially applicable technologies to a readiness level for practical use, new and innovative methods are still needed. One such method is the concept of Advanced Micro Cooling Modules (AMCMs), which are essentially compact two-phase heat exchangers constructed of microchannels and designed to remove large amounts of heat rapidly from critical systems by incorporating phase transition. The development of AMCMs requires fundamental technological advancement in many areas, including: (1) development of measurement methods/systems for flow-pattern measurement/identification for two-phase mixtures in microchannels; (2) development of a phenomenological model for two-phase flow which includes the quantitative measure of flow patterns; and (3) database development for multiphase heat transfer/fluid dynamics flows in microchannels. This paper focuses on the results of experimental research in the phenomena of two-phase flow in microchannels. The work encompasses both an experimental and an analytical approach to incorporating flow patterns for air-water mixtures flowing in a microchannel, which are necessary tools for the optimal design of AMCMs. Specifically, the following topics are addressed: (1) design and construction of a sensitive test system for two-phase flow in microchannels, one which measures ac and dc components of in-situ physical mixture parameters including spatial concentration using concomitant methods; (2) data acquisition and analysis in the amplitude, time, and frequency domains; and (3) analysis of results

  15. Effect of fluid-colloid interactions on the mobility of a thermophoretic microswimmer in non-ideal fluids.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Sengupta, Ankush; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    Janus colloids propelled by light, e.g., thermophoretic particles, offer promising prospects as artificial microswimmers. However, their swimming behavior and its dependence on fluid properties and fluid-colloid interactions remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the behavior of a thermophoretic Janus colloid in its own temperature gradient using numerical simulations. The dissipative particle dynamics method with energy conservation is used to investigate the behavior in non-ideal and ideal-gas like fluids for different fluid-colloid interactions, boundary conditions, and temperature-controlling strategies. The fluid-colloid interactions appear to have a strong effect on the colloid behavior, since they directly affect heat exchange between the colloid surface and the fluid. The simulation results show that a reduction of the heat exchange at the fluid-colloid interface leads to an enhancement of colloid's thermophoretic mobility. The colloid behavior is found to be different in non-ideal and ideal fluids, suggesting that fluid compressibility plays a significant role. The flow field around the colloid surface is found to be dominated by a source-dipole, in agreement with the recent theoretical and simulation predictions. Finally, different temperature-control strategies do not appear to have a strong effect on the colloid's swimming velocity. PMID:26223678

  16. Flow-separation patterns on symmetric forebodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.

    1986-01-01

    Flow-visualization studies of ogival, parabolic, and conical forebodies were made in a comprehensive investigation of the various types of flow patterns. Schlieren, vapor-screen, oil-flow, and sublimation flow-visualization tests were conducted over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg. to 88 deg., over a Reynolds-number range from 0.3X10(6) to 2.0X10(6) (based on base diameter), and over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 2. The principal effects of angle of attack, Reynolds number, and Mach number on the occurrence of vortices, the position of vortex shedding, the principal surface-flow-separation patterns, the magnitude of surface-flow angles, and the extent of laminar and turbulent flow for symmetric, asymmetric, and wake-like flow-separation regimes are presented. It was found that the two-dimensional cylinder analogy was helpful in a qualitative sense in analyzing both the surface-flow patterns and the external flow field. The oil-flow studies showed three types of primary separation patterns at the higher Reynolds numbers owing to the influence of boundary-layer transition. The effect of angle of attack and Reynolds number is to change the axial location of the onset and extent of the primary transitional and turbulent separation regions. Crossflow inflectional-instability vortices were observed on the windward surface at angles of attack from 5 deg. to 55 deg. Their effect is to promote early transition. At low angles of attack, near 10 deg., an unexpected laminar-separation bubble occurs over the forward half of the forebody. At high angles of attack, at which vortex asymmetry occurs, the results support the proposition that the principal cause of vortex asymmetry is the hydrodynamic instability of the inviscid flow field. On the other hand, boundary-layer asymmetries also occur, especially at transitional Reynolds numbers. The position of asymmetric vortex shedding moves forward with increasing angle of attack and with increasing Reynolds number, and moves

  17. Heterogeneity in a Low-Permeability Formation or Non-Ideal Testing Conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Deeds, N. E.; Pickens, J. F.; Distinguin, M.; Delay, J.

    2005-12-01

    Hydraulic testing in packer-isolated wellbore intervals in low-permeability formations is often complicated by non-ideal conditions such as thermal expansion of fluid in the test interval, packer squeeze and borehole closure. Such processes lead to fluid accumulation and pressurization within the wellbore during shut-in, and can exert significant effects on the measured borehole pressure response. Unless these conditions are taken into account during test interpretation, it is possible to make inappropriate conclusions regarding formation heterogeneity (e.g., lateral permeability variations) and/or static pressure levels. We have developed a lumped parameter modeling approach by treating the combined effect of these processes as the equivalent of an additional volume of fluid accumulating within the test interval (in addition to the nominal test-interval volume at the time of shut-in). We postulate that the rate of fluid accumulation can be treated in a simple manner as a constant value for the duration of the test. Thus, the fluid accumulation problem can be recast as the equivalent of a constant injection rate into the packed-off volume within the borehole. We show how this surrogate injection rate can be estimated from the measured pressure data by exploiting the analogy between the pressure response during borehole storage dominated conditions and that of a line-source well with an exponentially varying flow rate. Shut-in test sequences (i.e., shut-in period prior to initiation of a pressure pulse test and shut-in period(s) during pulse test(s)) can then be analyzed as effective constant-rate injection periods. The methodology is demonstrated using data from a recent series of hydraulic tests conducted in support of site characterization activities by ANDRA, the French radioactive waste management agency. In many of these tests, the measured pressure response was fitted to a 2-zone radially composite system model. Although the fit was visually excellent, static

  18. The J-S model versus a non-ideal MHD theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Franca; Lazzari, Barbara; Nibbi, Roberta

    2015-07-01

    A new non-ideal electromagnetic interpretation of the J-S type viscoelastic model for polymeric fluids is given and a generalized resisto-elastic magnetohydrodynamic scenario for collisionless plasmas is proposed. The influence of the new theory on the incompressible transverse Alfvén waves is thoroughly investigated.

  19. The Representation of Highly Non-Ideal Phase Equilibria Using Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charos, Georgios N.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Previous work focused on use of computer graphics in teaching thermodynamic phase equilibria for classes I and II. Extends this work to include the considerably more non-ideal phase behavior shown by classes III, IV, and V. Student and instructor response has been overwhelmingly positive about the approach. (JN)

  20. Magnetogasdynamics shock waves in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Gorakh

    2016-07-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind a magnetogasdynamics cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric non ideal gas with increasing energy and conductive and radiative heat fluxes in presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assume to be varying and obeying power laws. In order to find the similarity solutions the angular velocity of the ambient medium is taken to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity and the absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The effects of the presence of radiation and conduction, the non-idealness of the gas and the magnetic field on the shock propagation and the flow behind the shock are investigated.

  1. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  2. Micromechanics of emergent patterns in plastic flows

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Santidan; Grant, Martin; Samajdar, Indradev; Haldar, Arunansu; Sain, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline solids undergo plastic deformation and subsequently flow when subjected to stresses beyond their elastic limit. In nature most crystalline solids exist in polycrystalline form. Simulating plastic flows in polycrystalline solids has wide ranging applications, from material processing to understanding intermittency of earthquake dynamics. Using phase field crystal (PFC) model we show that in sheared polycrystalline solids the atomic displacement field shows spatio-temporal heterogeneity spanning over several orders of length and time scales, similar to that in amorphous solids. The displacement field also exhibits localized quadrupolar patterns, characteristic of two dislocations of the opposite sign approaching each other. This is a signature of crystallinity at microscopic scale. Polycrystals being halfway between single crystals and amorphous solids, in terms of the degree of structural order, descriptions of solid mechanics at two widely different scales, namely continuum plastic flow and discrete dislocation dynamics turns out to be necessary here. PMID:24056757

  3. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang, S.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  4. Generalized Pseudo-Reaction Zone Model for Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    The pseudo-reaction zone model was proposed to improve engineering scale simulations with high explosives that have a slow reaction component. In this work an extension of the pseudo-reaction zone model is developed for non-ideal explosives that propagate well below the steady-planar Chapman-Jouguet velocity. A programmed burn method utilizing Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and a detonation velocity dependent pseudo-reaction rate has been developed for non-ideal explosives and applied to the explosive mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO). The pseudo-reaction rate is calibrated to the experimentally obtained normal detonation velocity—shock curvature relation. Cylinder test simulations predict the proper expansion to within 1% even though significant reaction occurs as the cylinder expands.

  5. Generalized Pseudo-Reaction Zone Model for Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, Bradley

    2007-06-01

    The pseudo-reaction zone model was proposed to improve engineering scale simulations when using Detonation Shock Dynamics with high explosives that have a slow reaction component. In this work an extension of the pseudo-reaction zone model is developed for non-ideal explosives that propagate well below their steady-planar Chapman-Jouguet velocity. A programmed burn method utilizing Detonation Shock Dynamics and a detonation velocity dependent pseudo-reaction rate has been developed for non-ideal explosives and applied to the explosive mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO). The pseudo-reaction rate is calibrated to the experimentally obtained normal detonation velocity---shock curvature relation. The generalized pseudo-reaction zone model proposed here predicts the cylinder expansion to within 1% by accounting for the slow reaction in ANFO.

  6. Experimental Method to Determine the Detonation Characteristics of Very Non-Ideal High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Gerard

    2005-07-01

    Common experimental configurations used to determine HE detonation velocity-curvature are right circular cylinders detonated in air. The steadily propagating detonation front is curved and its velocity depends upon the diameter of the cylinder. This configuration requires several experiments with different diameters and sufficiently long cylinders to assume a steadily propagating detonation front. This last hypothesis is practically not achieved for non-ideal HE using reasonably long cylinders. To elude this problem, a special explosive device called ``logosphere,'' developed by CEA, has been adapted to non ideal HE. It provides a well define spherically diverging detonation wave and allows measurements of the detonation velocity-curvature relationship by means of piezoelectric pins without any perturbation. VISAR and DLI diagnostics record the material velocities at the rear surface of HE through transparent windows. The particle velocity values are used to determine the curved detonation states using the detonation velocity-acceleration-curvature model of Louis Brun.

  7. Experimental Method to Determine the Detonation Characteristics of a Very Non-Ideal High Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, G.; Le Gallic, C.; Davoine, F.; Bouinot, P.

    2006-07-01

    Common experimental configurations used to determine HE detonation velocity-curvature are right circular cylinders detonated in air. The steadily propagating detonation front is curved and its velocity depends upon the diameter of the cylinder. This configuration requires several experiments with different diameters and sufficiently long cylinders to assume a steadily propagating detonation front. This last hypothesis is practically not achieved for non-ideal HE using reasonably long cylinders. To elude this problem, a special explosive device called "logosphere", developed by CEA, has been adapted to non ideal HE. It provides a well define spherically diverging detonation wave and allows measurements of the detonation velocity-curvature relationship by means of piezoelectric pins without any perturbation. VISAR and IDL diagnostics record the material velocities at the rear surface of the explosive through transparent windows. The particle velocity values are used to determine the curved detonation states using the detonation velocity-acceleration-curvature model of Louis Brun.

  8. Non-ideal feedforward torque control of wind turbines: Impacts on annual energy production & gross earnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Christoph; Schechner, Korbinian

    2016-09-01

    We discuss non-ideal torque control in wind turbine systems. Most high-level controllers generate a reference torque which is then send to the underlying electrical drive system (generator+inverter) of the wind turbine system to steer the turbine/generator to its optimal operation point (depending on the wind speed). The energy production heavily depends on the mechanical power (i.e. the product of rotational speed and generator torque). However, since torque sensors in the MW range are not available or extremely expensive, the underlying torque control system is implemented as feedforward control and, therefore, is inherently sensitive to parameter variations/uncertainties. Based on real wind data and a wind turbine system model, we discuss causes and impacts of non-ideal feedforward torque control on the energy production and the annual gross earnings.

  9. Exciton-like electromagnetic excitations in non-ideal microcavity supercrystals.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Vladimir; Fedorov, Stanislav; Gumennyk, Kostyantyn; Sychanova, Marina; Kavokin, Alexey

    2014-11-06

    We study localized photonic excitations in a quasi-two-dimensional non-ideal binary microcavity lattice with use of the virtual crystal approximation. The effect of point defects (vacancies) on the excitation spectrum is investigated by numerical modelling. We obtain the dispersion and the energy gap of the electromagnetic excitations which may be considered as Frenkel exciton-like quasiparticles and analyze the dependence of their density of states on the defect concentrations in a microcavity supercrystal.

  10. Profiles of neutral lines emitted from weakly non-ideal helium plasmas produced in flashlamps

    SciTech Connect

    Vitel, Yves; El Bezzari, Mohammed; D'yachkov, Lev G.; Kurilenkov, Yuri K.

    1999-04-01

    High pressure helium arcs are created in linear flashlamps. Plasma diagnostics taking into account non-ideality effects, give on axis electron densities in the range 2 10{sup 17}-1.7 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and temperatures included between 20000 and 30000 K. In these conditions of dense plasmas, profiles of emitted neutral lines are recorded and compared with other experimental values and theoretical calculations.

  11. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  12. Treatment of non-ideality in the SPACCIM multiphase model - Part 1: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusumdar, A. J.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2016-01-01

    Ambient tropospheric deliquesced particles generally comprise a complex mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Dynamic modeling of physical and chemical processes in this complex matrix is challenging. Thus, up-to-date multiphase chemistry models generally do not consider non-ideal solution effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed at presenting further development of the SPACCIM (Spectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model) through treatment of solution non-ideality, which has not been considered before. The present paper firstly describes the model developments including (i) the implementation of solution non-ideality in aqueous-phase reaction kinetics in the SPACCIM framework, (ii) the advancements in the coupling scheme of microphysics and multiphase chemistry and (iii) the required adjustments of the numerical schemes, especially in the sparse linear solver and the calculation of the Jacobian. Secondly, results of sensitivity investigations are outlined, aiming at the evaluation of different activity coefficient modules and the examination of the contributions of different intermolecular forces to the overall activity coefficients. Finally, first results obtained with the new model framework are presented. The SPACCIM parcel model was developed and, so far, applied for the description of aerosol-cloud interactions. To advance SPACCIM also for modeling physical and chemical processes in deliquesced particles, the solution non-ideality has to be taken into account by utilizing activities in reaction terms instead of aqueous concentrations. The main goal of the extended approach was to provide appropriate activity coefficients for solved species. Therefore, an activity coefficient module was incorporated into the kinetic model framework of SPACCIM. Based on an intercomparison of different activity coefficient models and the comparison with experimental data, the AIOMFAC approach was implemented and extended by additional interaction

  13. Patterns and flow in frictional fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sandnes, B.; Flekkøy, E.G.; Knudsen, H.A.; Måløy, K.J.; See, H.

    2011-01-01

    Pattern-forming processes in simple fluids and suspensions have been studied extensively, and the basic displacement structures, similar to viscous fingers and fractals in capillary dominated flows, have been identified. However, the fundamental displacement morphologies in frictional fluids and granular mixtures have not been mapped out. Here we consider Coulomb friction and compressibility in the fluid dynamics, and discover surprising responses including highly intermittent flow and a transition to quasi-continuodynamics. Moreover, by varying the injection rate over several orders of magnitude, we characterize new dynamic modes ranging from stick-slip bubbles at low rate to destabilized viscous fingers at high rate. We classify the fluid dynamics into frictional and viscous regimes, and present a unified description of emerging morphologies in granular mixtures in the form of extended phase diagrams. PMID:21505444

  14. Treatment of non-ideality in the multiphase model SPACCIM - Part 1: Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusumdar, A. J.; Wolke, R.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-06-01

    Ambient tropospheric deliquesced particles generally comprise a complex mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Dynamic modeling of physical and chemical processes in this complex matrix is challenging. Thus, up-to-date multiphase chemistry models do generally not consider non-ideal solution effects. Therefore, the present study was aimed at the further development of the SPACCIM model to treat both complex multiphase chemistry and phase transfer processes considering newly non-ideality properties of concentrated aerosol solutions. The present paper describes firstly, the performed model development including (i) the kinetic implementation of the non-ideality in the SPACCIM framework, (ii) the advancements in the coupling scheme of microphysics and multiphase chemistry and (iii) the required adjustments of the numerical schemes, especially in the sparse linear solver and the calculation of the Jacobian. Secondly, results of performed sensitivity investigations are outlined aiming at the evaluation of different activity coefficient modules and the examination of the contributions of different intermolecular forces to the overall activity coefficients. Finally, first results obtained with the new model framework are presented. The main product of the performed model development is the new kinetic model approach SPACCIM-SpactMod, which utilizes activities in reaction terms instead of aqueous concentrations. Based on an intercomparison of different activity coefficient models and the comparison with experimental data, AIOMFAC was selected as base model and extended by additional interaction parameters from literature for mixed organic-inorganic systems. Moreover, the performance and the capability of the applied activity coefficient module were evaluated by means of water activity measurements, literature data and results of other thermodynamic equilibrium models. Comprehensive comparison studies showed that the SpactMod (SPACCIM activity coefficient

  15. Non-ideal Effects in Streaming Bi-Dust Acoustic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, J.; Castro, E.; Martin, P.; Arias, H.

    2006-12-04

    Streaming dust acoustic instabilities in the presence of a dust beam in a weakly non-ideal dusty plasma have been studied considering a new form for the state equation with two kind of grains. Fluctuating charging effects are not considered in this work. Homogeneous dust-acoustic waves (DAWS) are studied for a perturbed plasma in a very low frequency regime, where dusty plasmas support new kind of waves and instabilities due to the dust collective dynamics. In this analysis a fluid model is used and electrons and ions are determined by their Boltzmann factors in order to find an adequate dispersion relation, which has several parameters depending of the state equation constants. In this paper we use the state equation structured by Ree and Hoover using Pade approximant for a hard-sphere gas in the form P = nT 1 + nb{sub 0} (1 + a{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + a{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}/1 - b{sub 1}b{sub 0}n + b{sub 2}b{sub 0}{sup 2}n{sup 2}) is applied, where b0 is calculated by the second virial term for the hard-core model. This type of equation is more accurate than other expressions and easier to manipulate. Comparisons between the ideal and non ideal cases is performed. Constants a1, a2, b1, b2, are calculated with the Pade method. The onset of the instability and also the growth rates are studied in function of relevant parameters of the system as the radius of the grains and their densities. In our analysis the instability region for non ideal plasma is compared with that of the ideal ones.

  16. A mechanistic view of the non-ideal osmotic and motional behavior of intracellular water.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I L; Kanal, K M; Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that essentially all of the water in cells has the same ideal motional and colligative properties as does water in bulk liquid state. This assumption is used in studies of volume regulation, transmembrane movement of solutes and electrical potentials, solute and solution motion, solute solubility and other phenomena. To get at the extent and the source of non-ideally behaved water (an operational term dependent on the measurement method), we studied the motional and colligative properties of water in cells, in solutions of amino acids and glycine peptides whose surface characteristics are known, and in solution of bovine serum albumin, hemoglobin and some synthetic polypeptides. Solutions of individual amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains showed one perturbed water molecule (structured-slowed in motion) per nine square angstroms of hydrophobic surface area. Water molecules adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces form pentagonal structural arrays, as shown by X-ray diffraction studies, that are reported to be disrupted by heat, electric field, hydrostatic pressure and phosphorylation state. Hydrophilic amino acids demonstrated water destructuring (increased motion) that was attributed to dielectric realignment of dipolar water molecules in the electric field between charge groups. In solutions of proteins, several methods indicate the equivalent of 2-8 layers of structured water molecules extending beyond the protein surface, and we have recently demonstrated that induced protein conformational change modifies the extent of non-ideally behaved water. Water self-diffusion rate as measured in three different cell types was about half that of bulk water, indicating that most of the water in these cells was slower in motion than bulk water. In different cell types the extent of osmotically perturbed water ranged from less that half to almost all of the intracellular water. The assumption that essentially all intracellular water

  17. Non-Ideal Detonation Properties of Ammonium Nitrate and Activated Carbon Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Atsumi; Echigoya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hidefumi; Ogawa, Terushige; Katoh, Katsumi; Kubota, Shiro; Wada, Yuji; Ogata, Yuji

    To obtain a better understanding of detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) and activated carbon (AC) mixtures, steel tube tests with several diameters were carried out for various compositions of powdered AN and AC mixtures and the influence of the charge diameter on the detonation velocity was investigated. The results showed that the detonation velocity increased with the increase of the charge diameter. The experimentally observed values were far below the theoretically predicted values made by the thermodynamic CHEETAH code and they showed so-called non-ideal detonation. The extrapolated detonation velocity of stoichiometric composition to the infinite diameter showed a good agreement with the theoretical value.

  18. Dynamics of the non-ideal autoparametric system with MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sado, Danuta

    2012-11-01

    The nonlinear response of a three degree of freedom autoparametric system with a double pendulum, including the magneto-rheological (MR) damper when the excitation comes from a DC motor which works with limited power supply, has been examined. The non-ideal source of power adds one degree of freedom which makes the system have four degrees of freedom. The influence of damping force in MR damper on the phenomenon of energy transfer has been studied. Near the internal and external resonance region, except periodic vibration also chaotic vibration has been observed.

  19. Quantification of non-ideal explosion violence with a shock tube

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I; Hill, Larry G

    2009-01-01

    There is significant interest in quantifying the blast violence associated with various nonideal explosions. Such data is essential to evaluate the damage potential of both explosive cookoff and terrorist explosive scenarios. We present a technique designed to measure the source energy associated with a non-ideal, asymmetrical, and three-dimensional explosion. A tube is used to confine and focus energy from a blast event into a one-dimensional, quasi-planar shock front. During propagation along the length of the tube, the wave is allowed to shocksteepen into a more ideal form. Pressure transducers then measure the shock overpressure as a function of the distance from the source. One-dimensional blast scaling theory allows calculation of the source energy from this data. This small-scale test method addresses cost and noise concerns as well as boosting and symmetry issues associated with large-scale, three-dimensional, blast arena tests. Results from both ideal explosives and non-ideal explosives are discussed.

  20. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length. PMID:25234987

  1. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length.

  2. A study of grout flow pattern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Hyun, S.

    2013-01-10

    A new disposal unit, designated as Salt Disposal Unit no. 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt nuclear waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System plan. The unit is cylindrical disposal vault of 380 ft diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has about 30 million gallons of capacity. Primary objective was to develop the computational model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as function of elevation of grout discharge port, and slurry rheology. A Bingham plastic model was basically used to represent the grout flow behavior. A two-phase modeling approach was taken to achieve the objective. This approach assumes that the air-grout interface determines the shape of the accumulation mound. The results of this study were used to develop the design guidelines for the discharge ports of the Saltstone feed materials in the SDU6 facility. The focusing areas of the modeling study are to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor under the baseline modeling conditions, to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation of discharge port, discharge pipe diameter, and grout properties, and to determine the changes in grout density as it is related to grout drop height. An axi-symmetric two-phase modeling method was used for computational efficiency. Based on the nominal design and operating conditions, a transient computational approach was taken to compute flow fields mainly driven by pumping inertia and natural gravity. Detailed solution methodology and analysis results are discussed here.

  3. Comparison of non-ideal solution theories for multi-solute solutions in cryobiology and tabulation of required coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Michal W; McGann, Locksley E; Nychka, John A; Elliott, Janet A W

    2014-10-01

    Thermodynamic solution theories allow the prediction of chemical potentials in solutions of known composition. In cryobiology, such models are a critical component of many mathematical models that are used to simulate the biophysical processes occurring in cells and tissues during cryopreservation. A number of solution theories, both thermodynamically ideal and non-ideal, have been proposed for use with cryobiological solutions. In this work, we have evaluated two non-ideal solution theories for predicting water chemical potential (i.e. osmolality) in multi-solute solutions relevant to cryobiology: the Elliott et al. form of the multi-solute osmotic virial equation, and the Kleinhans and Mazur freezing point summation model. These two solution theories require fitting to only single-solute data, although they can make predictions in multi-solute solutions. The predictions of these non-ideal solution theories were compared to predictions made using ideal dilute assumptions and to available literature multi-solute experimental osmometric data. A single, consistent set of literature single-solute solution data was used to fit for the required solute-specific coefficients for each of the non-ideal models. Our results indicate that the two non-ideal solution theories have similar overall performance, and both give more accurate predictions than ideal models. These results can be used to select between the non-ideal models for a specific multi-solute solution, and the updated coefficients provided in this work can be used to make the desired predictions.

  4. Unsaturated Zone Flow Patterns and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers

    2001-10-17

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents the development of an expected-case model for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport that will be described in terms of the representativeness of models of the natural system. The expected-case model will provide an evaluation of the effectiveness of the natural barriers, assess the impact of conservatism in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), and support the development of further models and analyses for public confidence building. The present models used in ''Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation'' (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) 2000 [1532461]) underestimate the natural-barrier performance because of conservative assumptions and parameters and do not adequately address uncertainty and alternative models. The development of an expected case model for the UZ natural barrier addresses issues regarding flow-pattern analysis and modeling that had previously been treated conservatively. This is in line with the Repository Safety Strategy (RSS) philosophy of treating conservatively those aspects of the UZ flow and transport system that are not important for achieving regulatory dose (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153246], Section 1.1.1). The development of an expected case model for the UZ also provides defense-in-depth in areas requiring further analysis of uncertainty and alternative models. In general, the value of the conservative case is to provide a more easily defensible TSPA for behavior of UZ flow and transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This AMR has been prepared in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (Bechtel SAIC Company (BSC) 2001 [155051], Section 1.3 - Work Package 4301213UMG). The work scope is to examine the data and current models of flow and transport in the Yucca Mountain UZ to identify models and analyses where conservatism may be reduced and

  5. Enabling R&D for accurate simulation of non-ideal explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, John Bahram; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schmitt, Robert Gerard

    2010-09-01

    We implemented two numerical simulation capabilities essential to reliably predicting the effect of non-ideal explosives (NXs). To begin to be able to treat the multiple, competing, multi-step reaction paths and slower kinetics of NXs, Sandia's CTH shock physics code was extended to include the TIGER thermochemical equilibrium solver as an in-line routine. To facilitate efficient exploration of reaction pathways that need to be identified for the CTH simulations, we implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS molecular dynamics code the MSST method, which is a reactive molecular dynamics technique for simulating steady shock wave response. Our preliminary demonstrations of these two capabilities serve several purposes: (i) they demonstrate proof-of-principle for our approach; (ii) they provide illustration of the applicability of the new functionality; and (iii) they begin to characterize the use of the new functionality and identify where improvements will be needed for the ultimate capability to meet national security needs. Next steps are discussed.

  6. Building a Numerical Relativistic Non-ideal Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, S. M.; Aloy, M. A.; Aloy-Torás, C.

    2014-09-01

    Including resistive effects in relativistic magnetized plasmas is a challenging task, that a number of authors have recently tackled employing different methods. From the numerical point of view, the difficulty in including non-ideal terms arises from the fact that, in the limit of very high plasma conductivity (i.e., close to the ideal MHD limit), the system of governing equations becomes stiff, and the standard explicit integrating methods produce instabilities that destroy the numerical solution. To deal with such a difficulty, we have extended the relativistic MHD code MRGENESIS, to include a number of Implicit Explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX-RK) numerical methods. To validate the implementation of the IMEX-RK schemes, several standard tests are presented in one and two spatial dimensions, covering different conductivity regimes.

  7. Building a numerical relativistic non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics code for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, S. Miranda; Aloy, M. A.; Aloy, Carmen.

    2014-08-01

    Including resistive effects in relativistic magnetized plasmas is a challenging task, that a number of authors have recently tackled employing different methods. From the numerical point of view, the difficulty in including non-ideal terms arises from the fact that, in the limit of very high plasma conductivity (i.e., close to the ideal MHD limit), the system of governing equations becomes stiff, and the standard explicit integrating methods produce instabilities that destroy the numerical solution. To deal with such a difficulty, we have extended the relativistic MHD code MR-GENESIS, to include a number of Implicit Explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX-RK) numerical methods. To validate the implementation of the IMEX-RK schemes, two standard tests are presented in one and two spatial dimensions, covering different conductivity regimes.

  8. Diameter Effect and Detonation Front Curvature of Ideal and Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, F. W.; Abernathy, R. L.; Leone, M. G.; Banks, M. L.

    1999-06-01

    Diameter effect and detonation front curvature data are presented for cast TNT, Tritonal, Urea Nitrate, ANFO, and two AN fertilizer/solid fuel explosives, designated Formula α and Formula β. Near ideal explosives, such as TNT, have relatively flat diameter effect curves and large detonation front curvatures. Although Tritonal exhibits a diameter effect curve similar to that of TNT, the presence of aluminum appears to reduce the front curvature. A low density, powdered material, Urea Nitrate, also exhibits near ideal behavior. The AN-based formulations exhibit marked non-ideal explosive characteristics: steeply falling diameter effect curves and small front curvatures. Although the AN-based explosives are similar in chemical composition and appear to have comparable infinite diameter detonation velocities, the failure diameters of Formula α and Formula β are significantly smaller than the failure diameter of ANFO.

  9. Role of spectral non-idealities in the design of solar thermophotovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Andrej; Nam, Youngsuk; Bierman, David M; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-20

    To bridge the gap between theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated efficiencies of solar thermophotovoltaics (STPVs), we consider the impact of spectral non-idealities on the efficiency and the optimal design of STPVs over a range of PV bandgaps (0.45-0.80 eV) and optical concentrations (1-3,000x). On the emitter side, we show that suppressing or recycling sub-bandgap radiation is critical. On the absorber side, the relative importance of high solar absorptance versus low thermal emittance depends on the energy balance. Both results are well-described using dimensionless parameters weighting the relative power density above and below the cutoff wavelength. This framework can be used as a guide for materials selection and targeted spectral engineering in STPVs.

  10. Non-ideal assembly of the driving unit affecting shape of load-displacement curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-03-01

    The results of nanoindentation testing strongly rely on load-displacement curves, but an abnormal load-displacement curve with obvious inflection in the unloading portion was commonly observed in previously published papers and the reason is not clear. In this paper, possible reasons involved in a custom-made indentation instrument, such as sensors, control and assembly issues, are analyzed and discussed step by step. Experimental results indicate that non-ideal assembly of the precision driving unit strongly affects the shape of the load-displacement curve and its affecting mechanism is studied by theoretical analysis and finite element simulations. This paper reveals the reason leading to the abnormal load-displacement curve, which is helpful for debugging of indentation instruments and can enhance comparability of indentation results.

  11. Redundant imprinting of information in non-ideal environments: Quantum Darwinism via a noisy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael; Quan, Haitao; Zurek, Wojciech

    2011-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism provides an information-theoretic framework for the emergence of the classical world from the quantum substrate. It recognizes that we - the observers - acquire our information about the ``systems of interest'' indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Objectivity, a key property of the classical world, arises via the proliferation of redundant information into the environment where many observers can then intercept it and independently determine the state of the system. While causing a system to decohere, environments that remain nearly invariant under the Hamiltonian dynamics, such as very mixed states, have a diminished ability to transmit information about the system, yet can still acquire redundant information about the system [1,2]. Our results show that Quantum Darwinism is robust with respect to non-ideal initial states of the environment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  12. Numerical modeling of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in non-ideal multijunction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengyang; Lyu, Zheng; Jia, Jieyang; Chen, Yusi; Liu, Yi; Huo, Yijie; Miao, Yu; Harris, James

    2016-03-01

    For solar cells composed of direct bandgap semiconductors such as GaAs, the performance can be significantly improved by utilizing photon recycling and luminescence coupling effects. Accurate modeling with those effects may offer insightful guidance in designing such devices. Previous research has demonstrated different numerical models on photon recycling and luminescent coupling. However, most of those works are based on complicated theoretical derivation and idealized assumptions, which made them hard to implement. In addition, very few works provide method to model both photon recycling and luminescent coupling effects. In this paper, we demonstrate an easy-to-implement but accurate numerical model to simulate those effects in multijunction solar cells. Our numerical model can be incorporated into commonly used equivalent circuit model with high accuracy. The simulation results were compared with experimental data and exhibit good consistency. Our numerical simulation is based on a self-consistent optical-electrical model that includes non-ideal losses in both the single junction and the tandem device. Based on the numerical analysis, we modified the two-diode circuit model by introducing additional current-control-current sources to represent the effects of both photon recycling and luminescence coupling. The effects of photon recycling on the diode equation have been investigated based on detailed-balanced model, accounting for internal optical losses. We also showed the practical limit of performance enhancement of photon recycling and luminescent coupling effects. This work will potentially facilitate the accurate simulation of solar cell with non-ideal effects, and provide more efficient tools for multijunction solar cell design and optimization.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

    2006-06-20

    We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

  14. Microgravity two-phase fluid flow pattern modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    When gas and liquid mixtures flow in a pipe, the distribution of the two phases may take many forms. A flow pattern, or flow regime, is the characteristic spatial distribution of the phases of flow in a pipe. Because heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that can be chosen. A theoretical two phase flow regime transition map under a microgravity environment was developed on physical concepts. These transitions use four basic flow patterns: dispersed flow, slug flow, stratified flow, and annular flow. The forces considered are body force, surface tension force, inertial force, friction, and the force from eddy turbulent fluctuation. Three dimensionless parameters were developed. Because these transition boundaries were developed based on physical concepts, they should be applicable to flow regimes occurring in various design conditions. Because the flow pattern data from KC-135 experiments are insufficient to verify these theoretical transition lines completely, an adiabatic experiment for flow regime analysis is recommended.

  15. A generic model of real-world non-ideal behaviour of FES-induced muscle contractions: simulation tool.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Cheryl L; Graham, Geoff M; Popovic, Milos R

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) applications are frequently evaluated in simulation prior to testing in human subjects. Such simulations are usually based on the typical muscle responses to electrical stimulation, which may result in an overly optimistic assessment of likely real-world performance. We propose a novel method for simulating FES applications that includes non-ideal muscle behaviour during electrical stimulation resulting from muscle fatigue, spasms and tremors. A 'non-idealities' block that can be incorporated into existing FES simulations and provides a realistic estimate of real-world performance is described. An implementation example is included, showing how the non-idealities block can be incorporated into a simulation of electrically stimulated knee extension against gravity for both a proportional-integral-derivative controller and a sliding mode controller. The results presented in this paper illustrate that the real-world performance of a FES system may be vastly different from the performance obtained in simulation using nominal muscle models. We believe that our non-idealities block should be included in future simulations that involve muscle response to FES, as this tool will provide neural engineers with a realistic simulation of the real-world performance of FES systems. This simulation strategy will help engineers and organizations save time and money by preventing premature human testing. The non-idealities block will become available free of charge at www.toronto-fes.ca in late 2011. PMID:21757801

  16. A generic model of real-world non-ideal behaviour of FES-induced muscle contractions: simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Cheryl L.; Graham, Geoff M.; Popovic, Milos R.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) applications are frequently evaluated in simulation prior to testing in human subjects. Such simulations are usually based on the typical muscle responses to electrical stimulation, which may result in an overly optimistic assessment of likely real-world performance. We propose a novel method for simulating FES applications that includes non-ideal muscle behaviour during electrical stimulation resulting from muscle fatigue, spasms and tremors. A 'non-idealities' block that can be incorporated into existing FES simulations and provides a realistic estimate of real-world performance is described. An implementation example is included, showing how the non-idealities block can be incorporated into a simulation of electrically stimulated knee extension against gravity for both a proportional-integral-derivative controller and a sliding mode controller. The results presented in this paper illustrate that the real-world performance of a FES system may be vastly different from the performance obtained in simulation using nominal muscle models. We believe that our non-idealities block should be included in future simulations that involve muscle response to FES, as this tool will provide neural engineers with a realistic simulation of the real-world performance of FES systems. This simulation strategy will help engineers and organizations save time and money by preventing premature human testing. The non-idealities block will become available free of charge at www.toronto-fes.ca in late 2011.

  17. A generic model of real-world non-ideal behaviour of FES-induced muscle contractions: simulation tool.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Cheryl L; Graham, Geoff M; Popovic, Milos R

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) applications are frequently evaluated in simulation prior to testing in human subjects. Such simulations are usually based on the typical muscle responses to electrical stimulation, which may result in an overly optimistic assessment of likely real-world performance. We propose a novel method for simulating FES applications that includes non-ideal muscle behaviour during electrical stimulation resulting from muscle fatigue, spasms and tremors. A 'non-idealities' block that can be incorporated into existing FES simulations and provides a realistic estimate of real-world performance is described. An implementation example is included, showing how the non-idealities block can be incorporated into a simulation of electrically stimulated knee extension against gravity for both a proportional-integral-derivative controller and a sliding mode controller. The results presented in this paper illustrate that the real-world performance of a FES system may be vastly different from the performance obtained in simulation using nominal muscle models. We believe that our non-idealities block should be included in future simulations that involve muscle response to FES, as this tool will provide neural engineers with a realistic simulation of the real-world performance of FES systems. This simulation strategy will help engineers and organizations save time and money by preventing premature human testing. The non-idealities block will become available free of charge at www.toronto-fes.ca in late 2011.

  18. Correlation between permeability and groundwater flow patterns in carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Lee, J.; Park, Y.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater flow in carbonate rocks is controlled by many factors such as degree of fracture and pore development, weathering and diagenesis. Among these factors, fracture is main factor and can form main flow path. Also, flow patterns in carbonate area are decided by these factors. This study was performed to understand factors controlling permeability and flow patterns in carbonate area and to evaluate correlation between permeability and flow patterns. Data used in this study were collected from many literatures and these data were analyzed and evaluated using graphic and statistical analysis. In many carbonate areas, branching conduit patterns were dominant. Of these areas, permeability was relatively high in areas where moving distance of flow was short and hydraulic gradient was steep. This work was supported by the Energy Resources R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2009201030001A).

  19. Effect of compositional heterogeneity on dissolution of non-ideal LNAPL mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Johnston, C. D.; Bastow, T. P.; Lekmine, G.; Rayner, J. L.; Nambi, I. M.; Suresh Kumar, G.; Ravi Krishna, R.; Davis, G. B.

    2016-11-01

    The extent of dissolution of petroleum hydrocarbon fuels into groundwater depends greatly on fuel composition. Petroleum fuels can consist of thousands of compounds creating different interactions within the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), thereby affecting the relative dissolution of the components and hence a groundwater plume's composition over long periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the variability in the effective solubilities and activity coefficients for common constituents of gasoline fuels (benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene) (BTX) in matrices with an extreme range of molar volumes and chemical affinities. Four synthetic mixtures were investigated comprising BTX with the bulk of the NAPL mixtures made up of either, ethylbenzene (an aromatic like BTX with similar molar volume); 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (an aromatic with a greater molar volume); n-hexane (an aliphatic with a low molar volume); and n-decane (an aliphatic with a high molar volume). Equilibrium solubility values for the constituents were under-predicted by Raoult's law by up to 30% (higher experimental concentrations) for the mixture with n-hexane as a filler and over-predicted by up to 12% (lower experimental concentrations) for the aromatic mixtures with ethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as fillers. Application of PP-LFER (poly-parameter linear free energy relationship) model for non-ideal mixtures also resulted in poor correlation between experimentally measured and predicted concentrations, indicating that differences in chemical affinities can be the major cause of deviation from ideal behavior. Synthetic mixtures were compared with the dissolution behavior of fresh and naturally weathered unleaded gasoline. The presence of lighter aliphatic components in the gasoline had a profound effect on estimating effective solubility due to chemical affinity differences (estimated at 0.0055 per percentage increase in the molar proportion of aliphatic) as

  20. Gas liquid flow at microgravity conditions - Flow patterns and their transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukler, A. E.; Fabre, J. A.; Mcquillen, J. B.; Vernon, R.

    1987-01-01

    The prediction of flow patterns during gas-liquid flow in conduits is central to the modern approach for modeling two phase flow and heat transfer. The mechanisms of transition are reasonably well understood for flow in pipes on earth where it has been shown that body forces largely control the behavior observed. This work explores the patterns which exist under conditions of microgravity when these body forces are suppressed. Data are presented which were obtained for air-water flow in tubes during drop tower experiments and Learjet trajectories. Preliminary models to explain the observed flow pattern map are evolved.

  1. The Small-scale Dynamo and Non-ideal Magnetohydrodynamics in Primordial Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Glover, Simon; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-08-01

    We study the amplification of magnetic fields during the formation of primordial halos. The turbulence generated by gravitational infall motions during the formation of the first stars and galaxies can amplify magnetic fields very efficiently and on short timescales up to dynamically significant values. Using the Kazantsev theory, which describes the so-called small-scale dynamo—a magnetohydrodynamical process converting kinetic energy from turbulence into magnetic energy—we can then calculate the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field. Our calculations are based on a detailed chemical network and we include non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects such as ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation. We follow the evolution of the magnetic field up to larger scales until saturation occurs on the Jeans scale. Assuming a weak magnetic seed field generated by the Biermann battery process, both Burgers and Kolmogorov turbulence lead to saturation within a rather small density range. Such fields are likely to become relevant after the formation of a protostellar disk and, thus, could influence the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the universe.

  2. THE SMALL-SCALE DYNAMO AND NON-IDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS IN PRIMORDIAL STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Glover, Simon; Klessen, Ralf S.; Schleicher, Dominik; Banerjee, Robi E-mail: christoph.federrath@monash.edu E-mail: klessen@uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: banerjee@hs.uni-hamburg.de

    2012-08-01

    We study the amplification of magnetic fields during the formation of primordial halos. The turbulence generated by gravitational infall motions during the formation of the first stars and galaxies can amplify magnetic fields very efficiently and on short timescales up to dynamically significant values. Using the Kazantsev theory, which describes the so-called small-scale dynamo-a magnetohydrodynamical process converting kinetic energy from turbulence into magnetic energy-we can then calculate the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field. Our calculations are based on a detailed chemical network and we include non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects such as ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation. We follow the evolution of the magnetic field up to larger scales until saturation occurs on the Jeans scale. Assuming a weak magnetic seed field generated by the Biermann battery process, both Burgers and Kolmogorov turbulence lead to saturation within a rather small density range. Such fields are likely to become relevant after the formation of a protostellar disk and, thus, could influence the formation of the first stars and galaxies in the universe.

  3. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the two-stage fragmentation model for cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2014-01-01

    We model molecular cloud fragmentation with thin-disk, non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include ambipolar diffusion and partial ionization that transitions from primarily ultraviolet-dominated to cosmic-ray-dominated regimes. These simulations are used to determine the conditions required for star clusters to form through a two-stage fragmentation scenario. Recent linear analyses have shown that the fragmentation length scales and timescales can undergo a dramatic drop across the column density boundary that separates the ultraviolet- and cosmic-ray-dominated ionization regimes. As found in earlier studies, the absence of an ionization drop and regular perturbations leads to a single-stage fragmentation on pc scales in transcritical clouds, so that the nonlinear evolution yields the same fragment sizes as predicted by linear theory. However, we find that a combination of initial transcritical mass-to-flux ratio, evolution through a column density regime in which the ionization drop takes place, and regular small perturbations to the mass-to-flux ratio is sufficient to cause a second stage of fragmentation during the nonlinear evolution. Cores of size ∼0.1 pc are formed within an initial fragment of ∼pc size. Regular perturbations to the mass-to-flux ratio also accelerate the onset of runaway collapse.

  4. Thermal lattice-Boltzmann method for non-ideal gases with potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, T.; Kroll, D. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present a thermal lattice-Boltzmann method for gases with potential energy. In addition to the single particle distribution function, additional distribution functions for the potential energy and the non-ideal part of the pressure tensor are defined which contain information about the two-particle distribution function. Guided by the BBGKY-hierarchy, a set of three coupled kinetic equations for these distribution functions is proposed. By means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion it is shown that the correct hydrodynamic equations, including the equation for energy transport, are obtained in the limit of large length and time scales. We discuss how the model can be discretized in order to achieve second-order accuracy and Galilean-invariance. A reduced version of the model, in which the pressure field is adiabatically eliminated, is implemented in two dimensions on a hexagonal lattice. Its stability is investigated numerically, and tests of the accuracy for the transversal and longitudinal modes of linear hydrodynamics, as well as tests of Galilean-invariance, are performed. Comparisons are also made with a hybrid model, in which the energy equation is solved by a finite-difference scheme. The method was further simplified in two cases: (i) for a constant temperature, and (ii) for a gas with only excluded-volume interactions.

  5. Patterns and instability of grannular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Borzsonyi, Tamas; Mcelwaine, Jim N

    2009-01-01

    Dense granular flows are often observed to become unstable and form inhomogeneous structures in nature or industry. Although recently significant advances have been made in understanding simple flows, instabilities are often not understood in detail. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes. These arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding plug-like regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material -- a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  6. Non-ideal effects of MOS capacitor in a switched capacitor waveform recorder ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yi-Nong

    2016-07-01

    SCAs (Switched Capacitor Arrays) have a wide range of uses, especially in high energy physics, nuclear science and astrophysics experiments. This paper presents a method of using a MOS capacitor as a sampling capacitor to gain larger capacitance with small capacitor area in SCA design. It studies the non-ideal effects of the MOS capacitor and comes up with ways to reduce these adverse effects. A prototype SCA ASIC which uses a MOS capacitor to store the samples has been designed and tested to verify this method. The SCA integrates 32 channels and each has 64 cells and a readout amplifier. The stored voltage is converted to a pair of differential currents (±4 mA max) and multiplexed to the output. All the functionalities have been verified. The power consumption is less than 2 mW/ch. The INL of all the cells in one channel are better than 0.39%. The equivalent input noise of the SCA has been tested to be 2.2 mV with 625 kHz full-scale sine wave as input, sampling at 40 MSPS (Mega-samples per Second) and reading out at 5 MHz. The effective resolution is 8.8 bits considering 1 V dynamic range. The maximum sampling rate reaches up to 50 MSPS and readout rate of 15 MHz to keep noise smaller than 2.5 mV. The test results validate the feasibility of the MOS capacitor. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375100), Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04060606-06) and State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics

  7. Non-Ideal Properties of Gallium Nitride Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qifeng

    The spectacular development of gallium nitride (GaN) based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in recent years foreshadows a new era for lighting. There are still several non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs that hinder their widespread applications. This dissertation studies these non-ideal properties including the large reverse leakage current, large subthreshold forward leakage current, an undesired parasitic cyan luminescence and high-concentration deep levels in GaInN blue LEDs. This dissertation also studies the thermal properties of GaInN LEDs. Chapter 1 gives a brief introduction of non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs, defects in epitaxially grown GaN devices, and doping problems of p-type GaN materials are discussed. The transient junction temperature measurement technique for GaN based LEDs is introduced. The leakage current of an LED includes the subthreshold forward leakage current and the reverse leakage current. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs affects the reliability, electrostatic discharge resilience, and sub-threshold power consumption. In Chapter 2, the reverse leakage current of a GaInN LED is analyzed by temperaturedependent current-voltage measurements. At low temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to the variable-range-hopping conduction. At high temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to a thermally-assisted multi-step tunneling. The thermal activation energies (95 meV ~ 162 meV), extracted from the Arrhenius plot for the reverse current in the high-temperature range, indicate a thermally activated tunneling process. Additional room-temperature capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements are performed to obtain information on the depletion width and doping concentration of the LED. The average internal electric field is estimated by the C-V measurements. The strong internal electric field enhances the thermal emission of electrons in the

  8. Non-Ideal Properties of Gallium Nitride Based Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qifeng

    The spectacular development of gallium nitride (GaN) based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in recent years foreshadows a new era for lighting. There are still several non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs that hinder their widespread applications. This dissertation studies these non-ideal properties including the large reverse leakage current, large subthreshold forward leakage current, an undesired parasitic cyan luminescence and high-concentration deep levels in GaInN blue LEDs. This dissertation also studies the thermal properties of GaInN LEDs. Chapter 1 gives a brief introduction of non-ideal properties of GaN based LEDs. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs, defects in epitaxially grown GaN devices, and doping problems of p-type GaN materials are discussed. The transient junction temperature measurement technique for GaN based LEDs is introduced. The leakage current of an LED includes the subthreshold forward leakage current and the reverse leakage current. The leakage current of GaN based LEDs affects the reliability, electrostatic discharge resilience, and sub-threshold power consumption. In Chapter 2, the reverse leakage current of a GaInN LED is analyzed by temperaturedependent current-voltage measurements. At low temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to the variable-range-hopping conduction. At high temperature, the reverse leakage current is attributed to a thermally-assisted multi-step tunneling. The thermal activation energies (95 meV ~ 162 meV), extracted from the Arrhenius plot for the reverse current in the high-temperature range, indicate a thermally activated tunneling process. Additional room-temperature capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements are performed to obtain information on the depletion width and doping concentration of the LED. The average internal electric field is estimated by the C-V measurements. The strong internal electric field enhances the thermal emission of electrons in the

  9. Flow pattern visualization in a mimic anaerobic digester using CFD.

    PubMed

    Vesvikar, Mehul S; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2005-03-20

    Three-dimensional steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in mimic anaerobic digesters to visualize their flow pattern and obtain hydrodynamic parameters. The mixing in the digester was provided by sparging gas at three different flow rates. The gas phase was simulated with air and the liquid phase with water. The CFD results were first evaluated using experimental data obtained by computer automated radioactive particle tracking (CARPT). The simulation results in terms of overall flow pattern, location of circulation cells and stagnant regions, trends of liquid velocity profiles, and volume of dead zones agree reasonably well with the experimental data. CFD simulations were also performed on different digester configurations. The effects of changing draft tube size, clearance, and shape of the tank bottoms were calculated to evaluate the effect of digester design on its flow pattern. Changing the draft tube clearance and height had no influence on the flow pattern or dead regions volume. However, increasing the draft tube diameter or incorporating a conical bottom design helped in reducing the volume of the dead zones as compared to a flat-bottom digester. The simulations showed that the gas flow rate sparged by a single point (0.5 cm diameter) sparger does not have an appreciable effect on the flow pattern of the digesters at the range of gas flow rates used. PMID:15685599

  10. Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, T. H.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Larned, S. T.; Sauquet, E.; Pella, H.; Catalogne, C.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective river management. The duration and frequency of zero-flow periods are associated with the ecological characteristics of rivers and have important implications for water resources management. We used daily flow records from 628 gauging stations on rivers with minimally modified flows distributed throughout France to predict regional patterns of flow intermittence. For each station we calculated two annual times series describing flow intermittence; the frequency of zero-flow periods (consecutive days of zero flow) in each year of record (FREQ; yr-1), and the total number of zero-flow days in each year of record (DUR; days). These time series were used to calculate two indices for each station, the mean annual frequency of zero-flow periods (mFREQ; yr-1), and the mean duration of zero-flow periods (mDUR; days). Approximately 20% of stations had recorded at least one zero-flow period in their record. Dissimilarities between pairs of gauges calculated from the annual times series (FREQ and DUR) and geographic distances were weakly correlated, indicating that there was little spatial synchronization of zero flow. A flow-regime classification for the gauging stations discriminated intermittent and perennial stations, and an intermittence classification grouped intermittent stations into three classes based on the values of mFREQ and mDUR. We used random forest (RF) models to relate the flow-regime and intermittence classifications to several environmental characteristics of the gauging station catchments. The RF model of the flow-regime classification had a cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.47, indicating fair performance and the intermittence classification had poor performance (cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.35). Both classification models identified significant environment-intermittence associations, in particular with regional-scale climate patterns and also catchment area, shape

  11. PATTERNS OF FLOWS IN AN INTERMEDIATE PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-09-20

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of H{alpha} images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s{sup -1}. The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows-downward and upward-in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13{sup 0} and 39{sup 0} in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  12. MEANS FOR VISUALIZING FLUID FLOW PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, F.E.; Palmer, L.D.; Poppendick, H.F.; Winn, G.M.

    1961-05-16

    An apparatus is given for determining both the absolute and relative velocities of a phosphorescent fluid flowing through a transparent conduit. The apparatus includes a source for exciting a narrow trsnsverse band of the fluid to phosphorescence, detecting means such as a camera located downstream from the exciting source to record the shape of the phosphorescent band as it passes, and a timer to measure the time elapsed between operation of the exciting source and operation of the camera.

  13. Flow Patterns Around a Complex Building

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, R; Chan, S; Lee, R; Leone, J, Shinn, J; Stevens, D

    1999-09-24

    The authors compare the results of a computer simulated flow field around building 170 (B170) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with field measurements. In order to aid in the setup of the field experiments, the simulations were performed first. B170 was chosen because of its architectural complexity and because a relatively simple fetch exists upwind (a field lies southwest of the site). Figure 1 shows a computational model of the building which retains the major architectural features of the real building (e.g., courtyard, alcoves, and a multi-level roof). Several important characteristics of the cases presented here are: (1) the flow was assumed neutral and no heat flux was imposed at the ground, representing cloudy or morning conditions, (2) a simple canopy parameterization was used to model the effect of a large row of eucalyptus trees which is located to the northeast of the building, (3) the wind directions studied were 200, 225, 250 degrees measured clockwise from true north (the prevailing winds at LLNL are from the southwest in the summer), (4) the incoming wind profile was modeled as logarithmic with a maximum of about 3 meters per second. In addition, note that the building is rotated counterclockwise by 25 degrees with respect to the east/west axis. For convenience, the flow is modeled in a coordinate system that has been rotated with the building.

  14. Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, T. H.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Larned, S. T.; Sauquet, E.; Pella, H.; Catalogne, C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective water resource management. We used daily flow records from 628 gauging stations on rivers with minimally modified flows distributed throughout France to predict regional patterns of flow intermittence. For each station we calculated two annual times-series describing flow intermittence; the frequency of zero-flow periods (consecutive days of zero-flow) in each year of record (FREQ; yr-1), and the total number of zero-flow days in each year of record (DUR; days). These time series were used to calculate two indices for each station, the mean annual frequency of zero-flow periods (mFREQ; yr-1), and the mean duration of zero-flow periods (mDUR; days). Approximately 20% of stations had recorded at least one zero-flow period. Dissimilarities between pairs of gauges calculated from the annual times-series (FREQ and DUR) and geographic distances were weakly correlated, indicating that there was little spatial synchronization of zero-flow. A flow-regime classification for the gauging stations discriminated intermittent and perennial stations, and an intermittence classification grouped intermittent stations into three classes based on the values of mFREQ and mDUR. We used Random Forest (RF) models to relate the flow-regime and intermittence classifications to several environmental characteristics of the gauging station catchments. The RF model of the flow-regime classification had a cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.47, indicating fair performance and the intermittence classification had poor performance (cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.35). Both classification models identified significant environment-intermittence associations, in particular with regional-scale climate patterns and also catchment area, shape and slope. However, we suggest that the fair-to-poor performance of the classification models is because intermittence is also controlled by processes operating at scales smaller

  15. Study of flow patterns in fume hood enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional model for flow inside a fume hood enclosure was developed and numerical computations were carried out to explore the flow pattern and possible path of contaminant transport under different operating conditions of the hood. Equations for the conservation of mass and momentum were solved for different flow rate and opening conditions in the hood. The face velocity was maintained constant at its rated value of 0.4 m/s. The flow was assumed to enter through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leave the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model was used for the prediction of turbulence. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow patterns around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. In addition, the effect of a person standing in front of the hood on the flow pattern was investigated. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its trailing surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. The computed flow patterns will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air from inside the room.

  16. Patterns of Flows in an Intermediate Prominence Observed by Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kwangsu; Chae, Jongchul; Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2010-09-01

    The investigation of plasma flows in filaments/prominences gives us clues to understanding their magnetic structures. We studied the patterns of flows in an intermediate prominence observed by Hinode/SOT. By examining a time series of Hα images and Ca II H images, we have found horizontal flows in the spine and vertical flows in the barb. Both of these flows have a characteristic speed of 10-20 km s-1. The horizontal flows displayed counterstreaming. Our detailed investigation revealed that most of the moving fragments in fact reversed direction at the end point of the spine near a footpoint close to the associated active region. These returning flows may be one possible explanation of the well-known counterstreaming flows in prominences. In contrast, we have found vertical flows—downward and upward—in the barb. Most of the horizontal flows in the spine seem to switch into vertical flows when they approach the barb, and vice versa. We propose that the net force resulting from a small deviation from magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, where magnetic fields are predominantly horizontal, may drive these patterns of flow. In the prominence studied here, the supposed magnetohydrostatic configuration is characterized by magnetic field lines sagging with angles of 13° and 39° in the spine and the barb, respectively.

  17. Scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns and its limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergarten, S.; Winkler, G.; Birk, S.

    2016-05-01

    Preferential flow patterns in the subsurface are of great importance for the availability and the quality of water resources. However, knowledge of their spatial structure is still behind their importance, so that understanding the nature of preferential flow patterns is a major issue in subsurface hydrology. Comparing the statistics of river catchment sizes and spring discharges, we found that the morphology of preferential subsurface flow patterns is probably scale invariant and similar to that of dendritic river networks. This result is not limited to karstic aquifers where the occurrence of dendritic structures has been known at least qualitatively for a long time. The scale invariance even seems to be independent of the lithology of the aquifer. However, scale invariance of river patterns seems to be only limited by the continental scale, while scale invariance of subsurface flow patterns breaks down at much smaller scales. The upper limit of scale invariance in subsurface flow patterns is highly variable. We found a range from thousands of square kilometers for limestone aquifers down to less than 1 km2 in the weathered zone and debris accumulations of crystalline rocks.

  18. Altered Doppler flow patterns in cirrhosis patients: an overview.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, Pooya; Lall, Chandana; Houshyar, Roozbeh; Helmy, Mohammad; Yang, Albert; Choi, Joon-Il; Ward, Garrett; Goodwin, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the hepatic vasculature is an integral part of evaluating precirrhotic and cirrhotic patients. While the reversal of the portal venous flow is a well-recognized phenomenon, other flow patterns, although not as easily understood, may play an important role in assessing the disease status. This article discusses the different characteristic flow patterns observed from the portal vein, hepatic artery, and hepatic vein in patients with liver cirrhosis or related complications and procedures. Knowledge of these different flow patterns provides additional information that may reinforce the diagnosis of cirrhosis, help in staging, and offer prognostic information for determining the direction of therapy. Doppler ultrasonography is invaluable when liver transplantation is being considered and aids in the diagnosis of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. PMID:26169079

  19. NICIL: A Stand Alone Library to Self-Consistently Calculate Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Coefficients in Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Nicil: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library. Nicil is a stand-alone Fortran90 module that calculates the ionisation values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. The module is fully parameterised such that the user can decide which processes to include and decide upon the values of the free parameters, making this a versatile and customisable code. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionisation; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionised. We demonstrate tests of the module, and then describe how to implement it into an existing numerical code.

  20. Flow patterns in free liquid film caused by thermocapillary effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Fei, Linhao; Kowata, Yosuke; Kaneko, Toshihiro; Pettit, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The basic flow patterns realized in a thin free liquid film driven by the thermocapillary effect are focused. Spetial attention is paied to the effect of the volume ratio of the liquid film to the hole sustaining the film on the flow patterns. We prepare a thin liquid film of less than 0 . 5 mm in thickness in order to stably realize the film under normal gravity. Liquid has in general negative temperature coefficient of it surface tension; that is, the fluid is driven to the colder to hotter regions by the non-uniform surface-tension distribution. In the case of thin free liquid film, however, it is found that a unique flow pattern is induced. One of the present authors, DRP, carried out a series of experiments under microgravity condition in the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003. He prepared a ring made of metal, and formed a thin film of water inside the ring. Once he added a non-uniform temperature distribution to the film by placing a heated iron at one end of the ring, a net flow toward the heated iron was realized. In order to understand flow patterns, we focus on the flow structures of the thermocapillary convection in a cross section normal to the end walls as well as the surface temperature distributions.

  1. Optical Imaging of Flow Pattern and Phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galland, Pierre A.; Liang, X.; Wang, L.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.; Breisacher, K.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved optical imaging technique has been used to image the spatial distribution of small droplets and jet sprays in a highly scattering environment. The snake and ballistic components of the transmitted pulse are less scattered, and contain direct information about the sample to facilitate image formation as opposed to the diffusive components which are due to multiple collisions as a light pulse propagates through a scattering medium. In a time-gated imaging scheme, these early-arriving, image-bearing components of the incident pulse are selected by opening a gate for an ultrashort period of time and a shadowgram image is detected. Using a single shot cooled CCD camera system, the formation of water droplets is monitored as a function of time. Picosecond time-gated image of drop in scattering cells, spray droplets as a function of let speed and gas pressure, and model calcification samples consisted of calcium carbonate particles of irregular shapes ranging in size from 0. 1 to 1.5 mm affixed to a microscope slide have been measured. Formation produced by an impinging jet will be further monitored using a CCD with 1 kHz framing illuminated with pulsed light. The desired image resolution of the fuel droplets is on the 20 pm scale using early light through a highly scattering medium. A 10(exp -6)m displacement from a jet spray with a flow speed of 100 m/sec introduced by the ns grating pulse used in the imaging is negligible. Early ballistic/snake light imaging offers nondestructive and noninvasive method to observe the spatial distribution of hidden objects inside a highly scattering environment for space, biomedical, and materials applications. In this paper, the techniques we will present are time-resolved K-F transillumination imaging and time-gated scattered light imaging. With a large dynamic range and high resolution, time-gated early light imaging has the potential for improving rocket/aircraft design by determining jets shape and particle sizes

  2. Numerical study of eccentric Couette Taylor flows and effect of eccentricity on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, C.; Wang, L.; Chew, Y. T.; Zhao, N.

    2004-10-01

    In this study, the differential quadrature (DQ) method was used to simulate the eccentric Couette Taylor vortex flow in an annulus between two eccentric cylinders with rotating inner cylinder and stationary outer cylinder. An approach combining the SIMPLE (semi-implicit method for pressure-linked equations) and DQ discretization on a non-staggered mesh was proposed to solve the time-dependent, three-dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes equations in the primitive variable form. The eccentric steady Couette Taylor flow patterns were obtained from the solution of three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations. The reported numerical results for steady Couette flow were compared with those from Chou [1], and San and Szeri [2]. Very good agreement was achieved. For steady eccentric Taylor vortex flow, detailed flow patterns were obtained and analyzed. The effect of eccentricity on the eccentric Taylor vortex flow pattern was also studied.

  3. Patterning electrohydrodynamic flows with conductive obstacles in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Tyrone F.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Barrett, Louis C.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Harnett, Cindy K.; Skulan, Andrew J.

    2005-03-01

    Flow patterns with both recirculating and unidirectional characteristics are useful for controlled mixing and pumping within microfluidic devices. We have developed a fabrication process that converts injection-molded polymer chips into devices that demonstrate induced-charge electroosmosis (ICEO) effects (1,2) in AC fields. Polymeric insulating posts are coated with metal to produce a nonuniform zeta potential under an applied electric field. Induced flows are analyzed by particle image velocimetry. Stable, recirculating flow patterns are discussed, along with their potential to produce well-characterized and reversible streamlines for on-chip mixing in chemical separation and synthesis devices. Asymmetric conductive features can bias the flow direction, generating unidirectional pumping in an AC field. This pumping approach will be discussed in comparison with DC electrokinetic pumps we have studied.

  4. Patterns in the sky: Natural visualization of aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James F.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the current publication is to present the collection of flight photographs to illustrate the types of flow patterns that were visualized and to present qualitative correlations with computational and wind tunnel results. Initially in section 2, the condensation process is discussed, including a review of relative humidity, vapor pressure, and factors which determine the presence of visible condensate. Next, outputs from computer code calculations are postprocessed by using water-vapor relationships to determine if computed values of relative humidity in the local flow field correlate with the qualitative features of the in-flight condensation patterns. The photographs are then presented in section 3 by flow type and subsequently in section 4 by aircraft type to demonstrate the variety of condensed flow fields that was visualized for a wide range of aircraft and flight maneuvers.

  5. Patterns of 3D flow in a rotating cylinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Anna; Dabiri, John; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Experimental data are presented for large arrays of rotating, finite-height cylinders, which show that the three-dimensional flows are strongly dependent on the geometric and rotational configurations of the array. Two geometric configurations of the cylinders, each with two rotational configurations, were examined for a total of four arrays. 2D PIV was conducted in multiple intersecting horizontal and vertical sheets at a location far downstream of the leading edge of the array in order to build up a picture of the 3D developed flow patterns. It was found that the rotation of the cylinders drives the formation of streamwise and transverse flow patterns between cylinders. These horizontal flow patterns, by conservation of mass, drive vertical flows through the top of the array. As the array of rotating cylinders may provide insight into the flow kinematics of an array of vertical axis wind turbines, this planform flux is of particular interest as it would bring down into the array high kinetic energy fluid from above the array, thus increasing the energy resource available to turbines far downstream of the leading edge of the array.

  6. Deposition patterns and dispersion in reactive channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Hawkins, C.; Jamtveit, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flow of natural fluids is often associated with dispersion of dissolved chemical species and their surface deposition either by precipitation kinetics or aggregation. For most industrial or practical flows, this wall deposition has a detrimental effect that hiders transport by clogging or alters the fluid container; therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of transport in reactive flows and the range of deposition patterns developed. This talk has two main aims. Firstly, it is to present a combined theoretical and numerical approach to explore the diverse yet generic wall morphologies that develop in channel flows either due to precipitation kinetics or aggregation of spherical particles. These deposition patterns range from dendrites to needles and fan-like structures growing against the mean flow direction, and depend strongly on flow perturbations and dispersion properties. The second goal is to revisit classical Taylor's theory of dispersion in turbulent pipe flows and to show that, in fully developed turbulence, it predicts a nontrivial connection between longitudinal dispersion and the turbulent energy spectrum that we can also test and observe in numerical simulations.

  7. Effect of the mitral valve on diastolic flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore; Dawoud, Fady; Luo, Hongchang; Lardo, Albert C.

    2014-12-15

    The leaflets of the mitral valve interact with the mitral jet and significantly impact diastolic flow patterns, but the effect of mitral valve morphology and kinematics on diastolic flow and its implications for left ventricular function have not been clearly delineated. In the present study, we employ computational hemodynamic simulations to understand the effect of mitral valve leaflets on diastolic flow. A computational model of the left ventricle is constructed based on a high-resolution contrast computed-tomography scan, and a physiological inspired model of the mitral valve leaflets is synthesized from morphological and echocardiographic data. Simulations are performed with a diode type valve model as well as the physiological mitral valve model in order to delineate the effect of mitral-valve leaflets on the intraventricular flow. The study suggests that a normal physiological mitral valve promotes the formation of a circulatory (or “looped”) flow pattern in the ventricle. The mitral valve leaflets also increase the strength of the apical flow, thereby enhancing apical washout and mixing of ventricular blood. The implications of these findings on ventricular function as well as ventricular flow models are discussed.

  8. Anisotropic Peridotite Rheology and Regional Upper Mantle Flow Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.; Boyce, D.; Dawson, P.; Castelnau, O.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the rheologic impact of strong lattice preferred orientation (LPO), such as develops due to plate-driven shear, on the pattern of upper mantle flow near plate boundaries. We use finite element models to simulate a regional system of mantle flow, that includes LPO evolution in olivine polycrystal aggregates tracked along flow paths and anisotropic viscosity tensors based on the LPO. Our first, loosely coupled approach begins with a flow field based on a scalar viscosity. The results are postprocessed to compute LPO by integration along streamlines, and an anisotropic viscosity tensor field is derived from LPO. A new flow field is then computed based on the viscosity tensor field. For this case, the predicted flow field differed in a modest but geologically relevant way from the isotropic case. In preparation for incorporating the LPO and effective viscosity calculation directly into the flow code, we have been testing this step separately to assess the sensitivity of the computed tensor to specified deformation parameters. New work explores a power law stress:strain rate relation for the LPO development, upon which the aggregate's effective viscosity tensor depends. The pattern and amplitude of predicted deviation from isotropic viscosity are stronger than for the previously assumed linear stress:strain rate case, as expected. Initial runs that employ the power law viscosity tensor in updated flow calculations are underway at the time of this writing. In addition to the stress exponent for LPO and the resulting viscosity tensor, flow model parameters that notably impact the predictions include the specified stiffening as asthenosphere cools to lithospheric temperatures and mesh resolution within the axial and the base of lithosphere regions. We will present results for subaxial oceanic spreading center flow and report the outcomes of model parameter testing.

  9. Observations on traffic flow patterns and traffic engineering practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Lixin

    2002-07-01

    Border Gateway Protocol allows ASs to apply diverse routing policies for selecting routes and propagating reachability information to other ASs. This enables network operators to configure routing policies so as to control traffic flows between ASs. However, BGP is not designed for the inter-AS traffic engineering. This makes it difficult to implement effective routing policies to address network performance and utilization problems. Network operators usually tweak routing policies to influence the inter-domain traffic among the available links. This can lead to undesirable traffic flow patterns across the Internet and degrade the Internet traffic performance. In this paper, we show several observations on Internet traffic flow patterns and derive routing policies that give rise to the traffic flow patterns. Our results show that an AS can reach as much as 20% of the prefixes via a peer link even though there is a path via a customer link. In addition, an AS can reach as much as 80% of the prefixes via a provider link even though there is a path via a peer link. Second, we analyze the cause of the prevalence of these traffic patterns. Our analysis shows that an AS typically does not receive the potential route from its customers or peers. Third, we find that alternate routes have with lower propagation delay than the chosen routes for some prefixes. This shows that some traffic engineering practices might adversely affect Internet performance.

  10. Flow-driven instabilities during pattern formation of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, A.; Steinbock, O.; Zykov, V.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2015-06-01

    The slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a well known model system for the study of biological pattern formation. In the natural environment, aggregating populations of starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells may experience fluid flows that can profoundly change the underlying wave generation process. Here we study the effect of advection on the pattern formation in a colony of homogeneously distributed Dictyostelium discoideum cells described by the standard Martiel-Goldbeter model. The external flow advects the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) downstream, while the chemotactic cells attached to the solid substrate are not transported with the flow. The evolution of small perturbations in cAMP concentrations is studied analytically in the linear regime and by corresponding numerical simulations. We show that flow can significantly influence the dynamics of the system and lead to a flow-driven instability that initiate downstream traveling cAMP waves. We also show that boundary conditions have a significant effect on the observed patterns and can lead to a new kind of instability.

  11. Subcutaneous blood flow in early male pattern baldness

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Peters, K.; Hansted, B.

    1989-05-01

    The subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe washout method in the scalp of 14 patients with early male pattern baldness. Control experiments were performed in 14 normal haired men matched for age. The SBF in the scalp of the normal individuals was about 10 times higher than previously reported SBF values in other anatomical regions. In patients with early male pattern baldness, SBF was 2.6 times lower than the values found in the normal individuals (13.7 +/- 9.6 vs 35.7 +/- 10.5 ml/100 g/min-1). This difference was statistically significant (p much less than 0.001). A reduced nutritive blood flow to the hair follicles might be a significant event in the pathogenesis of early male pattern baldness.

  12. Mapping algorithm for freeform construction using non-ideal light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Michaelis, D.; Schreiber, P.; Dick, L.; Bräuer, A.

    2015-09-01

    Using conventional mapping algorithms for the construction of illumination freeform optics' arbitrary target pattern can be obtained for idealized sources, e.g. collimated light or point sources. Each freeform surface element generates an image point at the target and the light intensity of an image point is corresponding to the area of the freeform surface element who generates the image point. For sources with a pronounced extension and ray divergence, e.g. an LED with a small source-freeform-distance, the image points are blurred and the blurred patterns might be different between different points. Besides, due to Fresnel losses and vignetting, the relationship between light intensity of image points and area of freeform surface elements becomes complicated. These individual light distributions of each freeform element are taken into account in a mapping algorithm. To this end the method of steepest decent procedures are used to adapt the mapping goal. A structured target pattern for a optics system with an ideal source is computed applying corresponding linear optimization matrices. Special weighting factor and smoothing factor are included in the procedures to achieve certain edge conditions and to ensure the manufacturability of the freefrom surface. The corresponding linear optimization matrices, which are the lighting distribution patterns of each of the freeform surface elements, are gained by conventional raytracing with a realistic source. Nontrivial source geometries, like LED-irregularities due to bonding or source fine structures, and a complex ray divergence behavior can be easily considered. Additionally, Fresnel losses, vignetting and even stray light are taken into account. After optimization iterations, with a realistic source, the initial mapping goal can be achieved by the optics system providing a structured target pattern with an ideal source. The algorithm is applied to several design examples. A few simple tasks are presented to discussed

  13. Chemical solver to compute molecule and grain abundances and non-ideal MHD resistivities in prestellar core-collapse calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, P.; Masson, J.; Chabrier, G.; Hennebelle, P.; Commerçon, B.; Vaytet, N.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a detailed chemical network relevant to calculate the conditions that are characteristic of prestellar core collapse. We solve the system of time-dependent differential equations to calculate the equilibrium abundances of molecules and dust grains, with a size distribution given by size-bins for these latter. These abundances are used to compute the different non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities (ambipolar, Ohmic and Hall), needed to carry out simulations of protostellar collapse. For the first time in this context, we take into account the evaporation of the grains, the thermal ionisation of potassium, sodium, and hydrogen at high temperature, and the thermionic emission of grains in the chemical network, and we explore the impact of various cosmic ray ionisation rates. All these processes significantly affect the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, which will modify the dynamics of the collapse. Ambipolar diffusion and Hall effect dominate at low densities, up to nH = 1012 cm-3, after which Ohmic diffusion takes over. We find that the time-scale needed to reach chemical equilibrium is always shorter than the typical dynamical (free fall) one. This allows us to build a large, multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table over a large temperature, density and ionisation rate ranges. This table, which we make accessible to the community, is used during first and second prestellar core collapse calculations to compute the non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamics resistivities, yielding a consistent dynamical-chemical description of this process. The multi-dimensional multi-species equilibrium abundance table and a copy of the code are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A18

  14. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  15. Flow-pattern evolution of the last British Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Anna L. C.; Clark, Chris D.; Jordan, Colm J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-flow patterns of the last British Ice Sheet from build-up to demise derived from geomorphological evidence. 100 flowsets identified in the subglacial bedform record (drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and ribbed moraine) are combined with ancillary evidence (erratic-transport paths, absolute dates and a semi-independently reconstructed retreat pattern) to define flow patterns, ice divides and ice-sheet margins during build-up, maximum glaciation and retreat. Overprinting and cross-cutting of landform assemblages are used to define the relative chronology of flow patterns and a tentative absolute chronology is presented based on a collation of available dates for ice advance and retreat. The ice-flow configuration of the last British Ice Sheet was not static. Some ice divides were remarkably stable, persisting through multiple stages of the ice-sheet evolution, whereas others were transient features existing for a short time and/or shifting in position 10s km. The 10 reconstructed stages of ice-sheet geometry capture two main modes of operation; first as an integrated ice sheet with a broadly N-S orientated ice divide, and second as a multi-domed ice sheet orientated parallel with the shelf edge. A thick integrated ice sheet developed as ice expanded out of source areas in Scotland to envelop southerly ice caps in northern England and Wales, and connect with the Irish Ice Sheet to the west and the Scandinavian Ice Sheet across the North Sea. Following break-up of ice over the North Sea, ice streaming probably drove mass loss and ice-sheet thinning to create a more complex divide structure, where ice-flow patterns were largely controlled by the form of the underlying topography. Ice surface lowering occurred before separation of, and retreat to, multiple ice centres centred over high ground. We consider this 10-stage reconstruction of the evolution in ice-sheet configuration to be the simplest palaeo

  16. Allowance for thermodynamic non-ideality in the characterization of protein self-association by frontal exclusion chromatography: hemoglobin revisited.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Wills, Peter R

    2003-05-01

    This investigation re-examines theoretical aspects of the allowance for effects of thermodynamic non-ideality on the characterization of protein self-association by frontal exclusion chromatography, and thereby provides methods of analysis with greater thermodynamic rigor than those used previously. Their application is illustrated by reappraisal of published exclusion chromatography data for hemoglobin on the controlled-pore-glass matrix CPG-120. The equilibrium constant of 100/M that is obtained for dimerization of the alpha(2)beta(2) species by this means is also deduced from re-examination of published studies of concentrated hemoglobin solutions by osmotic pressure and sedimentation equilibrium methods. PMID:12834853

  17. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  18. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  19. Pattern formation in crystal growth under parabolic shear flow.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K

    2003-08-01

    Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface occurring in a crystal growing from an undercooled thin liquid bounded on one side by a free surface and flowing down inclined plane, is investigated by a linear stability analysis under shear flow. It is found that restoring forces due to gravity and surface tension is an important factor for stabilization of the solid-liquid interface on long length scales. This is a stabilizing effect different from the Gibbs-Thomson effect. A particular long wavelength mode of about 1 cm of wavy pattern, observed on the surface of icicles covered with a thin layer of flowing water is obtained from the dispersion relation, including the effect of flow and restoring forces.

  20. Pattern formation in directional solidification under shear flow. I. Linear stability analysis and basic patterns.

    PubMed

    Marietti, Y; Debierre, J M; Bock, T M; Kassner, K

    2001-06-01

    An asymptotic interface equation for directional solidification near the absolute stability limit is extended by a nonlocal term describing a shear flow parallel to the interface. In the long-wave limit considered, the flow acts destabilizing on a planar interface. Moreover, linear stability analysis suggests that the morphology diagram is modified by the flow near onset of the Mullins-Sekerka instability. Via numerical analysis, the bifurcation structure of the system is shown to change. Besides the known hexagonal cells, structures consisting of stripes arise. Due to its symmetry-breaking properties, the flow term induces a lateral drift of the whole pattern, once the instability has become active. The drift velocity is measured numerically and described analytically in the framework of a linear analysis. At large flow strength, the linear description breaks down, which is accompanied by a transition to flow-dominated morphologies which is described in the following paper. Small and intermediate flows lead to increased order in the lattice structure of the pattern, facilitating the elimination of defects. Locally oscillating structures appear closer to the instability threshold with flow than without.

  1. Wettability control on multiphase flow in patterned microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Benzhong; MacMinn, Christopher W; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-09-13

    Multiphase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes, including geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and water infiltration into soil. Although it is well known that the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and pore fluids, the effect of wettability on multiphase flow continues to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. Here, we study the impact of wettability on viscously unfavorable fluid-fluid displacement in disordered media by means of high-resolution imaging in microfluidic flow cells patterned with vertical posts. By systematically varying the wettability of the flow cell over a wide range of contact angles, we find that increasing the substrate's affinity to the invading fluid results in more efficient displacement of the defending fluid up to a critical wetting transition, beyond which the trend is reversed. We identify the pore-scale mechanisms-cooperative pore filling (increasing displacement efficiency) and corner flow (decreasing displacement efficiency)-responsible for this macroscale behavior, and show that they rely on the inherent 3D nature of interfacial flows, even in quasi-2D media. Our results demonstrate the powerful control of wettability on multiphase flow in porous media, and show that the markedly different invasion protocols that emerge-from pore filling to postbridging-are determined by physical mechanisms that are missing from current pore-scale and continuum-scale descriptions. PMID:27559089

  2. Density pattern in supercritical flow of liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Ancilotto, F.; Toigo, F.; Dalfovo, F.; Pitaevskii, L.P.

    2005-03-01

    A density-functional theory is used to investigate the instability arising in superfluid {sup 4}He as it flows at velocity u just above the Landau critical velocity of rotons v{sub c}. Confirming an early theoretical prediction by one of us [JETP Lett. 39, 511 (1984)], we find that a stationary periodic modulation of the density occurs, with amplitude proportional to (u-v{sub c}){sup 1/2} and wave vector equal to the roton wave vector. This density pattern is studied for supercritical flow both in bulk helium and in a channel of nanometer cross section.

  3. Mantle Flow Pattern and Dynamic Topography beneath the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Kirby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The complex tectonic history of the eastern US over the past billion years includes episodes of subduction and rifting associated with two complete cycles of supercontinent assembly and breakup. Both the previous global tomography models (S40RTS, SAVANI, TX2011, GyPSuM, SMEAN) and the analysis of the shear-wave splitting from the broadband seismic stations find a distinct coast-to-inland differentiation pattern in the lithosphere and upper mantle. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) includes a dense linear seismic array from the Atlantic coast of Virginia to the western boarder of Ohio, crossing several different tectonic zones. To derive the regional mantle flow pattern along with its surface expression such as dynamic topography and aid the interpretation of the seismic observations, we are building a new geodynamic model based on ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) that uses buoyancy derived from seismic tomography along with realistic lithosphere and sub-lithosphere structure. At present, we use S40RTS and SAVANI tomography models together with the temperature-dependent viscosity to compute the mantle flow and dynamic topography. Beneath the eastern US, the upper mantle flow in our model is primarily parallel to the trend of the Appalachian belt, which is broadly consistent with the direction of the local shear-wave splitting. The dynamic topography results exhibit a coast-to-inland magnitude differentiation along the MAGIC seismic deployment. The numerical tests also show that both the magnitude and pattern of the dynamic topography are quite sensitive to the density perturbation and rigidity of the lithosphere/sub-lithosphere. Our future work involves using other tomography and viscosity models to obtain the mantle flow pattern as well as the resulting dynamic topography and geoid.

  4. Lymph flow pattern in the intact thoracic duct in sheep.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, M; Flatebø, T; Nicolaysen, G

    1997-08-15

    1. To study the lymph flow dynamics in the intact thoracic duct, we applied an ultrasound transit-time flow probe in seven anaesthetized and four unanaesthetized adult sheep (approximately 60 kg). In unanaesthetized non-fasting animals we found that lymph flow in the thoracic duct was always regular pulsatile (pulsation frequency, 5.2 +/- 0.8 min-1) with no relation to heart or respiratory activity. At baseline the peak level of the thoracic duct pulse flow was 11.6-20.7 ml min-1 with a nadir of 0-3.6 ml min-1. Mean lymph flow was 5.4 +/- 3.1 ml min-1. The flow pattern of lymph in the thoracic duct was essentially the same in the anaesthetized animals. 2. In both the anaesthetized and unanaesthetized animals, the lymph flow response to a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure showed interindividual variation. Some were sensitive to any increase in outflow venous pressure, but others were resistant in that lymph flow did not decrease until outflow venous pressure was increased to higher levels. This resistance was also observed in the high lymph flow condition produced by fluid infusion in the anaesthetized animal and mechanical constriction of the caudal vena cava in the unaesthetized animals. Pulsation frequency of the thoracic duct flow initially increased and then decreased with a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure. This initial increase might be a compensatory response to maintain lymph flow against elevated outflow venous pressure. 3. To test the effect of long-term outflow venous pressure elevation in unanaesthetized sheep, outflow venous pressure was increased by inflation of a cuff around the cranial vena cava for 1, 5 or 25 h. The cuff was inflated to a level where lymph flow was reduced. Lymph flow remained low or decreased further during the entire cuff-inflation period. We calculated the lymph debt caused by the outflow venous pressure elevation and the amount 'repaid' when venous pressure returned to normal. Lymph debt for 25 h

  5. Lymph flow pattern in the intact thoracic duct in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, M; Flatebø, T; Nicolaysen, G

    1997-01-01

    1. To study the lymph flow dynamics in the intact thoracic duct, we applied an ultrasound transit-time flow probe in seven anaesthetized and four unanaesthetized adult sheep (approximately 60 kg). In unanaesthetized non-fasting animals we found that lymph flow in the thoracic duct was always regular pulsatile (pulsation frequency, 5.2 +/- 0.8 min-1) with no relation to heart or respiratory activity. At baseline the peak level of the thoracic duct pulse flow was 11.6-20.7 ml min-1 with a nadir of 0-3.6 ml min-1. Mean lymph flow was 5.4 +/- 3.1 ml min-1. The flow pattern of lymph in the thoracic duct was essentially the same in the anaesthetized animals. 2. In both the anaesthetized and unanaesthetized animals, the lymph flow response to a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure showed interindividual variation. Some were sensitive to any increase in outflow venous pressure, but others were resistant in that lymph flow did not decrease until outflow venous pressure was increased to higher levels. This resistance was also observed in the high lymph flow condition produced by fluid infusion in the anaesthetized animal and mechanical constriction of the caudal vena cava in the unaesthetized animals. Pulsation frequency of the thoracic duct flow initially increased and then decreased with a stepwise increase in the outflow venous pressure. This initial increase might be a compensatory response to maintain lymph flow against elevated outflow venous pressure. 3. To test the effect of long-term outflow venous pressure elevation in unanaesthetized sheep, outflow venous pressure was increased by inflation of a cuff around the cranial vena cava for 1, 5 or 25 h. The cuff was inflated to a level where lymph flow was reduced. Lymph flow remained low or decreased further during the entire cuff-inflation period. We calculated the lymph debt caused by the outflow venous pressure elevation and the amount 'repaid' when venous pressure returned to normal. Lymph debt for 25 h

  6. Microscopic Current Flow Patterns in Nanoscale Quantum Point Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Na; Bushong, Neil; Hatcher, Ryan; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2006-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale conductors has been studied extensively mainly using the stationary scattering approach. However, the dynamical nature of transport, and in particular, the flow patterns of the microscopic current through a nanoscale junction, have remained poorly understood. We apply a novel time-dependent transport approach [1], which combines closed and finite geometries with time-dependent density functional theory,to study current flow patterns in nanoscale quantum point contacts [2]. The results of both atomistic and jellium calculations show that surface charges form dynamically at the junction-electrode interfaces in both abrupt and adiabatic junctions. The curr ent exhibits some characteristics of a classical hydrodynamic liquid but also displays unique patterns arising from the interaction with the surface charges. We also investigate the effect of the flow velocity, charge density, and lattice structures on the electron dynamics. If time permits we also discuss the effects of the viscosity of the electron liquid [3]. Work supported by DOE (DE-FG02-05ER46204). [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] N. Bushong, N. Sai and, M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. (in press). [3] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale, and M. Di Ventra, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005 ).

  7. Flow Pattern in a Converging-Diverging Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswatitsch, K.; Rothstein, W.

    1949-01-01

    The present report describes a new method for the prediction of the flow pattern of a gas in the two-dimensional and axially symmetrical case. It is assumed that the expansion of the gas is adiabatic and the flow stationary. The several assumptions necessary of the nozzle shape effect, in general, no essential limitation on the conventional nozzles. The method is applicable throughout the entire speed range; the velocity of sound itself plays no singular part. The principal weight is placed on the treatment of the flow near the throat of a converging-diverging nozzle. For slender nozzles formulas are derived for the calculation of the velocity components as function of the location.

  8. Animating streamlines with repeated asymmetric patterns for steady flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chih-Kuo; Liu, Zhanping; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-01-01

    Animation provides intuitive cueing for revealing essential spatial-temporal features of data in scientific visualization. This paper explores the design of Repeated Asymmetric Patterns (RAPs) in animating evenly-spaced color-mapped streamlines for dense accurate visualization of complex steady flows. We present a smooth cyclic variable-speed RAP animation model that performs velocity (magnitude) integral luminance transition on streamlines. This model is extended with inter-streamline synchronization in luminance varying along the tangential direction to emulate orthogonal advancing waves from a geometry-based flow representation, and then with evenly-spaced hue differing in the orthogonal direction to construct tangential flow streaks. To weave these two mutually dual sets of patterns, we propose an energy-decreasing strategy that adopts an iterative yet efficient procedure for determining the luminance phase and hue of each streamline in HSL color space. We also employ adaptive luminance interleaving in the direction perpendicular to the flow to increase the contrast between streamlines.

  9. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Adsorption/Desorption in Packed Sorption Beds Under Ideal and Non-Ideal Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, H.; Knox, J. C.; Smith, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of the wall effect on packed beds in the adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water on molecular sieve 5A of 0.127 cm in radius is examined experimentally and with one-dimensional computer simulations. Experimental results are presented for a 22.5-cm long by 4.5-cm diameter cylindrical column with concentration measurements taken at various radial locations. The set of partial differential equations are solved using finite differences and Newman's method. Comparison of test data with the axial-dispersed, non-isothermal, linear driving force model suggests that a two-dimensional model (submitted to Separation Science and Technology) is required for accurate simulation of the average column breakthrough concentration. Additional comparisons of test data with the model provided information on the interactive effects of carrier gas coadsorption with CO2, as well as CO2-H2O interactions.

  11. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The capability to provide fast and reliable imaging of targets and interfaces in non-accessible probed scenarios is a topic of great scientific interest, and many investigations have shown that Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can provide an efficient technique to conduct this kind of analysis in various applications of geophysical nature and civil engineering. In these cases, the development of an efficient and accurate imaging procedure is strongly dependent on the capability of accounting for the incident field that activates the scattering phenomenon. In this frame, based on a suitable implementation of an electromagnetic (EM) CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), it has been possible to accurately and efficiently model the radiation pattern of real antennas in environments typically considered in GPR surveys [1]. A typical scenario of our interest is constituted by targets hidden in a ground medium, described by certain EM parameters and probed by a movable GPR using interfacial antennas [2]. The transmitting and receiving antennas considered here are Vivaldi ones, but a wide variety of other antennas can be modeled and designed, similar to those ones available in commercial GPR systems. Hence, an advanced version of a well-known microwave tomography approach (MTA) [3] has been implemented, both in the canonical 2D scalar case and in the more realistic 3D vectorial one. Such an approach is able to account for the real distribution of the radiated and scattered EM fields. Comparisons of results obtained by means of a 'conventional' implementation of the MTA, where the antennas are modeled as ideal line sources, and by means of our 'advanced' approach, which instead takes into account the radiation features of the chosen antenna type, have been carried out and discussed. Since the antenna radiation patterns are modified by the probed environment, whose EM features and the possible stratified structure usually are not exactly known, the imaging capabilities of the MTA

  12. Patterns of Gene Flow Define Species of Thermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Didelot, Xavier; Held, Nicole L.; Herrera, Alfa; Darling, Aaron; Reno, Michael L.; Krause, David J.; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing appreciation of their vast diversity in nature, mechanisms of speciation are poorly understood in Bacteria and Archaea. Here we use high-throughput genome sequencing to identify ongoing speciation in the thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. Patterns of homologous gene flow among genomes of 12 strains from a single hot spring in Kamchatka, Russia, demonstrate higher levels of gene flow within than between two persistent, coexisting groups, demonstrating that these microorganisms fit the biological species concept. Furthermore, rates of gene flow between two species are decreasing over time in a manner consistent with incipient speciation. Unlike other microorganisms investigated, we do not observe a relationship between genetic divergence and frequency of recombination along a chromosome, or other physical mechanisms that would reduce gene flow between lineages. Each species has its own genetic island encoding unique physiological functions and a unique growth phenotype that may be indicative of ecological specialization. Genetic differentiation between these coexisting groups occurs in large genomic “continents,” indicating the topology of genomic divergence during speciation is not uniform and is not associated with a single locus under strong diversifying selection. These data support a model where species do not require physical barriers to gene flow but are maintained by ecological differentiation. PMID:22363207

  13. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. PMID:27343625

  14. Non-linear least squares analysis of phase diagrams for non-ideal binary mixtures of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, E E; Johnson, M L; Huang, C H

    1990-01-01

    A computer program for non-linear least squares minimization has been applied to construct temperature-composition phase diagrams for several binary systems of different phospholipids based on their calorimetric data. The calculated phase diagram is guided to fit the calorimetric data with two adjustable parameters that describe the non-ideal mixing of lipid components in the gel and liquid-crystalline phases. The parameter estimation procedure is presented to show that the computer program can be used not only to generate phase diagrams with characteristic shapes but also to numerically estimate the lipid-lipid pair interactions between the mixed and the like pairs in the two-dimensional plane of the bilayer in both the gel and liquid-crystalline states. The binary lipid systems examined include dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/1-palmitoyl-2-stearoylphosphatidylchol ine, 1-capryl-2-behenoylphosphatidylcholine/1-behenoyl-2-lauro ylphosphatidylcholine, and 1-stearoyl-2-caprylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylchol ine.

  15. Fluid flow patterns in porous media with partially ordered microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsaeidi, A.; Thompson, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Natural granular porous media found in geosciences applications are disordered at the pore scale, which contributes to the interesting behavior that they exhibit including hydrodynamic dispersion, capillary pressure and wetting behavior, and various types of fingering. Many standard equations and models that have been developed for transport in porous media are based on the assumption of uniform disorder, randomly distributed parameters, and isotropic behavior. However, factors that cause partial ordering (e.g., settling of oblong grains, alignment of elongated particles, or packing structures near a boundary) can lead to anomalous flow behavior relative to the base case, when in turn requires different ways to understand and describe transport. In this work we examine the packing structure and fluid flow patterns in packings of equilateral cylindrical particles that are packed in a tube. The detailed packing structures are obtained experimentally from microCT experiments, and the flow patterns are simulated by numerical solution of the Stokes equations using the finite element method. This research is of interest in chemical engineering because this type of packing is used in catalytic reactors. However, the structures are also interesting from both a fundamental perspective and as prototypes for partially ordered natural materials because the packings undergo a transition from fully disordered internally to highly structured at the wall, and therefore provide insight into differences caused by the ordering.

  16. Improving optical fiber current sensor accuracy using artificial neural networks to compensate temperature and minor non-ideal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Antonio C.; Besen, Marcio; Encinas, Leonardo S.; Nicolodi, Rosane

    2011-05-01

    This article presents a practical signal processing methodology, based on Artificial Neural Networks - ANN, to process the measurement signals of typical Fiber Optic Current Sensors - FOCS, achieving higher accuracy from temperature and non-linearity compensation. The proposed idea resolve FOCS primary problems, mainly when it is difficult to determine all errors sources present in the physical phenomenon or the measurement equation becomes too nonlinear to be applied in a wide measurement range. The great benefit of ANN is to get a transfer function for the measurement system taking in account all unknowns, even those from unwanted and unknowing effects, providing a compensated output after the ANN training session. Then, the ANN training is treated like a black box, based on experimental data, where the transfer function of the measurement system, its unknowns and non-idealities are processed and compensated at once, given a fast and robust alternative to the FOCS theoretical method. A real FOCS system was built and the signals acquired from the photo-detectors are processed by the Faraday's Laws formulas and the ANN method, giving measurement results for both signal processing strategies. The coil temperature measurements are also included in the ANN signal processing. To compare these results, a current measuring instrument standard is used together with a metrological calibration procedure. Preliminary results from a variable temperature experiment shows the higher accuracy, better them 0.2% of maximum error, of the ANN methodology, resulting in a quick and robust method to hands with FOCS difficulties on of non-idealities compensation.

  17. Intracardiac flow patterns in early embryonic life. A reexamination.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Manasek, F; Arcilla, R A

    1983-09-01

    Microangiography, using methylene blue injected at eight vitelline vein sites, was performed on 156 developing chick embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 14-22. Two stream patterns were observed. Type A coursed sequentially through the dorsal portion of the sinus venosus, the cranial segments of the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal, the ventral parts of the primitive ventricle and conus cordis, and, finally, the left branchial arches. Type B coursed through the ventral portion of the sinus venosus, the caudal segments of the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal, the dorsal parts of the primitive ventricle and conus cordis, and, finally, the right branchial arches. Both streams flowed in parallel fashion in the conus cordis. At Hamburger-Hamilton stages 17-18, the dye stream from the right lateral vitelline vein was chiefly type A, whereas that from the left lateral vitelline vein was type B. At Hamburger-Hamilton stages 19-22, those patterns reversed, i.e., the right lateral vitelline vein stream ran as type B, whereas the left lateral vitelline vein stream assumed type A pattern. The cranial-caudal relationship of the two streams at the primitive atrium and atrioventricular canal is not consistent with the hypothesis that these streams separately expand the future right atrium and left atrium. Their parallel direction at the conus cordis does not support the theory that spiral septation is initiated by two spiral streams. The longitudinal separation of the two streams at and beyond the branchial arches also argues against aortico-pulmonary septation as a consequence of flow streaming. Our observations do not support the traditional flow-molding theory.

  18. Gene flow pattern among Aedes aegypti populations in Mexico.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Mercado-Curiel, Ricardo F; Diaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Pérez Ramirez, Gerardo; Black, William C

    2013-03-01

    Patterns of gene flow vary greatly among Aedes aegypti populations throughout Mexico. The populations are panmictic along the Pacific coast, isolated by distance in northeast Mexico, and exhibit moderate gene flow across the Yucatan peninsula. Nine Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, were taken to examine the local patterns of gene flow. Genetic variation was examined in a 387-bp region of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 4 mitochondrial gene (ND4) using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and 3 haplotypes were detected. Cluster analysis on the linearized FST genetic distances failed to group collections in geographic proximity. Regression analysis of linear or road distances on linearized F(ST) indicated that proximal collections were as diverse as distant collections across an approximately 800-km range. The geographical distribution of the Mexican mosquito haplotype frequencies was determined for the ND4 sequences from 524 individuals from Oaxaca (this study) and 2,043 individuals from our previous studies. Herein, we report on yet another pattern dominated by genetic drift among 9 Ae. aegypti collections from 6 cities in Oaxaca, Mexico, and compare it to those reported in other regions of Mexico. Molecular analysis of variance showed that there was as much genetic variation among collections 4 km apart as there was among all collections. The numbers of haplotypes and the amount of genetic diversity among the collections from Oaxaca were much lower than detected in previous studies in other regions of Mexico and may reflect the effects of control efforts or adaptations to the altitudinal limits (1,500 m) of the species in Mexico. The geographical distribution of mosquito haplotypes in Mexico is also reported. Furthermore, based on the distribution of the mosquito haplotypes in America, we suggest that mosquito dispersion is very efficient, most likely due to commercial transportation.

  19. Pattern formation during mixing and segregation of flowing granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Guy; Shattuck, Mark

    1996-02-01

    Powder mixing plays an important role in a number of industries ranging from pharmaceuticals and food to ceramics and mining. Avalanches provide a mechanism for the stretching and folding needed to mix granular solids. However, unlike fluids, when particles dissimilar in size, density, or shape flow, they can spontaneously demix or segregate. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we track the transport of granular solids in a slowly rotating tube both with and without segregation effects. Compared with experiments in a 2-dimensional rotating disk partially filled with colored particles, the mixing kinematics and the granular pattern formation in a tube are changed by an axial flow instability. From simple physical principles we argue how size and density segregation mechanisms can be made to cancel, allowing good mixing of dissimilar particles, and we show experiments verifying this. Further experiments isolate the axial transport in the slowly rotating tube. Axial transport can appear faster with segregation than without.

  20. Patterns, Instabilities, Colors, and Flows in Vertical Foam Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilixiati, Subinuer; Wojcik, Ewelina; Zhang, Yiran; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Foams find use in many applications in daily life, industry and biology. Examples include beverages, firefighting foam, cosmetics, foams for oil recovery and foams formed by pollutants. Foams are collection of bubbles separated by thin liquid films that are stabilized against drainage by the presence of surfactant molecules. Drainage kinetics and stability of the foam are strongly influenced by surfactant type, addition of particles, proteins and polymers. In this study, we utilize the thin film interference colors as markers for identifying patterns, instabilities and flows within vertical foam films. We experimentally study the emergence of thickness fluctuations near the borders and within thinning films, and study how buoyancy, capillarity and gravity driven instabilities and flows, are affected by variation in bulk and interfacial physicochemical properties dependent on the choice of constituents.

  1. Multiple convection patterns and thermohaline flow in an idealized OGCM

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmstorf, S.

    1995-12-01

    This paper investigates how multiple steady states arise in an ocean general circulation model, caused by the fact that many different convection patterns can be stable under the same surface boundary conditions. Two alternative boundary conditions are used in the experiments: classical mixed boundary conditions and a diffusive atmospheric heat balance combined with fixed salt fluxes. In both cases, transitions between different quasi-steady convection patterns can be triggered by briefly adding fresh water at convection sites. Either a large-scale freshwater anomaly is used to completely erase the previous convection pattern or a {open_quotes}surgical{close_quotes} anomaly is added to single grid points to turn off convection there. Under classical mixed-boundary conditions, different convection sites can lead to different overturning rates of deep water. The dynamics of the convection-driven flow is analyzed in some detail. With an energy balance atmosphere, in contrast, the overturning rate is very robust, apparently regulated by a negative thermal feedback. In spite of this, different convection patterns are associated with very different climatic states, since the heat transport of the deep circulation depends strongly on where convection takes place. It is suggested that considerable climate variability in the North Atlantic could be caused by changes in high-latitude convection.

  2. Preferential accumulation of bubbles in Couette-Taylor flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, Eric; Simonnet, Marie; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the migration of bubbles in several flow patterns occurring within the gap between a rotating inner cylinder and a concentric fixed outer cylinder. The time-dependent evolution of the two-phase flow is predicted through three-dimensional Euler-Lagrange simulations. Lagrangian tracking of spherical bubbles is coupled with direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. We assume that bubbles do not influence the background flow (one-way coupling simulations). The force balance on each bubble takes into account buoyancy, added-mass, viscous drag, and shear-induced lift forces. For increasing velocities of the rotating inner cylinder, the flow in the fluid gap evolves from the purely azimuthal steady Couette flow to Taylor toroidal vortices and eventually a wavy vortex flow. The migration of bubbles is highly dependent on the balance between buoyancy and centripetal forces (mostly due to the centripetal pressure gradient) directed toward the inner cylinder and the vortex cores. Depending on the rotation rate of the inner cylinder, bubbles tend to accumulate alternatively along the inner wall, inside the core of Taylor vortices or at particular locations within the wavy vortices. A stability analysis of the fixed points associated with bubble trajectories provides a clear understanding of their migration and preferential accumulation. The location of the accumulation points is parameterized by two dimensionless parameters expressing the balance of buoyancy, centripetal attraction toward the inner rotating cylinder, and entrapment in Taylor vortices. A complete phase diagram summarizing the various regimes of bubble migration is built. Several experimental conditions considered by Djéridi, Gabillet, and Billard [Phys. Fluids 16, 128 (2004)] are reproduced; the numerical results reveal a very good agreement with the experiments. When the rotation rate is increased further, the numerical results indicate the formation of oscillating bubble

  3. Effects of tumors on inhaled pharmacologic drugs: I. Flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X

    2001-01-01

    Lung carcinomas are now the most common form of cancer. Clinical data suggest that tumors are found preferentially in upper airways, perhaps specifically at carina within bifurcations. The disease can be treated by aerosolized pharmacologic drugs. To enhance their efficacies site-specific drugs must be deposited selectively. Since inhaled particles are transported by air, flow patterns will naturally affect their trajectories. Therefore, in Part I of a systematic investigation, we focused on tumor-induced effects on airstreams, in Part II (the following article [p. 245]), particle trajectories were determined. To facilitate the targeted delivery of inhaled drugs, we simulated bifurcations with tumors on carinas using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package (FIDAP) with a Cray T90 supercomputer and studied effects of tumor sizes and ventilatory parameters on localized flow patterns. Critical tumor sizes existed; e.g., tumors had dominant effects when r/R > or = 0.8 for bifurcation 3-4 and r/R > or = 0.6 for bifurcation 7-8 (r = tumor radius and R = airway radius). The findings suggest that computer modeling is a means to integrate alterations to airway structures caused by diseases into aerosol therapy protocols.

  4. Decoding complex flow-field patterns in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Christophel, Thomas B; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-05-01

    There has been a long history of research on visual working memory. Whereas early studies have focused on the role of lateral prefrontal cortex in the storage of sensory information, this has been challenged by research in humans that has directly assessed the encoding of perceptual contents, pointing towards a role of visual and parietal regions during storage. In a previous study we used pattern classification to investigate the storage of complex visual color patterns across delay periods. This revealed coding of such contents in early visual and parietal brain regions. Here we aim to investigate whether the involvement of visual and parietal cortex is also observable for other types of complex, visuo-spatial pattern stimuli. Specifically, we used a combination of fMRI and multivariate classification to investigate the retention of complex flow-field stimuli defined by the spatial patterning of motion trajectories of random dots. Subjects were trained to memorize the precise spatial layout of these stimuli and to retain this information during an extended delay. We used a multivariate decoding approach to identify brain regions where spatial patterns of activity encoded the memorized stimuli. Content-specific memory signals were observable in motion sensitive visual area MT+ and in posterior parietal cortex that might encode spatial information in a modality independent manner. Interestingly, we also found information about the memorized visual stimulus in somatosensory cortex, suggesting a potential crossmodal contribution to memory. Our findings thus indicate that working memory storage of visual percepts might be distributed across unimodal, multimodal and even crossmodal brain regions.

  5. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  6. Method And Aparatus For Improving Resolution In Spectrometers Processing Output Steps From Non-Ideal Signal Sources

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Momayezi, Michael

    2003-07-01

    A method and apparatus for processing step-like output signals generated by non-ideal, nominally single-pole ("N-1P") devices responding to possibly time-varying, pulse-like input signals of finite duration, wherein the goal is to recover the integrated areas of the input signals. Particular applications include processing step-like signals generated by detector systems in response to absorbed radiation or particles and, more particularly, to digitally processing such step-like signals in high resolution, high rate gamma ray (.gamma.-ray) spectrometers with resistive feedback preamplifiers connected to large volume germanium detectors. Superconducting bolometers can be similarly treated. The method comprises attaching a set of one or more filters to the device's (e.g., preamplifier's) output, capturing a correlated multiple output sample from the filter set in response to a detected event, and forming a weighted sum of the sample values to accurately recover the total area (e.g., charge) of the detected event.

  7. Performance of Orbitrap mass analyzer at various space charge and non-ideal field conditions: simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, Andriy; Vladimirov, Gleb; Heeren, Ron M A; Nikolaev, Eugene N

    2012-05-01

    The orbital trap mass analyzer provides a number of unique analytical features along with inevitable limitations as an electrostatic instrument operating in high space charge regimes resulting in systematic measured frequency errors as an effect of stored ion clouds on the trap field and each other effect of non-ideal machining the trap electrodes, effect of injection slot, effect of real versus theoretical trap dimensions, etc. This paper deals with determining the influence of the space charge effect and imperfection of the electrostatic field on the motion of ion ensembles in the orbital trap. We examine effects of theoretically modeled non-harmonicity of the electrostatic potential and the number of confined ions on stability of coherent ion motion in the trap that determines the frequency shifts of axial ion oscillation. Three different Orbitrap geometries were considered: geometry close to preproduction Orbitrap, close to standard Orbitrap, close to high field Orbitrap. Frequency shifts for m/z = 500 and for charge state +23 of cytochrome c isotopic cluster particles with 10(4)-6*10(6) elemental charges in the trap were considered. Refined spectra were calculated using the filter diagonalization method proposed by Mandelshtam et al. and applied to mass spectrometry by O'Connor and Aizikov.

  8. Mixing dynamics and pattern formation around flow stagnation points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    We study the mixing of two reactive fluids in the presence of convective instabilities. Such system is characterized by the formation of unique porosity patterns and mixing dynamics linked to the evolution of vortices and stagnation points. Around them, the fluid-fluid interface is stretched and compressed, which enhances mixing and triggers chemical reactions, and the system can be analyzed using fluid deformation model. We consider velocity fields generated by a double gyre synthetic velocity field and Rayleigh-Bénard and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The different flow structures can be visualized by the strain rate and the finite time Lyapunov exponents. We show that the mixing enhancement given by the scalar dissipation rate is controlled by the equilibrium between interface compression and diffusion, which depends on the velocity field configuration. Furthermore, we establish a quantitative relation between the mixing rate and the evolution of the potential energy of the fluid when convection is driven by density instabilities.

  9. Flow pattern defects in Czochralski-grown silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rantamäki, R.; Molarius, J.; Tilli, M.; Tuomi, T.

    1997-01-01

    The radial distribution of grown-in microdefects in eight Czochralski-grown silicon crystals was measured by counting the flow pattern (FP) defects revealed by preferential etching. At the center of the crystal, the FP-defect density increased from 5.2 to 6.7 × 105 1/cm3, when the pulling speed was increased from 0.8 to 1.1 mm/min. The magnitude of this effect was only about half as large, when the pulling speed was increased from 1.1 to 1.3 mm/min. Annealing at 1200 °C for 2 h in argon ambient was found to decrease the FP-defect densities significantly, but less than that in oxygen ambient.

  10. Temporal Patterns in Bivalve Excurrent Flow Under Varying Ambient Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavan, S. K.; Webster, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    The predator-prey relationship between blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and bivalve clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) is mediated by the transport of metabolites released by the prey (clams) and transported downstream as a passive scalar. This study focuses on how the prey behavior contributes to the information available within the odorant plume. Clams may modify factors such as excurrent flux, flow unsteadiness, and siphon height and diameter. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system has been used to quantify the temporal patterns in the excurrent jet of the bivalve siphon under varying ambient flow conditions. According to a spectral analysis of siphon excurrent velocity time records, there is a low frequency periodic component that could contribute to the mixing of clam metabolites through the generation of persistent jet vorticies. Also, fractal analysis of the velocity time records shows that as the ambient velocity increases the excurrent velocity becomes more correlated and less random. These results suggest that for high ambient flow a low frequency periodicity may be sufficient to promote the mixing and dilution of metabolites. In contrast, for low ambient flow more random siphon excurrent velocity may be required to reduce the amount of information available to predators in the downstream odorant plume.

  11. Effects of parent vessel geometry on intraaneurysmal flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2006-03-01

    This study shows the influence of the upstream parent artery geometry on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms. Patient-specific models of four cerebral aneurysms at four typical locations were constructed from 3D rotational angiography images. Two geometrical models were constructed for each patient, one with the native parent vessel geometry and another with the parent vessel truncated approximately 1cm upstream from the aneurysm. For one aneurysm, two images were used to construct a model as realistic and large as possible - down to the carotid bifurcation - which was cut at seven different locations. Corresponding finite element grids were generated and computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out under pulsatile flow conditions. It was found that truncated models tended to underestimate the wall shear stress in the aneurysm and to shift the impaction zone to the neck when compared with the native geometry. In one aneurysm the parent vessel included a tortuous segment close to the neck that strongly influenced the flow pattern entering the aneurysm. Thus, including longer portions of the parent vessel beyond this segment did not have a substantial effect. Depending on the dominant geometrical features the length of the parent artery needed for an accurate representation of the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics may vary among individuals. In conclusion, failure to properly model the inflow stream determined by the upstream parent artery can significantly influence the results of intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic models. The upstream portion of the parent vessel of cerebral aneurysms should be included in order to accurately represent the intraaneurysmal hemodynamics.

  12. Dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling and stack flow pattern analysis for all-vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhongbao; Zhao, Jiyun; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Xiong, Binyu

    2014-08-01

    The present study focuses on dynamic thermal-hydraulic modeling for the all-vanadium flow battery and investigations on the impact of stack flow patterns on battery performance. The inhomogeneity of flow rate distribution and reversible entropic heat are included in the thermal-hydraulic model. The electrolyte temperature in tanks is modeled with the finite element modeling (FEM) technique considering the possible non-uniform distribution of electrolyte temperature. Results show that the established model predicts electrolyte temperature accurately under various ambient temperatures and current densities. Significant temperature gradients exist in the battery system at extremely low flow rates, while the electrolyte temperature tends to be the same in different components under relatively high flow rates. Three stack flow patterns including flow without distribution channels and two cases of flow with distribution channels are compared to investigate their effects on battery performance. It is found that the flow rates are not uniformly distributed in cells especially when the stack is not well designed, while adding distribution channels alleviates the inhomogeneous phenomenon. By comparing the three flow patterns, it is found that the serpentine-parallel pattern is preferable and effectively controls the uniformity of flow rates, pressure drop and electrolyte temperature all at expected levels.

  13. Subsurface flow and vegetation patterns in tidal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, Nadia; Silvestri, Sonia; Marani, Marco

    2004-05-01

    Tidal environments are characterized by a complex interplay of hydrological, geomorphic, and biological processes, and their understanding and modeling thus require the explicit description of both their biotic and abiotic components. In particular, the presence and spatial distribution of salt marsh vegetation (a key factor in the stabilization of the surface soil) have been suggested to be related to topographic factors and to soil moisture patterns, but a general, process-based comprehension of this relationship has not yet been achieved. The present paper describes a finite element model of saturated-unsaturated subsurface flow in a schematic salt marsh, driven by tidal fluctuations and evapotranspiration. The conditions leading to the establishment of preferentially aerated subsurface zones are studied, and inferences regarding the development and spatial distribution of salt marsh vegetation are drawn, with important implications for the overall ecogeomorphological dynamics of tidal environments. Our results show that subsurface water flow in the marsh induces complex water table dynamics, even when the tidal forcing has a simple sinusoidal form. The definition of a space-dependent aeration time is then proposed to characterize root aeration. The model shows that salt marsh subsurface flow depends on the distance from the nearest creek or channel and that the subsurface water movement near tidal creeks is both vertical and horizontal, while farther from creeks, it is primarily vertical. Moreover, the study shows that if the soil saturated conductivity is relatively low (10-6 m s-1, values quite common in salt marsh areas), a persistently unsaturated zone is present below the soil surface even after the tide has flooded the marsh; this provides evidence of the presence of an aerated layer allowing a prolonged presence of oxygen for aerobic root respiration. The results further show that plant transpiration increases the extent and persistence of the aerated

  14. Gain fixed-pattern-noise correction via optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, SukHwan; El Gamal, Abbas

    2002-04-01

    Fixed pattern noise (FPN) or nonuniformity caused by device and interconnect parameter variations across an image sensor is a major source of image quality degradation especially in CMOS image sensors. In a CMOS image sensor, pixels are read out through different chains of amplifiers each with different gain and offset. Whereas offset variations can be significantly reduced using correlated double sampling (CDS), no widely used method exists for reducing gain FPN. In this paper, we propose to use a video sequence and its optical flow to estimate gain FPN for each pixel. This scheme can be used in a digital video or still camera by taking any video sequence with motion prior to capture and using it to estimate gain FPN. Our method assumes that brightness along the motion trajectory is constant over time. The pixels are grouped in blocks and each block's pixel gains are estimated by iteratively minimizing the sum of the squared brightness variations along the motion trajectories. We tested this method on synthetically generated sequences with gain FPN and obtained results that demonstrate significant reduction in gain FPN with modest computations.

  15. Dissolution patterns and mixing dynamics in unstable reactive flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco; Cabeza, Yoar; Carrera, Jesus

    2015-08-01

    We study the fundamental problem of mixing and chemical reactions under a Rayleigh-Taylor-type hydrodynamic instability in a miscible two-fluid system. The dense fluid mixture, which is generated at the fluid-fluid interface, leads to the onset of a convective fingering instability and triggers a fast chemical dissolution reaction. Contrary to intuition, the dissolution pattern does not map out the finger geometry. Instead, it displays a dome-like, hierarchical structure that follows the path of the ascending fluid interface and the regions of maximum mixing. These mixing and reaction hot spots coincide with the flow stagnation points, at which the interfacial mixing layer is compressed and deformed. We show that the deformation of the boundary layer around the stagnation points controls the evolution of the global scalar dissipation and reaction rates and shapes the structure of the reacted zones. The persistent compression of the mixing layer explains the independence of the mixing rate from the Rayleigh number when convection dominates.

  16. Patterns in groundwater chemistry resulting from groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    Groundwater flow influences hydrochemical patterns because flow reduces mixing by diffusion, carries the chemical imprints of biological and anthropogenic changes in the recharge area, and leaches the aquifer system. Global patterns are mainly dictated by differences in the flux of meteoric water passing through the subsoil. Within individual hydrosomes (water bodies with a specific origin), the following prograde evolution lines (facies sequence) normally develop in the direction of groundwater flow: from strong to no fluctuations in water quality, from polluted to unpolluted, from acidic to basic, from oxic to anoxic-methanogenic, from no to significant base exchange, and from fresh to brackish. This is demonstrated for fresh coastal-dune groundwater in the Netherlands. In this hydrosome, the leaching of calcium carbonate as much as 15m and of adsorbed marine cations (Na+, K+, and Mg2+) as much as 2500m in the flow direction is shown to correspond with about 5000yr of flushing since the beach barrier with dunes developed. Recharge focus areas in the dunes are evidenced by groundwater displaying a lower prograde quality evolution than the surrounding dune groundwater. Artificially recharged Rhine River water in the dunes provides distinct hydrochemical patterns, which display groundwater flow, mixing, and groundwater ages. Résumé Les écoulements souterrains influencent les différents types hydrochimiques, parce que l'écoulement réduit le mélange par diffusion, porte les marques chimiques de changements biologiques et anthropiques dans la zone d'alimentation et lessive le système aquifère. Ces types dans leur ensemble sont surtout déterminés par des différences dans le flux d'eau météorique traversant le sous-sol. Dans les "hydrosomes" (masses d'eau d'origine déterminée), les lignes marquant une évolution prograde (séquence de faciès) se développent normalement dans la direction de l'écoulement souterrain : depuis des fluctuations fortes de la

  17. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  18. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-08-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  19. Two-Phase Flow Patterns in a Four by Four Rod Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitaka Mizutani; Shigeo Hosokawa; Akio Tomiyama

    2006-07-01

    Air-water two-phase flow patterns in a four by four square lattice rod bundle consisting of an acrylic channel box of 68 mm in width and transparent rods of 12 mm in diameter were observed by utilizing a high speed video camera, FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) tubes for rods, and a fiber-scope inserted in a rod. The FEP possesses the same refractive index as water, and thereby, whole flow patterns in the bundle and local flow patterns in subchannels were successfully visualized with little optical distortion. The ranges of liquid and gas volume fluxes, and , in the present experiments were 0.1 < < 2.0 m/s and 0.04 < < 8.85 m/s, which covered typical two-phase flow patterns appearing in a fuel bundle of a boiling water nuclear reactor. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) the region of slug flow in the - flow pattern diagram is so narrow that it can be regarded as a boundary between bubbly and churn flows, (2) the boundary between bubbly and churn flows is close to the boundary between bubbly and slug flows of the Mishima and Ishii's flow pattern transition model, and (3) the boundary between churn and annular flows is well predicted by the Mishima and Ishii's model. (authors)

  20. Flow pattern transition accompanied with sudden growth of flow resistance in two-dimensional curvilinear viscoelastic flows.

    PubMed

    Yatou, Hiroki

    2010-09-01

    We numerically find three types of steady solutions of viscoelastic flows and flow pattern transitions between them in a two-dimensional wavy-walled channel for low to moderate Weissenberg (Wi) and Reynolds (Re) numbers using a spectral element method. The solutions are called "convective," "transition," and "elastic" in ascending order of Wi. In the convective region in the Wi-Re parameter space, convective effect and pressure gradient balance on average. As Wi increases, elastic effect becomes comparable, and the first transition sets in. Through the transition, a separation vortex disappears, and a jet flow induced close to the wall by the viscoelasticity moves into the bulk; the viscous drag significantly drops, and the elastic wall friction rises sharply. This transition is caused by an elastic force in the streamwise direction due to the competition of the convective and elastic effects. In the transition region, the convective and elastic effects balance. When the elastic effect becomes greater than the convective effect, the second transition occurs but it is relatively moderate. The second transition seems to be governed by the so-called Weissenberg effect. These transitions are not sensitive to driving forces. By a scaling analysis, it is shown that the stress component is proportional to the Reynolds number on the boundary of the first transition in the Wi-Re space. This scaling coincides well with the numerical result.

  1. Magnetic characterization of non-ideal single-domain monoclinic pyrrhotite and its demagnetization under hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa with implications for impact demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, Natalia S.; Chareev, Dmitriy A.; Rochette, Pierre; Kars, Myriam; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Sadykov, Ravil A.; Kuzina, Dilyara M.; Axenov, Sergey N.

    2016-08-01

    Here we present a comprehensive magnetic characterization of synthesized non-ideal single-domain (SD) monoclinic pyrrhotite (Fe7S8). The samples were in the form of a powder and a powder dispersed in epoxy. "Non-ideal" refers to a powder fraction of predominantly SD size with a minor contribution of small pseudo-single-domain grains; such non-ideal SD pyrrhotite was found to be a remanence carrier in several types of meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites, SNC…), which justifies the usage of synthetic compositions as analogous to natural samples. Data were collected from 5 to 633 K and include low-field magnetic susceptibility (χ0), thermomagnetic curves, major hysteresis loops, back-field remanence demagnetization curves, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), alternating field and pressure demagnetization of saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), low temperature data (such as zero-field-cooled and field-cooled remanence datasets together with room temperature SIRM cooling-warming cycles) as well as XRD and Mössbauer spectra. The characteristic Besnus transition is observed at ∼33 K. FORC diagrams indicate interacting SD grains. The application of hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa using nonmagnetic high-pressure cells resulted in the demagnetization of the sample by 32-38%. Repeated cycling from 1.8 GPa to atmospheric pressure and back resulted in a total remanence decrease of 44% (after 3 cycles). Pressure demagnetization experiments have important implications for meteorite paleomagnetism and suggest that some published paleointensities of meteorites with non-ideal SD monoclinic pyrrhotite as remanence carrier may be lower limits because shock demagnetization was not accounted for.

  2. Patterning process exploration of metal 1 layer in 7nm node with 3D patterning flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Ciofi, Ivan; Saad, Yves; Matagne, Philippe; Bachmann, Michael; Oulmane, Mohamed; Gillijns, Werner; Lucas, Kevin; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Schmoeller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In 7mn node (N7), the logic design requires the critical poly pitch (CPP) of 42-45nm and metal 1 (M1) pitch of 28- 32nm. Such high pattern density pushes the 193 immersion lithography solution toward its limit and also brings extremely complex patterning scenarios. The N7 M1 layer may require a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) with triple litho-etch (LE3) block process. Therefore, the whole patterning process flow requires multiple exposure+etch+deposition processes and each step introduces a particular impact on the pattern profiles and the topography. In this study, we have successfully integrated a simulation tool that enables emulation of the whole patterning flow with realistic process-dependent 3D profile and topology. We use this tool to study the patterning process variations of N7 M1 layer including the overlay control, the critical dimension uniformity (CDU) budget and the lithographic process window (PW). The resulting 3D pattern structure can be used to optimize the process flow, verify design rules, extract parasitics, and most importantly, simulate the electric field and identify hot spots for dielectric reliability. As an example application, we will report extractions of maximum electric field at M1 tipto- tip which is one of the most critical patterning locations and we will demonstrate the potential of this approach for investigating the impact of process variations on dielectric reliability. We will also present simulations of an alternative M1 patterning flow, with a single exposure block using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and analyze its advantages compared to the LE3 block approach.

  3. Pattern-based DTCO flow for early estimation of lithographic difficulty using optical image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhry, Moutaz; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Cain, Jason; Kwan, Joe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we introduce a fast and reasonably accurate methodology to determine patterning difficulty based on the fundamentals of optical image processing techniques to analyze the frequency content of design shapes which determines patterning difficulties via a computational patterning transfer function. In addition, with the help of Monte- Carlo random pattern generator, we use this flow to identify a set of difficult patterns that can be used to evaluate the design ease-of-manufacturability via a scoring methodology as well as to help with the optimization phases of post-tape out flows. This flow offers the combined merits of scoring-based criteria and model-based approach for early designs. The value of this approach is that it provides designers with early prediction of potential problems even before the rigorous model-based DFM kits are developed. Moreover, the flow establishes a bi-directional platform for interaction between the design and the manufacturing communities based on geometrical patterns.

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Caner Yurteri

    2001-08-20

    The proposed research is directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This fundamental research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners to the kinetic emissions limit (below 0.2 lb./MMBTU). Experimental studies include both cold and hot flow evaluations of the following parameters: flame holder geometry, secondary air swirl, primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air and coal particle size distribution. Hot flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance. Cold flow studies will be conducted with surrogate particles as well as pulverized coal. The cold flow furnace will be similar in size and geometry to the hot-flow furnace but will be designed to use a laser Doppler velocimeter/phase Doppler particle size analyzer. The results of these studies will be used to predict particle trajectories in the hot-flow furnace as well as to estimate the effect of flame holder geometry on furnace flow field. The hot-flow experiments will be conducted in a novel near-flame down-flow pulverized coal furnace. The furnace will be equipped with externally heated walls. Both reactors will be sized to minimize wall effects on particle flow fields. The cold-flow results will be compared with Fluent computation fluid dynamics model predictions and correlated with the hot-flow results with the overall goal of providing insight for novel low NO{sub x} burner geometry's.

  5. Experimental measurement of the scaling of the diameter- and thickness-effect curves for ideal, insensitive, and non-ideal explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott I.; Short, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Numerous two-dimensional high-explosive slab tests were fielded for explosives that exhibit ideal (PBX 9501), slightly non-ideal (PBX 9502), and highly non-ideal (ANFO) detonation. Detonation velocity versus slab thickness t (thickness-effect curves) are compared to previous diameter-effect measurements obtained by varying the diameter d of cylindrical rate sticks. The scale factors d/t necessary to overlay the diameter- and thickness-effect curves were computed for each explosive formulation. We observe that the scale factor varies with detonation velocity (or level of detonation "ideality"). The measured scale factors range from 1.89-2.20, 1.25-1.87, and 1.79-1.05 for PBX 9501, PBX 9502, and ANFO formulations, respectively, as detonation velocity varies from the (near failure) critical velocity to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity. These results support our previous theoretical prediction that the scale factor relating the diameter- and thickness-effect curves will increasingly deviate from two as the detonation structure becomes increasingly non-ideal.

  6. Experimental Measurement of the Scaling of the Diameter- and Thickness-Effect Curves for Ideal, Insensitive, and Non-Ideal Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Short, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Numerous two-dimensional high-explosive slab rate sticks were fielded for explosives that exhibit ideal (PBX 9501), slightly non-ideal (PBX 9502), and highly non-ideal (ANFO) detonation. Detonation velocity versus slab thickness t (thickness-effect curves) are compared to previous diameter-effect measurements obtained by varying the diameter d of cylindrical rate sticks. The scale factors d / t necessary to overlay the diameter- and thickness-effect curves were computed for each explosive formulation. We observe that the scale factor varies with detonation velocity (or level of detonation ``ideality''). The measured scale factors range from 1.89-2.20, 1.41-1.87, and 1.79-1.05 for PBX 9501, PBX 9502, and ANFO formulations, respectively, as detonation velocity varies from the (near failure) critical velocity to the Chapman-Jouget velocity. These results support our previous theoretical prediction that the scale factor relating the diameter- and thickness-effect curves will increasingly deviate from two as the detonation structure becomes increasingly non-ideal.

  7. Analysis of Viking infrared thermal mapping data of Mars. The effects of non-ideal surfaces on the derived thermal properties of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal interia of the surface of Mars varies spatially by a factor of eight. This is attributable to changes in the average particle size of the fine material, the surface elevation, the atmospheric opacity due to dust, and the fraction of the surface covered by rocks and fine material. The effects of these non-ideal properties on the surface temperatures and derived thermal inertias are modeled, along with the the effects of slopes, CO2 condensed onto the surface, and layering of fine material upon solid rock. The non-ideal models are capable of producing thermal behavior similar to that observed by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper, including a morning delay in the post-dawn temperature rise and an enhanced cooling in the afternoon relative to any ideal, homogeneous model. The enhanced afternoon cooling observed at the Viking-1 landing site is reproduced by the non-ideal models while that atop Arsia Mons volcano is not, but may be attributed to the observing geometry.

  8. Longitudinal cerebral blood flow and amyloid deposition: an emerging pattern?

    PubMed Central

    Sojkova, Jitka; Beason-Held, Lori; Zhou, Yun; An, Yang; Kraut, Michael A; Ye, Weigo; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; Wong, Dean F; Resnick, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Although cerebral amyloid deposition may precede cognitive impairment by decades, the relationship between amyloid deposition and longitudinal change in neuronal function has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to determine whether nondemented individuals with high and low amyloid burden show different patterns of longitudinal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in the years preceding measurement of amyloid deposition. Methods Twenty-eight nondemented participants (mean (SD) age at [11C] PIB 82.5(4.8) yrs; 6 mildly impaired) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging underwent yearly resting-state [15O]H2O PET scans for up to 8 years. [11C]PIB images of amyloid deposition were acquired on average 10.8(0.8) years after the first CBF scan. [11C]PIB distribution volume ratios (DVR) of regions of interest were estimated by fitting a reference tissue model to the measured time activity curves. Based on mean cortical DVR, participants were divided into high and low [11C]PIB retention groups. Differences in longitudinal rCBF changes between high and low [11C]PIB groups were investigated by voxel-based analysis. Results Longitudinal rCBF changes differed significantly between high (n=10) and low (n=18) [11C]PIB groups (p<=0.001). Greater longitudinal decreases in rCBF in the high [11C]PIB group were seen in right anterior/mid cingulate, right supramarginal gyrus, left thalamus and midbrain bilaterally relative to the low group. Greater increases in rCBF over time in the high [11C]PIB group were found in left medial and inferior frontal gyri, right precuneus, left inferior parietal lobule, and the left postcentral gyrus. Conclusion In this group of nondemented older adults, those with high [11C]PIB show greater longitudinal declines in rCBF in certain areas, representing regions with greater decrements in neuronal function. Greater longitudinal increases in rCBF are also observed in those with higher amyloid load and may represent an attempt to preserve

  9. Computer simulation of blood flow patterns in arteries of various geometries.

    PubMed

    Wong, P K; Johnston, K W; Ethier, C R; Cobbold, R S

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to illustrate the application of computer simulation to the study of blood flow through arteries and to demonstrate the relationship between geometry of the vessels and local flow patterns. A finite element computer program was developed to simulate steady and pulsatile blood flow by solving the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. The accuracy of the computational method has been confirmed by comparing the numeric results to analytic solutions and to published experimental data from physical models. The results are presented as plots of the velocity vectors, streamlines, and pressure contours. The computational model has been applied to illustrate flow patterns in the following situations: pulsatile flow in a cylindric artery and an artery with an axisymmetric stenosis, steady flow in cylindric arteries with stenoses of varying severity and with different flow rates, steady flow in an artery containing a fusiform aneurysm, steady flow in a two-dimensional model of a symmetric Y-shaped bifurcation, and steady flow in a two-dimensional model of the carotid bifurcation. Regions that are commonly associated with arterial disease often coincide with zones of reversed or stagnant flow. In conclusion, the versatility and feasibility of computational simulation of blood flow is illustrated by this study. Although this mathematic model is a simplification of the real flow phenomena, it yields results that provide useful insights into the understanding of local blood flow patterns for a variety of complex geometries.

  10. Resonant pattern formation in active media driven by time-dependent flows.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vincente

    2006-06-01

    The effect of a time-dependent flow in an oscillatory chemical system supporting front propagation is studied. Resonant target patterns depend on the strength and frequency of the time-dependent flow. The flow time scale needed to entrain the system to the resonant target period of oscillation depends on the closeness to the natural oscillation frequency of the medium. The flow strength needed to obtain these patterns is interpreted in terms of mixing optimization, and we give conditions for the flow that guarantee the best mixing with the Bernoulli property. PMID:16906952

  11. Flow pattern changes influenced by variation of viscosities of a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture flow in a vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Keska, Jerry K.; Hincapie, Juan; Jones, Richard

    2011-02-15

    In the steady-state flow of a heterogeneous mixture such as an air-liquid mixture, the velocity and void fraction are space- and time-dependent parameters. These parameters are the most fundamental in the analysis and description of a multiphase flow. The determination of flow patterns in an objective way is extremely critical, since this is directly related to sudden changes in spatial and temporal changes of the random like characteristic of concentration. Flow patterns can be described by concentration signals in time, amplitude, and frequency domains. Despite the vital importance and countless attempts to solve or incorporate the flow pattern phenomena into multiphase models, it has still been a very challenging topic in the scientific community since the 1940's and has not yet reached a satisfactory solution. This paper reports the experimental results of the impact of fluid viscosity on flow patterns for two-phase flow. Two-phase flow was created in laboratory equipment using air and liquid as phase medium. The liquid properties were changed by using variable concentrations of glycerol in water mixture which generated a wide-range of dynamic viscosities ranging from 1 to 1060 MPa s. The in situ spatial concentration vs. liquid viscosity and airflow velocity of two-phase flow in a vertical ID=50.8 mm pipe were measured using two concomitant computer-aided measurement systems. After acquiring data, the in situ special concentration signals were analyzed in time (spatial concentration and RMS of spatial concentration vs. time), amplitude (PDF and CPDF), and frequency (PSD and CPSD) domains that documented broad flow pattern changes caused by the fluid viscosity and air velocity changes. (author)

  12. Hyporheic flow patterns in relation to large river floodplain attributes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-calibrated models of hyporheic flow have emphasized low-order headwater systems. In many cases, however, hyporheic flow in large lowland river floodplains may be an important contributor to ecosystem services such as maintenance of water quality and habitat. In this study, ...

  13. Experimental investigation on flow patterns of RP-3 kerosene under sub-critical and supercritical pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Active cooling with endothermic hydrocarbon fuel is proved to be one of the most promising approaches to solve the thermal problem for hypersonic aircraft such as scramjet. The flow patterns of two-phase flow inside the cooling channels have a great influence on the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, phase transition processes of RP-3 kerosene flowing inside a square quartz-glass tube were experimentally investigated. Three distinct phase transition phenomena (liquid-gas two phase flow under sub-critical pressures, critical opalescence under critical pressure, and corrugation under supercritical pressures) were identified. The conventional flow patterns of liquid-gas two phase flow, namely bubble flow, slug flow, churn flow and annular flow are observed under sub-critical pressures. Dense bubble flow and dispersed flow are recognized when pressure is increased towards the critical pressure whilst slug flow, churn flow and annular flow disappear. Under critical pressure, the opalescence phenomenon is observed. Under supercritical pressures, no conventional phase transition characteristics, such as bubbles are observed. But some kind of corrugation appears when RP-3 transfers from liquid to supercritical. The refraction index variation caused by sharp density gradient near the critical temperature is thought to be responsible for this corrugation.

  14. Effect of diastolic flow patterns on the function of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of intraventricular flow patterns on the pumping efficiency and the blood mixing and transport characteristics of the left ventricle. The simulations employ a geometric model of the left ventricle which is derived from contrast computed tomography. A variety of diastolic flow conditions are generated for a fixed ejection fraction in order to delineate the effect of flow patterns on ventricular performance. The simulations indicate that the effect of intraventricular blood flow pattern on the pumping power is physiologically insignificant. However, diastolic flow patterns have a noticeable effect on the blood mixing as well as the residence time of blood cells in the ventricle. The implications of these findings on ventricular function are discussed.

  15. The Dakota aquifer near Pueblo, Colorado; faults and flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Dakota Sandstone and the underlying Purgatoire Formation consisting of the Glencairn Shale and Lytle Sandstone Members form a board outcrop at the southeastern margin of the Canon City Embankment. The two formations form the Dakota aquifer, which supplies water to many domestic, stock, and irrigation wells in addition to a few municipal wells in the 12-township study area. Five large faults and several small faults, all apparently of high angle, are found in the study area. Analysis of water levels and water quality shows that parts of some of these faults restrict the flow of groundwater in the Dakota aquifer. Lithology of the rocks, particularly in the Dakota Sandstone and in the Glencairn Shale Member, is extremely variable. The lithology appears to affect the flow regime, possibly by determining how a particular segment of a fault affects flow. (USGS)

  16. Children's Brain Responses to Optic Flow Vary by Pattern Type and Motion Speed.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Rick O; Thomas, Amanda L; Fesi, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Structured patterns of global visual motion called optic flow provide crucial information about an observer's speed and direction of self-motion and about the geometry of the environment. Brain and behavioral responses to optic flow undergo considerable postnatal maturation, but relatively little brain imaging evidence describes the time course of development in motion processing systems in early to middle childhood, a time when psychophysical data suggest that there are changes in sensitivity. To fill this gap, electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were recorded in 4- to 8-year-old children who viewed three time-varying optic flow patterns (translation, rotation, and radial expansion/contraction) at three different speeds (2, 4, and 8 deg/s). Modulations of global motion coherence evoked coherent EEG responses at the first harmonic that differed by flow pattern and responses at the third harmonic and dot update rate that varied by speed. Pattern-related responses clustered over right lateral channels while speed-related responses clustered over midline channels. Both children and adults show widespread responses to modulations of motion coherence at the second harmonic that are not selective for pattern or speed. The results suggest that the developing brain segregates the processing of optic flow pattern from speed and that an adult-like pattern of neural responses to optic flow has begun to emerge by early to middle childhood.

  17. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  18. Children's Brain Responses to Optic Flow Vary by Pattern Type and Motion Speed.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Rick O; Thomas, Amanda L; Fesi, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Structured patterns of global visual motion called optic flow provide crucial information about an observer's speed and direction of self-motion and about the geometry of the environment. Brain and behavioral responses to optic flow undergo considerable postnatal maturation, but relatively little brain imaging evidence describes the time course of development in motion processing systems in early to middle childhood, a time when psychophysical data suggest that there are changes in sensitivity. To fill this gap, electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were recorded in 4- to 8-year-old children who viewed three time-varying optic flow patterns (translation, rotation, and radial expansion/contraction) at three different speeds (2, 4, and 8 deg/s). Modulations of global motion coherence evoked coherent EEG responses at the first harmonic that differed by flow pattern and responses at the third harmonic and dot update rate that varied by speed. Pattern-related responses clustered over right lateral channels while speed-related responses clustered over midline channels. Both children and adults show widespread responses to modulations of motion coherence at the second harmonic that are not selective for pattern or speed. The results suggest that the developing brain segregates the processing of optic flow pattern from speed and that an adult-like pattern of neural responses to optic flow has begun to emerge by early to middle childhood. PMID:27326860

  19. Children's Brain Responses to Optic Flow Vary by Pattern Type and Motion Speed

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amanda L.; Fesi, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Structured patterns of global visual motion called optic flow provide crucial information about an observer's speed and direction of self-motion and about the geometry of the environment. Brain and behavioral responses to optic flow undergo considerable postnatal maturation, but relatively little brain imaging evidence describes the time course of development in motion processing systems in early to middle childhood, a time when psychophysical data suggest that there are changes in sensitivity. To fill this gap, electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were recorded in 4- to 8-year-old children who viewed three time-varying optic flow patterns (translation, rotation, and radial expansion/contraction) at three different speeds (2, 4, and 8 deg/s). Modulations of global motion coherence evoked coherent EEG responses at the first harmonic that differed by flow pattern and responses at the third harmonic and dot update rate that varied by speed. Pattern-related responses clustered over right lateral channels while speed-related responses clustered over midline channels. Both children and adults show widespread responses to modulations of motion coherence at the second harmonic that are not selective for pattern or speed. The results suggest that the developing brain segregates the processing of optic flow pattern from speed and that an adult-like pattern of neural responses to optic flow has begun to emerge by early to middle childhood. PMID:27326860

  20. Infant-specific gaze patterns in response to radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The focus of a radial optic flow is a valid visual cue used to perceive and control the heading direction of animals. Gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow were measured in human infants (N = 100, 4–18 months) and in adults (N = 20) using an eye-tracking technique. Overall, although the adults showed an advantage in detecting the focus of an expansion flow (representing forward locomotion) against that of a contraction flow (representing backward locomotion), infants younger than 1 year showed an advantage in detecting the focus of a contraction flow. Infants aged between 13 and 18 months showed no significant advantage in detecting the focus in either the expansion or in the contraction flow. The uniqueness of the gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow in infants shows that the visual information necessary to perceive heading direction potentially differs between younger and mature individuals. PMID:27708361

  1. Boundary layer flow visualisation patterns on a riblet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. G.

    Boundary layer flow visualization methods, developed at Queen Mary and Westfield College, have been applied to a riblet surface. The results reveal cellular crossflows developing in the grooves between the riblets. These local flor regimes appear to have little direct effect on the flow in the wall layers immediately adjacent to them. Qualitatively, the behavior of the wall layers appears to be that which would be expected if a virtual surface existed at a level slightly above the riblet tops, but a tendency for the origin of longitudinal eddy pairs to become anchored to the top of a riblet is noted.

  2. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  3. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  4. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  5. Common MRI acquisition non-idealities significantly impact the output of the boundary shift integral method of measuring brain atrophy on serial MRI.

    PubMed

    Preboske, Gregory M; Gunter, Jeff L; Ward, Chadwick P; Jack, Clifford R

    2006-05-01

    Measuring rates of brain atrophy from serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies is an attractive way to assess disease progression in neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). A widely recognized approach is the boundary shift integral (BSI). The objective of this study was to evaluate how several common scan non-idealities affect the output of the BSI algorithm. We created three types of image non-idealities between the image volumes in a serial pair used to measure between-scan change: inconsistent image contrast between serial scans, head motion, and poor signal-to-noise (SNR). In theory the BSI volume difference measured between each pair of images should be zero and any deviation from zero should represent corruption of the BSI measurement by some non-ideality intentionally introduced into the second scan in the pair. Two different BSI measures were evaluated, whole brain and ventricle. As the severity of motion, noise, and non-congruent image contrast increased in the second scan, the calculated BSI values deviated progressively more from the expected value of zero. This study illustrates the magnitude of the error in measures of change in brain and ventricle volume across serial MRI scans that can result from commonly encountered deviations from ideal image quality. The magnitudes of some of the measurement errors seen in this study exceed the disease effect in AD shown in various publications, which range from 1% to 2.78% per year for whole brain atrophy and 5.4% to 13.8% per year for ventricle expansion (Table 1). For example, measurement error may exceed 100% if image contrast properties dramatically differ between the two scans in a measurement pair. Methods to maximize consistency of image quality over time are an essential component of any quantitative serial MRI study.

  6. Remarks on the derivation of the governing equations for the dynamics of a nonlinear beam to a non ideal shaft coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Fenili, André; Lopes Rebello da Fonseca Brasil, Reyolando Manoel

    2014-12-10

    We derive nonlinear governing equations without assuming that the beam is inextensible. The derivation couples the equations that govern a weak electric motor, which is used to rotate the base of the beam, to those that govern the motion of the beam. The system is considered non-ideal in the sense that the response of the motor to an applied voltage and the motion of the beam must be obtained interactively. The moment that the motor exerts on the base of the beam cannot be determined without solving for the motion of the beam.

  7. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  8. Surface Patterning: Controlling Fluid Flow Through Dolphin and Shark Skin Biomimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Lawren; Lang, Amy; Bradshaw, Michael; McVay, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Dolphin skin is characterized by circumferential ridges, perpendicular to fluid flow, present from the crest of the head until the tail fluke. When observing a cross section of skin, the ridges have a sinusoidal pattern. Sinusoidal grooves have been proven to induce vortices in the cavities that can help control flow separation which can reduce pressure drag. Shark skin, however, is patterned with flexible scales that bristle up to 50 degrees with reversed flow. Both dolphin ridges and shark scales are thought to help control fluid flow and increase swimming efficiency by delaying the separation of the boundary layer. This study investigates how flow characteristics can be altered with bio-inspired surface patterning. A NACA 4412 hydrofoil was entirely patterned with transverse sinusoidal grooves, inspired by dolphin skin but scaled so the cavities on the model have the same Reynolds number as the cavities on a swimming shark. Static tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of approximately 100,000 and at varying angles of attack. The results were compared to the smooth hydrofoil case. The flow data was quantified using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The results of this study demonstrated that the patterned hydrofoil experienced greater separation than the smooth hydrofoil. It is hypothesize that this could be remediated if the pattern was placed only after the maximum thickness of the hydrofoil. Funding through NSF REU grant 1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Measurement of Flow Patterns and Dispersion in the Human Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank E.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2006-03-01

    A detailed knowledge of the flow and dispersion within the human respiratory tract is desirable for numerous reasons. Both risk assessments of exposure to toxic particles in the environment and the design of medical delivery systems targeting both lung-specific conditions (asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) and system-wide ailments (diabetes, cancer, hormone replacement) would profit from such an understanding. The present work features experimental efforts aimed at elucidating the fluid mechanics of the lung. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of oscillatory flows were undertaken in anatomically accurate models (single and multi-generational) of the conductive region of the lung. PIV results captured primary and secondary velocity fields. LIF was used to determine the amount of convective dispersion across an individual generation of the lung.

  10. Flow pattern visualization in a mimic anaerobic digester: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Vesvikar, M S; Varma, R; Karim, K; Al-Dahhan, M

    2005-01-01

    Advanced non-invasive experiments like computer automated radioactive particle tracking and computed tomography along with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in mimic anaerobic digesters to visualize their flow pattern and obtain hydrodynamic parameters. The mixing in the digester was provided by sparging gas at three different flow rates. The simulation results in terms of overall flow pattern, location of circulation cells and stagnant regions, trends of liquid velocity profiles, and volume of dead zones agree reasonably well with the experimental data. CFD simulations were also performed on different digester configurations. The effects of changing draft tube size, clearance, and shape of the tank bottoms were calculated to evaluate the effect of digester design on its flow pattern. Changing the draft tube clearance and height had no influence on the flow pattern or dead regions volume. However increasing the draft tube diameter or incorporating a conical bottom design helped in reducing the volume of the dead zones as compared to a flat bottom digester. The simulations showed that the gas flow rate sparged by a single point (0.5 cm diameter) sparger does not have appreciable effect on the flow pattern of the digesters. PMID:16180475

  11. Formation of Interfacial Patterns in Aggregation and Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás

    1987-01-01

    Computer simulations and experiments on viscous fingering are used to investigate the effects of fluctuations, driving force and anisotropy on the growth of two dimensional unstable interfaces. It is demonstrated that variations of the diffusion-limited aggregation model capture many of the most important features of Laplacian pattern formation. In the viscous fingering experiments carried out in a radial Hele-Shaw cell with nematic or smectic liquid crystals a number of unexpected morphological phase transitions can be observed including crossovers from tip splitting to dendritic growth and from fractal to homogeneous structures. The investigations reviewed here suggest that the role of noise, driving force and anisotropy is crucial in the formation of patterns and it is the complex interplay of these factors which produces the great variety of morphologies found in nature.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF COAL PARTICLE FLOW PATTERNS IN LOW NOX BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Gregory E. Ogden; Jennifer Sinclair; Stephanus Budilarto

    2001-09-04

    It is well understood that the stability of axial diffusion flames is dependent on the mixing behavior of the fuel and combustion air streams. Combustion aerodynamic texts typically describe flame stability and transitions from laminar diffusion flames to fully developed turbulent flames as a function of increasing jet velocity. Turbulent diffusion flame stability is greatly influenced by recirculation eddies that transport hot combustion gases back to the burner nozzle. This recirculation enhances mixing and heats the incoming gas streams. Models describing these recirculation eddies utilize conservation of momentum and mass assumptions. Increasing the mass flow rate of either fuel or combustion air increases both the jet velocity and momentum for a fixed burner configuration. Thus, differentiating between gas velocity and momentum is important when evaluating flame stability under various operating conditions. The research efforts described herein are part of an ongoing project directed at evaluating the effect of flame aerodynamics on NO{sub x} emissions from coal fired burners in a systematic manner. This research includes both experimental and modeling efforts being performed at the University of Arizona in collaboration with Purdue University. The objective of this effort is to develop rational design tools for optimizing low NO{sub x} burners. Experimental studies include both cold-and hot-flow evaluations of the following parameters: primary and secondary inlet air velocity, coal concentration in the primary air, coal particle size distribution and flame holder geometry. Hot-flow experiments will also evaluate the effect of wall temperature on burner performance.

  13. Numerical analysis of respiratory flow patterns within human upper airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Yu, Shen; Gao, Fei

    2009-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is used to study the respiratory airflow dynamics within a human upper airway. The airway model which consists of the airway from nasal cavity, pharynx, larynx and trachea to triple bifurcation is built based on the CT images of a healthy volunteer and the Weibel model. The flow characteristics of the whole upper airway are quantitatively described at any time level of respiratory cycle. Simulation results of respiratory flow show good agreement with the clinical measures, experimental and computational results in the literature. The air mainly passes through the floor of the nasal cavity in the common, middle and inferior nasal meatus. The higher airway resistance and wall shear stresses are distributed on the posterior nasal valve. Although the airways of pharynx, larynx and bronchi experience low shear stresses, it is notable that relatively high shear stresses are distributed on the wall of epiglottis and bronchial bifurcations. Besides, two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models of normal and abnormal airways are built to discuss the flow-induced deformation in various anatomy models. The result shows that the wall deformation in normal airway is relatively small.

  14. [The correlation between flow pattern during cardiopulmonary bypass and patency of the coronary artery bypass grafts].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, H; Shirakawa, M; Nakayama, T; Asai, T; Nakayama, M; Ito, T; Yano, Y

    2005-07-01

    Recently the availability of transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is reported especially in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). But little is known about TTFM findings in on-pump CABG. We examined the correlation between the TTFM flow pattern and the angiography findings in on-pump CABG. The subjects consisted of 52 patients who underwent on-pump CABG and angiography early after operation. In these patients, 55 internal thoracic artery (ITA), 17 gastroepiploic artery (GEA), 13 saphenous vein graft (SVG) and 41 radial artery (RA) were tested with TTFM during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). TTFM demonstrated a diastolic filling pattern in 53 ITA, 16 GEA, 13 SVG and 36 RA. The angiography revealed that all these grafts were perfectly patent with the exception of a GEA with a flow competition pattern. TTFM revealed an abnormal flow pattern in 2 ITA (these 2 grafts were revised during CPB and the angiography demonstrated their perfect patency), 1 GEA (to and fro pattern), 0 SVG and 5 RA (the abnormal pattern was due to graft spasm in 3 of 5, and the angiography revealed their perfect patency, however, the angiography detected stenosis in the remaining 2 grafts). The present study found that the TTFM flow pattern during CPB correlated well with the angiography findings. TTFM during CPB was useful to detect graft failure, and grafts were revised safely during CPB. PMID:16004331

  15. MotionFlow: Visual Abstraction and Aggregation of Sequential Patterns in Human Motion Tracking Data.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujin; Elmqvist, Niklas; Ramani, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Pattern analysis of human motions, which is useful in many research areas, requires understanding and comparison of different styles of motion patterns. However, working with human motion tracking data to support such analysis poses great challenges. In this paper, we propose MotionFlow, a visual analytics system that provides an effective overview of various motion patterns based on an interactive flow visualization. This visualization formulates a motion sequence as transitions between static poses, and aggregates these sequences into a tree diagram to construct a set of motion patterns. The system also allows the users to directly reflect the context of data and their perception of pose similarities in generating representative pose states. We provide local and global controls over the partition-based clustering process. To support the users in organizing unstructured motion data into pattern groups, we designed a set of interactions that enables searching for similar motion sequences from the data, detailed exploration of data subsets, and creating and modifying the group of motion patterns. To evaluate the usability of MotionFlow, we conducted a user study with six researchers with expertise in gesture-based interaction design. They used MotionFlow to explore and organize unstructured motion tracking data. Results show that the researchers were able to easily learn how to use MotionFlow, and the system effectively supported their pattern analysis activities, including leveraging their perception and domain knowledge.

  16. Vapor Flow Patterns During a Start-Up Transient in Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Ghoniem, N, M.; Catton, I.

    1996-01-01

    The vapor flow patterns in heat pipes are examined during the start-up transient phase. The vapor core is modelled as a channel flow using a two dimensional compressible flow model. A nonlinear filtering technique is used as a post process to eliminate the non-physical oscillations of the flow variables. For high-input heat flux, multiple shock reflections are observed in the evaporation region. The reflections cause a reverse flow in the evaporation and circulations in the adiabatic region. Furthermore, each shock reflection causes a significant increase in the local pressure and a large pressure drop along the heat pipe.

  17. Analysis of the polishing slurry flow of chemical mechanical polishing by polishing pad with phyllotactic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yushan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Li, Nan; Duan, Min; Xing, Xue-Ling

    2011-05-01

    In order to make the polishing slurry distribution more uniform over the polishing region, a new kind of polishing pad, which has sunflower seed pattern, has been designed based on the phyllotaxis theory of biology, and the boundary conditions of polishing slurry flow have been established. By the help of computational fluid dynamics software (FLUENT), the flow state of the polishing slurry is simulated and the effects of the phyllotactic parameters of polishing pad on the flow field of polishing slurry are analyzed. The results show that when the polishing slurry is imported from the center of phyllotaxis polishing pad, the slurry flows along the counterclockwise and clockwise spiral grooves of phyllotatic pattern, which make fluid flow divergence around, and the flow field becomes more uniform.

  18. Analysis of the polishing slurry flow of chemical mechanical polishing by polishing pad with phyllotactic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yushan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Jun; Li, Nan; Duan, Min; Xing, Xue-Ling

    2010-12-01

    In order to make the polishing slurry distribution more uniform over the polishing region, a new kind of polishing pad, which has sunflower seed pattern, has been designed based on the phyllotaxis theory of biology, and the boundary conditions of polishing slurry flow have been established. By the help of computational fluid dynamics software (FLUENT), the flow state of the polishing slurry is simulated and the effects of the phyllotactic parameters of polishing pad on the flow field of polishing slurry are analyzed. The results show that when the polishing slurry is imported from the center of phyllotaxis polishing pad, the slurry flows along the counterclockwise and clockwise spiral grooves of phyllotatic pattern, which make fluid flow divergence around, and the flow field becomes more uniform.

  19. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  20. Reconstructing Flow Patterns from Tsunami Deposits with No Visible Sedimentary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, C. L.; Chague-Goff, C.; Goff, J. R.; Wassmer, P.; Gomez, C. A.; Hart, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    High energy coastal events, such as tsunamis, commonly leave sediment deposits in the landscape that may be preserved in the geological record. A set of anomalous sand and silt layers intercalated between soil units was identified alongside an estuary in Okains Bay, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. Okains Bay, comprised of a coastal plain of Holocene progradational dune ridges, was flooded by tsunamis in 1868 and 1960. Previous research has assessed the relationship between tsunami flow patterns and sediment deposits for recent events, and we aim to extend this application to older deposits where flow patterns were not recorded and sedimentary structures are not visually apparent. A multi-proxy approach was used to investigate the sediment deposits at twelve sites along a 2 km length of the estuary margin and map inundation patterns. Measurements of Magnetic Fabric (MF: Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility) were used to determine the flow direction during deposition, alongside stratigraphy and particle size analyses to assess wave energy. Flow direction results were overlaid on a digital elevation model of the study site to interpret flow patterns. Deposits became thinner and particle size decreased with distance from the coast, indicating waning flow energy with distance inland. MF results indicate that inundation occurred via the estuary channel, with primary flow directions oriented perpendicular or sub-perpendicular to the channel at each site. On a smaller scale, results showed evidence of current reversal at some sites, with flow directed alternately away from and towards the estuary channel. This is consistent with uprush and backwash patterns observed in tsunami wave sequences. Topographic control of flow patterns is also evident from the data. This research demonstrates a method for investigating older, structurally-degraded deposits and has implications for the reconstruction of paleotsunami inundation from their sedimentary deposits.

  1. Fractal patterns in turbulent flow for laden particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, M.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Angilella, J.-R.

    2011-12-01

    We use Kinematic Simulation as a particular kind of synthetic turbulence model to study the preferential accumulation of laden particles with inertia and gravity. Particles are released as a unifrom cloud in the periodic simulation box. We allow particles to settle in synthetic flow and after some times particles concentrate in a particular sub-domain. We study the dimensional properties of these attractors as functions of drift parameter and Stokes number. The attractor's topology varies from curve(D = 1) to fractal plane.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of patterns in laryngeal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, N. E.; Artana, G.; Sciamarella, D.

    2009-05-01

    Unsteady airflow is investigated in a channel with a geometry approximating that of the human larynx. The laryngeal flow is simulated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible two-dimensional viscous fluid, and visualized using the Schlieren technique in an experimental setup consisting of a rigid replica of the larynx, with and without ventricular bands. This study shows the spontaneous formation of vortex couples in several regions of the laryngeal profile, and at different stages of the evolution of the starting glottal jet.

  3. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  4. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K; Vittoria, Fabio A; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel "modified local retrieval" method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used "global retrieval" method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat's heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  5. Effects of non-idealities and quantization of the center of mass motion on symmetric and asymmetric collective states in a collective state atomic interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Resham; Kim, May E.; Fang, Renpeng; Tu, Yanfei; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of an ensemble of ? non-interacting, identical atoms excited by a laser. In general, the ?-th atom sees a Rabi frequency ?, an initial position dependent laser phase ?, and a motion induced Doppler shift of ?. When ? or ? is distinct for each atom, the system evolves into a superposition of ? intercoupled states, of which there are ? symmetric and ? asymmetric collective states. For a collective state atomic interferometer (COSAIN), we recently proposed, it is important to understand the behavior of all the collective states under various conditions. In this paper, we show how to formulate the properties of these states under various non-idealities, and use this formulation to understand the dynamics thereof. We also consider the effect of treating the center of mass degree of freedom of the atoms quantum mechanically on the description of the collective states, illustrating that it is indeed possible to construct a generalized collective state, as needed for the COSAIN, when each atom is assumed to be in a localized wave packet. The analysis presented in this paper is important for understanding the dynamics of the COSAIN, and will help advance the analysis and optimization of spin squeezing in the presence of practically unavoidable non-idealities as well as in the domain where the center of mass motion of the atoms is quantized.

  6. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; de Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings.

  7. Uncertainty estimation of non-ideal analog switches using programmable Josephson voltage standards for mutual inductance measurement in the joule balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Zhengkun; Xu, Jinxin; You, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the mutual inductance is one of the key techniques in the joule balance to determine the Planck constant h, where a standard-square-wave compensation method was proposed to accurately measure the dc value of the mutual inductance. With this method, analog switches are used to compose an analog-switch signal generator to synthesize the excitation and compensation voltages. However, the accuracy of the compensation voltage is influenced by the non-ideal behaviors of analog-switches. In this paper, the effect from these non-ideal switches is analyzed in detail and evaluated with the equivalent circuits. A programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) is used to generate a reference compensation voltage to measure the time integration of the voltage waveform generated by the analog-switch signal generator. Moreover, the effect is also evaluated experimentally by comparing the difference between the mutual inductance measured with the analog-switch signal generator and the value determined by the PJVS-analog-switch generator alternately in the same mutual inductance measurement system. The result shows that the impact of analog switches is 1.97  ×  10-7 with an uncertainty of 1.83  ×  10-7 (k  =  1) and confirms that the analog switch method can be used regularly instead of the PJVS in the mutual inductance measurement for the joule balance experiment.

  8. Selection of two-phase flow patterns at a simple junction in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Engl, W; Ohata, K; Guillot, P; Colin, A; Panizza, P

    2006-04-01

    We study the behavior of a confined stream made of two immiscible fluids when it reaches a T junction. Two flow patterns are witnessed: the stream is either directed in only one sidearm, yielding a preferential flow pathway for the dispersed phase, or splits between both. We show that the selection of these patterns is not triggered by the shape of the junction nor by capillary effects, but results from confinement. It can be anticipated in terms of the hydrodynamic properties of the flow. A simple model yielding universal behavior in terms of the relevant adimensional parameters of the problem is presented and discussed.

  9. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.

    1983-10-12

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell having compound cross flow gas patterns

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.

    1985-01-01

    A core construction for a fuel cell is disclosed having both parallel and cross flow passageways for the fuel and the oxidant gases. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte wall consists of cathode and anode materials sandwiching an electrolyte material. Each interconnect wall is formed as a sheet of inert support material having therein spaced small plugs of interconnect material, where cathode and anode materials are formed as layers on opposite sides of each sheet and are electrically connected together by the interconnect material plugs. Each interconnect wall in a wavy shape is connected along spaced generally parallel line-like contact areas between corresponding spaced pairs of generally parallel electrolyte walls, operable to define one tier of generally parallel flow passageways for the fuel and oxidant gases. Alternate tiers are arranged to have the passageways disposed normal to one another. Solid mechanical connection of the interconnect walls of adjacent tiers to the opposite sides of the common electrolyte wall therebetween is only at spaced point-like contact areas, 90 where the previously mentioned line-like contact areas cross one another.

  12. Defect turbulence in a spiral wave pattern in the torsional Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Cros, A; Le Gal, P

    2004-01-01

    Our experimental study is devoted to the transition to defect turbulence of a periodic spiral wave pattern occurring in the flow between a rotating and a stationary disk. As the rotation rate Omega of the disk is increased, the radial phase velocity of the waves changes its sign: The waves that propagate first outward on average, then become stationary and finally propagate inward. As they become stationary, the nucleation of topological defects breaks the periodicity of the pattern. For higher Omega, more and more defects are generated in the flow pattern. This article presents the statistical study of this defect mediated turbulence.

  13. Pattern formation in directional solidification under shear flow. II. Morphologies and their characterization.

    PubMed

    Marietti, Y; Debierre, J M; Bock, T M; Kassner, K

    2001-06-01

    In the preceding paper, we have established an interface equation for directional solidification under the influence of a shear flow parallel to the interface. This equation is asymptotically valid near the absolute stability limit. The flow, described by a nonlocal term, induces a lateral drift of the whole pattern due to its symmetry-breaking properties. We find that at not-too-large flow strengths, the transcritical nature of the transition to hexagonal patterns shows up via a hexagonal modulation of the stripe pattern even when the linear instability threshold of the flowless case has not yet been attained. When the flow term is large, the linear description of the drift velocity breaks down and transitions to flow-dominated morphologies take place. The competition between flow-induced and diffusion-induced patterns (controlled by the temperature gradient) leads to new phenomena such as the transition to a different lattice structure in an array of hexagonal cells. Several methods to characterize the morphologies and their transitions are investigated and compared. In particular, we consider two different ways of defining topological defects useful in the description of patterns and we discuss how they are related to each other.

  14. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  15. Luminal flow patterns dictate arterial drug deposition in stent-based delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Tzafriri, Abraham R.; Arifin, Davis Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2010-01-01

    Endovascular stents reside in a dynamic flow environment and yet the impact of flow on arterial drug deposition after stent-based delivery is only now emerging. We employed computational fluid dynamic modeling tools to investigate the influence of luminal flow patterns on arterial drug deposition and distribution. Flow imposes recirculation zones distal and proximal to the stent strut that extend the coverage of tissue absorption of eluted drug and induce asymmetry in tissue drug distribution. Our analysis now explains how the disparity in sizes of the two recirculation zones and the asymmetry in drug distribution are determined by a complex interplay of local flow and strut geometry. When temporal periodicity was introduced as a model of pulsatile flow, the net luminal flow served as an index of flow-mediated spatio-temporal tissue drug uptake. Dynamically changing luminal flow patterns are intrinsic to the coronary arterial tree. Coronary drug eluting stents should be appropriately considered where luminal flow, strut design and pulsatility have direct effects on tissue drug uptake after local delivery. PMID:18926864

  16. Visualized flow patterns of double concentric jets at low annulus velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Lin, Chih L.

    1994-09-01

    The flow structures in the near wake region of the unducted double concentric jets at low Reynolds numbers are studied by smoke-wire flow visualization technique. Four typical characteristic flow regimes -- weak flow, pre-penetration, transition, and penetration -- are identified for different jet velocities in the near disk region. Flow patterns and behvaior in each characteristic flow regime are investigated. The contours of the separation surfaces and the lengths of the recirculation zone in various flow regimes are correlated with nondimensional parameters. The recirculation length reaches a maximum in the transition region. The toroidal recirculation region exhibits both expelling and shear-layer vortex shedding. The shedding processes are presented, and the frequencies are correlated with Strouhal number and central-to-annular jet velocity ratio.

  17. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  18. Permeability and effective slip in confined flows transverse to wall slippage patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Datta, Subhra; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    The pressure-driven Stokes flow through a plane channel with arbitrary wall separation having a continuous pattern of sinusoidally varying slippage of arbitrary wavelength and amplitude on one/both walls is modelled semi-analytically. The patterning direction is transverse to the flow. In the special situations of thin and thick channels, respectively, the predictions of the model are found to be consistent with lubrication theory and results from the literature pertaining to free shear flow. For the same pattern-averaged slip length, the hydraulic permeability relative to a channel with no-slip walls increases as the pattern wave-number, amplitude, and channel size are decreased. Unlike discontinuous wall patterns of stick-slip zones studied elsewhere in the literature, the effective slip length of a sinusoidally patterned wall in a confined flow continues to scale with both channel size and the pattern-averaged slip length even in the limit of thin channel size to pattern wavelength ratio. As a consequence, for sufficiently small channel sizes, the permeability of a channel with sinusoidal wall slip patterns will always exceed that of an otherwise similar channel with discontinuous patterns on corresponding walls. For a channel with one no-slip wall and one patterned wall, the permeability relative to that of an unpatterned reference channel of same pattern-averaged slip length exhibits non-monotonic behaviour with channel size, with a minimum appearing at intermediate channel sizes. Approximate closed-form estimates for finding the location and size of this minimum are provided in the limit of large and small pattern wavelengths. For example, if the pattern wavelength is much larger than the channel thickness, exact results from lubrication theory indicate that a worst case permeability penalty relative to the reference channel of ˜23% arises when the average slip of the patterned wall is ˜2.7 times the channel size. The results from the current study should

  19. Flow in microchannels with rough walls: flow pattern and pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao Li; Wang, Yuan

    2007-03-01

    In this paper perturbation methods are introduced to study the laminar flow in microchannels between two parallel plates with rough wall surfaces. By a coordinate transformation, the physical domain of the microchannel is transformed into the computational one. The relative roughness as a small parameter presents the governing equations resulting from the coordinate transformation. The equations are linearized through applying the perturbation method, and the spectral collocation method is employed to solve the perturbation equations. Furthermore, the boundary perturbation method is used to analyze the spatially-averaged pressure drop of the microchannel. The numerical results show that flow in microchannels with rough surfaces is quite different from Poiseuille flow: there exist apparent fluctuations and periodic variations of vorticity along the flow direction in the flow field; flow is viscously dominant under the conditions of a low Reynolds number and the flow separations happen in the troughs of wavy walls at a high Reynolds number. The spatially-averaged pressure drop being subject to the invariable flow rate could be greater than, equal to or even less than the theoretical value, which is qualitatively consistent with the results of the microfluidic experiments.

  20. A numerical analysis of the aortic blood flow pattern during pulsed cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Gramigna, V; Caruso, M V; Rossi, M; Serraino, G F; Renzulli, A; Fragomeni, G

    2015-01-01

    In the modern era, stroke remains a main cause of morbidity after cardiac surgery despite continuing improvements in the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) techniques. The aim of the current work was to numerically investigate the blood flow in aorta and epiaortic vessels during standard and pulsed CPB, obtained with the intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP). A multi-scale model, realized coupling a 3D computational fluid dynamics study with a 0D model, was developed and validated with in vivo data. The presence of IABP improved the flow pattern directed towards the epiaortic vessels with a mean flow increase of 6.3% and reduced flow vorticity. PMID:24962383

  1. Influence of flow patterns on chromatographic efficiency in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Marchal, L; Foucaul, A; Patissier, G; Rosant, J M; Legrand, J

    2000-02-11

    Visualization of flow patterns in centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was performed with an asynchronous camera and a stroboscope triggered by the CPC rotor, allowing a channel to be selected and observed regardless of rotational speed. Three main types of flow states were noted as a function of rotational speed and flow-rate: jets stuck along channel walls, broken jets and atomization. Our observations emphasize the importance of Coriolis force on flow shape. Chromatographic efficiency was related to the dispersion of the mobile phase in the stationary phase.

  2. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  3. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  4. Mean flow velocity patterns within a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J T; Tarbell, J M; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B

    1989-01-01

    A laser Doppler anemometry system was used to measure fluid velocities at 127 locations within a plexiglas model of the 70 cm3 Penn State electric ventricular assist device (VAD) fitted with Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave tilting disk valves. The velocity measurements were made using a seeded blood analog fluid that matched the kinematic viscosity of blood and the refractive index of plexiglas. At each location, 250 instantaneous velocity realizations were collected at eight instances during the pump cycle. The data were filtered and averaged to calculate mean (ensemble averaged) velocities. The results indicate that the largest mean velocities are created during systole in the VADs outlet tract, and during diastole in the major orifice of the mitral valve. A single vortex centered roughly about the axis of the cylindrical portion of the pump is created during early diastole. This vortex, which persists into early systole, provides good washing of the VAD walls. However, it does appear to impede the flow entering the VAD through the minor orifice of the mitral valve. High velocities also occur during diastole along the minor orifice wall of the outlet tract and are directed into the chamber. These retrograde velocities suggest the presence of a regurgitant jet near the wall of the prosthetic valve.

  5. Field-scale Prediction of Enhanced DNAPL Dissolution Using Partitioning Tracers and Flow Pattern Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Annable, M. D.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The equilibrium streamtube model (EST) has demonstrated the ability to accurately predict dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) dissolution in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Here the model is applied to predict DNAPL dissolution at a PCE-contaminated dry cleaner site, located in Jacksonville, Florida. The EST is an analytical solution with field-measurable input parameters. Here, measured data from a field-scale partitioning tracer test were used to parameterize the EST model and the predicted PCE dissolution was compared to measured data from an in-situ alcohol (ethanol) flood. In addition, a simulated partitioning tracer test from a calibrated spatially explicit multiphase flow model (UTCHEM) was also used to parameterize the EST analytical solution. The ethanol prediction based on both the field partitioning tracer test and the UTCHEM tracer test simulation closely matched the field data. The PCE EST prediction showed a peak shift to an earlier arrival time that was concluded to be caused by well screen interval differences between the field tracer test and alcohol flood. This observation was based on a modeling assessment of potential factors that may influence predictions by using UTCHEM simulations. The imposed injection and pumping flow pattern at this site for both the partitioning tracer test and alcohol flood was more complex than the natural gradient flow pattern (NGFP). Both the EST model and UTCHEM were also used to predict PCE dissolution under natural gradient conditions, with much simpler flow patterns than the forced-gradient double five spot of the alcohol flood. The NGFP predictions based on parameters determined from tracer tests conducted with complex flow patterns underestimated PCE concentrations and total mass removal. This suggests that the flow patterns influence aqueous dissolution and that the aqueous dissolution under the NGFP is more efficient than dissolution under complex flow patterns.

  6. Analyzing Unsatirated Flow Patterns in Fractured Rock Using an Integrated Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; G. Lu; K. Zhang; L. Pan; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-08-03

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies, because of the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. This paper presents an integrated modeling methodology for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for modeling analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations and their results of flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides a much clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain's flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  7. Effect of air-flow on the evaluation of refractive surgery ablation patterns.

    PubMed

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; Schumacher, Silvia; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Siegel, Jan; Mrochen, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-02-28

    An Allegretto Eye-Q laser platform (Wavelight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) was used to study the effect of air-flow speed on the ablation of artificial polymer corneas used for testing refractive surgery patterns. Flat samples of two materials (PMMA and Filofocon A) were ablated at four different air flow conditions. The shape and profile of the ablated surfaces were measured with a precise non-contact optical surface profilometer. Significant asymmetries in the measured profiles were found when the ablation was performed with the clinical air aspiration system, and also without air flow. Increasing air-flow produced deeper ablations, improved symmetry, and increased the repeatability of the ablation pattern. Shielding of the laser pulse by the plume of smoke during the ablation of plastic samples reduced the central ablation depth by more than 40% with no-air flow, 30% with clinical air aspiration, and 5% with 1.15 m/s air flow. A simple model based on non-inertial dragging of the particles by air flow predicts no central shielding with 2.3 m/s air flow, and accurately predicts (within 2 μm) the decrease of central ablation depth by shielding. The shielding effects for PMMA and Filofocon A were similar despite the differences in the ablation properties of the materials and the different full-shielding transmission coefficient, which is related to the number of particles ejected and their associated optical behavior. Air flow is a key factor in the evaluation of ablation patterns in refractive surgery using plastic models, as significant shielding effects are found with typical air-flow levels used under clinical conditions. Shielding effects can be avoided by tuning the air flow to the laser repetition rate.

  8. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  9. Comparison of visualized turbine endwall secondary flows and measured heat transfer patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    Various flow visualization techniques were used to define the secondary flows near the endwall in a large heat transfer data. A comparison of the visualized flow patterns and the measured Stanton number distribution was made for cases where the inlet Reynolds number and exit Mach number were matched. Flows were visualized by using neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, by using smoke from oil soaked cigars, and by a few techniques using permanent marker pen ink dots and synthetic wintergreen oil. Details of the horseshoe vortex and secondary flows can be directly compared with heat transfer distribution. Near the cascade entrance there is an obvious correlation between the two sets of data, but well into the passage the effect of secondary flow is not as obvious.

  10. Comparison of visualized turbine endwall secondary flows and measured heat transfer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaugler, R. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Various flow visualization techniques were used to define the seondary flows near the endwall in a large heat transfer data. A comparison of the visualized flow patterns and the measured Stanton number distribution was made for cases where the inlet Reynolds number and exit Mach number were matched. Flows were visualized by using neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, by using smoke from oil soaked cigars, and by a few techniques using permanent marker pen ink dots and synthetic wintergreen oil. Details of the horseshoe vortex and secondary flows can be directly compared with heat transfer distribution. Near the cascade entrance there is an obvious correlation between the two sets of data, but well into the passage the effect of secondary flow is not as obvious. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14435

  11. Comparison of visualized turbine endwall secondary flows and measured heat transfer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaugler, R. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1983-03-01

    Various flow visualization techniques were used to define the secondary flows near the endwall in a large heat transfer data. A comparison of the visualized flow patterns and the measured Stanton number distribution was made for cases where the inlet Reynolds number and exit Mach number were matched. Flows were visualized by using neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles, by using smoke from oil soaked cigars, and by a few techniques using permanent marker pen ink dots and synthetic wintergreen oil. Details of the horseshoe vortex and secondary flows can be directly compared with heat transfer distribution. Near the cascade entrance there is an obvious correlation between the two sets of data, but well into the passage the effect of secondary flow is not as obvious.

  12. Analyzing flow patterns in unsaturated fractured rock of YuccaMountain using an integrated modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur S.

    2003-11-03

    This paper presents a series of modeling investigations to characterize percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The investigations are conducted using a modeling approach that integrates a wide variety of moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model through model calibration. This integrated modeling approach, based on a dual-continuum formulation, takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain's highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. In particular, the model results are examined against different types of field-measured data and used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptual models and their effects on flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this work to provide understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, which is a crucial issue in assessing repository performance.

  13. Lower limits of spin detection efficiency for two-parameter two-qubit (TPTQ) states with non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Nayereh; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a TPTQ state as an input state of a non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors. Minimal spin polarization required to demonstrate spin entanglement according to entanglement witness and CHSH inequality with respect to (w.r.t.) their two free parameters have been found, and we have numerically shown that the entanglement witness is less stringent than the direct tests of Bell's inequality in the form of CHSH in the entangled limits of its free parameters. In addition, the lower limits of spin detection efficiency fulfilling secure cryptographic key against eavesdropping have been derived. Finally, we have considered TPTQ state as an output of spin decoherence channel and the region of ballistic transmission time w.r.t. spin relaxation time and spin dephasing time has been found.

  14. Lower limits of spin detection efficiency for two-parameter two-qubit (TPTQ) states with non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Nayereh; Ghasemi, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated a TPTQ state as an input state of a non-ideal ferromagnetic detectors. Minimal spin polarization required to demonstrate spin entanglement according to entanglement witness and CHSH inequality with respect to (w.r.t.) their two free parameters have been found, and we have numerically shown that the entanglement witness is less stringent than the direct tests of Bell's inequality in the form of CHSH in the entangled limits of its free parameters. In addition, the lower limits of spin detection efficiency fulfilling secure cryptographic key against eavesdropping have been derived. Finally, we have considered TPTQ state as an output of spin decoherence channel and the region of ballistic transmission time w.r.t. spin relaxation time and spin dephasing time has been found.

  15. An active region model for capturing fractal flow patterns in unsaturated soils: model development.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Zhang, R; Bodvarsson, G S

    2005-11-01

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  16. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  17. Laminar flow in a microchannel with hydrophobic surface patterned microribs oriented parallel to the flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynes, D.; Jeffs, K.; Woolford, B.; Webb, B. W.

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel with ultrahydrophobic top and bottom walls. The walls are fabricated with microribs and cavities that are oriented parallel to the flow direction. The channel walls are modeled in an idealized fashion, with the shape of the liquid-vapor meniscus approximated as flat. An analytical model of the vapor cavity flow is employed and coupled with a numerical model of the liquid flow by matching the local liquid and vapor phase velocity and shear stress at the interface. The numerical predictions show that the effective slip length and the reduction in the classical friction factor-Reynolds number product increase with increasing relative cavity width, increasing relative cavity depth, and decreasing relative microrib/cavity module length. Comparisons were also made between the zero shear interface model and the liquid-vapor cavity coupled model. The results illustrate that the zero shear interface model underpredicts the overall flow resistance. Further, the deviation between the two models was found to be significantly larger for increasing values of both the relative rib/cavity module width and the cavity fraction. The trends in the frictional pressure drop predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements made at similar conditions, with greater deviation observed at increasing size of the cavity fraction. Based on the numerical predictions, an expression is proposed in which the friction factor-Reynolds number product may be estimated in terms of the important variables.

  18. Effective Medium Theory for Drag Reducing Micro-patterned Surfaces in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, I.

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by the lotus effect, many studies in the last decade have focused on micro- and nano-patterned surfaces. They revealed that patterns at the micro-scale combined with high contact angles can significantly reduce skin drag. However, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features, that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model flow over patterned surfaces in both Cassie and Wenzel states. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or Karman) number in turbulent regime, the viscosity ratio between the fluid in and above the features, and their geometrical properties. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flows over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  19. Effective Medium Theory for Drag Reducing Micro-patterned Surfaces in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Ilenia

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the lotus effect, many studies in the last decade have focused on micro- and nano-patterned surfaces. They revealed that patterns at the micro-scale combined with high contact angles can significantly reduce skin drag. However, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model flows over patterned surfaces in both Cassie and Wenzel states. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or Karman) number in turbulent regime. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flow over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  20. Impact of vegetation die-off on spatial flow patterns over a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Moonen, Pieter; Schoelynck, Jonas; Govers, Gerard; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale die-off of tidal marsh vegetation, caused by global change, is expected to change flow patterns over tidal wetlands, and hence to affect valuable wetland functions such as reduction of shoreline erosion, attenuation of storm surges, and sedimentation in response to sea level rise. This study quantified for the first time the effects of large-scale (4 ha) artificial vegetation removal, as proxy of die-off, on the spatial flow patterns through a tidal marsh channel and over the surrounding marsh platform. After vegetation removal, the flow velocities measured on the platform increased by a factor of 2 to 4, while the channel flow velocities decreased by almost a factor of 3. This was associated with a change in flow directions on the platform, from perpendicular to the channel edges when vegetation was present, to a tendency of more parallel flow to the channel edges when vegetation was absent. Comparison with hydrodynamic model simulations explains that the vegetation-induced friction causes both flow reduction on the vegetated platform and flow acceleration towards the non-vegetated channels. Our findings imply that large-scale vegetation die-off would not only result in decreased platform sedimentation rates, but also in sediment infilling of the channels, which together would lead to further worsening of plant growth conditions and a potentially runaway feedback to permanent vegetation loss.

  1. Flow pattern in the vicinity of self-propelling hot Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Thomas; Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2013-07-01

    We study the temperature field and the resulting flow pattern in the vicinity of a heated metal-capped Janus particle. If its thickness exceeds about 10 nm, the cap forms an isotherm and the flow pattern comprises a quadrupolar term that decays with the square of the inverse distance ~r(-2). For much thinner caps the velocity varies as ~r(-3). These findings could be relevant for collective effects in dense suspensions and for the circular tracer motion observed recently in the vicinity of a tethered Janus particle. PMID:23944457

  2. Flow pattern in the vicinity of self-propelling hot Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Thomas; Majee, Arghya; Würger, Alois

    2013-07-01

    We study the temperature field and the resulting flow pattern in the vicinity of a heated metal-capped Janus particle. If its thickness exceeds about 10 nm, the cap forms an isotherm and the flow pattern comprises a quadrupolar term that decays with the square of the inverse distance ˜r-2. For much thinner caps the velocity varies as ˜r-3. These findings could be relevant for collective effects in dense suspensions and for the circular tracer motion observed recently in the vicinity of a tethered Janus particle.

  3. Probabilistic and Other Neural Nets in Multi-Hole Probe Calibration and Flow Angularity Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskaran, Subbiah; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Noever, David

    1998-01-01

    The use of probabilistic (PNN) and multilayer feed forward (MLFNN) neural networks are investigated for calibration of multi-hole pressure probes and the prediction of associated flow angularity patterns in test flow fields. Both types of networks are studied in detail for their calibration and prediction characteristics. The current formalism can be applied to any multi-hole probe, however the test results for the most commonly used five-hole Cone and Prism probe types alone are reported in this article.

  4. Pattern recognition analysis of anterior cingulate cortex blood flow to classify depression polarity†

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, J. R. C.; Mourao-Miranda, J.; Aizenstein, H. J.; Versace, A.; Kozel, F. A.; Lu, H.; Marquand, A.; LaBarbara, E. J.; Brammer, M.; Trivedi, M.; Kupfer, D. J.; Phillips, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating bipolar from recurrent unipolar depression is a major clinical challenge. In 18 healthy females and 36 females in a depressive episode - 18 with bipolar disorder type I, 18 with recurrent unipolar depression - we applied pattern recognition analysis using subdivisions of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) blood flow at rest, measured with arterial spin labelling. Subgenual ACC blood flow classified unipolar v. bipolar depression with 81% accuracy (83% sensitivity, 78% specificity). PMID:23969484

  5. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  6. A herringbone bedform pattern of possible Taylor-Görtler type flow origin seen in sonographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toimil, Lawrence J.; Reimnitz, Erk

    1979-01-01

    Side-scan sonar records collected in a shallow arctic lagoon (2–2.5 m depth) reveal a herringbone pattern of current-aligned linear reflectors with branching diagonals. The major longitudinal reflectors have no detectable relief (<20 cm), are spaced 5–10 m apart, and may represent current-aligned helical cell boundaries preserved in the silty fine sand of the lagoon floor. The pattern suggests a three-dimensional flow regime of the Taylor-Görtler type.

  7. Vector projectile imaging: time-resolved dynamic visualization of complex flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Lai, Simon S M; Yu, Alfred C H

    2014-09-01

    Achieving non-invasive, accurate and time-resolved imaging of vascular flow with spatiotemporal fluctuations is well acknowledged to be an ongoing challenge. In this article, we present a new ultrasound-based framework called vector projectile imaging (VPI) that can dynamically render complex flow patterns over an imaging view at millisecond time resolution. VPI is founded on three principles: (i) high-frame-rate broad-view data acquisition (based on steered plane wave firings); (ii) flow vector estimation derived from multi-angle Doppler analysis (coupled with data regularization and least-squares fitting); (iii) dynamic visualization of color-encoded vector projectiles (with flow speckles displayed as adjunct). Calibration results indicated that by using three transmit angles and three receive angles (-10°, 0°, +10° for both), VPI can consistently compute flow vectors in a multi-vessel phantom with three tubes positioned at different depths (1.5, 4, 6 cm), oriented at different angles (-10°, 0°, +10°) and of different sizes (dilated diameter: 2.2, 4.4 and 6.3 mm; steady flow rate: 2.5 mL/s). The practical merit of VPI was further illustrated through an anthropomorphic flow phantom investigation that considered both healthy and stenosed carotid bifurcation geometries. For the healthy bifurcation with 1.2-Hz carotid flow pulses, VPI was able to render multi-directional and spatiotemporally varying flow patterns (using a nominal frame rate of 416 fps or 2.4-ms time resolution). In the case of stenosed bifurcations (50% eccentric narrowing), VPI enabled dynamic visualization of flow jet and recirculation zones. These findings suggest that VPI holds promise as a new tool for complex flow analysis.

  8. Pattern recognition techniques for horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arubi, Tesi I. M.; Yeung, Hoi

    2012-03-01

    The oil and gas industry need for high performing and low cost multiphase meters is ever more justified given the rapid depletion of conventional oil reserves that has led oil companies to develop smaller and marginal fields and reservoirs in remote locations and deep offshore, thereby placing great demands for compact and more cost effective solutions of on-line continuous multiphase flow measurement for well testing, production monitoring, production optimisation, process control and automation. The pattern recognition approach for clamp-on multiphase measurement employed in this study provides one means for meeting this need. High speed caesium-137 radioisotope-based densitometers were installed vertically at the top of a 50.8mm and 101.6mm riser as well as horizontally at the riser base in the Cranfield University multiphase flow test facility. A comprehensive experimental campaign comprising flow conditions typical of operating conditions found in the Petroleum Industry was conducted. The application of a single gamma densitometer unit, in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques to determine both the phase volume fractions and velocities to yield the individual phase flow rates of horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flows was investigated. The pattern recognition systems were trained to map the temporal fluctuations in the multiphase mixture density with the individual phase flow rates using statistical features extracted from the gamma counts signals as their inputs. Initial results yielded individual phase flow rate predictions to within ±5% relative error for the two phase airwater flows and ±10% for three phase air-oil-water flows data.

  9. Identification of microfluidic two-phase flow patterns in lab-on-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao; Halvorsen, Einar

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a capacitive sensor for identification of microfluidic two-phase flow in lab-on-chip devices. With interdigital electrodes and thin insulation layer utilized, this sensor is capable of being integrated with the microsystems easily. Transducing principle and design considerations are presented with respect to the microfluidic gas/liquid flow patterns. Numerical simulation results verify the operational principle. And the factors affecting the performance of the sensor are discussed. Besides, a feasible process flow for the fabrication is also proposed.

  10. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation: Merging Jets and the Ultimate Jet Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey B. Parker and John A. Krommes

    2013-01-30

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. It is shown that for statisti- cally averaged equations of quasigeostrophic turbulence on a beta plane, zonal flows and inhomoge- neous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  11. Modality transition-based network from multivariate time series for characterizing horizontal oil-water flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mei-Shuang; Jin, Ning-De; Gao, Zhong-Ke

    2015-11-01

    The simultaneous flow of oil and water through a horizontal pipe is a common occurrence during petroleum industrial processes. Characterizing the flow behavior underlying horizontal oil-water flows is a challenging problem of significant importance. In order to solve this problem, we carry out experiment to measure multivariate signals from different flow patterns and then propose a novel modality transition-based network to analyze the multivariate signals. The results suggest that the local betweenness centrality and weighted shortest path of the constructed network can characterize the transitions of flow conditions and further allow quantitatively distinguishing and uncovering the dynamic flow behavior underlying different horizontal oil-water flow patterns.

  12. Bronchodilator delivery by metered-dose inhaler in mechanically ventilated COPD patients: influence of flow pattern.

    PubMed

    Mouloudi, E; Prinianakis, G; Kondili, E; Georgopoulos, D

    2000-08-01

    In mechanically ventilated patients the flow pattern during bronchodilator delivery by metered-dose inhaler (MDI) could be a factor that might influence the effectiveness of this therapy. In order to test this the effect of two different inspiratory flow patterns on the bronchodilation induced by beta2-agonists administered via MDI and spacer in a group of mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was examined. Eighteen mechanically ventilated patients with COPD, were prospectively randomized to receive two (n=8, protocol A) or six (n=10 protocol B) puffs salbutamol (100 microg x puff(-1)) either under pressure control (decelerating flow pattern) or under volume control (square wave flow pattern). With both modes, tidal volume and inspiratory time were identical. Salbutamol was administered via an MDI adapted to the inspiratory limb of the ventilator circuit using an aerosol cloud-enhancer spacer. After a 6-h washout, patients were crossed over to receive the same dose of salbutamol (200 or 600 microg, respectively in protocols A and B) by the alternative mode of administration. Static and dynamic airway pressures, minimum (Rint) and maximum (Rrs) inspiratory resistance and the difference between Rrs and Rint (deltaR) were measured before and at 15, 30 and 60 min after salbutamol. Independent of the dose, salbutamol caused a significant decrease in dynamic and static airway pressures, Rint and Rrs. These changes were not influenced by the inspiratory flow pattern and were evident at 15, 30 and 60 min after salbutamol. It is concluded that salbutamol delivered via metered dose inhaler and spacer device, induces significant bronchodilation in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the magnitude of which is not affected by the inspiratory flow/time profile.

  13. Beat-rate dependent mitral flow patterns for in vitro hemodynamic applications.

    PubMed

    Vismara, Riccardo; Fiore, Gianfranco B

    2010-12-01

    The conservative surgery approach for restoring the functionality of heart valves has predominated during the last two decades, particularly for the mitral valve. In vitro pulsatile testing is a key methodology for the investigation of heart valve hemodynamics, and particularly for the ideation, validation and optimization of novel techniques in heart valve surgery. Traditionally, however, pulsatile mock loops have been developed for the study of aortic valve substitutes, and scarce attention has been paid in replicating the mitral flow patterns with due hemodynamic fidelity. In this work we provide detailed analytical expressions to produce beat-rate dependent, physiologic-like mitral flow patterns for in vitro applications. The approach we propose is based on a biomechanical analysis of the factors which govern hemodynamic changes in the mitral flow pattern, namely in terms of E and A wave contours and E/A peaks ratio, when switching from rest to mild exercise conditions. The patterns from the model we obtained were in good agreement with clinical literature data in terms of i) gradual superimposition of the E and A wave, which yielded a single peak at 96 bpm; ii) decrease in the E/A ratio with increasing heart rate; iii) amount of flow delivered by each of the two waves. The proposed method provides a physiologically representative, beat-rate dependent analytical expression of the mitral flow pattern, which can be used in in vitro hydrodynamic investigations to accurately replicate the changes that the flow waves experience when the heart rate shifts from rest to mild exercise conditions.

  14. Influence of initial conditions on the flow patterns of a shock-accelerated thin fluid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Budzinski, J.M.; Benjamin, R.F. ); Jacobs, J.W. )

    1994-11-01

    Previous observations of three flow patterns generated by shock acceleration of a thin perturbed, fluid layer are now correlated with asymmetries in the initial conditions. Using a different diagnostic (planar laser Rayleigh scattering) than the previous experiments, upstream mushrooms, downstream mushrooms, and sinuous patterns are still observed. For each experiment the initial perturbation amplitude on one side of the layer can either be larger, smaller, or the same as the amplitude on the other side, as observed with two images per experiment, and these differences lead to the formation of the different patterns.

  15. Breathing patterns of preterm infants during bottle feeding: role of milk flow.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P

    1991-12-01

    Milk flow achieved during feeding may contribute to the ventilatory depression observed during nipple feeding. One of the important determinants of milk flow is the size of the feeding hole. In the first phase of the study, investigators compared the breathing patterns of 10 preterm infants during bottle feeding with two types of commercially available (Enfamil) single-hole nipples: one type designed for term infants and the other for preterm infants. Reductions in ventilation, tidal volume, and breathing frequency, compared with prefeeding control values, were observed with both nipple types during continuous and intermittent sucking phases; no significant differences were observed for any of the variables. Unlike the commercially available, mechanically drilled nipples, laser-cut nipple units showed a markedly lower coefficient of variation in milk flow. In the second phase of the study, two sizes of laser-cut nipple units, low and high flow, were used to feed nine preterm infants. Significantly lower sucking pressures were observed with high-flow nipples as compared with low-flow nipples. Decreases in minute ventilation and breathing frequency were also significantly greater with high-flow nipples. These results suggest that milk flow contributes to the observed reduction in ventilation during nipple feeding and that preterm infants have limited ability to self-regulate milk flow.

  16. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states. PMID:26589329

  17. Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; McDonald, John P.; Schalla, Ronald; Sweeney, Mark D.; M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett

    2002-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory made in situ flow measurements in groundwater monitoring wells at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to determine the flow direction in an aquifer with a flat water table. Given the total errors in water level elevations, flow directions based on the potentiometric surface are ambiguous at best. The colloidal borescope was used because it allows direct, real time observation of mobile colloidal particles in the open interval of a water well and thus, avoids the use of water level data. The results characterize a complex groundwater flow pattern under several buried waste storage tank farms. The aquifer, artificially high due to large volume liquid discharges to the soil column from Hanford's nuclear production era, is currently receding to original conditions. The aquifer lies in unconsolidated gravel beds overlying an impermeable basalt surface that has a plucked, flood-scoured, scabland structure. The current aquifer thickness is similar to the relief on the basalt basement. Thus the groundwater must flow around the impermeable basalt structures producing a complicated flow pattern under the waste storage unit. The original monitoring network was designed for northwest flow when the water table was held artificially high. Proper locations for new wells are dependent on our knowledge of the flow direction. The results of the colloidal borescope investigation agree with the southerly direction indicated from hydrographs, contaminant trends, other direct flow data and the general concept of a receding aquifer draining off the southern limb of a basalt anticline. Flow in the aquifer is diverted by irregular local structural highs of very low permeability basalt.

  18. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states.

  19. Simultaneous imaging of blood flow and hemoglobin concentration change in skin tissue using NIR speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizu, Yoshihisa; Hirata, Tatsuya; Maeda, Takaaki; Nishidate, Izumi; Yokoi, Naomichi

    2009-07-01

    We propose a method for imaging simultaneously blood flow and hemoglobin concentration change in skin tissue using speckle patterns acquired at two wavelengths of 780 and 830 nm. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is useful for time-varying analysis of blood circulation in human forearm skin tissue from one set of sequential speckle images.

  20. Video camera observation for assessing overland flow patterns during rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Oismüller, Markus; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Physically based hydrological models have been widely used in various studies to model overland flow propagation in cases such as flood inundation and dam break flow. The capability of such models to simulate the formation of overland flow by spatial and temporal discretization of the empirical equations makes it possible for hydrologists to trace the overland flow generation both spatially and temporally across surface and subsurface domains. As the upscaling methods transforming hydrological process spatial patterns from the small obrseved scale to the larger catchment scale are still being progressively developed, the physically based hydrological models become a convenient tool to assess the patterns and their behaviors crucial in determining the upscaling process. Related studies in the past had successfully used these models as well as utilizing field observation data for model verification. The common observation data used for this verification are overland flow discharge during natural rainfall events and camera observations during synthetic events (staged field experiments) while the use of camera observations during natural events are hardly discussed in publications. This study advances in exploring the potential of video camera observations of overland flow generation during natural rainfall events to support the physically based hydrological model verification and the assessment of overland flow spatial patterns. The study is conducted within a 64ha catchment located at Petzenkirchen, Lower Austria, known as HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory). The catchment land covers are dominated by arable land (87%) with small portions (13%) of forest, pasture and paved surfaces. A 600m stream is running at southeast of the catchment flowing southward and equipped with flumes and pressure transducers measuring water level in minutely basis from various inlets along the stream (i.e. drainages, surface runoffs, springs) to be calculated into flow discharge. A

  1. Blood flow patterns in the salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, before, during and after metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Malvin, G M; Heisler, N

    1988-07-01

    The patterns of blood flow through the complex circulation of the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, were investigated during aquatic normoxia and hypoxia by application of the microsphere technique. The distribution of differently labelled microspheres injected into the bloodstream towards the left and right atria, respectively, was used to evaluate the role of the ductus arteriosus in lung perfusion before, during and after metamorphosis, as well as the general contribution of right and left atrial outputs to the blood flow in gills and lungs in neotenic and postmetamorphic animals. The distribution patterns of radioactive microspheres among pulmonary, branchial and systemic tissues indicated that the ductus arteriosus is the major pulmonary perfusion pathway in neotenic and metamorphosing animals, whereas after metamorphosis the main perfusion pathway is down the entire length of the pulmonary artery. In neotenes, the ductus arteriosus becomes even more important during aquatic hypoxia. The anterior branchial arches receive blood richer in pulmonary venous blood than the posterior arches. Approximately 26% of left atrial output and 36% of right atrial output perfuses the brachial respiratory lamellae during normoxia in neotenes. Severe aquatic hypoxia appears to increase the fraction of cardiac output flowing to the lung and decrease the fraction flowing into the first branchial arch in neotenes. This decrease into the first arch may facilitate lung perfusion and also reduce branchial O2 loss. In postmetamorphic animals, approximately 55% of right atrial output and 32% of left atrial output is directed to the lungs. The flow patterns in postmetamorphic animals remain unaffected by aquatic hypoxia.

  2. Pattern formation in multiphase flow through porous media: continuum models and phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and geologic storage, dissociation of methane hydrates in permafrost, infiltration of water in soil, and enhanced oil recovery, are some relevant examples of multiphase flow in porous media. While flow instabilities and pattern formation play a central role in these processes, our ability to describe them using mathematical models has been hampered by the lack of a macroscopic theory that explains the patterns observed in experimental and field conditions. We propose a new approach —phase-field modeling— to advance our fundamental understanding of multiphase porous media flow. The basic tenet, with origins in the mathematical description of solidification processes, is that the energy of the system is a function of the inhomogeneous distribution of fluid phases in the pore space, and should account for the presence of macroscopic interfaces. We present numerical simulations and compare our predictions with experimental observations. Numerical simulation of viscous fingering in a Hele-Shaw cell using the proposed phase-field modeling approach

  3. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  4. Effective medium theory for drag-reducing micro-patterned surfaces in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Ilenia

    2014-11-01

    Many studies in the last decade have revealed that patterns at the microscale can reduce skin drag. Yet, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features, that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model turbulent flow over patterned surfaces. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or Karman) number in turbulent regime, the viscosity ratio between the fluid in and above the features, and their geometrical properties. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flows over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  5. Onset of thermal convection and its flow patterns in a rectangular cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Yoshinari; Funakoshi, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    The onset of thermal convection of a fluid in a rectangular cavity of aspect ratios Ax and Ay exposed to a vertically linear temperature field is examined under the assumption that all its walls are rigid, and of perfect thermal conductance. For several Ax and Ay smaller than 6, the critical Rayleigh number Rc and the steady flow patterns of most unstable modes are computed by a Galerkin spectral method of high accuracy. Characteristics of flow patterns are examined by using upper-wall flow patterns based on near-wall velocity fields, distributions of vertical velocity, and trajectories of fluid particles. We find that a symmetry mode that is not the most unstable when the difference between Ax and Ay is large is the most unstable if both Ax and Ay are around 4 or around 5.5. The flow pattern of this mode is consistent with the results in a preceding experimental study. Rc increases rapidly as Ax or Ay decreases to zero and decreases slowly as they increase. The validity of the assumption of finite roll is found to be limited, even if the difference between Ax and Ay is large. The flow pattern for {A}x={A}y=A becomes more complicated, and the number of convection cells increases as A increases. The motion of fluid particles in each cell is roughly the circulation along closed curves around an axis that is on the central horizontal plane but is not necessarily parallel to side walls. Moreover, the motion of fluid particles near side walls can be much different from that in the central part of the cavity.

  6. Relationship between Oral Flow Patterns, Nasal Obstruction, and Respiratory Events during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Furukawa, Taiji; Sugimoto, Akira; Katada, Koji; Kotani, Ryosuke; Yoshizawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep breathing patterns are altered by nasal obstruction and respiratory events. This study aimed to describe the relationships between specific sleep oral flow (OF) patterns, nasal airway obstruction, and respiratory events. Methods: Nasal flow and OF were measured simultaneously by polysomnography in 85 adults during sleep. OF was measured 2 cm in front of the lips using a pressure sensor. Results: OF could be classified into three patterns: postrespiratory event OF (postevent OF), during-respiratory event OF (during-event OF), and spontaneous arousal-related OF (SpAr-related OF). Postevent OFs begin at the end of airflow reduction, are preceded by respiratory arousal, and are accompanied by postapneic hyperventilation; during-event OFs occur during nasal flow reduction; and SpAr-related OFs to OF begin during stable breathing, and are preceded by spontaneous arousal but are rarely accompanied by apnea/hypopnea. Multivariate regression showed that nasal obstruction was predictive of SpAr-related OF. The relative frequency of SpAr-related OF events was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index. The fraction of SpAr-related OF duration relative to total OF duration was significantly greater in patients with nasal obstruction than in those without. Conclusions: SpAr-related OF was associated with nasal obstruction, but not respiratory events. This pattern thus functions as a “nasal obstruction bypass”, mainly in normal subjects and patients with mild sleep disordered breathing (SDB). By contrast, the other two types were related to respiratory events and were typical patterns seen in patients with moderate and severe SDB. Citation: Suzuki M, Furukawa T, Sugimoto A, Katada K, Kotani R, Yoshizawa T. Relationship between oral flow patterns, nasal obstruction, and respiratory events during sleep. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):855–860. PMID:25766699

  7. Analysis of spatial flow patterns across the Indian subcontinent via multi-basin hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    In here, we use examples from the recent HYPE hydrological model set-up across 6010 subbasins for the Indian subcontinent, named India-HYPE v1.0 (Pechlivanidis and Arheimer, 2015), and demonstrate the potential of multi-basin modelling for process understanding and comparative hydrology. We analyse the flow characteristics in all modelled 6010 subbasins and group them based on similarities in 12 flow signatures to gain insights in spatial patterns of flow generating processes. We applied a k-means clustering approach within the 12-dimensional space (consisting of the 12 calculated flow signatures) to categorise the subbasins based on their combined similarity in flow signatures. To highlight the hydrological insights gained during model identification, we conducted the clustering analysis on two different steps of the model calibration and explored the sensitivity of calibration on the spatial patterns of flow signatures. Analysis resulted into six different classes of varying size with different distribution in signatures. Although the classes are geographically distinct, their flow response is dependent on the physiographic and climatic characteristics at the regional scale. Factors including for instance the dominance of snow/ice processes, volume in precipitation and evaporation rates affect the catchment functioning and hence drive the clustering. Catchments in the Himalayan region and the Western Ghats respond similarly and are characterised by high mean annual specific runoff values and variable flow regime. Response of the catchments in the tropical zone is characterised by high peaks, while catchments in the dry regions show very strong flow variability and respond quickly to rainfall. Finally, model parameterisation can affect the spatial pattern of clusters in terms of catchment functioning. In particular, clusters after calibration seem to have a consistent spatial structure; this also justifies the validity of parameter regionalisation approaches based

  8. Simulation of tidal flow and circulation patterns in the Loxahatchee River Estuary, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, G.M.; Goodwin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a two-dimensional, vertically averaged, computer simulation model of the Loxahatchee River estuary show that under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, water circulation is dominated by freshwater inflow rather than by tidal influence. The model can simulate tidal flow and circulation in the Loxahatchee River estuary under typical low freshwater inflow and vertically well mixed conditions, but is limited, however, to low-flow and well mixed conditions. Computed patterns of residual water transport show a consistent seaward flow from the northwest fork through the central embayment and out Jupiter Inlet to the Atlantic Ocean. A large residual seaward flow was computed from the North Intracoastal Waterway to the inlet channel. Although the tide produces large flood and ebb flows in the estuary, tide-induced residual transport rates are low in comparison with freshwater-induced residual transport. Model investigations of partly mixed or stratified conditions in the estuary need to await development of systems capable of simulating three-dimensional flow patterns. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Streaming driven by sessile microbubbles: Explaining flow patterns and frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Wang, Cheng; Guo, Lin; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound excitation of bubbles drives powerful steady streaming flows which have found widespread applications in microfluidics, where bubbles are typically of semicircular cross section and attached to walls of the device (sessile). While bubble-driven streaming in bulk fluid is well understood, this practically relevant case presents additional complexity introduced by the wall and contact lines. We develop an asymptotic theory that takes into account the presence of the wall as well as the oscillation dynamics of the bubble, providing a complete description of the streaming flow as a function only of the driving frequency, the bubble size, and the physical properties of the fluid. We show that the coupling between different bubble oscillation modes sustains the experimentally observed streaming flow vortex pattern over a broad range of frequencies, greatly exceeding the widths of individual mode resonances. Above a threshold frequency, we predict, and observe in experiment, reversal of the flow direction. Our analytical theory can be used to guide the design of microfluidic devices, both in situations where robust flow patterns insensitive to parameter changes are desired (e.g. lab-on-a-chip sorters), and in cases where intentional modulation of the flow field appearance is key (e.g. efficient mixers). Current address: Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology.

  10. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2. 1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  11. MODFLOW 2.0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  12. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2.1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  13. Non-parametric linear regression of discrete Fourier transform convoluted chromatographic peak responses under non-ideal conditions of internal standard method.

    PubMed

    Korany, Mohamed A; Maher, Hadir M; Galal, Shereen M; Fahmy, Ossama T; Ragab, Marwa A A

    2010-11-15

    This manuscript discusses the application of chemometrics to the handling of HPLC response data using the internal standard method (ISM). This was performed on a model mixture containing terbutaline sulphate, guaiphenesin, bromhexine HCl, sodium benzoate and propylparaben as an internal standard. Derivative treatment of chromatographic response data of analyte and internal standard was followed by convolution of the resulting derivative curves using 8-points sin x(i) polynomials (discrete Fourier functions). The response of each analyte signal, its corresponding derivative and convoluted derivative data were divided by that of the internal standard to obtain the corresponding ratio data. This was found beneficial in eliminating different types of interferences. It was successfully applied to handle some of the most common chromatographic problems and non-ideal conditions, namely: overlapping chromatographic peaks and very low analyte concentrations. For example, a significant change in the correlation coefficient of sodium benzoate, in case of overlapping peaks, went from 0.9975 to 0.9998 on applying normal conventional peak area and first derivative under Fourier functions methods, respectively. Also a significant improvement in the precision and accuracy for the determination of synthetic mixtures and dosage forms in non-ideal cases was achieved. For example, in the case of overlapping peaks guaiphenesin mean recovery% and RSD% went from 91.57, 9.83 to 100.04, 0.78 on applying normal conventional peak area and first derivative under Fourier functions methods, respectively. This work also compares the application of Theil's method, a non-parametric regression method, in handling the response ratio data, with the least squares parametric regression method, which is considered the de facto standard method used for regression. Theil's method was found to be superior to the method of least squares as it assumes that errors could occur in both x- and y-directions and

  14. Dual-RiverSonde measurements of two-dimensional river flow patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Stumpner, P.; Burau, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional river flow patterns have been measured using a pair of RiverSondes in two experiments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta system of central California during April and October 2007. An experiment was conducted at Walnut Grove, California in order to explore the use of dual RiverSondes to measure flow patterns at a location which is important in the study of juvenile fish migration. The data available during the first experiment were limited by low wind, so a second experiment was conducted at Threemile Slough where wind conditions and surface turbulence historically have resulted in abundant data. Both experiments included ADCP near-surface velocity measurements from either manned or unmanned boats. Both experiments showed good comparisons between the RiverSonde and ADCP measurements. The flow conditions at both locations are dominated by tidal effects, with partial flow reversal at Walnut Grove and complete flow reversal at Threemile Slough. Both systems showed complex flow patterns during the flow reversals. Quantitative comparisons between the RiverSondes and an ADCP on a manned boat at Walnut Grove showed mean differences of 4.5 cm/s in the u (eastward) and 7.6 cm/s in the v (northward) components, and RMS differences of 14.7 cm/s in the u component and 21.0 cm/s in the v component. Quantitative comparisons between the RiverSondes and ADCPs on autonomous survey vessels at Threemile Slough showed mean differences of 0.007 cm/s in the u component and 0.5 cm/s in the v component, and RMS differences of 7.9 cm/s in the u component and 13.5 cm/s in the v component after obvious outliers were removed. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  15. Coal Particle Flow Patterns for O2 Enriched, Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Sinclair Curtis

    2005-08-01

    This project involved a systematic investigation examining the effect of near-flame burner aerodynamics on standoff distance and stability of turbulent diffusion flames and the resultant NO{sub x} emissions from actual pulverized coal diffusion flames. Specifically, the scope of the project was to understand how changes in near-flame aerodynamics and transport air oxygen partial pressure can influence flame attachment and coal ignition, two properties essential to proper operation of low NO{sub x} burners. Results from this investigation utilized a new 2M tall, 0.5m in diameter combustor designed to evaluate near-flame combustion aerodynamics in terms of transport air oxygen partial pressure (Po{sub 2}), coal fines content, primary fuel and secondary air velocities, and furnace wall temperature furnish insight into fundamental processes that occur during combustion of pulverized coal in practical systems. Complementary cold flow studies were conducted in a geometrically similar chamber to analyze the detailed motion of the gas and particles using laser Doppler velocimetry. This final technical report summarizes the key findings from our investigation into coal particle flow patterns in burners. Specifically, we focused on the effects of oxygen enrichment, the effect of fines, and the effect of the nozzle velocity ratio on the resulting flow patterns. In the cold flow studies, detailed measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) were made to determine the details of the flow. In the hot flow studies, observations of flame stability and measurements of NO{sub x} were made to determine the effects of the flow patterns on burner operation.

  16. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Propagation of a spherical shock wave in mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles under the influence of gravitational field with conductive and radiative heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2016-01-01

    Self-similar solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow behind a spherical shock wave propagating in a dusty gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes under the influence of a gravitational field. The shock is assumed to be driven out by a moving piston and the dusty gas to be a mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are uniformly distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The medium is assumed to be under the influence of a gravitational field due to central mass ( bar{m} ) at the origin (Roche Model). It is assumed that the gravitational effect of the mixture itself can be neglected compared with the attraction of the central mass. The initial density of the ambient medium is taken to be always constant. The effects of the variation of the gravitational parameter and nonidealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. Also, the effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are investigated. It is shown that due to an increase in the gravitational parameter the compressibility of the medium at any point in the flow-field behind the shock decreases and all other flow variables and the shock strength are increased. Further, it is found that the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the piston and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in dusty gas under the influence of a

  18. Patterns and age distribution of ground-water flow to streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, E.; Reilly, T.E.; Pollock, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of ground-water flow in a generic aquifer system were made to characterize the topology of ground-water flow in the stream subsystem and to evaluate its relation to deeper ground-water flow. The flow models are patterned after hydraulic characteristics of aquifers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and are based on numerical solutions to three-dimensional, steady-state, unconfined flow. The models were used to evaluate the effects of aquifer horizontal-to-vertical hydraulic conductivity ratios, aquifer thickness, and areal recharge rates on flow in the stream subsystem. A particle tracker was used to determine flow paths in a stream subsystem, to establish the relation between ground-water seepage to points along a simulated stream and its source area of flow, and to determine ground-water residence time in stream subsystems. In a geometrically simple aquifer system with accretion, the source area of flow to streams resembles an elongated ellipse that tapers in the downgradient direction. Increased recharge causes an expansion of the stream subsystem. The source area of flow to the stream expands predominantly toward the stream headwaters. Baseflow gain is also increased along the reach of the stream. A thin aquifer restricts ground-water flow and causes the source area of flow to expand near stream headwaters and also shifts the start-of-flow to the drainage basin divide. Increased aquifer anisotropy causes a lateral expansion of the source area of flow to streams. Ground-water seepage to the stream channel originates both from near- and far-recharge locations. The range in the lengths of flow paths that terminate at a point on a stream increase in the downstream direction. Consequently, the age distribution of ground water that seeps into the stream is skewed progressively older with distance downstream. Base flow ia an integration of ground water with varying age and potentially different water quality, depending on the source within the drainage basin

  19. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  20. Visualization of flow patterns induced by an impinging jet issuing from a circular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. R.

    1983-12-01

    A four-jet impingement flow with application to high-performance VTOL aircraft is investigated. Flow visualization studies were conducted with water as the working medium. Photographs of different cross sections of the flow are presented to describe the properties of the fountain upwash and the stagnation-line patterns. The visualization technique involves the introduction of fluorescein-sodium, a fluorescent dye, into the jet flow and illumination by a sheet of light obtained by spreading a laser beam. Streak-line photographs were also taken using air bubbles as tracer particles. The strength and orientation of the fountain(s) were observed for different heights of the nozzle configuration above the ground and inclination angles of the forward nozzles.

  1. A study of the Marangoni flow and particle deposition patterns in an evaporating octane droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hua; Larson, Ronald

    2004-03-01

    We investigate flow behavior in an evaporating octane droplet experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments, we for the first time observed a strong recirculatory flow, which we attribute to a Marangoni effect driven by a temperature gradient along the droplet surface due to thermal cooling. A micro-PIV technique is used to map the velocity field in the droplet, including the strong recirculation. An approximated analytical solution of the Marangoni flow is developed using the lubrication assumption and is confirmed to be accurate by an FEM analysis for the flow in the evaporating droplet. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical results and good agreement is found. Finally, the particle deposition patterns on the substrate formed at various Marangoni numbers are discussed.

  2. Consistency of groundwater flow patterns in mountainous topography: Implications for valley bottom water replenishment and for defining groundwater flow boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, L. A.; Allen, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Topographic influences on groundwater flow processes that contribute to baseflow and mountain block recharge (MBR) are conceptually investigated using three-dimensional numerical models of saturated groundwater flow. Model domains for conceptual and real topographies are developed as "mountain groundwatershed units" (MGUs) to represent regional-scale watershed systems. Results indicate regularity in groundwater flow patterns that reflect consistency of prominent topographic features, providing a basis for conceptualizing three-dimensional groundwater flow. Baseflow is generated mainly from recharge within the watershed area. MBR is produced primarily from recharge that is focused across triangular facets near the mountain front (˜73%-97% of total MBR), with additional contributions originating within the watershed (up to ˜27% of MBR). MBR contributions originating from recharge near the highest-elevation watershed boundaries are minimal but are greater for topography with less stream incision. With orographic influences, more MBR originates within the watershed. MBR rates are relatively consistent between models because of similarities in mountain front topography, while baseflow is variable. Gains and losses to systems via cross-watershed groundwater flux, generated because of topographic differences between adjacent watersheds, cause baseflow to vary by up to ˜10% but do not significantly influence MBR. In data-sparse regions such as mountains, a basic numerical modeling approach, using the MGU concept with topography data and mapped watershed boundaries, can be used to develop site-specific conceptual models to constrain water budgets, to delineate recharge areas, and to guide further investigation and data collection.

  3. Nonlinear waves and pattern formation in multiphase flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    The paper analyzes pattern formation in initially homogeneous one-dimensional two-phase flows in porous medium. It is shown that generally these flows are unstable. The mechanism of the instabilities is associated with inertial effects. Such instabilities are of explosive type and are probably important in various engineering applications and natural phenomena. In small-amplitude finite approximation the evolution of patterns is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. Pattern formation occurs when the coefficient multiplying the Burgers term becomes negative. During nonlinear evolution a soliton with a tail is formed. The amplitude of the soliton increases while the tail decreases. These results can be regarded as a generalization of results by Harris and Crighton (1994) to the case of two-phase flows in porous medium. The obtained solution in form of soliton with a tail can be interpreted as initial phase of formation of the phase composition inhomogeneities in porous media. In the case of fluidized beds this pattern can be regarded as initial phase of bubble formation in a fluidized bed of granular material. The characteristic size of bubbles and time of its formation are estimated.

  4. Unsaturated flow patterns observed in mine soils with embedded porous fragments using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, A.; Gerke, H. H.; Vontobel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Mine soils represent a typical dual-porosity medium characterized by porous fragments (e.g., lignitic or clayey clods) that are embedded in a coarser-textured sand-dust matrix. Effects of heterogeneously-distributed embedded fragments of various sizes and shapes on flow are largely unknown. The objective of this study is to identify water flow paths using neutron radiography and imaging techniques. Experiments were carried out at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ (PSI, Villigen). Neutron radiography (at the NEUTRA instrument) was used to observe unsaturated water movement under different flow conditions. For 2D-steady-state flow experiments, we used a double-membrane setup to infiltrate water (H2O) in slap-type undisturbed soil samples. Before the experiments, most of the water that was initially present in the samples has been exchanged by deuterium oxide (D2O). The 2D radiography series' show the dynamics of the spatial changes in water contents during the unsaturated flow process at defined matric potentials. In addition, we conducted multistep in- and outflow experiments to observe the 3D spatial distribution of the water content during the stationary phases at different steps of imposed pressure heads. Two minature tensiometers, one in the sandy matrix and the other in lignitic fragments, monitored the equilibration of soil water matric potentials in the dual-porosity medium. Our observations basically confirm that flow patterns are strongly related to the local-scale structures and that a more continuous pore region exists in the vicinity of fragments for the imposed moisture conditions. This continuous pore domain allows for preferential flow within a relatively small fraction of the otherwise coarse-textured porous medium. The geometries and hydraulic properties of the porous fragments are additionally modifying the flow patterns.

  5. An analysis of contrast agent flow patterns from sequential ultrasound images using a motion estimation algorithm based on optical flow patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Hwang, Yoo Na; Park, Sung Yun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Kim, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates flow patterns of contrast agents from successive ultrasound image sequences by using an anisotropic diffusion-based optical flow algorithm. Before flow fields were recovered, the test sequences were reconstructed using relative composition of structural and textural parts from the original image. To improve estimation performance, an anisotropic diffusion filtering model was embedded into a spline-based slightly nonconvex total variation-L1 minimization algorithm. In addition, an incremental coarse-to-fine warping framework was employed with a linear minimization scheme to account for a large displacement. After each warping iteration, the implementation used intermediate bilateral filtering to prevent oversmoothing across motion boundaries. The performance of the proposed algorithm was tested using three different sequences obtained from two simulated datasets and phantom ultrasound sequences. The results indicate the robust performance of the proposed method under different noise environments. The results of the phantom study also demonstrate reliable performance according to different injection conditions of contrast agents. These experimental results suggest the potential clinical applicability of the proposed algorithm to ultrasonographic diagnosis based on contrast agents.

  6. Cryptic Species? Patterns of Maternal and Paternal Gene Flow in Eight Neotropical Bats

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Elizabeth L.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of sequence divergence at mitochondrial loci are frequently used in phylogeographic analysis and species delimitation though single marker systems cannot assess bi-parental gene flow. In this investigation I compare the phylogeographic patterns revealed through the maternally inherited mitochondrial COI region and the paternally inherited 7th intron region of the Dby gene on the Y-chromosome in eight common Neotropical bat species. These species are diverse and include members of two families from the feeding guilds of sanguivores, nectarivores, frugivores, carnivores and insectivores. In each case, the currently recognized taxon is comprised of distinct, substantially divergent intraspecific mitochondrial lineages suggesting cryptic species complexes. In Chrotopterus auritus, and Saccopteryx bilineata I observed congruent patterns of divergence in both genetic regions suggesting a cessation of gene flow between intraspecific groups. This evidence supports the existence of cryptic species complexes which meet the criteria of the genetic species concept. In Glossophaga soricina two intraspecific groups with largely sympatric South American ranges show evidence for incomplete lineage sorting or frequent hybridization while a third group with a Central American distribution appears to diverge congruently at both loci suggesting speciation. Within Desmodus rotundus and Trachops cirrhosus the paternally inherited region was monomorphic and thus does not support or refute the potential for cryptic speciation. In Uroderma bilobatum, Micronycteris megalotis and Platyrrhinus helleri the gene regions show conflicting patterns of divergence and I cannot exclude ongoing gene flow between intraspecific groups. This analysis provides a comprehensive comparison across taxa and employs both maternally and paternally inherited gene regions to validate patterns of gene flow. I present evidence for previously unrecognized species meeting the criteria of the genetic species

  7. Pattern Formation in Diffusion Flames Embedded in von Karman Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha

    2006-01-01

    Pattern formation is observed in nature in many so-called excitable systems that can support wave propagation. It is well-known in the field of combustion that premixed flames can exhibit patterns through differential diffusion mechanism between heat and mass. However, in the case of diffusion flames where fuel and oxidizer are separated initially there have been only a few observations of pattern formation. It is generally perceived that since diffusion flames do not possess an inherent propagation speed they are static and do not form patterns. But in diffusion flames close to their extinction local quenching can occur and produce flame edges which can propagate along stoichiometric surfaces. Recently, we reported experimental observations of rotating spiral flame edges during near-limit combustion of a downward-facing polymethylmethacrylate disk spinning in quiescent air. These spiral flames, though short-lived, exhibited many similarities to patterns commonly found in quiescent excitable media including compound tip meandering motion. Flame disks that grow or shrink with time depending on the rotational speed and in-depth heat loss history of the fuel disk have also been reported. One of the limitations of studying flame patterns with solid fuels is that steady-state conditions cannot be achieved in air at normal atmospheric pressure for experimentally reasonable fuel thickness. As a means to reproduce the flame patterns observed earlier with solid fuels, but under steady-state conditions, we have designed and built a rotating, porous-disk burner through which gaseous fuels can be injected and burned as diffusion flames. The rotating porous disk generates a flow of air toward the disk by a viscous pumping action, generating what is called the von K rm n boundary layer which is of constant thickness over the entire burner disk. In this note we present a map of the various dynamic flame patterns observed during the combustion of methane in air as a function of

  8. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates.

  9. Binary mixtures with novel monomeric and dimeric surfactants: influence of the head group nature and number of hydrophobic chains on non-ideality.

    PubMed

    Martín, Victoria Isabel; Rodríguez, Amalia; del Mar Graciani, María; Moyá, María Luisa

    2012-02-15

    The micellization and micellar growth in the mixtures of N,N-dimethyl, N-phenyl,N-dodecylammonium bromide, PH12, N,N-dimethyl,N-ciclohexylmethyl,N-dodecylammonium bromide, CH12, and their two dimeric counterparts m-dimethylphenyl-α-ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide, 12PH12, and m-dimethylciclohexyl-α-ω-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium) bromide, 12CH12, with dodecyltrimethylammoniumbromide, DTAB, and with N-decanoyl N-methylglucamide, MEGA10, were investigated at 303 K. Circular dichroism, CD, experiments showed the formation of mixed micelles. Two-dimensional, 2D, rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments indicated that the arrangement of the rings in the pure and mixed micelles is similar, with the rings bent into the micelle interior avoiding contact with water. Application of different theoretical approaches shows that PH12 and CH12 mixtures with DTAB and with MEGA10 behave almost ideally. The binary systems of 12PH12 and 12CH12 with DTAB and with MEGA10 show a non-ideal behavior. An increment in the solution mole fraction of MEGA10 and DTAB diminishes the tendency of the micellar aggregates to grow.

  10. Scale model studies for improvement of flow patterns of a low-speed tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    Flow along a nacelle was investigated with and without an orifice plate inserted into the airstream. The flow became more uniform in transit through the orifice when compared with the upstream flow and remained more uniform immediately downstream from the orifice. No improvement was found farther downstream with or without the orifice plate. Various windmills were studied to determine their effects on the downstream flow pattern. The windmill retarded flow velocity inside the circle inscribed by the tip of free wheeling propellers (used as substitute windmills), while the main stream passed over the blades seemingly unrestricted and without showing any increase in diameter. Results show that by varying a torque, the flow across a windmill can be effectively redistributed, an effect that could be gainfully employed in situations where the main flow into a diffuser is concentrated near the center. The construction of the 1/24 scale model tunnel and the velocity transverses obtained on the model are discussed. The transverses indicate that the velocity distribution may be considered worse in the vertical than in the horizontal plane.

  11. Spatial and temporal patterns of debris flow deposition in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of debris-flow occurrence were investigated in 125 headwater basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Time since the previous debris-flows was established using dendrochronology, and recurrence interval estimates ranged from 98 to 357 years. Tributary basins with larger drainage areas had a greater abundance of potential landslide source areas and a greater frequency of scouring events compared to smaller basins. The flux rate of material delivered to the confluence with a larger river influenced the development of small-scale debris-flow fans. Fans at the mouths of tributary basins with smaller drainage areas had a higher likelihood of being eroded by the mainstem river in the interval between debris-flows, compared to bigger basins that had larger, more persistent fans. Valley floor width of the receiving channel also influenced fan development because it limited the space available to accommodate fan formation. Of 63 recent debris-flows, 52% delivered sediment and wood directly to the mainstem river, 30% were deposited on an existing fan before reaching the mainstem, and 18% were deposited within the confines of the tributary valley before reaching the confluence. Spatial variation in the location of past and present depositional surfaces indicated that sequential debris-flow deposits did not consistently form in the same place. Instead of being spatially deterministic, results of this study suggest that temporally variable and stochastic factors may be important for predicting the runout length of debris-flows.

  12. Numerical simulation of cold flow patterns and turbulent mixing in a simplified burner

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1994-10-01

    The COYOTE computer program was used to simulate the flow field and turbulent mixing near the fuel and air inlets in a simplified burner. The authors report the results of four cold flow calculations that illustrate several interesting phenomena in addition to demonstrating the capabilities of the basic hydrodynamics model and the turbulence model. They also demonstrate some interesting facets of the hydrodynamics of burners. They summarize their findings as follows: (1) two different grids gave vastly different answers, underscoring the importance of assuring grid-independence in numerical solutions; (2) cold flow patterns are much different than reactive flow fields, making it unwise to apply conclusions from the former to the latter; (3) the problem is elliptic, and it is necessary to include the whole furnace in the calculations; (4) the flow patterns exhibited weakly unstable, almost metastable, modes that make it difficult to ascertain when steady conditions have been obtained. The long range goals of this study are to identify parameters that affect the production of NO{sub x} and to discover methods of reducing emissions while maintaining or improving burner efficiency.

  13. The impact of traffic-flow patterns on air quality in urban street canyons.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Prashant; Gokhale, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different urban traffic-flow patterns on pollutant dispersion in different winds in a real asymmetric street canyon. Free-flow traffic causes more turbulence in the canyon facilitating more dispersion and a reduction in pedestrian level concentration. The comparison of with and without a vehicle-induced-turbulence revealed that when winds were perpendicular, the free-flow traffic reduced the concentration by 73% on the windward side with a minor increase of 17% on the leeward side, whereas for parallel winds, it reduced the concentration by 51% and 29%. The congested-flow traffic increased the concentrations on the leeward side by 47% when winds were perpendicular posing a higher risk to health, whereas reduced it by 17-42% for parallel winds. The urban air quality and public health can, therefore, be improved by improving the traffic-flow patterns in street canyons as vehicle-induced turbulence has been shown to contribute significantly to dispersion.

  14. The impact of traffic-flow patterns on air quality in urban street canyons.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Prashant; Gokhale, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different urban traffic-flow patterns on pollutant dispersion in different winds in a real asymmetric street canyon. Free-flow traffic causes more turbulence in the canyon facilitating more dispersion and a reduction in pedestrian level concentration. The comparison of with and without a vehicle-induced-turbulence revealed that when winds were perpendicular, the free-flow traffic reduced the concentration by 73% on the windward side with a minor increase of 17% on the leeward side, whereas for parallel winds, it reduced the concentration by 51% and 29%. The congested-flow traffic increased the concentrations on the leeward side by 47% when winds were perpendicular posing a higher risk to health, whereas reduced it by 17-42% for parallel winds. The urban air quality and public health can, therefore, be improved by improving the traffic-flow patterns in street canyons as vehicle-induced turbulence has been shown to contribute significantly to dispersion. PMID:26412198

  15. Constructed wetlands dye study to determine flow patterns and residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Cano, M.L.; Dorn, P.B.; Vipond, T.E.; Dunn, A.N.; Hawkins, B.F.

    1995-12-31

    Two pilot-scale wetlands (30 m x 6 m) were constructed for tertiary treatment for refinery effluent to remove divalent cationic metals and chronic toxicity. The wetlands have free water surface flow ({approximately}30 cm depth) and are populated with bulrush. To understand the removal of specific pollutants by the biological system and design full scale systems, it is necessary to determine the flow pattern and residence time for each of the wetland cells. A tracer study using a slug injection technique was conducted with rhodamine WT dye. An engineering approach was used to determine retention times by measuring the dye effluent concentration as a function of time and analyzing this profile. Dispersion indexes for the wetlands were also calculated. In addition, flow patterns were determined by periodically sampling a grid within each of the wetland cells. The dye study results indicated: (1) the actual retention time was less than the theoretical retention time (based on volume and flow rate) and (2) partial plug flow regime with a dispersion index of 3.74 was present. These data will be useful for future modeling of pollutant removal by the wetland cells and for the design of full scale systems.

  16. Fluid Flow Patterns Derived from Bottom Simulating Reflections Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Wu, S.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid migration pattern is important for understanding the structural characteristics of a mountain belt and for hydrocarbon exploration. However, these patterns are difficult to measure on the seafloor. Using phase properties of the gas hydrates, we studied the fluid flow patterns offshore Southwestern Taiwan. Seismic explorations in this region show a wide-spread bottom-simulating-reflector (BSR), which is interpreted as the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It provides us an opportunity to study possible fluid flow patterns at several hundred meters sub-bottom depths of the marine sediments. We used BSR-based geothermal gradient patterns to derive 1D vertical fluid flow models by analyzing the Péclet numbers. We found the regional fluid flow rates ranges from 6 cm/yr to 43 cm/yr and also discovered two prospect sites: Yung-An Ridge and Formosa Ridge in active and passive margins respectively. Next, we forward-modeled 2D steady-state temperature fields of these two sites to account for the topographic effects to compare with the BSR-based temperature. The discrepancy between the 2D conductive thermal model and the BSR-based temperature was interpreted as a result of fluid migration. We discovered our interpreted fluid migration patterns are pretty consistent with the regional structure, and the BSR-based temperatures are about 2~3oC higher than the conduction model near faults and chimney zones. We interpret that it is possible active dewatering inside the accretionary prism to allow fluid to migrate upward here. For Formosa Ridge in the passive margin, the BSR-based temperatures are about 4-5oC colder than the theoretical model, especially on the flanks. We interpret that cold seawater is moving into the ridge from the flanks, cooling the ridge, and then some of the fluid is expelled at the ridge top. The shallow temperature fields are strongly affected by 2D or even 3D topographic effects, but we can still gain much information regarding fluid flow

  17. Groundwater flow pattern and related environmental phenomena in complex geologic setting based on integrated model construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Havril, Tímea; Simon, Szilvia; Galsa, Attila; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Müller, Imre; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2016-08-01

    Groundwater flow, driven, controlled and determined by topography, geology and climate, is responsible for several natural surface manifestations and affected by anthropogenic processes. Therefore, flowing groundwater can be regarded as an environmental agent. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow could reveal the flow pattern and explain the observed features. In complex geologic framework, where the geologic-hydrogeologic knowledge is limited, the groundwater flow model could not be constructed based solely on borehole data, but geophysical information could aid the model building. The integrated model construction was presented via the case study of the Tihany Peninsula, Hungary, with the aims of understanding the background and occurrence of groundwater-related environmental phenomena, such as wetlands, surface water-groundwater interaction, slope instability, and revealing the potential effect of anthropogenic activity and climate change. The hydrogeologic model was prepared on the basis of the compiled archive geophysical database and the results of recently performed geophysical measurements complemented with geologic-hydrogeologic data. Derivation of different electrostratigraphic units, revealing fracturing and detecting tectonic elements was achieved by systematically combined electromagnetic geophysical methods. The deduced information can be used as model input for groundwater flow simulation concerning hydrostratigraphy, geometry and boundary conditions. The results of numerical modelling were interpreted on the basis of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and validated by field mapping of groundwater-related phenomena. The 3D model clarified the hydraulic behaviour of the formations, revealed the subsurface hydraulic connection between groundwater and wetlands and displayed the groundwater discharge pattern, as well. The position of wetlands, their vegetation type, discharge features and induced landslides were explained as

  18. Reconstructing spatio-temporal patterns of debris-flow activity using dendrogeomorphological methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollschweiler, Michelle; Stoffel, Markus; Ehmisch, Melanie; Monbaron, Michel

    2007-07-01

    Debris flows are a major threat in many parts of the Alps, where they repeatedly cause severe damage to infrastructure and transportation corridors or even loss of life. Nonetheless, the spatial behavior of past debris-flow activity and the analysis of areas affected during particular events have been widely neglected in reconstructions so far. It was therefore the purpose of this study to reconstruct spatio-temporal patterns of past debris flows on a forested cone in the Swiss Alps (Bruchji torrent, Blatten, Valais). The analysis of past events was based on a detailed geomorphic map (1:1000) of all forms related to debris flows as well as on tree-ring series from 401 heavily affected trees ( Larix decidua Mill. and Picea abies (L.) Karst.) growing in or next to deposits. The samples were analyzed and growth disturbances related to debris-flow activity assessed, such as tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts, the onset of reaction wood or abrupt growth suppression or release. In total, 960 growth disturbances were identified in the samples, belonging to 40 different event years between A.D. 1867 and 2005. In addition, the coupling of tree-ring data with the geomorphic map allowed reconstruction of eleven formerly active channels and spatial representation of individual events. Based on our results we believe that before 1935, debris flows preferentially used those channels located in the western part of the cone, whereas the eastern part of the cone remained widely unaffected. The spatial representation of the 40 events also allowed identification of five different spatial patterns for debris flows at the study site.

  19. Electrode configurations inside an electrostatic precipitator and their impact on collection efficiency and flow pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Cheng, Lu; Shen, Xinjun; Li, Shuran; Yan, Keping

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) units have wide application in lots industries processes as gas filtration devices. Regarding their high efficiency, further improvement is still required. Wide ESP (plate-to-plate distance greater than 400 mm) is one of a promising way to improve existing ESP due to its ability to reduce equipment investment significantly. However, its large-scale application has been limited because it may potentially lead to collection efficiency reduction. This article focuses on the study of two major effects when several different electrode configurations are applied. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow pattern inside ESP and particle collection efficiency were investigated by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) respectively. Results suggested that the collection efficiency of wide ESP is rather complicated and highly related to inner gas flow pattern.

  20. (Questions)n on phloem biology. 2. Mass flow, molecular hopping, distribution patterns and macromolecular signalling.

    PubMed

    van Bel, Aart J E; Furch, Alexandra C U; Hafke, Jens B; Knoblauch, Michael; Patrick, John W

    2011-10-01

    This review speculates on correlations between mass flow in sieve tubes and the distribution of photoassimilates and macromolecular signals. Since micro- (low-molecular compounds) and macromolecules are withdrawn from, and released into, the sieve-tube sap at various rates, distribution patterns of these compounds do not strictly obey mass-flow predictions. Due to serial release and retrieval transport steps executed by sieve tube plasma membranes, micromolecules are proposed to "hop" between sieve element/companion cell complexes and phloem parenchyma cells under source-limiting conditions (apoplasmic hopping). Under sink-limiting conditions, micromolecules escape from sieve tubes via pore-plasmodesma units and are temporarily stored. It is speculated that macromolecules "hop" between sieve elements and companion cells using plasmodesmal trafficking mechanisms (symplasmic hopping). We explore how differential tagging may influence distribution patterns of macromolecules and how their bidirectional movement could arise. Effects of exudation techniques on the macromolecular composition of sieve-tube sap are discussed. PMID:21889037

  1. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  2. Effects of refraction by means flow velocity gradients on the standing wave pattern in three-dimensional, rectangular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of a mean vortical flow on the connection between the standing wave pattern in a rectangular three dimensional waveguide and the corresponding duct axial impedance was determined analytically. The solution was derived using a perturbation scheme valid for low mean flow Mach numbers and plane wave sound frequencies. The results show that deviations of the standing wave pattern due to refraction by the mean flow gradients are small.

  3. Film flows and self-organized patterns of 2D-localized structures

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Films flowing down an inclined plane are considered. An unconventional perturbation approach is discussed. It yields the most general evolution equation for film thickness and the least restrictive conditions for its validity. Results of numerical simulations of the dissipative-dispersive evolution equation indicate that novel, more complex type of spatiotemporal patterns can exist for strange attractors of nonequilibrium systems. It is suggested that real-life experiments satisfying the validity conditions of this theory are possible.

  4. Flow patterns of rotating time-dependent Hartree-Fock wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, M.; Bouten, M.; Van Leuven, P.

    1982-12-01

    A soluble model (Elliott's model in two dimensions) is used to study how well flow patterns and features of rotational motion are represented by the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation. Due to the spreading of the wave packet in the exact Schrödinger time-evolution, the agreement is good only for phenomena which probe the current during a short time interval.

  5. Analysing flow patterns in degraded peat soils using TiO2 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Dye tracing is a valuable method for studying the flow patterns in soils. However, limited information is available on water flow and solute transport pathways in dark colored peat soils because the frequently used Brilliant Blue FCF dye does not visibly stain the soil. In this study, we were aiming at testing the suitability of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer for dark peat soils. The objectives were to quantify the physical properties of different degraded peat soils and visualize the flow patterns. Soil samples were collected from two low-lying fen sites, where the top soil was highly degraded, while lower horizons were less decomposed. Dye tracer experiments were conducted at both sites by applying a TiO2 suspension (10 g/l) with a pulse of 40 mm. Soil profiles were prepared for photo documentation the following day. It was found that the physical and hydraulic properties of peat were significantly influenced by the degree of peat decomposition and degradation. Higher decomposed and degraded peat soils had a higher bulk density, lower organic matter content and lower porosity. Moreover, higher decomposition and degradation resulted in a lower saturated hydraulic conductivity as long as investigated samples originated from the same site. In addition, degraded peat soils showed less anisotropy than un-degraded peat. It turned out that TiO2 is a suitable dye tracer to visualize the flow paths in peat soils. Although dye patterns differed within the same plot and between different plots, most of the flow patterns indicated a preferential flow situation. The distribution of TiO2 in the soil profile, as analyzed from 5 by 5 cm grid cells, compared to the distribution of bromide, which was applied along with the dye confirming the suitability of the dye tracer. Un-decomposed plant structures, such as wood branches and leaves, were identified as the major preferential flow path in un-degraded peat. For degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm

  6. Two-dimensional surface river flow patterns measured with paired RiverSondes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Two RiverSondes were operated simultaneously in close proximity in order to provide a two-dimensional map of river surface velocity. The initial test was carried out at Threemile Slough in central California. The two radars were installed about 135 m apart on the same bank of the channel. Each radar used a 3-yagi antenna array and determined signal directions using direction finding. The slough is approximately 200 m wide, and each radar processed data out to about 300 m, with a range resolution of 15 m and an angular resolution of 1 degree. Overlapping radial vector data from the two radars were combined to produce total current vectors at a grid spacing of 10 m, with updates every 5 minutes. The river flow in the region, which has a maximum velocity of about 0.8 m/s, is tidally driven with flow reversals every 6 hours, and complex flow patterns were seen during flow reversal. The system performed well with minimal mutual interference. The ability to provide continuous, non-contact two-dimensional river surface flow measurements will be useful in several unique settings, such as studies of flow at river junctions where impacts to juvenile fish migration are significant. Additional field experiments are planned this year on the Sacramento River. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  7. Two-dimensional surface river flow patterns measured with paired RiverSondes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    Two RiverSondes were operated simultaneously in close proximity in order to provide a two-dimensional map of river surface velocity. The initial test was carried out at Threemile Slough in central California. The two radars were installed about 135 m apart on the same bank of the channel. Each radar used a 3-yagi antenna array and determined signal directions using direction finding. The slough is approximately 200 m wide, and each radar processed data out to about 300 m, with a range resolution of 15 m and an angular resolution of 1 degree. Overlapping radial vector data from the two radars were combined to produce total current vectors at a grid spacing of 10 m, with updates every 5 minutes. The river flow in the region, which has a maximum velocity of about 0.8 m/s, is tidally driven with flow reversals every 6 hours, and complex flow patterns were seen during flow reversal. The system performed well with minimal mutual interference. The ability to provide continuous, non-contact two-dimensional river surface flow measurements will be useful in several unique settings, such as studies of flow at river junctions where impacts to juvenile fish migration are significant. Additional field experiments are planned this year on the Sacramento River. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  8. Parotid secretion daily patterns and measurement with ultrasonic flow probes in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Meot, F; Cirio, A; Boivin, R

    1997-09-01

    Five sheep under halothane anesthesia were prepared with bilateral transit time ultrasonic flow probes around the parotid ducts. The ducts were fitted with non-obstructive sampling catheters through their oral ends. After probe encapsulation (8 days), salivary flows were continuously recorded (4-5 days, dual-channel ultrasonic flowmeter). For rumination, eating, resting and drinking periods, respectively, the parotid daily outputs recorded were 1.96 +/- 0.57, 0.97 +/- 0.34, 2.84 +/- 0.41 and < 0.041 and bilateral flow rates were 6.76 +/- 0.70, 5.63 +/- 1.42, 2.50 +/- 0.58 and 1.69 +/- 0.88 ml min-1. An ipsilateral secretory reflex was evident when the sheep changed chewing side during rumination (4.44 +/- 0.96 ml min-1 ipsilateral vs 2.63 +/- 0.90 ml min-1 contralateral flow, P < 0.01). Secretory patterns are described in detail during rest, eating, drinking and rumination periods. The pH of parotid saliva (8.36 +/- 0.14) and the osmolality (273.8 +/- 9.9 mosmol kg-1) were independent of secretory rates. In situ probe calibration showed high accuracy (0-9%). The main advantages of the technique are its accuracy and good tolerance, duct integrity and maintenance of nervous supply, minimal surgery, uninterrupted salivary flow, simultaneous bilateral measurements and precise flow monitoring, permitting detailed observations.

  9. Modeling reaction--diffusion pattern formation in the Couette flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Elezgaray, J. ); Arneodo, A. )

    1991-07-01

    We report on a numerical and theoretical study of spatio--temporal pattern forming phenomena in a one-dimensional reaction--diffusion system with equal diffusion coefficients. When imposing a concentration gradient through the system, this model mimics the sustained stationary and periodically oscillating front structures'' observed in a recent experiment conducted in the Couette flow reactor. Conditions are also found under which oscillations of the nontrivial spatial patterns become chaotic. Singular perturbation techniques are used to study the existence and the linear stability of single-front and multi-front patterns. A nonlinear analysis of bifurcating patterns is carried out using a center manifold/normal form approach. The theoretical predictions of the normal form calculations are found in quantitative agreement with direct simulations of the Hopf bifurcation from steady to oscillating front patterns. The remarkable feature of these sustained spatio--temporal phenomena is the fact that they organize due to the interaction of the diffusion process with a chemical reaction which itself would proceed in a stationary manner if diffusion was negligible. This study clearly demonstrates that complex spatio--temporal patterns do not necessarily result from the coupling of oscillators or nonlinear transport.

  10. Street canyon flow patterns in a horizontal plane : measurements from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. J.; Khalsa, H. S.; Nelson, M. A.; Boswell, D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the larger Joint URBAN 2003 tracer field experiment performed in Oklahoma City from June 29 to July 30, 2003, a collaborative team of government and university researchers instrumented a downtown street canyon with a high density of wind sensor instrumentation (Brown et al., 2003). The goal of the Park Avenue street canyon experiment was to garner flow field information in order to better understand the transport and dispersion of tracers released in the street canyon and to test and improve the next generation of urban dispersion models. In this paper, we focus on describing the mean flow patterns that developed in the street canyon in a horizontal plane near the surface. We look at the patterns that develop over entire Intensive Operating Periods (IOP's) lasting from 6-9 hours in length, and as a function of inflow wind direction. Most prior street canyon experiments have generally focused on the vertical structure of the flow; this work contributes to the understanding of the horizontal nature of the flow.

  11. Estimating salivary flow and ruminal water balance of intake, diet, feeding pattern, and slaframine.

    PubMed

    Jacques, K; Harmon, D L; Croom, W J; Hagler, W M

    1989-02-01

    Three experiments with ruminally fistulated cattle fed 12 times daily were conducted to study the role of saliva secretion in ruminal water balance when intake, diet, and feeding pattern were altered. Water balance data were determined from continuously infused Co-EDTA and pulse-dosed Cr-EDTA with saliva flow estimated by difference between water intake and ruminal outflow. Any net transruminal water flux would be included in the estimate of salivary flow. When the concentration of bluestem hay in the diet was increased from 50 to 90%, ruminal fluid volume, saliva secretion, water intake, dilution rate, and total ruminal outflow increased. At equal intake, the higher forage diet increased ruminal liquid volume, outflow, and saliva secretion but had no effect on dilution rate. Intake, but not forage concentration, affected ruminal pH when 50 and 90% hay diets were fed. Increasing feeding frequency of forage in a 65% bluestem hay diet from 4 to 12 times daily (the grain portion was fed 12 times daily) increased dilution and ruminal outflow; however, the latter was only significant with data from Cr-EDTA. Ruminal volatile fatty acids were not altered by feeding frequency of forage. Nycterohemeral patterns were seen in water intake, ruminal dilution rate, outflow, and salivary flow in both studies. Slaframine increased saliva flow by 29% and was accompanied by increased ruminal liquid volume, dilution rate, and outflow.

  12. Invasion Patterns During Two-phase Flow In Deformable Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Toussaint, Renaud; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik

    2016-04-01

    We will present our experimental study of the viscous fingering and fracturing patterns that occur when air at constant overpressure invades a circular Hele-Shaw cell containing a liquid-saturated deformable porous medium [1] - i.e. during the flow of two non-miscible fluids in a confined granular medium at high enough rate to deform it. The resulting patterns are characterized in terms of growth rate, average finger thickness as function of radius and time, and fractal properties. Based on experiments with various injection pressures, we identify and compare typical pattern characteristics when there is no deformation, compaction, and/or decompaction of the porous medium. This is achieved by preparing monolayers of glass beads in cells with various boundary conditions, ranging from a rigid disordered porous medium to a deformable granular medium with either a semi-permeable or a free outer boundary. We show that the patterns formed have characteristic features depending on the boundary conditions. For example, the average finger thickness is found to be constant with radius in the non-deformable system, while in the deformable ones there is a larger initial thickness decreasing to the non-deformable value. Then, depending on whether the outer boundary is semi-permeable or free there is a further decrease or increase in the average finger thickness. When estimated from the flow patterns, the box-counting fractal dimensions Db= 1.59±0.06 are not found to change significantly with boundary conditions, but by using a method to locally estimate fractal dimensions, we see a transition in behavior with radius for patterns in deformable systems; In the deformable system with a free boundary, it seems to be a transition in universality class as the local fractal dimensions decrease towards the outer rim, where fingers are opening up like fractures in a paste. In addition, we show a collapse of mass N plotted as function of radius r for the patterns at different snapshots

  13. Genomewide introgressive hybridization patterns in wild Atlantic salmon influenced by inadvertent gene flow from hatchery releases.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, M Y; Gross, R; Bruneaux, M; Vähä, J-P; Burimski, O; Pukk, L; Vasemägi, A

    2016-03-01

    Many salmonid fish populations are threatened by genetic homogenization, primarily due to introgressive hybridization with hatchery-reared conspecifics. By applying genomewide analysis using two molecular marker types (1986 SNPs and 17 microsatellites), we assessed the genetic impacts of inadvertent gene flow via straying from hatchery releases on wild populations of Atlantic salmon in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea, over 16 years (1996-2012). Both microsatellites and SNPs revealed congruent population genetic structuring, indicating that introgression changed the genetic make-up of wild populations by increasing genetic diversity and reducing genetic divergence. However, the degree of genetic introgression varied among studied populations, being higher in the eastern part and lower in the western part of Estonia, which most likely reflects the history of past stocking activities. Using kernel smoothing and permutation testing, we detected considerable heterogeneity in introgression patterns across the genome, with a large number of regions exhibiting nonrandom introgression widely dispersed across the genome. We also observed substantial variation in nonrandom introgression patterns within populations, as the majority of genomic regions showing elevated or reduced introgression were not consistently detected among temporal samples. This suggests that recombination, selection and stochastic processes may contribute to complex nonrandom introgression patterns. Our results suggest that (i) some genomic regions in Atlantic salmon are more vulnerable to introgressive hybridization, while others show greater resistance to unidirectional gene flow; and (ii) the hybridization of previously separated populations leads to complex and dynamic nonrandom introgression patterns that most likely have functional consequences for indigenous populations. PMID:26840557

  14. Genomewide introgressive hybridization patterns in wild Atlantic salmon influenced by inadvertent gene flow from hatchery releases.

    PubMed

    Ozerov, M Y; Gross, R; Bruneaux, M; Vähä, J-P; Burimski, O; Pukk, L; Vasemägi, A

    2016-03-01

    Many salmonid fish populations are threatened by genetic homogenization, primarily due to introgressive hybridization with hatchery-reared conspecifics. By applying genomewide analysis using two molecular marker types (1986 SNPs and 17 microsatellites), we assessed the genetic impacts of inadvertent gene flow via straying from hatchery releases on wild populations of Atlantic salmon in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea, over 16 years (1996-2012). Both microsatellites and SNPs revealed congruent population genetic structuring, indicating that introgression changed the genetic make-up of wild populations by increasing genetic diversity and reducing genetic divergence. However, the degree of genetic introgression varied among studied populations, being higher in the eastern part and lower in the western part of Estonia, which most likely reflects the history of past stocking activities. Using kernel smoothing and permutation testing, we detected considerable heterogeneity in introgression patterns across the genome, with a large number of regions exhibiting nonrandom introgression widely dispersed across the genome. We also observed substantial variation in nonrandom introgression patterns within populations, as the majority of genomic regions showing elevated or reduced introgression were not consistently detected among temporal samples. This suggests that recombination, selection and stochastic processes may contribute to complex nonrandom introgression patterns. Our results suggest that (i) some genomic regions in Atlantic salmon are more vulnerable to introgressive hybridization, while others show greater resistance to unidirectional gene flow; and (ii) the hybridization of previously separated populations leads to complex and dynamic nonrandom introgression patterns that most likely have functional consequences for indigenous populations.

  15. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes. PMID:22042624

  16. Simulated effects of alternative withdrawal strategies on ground-water-flow patterns, New Jersey Pinelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modica, Edward

    1996-01-01

    A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water- flow model of the unconfined part of the Kirkwood- Cohasey aquifer system beneath the upper parts of the Rancocas Creek and Wading River Basins in the New Jersey Pinelands was developed to (1) define ground-water-flow patterns and residence times in an aquifer system typical of the New Jersey Coastal Plain and (2) demonstrate the effects of alternative withdrawal strategies of ground- water-flow patterns and streams. Ground-water flow near the McDonald's-Middle Branch area was analyzed by using a particle tracker to demonstrate the effects of three hypothetical withdrawal scenarios on the configurations of source areas of ground-water flow to withdrawal wells, streams, and other discharge outlets in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. Under natural conditions, most ground-water discharge to streams and wetlands. Ground-water residence times ranged from slightly greater than zero to about 200 years. Much of the ground water remained in the system for less than 20 years because it discharged to streams. Residence times of ground water were reduced significantly by persistent withdrawals. The configurations of source areas of flow to local stream systems and to the Piney Point aquifer are affected by the location of a withdrawal well. Results of withdrawal simulations indicate that well-location strategies applied in the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system can alleviate the adverse effects of withdrawals on streams and that large-scale regional withdrawals in confined aquifers can adversely effect streams although the effects are dispersed over numerous streams.

  17. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    PubMed

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes.

  18. Apatite-Melt Partitioning at 1 Bar: An Assessment of Apatite-Melt Exchange Equilibria Resulting from Non-Ideal Mixing of F and Cl in Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Ustunisik, G.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    The mineral apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] is present in a wide range of planetary materials. Due to the presence of volatiles within its crystal structure (X-site), many recent studies have attempted to use apatite to constrain the volatile contents of planetary magmas and mantle sources. In order to use the volatile contents of apatite to precisely determine the abundances of volatiles in coexisting silicate melt or fluids, thermodynamic models for the apatite solid solution and for the apatite components in multi-component silicate melts and fluids are required. Although some thermodynamic models for apatite have been developed, they are incomplete. Furthermore, no mixing model is available for all of the apatite components in silicate melts or fluids, especially for F and Cl components. Several experimental studies have investigated the apatite-melt and apatite-fluid partitioning behavior of F, Cl, and OH in terrestrial and planetary systems, which have determined that apatite-melt partitioning of volatiles are best described as exchange equilibria similar to Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and silicate melt. However, McCubbin et al. recently reported that the exchange coefficients may vary in portions of apatite compositional space where F, Cl, and OH do not mix ideally in apatite. In particular, solution calorimetry data of apatite compositions along the F-Cl join exhibit substantial excess enthalpies of mixing. In the present study, we conducted apatite-melt partitioning experiments in evacuated, sealed silica-glass tubes at approximately 1 bar and 950-1050 degrees Centigrade on a synthetic Martian basalt composition equivalent to the basaltic shergottite Queen Alexandria Range (QUE) 94201. These experiments were conducted dry, at low pressure, to assess the effects of temperature and apatite composition on the partitioning behavior of F and Cl between apatite and basaltic melt along the F-Cl apatite binary join, where there is non-ideal mixing of F and Cl

  19. Patterns and rates of ground-water flow on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Modica, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Increased ground-water contamination from human activities on Long Island has prompted studies to define the pattern and rate of ground-water movement. A two-dimensional, fine-mesh, finite-element model consisting of 11,969 nodes and 22,880 elements was constructed to represent ground-water flow along a north-south section through central Long Island. The model represents average hydrologic conditions within a corridor approximately 15 miles wide. The model solves discrete approximations of both the potential and stream functions. The resulting flownet depicts flow paths and defines the vertical distribution of flow within the section. Ground-water flow rates decrease with depth. Sixty-two percent of the water flows no deeper than the upper glacial (water-table) aquifer, 38 percent enters the underlying Magothy aquifer, and only 3.1 percent enters the Lloyd aquifer. The limiting streamlines for flow to the Magothy and Lloyd aquifers indicate that aquifer recharge areas are narrow east-west bands through the center of the island. The recharge area of the Magothy aquifer is only 5.4 miles wide; that of the Lloyd aquifer is less than 0.5 miles. The distribution of ground-water traveltime and a flownet are calculated from model results; both are useful in the investigation of contaminant transport or the chemical evolution of ground water within the flow system. A major discontinuity in traveltime occurs across the streamline which separates the flow subsystems of the two confined aquifers. Water that reaches the Lloyd aquifer attains traveltimes as high as 10,000 years, whereas water that has not penetrated deeper than the Magothy aquifer attains traveltimes of only 2,000 years. The finite-element approach used in this study is particularly suited to ground-water systems that have complex hydrostratigraphy and cross-sectional symmetry.

  20. Fluid flow pattern in upflow reactors of anerobic treatment of beet sugar factory wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Heertjes, P.M.; Kuijvenhaven, L.J.; Van Der Meer, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Residence-time-distribution experiments for the fluid in a 30-m cubed pilot plant and a 200-m cubed prototype upflow reactor were performed by means of continuous injection of an LiCl solution as a tracer in the influent of the reactor and measurement of the response of this stimulus on several locations in the reactor and in the effluent. In a similar way as described in an article published earlier, models have been developed by use of the measured data of the fluid flow pattern which consisted of regions of ideal mixing, plug flow, dead space, and short circuiting. It appeared that the fluid flow patterns in the two reactors were to a large extent analogous. For the pilot plant, three-mixer models appeared to be appropriate while for the prototype reactor two-mixer models have been found. This difference was a result of the difference in the heights of the sludge beds in the reactor: 2-3 m in the pilot plant and only 0.4 m in the prototype reactor, a result of too small an amount of sludge. Another difference was that, due to a large amount of mud in the prototype reactor, a region of dead space occurred in the models for the fluid flow pattern in this reactor. The dimensions of the prototype reactor have been chosen according to several recommendations obtained from work with the pilot plant, (e.g., scale-up should be done by increasing the cross section of the reactor; one influent point should be applied per 5 m squared bottom surface). The results presented here clearly show the value of these recommendations. (Refs. 7).

  1. Functional assessment of expiratory flow pattern in feline lower airway disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Hui; Lee, Jih-Jong; Liu, Chen-Hsuan

    2014-08-01

    Feline lower airway disease (FLAD) is a chronic respiratory disease of which there is a lack of information on functional assessment in current veterinary medicine. The purposes of this study were to investigate expiratory pattern and evaluate the diagnostic utility of functional parameters in cats with FLAD. Thirty-three client-owned cats (23 FLAD cats and 10 control cats) were studied. Under quiet tidal breathing, pseudo-tidal breathing flow-volume loop (pTBFVL) was obtained from a barometric whole body plethysmography (BWBP) device. There were significant differences in the shapes of expiratory, but not inspiratory, curves between FLAD and control cats. The incidence of the presence of concave expiratory curve indicating lower airway obstruction was 74% in FLAD cats. To assess the diagnostic utility of pTBFVL indices in cats with FLAD, area under the receiver-operator curve was 0.86 for PEF/EF50 (peak expiratory flow divided by expiratory flow at end expiratory volume plus 50% tidal volume); a cuff-off value of PEF/EF50 >1.51 distinguished normal from FLAD (73.9% sensitivity, 100% specificity). There were no significant differences in traditionally measured BWBP parameters (ie, enhanced pause) between cats with and without FLAD in the present study. In conclusion, underlying change on expiratory flow pattern during natural tidal breathing existed in FLAD cats, and selected pTBFVL indices were useful in discriminating FLAD from normal cats. Tidal breathing pattern depicted by pseudoflow-pseudovolume loops from a BWBP system could be a non-invasive tool for functional assessment in client-owned cats. PMID:24327372

  2. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  3. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 x 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  4. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid setup monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network. PMID:19494426

  5. Identifying variably saturated water-flow patterns in a steep hillslope under intermittent heavy rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Kadi, A. I.; Torikai, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify water-flow patterns in part of an active landslide, through the use of numerical simulations and data obtained during a field study. The approaches adopted include measuring rainfall events and pore-pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated soils at the site. To account for soil variability, the Richards equation is solved within deterministic and stochastic frameworks. The deterministic simulations considered average water-retention data, adjusted retention data to account for stones or cobbles, retention functions for a heterogeneous pore structure, and continuous retention functions for preferential flow. The stochastic simulations applied the Monte Carlo approach which considers statistical distribution and autocorrelation of the saturated conductivity and its cross correlation with the retention function. Although none of the models is capable of accurately predicting field measurements, appreciable improvement in accuracy was attained using stochastic, preferential flow, and heterogeneous pore-structure models. For the current study, continuum-flow models provide reasonable accuracy for practical purposes, although they are expected to be less accurate than multi-domain preferential flow models.

  6. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    2016-01-01

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China.

  7. A landscape lake flow pattern design approach based on automated CFD simulation and parallel multiple objective optimization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Tian, Yimei; Shen, Hailiang; Wang, Yi; Kang, Mengxin

    2016-01-01

    A design approach for determining the optimal flow pattern in a landscape lake is proposed based on FLUENT simulation, multiple objective optimization, and parallel computing. This paper formulates the design into a multi-objective optimization problem, with lake circulation effects and operation cost as two objectives, and solves the optimization problem with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II. The lake flow pattern is modelled in FLUENT. The parallelization aims at multiple FLUENT instance runs, which is different from the FLUENT internal parallel solver. This approach: (1) proposes lake flow pattern metrics, i.e. weighted average water flow velocity, water volume percentage of low flow velocity, and variance of flow velocity, (2) defines user defined functions for boundary setting, objective and constraints calculation, and (3) parallels the execution of multiple FLUENT instances runs to significantly reduce the optimization wall-clock time. The proposed approach is demonstrated through a case study for Meijiang Lake in Tianjin, China. PMID:27642835

  8. Comparison of cerebral blood flow pattern by transcranial Doppler in patients with diffuse and focal causes of brain death

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Alireza; Iranmanesh, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study aims to assess the cerebral vessels flow in brain death patients with different causes, including focal and diffuse lesions and comparison of flows according to the underlying causes. Materials and Methods: Two groups of 15 brain-dead patients one with focal and the other with diffuse brain lesions were compared according to their cerebral blood flow pattern 48 h passed brain death certification. Results: Bilateral absence of flow in middle cerebral artery (MCA) was found in 54.5% of brain-dead patients with diffuse lesion and 50.33% of those with focal lesions. Systolic spike pattern in MCA flow was found in 46.2% of patients with focal lesion and 16.65% of patients with diffuse lesion. Diastole–systole separation pattern in MCA was seen in 16.65% of patients with the diffuse lesions. This pattern in MCA was not seen in patients with the focal lesion group. In carotid arteries, we did not find the absence of flow in any cases. Thirty percent of all patients in both groups had a normal flow pattern (36.6% of patients with focal lesions and 23.3% of patients with diffuse lesion). Patients with focal lesion had 33.3% systolic spike pattern flow and had 23.35% diastole–systole separation flow pattern. In intra-cranial vessels, systolic spike pattern was more common among patients with focal lesions than patients with diffuse lesion, however, this difference was not statistically significant (46.2% of patients with focal lesion and 16.65% of patients with diffuse lesion) (P value = 0.244-0.09). Diastole–systole separation flow was more common in patients with diffuse lesions than those with the focal lesions although this could not reach the significant level as the previous pattern (20% of patients with diffuse lesion versus no case in patients with focal lesion) (P value = 0.181). Conclusion: Absence of flow was the most common brain flow pattern in the focal and diffuse group lesions. There was no difference in flow pattern between the

  9. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination. PMID:26825852

  10. Baleen wear reveals intraoral water flow patterns of mysticete filter feeding.

    PubMed

    Werth, Alexander J; Straley, Janice M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    A survey of macroscopic and microscopic wear patterns in the baleen of eight whale species (Cetacea: Mysticeti) discloses structural, functional, and life history properties of this neomorphic keratinous tissue, including evidence of intraoral water flow patterns involved in filter feeding. All baleen demonstrates wear, particularly on its medial and ventral edges, as flat outer layers of cortical keratin erode to reveal horn tubes, also of keratin, which emerge as hair-like fringes. This study quantified five additional categories of specific wear: pitting of plates, scratching of plates, scuffing of fringes, shortening of fringes, and reorientation of fringes (including fringes directed between plates to the exterior of the mouth). Blue whale baleen showed the most pitting and sei whale baleen the most scratching; gray whale baleen had the most fringe wear. The location of worn baleen within the mouth suggests that direct contact with the tongue is not responsible for most wear, and that flowing water as well as abrasive prey or sediment carried by the flowing water likely causes pitting and scratching of plates as well as fringe fraying, scuffing, shortening, and reorientation. Baleen also has elevated vertical and horizontal ridges that are unrelated to wear; these are probably related to growth and may allow for age determination.

  11. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  12. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation.

  13. Numerical simulation of the convective flow patterns within a rotating concentric annulus with radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Ares; Avila, Ruben

    2010-11-01

    The GEODYNAMO research requires the numerical study of the natural convection of the fluid confined in a rotating spherical shell. We present the flow patterns of a uniform-density Boussinesq fluid within a rotating spherical annulus with radial aspect ratio η=0.35. The convective flow is induced by a gravity field acting radially inwards towards the center of the spheres, and the temperature difference between the internal sphere at Ti and the external sphere at Te (where Ti>Te). We also show (i) the influence of the rotation on the heat transfer rate, and (ii) the influence of the differential rotation (the internal sphere rotates at a different angular velocity than the reference frame and the external sphere) on the heat transfer rate. The fluid equations are solved by using the spectral element method (SEM). In order to avoid the singularity at the poles of the spheres, the numerical mesh is generated by using the Cubed-Sphere algorithm. The flow patterns are obtained for subcritical and supercritical Rayleigh numbers and Taylor numbers in the range 10^3 and 10^5. The results are successfully compared with data previously reported in the literature.

  14. FR Number Effect on Downcomer Flow pattern Development in Cold Leg Injection Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Gavritas, Mirela; Woods, Brian G.

    2002-07-01

    In addition to acquiring data for code verification, the recent rapid Boron dilution (RBD) test program at the University of Maryland 2 x 4 Thermalhydraulic Loop Facility (UM 2 x 4 Loop) aimed to resolve several issues related to physical phenomena that can affect the re-boration of a boron dilute slug as it travels to the core. Among these issues, confirmation was sought that buoyancy plays a minimal role in the mixing of the slug as it travels through the downcomer. The tests showed, however, that the Froude (Fr) number substantially impacts the downcomer flow pattern. The slug distribution in the downcomer clearly changes from penetrating downwards along a single jet when the Fr number is smaller than approximately 6 to splitting into two jets that form a stagnation region under the injection site when Fr exceeds approximately 10. This observation was initially made evaluating the evolution histories of Fr numbers throughout individual tests. Closer examination of a broad family of tests showed that the flow pattern can actually be predicted based on Fr numbers determined from initial and boundary test conditions. Even though global figures of merit for mixing, e.g., azimuthally averaged scalar descriptors of mixing at a horizontal level of the downcomer, are only weakly affected by Fr number changes, this finding has substantial implications to the computational assessment of rapid Boron-dilution (RBD) consequences. A thorough understanding of the flow field is an essential prerequisite in computational fluid dynamics modeling. (authors)

  15. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  16. Fluid flow pattern and water residence time in waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Badrot-Nico, F; Guinot, V; Brissaud, F

    2009-01-01

    As treatment processes are kinetic-dependent, a consistent description of water residence times is essential to the prediction of waste stabilization ponds performance. A physically-based 3D transient CFD model simulating the water velocity, temperature and concentration fields as a function of all influent meteorological factors--wind speed and direction, solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity--was used to identify the relationships between the meteorological conditions and the hydrodynamic patterns and water residence times distributions in a polishing pond. The required meteorological data were recorded on site and water temperatures recorded at 10 sampling sites for 141 days. Stratification events appear on very calm days for wind speeds lower than 3 m s(-1) and on sunny days for wind speeds lower than 5 m s(-1). De-stratification is related to two mixing processes: nightly convection cells and global mixing patterns. Numerical tracer experiments show that the results of the flow patterns can be evaluated using the dispersed flow regime approximation and, for wind speeds exceeding 6 m s(-1), the completely stirred tank reactor assumption. PMID:19342800

  17. Gas–liquid two-phase flow patterns in rectangular polymeric microchannels: effect of surface wetting properties

    PubMed Central

    Huh, D; Kuo, C-H; Grotberg, J B

    2010-01-01

    Here we map gas–liquid two-phase flow regimes observed in polymeric microchannels with different wetting properties. We utilized video and confocal microscopy to examine two-phase flow patterns produced by parallel injection of air and water through a Y-shaped junction into a rectangular microchannel made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). We observed seven flow regimes in microchannels with hydrophobic walls, whereas only two flow patterns were identified in hydrophilic microchannels. Our study demonstrates that surface wettability has a profound influence on the spatial distribution of air and water moving in microchannels. PMID:20126421

  18. FLOW PATTERN AND SUSPENDED SEDIMENT TRANSPORT AROUND SPUR DIKES IN THE KIKUCHI RIVER ESTUARY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmoto, Terunori; Hirakawa, Ryuichi

    A series of spur dikes was constructed to reinforce an embankment at bends in the lower reach of the Kikuchi River. In recent years, eutrophicated fine sediment accumulation around spur dikes has caused a serious problem in estuary ecosystem. Therefore, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport has developed the renaturalization project of sand beach in the estuary. In this study, we have particularly investigated flow patterns and fine sediment transport around these spur dikes by using Stream-pro Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and radio-controlled model boat equipped with Workhorse ADCP in the period of spring tide. The results show that these spur dikes weakened flow and SS transport in the concave, and strengthened them in the convex of the bend. In addition, fine sediment accumulation were discussed through streamwise distribution of SS transport in both cases of flood and ebb tide.

  19. The prescribed output pattern regulates the modular structure of flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beber, Moritz Emanuel; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2013-11-01

    Modules are common functional and structural properties of many social, technical and biological networks. Especially for biological systems it is important to understand how modularity is related to function and how modularity evolves. It is known that time-varying or spatially organized goals can lead to modularity in a simulated evolution of signaling networks. Here, we study a minimal model of material flow in networks. We discuss the relation between the shared use of nodes, i.e., the cooperativity of modules, and the orthogonality of a prescribed output pattern. We study the persistence of cooperativity through an evolution of robustness against local damages. We expect the results to be valid for a large class of flow-based biological and technical networks.

  20. The prescribed output pattern regulates the modular structure of flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel Beber, Moritz; Armbruster, Dieter; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2013-11-01

    Modules are common functional and structural properties of many social, technical and biological networks. Especially for biological systems it is important to understand how modularity is related to function and how modularity evolves. It is known that time-varying or spatially organized goals can lead to modularity in a simulated evolution of signaling networks. Here, we study a minimal model of material flow in networks. We discuss the relation between the shared use of nodes, i.e., the cooperativity of modules, and the orthogonality of a prescribed output pattern. We study the persistence of cooperativity through an evolution of robustness against local damages. We expect the results to be valid for a large class of flow-based biological and technical networks. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2013-40672-3

  1. Patterns of deformation and volcanic flows associated with lithospheric loading by large volcanoes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgovern, Patrick J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan radar imaging and topography data are now available for a number of volcanoes on Venus greater than 100 km in radius. These data can be examined to reveal evidence of the flexural response of the lithosphere to the volcanic load. On Venus, erosion and sediment deposition are negligible, so tectonic evidence of deformation around large volcanoes should be evident except where buried by very young flows. Radar images reveal that most tectonic features and flow units on the flanks of these volcanoes have predominantly radial orientations. However, both Tepev Mons in Bell Regio and Sapas Mons in Atla Regio exhibit circumferential graben on their flanks. In addition, images reveal several flow units with an annular character around the north and west flanks of Tepev Mons. This pattern most likely results from ponding of flows in an annular flexural moat. Maat Mons in Atla Regio and Sif Mons in Eistla Regio are examples of volcanoes that lack circumferential graben and annular flows; discernible flow units and fractures on these constructs appear to be predominantly radial. Altimetry data can also provide evidence of flexural response. Tepev Mons is partially encircled by depressions that may be sections of a flexural moat that has not been completely filled. The locations of these depressions generally coincide with the annular flows described above. There is weaker evidence for such depressions around Maat Mons as well. The lack of circumferential tectonic features around most volcanoes on Venus might be explained by gradual moat filling and coverage by radial flows. The depressions around Tepev (and possible Maat) may indicate that this process is currently continuing. We use analytic models of plate flexure in an axisymmetric geometry to constrain the elastic plate thickness supporting Tepev Mons. If we consider the outer radius of the ponded flows to be the edge of a moat, we find that models with elastic plate thickness of 10-20 km fit best. Finite element

  2. Flow patterns in a slurry-bubble-column reactor under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Toselane, B.A.; Brown, D.M.; Zou, B.S.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1995-12-31

    The gas and liquid radioactive tracer response curves obtained in an industrial bubble column reactor of height to diameter ratio of 10 are analyzed and the suitability of the axial dispersion model for interpretation of the results is discussed. The relationship between the tracer concentration distribution and measured detector response of the soluble gas tracer (Ar-41) is possibly dominated by the dissolved gas. The one dimensional axial dispersion model cannot match all the experimental observations well and the flow pattern of the undissolved gas cannot be determined with certainty.

  3. Broad-scale patterns of invertebrate richness and community composition in temporary rivers: effects of flow intermittence

    EPA Science Inventory

    A central goal in ecology is to identify general relationships between environmental drivers and community patterns. In this study, we investigated the relationships between aquatic invertebrate communities and river flow intermittence across multiple continents. Particularly, we...

  4. Pattern of pulmonary venous blood flow in the hypoplastic left heart syndrome in the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Better, D; Apfel, H; Zidere, V; Allan, L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether restriction at the atrial septum in the newborn with hypoplastic left heart syndrome can be predicted accurately by examining the pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus. A restrictive atrial septum can contribute to haemodynamic instability before surgery for this lesion and has been associated with an increased mortality.
DESIGN—Pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler tracings were compared between fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and controls. The size of the atrial septal defect on the postnatal echocardiogram was graded according to the degree of restriction. Pulsed Doppler tracings of pulmonary venous blood flow were obtained in 18 fetuses with left atrial outflow atresia and compared with 77 controls, adjusted for gestational age. Postnatal echocardiograms were available for analysis in 13 of 18 neonates.
SETTING—A tertiary referral centre for fetal cardiology and paediatric cardiac surgery.
RESULTS—Fetuses with hypoplastic left heart syndrome were different from controls in all pulmonary vein indices measured. As assessed from the postnatal echocardiogram, there were seven fetuses with a restrictive atrial septum. In these fetuses, the systolic flow velocity (p < 0.01), S/D ratio (p < 0.01), and peak reversal wave (p < 0.001) in the pulmonary vein tracing showed a good correlation with the degree of restriction.
CONCLUSIONS—The Doppler pattern of pulmonary venous flow in the fetus with hypoplastic left heart syndrome appears to be a reliable predictor of restriction of the atrial septum in the neonate. This may help in the immediate post-delivery management of these infants before surgery.


Keywords: fetus; congenital heart defects; echocardiography; risk factors PMID:10336926

  5. Using patterns of debris flow erosion and deposition in the Icelandic Westfjords to delineate hazard zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, S. J.; Decaulne, A.; Balme, M. R.; Murray, J. B.; Towner, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    Debris flows pose a significant risk to infrastructure and people; hence the aim of this study is to better understand the behaviour of debris flows by studying examples from above the town of Ísafjörður in north-western Iceland. Debris flow is a recognised hazard in the region [1], but above Ísafjörður occurs with particularly high regularity [2] and can involve large volumes of debris. We have used airborne laser altimeter (LiDAR) and differential GPS data to produce isopach maps of flows that occurred in 1999, 2007 and 2008 above Ísafjörður and in adjacent valleys. Compared to observations from the literature, e.g. [3-5], these flows start depositing at unusually high slope gradients (up to 45°). However the larger flows are also unusually mobile compared to typical hill-slope debris flows [4], but they are not as mobile as channelized flows [6]. This means that for a given volume their run-out distance is much greater than expected and hence more likely to reach the town. The volumes for the flows were calculated in two ways: firstly we were able to take the difference between the surfaces before (LiDAR) and after (dGPS) three small flows that occurred in 2008. Secondly, for flows prior to our 2008 LiDAR survey, we interpolated the pre-flow surface based on surrounding topography and measured differences from our post-flow surveys. The second method therefore has a tendency to over-estimate the flow volumes. The scheme for dGPS surveying involved obtaining numerous cross sections and taking long profiles along the channel and adjacent levees. Based on the volumes that we have calculated using these more accurate methods, we have increased the value of volume estimates for recorded historic debris flows reported by [2] and have revised the local denudation rate to 45 mm per 100 yr. Using the isopach maps and associated field observations we have found a relationship between slope and deposition volume, where the runout and pattern of deposition is a

  6. Flow Field and Nutrient Dynamics Control Over Formation of Parallel Vegetation Patterns in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, V.; Cheng, Y.; Stieglitz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Pattern formation in vegetated communities reflects the underlying mechanisms governing resource utilization and distribution across the landscape. An example of a patterned ecosystem is the Florida Everglades, which is characterized by parallel and slightly elevated peat "ridges" separated by deeper water "slough" communities (R&S). Ridges are dominated by sawgrass (Cladium jamaiscence). These patterns are thought to be aligned with and develop in response to the historic surface water flow direction, though the precise mechanisms which lead to their formation are poorly understood. Over the years this R&S habitat has degraded in areas where the natural flow regime, hydroperiod, and water depths have been impacted by human development. Managing and restoring this habitat has been an objective of the U.S. Federal and Florida State governments since the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was authorized in 2000. It is imperative, however, to develop a mechanistic understanding of ridge-slough formation before the potential benefits of hydrologic forecasts associated with CERP can be evaluated. Recently, Cheng et al (see Cheng et al, session NG14) employed a simple 2D advection-diffusion model developed by Rietkerk et al (2004) to describe for the first time, the formation of parallel stripes from hydrologic interactions. To simulate parallel stripes, Cheng et al retained the basic equations of the Rietkerk model but allowed for constant advection of water and nutrient in one direction to simulate slope conditions, with evapotranspiration driven advection of water and nutrient perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. We employ this modeling framework and parameterize the model with Everglades field data to simulate ridge-slough formation. In this model, the relatively higher rates of evapotranspiration on the ridges compared to the sloughs create hydraulic gradients which carry dissolved nutrients from the sloughs to the faster growing ridges. With

  7. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R.

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  8. Induced-charge electro-osmosis around metal and Janus spheres in water: Patterns of flow and breaking symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lazo, Israel; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2014-11-01

    We establish experimentally the flow patterns of induced-charge electro-osmosis around immobilized metallic spheres in aqueous electrolyte. The ac field modifies local electrolyte concentration and causes quadrupolar flows with inward velocities being smaller than the outward ones. At high fields, the flow becomes irregular, with vortices smaller than the size of the sphere. Janus metallodielectric spheres create dipolar flows and pump the fluid from the dielectric toward the metallic part. The experimentally determined far-field flows decay with distance as r-3.

  9. Effects of Daily Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Patterns on Flow and VOC Transport to Groundwater along a Watershed Flow Path

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.L.; Thoms, R.B.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    MTBE and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely observed in shallow groundwater in the United States, especially in urban areas. Previous studies suggest that the atmosphere and/or nonpoint surficial sources could be responsible for some of those VOCs, especially in areas where there is net recharge to groundwater. However, in semiarid locations where annual potential evapotranspiration can exceed annual precipitation, VOC detections in groundwater can be frequent. VOC transport to groundwater under net discharge conditions has not previously been examined. A numerical model is used here to demonstrate that daily precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) patterns can have a significant effect on recharge to groundwater, water table elevations, and VOC transport. Ten-year precipitation/ET scenarios from six sites in the United States are examined using both actual daily observed values and "average" pulsed precipitation. MTBE and tetrachloroethylene transport, including gas-phase diffusion, are considered. The effects of the precipitation/ET scenarios on net recharge and groundwater flow are significant and complicated, especially under low-precipitation conditions when pulsed precipitation can significantly underestimate transport to groundwater. In addition to precipitation and evapotranspiration effects, location of VOC entry into the subsurface within the watershed is important for transport in groundwater. This is caused by groundwater hydraulics at the watershed scale as well as variations in ET within the watershed. The model results indicate that it is important to consider both daily precipitation/ET patterns and location within the watershed in order to interpret VOC occurrence in groundwater, especially in low-precipitation settings.

  10. Patterns of Gene Flow between Crop and Wild Carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; Ramsey, Adam J; Iorizzo, Massimo; Simon, Philipp W

    2016-01-01

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for cultivation and understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene flow for wild relatives of crop species. Moreover, the comparison of genetic markers with different modes of inheritance, or transmission, such as those of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, can inform the relative risk of transgene escape via pollen versus seed. Here we investigate patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in two regions of the United States. We employed 15 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and one polymorphic chloroplast marker. Further, we utilized both conventional population genetic metrics along with Shannon diversity indices as the latter have been proposed to be more sensitive to allele frequency changes and differentiation. We found that populations in both regions that were proximal to crop fields showed lower levels of differentiation to the crops than populations that were located farther away. We also found that Shannon measures were more sensitive to differences in both genetic diversity and differentiation in our study. Finally, we found indirect evidence of paternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and accompanying lower than expected levels of chloroplast genetic structure amongst populations as might be expected if chloroplast DNA genes flow through both seed and pollen. Our findings of substantial gene flow for both nuclear and chloroplast markers demonstrate the efficiency of both pollen and seed to transfer genetic information amongst populations of carrot. PMID:27603516

  11. Swarming in viscous fluids: Three-dimensional patterns in swimmer- and force-induced flows.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R

    2016-04-01

    We derive a three-dimensional theory of self-propelled particle swarming in a viscous fluid environment. Our model predicts emergent collective behavior that depends critically on fluid opacity, mechanism of self-propulsion, and type of particle-particle interaction. In "clear fluids" swimmers have full knowledge of their surroundings and can adjust their velocities with respect to the lab frame, while in "opaque fluids" they control their velocities only in relation to the local fluid flow. We also show that "social" interactions that affect only a particle's propensity to swim towards or away from neighbors induces a flow field that is qualitatively different from the long-ranged flow fields generated by direct "physical" interactions. The latter can be short-ranged but lead to much longer-ranged fluid-mediated hydrodynamic forces, effectively amplifying the range over which particles interact. These different fluid flows conspire to profoundly affect swarm morphology, kinetically stabilizing or destabilizing swarm configurations that would arise in the absence of fluid. Depending upon the overall interaction potential, the mechanism of swimming ( e.g., pushers or pullers), and the degree of fluid opaqueness, we discover a number of new collective three-dimensional patterns including flocks with prolate or oblate shapes, recirculating pelotonlike structures, and jetlike fluid flows that entrain particles mediating their escape from the center of mill-like structures. Our results reveal how the interplay among general physical elements influence fluid-mediated interactions and the self-organization, mobility, and stability of new three-dimensional swarms and suggest how they might be used to kinetically control their collective behavior. PMID:27176395

  12. Patterns of Gene Flow between Crop and Wild Carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; Ramsey, Adam J.; Iorizzo, Massimo; Simon, Philipp W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for cultivation and understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene flow for wild relatives of crop species. Moreover, the comparison of genetic markers with different modes of inheritance, or transmission, such as those of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, can inform the relative risk of transgene escape via pollen versus seed. Here we investigate patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in two regions of the United States. We employed 15 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and one polymorphic chloroplast marker. Further, we utilized both conventional population genetic metrics along with Shannon diversity indices as the latter have been proposed to be more sensitive to allele frequency changes and differentiation. We found that populations in both regions that were proximal to crop fields showed lower levels of differentiation to the crops than populations that were located farther away. We also found that Shannon measures were more sensitive to differences in both genetic diversity and differentiation in our study. Finally, we found indirect evidence of paternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and accompanying lower than expected levels of chloroplast genetic structure amongst populations as might be expected if chloroplast DNA genes flow through both seed and pollen. Our findings of substantial gene flow for both nuclear and chloroplast markers demonstrate the efficiency of both pollen and seed to transfer genetic information amongst populations of carrot. PMID:27603516

  13. Patterns of Gene Flow between Crop and Wild Carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Jennifer R; Ramsey, Adam J; Iorizzo, Massimo; Simon, Philipp W

    2016-01-01

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for cultivation and understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene flow for wild relatives of crop species. Moreover, the comparison of genetic markers with different modes of inheritance, or transmission, such as those of the nuclear and chloroplast genomes, can inform the relative risk of transgene escape via pollen versus seed. Here we investigate patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in two regions of the United States. We employed 15 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and one polymorphic chloroplast marker. Further, we utilized both conventional population genetic metrics along with Shannon diversity indices as the latter have been proposed to be more sensitive to allele frequency changes and differentiation. We found that populations in both regions that were proximal to crop fields showed lower levels of differentiation to the crops than populations that were located farther away. We also found that Shannon measures were more sensitive to differences in both genetic diversity and differentiation in our study. Finally, we found indirect evidence of paternal transmission of chloroplast DNA and accompanying lower than expected levels of chloroplast genetic structure amongst populations as might be expected if chloroplast DNA genes flow through both seed and pollen. Our findings of substantial gene flow for both nuclear and chloroplast markers demonstrate the efficiency of both pollen and seed to transfer genetic information amongst populations of carrot.

  14. Swarming in viscous fluids: Three-dimensional patterns in swimmer- and force-induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2016-04-01

    We derive a three-dimensional theory of self-propelled particle swarming in a viscous fluid environment. Our model predicts emergent collective behavior that depends critically on fluid opacity, mechanism of self-propulsion, and type of particle-particle interaction. In "clear fluids" swimmers have full knowledge of their surroundings and can adjust their velocities with respect to the lab frame, while in "opaque fluids" they control their velocities only in relation to the local fluid flow. We also show that "social" interactions that affect only a particle's propensity to swim towards or away from neighbors induces a flow field that is qualitatively different from the long-ranged flow fields generated by direct "physical" interactions. The latter can be short-ranged but lead to much longer-ranged fluid-mediated hydrodynamic forces, effectively amplifying the range over which particles interact. These different fluid flows conspire to profoundly affect swarm morphology, kinetically stabilizing or destabilizing swarm configurations that would arise in the absence of fluid. Depending upon the overall interaction potential, the mechanism of swimming ( e.g., pushers or pullers), and the degree of fluid opaqueness, we discover a number of new collective three-dimensional patterns including flocks with prolate or oblate shapes, recirculating pelotonlike structures, and jetlike fluid flows that entrain particles mediating their escape from the center of mill-like structures. Our results reveal how the interplay among general physical elements influence fluid-mediated interactions and the self-organization, mobility, and stability of new three-dimensional swarms and suggest how they might be used to kinetically control their collective behavior.

  15. The study of flow pattern and phase-change problem in die casting process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Wei, H.; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    The flow pattern and solidification phenomena in die casting process have been investigated in the first phase study. The flow pattern in filling process is predicted by using a VOF (volume of fluid) method. A good agreement with experimental observation is obtained for filling the water into a die cavity with different gate geometry and with an obstacle in the cavity. An enthalpy method has been applied to solve the solidification problem. By treating the latent heat implicitly into the enthalpy instead of explicitly into the source term, the CPU time can be reduced at least 20 times. The effect of material properties on solidification fronts is tested. It concludes that the dependence of properties on temperature is significant. The influence of the natural convection over the diffusion has also been studied. The result shows that the liquid metal solidification phenomena is diffusion dominant, and the natural convection can affect the shape of the interface. In the second phase study, the filling and solidification processes will be considered simultaneously.

  16. Ion flow patterns near Mars, Venus and a small scale comet: similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Hans; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Rojas-Castillo, Diana; Holmström, Mats; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Behar, Etienne

    2016-04-01

    Using data from the ASPERA-3 (Mars) and ASPERA-4 (Venus) instruments we have investigated the ion flow patterns near Mars and Venus. For both planets heavy ions move more radially in the magnetosheath than does light ions. This is consistent with ion pick up in the magnetosheath, and heavy ions moving along the solar wind electric field. In the magnetotail the ion flow patterns of the two planets are fundamentally different. At Mars the heavy ions (at energies detectable with ASPERA-3) move more or less straight tailward on average. The light ions have an inward component, moving towards the center of the tail. At Venus the heavy ions move towards the center of the tail. The light ions at Venus have a component towards the center of the tail just like at Mars. The net effect is that at Mars the light ions move more towards the center of the tail than the heavy ions, whereas the situation is the opposite at Venus. We discuss these differences, and also compare with the ion dynamics observed at comet 67P using the RPC-ICA instrument on Rosetta, which is close to identical to the ion sensors of ASPERA 3 and 4. By comparison with the situation at a small scale comet we try to elucidate the role of the scale of the system in terms of ion gyro radius.

  17. Imaging wet granules with different flow patterns by electrical capacitance tomography and microwave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. G.; Zhang, J. L.; Ramli, M. F.; Mao, M. X.; Ye, J. M.; Yang, W. Q.; Wu, Z. P.

    2016-11-01

    The moisture content of granules in fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating processes can typically be between 1%~25%, resulting in the change of permittivity and conductivity during the processes. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) has been used for this purpose, but has a limit because too much water can cause a problem in capacitance measurement. Considering that microwave tomography (MWT) has a wide range of frequency (1~2.5 GHz) and can be used to measure materials with high permittivity and conductivity, the objective of this research is to combine ECT and MWT together to investigate the solids concentration with different moisture content and different flow patterns. The measurement results show that both ECT and MWT are functions of moisture content as well as flow patterns, and their measurements are complementary to each other. This is the first time that these two tomography modalities have been combined together and applied to image the complex solids distribution. The obtained information may be used for the process control of fluidised bed drying, granulation and coating to improve operation efficiency.

  18. Flow-pattern Guided Fabrication of High-density Barcode Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lisa S; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-06

    Antibody microarray as a well-developed technology is currently challenged by a few other established or emerging high-throughput technologies. In this report, we renovate the antibody microarray technology by using a novel approach for manufacturing and by introducing new features. The fabrication of our high-density antibody microarray is accomplished through perpendicularly oriented flow-patterning of single stranded DNAs and subsequent conversion mediated by DNA-antibody conjugates. This protocol outlines the critical steps in flow-patterning DNA, producing and purifying DNA-antibody conjugates, and assessing the quality of the fabricated microarray. The uniformity and sensitivity are comparable with conventional microarrays, while our microarray fabrication does not require the assistance of an array printer and can be performed in most research laboratories. The other major advantage is that the size of our microarray units is 10 times smaller than that of printed arrays, offering the unique capability of analyzing functional proteins from single cells when interfacing with generic microchip designs. This barcode technology can be widely employed in biomarker detection, cell signaling studies, tissue engineering, and a variety of clinical applications.

  19. Genetic architecture and genomic patterns of gene flow between hybridizing species of Picea.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, A; Ingvarsson, P K; Aitken, S N

    2015-08-01

    Hybrid zones provide an opportunity to study the effects of selection and gene flow in natural settings. We employed nuclear microsatellites (single sequence repeat (SSR)) and candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) to characterize the genetic architecture and patterns of interspecific gene flow in the Picea glauca × P. engelmannii hybrid zone across a broad latitudinal (40-60 degrees) and elevational (350-3500 m) range in western North America. Our results revealed a wide and complex hybrid zone with broad ancestry levels and low interspecific heterozygosity, shaped by asymmetric advanced-generation introgression, and low reproductive barriers between parental species. The clinal variation based on geographic variables, lack of concordance in clines among loci and the width of the hybrid zone points towards the maintenance of species integrity through environmental selection. Congruency between geographic and genomic clines suggests that loci with narrow clines are under strong selection, favoring either one parental species (directional selection) or their hybrids (overdominance) as a result of strong associations with climatic variables such as precipitation as snow and mean annual temperature. Cline movement due to past demographic events (evidenced by allelic richness and heterozygosity shifts from the average cline center) may explain the asymmetry in introgression and predominance of P. engelmannii found in this study. These results provide insights into the genetic architecture and fine-scale patterns of admixture, and identify loci that may be involved in reproductive barriers between the species. PMID:25806545

  20. Seascape analysis reveals regional gene flow patterns among populations of a marine planktonic diatom

    PubMed Central

    Godhe, Anna; Egardt, Jenny; Kleinhans, David; Sundqvist, Lisa; Hordoir, Robinson; Jonsson, Per R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the gene flow of the common marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi, in Scandinavian waters and tested the null hypothesis of panmixia. Sediment samples were collected from the Danish Straits, Kattegat and Skagerrak. Individual strains were established from germinated resting stages. A total of 350 individuals were genotyped by eight microsatellite markers. Conventional F-statistics showed significant differentiation between the samples. We therefore investigated whether the genetic structure could be explained using genetic models based on isolation by distance (IBD) or by oceanographic connectivity. Patterns of oceanographic circulation are seasonally dependent and therefore we estimated how well local oceanographic connectivity explains gene flow month by month. We found no significant relationship between genetic differentiation and geographical distance. Instead, the genetic structure of this dominant marine primary producer is best explained by local oceanographic connectivity promoting gene flow in a primarily south to north direction throughout the year. Oceanographic data were consistent with the significant FST values between several pairs of samples. Because even a small amount of genetic exchange prevents the accumulation of genetic differences in F-statistics, we hypothesize that local retention at each sample site, possibly as resting stages, is an important component in explaining the observed genetic structure. PMID:24174105

  1. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V, Oliver C

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities.

  2. Evaluation of Spatial Pattern of Altered Flow Regimes on a River Network Using a Distributed Hydrological Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Saavedra V., Oliver C.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of the spatial variability of natural flow regimes has been less studied than that of the temporal variability, despite its ecological importance for river ecosystems. Here, we aimed to quantify the spatial patterns of flow regime alterations along a river network in the Sagami River, Japan, by estimating river discharge under natural and altered flow conditions. We used a distributed hydrological model, which simulates hydrological processes spatiotemporally, to estimate 20-year daily river discharge along the river network. Then, 33 hydrologic indices (i.e., Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration) were calculated from the simulated discharge to estimate the spatial patterns of their alterations. Some hydrologic indices were relatively well estimated such as the magnitude and timing of maximum flows, monthly median flows, and the frequency of low and high flow pulses. The accuracy was evaluated with correlation analysis (r > 0.4) and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test (α = 0.05) by comparing these indices calculated from both observed and simulated discharge. The spatial patterns of the flow regime alterations varied depending on the hydrologic indices. For example, both the median flow in August and the frequency of high flow pulses were reduced by the maximum of approximately 70%, but these strongest alterations were detected at different locations (i.e., on the mainstream and the tributary, respectively). These results are likely caused by different operational purposes of multiple water control facilities. The results imply that the evaluation only at discharge gauges is insufficient to capture the alteration of the flow regime. Our findings clearly emphasize the importance of evaluating the spatial pattern of flow regime alteration on a river network where its discharge is affected by multiple water control facilities. PMID:26207997

  3. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  4. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l‑1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  5. Functional morphology and patterns of blood flow in the heart of Python regius.

    PubMed

    Starck, J Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Brightness-modulated ultrasonography, continuous-wave Doppler, and pulsed-wave Doppler-echocardiography were used to analyze the functional morphology of the undisturbed heart of ball pythons. In particular, the action of the muscular ridge and the atrio-ventricular valves are key features to understand how patterns of blood flow emerge from structures directing blood into the various chambers of the heart. A step-by-step image analysis of echocardiographs shows that during ventricular diastole, the atrio-ventricular valves block the interventricular canals so that blood from the right atrium first fills the cavum venosum, and blood from the left atrium fills the cavum arteriosum. During diastole, blood from the cavum venosum crosses the muscular ridge into the cavum pulmonale. During middle to late systole the muscular ridge closes, thus prohibiting further blood flow into the cavum pulmonale. At the same time, the atrio-ventricular valves open the interventricular canal and allow blood from the cavum arteriosum to flow into the cavum venosum. In the late phase of ventricular systole, all blood from the cavum pulmonale is pressed into the pulmonary trunk; all blood from the cavum venosum is pressed into both aortas. Quantitative measures of blood flow volume showed that resting snakes bypass the pulmonary circulation and shunt about twice the blood volume into the systemic circulation as into the pulmonary circulation. When digesting, the oxygen demand of snakes increased tremendously. This is associated with shunting more blood into the pulmonary circulation. The results of this study allow the presentation of a detailed functional model of the python heart. They are also the basis for a functional hypothesis of how shunting is achieved. Further, it was shown that shunting is an active regulation process in response to changing demands of the organism (here, oxygen demand). Finally, the results of this study support earlier reports about a dual pressure

  6. Upper airway collapsibility and patterns of flow limitation at constant end-expiratory lung volume.

    PubMed

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit) is measured using a series of pressure drops. However, pressure drops also lower end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), which independently affects Pcrit. We describe a technique to measure Pcrit at a constant EELV. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and controls were instrumented with an epiglottic catheter, magnetometers (to measure change in EELV), and nasal mask/pneumotachograph and slept supine on nasal CPAP. Pcrit was measured in standard fashion and using our novel "biphasic technique" in which expiratory pressure only was lowered for 1 min before the inspiratory pressure was dropped; this allowed EELV to decrease to the drop level before performing the pressure drop. Seven OSA and three controls were studied. The biphasic technique successfully lowered EELV before the inspiratory pressure drop. Pcrit was similar between the standard and biphasic techniques (-0.4 ± 2.6 vs. -0.6 ± 2.3 cmH(2)O, respectively, P = 0.84). Interestingly, we noted three different patterns of flow limitation: 1) classic Starling resistor type: flow fixed and independent of downstream pressure; 2) negative effort dependence within breaths: substantial decrease in flow, sometimes with complete collapse, as downstream pressure decreased; and 3) and negative effort dependence across breaths: progressive reductions in peak flow as respiratory effort on successive breaths increased. Overall, EELV changes do not influence standard passive Pcrit measurements if breaths 3-5 of pressure drops are used. These results also highlight the importance of inspiratory collapse in OSA pathogenesis. The cause of negative effort dependence within and across breaths is not known and requires further study. PMID:22628372

  7. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l-1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  8. Influence of urbanization pattern on stream flow of a peri-urban catchment under Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.; Ferreira, António J. D.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Coelho, Celeste A. O.

    2015-04-01

    The demand for better life quality and lower living costs created a great pressure on peri-urban areas, leading to significant land-use changes. The complexity of mixed land-use patterns, however, presents a challenge to understand the hydrological pathways and streamflow response involved in such changes. This study assesses the impact of a actively changing Portuguese peri-urban area on catchment hydrology. It focuses on quantifying streamflow delivery from contributing areas, of different land-use arrangement and the seasonal influence of the Mediterranean climate on stream discharge. The study focuses on Ribeira dos Covões a small (6 km2) peri-urban catchment on the outskirts of Coimbra, one of the main cities in central Portugal. Between 1958 and 2012 the urban area of the catchment expanded from 8% to 40%, mostly at the expense of agriculture (down from 48% to 4%), with woodland now accounting for the remaining 56% of the catchment area. The urban area comprises contrasting urban settings, associated with older discontinuous arrangement of buildings and urban structures and low population density (<25 inhabitants/km), and recent well-defined urban cores dominated by apartment blocks and high population density (9900 inhabitants/km). The hydrological response of the catchment has been monitored since 2007 by a flume installed at the outlet. In 2009, five rainfall gauges and eight additional water level recorders were installed upstream, to assess the hydrological response of different sub-catchments, characterized by distinct urban patterns and either limestone or sandstone lithologies. Annual runoff coefficients range between 14% and 22%. Changes in annual baseflow index (36-39% of annual rainfall) have been small with urbanization (from 34% to 40%) during the monitoring period itself. Annual runoff coefficients were lowest (14-7%) on catchments >80% woodland and highest (29% on sandstone; 18% on limestone) in the most urbanized (49-53% urban) sub

  9. Three-dimensional flow structure and patterns of bed shear stress in an evolving compound meander bend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, Frank; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Compound meander bends with multiple lobes of maximum curvature are common in actively evolving lowland rivers. Interaction among spatial patterns of mean flow, turbulence, bed morphology, bank failures and channel migration in compound bends is poorly understood. In this paper, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of the three-dimensional (3D) flow velocities in a compound bend are examined to evaluate the influence of channel curvature and hydrologic variability on the structure of flow within the bend. Flow structure at various flow stages is related to changes in bed morphology over the study timeframe. Increases in local curvature within the upstream lobe of the bend reduce outer bank velocities at morphologically significant flows, creating a region that protects the bank from high momentum flow and high bed shear stresses. The dimensionless radius of curvature in the upstream lobe is one-third less than that of the downstream lobe, with average bank erosion rates less than half of the erosion rates for the downstream lobe. Higher bank erosion rates within the downstream lobe correspond to the shift in a core of high velocity and bed shear stresses toward the outer bank as flow moves through the two lobes. These erosion patterns provide a mechanism for continued migration of the downstream lobe in the near future. Bed material size distributions within the bend correspond to spatial patterns of bed shear stress magnitudes, indicating that bed material sorting within the bend is governed by bed shear stress. Results suggest that patterns of flow, sediment entrainment, and planform evolution in compound meander bends are more complex than in simple meander bends. Moreover, interactions among local influences on the flow, such as woody debris, local topographic steering, and locally high curvature, tend to cause compound bends to evolve toward increasing planform complexity over time rather than stable configurations.

  10. Characterization of aggregate load and pattern in living yeast cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Itahisa Hernández; Fleming, Thomas; Eckstein, Volker; Herzig, Stephan; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is both a hallmark of and a driving force for a number of diseases. It is therefore important to identify the nature of these aggregates and the mechanism(s) by which the cell counteracts their detrimental properties. Currently, the study of aggregation in vivo is performed primarily using fluorescently tagged versions of proteins and analyzing the aggregates by fluorescence microscopy. While this strategy is considered the gold standard, it has several limitations, particularly with respect to its suitability for high-throughput screening (HTS). Here, using a GFP fusion of the well-characterized yeast prion amyloid protein [PSI+], we demonstrate that flow cytometry, which utilizes the same physical principles as fluorescence microscopy, can be used to determine the aggregate load and pattern in live and fixed yeast cells. Furthermore, our approach can easily be applied to high-throughput analyses such as screenings with a yeast deletion library. PMID:27625208

  11. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2016-08-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  12. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels.

  13. Altered Diastolic Flow Patterns and Kinetic Energy in Subtle Left Ventricular Remodeling and Dysfunction Detected by 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Alexandru; Eriksson, Jonatan; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Ebbers, Tino; Bolger, Ann F.; Engvall, Jan; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aims 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows quantitative assessment of left ventricular (LV) function according to characteristics of the dynamic flow in the chamber. Marked abnormalities in flow components’ volume and kinetic energy (KE) have previously been demonstrated in moderately dilated and depressed LV’s compared to healthy subjects. We hypothesized that these 4D flow-based measures would detect even subtle LV dysfunction and remodeling. Methods and Results We acquired 4D flow and morphological MRI data from 26 patients with chronic ischemic heart disease with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I and II and with no to mild LV systolic dysfunction and remodeling, and from 10 healthy controls. A previously validated method was used to separate the LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) into functional components: direct flow, which passes directly to ejection, and non-ejecting flow, which remains in the LV for at least 1 cycle. The direct flow and non-ejecting flow proportions of end-diastolic volume and KE were assessed. The proportions of direct flow volume and KE fell with increasing LVEDV-index (LVEDVI) and LVESV-index (LVESVI) (direct flow volume r = -0.64 and r = -0.74, both P<0.001; direct flow KE r = -0.48, P = 0.013, and r = -0.56, P = 0.003). The proportions of non-ejecting flow volume and KE rose with increasing LVEDVI and LVESVI (non-ejecting flow volume: r = 0.67 and r = 0.76, both P<0.001; non-ejecting flow KE: r = 0.53, P = 0.005 and r = 0.52, P = 0.006). The proportion of direct flow volume correlated moderately to LVEF (r = 0.68, P < 0.001) and was higher in a sub-group of patients with LVEDVI >74 ml/m2 compared to patients with LVEDVI <74 ml/m2 and controls (both P<0.05). Conclusion Direct flow volume and KE proportions diminish with increased LV volumes, while non-ejecting flow proportions increase. A decrease in direct flow volume and KE at end-diastole proposes that alterations in these novel 4D flow-specific markers may detect

  14. Basket pattern blood flow signals discovered in a case of splenic hamartoma by power Doppler ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Shigeo; Shiraki, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Kouji; Nakano, Takeshi; Koyama, Mutsumi; Yano, Takatsugu; Sanda, Takayuki; Tamaki, Hisao; Hirano, Tadanori; Fukudome, Kazuo; Ishihara, Akinori

    2005-01-01

    We present the gray-scale ultrasonography (GSUS), power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS), abdominal computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for a case of splenic hamartoma in a 27-year-old man, showing a φ 50 mm homogeneous, iso- and hypo-echoic splenic mass with evidence of a small plural cystic lesion. This splenic hamartoma showed increased vascularity on power Doppler sonograms. PDUS showed multiple circular blood flow signals inside the mass (i.e. a basket pattern), which was consistent with the small plural cystic lesion shown by GSUS. Spectral analysis also confirmed arterial and venous flow. CT scans showed that the mass had low-density relative to the normal spleen and MRI showed that the mass was isodense, relative to the normal spleen. Therefore, CT and MRI are not useful for the diagnosis of splenic hamartoma. Ultrasonography can be used to diagnose splenic hamartoma without administration of a contrast material and therefore is an indispensable method for the diagnosis of splenic hamartoma. PMID:16127761

  15. Phosphorus Flow Patterns in the Chaohu Watershed from 1978 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Songyan; Yuan, Zengwei

    2015-12-15

    Understanding historical patterns of phosphorus (P) cycling is critical for sustainable P management and eutrophication mitigation in watersheds. This study built a bottom-up model using the substance flow analysis approach to quantify P cycling in the Chaohu watershed during 1978-2012. We found that P flows have been intensified, with a 5-fold increase of annual P inputs to sustain the expanding intensive agriculture. Annually, most P inputs (75%) were stored within the watershed, which caused accelerating buildup of legacy P in cultivated land (from 4.9 Gg to 6.5 × 10(2) Gg), uncultivated land (from 2.1 Gg to 1.3 × 10(2) Gg) and surface water (from 3.7 Gg to 2.6 × 10(2) Gg) during 1978-2012. The main legacy P sources include fertilizer application for cultivated land, phosphogypsum abandonment for uncultivated land, respectively. The animal husbandry contributed about 63-66% of total P inputs to surface water. The contribution of animal food-P increased greatly during 1978-2012, from 7% to 24% and from 1% to 8% for urban and rural residents, respectively. This work demonstrates principle for the buildup of legacy P at the watershed-scale, and advances the knowledge of sustainable P management, such as improving agricultural technologies to reduce fertilizer application.

  16. Phosphorus Flow Patterns in the Chaohu Watershed from 1978 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Songyan; Yuan, Zengwei

    2015-12-15

    Understanding historical patterns of phosphorus (P) cycling is critical for sustainable P management and eutrophication mitigation in watersheds. This study built a bottom-up model using the substance flow analysis approach to quantify P cycling in the Chaohu watershed during 1978-2012. We found that P flows have been intensified, with a 5-fold increase of annual P inputs to sustain the expanding intensive agriculture. Annually, most P inputs (75%) were stored within the watershed, which caused accelerating buildup of legacy P in cultivated land (from 4.9 Gg to 6.5 × 10(2) Gg), uncultivated land (from 2.1 Gg to 1.3 × 10(2) Gg) and surface water (from 3.7 Gg to 2.6 × 10(2) Gg) during 1978-2012. The main legacy P sources include fertilizer application for cultivated land, phosphogypsum abandonment for uncultivated land, respectively. The animal husbandry contributed about 63-66% of total P inputs to surface water. The contribution of animal food-P increased greatly during 1978-2012, from 7% to 24% and from 1% to 8% for urban and rural residents, respectively. This work demonstrates principle for the buildup of legacy P at the watershed-scale, and advances the knowledge of sustainable P management, such as improving agricultural technologies to reduce fertilizer application. PMID:26556468

  17. Flow cytometric leukocyte population patterns in brown bullhead from three Ohio rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Torsella, T.A.; Neiheisel, T.; Cormier, S.M.; Bercz, P.

    1994-12-31

    Brown bullhead (A. nebulosus) were collected from three Ohio rivers: Old Woman Creek (OWC), classified as clean, Cuyahoga (CR) and Black Rivers (BR), documented as polluted. Each river was sampled in April and September 1993. Patterns of leukocyte distribution (prepared via density gradient) by GSH content and oxidative burst capacity, using fluorescent probes were determined by flow cytometry. Sample processing was in blind coded batches. Three principal classes of leukocytes were identified. Type A; large, very granular with high GSH reserves and marked capacity for oxidative burst. Type B were smaller, less granular, contained low GSH and negligible oxidative burst capacity. Type C were small, less granular, possessing intermediate GSH and peroxidative activity. ANOVA of the subset distributions and mean fluorescent intensities by sex, site and season, disclosed: Type C were significantly (p < 0.001) elevated in the spring OWC males, whereas type A dominated in the spring CR and spring BR males. No differences in Type A/Type C patterns were seen in the spring females. In the fall sampling, significant dominance (p < 0.001) of Type A was seen in both sexes of the OWC fish, the CR and BR fish showed a predominance of Type C. These may be explained by chemical stressors, affecting immune competence. Sex differences in the spring were attributed to hormonal (spawning) influences.

  18. Swarming in viscous fluids: three-dimensional patterns in swimmer- and force-induced flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; D'Orsogna, Maria R.; Chou, Tom

    Mathematical models of self-propelled interacting particles have reproduced various fascinating ``swarming'' patterns observed in natural and artificial systems. The formulation of such models usually ignores the influence of the surrounding medium in which the particles swarm. Here we develop from first principles a three-dimensional theory of swarming particles in a viscous fluid environment and investigate how the hydrodynamic coupling among the particles may affect their collective behavior. Specifically, we examine the hydrodynamic coupling among self-propelled particles interacting through ``social'' or ``mechanical'' forces. We discover that new patterns arise as a consequence of different interactions and self-propulsion mechanisms. Examples include flocks with prolate or oblate shapes, intermittent mills, recirculating peloton-like structures, and jet-like fluid flows that kinetically destabilize mill-like structures. Our results reveal possible mechanisms for three-dimensional swarms to kinetically control their collective behaviors in fluids. Supported by NSF DMS 1021818 & 1021850, ARO W1911NF-14-1-0472, ARO MURI W1911NF-11-10332.

  19. Oncocytic tumours of the salivary gland, kidney, and thyroid: nuclear DNA patterns studied by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, L M; Farrow, G M; Hay, I D; Lieber, M M

    1986-06-01

    Nuclear DNA ploidy studies were performed by flow cytometry on extracted nuclei from 12 oncocytic tumours of the salivary gland, 65 oncocytic tumours of the kidney, and 37 oncocytic tumours of the thyroid gland from the pathology archives of the Mayo Clinic. In order to provide an interesting clinical spectrum, three different classes of well-differentiated oncocytic tumours were selected for examination. Salivary gland oncocytic tumours were chosen for their generally benign behaviour. Oncocytic thyroid cancers exhibiting malignant potential because of local invasion, were thought to represent the opposite extreme of aggressiveness. Renal oncocytic tumours were known to demonstrate an intermediate degree of malignancy. All of the oncocytic salivary gland tumours showed a 'normal' DNA histogram and had a benign clinical course. For the oncocytic tumours of the kidney, 45% of DNA histograms were normal, 40% exhibited a significant increase in the DNA tetraploid/polyploid (4C) peak, and 15% showed a DNA aneuploid peak. Three patients with a DNA tetraploid pattern developed tumour metastasis and two have died from metastatic renal cancer. Among the oncocytic thyroid cancers, 27% were normal, 22% exhibited an increased DNA tetraploid peak, and 51% had a distinct DNA aneuploid peak. None of the thyroid tumour patients with a normal DNA pattern or with an increased DNA tetraploid peak died as a result of thyroid malignancy. In contrast, 58% of patients whose thyroid tumours showed a DNA aneuploid peak subsequently died from thyroid cancer.

  20. The study of epigenetic mechanisms based on the analysis of histone modification patterns by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Watson, Maria; Chow, Sue; Barsyte, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Shankey, T Vincent; Minden, Mark; Hedley, David

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of genes involved in cell growth, survival, or differentiation through histone modifications is an important determinant of cancer development and outcome. The basic science of epigenetics uses analytical tools that, although powerful, are not well suited to the analysis of heterogeneous cell populations found in human cancers, or for monitoring the effects of drugs designed to modulate epigenetic mechanisms in patients. To address this, we selected three clinically relevant histone marks (H3K27me3, H3K9ac, and H3K9me2), modulated their expression levels by in vitro treatments to generate high and low expressing control cells, and tested the relative sensitivity of candidate antibodies to detect the differences in expression levels by flow cytoametry using a range of sample preparation techniques. We identified monoclonal antibodies to all three histone marks that were suitable for flow cytoametry. Staining intensities were reduced with increasing formaldehyde concentration, and were not affected by ionic strength or by alcohol treatment. A protocol suitable for clinical samples was then developed, to allow combined labeling of histone marks and surface antigens while preserving light scatter signals. This was applied to normal donor blood, and to samples obtained from 25 patients with leukemia (predominantly acute myeloid leukemia). Significant cellular heterogeneity in H3K9ac and H3K27me3 staining was seen in normal peripheral blood, but the patterns were very similar between individual donors. In contrast, H3K27me3 in particular showed considerable inter-patient heterogeneity in the leukemia cell populations. Although further refinements are likely needed to fully optimize sample staining protocols, "flow epigenetics" appears to be technically feasible, and to have potential both in basic research, and in clinical application. PMID:24038859

  1. Finite element analysis of current flowing patterns and AC loss in the multifilament strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wurui; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic current flow and field distribution scheme under the imposed low current injection and the applied weak field is meaningful to interpret Ic degradation and AC loss in a strand that performs as a normal composite conductor. A 2D finite element (FE) transport model is built in COMSOL to identify the various transverse resistance components and reveal the interrelation among them. Then the transverse resistivity components are taken as the basic electrical components in a 3D composite strand model. The 3D model follows the realistic trajectories of twisted filaments in strand composite and experimental material properties. To address the potential/current map in the stationary transport, the FE model is thoroughly analyzed for the short-sample and long-sample strand, imposed by two in-plane steady current injections and a potential boundary condition at one strand end with the other end grounded, respectively. The results show that the short-sample longitudinal current is uniform with little resistivity loss, and flows from the positive source and converges to the negative one in the cross section with different paths and current proportions between filaments and matrix. However, for the long-sample, there is a serious reduction in electric potential along the strand axis and the currents mostly concentrate on filaments. The time-varying problem is also implemented by computing AC loss induced by a relatively far-away alternating line current. It is discussed where appropriate that the effect of the twist pitch and contact resistivity on the pattern and magnitude of the current flow and AC loss.

  2. Synoptic flow patterns and decadal variations of wind-induced mixing over western Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratton, Sean D.; Colle, Brian A.; Wilson, Robert E.

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the large-scale atmospheric flow patterns that favor mixing events within western Long Island Sound (wLIS) and how interannual and interdecadal variations in surface winds relate to bottom dissolved oxygen (DOb) variability. DOb data from the wLIS Coastal Observing System buoy were used in conjunction with the surface winds at La Guardia Airport and National Buoy Data Center buoy to identify criteria for water column ventilation and mixing from June to September. It is shown that mixing for a 36 h period after onset is favored when a majority of the surface wind observations for a day (starting at 00 UTC) are from 30° to 110° (NE to ESE) and ≥ 4 m s-1. This criterion was used to develop a synoptic climatology and the trend in potential mixing events from 1950 to 2009. These mixing events were categorized based on three synoptic patterns: high pressure, low pressure, and a hybrid high and low. High-pressure patterns, which include a hybrid system with a high building from the north/west and low to the south, result in the largest percentage of potential mixing events (76.9%). The number of potential mixing events increases from the 1950s to 1990s (full season and July-August) primarily from an increasing number of high-pressure systems; however, the seasonal DOb decreased during this period. There was a slight decrease in the number of July-August potential mixing events from 1990 to 2009, mainly from a decrease in the number of low-pressure systems.

  3. Radial patterns of sap flow in woody stems of dominant and understory species: scaling errors associated with positioning of sensors.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Cermák, Jan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2002-09-01

    We studied sap flow in dominant coniferous (Pinus sylvestris L.) and broadleaf (Populus canescens L.) species and in understory species (Prunus serotina Ehrh. and Rhododendron ponticum L.) by the heat field deformation (HFD) method. We attempted to identify possible errors arising during flow integration and scaling from single-point measurements to whole trees. Large systematic errors of -90 to 300% were found when it was assumed that sap flow was uniform over the sapwood depth. Therefore, we recommend that the radial sap flow pattern should be determined first using sensors with multiple measuring points along a stem radius followed by single-point measurements with sensors placed at a predetermined depth. Other significant errors occurred in the scaling procedure even when the sap flow radial pattern was known. These included errors associated with uncertainties in the positioning of sensors beneath the cambium (up to 15% per 1 mm error in estimated xylem depth), and differences in environmental conditions when the radial profile applied for integration was determined over the short term (up to 47% error). High temporal variation in the point-to-area correction factor along the xylem radius used for flow integration is also problematic. Compared with midday measurements, measurements of radial variation of sap flow in the morning and evening of sunny days minimized the influence of temporal variations on the point-to-area correction factor, which was especially pronounced in trees with a highly asymmetric sap flow radial pattern because of differences in functioning of the sapwood xylem layers. Positioning a single-point sensor at a depth with maximum sap flow is advantageous because of the high sensitivity of maximum sap flow to water stress conditions and changes in micro-climate, and because of the lower random errors associated with the positioning of a single-point sensor along the xylem radius. PMID:12204847

  4. Impact of surgical shape on blood flow pattern for patient specific coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    We present a numerical framework for studying blood flow patterns in patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass surgeries. We use a stabilized finite element framework for performing blood flow simulations. Specialized lumped parameter boundary conditions for the coronary arteries, aorta and its branches are utilized. Computational models of CABG patients are constructed from CT scan images. A comprehensive study of how surgical shape affects hemodynamics in patient-specific CABG surgery has not been performed till date. The objective of this work is to study the effect of surgical geometry on blood flow pattern, especially downstream and in the proximity of the suture locations of the bypass graft. Quantities such as energy efficiency, wall shear stresses and its gradients and oscillatory shear index are extracted and compared for different surgical shapes in a systematic fashion. A framework and results for robust optimization of bypass graft anastomoses in unsteady flow will be presented. Implications of surgical geometry on graft patency will be discussed.

  5. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  6. An experimental investigation of flow patterns and liquid entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, John Steven

    An experimental study of two-phase flow patterns and droplet entrainment in a horizontal-tube evaporator was conducted. Measurements were made with serpentine aluminum and glass evaporators with geometries typical of those used for domestic refrigeration. The refrigerant in the majority of tests was R134a, which will replace R12 for refrigeration and automotive air-conditioning in 1995. The phenomenon of primary interest was the nonequilibrium transport of droplets within superheated vapor at the evaporator exit. Of particular concern were substantial variations in the liquid rate with time, and corresponding fluctuations in exit temperature. These variations are due to the formation of slugs which rapidly transport a surplus of liquid toward the exit. A flow loop was constructed to circulate oil-free refrigerant through the evaporator under widely varying conditions. Liquid carry over (expressed as a dimensionless entrained mass fraction, EMF) was measured as a function of inlet quality, heat flux, mass flux, and exit superheat. A laser-based phase/Doppler particle analyzer was used to measure droplet diameters and velocities at the evaporator exit. Tests with three refrigerants over wide ranges of operating conditions revealed time-averaged EMF's of no more than 0.1 percent. Analysis of variance showed exit superheat to have the strongest effect, followed by mass flux, inlet quality, and heat flux. Time-averaged EMF's varied with operating conditions by several orders of magnitude, decreasing with increasing superheat level (due to lower entrainment rates near the exit and more rapid droplet vaporization) and mass flux and inlet quality (due to reduced slug formation). The incidence of slug flow and its effect on evaporator exit conditions were documented in time-resolved experiments, using techniques such as auto- and cross-correlation and Fourier transform. Time-resolved EMF's as high as one percent were observed, as well as sharp reductions in exit superheat

  7. High-reproducibility, flexible conductive patterns fabricated with silver nanowire by drop or fit-to-flow method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An unusual strategy was designed to fabricate conductive patterns with high reproducibility for flexible electronics by drop or fit-to-flow method. Silver nanowire (SNW) ink with surface tension of 36.9 mN/m and viscosity of 13.8 mPa s at 20°C was prepared and characterized using a field emission transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analyzer, scanning electron microscope, and four-point probe. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern as template was fabricated by spin coating (500 rpm), baking at 80°C for 3 h, and laser cutting. The prepared SNW ink can flow along the trench of the PDMS pattern spontaneously, especially after plasma treatment with oxygen, and show a low resistivity of 12.9 μΩ cm after sintering at 125°C for 30 min. In addition, an antenna pattern was also prepared to prove the feasibility of the approach. PMID:23537333

  8. Understanding thermo-fluidic characteristics of a glass tube closed loop pulsating heat pipe: flow patterns and fluid oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, V. K.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Brusly Solomon, A.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental program has been carried out to understand the thermo-fluidic characterization of deionized (DI) water charged closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with flow patterns and fluid oscillations. The CLPHP is examined under vertical and horizontal heating modes with varying heat power. The flow patterns along with fluid oscillations are correlated with thermal performance of the CLPHP. Further, the CLPHP with copper oxide nanofluid study is carried out to understand operational behavior of the device. Fast Fourier frequencies, average frequency of the internal fluid temperature are investigated. Several important features of CLPHP operation are identified by the visual study.

  9. Winds, Waves, Tides, and the Resulting Flow Patterns and Fluxes of Water, Sediment, and Coral Larvae off West Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Field, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    A series of recent studies has focused on the flow patterns and particle fluxes along the coast of West Maui, Hawaii, USA, from Honolua south to Puumana. From those studies a relatively good understanding has emerged of the physical processes that influence the relative amount of suspended sediment in nearshore waters and the circulation patterns that transport sediment and coral larvae along the coast and between islands. This report is a synthesis of our existing knowledge on the nature of flow and transport off West Maui.

  10. Pore Scale and Continuum Modeling for Gas Flow Pattern obtained by Multi-Scale Optical Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazik, D.; Samani, S.; Geistlinger, H.

    2008-12-01

    A multi-scale optical imaging technique was developed allowing for the 2D observation of two phase flow in porous media at two different scales simultaneously: Using two coupled camera systems a 2D flow cell (0.5 x 0.5 m²) is recorded entirely at the bench scale and at the pore scale with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm and 0.01 mm respectively. The technique is applied to study channelized gas flow in saturated 0.5mm glass beads. We analyze the phase distribution at the pore scale and derive a pixel-based method for the measurement of saturation at the larger scale. Pore-Scale-Models: Both a grain-size- and flow rate-dependent transition are observed in the gas flow pattern. Standard quasi-static criteria do not explain the experimental results, since they do not take into account the competition between stabilizing friction forces and destabilizing capillary and gravitational forces. Conceptualizing the steady state tortuous gas flow as core-annular flow and applying Hagen-Poiseuille flow for a straight capillary, we propose a flow rate and grain-size-dependent stability criterion (coherence condition) that accounts for the experimental results. Continuum Scale Models: The main objective of this paper is to test the validity of the continuum approach for two-fluid flow for macroscopic homogeneous media. Using a reasonable log-normal distribution of capillary radii that led to a matrix potential that fits the experimental steady-state capillary pressure, the continuum model (TOUGH2) was able to describe the functional form of the dynamical gas volume, an integral flow property, as a function of the flow rate for the 0.5mm glass beads. On the other hand, the continuum model fails to describe the spatial-temporal distribution of the gas flow. For the first time, we were able to quantify the plateau-like gas distribution using optical tomography. This result is in strong contradiction to the Gaussian-like distribution obtained from the continuum model. Both

  11. Classification of Unsteady Flow Patterns in a Rotodynamic Blood Pump: Introduction of Non-Dimensional Regime Map.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Brackett, Jaclyn; Antaki, James F

    2015-09-01

    Rotodynamic blood pumps (also known as rotary or continuous flow blood pumps) are commonly evaluated in vitro under steady flow conditions. However, when these devices are used clinically as ventricular assist devices (VADs), the flow is pulsatile due to the contribution of the native heart. This study investigated the influence of this unsteady flow upon the internal hemodynamics of a centrifugal blood pump. The flow field within the median axial plane of the flow path was visualized with particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a transparent replica of the Levacor VAD. The replica was inserted in a dynamic cardiovascular simulator that synchronized the image acquisition to the cardiac cycle. As compared to steady flow, pulsatile conditions produced periodic, transient recirculation regions within the impeller and separation in the outlet diffuser. Dimensional analysis revealed that the flow characteristics could be uniquely described by the non-dimensional flow coefficient (Φ) and its time derivative ([Formula: see text]), thereby eliminating impeller speed from the experimental matrix. Four regimes within the Φ-[Formula: see text] plane were found to classify the flow patterns, well-attached or disturbed. These results and methods can be generalized to provide insights for both design and operation of rotodynamic blood pumps for safety and efficacy. PMID:26577357

  12. Interpreting the spatio-temporal patterns of sea turtle strandings: Going with the flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; Mooreside, P.; Crowder, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of specific mortality sources is crucial for management of species that are vulnerable to human interactions. Beachcast carcasses represent an unknown fraction of at-sea mortalities. While a variety of physical (e.g., water temperature) and biological (e.g., decomposition) factors as well as the distribution of animals and their mortality sources likely affect the probability of carcass stranding, physical oceanography plays a major role in where and when carcasses strand. Here, we evaluate the influence of nearshore physical oceanographic and wind regimes on sea turtle strandings to decipher seasonal trends and make qualitative predictions about stranding patterns along oceanfront beaches. We use results from oceanic drift-bottle experiments to check our predictions and provide an upper limit on stranding proportions. We compare predicted current regimes from a 3D physical oceanographic model to spatial and temporal locations of both sea turtle carcass strandings and drift bottle landfalls. Drift bottle return rates suggest an upper limit for the proportion of sea turtle carcasses that strand (about 20%). In the South Atlantic Bight, seasonal development of along-shelf flow coincides with increased numbers of strandings of both turtles and drift bottles in late spring and early summer. The model also predicts net offshore flow of surface waters during winter - the season with the fewest relative strandings. The drift bottle data provide a reasonable upper bound on how likely carcasses are to reach land from points offshore and bound the general timeframe for stranding post-mortem (< two weeks). Our findings suggest that marine turtle strandings follow a seasonal regime predictable from physical oceanography and mimicked by drift bottle experiments. Managers can use these findings to reevaluate incidental strandings limits and fishery takes for both nearshore and offshore mortality sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd

  13. Using Groundwater Temperatures and Heat Flow Patterns to Assess Groundwater Flow in Snake Valley, Nevada and Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masbruch, M. D.; Chapman, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s (SNWA) proposal to develop groundwater resources in Snake Valley and adjacent basins in eastern Nevada has focused attention on understanding the links between basin-fill and carbonate aquifer systems, groundwater flow paths, and the movement of groundwater between basins. The SNWA development plans are contentious in part because (1) there are few perennial streams that flow into the basins and these surface-water resources are fully appropriated; (2) groundwater resources that sustain streams, springs, wetlands, and the local agricultural economy are also limited; and (3) because Snake Valley straddles the Utah-Nevada state line. We report groundwater temperatures and estimates of heat flow used to constrain estimates of groundwater flow into and through Snake Valley. Thermal logs have been collected from 24 monitoring wells in the Utah part of the valley. Natural, undisturbed geothermal gradients within the Basin and Range are generally 30 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 90 mW/m2. Geothermal gradients in the southern portion of Snake Valley are lower than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with the majority ranging between 10 and 20 °C/km, corresponding to heat flow values of 30 to 60 mW/m2. In the northern portion of the basin, however, geothermal gradients are generally higher than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with thermal logs of two wells indicating gradients of 39 °C/km and 51 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 117 and 153 mW/m2, respectively. These observations suggest heat is being redistributed by groundwater flow to discharge points in northern Snake Valley. This interpretation is also supported by spring temperatures in northern Snake Valley and at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge to the northeast that are higher than ambient (12 °C) surface temperature. These thermal data are being used together with water levels and

  14. Thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal mineral-fluid equilibria in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-H-O-Cl at elevated temperatures and pressures: Implications for hydrothermal mass transfer in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-H-O-Cl using the GEM-Selektor Gibbs free energy minimization code. Combination of non-ideal mixing properties in solids with multicomponent aqueous fluids represents a substantial improvement and it provides increased accuracy over existing modeling strategies. Application to the 10-component system allows us to link fluid composition and speciation with whole-rock mineralogy, mass and volume changes. We have simulated granite-fluid interaction over a wide range of conditions (200-600 °C, 100 MPa, 0-5 m Cl and fluid/rock ratios of 10-2-104) in order to explore composition of magmatic fluids of variable salinity, temperature effects on fluid composition and speciation and to simulate several paths of alteration zoning. At low fluid/rock ratios (f/r) the fluid composition is buffered by the silicate-oxide assemblage and remains close to invariant. This behavior extends to a f/r of 0.1 which exceeds the amount of exsolved magmatic fluids controlled by water solubility in silicate melts. With increasing peraluminosity of the parental granite, the Na-, K- and Fe-bearing fluids become more acidic and the oxidation state increases as a consequence of hydrogen and ferrous iron transfer to the fluid. With decreasing temperature, saline fluids become more Ca- and Na-rich, change from weakly acidic to alkaline, and become significantly more oxidizing. Large variations in Ca/Fe and Ca/Mg ratios in the fluid are a potential geothermometer. The mineral assemblage changes from cordierite-biotite granites through two-mica granites to chlorite-, epidote- and zeolite-bearing rocks. We have carried out three rock-titration simulations: (1) reaction with the 2 m NaCl fluid leads to albitization, chloritization and desilication, reproducing essential features observed in episyenites, (2) infiltration of a high-temperature fluid into the granite at 400 °C leads to hydrolytic

  15. Gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern identification by ultrasonic echoes reflected from the inner wall of a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fachun; Zheng, Hongfeng; Yu, Hao; Sun, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel ultrasonic pulse echo method is proposed for flow pattern identification in a horizontal pipe with gas-liquid two-phase flow. A trace of echoes reflected from the pipe’s internal wall rather than the gas-liquid interface is used for flow pattern identification. Experiments were conducted in a horizontal air-water two-phase flow loop. Two ultrasonic transducers with central frequency of 5 MHz were mounted at the top and bottom of the pipe respectively. The experimental results show that the ultrasonic reflection coefficient of the wall-gas interface is much larger than that of the wall-liquid interface due to the large difference in the acoustic impedance of gas and liquid. The stratified flow, annular flow and slug flow can be successfully recognized using the attenuation ratio of the echoes. Compared with the conventional ultrasonic echo measurement method, echoes reflected from the inner surface of a pipe wall are independent of gas-liquid interface fluctuation, sound speed, and gas and liquid superficial velocities, which makes the method presented a promising technique in field practice.

  16. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  17. Effect of myocardial anisotropy on the torso current flow patterns, potentials and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ramon, C; Wang, Y; Haueisen, J; Schimpf, P; Jaruvatanadilok, S; Ishimaru, A

    2000-05-01

    The effects of myocardial anisotropy on the torso current flow patterns, voltage and the magnetic field were examined using an anatomically realistic torso model of an adult male subject. A finite element model of the torso was built with 19 major tissue types identified. The myocardial fibre orientation in the heart wall was included with a voxel resolution of 0.078 x 0.078 x 0.3 cm. The fibre orientations from the canine heart which are available in the literature were mapped to our adult male subject's human heart using deformable mapping techniques. The current and potential distribution in the whole torso were computed using an idealized dipolar source of +/-1.0 V in the middle of the septum of the heart wall as a boundary condition. An adaptive finite element solver was used. Two cases were studied. In one case the myocardium was isotropic and in the other it was anisotropic. It was found that the current density distribution shows a very noticeable difference between the isotropic and anisotropic myocardium. The resultant magnetic field in front of the torso was computed using the Biot-Savart law. It was found that the magnetic field profile was slightly affected by the myocardial anisotropy. The potential on the torso surface also shows noticeable changes due to the myocardial anisotropy. PMID:10843096

  18. A test of the influence of continental axes of orientation on patterns of human gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2011-12-01

    The geographic distribution of genetic variation reflects trends in past population migrations and can be used to make inferences about these migrations. It has been proposed that the east-west orientation of the Eurasian landmass facilitated the rapid spread of ancient technological innovations across Eurasia, while the north-south orientation of the Americas led to a slower diffusion of technology there. If the diffusion of technology was accompanied by gene flow, then this hypothesis predicts that genetic differentiation in the Americas along lines of longitude will be greater than that in Eurasia along lines of latitude. We use 678 microsatellite loci from 68 indigenous populations in Eurasia and the Americas to investigate the spatial axes that underlie population-genetic variation. We find that genetic differentiation increases more rapidly along lines of longitude in the Americas than along lines of latitude in Eurasia. Distance along lines of latitude explains a sizeable portion of genetic distance in Eurasia, whereas distance along lines of longitude does not explain a large proportion of Eurasian genetic variation. Genetic differentiation in the Americas occurs along both latitudinal and longitudinal axes and has a greater magnitude than corresponding differentiation in Eurasia, even when adjusting for the lower level of genetic variation in the American populations. These results support the view that continental orientation has influenced migration patterns and has played an important role in determining both the structure of human genetic variation and the distribution and spread of cultural traits.

  19. Pressure distributions and oil-flow patterns for a swept circulation-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Wood, Norman J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure distributions and photographs of oil flow patterns are presented for a circulation control wing. The model was an aspect ratio four semispan wing mounted on the side wall of the NASA Ames Transonic Wind Tunnel. The airfoil was a 20 percent thick ellipse, modified with circular leading and trailing edges of 4 percent radius, and had a 25.4 cm constant chord. This configuration does not represent a specific wing design, but is generic. A full span, tangetial, rearward blowing, circulation control slot was incorporated ahead of the trailing edge on the upper surface. The wing was tested at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.75 at sweep angle of 0 to 45 deg with internal to external pressure ratios of 1.0 to 3.0. Lift and pitching momemt coefficients were obtained from measured pressure distributions at five span stations. When the conventional corrections resulting from sweep angle are applied to the lift and moment of circulation control sections, no additional corrections are necessary to account for changes in blowing efficiency. This is demonstrated for an aft sweep angle of 45 deg. An empirical technique for estimating the downwash distribution of a swept wing was validated.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Flow and Sediment Transport Patterns in Indian River Inlet, de, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtpoor, M.; Puleo, J. A.; Kraus, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Indian River Inlet (IRI), the only water way which connects the Atlantic Ocean to Delaware inland bays, plays an essential role in sediment exchange between the ocean and two bays. Complex and turbulent flow patterns inside the tidal channel during high and low tide cause large quantities of sediment to move through the inlet. During ebb a tidal jet with peak velocities sometimes nearing 5 m/s emerges from the inlet veering south assisting in the formation of a semi-lunar ebb shoal that can affect shoreline evolution. Within the inlet, two scour holes have deepened significantly over the last 20 years reaching depths of 30m compared to the roughly 8-10 m depth of the channel. The scour holes presently threaten in-water piers that support a bridge across the inlet. It is believed the scour holes are a result of large-scale vertical motions initiated over a bathymetric high directly underneath the bridge and eddy shedding off the bridge piers themselves. In this study, the Coastal Modeling System (CMS) is used to simulate the 2D depth-averaged motion within the inlet-bay system. CMS includes sediment transport predictions based on advection-diffusion equations and subsequent morphological change. Preliminary results will include hydrodynamic simulations before and after scour hole growth and with and without the addition of wave forcing.

  1. Motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface: flow patterns and loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Lin, J.-C.; Unal, M. F.; Rockwell, D.

    The flow structure and loading due to combined translatory and sinusoidal motion of a cylinder adjacent to a free-surface are characterized using a cinema technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry and simultaneous force measurements. The instantaneous patterns of vorticity and streamline topology are interpreted as a function of degree of submergence beneath the free-surface. The relative magnitudes of the peak vorticity and the circulation of vortices formed from the upper and lower surfaces of the cylinder, as well as vortex formation from the free-surface, are remarkably affected by the nominal submergence. The corresponding streamline topology, interpreted in terms of foci, saddle points, and multiple separation and reattachment points also exhibit substantial changes with submergence. All of these features affect the instantaneous loading of the cylinder. Calculation of instantaneous moments of vorticity and the incremental changes in these moments during the cylinder motion allow identification of those vortices that contribute most substantially to the instantaneous lift and drag. Furthermore, the calculated moments are in general accord with the time integrals of the measured lift and drag acting on the cylinder for sufficiently large submergence.

  2. Source Water Flow Pathways In Forested, Mountain, Headwater Streams: A Link Between Sediment Movement Patterns And Stream Water Chemistry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Liu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Three years of continuous and discrete sediment and water quality data, from four forested, mountain, headwater catchments in the Sierra Nevada, is used to identify water sources, determine the importance of sub-surface flow pathways, detect any changes in source waters due to seasonal variation or drought, and link flow pathways with observed patterns of in-channel sediment movement within the study watersheds. Patterns in stream chemistry and turbidity point to infiltration as the dominant flow pathway within these catchments. Data support a flow pathway conceptual model in which precipitation water infiltrates into the shallow or deeper subsurface, increasing the hydraulic head of the water table and pushing pre-event water into the stream ahead of event water. Study catchments contain perennial streams and are characterized by a Mediterranean climate with a distinct wet and dry season. Sites are located in the rain-snow transition zone with snow making up 40 to 60 percent of average annual precipitation. Barring human disturbances such as logging/grazing (compaction) or fire (hydrophobicity), catchment soils have high infiltration capacities. Springs and seeps maintain baseflow during the summer low-flow season, and shifting chemical signals within the streams indicate the increased importance of sub-surface water sources during drought years. End-member mixing analysis was conducted to identify possible water end members. Turbidity hysteresis patterns described by previous studies show in-channel sources are dominant for discharge events year round, and there is no difference in fine sediment delivery to streams with or without a soil protecting layer of snow on the land surface. The dominance of sub-surface water sources and evidence for infiltration flow fits with turbidity data, as little material is reaching the stream due to erosive overland flow. An understanding of flow pathways provides a foundation for sustainable land use management in forested

  3. Interfacial-tension-force model for the wavy stratified liquid-liquid flow pattern transition: The usage of two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Marcelo Souza; Rodriguez, Oscar Mauricio Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    The study of the hydrodynamic stability of flow patterns is important in the design of equipment and pipelines for multiphase flows. The maintenance of a particular flow pattern becomes important in many applications, e.g., stratified flow pattern in heavy oil production avoiding the formation of emulsions because of the separation of phases and annular flow pattern in heat exchangers which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Flow maps are drawn to orientate engineers which flow pattern is present in a pipeline, for example. The ways how these flow maps are drawn have changed from totally experimental work, to phenomenological models, and then to stability analysis theories. In this work an experimental liquid-liquid flow map, with water and viscous oil as work fluids, drawn via subjective approach with high speed camera was used to compare to approaches of the same theory: the interfacial-tension-force model. This theory was used to drawn the wavy stratified flow pattern transition boundary. This paper presents a comparison between the two approaches of the interfacial-tension-force model for transition boundaries of liquid-liquid flow patterns: (i) solving the wave equation for the wave speed and using average values for wave number and wave speed; and (ii) solving the same equation for the wave number and then using a correlation for the wave speed. The results show that the second approach presents better results.

  4. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  5. Strain-hardening extrusion—II. Analysis of slip-line fields based on experimental flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conning, S. W.; Farmer, L. E.; Oxley, P. L. B.

    1982-08-01

    A METHOD of constructing slip-line fields based on experimental extrusion flow patterns was described in a previous paper. Such fields provide a basis for constructing representative solutions of strain-hardening flow problems. In this paper, after proving some theoretical results on the structure of such solutions, a method of analyzing slip-line fields is described and some typical results presented. The analysis comprises computation of the velocity solution and construction from it of a set of streamlines for comparison with the original flow pattern; computation of the total strain by integration along the streamlines, its graduation and adjustment to meet the boundary conditions; estimation of the stress field (shear stress k and mean pressure p) and check for consistency; and computation of the forces on the boundary of the plastic region and their resultant.

  6. Design configurations affecting flow pattern and solids accumulation in horizontal free water and subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, A; Sidrach-Cardona, R; Sánchez, J C; Carretero, J; Garfi, M; Bécares, E

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different horizontal constructed wetland (CW) design parameters on solids distribution, loss of hydraulic conductivity over time and hydraulic behaviour, in order to assess clogging processes in wetlands. For this purpose, an experimental plant with eight CWs was built at mesocosm scale. Each CW presented a different design characteristic, and the most common CW configurations were all represented: free water surface flow (FWS) with different effluent pipe locations, FWS with floating macrophytes and subsurface flow (SSF), and the presence of plants and specific species (Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis) was also considered. The loss of the hydraulic conductivity of gravel was greatly influenced by the presence of plants and organic load (representing a loss of 20% and c.a. 10% in planted wetlands and an overloaded system, respectively). Cattail seems to have a greater effect on the development of clogging since its below-ground biomass weighed twice as much as that of common reed. Hydraulic behaviour was greatly influenced by the presence of a gravel matrix and the outlet pipe position. In strict SSF CW, the water was forced to cross the gravel and tended to flow diagonally from the top inlet to the bottom outlet (where the inlet and outlet pipes were located). However, when FWS was considered, water preferentially flowed above the gravel, thus losing half the effective volume of the system. Only the presence of plants seemed to help the water flow partially within the gravel matrix.

  7. A summary of measured hydraulic data for the series of steady and unsteady flow experiments over patterned roughness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Dannie L.; Flynn, Kathleen M.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes and makes available to other investigators the measured hydraulic data collected during a series of experiments designed to study the effect of patterned bed roughness on steady and unsteady open-channel flow. The patterned effect of the roughness was obtained by clear-cut mowing of designated areas of an otherwise fairly dense coverage of coastal Bermuda grass approximately 250 mm high. All experiments were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility during the period of October 7 through December 12, 1974. Data from 18 steady flow experiments and 10 unsteady flow experiments are summarized. Measured data included are ground-surface elevations, grass heights and densities, water-surface elevations and point velocities for all experiments. Additional tables of water-surface elevations and measured point velocities are included for the clear-cut areas for most experiments. One complete set of average water-surface elevations and one complete set of measured point velocities are tabulated for each steady flow experiment. Time series data, on a 2-minute time interval, are tabulated for both water-surface elevations and point velocities for each unsteady flow experiment. All data collected, including individual records of water-surface elevations for the steady flow experiments, have been stored on computer disk storage and can be retrieved using the computer programs listed in the attachment to this report. (Kosco-USGS)

  8. Experimental study on the flow patterns and the two-phase pressure drops in a horizontal impacting T-Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, C.; Malandrone, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-04-01

    The present paper analyzes the experimental results concerning the flow patterns and pressure drops in two-phase flow through a horizontal impacting T-junction, whose outlet pipes are aligned and perpendicular to the inlet pipe. The test section consists of plexiglass pipes with inner diameter of 10 mm. A mixture of water and air at ambient temperature and pressures up to 2.4 bar flows through the T-junction, with different splitting of flow rates in the two outlet branches; superficial velocities of air and water in the inlet pipe have been varied up to a maximum of 35 m/s and 3.5 m/s respectively. The flow patterns occurring in the inlet and branch pipes are compared with the predictions of the Baker and Taitel - Dukler maps. The pressure drops along the branches have been measured relatively to different splitting of the flow rate through the two branches and the pressure loss coefficients in the junction have been evaluated. Friction pressure drops have allowed us to evaluate two-phase friction multipliers, which have then been compared to the predictions of Lockhart-Martinelli, and Friedel correlations. Local pressure drops have been extrapolated at the junction centre and analyzed; the two-phase multiplier has been evaluated and compared with the predictions of Chisholm correlation; the value of the empirical coefficient that minimizes the discrepancy has also been evaluated.

  9. The global metabolic transition: Regional patterns and trends of global material flows, 1950–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schaffartzik, Anke; Mayer, Andreas; Gingrich, Simone; Eisenmenger, Nina; Loy, Christian; Krausmann, Fridolin

    2014-01-01

    Since the World War II, many economies have transitioned from an agrarian, biomass-based to an industrial, minerals-based metabolic regime. Since 1950, world population grew by factor 2.7 and global material consumption by factor 3.7–71 Gigatonnes per year in 2010. The expansion of the resource base required by human societies is associated with growing pressure on the environment and infringement on the habitats of other species. In order to achieve a sustainability transition, we require a better understanding of the currently ongoing metabolic transition and its potential inertia. In this article, we present a long-term global material flow dataset covering material extraction, trade, and consumption of 177 individual countries between 1950 and 2010. We trace patterns and trends in material flows for six major geographic and economic country groupings and world regions (Western Industrial, the (Former) Soviet Union and its allies, Asia, the Middle East and Northern Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa) as well as their contribution to the emergence of a global metabolic profile during a period of rapid industrialization and globalization. Global average material use increased from 5.0 to 10.3 tons per capita and year (t/cap/a) between 1950 and 2010. Regional metabolic rates range from 4.5 t/cap/a in Sub-Saharan Africa to 14.8 t/cap/a in the Western Industrial grouping. While we can observe a stabilization of the industrial metabolic profile composed of relatively equal shares of biomass, fossil energy carriers, and construction minerals, we note differences in the degree to which other regions are gravitating toward a similar form of material use. Since 2000, Asia has overtaken the Western Industrial grouping in terms of its share in global resource use although not in terms of its per capita material consumption. We find that at a sub-global level, the roles of the world regions have changed. There are, however, no signs yet

  10. Fluid Flow Patterns in a Submarine Volcano: Simulating the Hydrothermal Evolution of Brothers Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, G.; de Ronde, C. E.; Driesner, T.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Brothers volcano is part of the southern Kermadec intra-oceanic arc located northeast of New Zealand, and is one of the world’s best-studied active submarine volcanoes. It provides insight into the complex subseafloor hydrology of a submarine arc volcano with evidence for different stages in its magmatic-hydrothermal evolution [1]. The volcanic edifice comprises an elongated caldera surrounding an asymmetrically centered post-collapse cone. While hydrothermal venting at the NW caldera wall is focused and dates back to at least 1,200 years, hydrothermal discharge at the cone summit is diffuse and considered to be significantly younger. Recent studies of regional seismicity and local harmonic tremor at Brothers volcano imply the existence of a hydrothermal fluid reservoir underneath the area of the present cone [2]. Using a combined finite element - finite volume method, we have computed multi-phase mass and heat transport with a process simulation scheme based on realistic fluid properties. We have used correlations that describe phase stability relations in the binary NaCl-H2O system up to 1000°C [3]. Our earlier results of generic fluid flow simulations showed that water depth and seafloor topography, together with crustal permeability and the relative contributions of seawater and magmatic fluids, are first-order physical parameters controlling the fluid flow patterns and the style of hydrothermal venting. In our more recent simulations, we use available data from Brothers volcano, including detailed bathymetry, physical and chemical measurements from different vent sites and information on the size and location of the subseafloor magma chamber(s). The implementation of two distinct magmatic stages (i.e., pre-cone vs. post-cone) shows that the topography of the volcanic edifice, in combination with the location and size of an underlying magma chamber, play an important role in the style and evolution of the hydrothermal system. [1] de Ronde, C. E. J., et al

  11. [Isovolumic relaxation flow patterns evaluated by pulsed Doppler echocardiography: comparison with invasive parameters].

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, N; Nakamura, K; Kawahira, M; Sanada, J; Hashimoto, S

    1986-03-01

    Left ventricular relaxation property was evaluated by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. The indices obtained from Doppler signals within the left ventricle (LV) during the isovolumic relaxation period (IRF) were compared with the hemodynamic parameters obtained from cardiac catheterization studies. Subjects of this study were four patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, four with hypertensive heart disease, three with angina pectoris, and seven normal subjects. All of them had no wall motion abnormalities and their ejection fractions were more than 0.60. The three indices of IRF were the time interval from the start of IRF to the time immediately before the rapid filling flow (isovolumic relaxation time; IRT), the time interval from the start to the peak (acceleration time; AcT), and the slope from the start to the peak (acceleration rate; AcR). The peak pressure (peak P) was measured at the same time. The positive and negative deflections of the first derivative of left ventricular (LV) pressure (+dp/dt and -dp/dt) and the time constant of LV pressure fall (time constant T) were calculated from LV pressure using a micromanometer-tipped angiocatheter. The end-diastolic volume index (EDVI), end-systolic volume index (ESVI), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated from the LV angiogram. There were no significant correlations between the three IRF indices (IRT, AcT and AcR) and the hemodynamic parameters (peak P, EDVI, +dp/dt and -dp/dt). However, the time constant T, which is a good index of LV relaxation property and which is relatively free from afterload and preload, correlated well with IRT (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001), AcT (r = 0.60, p less than 0.01), and AcR (r = -0.66, p less than 0.01). It was concluded that the indices obtained from the blood flow patterns of the left ventricle during isovolumic relaxation were useful for estimating left ventricular relaxation property non-invasively and quantitatively.

  12. Colloid deposition on non-ideal porous media: The influences of collector shape and roughness on the single-collector efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiers, James E.; Ryan, J. N.

    2005-11-01

    The transport of groundwater colloids (e.g., bacteria, viruses, clay particles) is governed, in part, by the rate at which the colloids strike and adhere to aquifer mineral grains. We report results of coupled flow and transport simulations that reveal how changes in mineral-grain shape and surface roughness influence the single-collector contact efficiency (ηT) - a parameter of colloid-filtration theory that quantifies the frequency of colloid collisions with the surface of a mineral grain (collector). Our analyses indicate that the sensitivity of ηT to variations in collector shape and roughness depends on colloid size and suggests that quantitative descriptions of colloid transport through real aquifers will, in some cases, require nontraditional approaches that are not limited by the simplifying assumptions of smooth, spherical collectors.

  13. Augmented Lagrangian and penalty methods for the simulation of two-phase flows interacting with moving solids. Application to hydroplaning flows interacting with real tire tread patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Stéphane; Sarthou, Arthur; Caltagirone, Jean-Paul; Sonilhac, Fabien; Février, Pierre; Mignot, Christian; Pianet, Grégoire

    2011-02-01

    The numerical simulation of the interaction between a free surface flow and a moving obstacle is considered for the analysis of hydroplaning flows. A new augmented Lagrangian method, coupled to fictitious domains and penalty methods, is proposed for the simulation of multi-phase flows. The augmented Lagrangian parameter is estimated by an automatic analysis of the discretization matrix resulting from the approximation of the momentum equations. The algebraic automatic augmented Lagrangian 3AL approach is validated on the natural convection in a differentially heated cavity, a two-dimensional collapse of a water column, the three-dimensional settling of a particle in a tank and the falling of a dense cylinder in air. Finally, the 3AL method is utilized to simulate the hydroplaning of a tire under various pattern shape conditions.

  14. Physics and (patho)physiology in confined flows: from colloidal patterns to cytoplasmic rheology and sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss a few problems that involve the interaction of fluids and solids in confined spaces. (i) Jamming in pressure-driven suspension flows that show a transition from Stokes flows to Darcy flows as the solids start to lock, as in evaporative patterning in colloids (e.g. coffee stain formation) .(ii) Jamming and clogging of red blood cells, as in sickle-cell pathophysiology, with implications for other diseases that involve jamming. (iii) The mechanical response of crowded networks of filaments bathed in a fluid, as in the cytoskeleton, that can be described by poroelasticity theory. In each case, I will show how simple theories of multiphase flow and deformation can be used to explain a range of experimental observations, while failing to account for others, along with some thoughts on how to improve them.

  15. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  16. The RiverFish Approach to Business Process Modeling: Linking Business Steps to Control-Flow Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliane, Devanir; Oikawa, Marcio K.; Malkowski, Simon; Alcazar, José Perez; Ferreira, João Eduardo

    Despite the recent advances in the area of Business Process Management (BPM), today’s business processes have largely been implemented without clearly defined conceptual modeling. This results in growing difficulties for identification, maintenance, and reuse of rules, processes, and control-flow patterns. To mitigate these problems in future implementations, we propose a new approach to business process modeling using conceptual schemas, which represent hierarchies of concepts for rules and processes shared among collaborating information systems. This methodology bridges the gap between conceptual model description and identification of actual control-flow patterns for workflow implementation. We identify modeling guidelines that are characterized by clear phase separation, step-by-step execution, and process building through diagrams and tables. The separation of business process modeling in seven mutually exclusive phases clearly delimits information technology from business expertise. The sequential execution of these phases leads to the step-by-step creation of complex control-flow graphs. The process model is refined through intuitive table and diagram generation in each phase. Not only does the rigorous application of our modeling framework minimize the impact of rule and process changes, but it also facilitates the identification and maintenance of control-flow patterns in BPM-based information system architectures.

  17. Modulated patterns in a reduced model of a transitional shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaume, C.; Knobloch, E.; Chini, G. P.; Julien, K.

    2016-02-01

    We consider a close relative of plane Couette flow called Waleffe flow in which the fluid is confined between two free-slip walls and the flow driven by a sinusoidal force. We use a reduced model of such flows constructed elsewhere to compute stationary exact coherent structures in this flow in periodic domains with a large spanwise period. The computations reveal the emergence of stationary states exhibiting strong amplitude and wavelength modulation in the spanwise direction. These modulated states lie on branches exhibiting complex dependence on the Reynolds number but no homoclinic snaking.

  18. Choice of In Vivo Versus Idealized Velocity Boundary Conditions Influences Physiologically Relevant Flow Patterns in a Subject-Specific Simulation of Flow in the Human Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Wake, Amanda K.; Oshinski, John N.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.; Giddens, Don P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate fluid mechanics models are important tools for predicting the flow field in the carotid artery bifurcation and for understanding the relationship between hemodynamics and the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Clinical imaging modalities can be used to obtain geometry and blood flow data for developing subject-specific, human carotid artery bifurcation models. Method of Approach We developed subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the human carotid bifurcation from magnetic resonance (MR) geometry data and phase contrast MR (PCMR) velocity data, measured in vivo. Two simulations were conducted with identical geometry, flow rates, and fluid parameters: (1) Simulation 1 used in vivo, measured velocity distributions as time-varying boundary conditions, and (2) Simulation 2 used idealized, fully-developed velocity profiles as boundary conditions. Results The position and extent of negative axial velocity regions (NAVR) vary between the two simulations at any given point in time, and these regions vary temporally within each simulation. The combination of inlet velocity boundary conditions, geometry, and flow waveforms influences NAVRs. In particular, the combination of flow division and the location of the velocity peak with respect to individual carotid geometry landmarks (bifurcation apex position and the departure angle of the IC) influences the size and location of these reversed flow zones. Average axial wall shear stress (WSS) distributions are qualitatively similar for the two simulations; however, instantaneous WSS values vary with the choice of velocity boundary conditions. Conclusions By developing subject-specific simulations from in vivo measured geometry and flow data and varying the velocity boundary conditions in otherwise identical models we isolated the effects of measured versus idealized velocity distributions on blood flow patterns. Choice of velocity distributions at boundary conditions are

  19. Study of secondary-flow patterns in an annular cascade of turbine nozzle blades with vortex design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohlik, Harold E; Allen, Hubert W; Herzig, Howard Z

    1953-01-01

    In order to increase understanding of the origin of losses in a turbine, the secondary-flow components in the boundary layers and the blade wakes of an annular cascade of turbine nozzle blades (vortex design) was investigated. A detailed study was made of the total-pressure contours and, particularly, of the inner-wall loss cores downstream of the blades. The inner-wall loss core associated with a blade of the turbine-nozzle cascade is largely the accumulation of low-momentum fluids originating elsewhere in the cascade. This accumulation is effected by a secondary-flow mechanism which acts to transport the low-momentum fluids across the channels on the walls and radially in the blade wakes and boundary layers. The patterns of secondary flow were determined by use of hydrogen sulfide traces, paint, flow fences, and total pressure surveys. At one flow condition investigated, the radial transport of low-momentum fluid in the blade wake and on the suction surface near the trailing edge accounted for 65 percent of the loss core; 30 percent resulted from flow in the thickened boundary layer on the suction surface and 35 percent from flow in the blade wake.

  20. Heat flow patterns of the North American continent: A discussion of the DNAG Geothermal Map of North America

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Steele, John L.; Carter, Larry C.

    1990-01-01

    The large and small-scale geothermal features of the North American continent and surrounding ocean areas illustrated on the new 1:5,000,000 DNAG Geothermal Map of North America are summarized. Sources for the data included on the map are given. The types of data included are heat flow sites coded by value, contours of heat flow with a color fill, areas of major groundwater effects on regional heat flow, the top-of-geopressure in the Gulf Coast region, temperature on the Dakota aquifer in the midcontinent, location of major hot springs and geothermal systems, and major center of Quaternary and Holocene volcanism. The large scale heat flow pattern that is well known for the conterminous United States and Canada of normal heat flow east of the Cordillera and generally high heat flow west of the front of the Cordillera dominates the continental portion of the map. However, details of the heat flow variations are also seen and are discussed briefly in this and the accompanying papers.

  1. Flow patterns and transport in Rayleigh surface acoustic wave streaming: combined finite element method and raytracing numerics versus experiments.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, Thomas; Gogel, Daniel; Kostur, Marcin; Talkner, Peter; Hänggi, Peter; Wixforth, Achim

    2008-10-01

    This work presents an approach for determining the streaming patterns that are generated by Rayleigh surface acoustic waves in arbitrary 3-D geometries by finite element method (FEM) simulations. An efficient raytracing algorithm is applied on the acoustic subproblem to avoid the unbearable memory demands and computational time of a conventional FEM acoustics simulation in 3-D. The acoustic streaming interaction is modeled by a body force term in the Stokes equation. In comparisons between experiments and simulated flow patterns, we demonstrate the quality of the proposed technique. PMID:18986877

  2. Theoretical and numerical analyses of pore-fluid flow patterns around and within inclined large cracks and faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongbin; Hobbs, B. E.; Ord, A.; Hornby, P.; Peng, Shenglin; Liu, Liangming

    2006-08-01

    Large cracks and faults play an important and diverse role in controlling pore-fluid flow patterns in pore-fluid-saturated porous rocks. Examples of fault-related fluid flow include (1) geological structural controls on groundwater flow and contaminant transport, (2) formation and localization of some valuable mineral deposits around and within fault zones, (3) impacts of heterogeneous fault zone hydraulic properties on the formation and location of petroleum reservoirs through fault sealing, compartmentalization and variability in pore-fluid flow pathways and (4) induced rupture and failure processes by the interaction between material deformation and pore-fluid flow around faults through cycles of brittle deformation and seismicity. In this paper, theoretical and numerical methods are used to investigate pore-fluid flow patterns around and within large cracks and faults in pore-fluid-saturated porous rocks. Although considerable numerical investigations have been carried out on the flow pattern around large cracks and faults, a full set of exact analytical solutions in the case of a fault having any finite but non-zero permeability is not yet available due to mathematical difficulties in solving the related partial differential equations in a conventional Cartesian coordinate system. For the purpose of deriving a full set of exact analytical solutions, large cracks and faults are treated as elliptic inclusions, in which both the aspect ratio of an elliptic crack and the permeability ratio of the crack to its surrounding rock are used to represent the hydrodynamic property contrast of the elliptic crack. It is assumed that the pore-fluid flow in the far field away from the elliptic crack is uniform and that the long axis of the elliptic crack is inclined to the inflow direction in the undisturbed far field. Under these assumptions, a full set of analytical solutions has been derived for the pore-fluid velocity, stream function and excess pore-fluid pressure around

  3. Geophysical controls of aquifer-river exchange flow patterns in a UK lowland meandering river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dara, Rebwar; Krause, Stefan; Rivett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The deposition of fine particles (clay and silt) and organic matters in alluvial sediments can substantially reduce the permeability of streambed sediments and extend towards the wider floodplain. The resulting hydraulic conductivity patterns within the streambed and floodplain have been shown to control both location as well as intensity of hyporheic exchange in many lowland rivers. The aim of the study is to investigate the variability in streambed permeability fields in an unprecedented spatial resolution and quantify the impacts on controlling hyporheic exchange fluxes in the River Tern, a UK lowland meandering stream. Geophysical surveys were conducted deploying Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in conjunction with geological information derived from core logs and bank exposures for mapping shallow subsurface structural heterogeneity. The GPR survey deployed a pulse EKKO pro equipped with a shielded 250 MHz antenna. For the floodplain survey, GPR profiles of 12 NE-SW and 6 NW- SE orientation profiles were taken creating a raster of approximately 10 m. The riparian terrestrial GPR surveys were accompanied by a longitudinal in channel GPR survey for which the antenna was deployed on a floating device. At locations identified to be representative for the range of streambed hydrofacies identified by GPR in investigated stream reach, multi-level mini-piezometer networks were installed in the streambed for monitoring groundwater-surface water exchange fluxes, and conducting dilution tracer tests for quantification of residence time distributions at the aquifer-river interface. Quasi-three-dimensional GPR profiles from closely spaced grids of 2D GPR data of floodplain deposits indicated a range of different radar facies and helped to delineate the type and extend of high and low conductive materials. The results of longitudinal GPR survey along a 240 m section of the river channel revealed that areas rich in low conductivity layers such as organic peat and clay lenses

  4. Ordinal pattern and statistical complexity analysis of daily stream flow time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, H.; Rosso, O. A.; Hauhs, M.

    2013-06-01

    When calculating the Bandt and Pompe ordinal pattern distribution from given time series at depth D, some of the D! patterns might not appear. This could be a pure finite size effect (missing patterns) or due to dynamical properties of the observed system (forbidden patterns). For pure noise, no forbidden patterns occur, contrary to deterministic chaotic maps. We investigate long time series of river runoff for missing patterns and calculate two global properties of their pattern distributions: the Permutation Entropy and the Permutation Statistical Complexity. This is compared to purely stochastic but long-range correlated processes, the k-noise (noise with power spectrum f - k ), where k is a parameter determining the strength of the correlations. Although these processes closely resemble runoff series in their correlation behavior, the ordinal pattern statistics reveals qualitative differences, which can be phrased in terms of missing patterns behavior or the temporal asymmetry of the observed series. For the latter, an index is developed in the paper, which may be used to quantify the asymmetry of natural processes as opposed to artificially generated data.

  5. Hyporheic flow patterns in relation to large river floodplain attributes Journal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-calibrated models of hyporheic flow have emphasized low-order headwater systems. In many cases, however, hyporheic flow in large lowland river floodplains may be an important contributor to ecosystem services such as maintenance of water quality and habitat. In this study, ...

  6. An Analysis of Conceptual Flow Patterns and Structures in the Physics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current research is to characterize the conceptual flow processes occurring in whole-class dialogic discussions with a high level of interanimation; in the present case, of a high-school class learning about image creation on plane mirrors. Using detailed chains of interaction and conceptual flow discourse maps--both developed for…

  7. Characterization of blood flow rate in dental pulp by speckle patterns of backscattered light from an in vivo tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Sergey K.; Chistyakova, Galina G.; Terekh, Alex S.; Smirnov, Alex V.; Salimi Zadeh, Mehrnush M.; Barun, Vladimir V.

    2014-10-01

    Experimental data on the hemodynamics of dental pulp at different stages of caries treatment are given. Observations of speckle patterns in backscattered laser light are used as a measurement method to qualitatively characterize changes in blood flow rate through the dental pulp. The measurements were made by the author-designed experimental setup. Theoretical estimations showed that stationary reflected light from an in vivo tooth contains a negligibly small information body on changes in the pulpal blood flow due to the shadowing of the pulp by optically thick enamel and dentin. Therefore, the temporal variations in the speckle patterns are the only possible way that can provide monitoring of blood conditions in the pulp by using backscattered light. Various statistical characteristics of the random reflected light fields are studied as indicators of blood flow rate changes. There were selected five statistical parameters of backscattered speckle images that give self-consistent data on these changes. The parameters include four combinations of integrals of the Fourier transforms of the observed temporal variations as well as the speckle image contrast. The selected parameters are shown to qualitatively agree with general considerations on the effects of reduced or increased blood flow rates on the selected integral quantities.

  8. Geological evidence for the geographical pattern of mantle return flow and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, W.

    1982-08-10

    Tectonic features at the earth's surface can be used to test models for mantle return flow and to determine the geographic pattern of this flow. A model with shallow return and deep continental roots places the strongest constraints on the geographical pattern of return flow and predicts recognizable surface manifestations. Because of the progressive shrinkage of the Pacific (averaging 0.5 km/sup 2//yr over the last 180 m.y.) this model predicts upper mantle outflow through the three gaps in the chain of continents rimming the Pacific (Carribbean, Drake Passage, Australian-Antartic gap). In this model, upper mantle return flow streams originating at the western Pacific trenches and at the Java Trench meet south of Australia, filling in behind this rapidly northward-moving continent and provding an explanation for the negative bathymetric and gravity anomalies of the 'Australian-Antarctic-Discordance'. The long-continued tectonic movements toward the east that characterize the Caribbean and the eastenmost Scotia Sea may be produced by viscous coupling to the predicted Pacific outflow through the gaps, and the Caribbean floor slopes in the predicted direction. If mantle outflow does not pass through the gaps in the Pacific perimeter, it must pass beneath three seismic zones (Central America, Lesser Antiles, Scotia Sea); none of these seismic zones shows foci below 200 km. Mantle material flowing through the Caribbean and Drake Passage gaps would supply the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, while the Java Trench supplies the Indian Ocean ridges, so that deep-mantle upwellings need not be centered under spreading ridges and therefore are not required to move laterally to follow ridge migrations. The analysis up to this point suggests that upper mantle return flow is a response to the motion of the continents. The second part of the paper suggest driving mechanism for the plate tectonic process which may explain why the continents move.

  9. Fluid Flow Patterns During Production from Gas Hydrates in the Laboratory compared to Field Settings: LARS vs. Mallik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, B.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.; Abendroth, S.; Spangenberg, E.; Thaler, J.; Schicks, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The GFZ's LArge Reservoir Simulator LARS allows for the simulation of the 2008 Mallik gas hydrate production test and the comparison of fluid flow patterns and their driving forces. Do we see the gas flow pattern described for Mallik [Uddin, M. et al., J. Can. Petrol Tech, 50, 70-89, 2011] in a pilot scale test? If so, what are the driving forces? LARS has a network of temperature sensors and an electric resistivity tomography (ERT) enabling a good spatial resolution of gas hydrate occurrences, water and gas distribution, and changes in temperature in the sample. A gas flow meter and a water trap record fluid flow patterns and a backpressure valve has controlled the depressurization equivalent to the three pressure stages (7.0 - 5.0 - 4.2 MPa) applied in the Mallik field test. The environmental temperature (284 K) and confining pressure (13 MPa) have been constant. The depressurization induced immediate endothermic gas hydrate dissociation until re-establishment of the stability conditions by a consequent temperature decrease. Slight gas hydrate dissociation continued at the top and upper lateral border due to the constant heat input from the environment. Here transport pathways were short and permeability higher due to lower gas hydrate saturation. At pressures of 7.0 and 5.0 MPa the LARS tests showed high water flow rates and short irregular spikes of gas production. The gas flow patterns at 4.2 MPa and 3.0MPa resembled those of the Mallik test. In LARS the initial gas surges overlap with times of hydrate instability while water content and lengths of pathways had increased. Water production was at a minimum. A rapidly formed continuous gas phase caused the initial gas surges and only after gas hydrate dissociation decreased to a minimum the single gas bubbles get trapped before slowly coalescing again. In LARS, where pathways were short and no additional water was added, a transport of microbubbles is unlikely to cause a gas surge as suggested for Mallik.

  10. Abnormal resting regional cerebral blood flow patterns and their correlates in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.; Tant, S.R.; Robinson, L.; Prakash, R.

    1988-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured under resting conditions in 108 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients and a matched group of normal controls with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Forty-six patients were free of all medication for two weeks. There were no significant differences in CBF to the two hemispheres. The patients showed a comparatively reduced anteroposterior (AP) gradient for CBF. Though there were no differences in frontal flow, the patients had higher flow to several postcentral brain regions, bilaterally. Cerebral blood flow in the patients correlated inversely with age and positively with carbon dioxide level. Women had higher flow than men. Duration of the illness was the only significant predictor of the reduced AP gradient in patients. Higher left temporal and right parietal flow were found to be the best discriminators between patients and controls. Mean hemispheric flow to both hemispheres and several brain regions correlated with the total score and the item, unusual thought content, of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. There were no differences in regional CBF between medicated and unmedicated patients.

  11. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  12. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating. PMID:25462638

  13. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: Bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  14. Vacuum-assisted Fluid Flow in Microchannels to Pattern Substrates and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Anil B.; Kung, Frank H.; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H.; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Substrate and cell patterning are widely used techniques in cell biology to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate interactions. Conventional patterning techniques work well only with simple shapes, small areas and selected bio-materials. This paper describes a method to distribute cell suspensions as well as substrate solutions into complex, long, closed (dead-end) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels using negative pressure. Our method builds upon a previous vacuum-assisted method used for micromolding (Jeon, Choi et al. 1999) and successfully patterned collagen-I, fibronectin and Sal-1 substrates on glass and polystyrene surfaces, filling microchannels with lengths up to 120 mm and covering areas up to 13 × 10 mm2. Vacuum-patterned substrates were subsequently used to culture mammalian PC12 and fibroblast cells and amphibian neurons. Cells were also patterned directly by injecting cell suspensions into microchannels using vacuum. Fibroblast and neuronal cells patterned using vacuum showed normal growth and minimal cell death indicating no adverse effects of vacuum on cells. Our method fills reversibly sealed PDMS microchannels. This enables the user to remove the PDMS microchannel cast and access the patterned biomaterial or cells for further experimental purposes. Overall, this is a straightforward technique that has broad applicability for cell biology. PMID:24989641

  15. Self-aligned double patterning compliant routing with in-design physical verification flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jhih-Rong; Jawandha, Harshdeep; Atkar, Prasad; Walimbe, Atul; Baidya, Bikram; Rizzo, Olivier; Pan, David Z.

    2013-03-01

    Among double patterning techniques, Self-aligned double patterning (SADP) has the advantage of good mask overlay control, which has made SADP a popular double patterning method for sub-32nm technology nodes. However, SADP process places several limitations on design flexibility. This work exploits an alternative post routing approach that has the flexibility to resolve lithography violations without the overhead of repeated rule checking. In addition, it allows for successive refinement in the definition of lithographic violations as the process node matures, and implementation of fixes as localized ECO (Engineering Change Order) operations without needing to reroute the complete design.

  16. Cerebral blood flow studied by /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of /sup 133/Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid /sup 133/Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group.

  17. Cerebral blood flow studied by Xenon-133 inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of /sup 133/Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid /sup 133/Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group.

  18. The relationship of pattern position to the flow of gold and casting completeness.

    PubMed

    DeWald, E

    1979-05-01

    To minimize the possibility of incomplete casting due to improper pattern orientation relative to the sprue and direction of the casting arm motion, the following precautions should be taken. 1. Locate the pattern in the trailing half of the casting ring 90 to 135 degrees away from the sprue position. 2. Once the pattern is in the position described, locate it downward in the lower outer quarter of the trailing half of the casting ring and secure it in that position. 3. Mark the ring or sprue former so that the invested pattern can be oriented properly in the casting arm. 4. When using an electric casting machine, be certain that the pyrometer is correct. If in doubt, it is advisable to check the melt state of the gold before casting. PMID:374713

  19. The pattern of surface waves in a shallow free surface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoshenkov, K. V.; Nichols, A.; Tait, S. J.; Maximov, G. A.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents new water surface elevation data including evidence of the spatial correlation of water surface waves generated in shallow water flows over a gravel bed without appreciable bed forms. Careful laboratory experiments have shown that these water surface waves are not well-known gravity or capillary waves but are caused by a different physical phenomenon. In the flow conditions studied, the shear present in shallow flows generates flow structures, which rise and impact on the water-air interface. It is shown that the spatial correlation function observed for these water surface waves can be approximated by the following analytical expression W (ρ)=e-ρ2/2σw2cos(2πL0-1ρ). The proposed approximation depends on the spatial correlation radius, σw, characteristic spatial period, L0, and spatial lag, ρ. This approximation holds for all the hydraulic conditions examined in this study. It is shown that L0 relates to the depth-averaged flow velocity and carries information on the shape of the vertical velocity profile and bed roughness. It is also shown that σw is related to the hydraulic roughness and the flow Reynolds number.

  20. Measurement of Flow Pattern Within a Rotating Stall Cell in an Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan; Braunscheidel, Edward P.

    2006-01-01

    Effective active control of rotating stall in axial compressors requires detailed understanding of flow instabilities associated with this compressor regime. Newly designed miniature high frequency response total and static pressure probes as well as commercial thermoanemometric probes are suitable tools for this task. However, during the rotating stall cycle the probes are subjected to flow direction changes that are far larger than the range of probe incidence acceptance, and therefore probe data without a proper correction would misrepresent unsteady variations of flow parameters. A methodology, based on ensemble averaging, is proposed to circumvent this problem. In this approach the ensemble averaged signals acquired for various probe setting angles are segmented, and only the sections for probe setting angles close to the actual flow angle are used for signal recombination. The methodology was verified by excellent agreement between velocity distributions obtained from pressure probe data, and data measured with thermoanemometric probes. Vector plots of unsteady flow behavior during the rotating stall regime indicate reversed flow within the rotating stall cell that spreads over to adjacent rotor blade channels. Results of this study confirmed that the NASA Low Speed Axial Compressor (LSAC) while in a rotating stall regime at rotor design speed exhibits one stall cell that rotates at a speed equal to 50.6 percent of the rotor shaft speed.

  1. Heat flow pattern at the Chicxulub impact crater, northern Yucatan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Cardeña, J. M.; Campos-Enríquez, J. O.; Unsworth, M.

    2016-02-01

    Along an east-west profile crossing the Chicxulub impact structure in northern Yucatán, México, Curie depths were obtained from statistical-spectral analysis of a grid of aeromagnetic data (256 km wide and 600 km long). These depths were corrected for flight height and depth to the sea floor to determine the geothermal gradient, assuming a temperature of 580 °C for the Curie temperature. Heat flow was then calculated from the geothermal gradients using a value of 2.67 W/m-K for the mean crustal thermal conductivity. The results show a conspicuous heat flow high above on the impact basin. In this location, the heat flow is 80 mW/m2 approximately. Available offshore estimates of the depth to the crustal magnetic source bases, on the northern Yucatán platform, and onshore heat flow determination on 8 shallow bore holes, and in a 1511 m deep one, support the existence of this major high heat flow anomaly associated with the impact crater. This high heat flow might be related to the impact through: (1) an uplift of the crystalline basement rocks in the center of the crater; and (2) impact induced radioactive element concentration into the crust below the impact structure. Higher thermal conductivities at the lower crust might also play a key role. Available seismological and thermal property data are compatible with these mechanisms.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Air Pressure Effects on the Flow Pattern during the Filling of a Vertical Die Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ortega, J. J.; Zamora, R.; López, J.; Faura, F.

    2011-05-01

    Porosity due to air entrapment in the molten metal during the injection process is one of the most important problems encountered in die-casting processes. The causes of air entrapment can be attributed mainly to the evolution of the free surface of the fluid flow during the filling and the use of inadequate air evacuation systems. Different studies of the main characteristics of the flow during the filling of a vertical die cavity can be found in the literature. In most of these studies, the effects of the air on the flow of molten metal during the injection are usually neglected. However, under certain conditions, specially when there is a poor evacuation of air through vents, these effects may substantially affect the filling pattern and the final amount of air trapped in the molten metal. The aim of this work is to study numerically the effects of air on the fluid flow during the early stages of the filling of a vertical die cavity with rectangular shape. To this end, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the die cavity are carried out using a commercial CFD code (FLOW-3D) based on the SOLA-VOF approach to solve the coupling between the momentum and mass conservation equations and to treat the free surface. The main characteristics of the flow are analyzed for a wide range of operating conditions. Also, filling visualization experiments are carried out on a test bench for validation purpose using water as working fluid in a transparent die model and a high-speed camera. The viability of the numerical model used in the simulations is finally discussed.

  3. Assessment of spatial and temporal patterns of green and blue water flows in inland river basins in Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, C. F.; Liu, J.; van der Velde, M.; Kraxner, F.

    2012-03-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions freshwater resources have become scarcer with increasing demands from socio-economic development and population growth. Until recently, water research and management in these has mainly focused on blue water but ignored green water. Here we report on spatial and temporal patterns of both blue and green water flows simulated by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for the Heihe river basin, the second largest inland river basin in Northwest China. Calibration and validation at two hydrological stations show good performance of the SWAT model in modelling hydrological processes. The total green and blue water flows were 22.09 billion m3 in the 2000s for the Heihe river basin. Blue water flows are larger in upstream sub-basins than in downstream sub-basins mainly due to high precipitation and large areas of glaciers in upstream. Green water flows are distributed more homogeneously among different sub-basins. The green water coefficient was 88.0% in the 2000s for the entire river basin, varying from around 80-90% in up- and mid-stream sub-basins to above 95% in downstream sub-basins. This is much higher than reported green water coefficient in many other river basins. The spatial patterns of green water coefficient were closely linked to dominant land covers (e.g. glaciers in upstream and desert in downstream) and climate conditions (e.g. high precipitation in upstream and low precipitation in downstream). There are no clear consistent historical trends of change in green and blue water flows and green water coefficient at both the river basin and sub-basin levels. This study provides insights into green and blue water endowments for the entire Heihe river basin at sub-basin level. The results are helpful for formulating reasonable water policies to improve water resources management in the inland river basins of China.

  4. Internal flow patterns on heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop oscillating heat-pipe with check valves using ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuwakietkumjohn, N.; Rittidech, S.

    2010-11-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the internal flow patterns and heat transfer characteristics of a closed-loop oscillating heat-pipe with check valves (CLOHP/CV). The ratio of number of check valves to meandering turns was 0.2. Ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture were used as working fluids with a filling ratio of 50% by total volume of tube. The CLOHP/CV was made of a glass tube with an inside diameter of 2.4 mm. The evaporator section was 50 mm and 100 mm in length and there were 10 meandering turns. An inclination angle of 90 from horizontal axis was established. The evaporator section was heated by an electric heater and the condenser section was cooled by distilled water. Temperature at the evaporator section was controlled at 85 C, 105 C and 125 C. The inlet and outlet temperatures were measured. A digital camera and video camera were used to observe the flow patterns at the evaporator. The silver nano-ethanol mixture gave higher heat flux than ethanol. When the temperature at the evaporator section was increased from 85 C to 105 C and 125 C. It was found that, the flow patterns occurred as annular flow + slug flow, slug flow + bubble flow and dispersed bubble flow + bubble flow respectively. The main regime of each flow pattern can be determined from the flow pattern map ethanol and a silver nano-ethanol mixture. Each of the two working fluids gave corresponding flow patterns. (author)

  5. Flow pattern-based mass and heat transfer and frictional drag of gas-non-Newtonian liquid flow in helical coil: two- and three-phase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thandlam, Anil Kumar; Das, Chiranjib; Majumder, Subrata Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of wall-liquid mass transfer and heat transfer phenomena with gas-Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in vertically helical coil reactor have been reported in this article. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various dynamic and geometric parameters on mass and heat transfer coefficients in the helical coil reactor. The flow pattern-based heat and mass transfer phenomena in the helical coil reactor are highlighted at different operating conditions. The study covered a wide range of geometric parameters such as diameter of the tube (d t ), diameter of the coil (D c ), diameter of the particle (d p ), pitch difference (p/D c ) and concentrations of non-Newtonian liquid. The correlation models for the heat and mass transfer coefficient based on the flow pattern are developed which may be useful in process scale-up of the helical coil reactor for industrial application. The frictional drag coefficient was also estimated and analyzed by mass transfer phenomena based on the electrochemical method.

  6. Spatially-resolved mean flow and turbulence help explain observed erosion and deposition patterns of snow over Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, E.; Giometto, M. G.; Leonard, K. C.; Maksym, T. L.; Meneveau, C. V.; Parlange, M. B.; Lehning, M.

    2014-12-01

    Sea ice-atmosphere interactions are major drivers of patterns of sea ice drift and deformations in the Polar regions, and affect snow erosion and deposition at the surface. Here, we combine analyses of sea ice surface topography at very high-resolutions (1-10 cm), and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) to study surface drag and snow erosion and deposition patterns from process scales to floe scales (1 cm - 100 m). The snow/ice elevations were obtained using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner during the SIPEX II (Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem eXperiment II) research voyage to East Antarctica (September-November 2012). LES are performed on a regular domain adopting a mixed pseudo-spectral/finite difference spatial discretization. A scale-dependent dynamic subgrid-scale model based on Lagrangian time averaging is adopted to determine the eddy-viscosity in the bulk of the flow. Effects of larger-scale features of the surface on wind flows (those features that can be resolved in the LES) are accounted for through an immersed boundary method. Conversely, drag forces caused by subgrid-scale features of the surface should be accounted for through a parameterization. However, the effective aerodynamic roughness parameter z0 for snow/ice is not known. Hence, a novel dynamic approach is utilized, in which z0 is determined using the constraint that the total momentum flux (drag) must be independent on grid-filter scale. We focus on three ice floe surfaces. The first of these surfaces (October 6, 2012) is used to test the performance of the model, validate the algorithm, and study the spatial distributed fields of resolved and modeled stress components. The following two surfaces, scanned at the same location before and after a snow storm event (October 20/23, 2012), are used to propose an application to study how spatially resolved mean flow and turbulence relates to observed patterns of snow erosion and deposition. We show how erosion and deposition patterns are correlated with the

  7. Temperature Relaxation in Non-Ideal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Dirk O.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2001-10-01

    The equilibration process of multi-temperature plasmas, i.e., the energy transfer between electrons and ions, is investigated for the case of hot electrons and cold ions. Such non-equilibrium plasmas occur in various experiments, including the creation and heating of plasmas with short-pulse lasers and intense ion beams. Temperature separation occurs since these drivers couple almost entirely to the electrons. The standard approach to the equilibration rates goes back to the early works of Landau and Spitzer. However, this approach is only valid for systems where the Coulomb logarithm is larger than three, which clearly fails for strongly coupled plasmas. We first generalize this approach by considering hyperbolic orbits for the particle trajectories. Then we calculate the energy transfer rates using a quantal kinetic equation of the Boltzmann type which allows an exact (T-matrix) treatment of close collisions. On this basis, we demonstrate the importance of hyperbolic orbits, quantum defraction effects on the scattering cross section, a correct treatment of the distribution, dynamic screening effects, and the influence of the plasma composition.

  8. Cerebral Blood Flow, Heart Rate, and Blood Pressure Patterns during the Tilt Test in Common Orthostatic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The head-up tilt test is widely used for evaluation of orthostatic intolerance. Although orthostatic symptoms usually reflect cerebral hypoperfusion, the cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) profile in orthostatic syndromes is not well described. This study evaluated CBFv and cardiovascular patterns associated with the tilt test in common orthostatic syndromes. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed the tilt test of patients with history of orthostatic intolerance. The following signals were recorded: ECG, blood pressure, CBFv using transcranial Doppler, respiratory signals, and end tidal CO2. Results. Data from 744 patients were analyzed. Characteristic pattern associated with a particular orthostatic syndrome can be grouped into abnormalities predominantly affecting blood pressure (orthostatic hypotension, orthostatic hypertension syndrome, vasomotor oscillations, and neurally mediated syncope—cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed), cerebral blood flow (orthostatic hypoperfusion syndrome, primary cerebral autoregulatory failure), and heart rate (tachycardia syndromes: postural tachycardia syndrome, paroxysmal sinus tachycardia, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia). Psychogenic pseudosyncope is associated with stable CBFv. Conclusions. The tilt test is useful add-on in diagnosis of several orthostatic syndromes. However diagnostic criteria for several syndromes had to be modified to allow unambiguous pattern classification. CBFv monitoring in addition to blood pressure and heart rate may increase diagnostic yield of the tilt test. PMID:27525257

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow, Heart Rate, and Blood Pressure Patterns during the Tilt Test in Common Orthostatic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Novak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The head-up tilt test is widely used for evaluation of orthostatic intolerance. Although orthostatic symptoms usually reflect cerebral hypoperfusion, the cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) profile in orthostatic syndromes is not well described. This study evaluated CBFv and cardiovascular patterns associated with the tilt test in common orthostatic syndromes. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed the tilt test of patients with history of orthostatic intolerance. The following signals were recorded: ECG, blood pressure, CBFv using transcranial Doppler, respiratory signals, and end tidal CO2. Results. Data from 744 patients were analyzed. Characteristic pattern associated with a particular orthostatic syndrome can be grouped into abnormalities predominantly affecting blood pressure (orthostatic hypotension, orthostatic hypertension syndrome, vasomotor oscillations, and neurally mediated syncope-cardioinhibitory, vasodepressor, and mixed), cerebral blood flow (orthostatic hypoperfusion syndrome, primary cerebral autoregulatory failure), and heart rate (tachycardia syndromes: postural tachycardia syndrome, paroxysmal sinus tachycardia, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia). Psychogenic pseudosyncope is associated with stable CBFv. Conclusions. The tilt test is useful add-on in diagnosis of several orthostatic syndromes. However diagnostic criteria for several syndromes had to be modified to allow unambiguous pattern classification. CBFv monitoring in addition to blood pressure and heart rate may increase diagnostic yield of the tilt test. PMID:27525257

  10. Element distribution patterns in the ordovician Galena group, Southeastern Minnesota: Indicators of fluid flow and provenance of terrigenous material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Morey, G.B.; Mossler, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a regional geochemical investigation of lower Paleozoic strata in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota, elemental concentrations in acid-insoluble residues were determined for carbonate rock in the Middle Ordovician Galena Group. Elemental distribution patterns within the insoluble residues, particularly those of Ti, Al, and Zr, show that the Wisconsin dome and the Wisconsin arch, which contributed sediment to the embayment prior to Galena time, continued as weak sources of sediment during this period. In contrast, trace metals commonly associated with Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc mineralization, including Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Ni, Co, As, and Mo, show dispersal patterns that are independent of those associated with primary depositional phenomena. These trace metals are concentrated in southern Minnesota in carbonate rocks near the interface between limestone- and dolostone-dominated strata. Dispersal patterns imply that the metals were carried by a north-flowing regional ground-water system. The results show that the geochemical attributes of insoluble residues can be used to distinguish provenance and transport directions of primary sediments within a depositional basin from effects of subsequent regional ground-water flow systems.

  11. Flow patterning in Hele-Shaw configurations using non-uniform electro-osmotic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Rubin, Shimon; Gat, Amir D.; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-10-01

    We present an analytical study of electro-osmotic flow in a Hele-Shaw configuration with non-uniform zeta potential distribution. Applying the lubrication approximation and assuming thin electric double layer, we obtain a pair of uncoupled Poisson equations for the pressure and depth-averaged stream function, and show that the inhomogeneous parts in these equations are governed by gradients in zeta potential parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field, respectively. We obtain a solution for the case of a disk-shaped region with uniform zeta potential and show that the flow field created is an exact dipole, even in the immediate vicinity of the disk. In addition, we study the inverse problem where the desired flow field is known and solve for the zeta potential distribution required in order to establish it. Finally, we demonstrate that such inverse problem solutions can be used to create directional flows confined within narrow regions, without physical walls. Such solutions are equivalent to flow within channels and we show that these can be assembled to create complex microfluidic networks, composed of intersecting channels and turns, which are basic building blocks in microfluidic devices.

  12. Flow patterns of dairy wastewater constructed wetlands in a cold climate.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Pete; Drizo, Aleksandra; Cully Hession, W

    2006-10-01

    Conservative tracer experiments, and spatial temperature and dissolved oxygen mapping within four subsurface treatment wetlands employed in this study demonstrated the importance of supplemental aeration and vegetation in reducing preferential flows in cold climate treatment wetlands. Four constructed wetlands, employing horizontal subsurface flow were used to treat dairy wastewater in a 2 x 2 factorial design consisting of two wetland cells with vegetation and two with supplemental aeration. Four tracer studies were conducted between November 2004 and May 2005. Two key observations were made, demonstrating that vegetation and aeration can be utilized in cold regions to prevent clogging and freezing, thereby reducing preferential flow paths which can reduce treatment efficiencies: (1) vegetation contributed to thermal protection and (2) aeration increased temperature and mixing. A comparison of multiple wetland cells with varying flow rates showed that the use of pore volume in tracer response curves was a better indicator of preferential flows than other indicators including volumetric efficiency, hydraulic efficiency and number of continuosly stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). This research helps further establish how constructed wetlands are a viable tool for treating wastewater in cold climates.

  13. Three-dimensional flow patterns in a scaled, physical vocal fold model with a unilateral polyp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seawright, Angela; Erath, Byron; Plesniak, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Trauma to the vocal folds often causes the formation of polyps; affecting the efficiency of speech and making voice rough and breathy. The change in flow characteristics due to a unilateral polyp positioned on the medial surface of a 7.5 times life-size physical vocal fold model was investigated. Previously reported phase-averaged intraglottal particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations in a coronal plane indicated significant variations in the flow behavior on different anterior offset planes relative to the polyp. Flow three-dimensionality was investigated by resolving the temporal evolution of the flow with laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Data were acquired superior to the glottal exit. Physiological values of Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers were matched. Results were compared to velocity fields generated by healthy vocal fold motion. The glottal jet trajectory, flow separation points, and the velocity distribution along the vocal fold walls were influenced. Thus, a polyp significantly disturbs and modifies the airflow through the vocal folds, which has implications on both the fluid-structure energy exchange and the sound production.

  14. Tracing Nitrogen Sources in Forested Catchments Under Varying Flow Conditions: Seasonal and Event Scale Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestyen, S. D.; Shanley, J. B.; Boyer, E. W.; Kendall, C.

    2004-12-01

    Our ability to assess how stream nutrient concentrations respond to biogeochemical transformations and stream flow dynamics is often limited by datasets that do not include all flow conditions that occur over event, monthly, seasonal, and yearly time scales. At the Sleepers River Research Watershed in northeastern Vermont, USA, nitrate, DOC (dissolved organic carbon), and major ion concentrations were measured on samples collected over a wide range of flow conditions from summer 2002 through summer 2004. Nutrient flushing occurred at the W-9 catchment and high-frequency sampling revealed critical insights into seasonal and event-scale controls on nutrient concentrations. In this seasonally snow-covered catchment, the earliest stage of snowmelt introduced nitrogen directly to the stream from the snowpack. As snowmelt progressed, the source of stream nitrate shifted to flushing of soil nitrate along shallow subsurface flow paths. In the growing season, nitrogen flushing to streams varied with antecedent moisture conditions. More nitrogen was available to flush to streams when antecedent moisture was lowest, and mobile nitrogen stores in the landscape regenerated under baseflow conditions on times scales as short as 7 days. Leaf fall was another critical time when coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlled nutrient fluxes. With the input of labile organic carbon from freshly decomposing leaves, nitrate concentrations declined sharply in response to in-stream immobilization or denitrification. These high-resolution hydrochemical data from multiple flow regimes are identifying "hot spots" and "hot moments" of biogeochemical and hydrological processes that control nutrient fluxes in streams.

  15. Fluid flow and seismicity pattern: Evidence from the 1997 Umbria-Marche (central Italy) seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, Andrea; Piccinini, Davide; Chiaraluce, Lauro; Cocco, Massimo

    2005-05-01

    We model the spatial and temporal evolution of seismicity during the 1997 Umbria-Marche seismic sequence in terms of subsequent failures promoted by fluid flow. The diffusion process of pore-pressure relaxation is represented as a pressure perturbation generated by coseismic stress changes and propagating through a fluid saturated medium. The values of isotropic diffusivity range between 22 and 90 m2/s. The calculated value of anisotropic diffusivity (Daniso = 250 m2/s) is largest along the average strike (N140°) direction of activated faults. Our results suggest that the observed spatio-temporal migration of seismicity is consistent with fluid flow.

  16. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux (on CD-ROM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, N. T.; Siegwarth, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    One reason for NASA's interest in cryogenic two-phase flow with low mass and heat flux is the need to design spacecraft heat exchangers used for vaporizing cryogenic propellants. The CD-ROM provides digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in (QuickTime9Trademark) format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson(Trademark) Video Codec for compression. Experiments were conducted to obtain data on the two-phase (liquid and vapor) flow behavior of cryogenic nitrogen and hydrogen under low mass and heat flux conditions. Tests were performed in normal gravity with a 1.5 degree up flow configuration. View ports in the apparatus permitted visual observation of the two-phase flow patterns. Computer codes to predict flow patterns were developed from theoretical/empirical models reported in the literature. Predictions from the computer codes were compared with experimental flow pattern observations. Results are presented employing the traditional two-dimensional flow pattern map format using the liquid and gas superficial velocities as coordinates. In general, the agreement between the experimental results and the analytical predictive methods is reasonably good. Small regions of the flow pattern maps are identified where the models are deficient as a result of neglecting phase change phenomena. Certain regions of the maps were beyond the range of the experiments and could not be completely validated. Areas that could benefit from further work include modeling of the transition from separated flow, collection of additional data in the bubble and annular flow regimes, and collection of experimental data at other inclination angles, tube diameters and high heat flux.

  17. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  18. Effect of advanced and delayed rotation on the dominant flow pattern and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uksul, Esra; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    During a flapping cycle of an insect, complex time dependent flows are produced as the wing reciprocates, producing a maximum lift at the stroke reversals. By flipping the wing rapidly at the end of each stroke, the insect modulates the flow around the wing and hence the aerodynamic forces necessary to hover. The duration and starting point of the flip play an important role in determining the amount of lift produced. To understand and tailor the effect of wing kinematics on the aerodynamic performance we focussed on the vortex dynamics of the flow field. Phase-averaged data from particle image velocimetry was used to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in rotation during a stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The period of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Vortex detection methods like the λ2 and Γ2 criteria are used to determine the effect of a delay or early rotation on the trajectories, size, shape and location of the prominent vortical structures. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the influence of the phase-shifts on the dominant mode structure and the related time-scales.

  19. Patterns of gene flow between crop and wild carrot, Daucus carota (Apiaceae) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of gene flow between crops and their wild relatives have implications for both management practices for farming and breeding as well as understanding the risk of transgene escape. These types of studies may also yield insight into population dynamics and the evolutionary consequences of gene...

  20. Fluid fluxes from petrological record: links to mineral-fluid thermodynamics and implications for flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow through the Earth's lithosphere is an inevitable consequence of fluid production during sediment compaction, prograde metamorphic reactions, and magmatic degassing, in settings ranging from subducting zones, continental crust underplating to shallow magma chambers. In addition, high buoyancy and low viscosity of aqueous fluid in a rock environment make flow universally viable and efficient. Fluids are not preserved in their pathways and much of their evidence including chemical composition is often retrieved from mineral mode, chemical, or isotopic variations. Several important links, advantages and artifacts arising from dimensional consistency and from correlations with mineral-fluid thermodynamics are worthy to revisit. The magnitude of fluid-rock interaction is measured by the fluid-rock ratio (mfl3 mr-3) or a time-integrated fluid flux (mfl3 mr-2). These two measures differ by mr, the characteristic distance of alteration or front propagation, parallel to the flow direction. As a consequence, the fluid-rock ratios depend on spatial relationships between flow direction, temperature- and pressure-gradient orientation, and alteration zone or vein geometry. The reservoir ratios, which are required in mass-balance or phase-equilibrium calculations, can still be unambiguously defined when the above variables are scaled to the flow direction. Gradients in mole amounts of reaction progress or mineral precipitated, n, per unit temperature or pressure are directly related to standard reaction enthalpy and volume, respectively. The effects of pressure are commonly assumed to be negligible. Systematic evaluation of mineral solubilities, however, reveals that (i) dn/dT is nearly identical for a variety of phases and from subduction to collisional geotherms but minerals dissolving into charged species exhibit higher solubilities, therefore, yield greater reaction progress and lower fluid fluxes along low-dT /dzgeotherms; (ii) during lateral (isobaric) flow, dn

  1. Evaporating sessile droplet pair: Insights into contact line motion, flow transitions and emergence of universal vaporisation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikeea, Angkur Jyoti Dipanka; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-06-01

    We have deciphered that the vaporization rate of a pair of sessile droplets placed in a close vicinity of each other not only gets suppressed but also approached a universal pattern in the long time asymptotic limit, irrespective of substrate hydrophobicity. In a short time, these droplets exhibit a series of naturally evolving characteristics such as alteration of evaporation modes, flow transitions, asymmetric deformation, and motion of the contact line. Such dynamics are uniquely determined by the degree of pinning. In addition, we show that the enhanced hydrophobicity does not always lead to lower evaporation rate in droplets.

  2. Size based sorting and patterning of microbeads by evaporation driven flow in a 3D micro-traps array.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Chung; Liu, Yuxin; Wang, Karen Yanping; Rahman, Abdur Rub Abdur

    2013-09-21

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) micro-traps array for size selective sorting and patterning of microbeads via evaporation-driven capillary flow. The interconnected micro-traps ar