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Sample records for non-invasive cardiac stress

  1. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  2. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S.; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D.; Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  3. Electro-resistive bands for non-invasive cardiac and respiration monitoring, a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Gaetano D; O'Loughlin, Aiden; Breen, Paul P

    2015-02-01

    Continuous unobtrusive monitoring of tidal volume, particularly for critical care patients (i.e. neonates and patients in intensive care) during sleep studies and during daily activities, is still an unresolved monitoring need. Also a successful monitoring solution is yet to be proposed for continuous non-invasive cardiac stroke volume monitoring that is a novel clinical need.In this paper we present the feasibility study for a wearable, non-invasive, non-contact and unobtrusive sensor (embedded in a standard T-shirt) based on four electro-resistive bands that simultaneously monitors tidal volume and cardiac stroke volume changes. This low power sensor system (requires only 100 mW and accepts a wide power supply range up to ±18 V); thus the sensor can be easily embedded in existing wearable solutions (i.e. Holter monitors). Moreover, being contactless, it can be worn over bandages or electrodes, and as it does not rely over the integrity of the garment to work, it allows practitioners to perform procedures during monitoring. For this preliminary evaluation, one subject has worn the sensor over the period of 24 h (removing it only to shower); the accuracy of the tidal volume tested against a portable spirometer reported a precision of ±10% also during physical activity; accuracy tests for cardiac output (as it may require invasive procedure) have not been carried out in this preliminary trial.

  4. Therapeutic Ultrasound to Non-Invasively Create Intra-Cardiac Communications in an Intact Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gabe E.; Miller, Ryan M.; Ensing, Greg; Ives, Kimberly; Gordon, David; Ludomirsky, Achi; Xu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy (histotripsy) can accurately and safely generate ventricular septal defects (VSDs) through the intact chest of a neonatal animal, with the eventual goal of developing a non-invasive technique of creating intra-cardiac communications in patients with congenital heart disease. Background Histotripsy is an innovative ultrasonic technique that generates demarcated, mechanical tissue fractionation utilizing high intensity ultrasound pulses. Previous work has shown that histotripsy can create atrial septal defects in a beating heart in an open-chest canine model. Methods Nine neonatal pigs were treated with transcutaneous histotripsy targeting the ventricular septum. Ultrasound pulses of 5μs duration at a peak negative pressure of 13 MPa and a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz were generated by a 1 MHz focused transducer. The procedure was guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results VSDs were created in all pigs with diameters ranging from 2–6.5mm. Six pigs were euthanized within 2 hrs of treatment, while 3 were recovered and maintained for 2–3 days to evaluate lesion maturation and clinical side effects. There were only transient clinical effects and pathology revealed mild collateral damage around the VSD with no significant damage to other cardiac or extra-cardiac structures. Conclusions Histotripsy can accurately and safely generate VSDs through the intact chest in a neonatal animal model. These results suggest that with further advances, histotripsy can be a useful, non-invasive technique to create intra-cardiac communications, which currently require invasive catheter-based or surgical procedures, to clinically stabilize newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:20853366

  5. Non-invasive cardiac output trending during exercise recovery on a bathroom-scale-based ballistocardiograph.

    PubMed

    Inan, O T; Etemadi, M; Paloma, A; Giovangrandi, L; Kovacs, G T A

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac ejection of blood into the aorta generates a reaction force on the body that can be measured externally via the ballistocardiogram (BCG). In this study, a commercial bathroom scale was modified to measure the BCGs of nine healthy subjects recovering from treadmill exercise. During the recovery, Doppler echocardiogram signals were obtained simultaneously from the left ventricular outflow tract of the heart. The percentage changes in root-mean-square (RMS) power of the BCG were strongly correlated with the percentage changes in cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (R(2) = 0.85, n = 275 data points). The correlation coefficients for individually analyzed data ranged from 0.79 to 0.96. Using Bland-Altman methods for assessing agreement, the mean bias was found to be -0.5% (+/-24%) in estimating the percentage changes in cardiac output. In contrast to other non-invasive methods for trending cardiac output, the unobtrusive procedure presented here uses inexpensive equipment and could be performed without the aid of a medical professional.

  6. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here.

  7. Non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology in amphibian conservation physiology

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive endocrinology utilizes non-invasive biological samples (such as faeces, urine, hair, aquatic media, and saliva) for the quantification of hormones in wildlife. Urinary-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and radio-immunoassay have enabled the rapid quantification of reproductive and stress hormones in amphibians (Anura: Amphibia). With minimal disturbance, these methods can be used to assess the ovarian and testicular endocrine functions as well as physiological stress in captive and free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine monitoring has therefore greatly advanced our knowledge of the functioning of the stress endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–interrenal axis) and the reproductive endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–gonadal axis) in the amphibian physiological stress response, reproductive ecology, health and welfare, and survival. Biological (physiological) validation is necessary for obtaining the excretory lag time of hormone metabolites. Urinary-based EIA for the major reproductive hormones, estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males, can be used to track the reproductive hormone profiles in relationship to reproductive behaviour and environmental data in free-living anurans. Urinary-based corticosterone metabolite EIA can be used to assess the sublethal impacts of biological stressors (such as invasive species and pathogenic diseases) as well as anthropogenic induced environmental stressors (e.g. extreme temperatures) on free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine methods can also assist in the diagnosis of success or failure of captive breeding programmes by measuring the longitudinal patterns of changes in reproductive hormones and corticosterone within captive anurans and comparing the endocrine profiles with health records and reproductive behaviour. This review paper focuses on the reproductive and the stress endocrinology of anurans and demonstrates the uses of non-invasive endocrinology

  8. Non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology in amphibian conservation physiology.

    PubMed

    Narayan, E J

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive endocrinology utilizes non-invasive biological samples (such as faeces, urine, hair, aquatic media, and saliva) for the quantification of hormones in wildlife. Urinary-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and radio-immunoassay have enabled the rapid quantification of reproductive and stress hormones in amphibians (Anura: Amphibia). With minimal disturbance, these methods can be used to assess the ovarian and testicular endocrine functions as well as physiological stress in captive and free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine monitoring has therefore greatly advanced our knowledge of the functioning of the stress endocrine system (the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis) and the reproductive endocrine system (the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis) in the amphibian physiological stress response, reproductive ecology, health and welfare, and survival. Biological (physiological) validation is necessary for obtaining the excretory lag time of hormone metabolites. Urinary-based EIA for the major reproductive hormones, estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males, can be used to track the reproductive hormone profiles in relationship to reproductive behaviour and environmental data in free-living anurans. Urinary-based corticosterone metabolite EIA can be used to assess the sublethal impacts of biological stressors (such as invasive species and pathogenic diseases) as well as anthropogenic induced environmental stressors (e.g. extreme temperatures) on free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine methods can also assist in the diagnosis of success or failure of captive breeding programmes by measuring the longitudinal patterns of changes in reproductive hormones and corticosterone within captive anurans and comparing the endocrine profiles with health records and reproductive behaviour. This review paper focuses on the reproductive and the stress endocrinology of anurans and demonstrates the uses of non-invasive endocrinology for

  9. Non-invasive cortisol measurements as indicators of physiological stress responses in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pschernig, Elisabeth; Wallner, Bernard; Millesi, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive measurements of glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations, including cortisol and corticosterone, serve as reliable indicators of adrenocortical activities and physiological stress loads in a variety of species. As an alternative to invasive analyses based on plasma, GC concentrations in saliva still represent single-point-of-time measurements, suitable for studying short-term or acute stress responses, whereas fecal GC metabolites (FGMs) reflect overall stress loads and stress responses after a species-specific time frame in the long-term. In our study species, the domestic guinea pig, GC measurements are commonly used to indicate stress responses to different environmental conditions, but the biological relevance of non-invasive measurements is widely unknown. We therefore established an experimental protocol based on the animals’ natural stress responses to different environmental conditions and compared GC levels in plasma, saliva, and fecal samples during non-stressful social isolations and stressful two-hour social confrontations with unfamiliar individuals. Plasma and saliva cortisol concentrations were significantly increased directly after the social confrontations, and plasma and saliva cortisol levels were strongly correlated. This demonstrates a high biological relevance of GC measurements in saliva. FGM levels measured 20 h afterwards, representing the reported mean gut passage time based on physiological validations, revealed that the overall stress load was not affected by the confrontations, but also no relations to plasma cortisol levels were detected. We therefore measured FGMs in two-hour intervals for 24 h after another social confrontation and detected significantly increased levels after four to twelve hours, reaching peak concentrations already after six hours. Our findings confirm that non-invasive GC measurements in guinea pigs are highly biologically relevant in indicating physiological stress responses compared to circulating

  10. Non-invasive cortisol measurements as indicators of physiological stress responses in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Matthias; Pschernig, Elisabeth; Wallner, Bernard; Millesi, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive measurements of glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations, including cortisol and corticosterone, serve as reliable indicators of adrenocortical activities and physiological stress loads in a variety of species. As an alternative to invasive analyses based on plasma, GC concentrations in saliva still represent single-point-of-time measurements, suitable for studying short-term or acute stress responses, whereas fecal GC metabolites (FGMs) reflect overall stress loads and stress responses after a species-specific time frame in the long-term. In our study species, the domestic guinea pig, GC measurements are commonly used to indicate stress responses to different environmental conditions, but the biological relevance of non-invasive measurements is widely unknown. We therefore established an experimental protocol based on the animals' natural stress responses to different environmental conditions and compared GC levels in plasma, saliva, and fecal samples during non-stressful social isolations and stressful two-hour social confrontations with unfamiliar individuals. Plasma and saliva cortisol concentrations were significantly increased directly after the social confrontations, and plasma and saliva cortisol levels were strongly correlated. This demonstrates a high biological relevance of GC measurements in saliva. FGM levels measured 20 h afterwards, representing the reported mean gut passage time based on physiological validations, revealed that the overall stress load was not affected by the confrontations, but also no relations to plasma cortisol levels were detected. We therefore measured FGMs in two-hour intervals for 24 h after another social confrontation and detected significantly increased levels after four to twelve hours, reaching peak concentrations already after six hours. Our findings confirm that non-invasive GC measurements in guinea pigs are highly biologically relevant in indicating physiological stress responses compared to circulating levels

  11. A new non-invasive statistical method to assess the spontaneous cardiac baroreflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Ducher, M; Fauvel, J P; Gustin, M P; Cerutti, C; Najem, R; Cuisinaud, G; Laville, M; Pozet, N; Paultre, C Z

    1995-06-01

    1. A new method was developed to evaluate cardiac baroreflex sensitivity. The association of a high systolic blood pressure with a low heart rate or the converse is considered to be under the influence of cardiac baroreflex activity. This method is based on the determination of the statistical dependence between systolic blood pressure and heart rate values obtained non-invasively by a Finapres device. Our computerized analysis selects the associations with the highest statistical dependence. A 'Z-coefficient' quantifies the strength of the statistical dependence. The slope of the linear regression, computed on these selected associations, is used to estimate baroreflex sensitivity. 2. The present study was carried out in 11 healthy resting male subjects. The results obtained by the 'Z-coefficient' method were compared with those obtained by cross-spectrum analysis, which has already been validated in humans. Furthermore, the reproducibility of both methods was checked after 1 week. 3. The results obtained by the two methods were significantly correlated (r = 0.78 for the first and r = 0.76 for the second experiment, P < 0.01). When repeated after 1 week, the average results were not significantly different. Considering individual results, test-retest correlation coefficients were higher with the Z-analysis (r = 0.79, P < 0.01) than with the cross-spectrum analysis (r = 0.61, P < 0.05). 4. In conclusion, as the Z-method gives results similar to but more reproducible than the cross-spectrum method, it might be a powerful and reliable tool to assess baroreflex sensitivity in humans.

  12. Prognostic value of non-invasive stress testing for coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Bigvava, Tamar; Zamani, Seyedeh Mahsa; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Gebker, Rolf; Pieske, Burkert; Kelle, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients remains a challenge but can have substantial prognostic implications for this patient group. Until now, sufficient data was not available on which to base the selection of the imaging modality in obese patients. The decision on which imaging modality to use should therefore follow the general guidelines. In this article, the authors discuss the prognostic value of the different non-invasive stress testing methods for CAD in obese patients.

  13. Evaluation of continuous non-invasive arterial pressure monitoring during induction of general anaesthesia in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G Anil; Jagadeesh, AM; Singh, Naveen G; Prasad, SR

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Continuous arterial pressure monitoring is essential in cardiac surgical patients during induction of general anaesthesia (GA). Continuous non-invasive arterial pressure (CNAP) monitoring is fast gaining importance due to complications associated with the invasive arterial monitoring. Recently, a new continuous non-invasive arterial pressure device (CNAP™) has been validated perioperatively in non-cardiac surgeries. The aim of our study is to compare and assess the performance of CNAP during GA with invasive arterial pressure (IAP) in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were included. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) data were recorded every minute for 20 min simultaneously for both IAP and CNAP™. Statistical analysis was performed using mountain plot and Bland Altman plots for assessing limits of agreement and bias (accuracy) calculation. Totally 1200 pairs of data were analysed. Results: The CNAP™ systolic, diastolic and MAP bias was 5.98 mm Hg, −3.72 mm Hg, and − 0.02 mm Hg respectively. Percentage within limits of agreement was 96.0%, 95.2% and 95.7% for systolic, diastolic and MAP. The mountain plot showed similar results as the Bland Altman plots. Conclusion: We conclude CNAP™ provides real-time estimates of arterial pressure comparable to IAP during induction of GA for cardiac surgery. We recommend CNAP can be used as an alternative to IAP in situations such as cardiac patients coming for non-cardiac surgeries, cardiac catheterization procedures, positive Allen's test, inability to cannulate radial artery and vascular diseases, where continuous blood pressure monitoring is required. PMID:25684809

  14. Signal processing technique for non-invasive real-time estimation of cardiac output by inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography).

    PubMed

    Bucklar, G B; Kaplan, V; Bloch, K E

    2003-05-01

    Inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography) non-invasively monitors changes in stroke volume by recording ventricular volume curves with an inductive plethysmographic transducer encircling the chest at the level of the heart. Clinical application of this method has been hampered, as data analysis has not been feasible in real time. Therefore a novel, real-time signal processing technique for inductance cardiography has been developed. Its essential concept consists in performance of multiple tasks by several, logically linked signal processing modules that have access to common databases. Based on these principles, a software application was designed that performs acquisition, display, filtering and ECG-triggered ensemble averaging of inductance signals and separates cardiogenic waveforms from noise related to respiration and other sources. The resulting ventricular volume curves are automatically analysed. Performance of the technique for monitoring cardiac output in real time was compared with thermodilution in four patients in an intensive care unit. The bias (mean difference) among 76 paired thoracocardiographic and thermodilution derived changes in cardiac output was 0%; limits of agreement (+/- 2 SD of the bias) were +/- 25%. It is concluded that the proposed signal processing technique for inductance cardiography holds promise for non-invasive, real-time estimation of changes in cardiac output.

  15. Thermal Imaging to Study Stress Non-invasively in Unrestrained Birds.

    PubMed

    Jerem, Paul; Herborn, Katherine; McCafferty, Dominic; McKeegan, Dorothy; Nager, Ruedi

    2015-11-06

    Stress, a central concept in biology, describes a suite of emergency responses to challenges. Among other responses, stress leads to a change in blood flow that results in a net influx of blood to key organs and an increase in core temperature. This stress-induced hyperthermia is used to assess stress. However, measuring core temperature is invasive. As blood flow is redirected to the core, the periphery of the body can cool. This paper describes a protocol where peripheral body temperature is measured non-invasively in wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) using infrared thermography. In the field we created a set-up bringing the birds to an ideal position in front of the camera by using a baited box. The camera takes a short thermal video recording of the undisturbed bird before applying a mild stressor (closing the box and therefore capturing the bird), and the bird's response to being trapped is recorded. The bare skin of the eye-region is the warmest area in the image. This allows an automated extraction of the maximum eye-region temperature from each image frame, followed by further steps of manual data filtering removing the most common sources of errors (motion blur, blinking). This protocol provides a time series of eye-region temperature with a fine temporal resolution that allows us to study the dynamics of the stress response non-invasively. Further work needs to demonstrate the usefulness of the method to assess stress, for instance to investigate whether eye-region temperature response is proportional to the strength of the stressor. If this can be confirmed, it will provide a valuable alternative method of stress assessment in animals and will be useful to a wide range of researchers from ecologists, conservation biologists, physiologists to animal welfare researchers.

  16. Thermal Imaging to Study Stress Non-invasively in Unrestrained Birds

    PubMed Central

    Jerem, Paul; Herborn, Katherine; McCafferty, Dominic; McKeegan, Dorothy; Nager, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Stress, a central concept in biology, describes a suite of emergency responses to challenges. Among other responses, stress leads to a change in blood flow that results in a net influx of blood to key organs and an increase in core temperature. This stress-induced hyperthermia is used to assess stress. However, measuring core temperature is invasive. As blood flow is redirected to the core, the periphery of the body can cool. This paper describes a protocol where peripheral body temperature is measured non-invasively in wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) using infrared thermography. In the field we created a set-up bringing the birds to an ideal position in front of the camera by using a baited box. The camera takes a short thermal video recording of the undisturbed bird before applying a mild stressor (closing the box and therefore capturing the bird), and the bird’s response to being trapped is recorded. The bare skin of the eye-region is the warmest area in the image. This allows an automated extraction of the maximum eye-region temperature from each image frame, followed by further steps of manual data filtering removing the most common sources of errors (motion blur, blinking). This protocol provides a time series of eye-region temperature with a fine temporal resolution that allows us to study the dynamics of the stress response non-invasively. Further work needs to demonstrate the usefulness of the method to assess stress, for instance to investigate whether eye-region temperature response is proportional to the strength of the stressor. If this can be confirmed, it will provide a valuable alternative method of stress assessment in animals and will be useful to a wide range of researchers from ecologists, conservation biologists, physiologists to animal welfare researchers. PMID:26575985

  17. Non-invasive evaluation of physiological stress in an iconic Australian marsupial: the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Webster, Koa; Nicolson, Vere; Mucci, Al; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-15

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are the only extant representatives of Australia's unique marsupial family Phascolarctidae and were listed as nationally Vulnerable in 2012. Causes of mortality are diverse, although the disease chlamydiosis, dog attacks, collisions with cars, and loss of habitat represent the principal reasons for the continued species decline. Koala breeding facilities in Queensland and New South Wales, Australia have been established for conservation and tourism. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress is important for determining the sub-lethal effects of environmental stressors on the well-being, reproduction and survival of Koalas in Zoos and also in the wild. In this study, we developed a faecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) for monitoring physiological stress in Koalas from two established Zoos in Australia and also within a free-living sub-population from Queensland. Biological validation of the FCM EIA was done using an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge. We discovered excretory lag-times of FCM of 24 h in females (n=2) and 48 h in male (n=2) Koalas in response to the ACTH challenge. FCM levels showed an episodic and delayed peak response lasting up to 9 days post ACTH challenge. This finding should be taken into consideration when designing future experiments to study the impacts of short-term (acute) and chronic stressors on the Koalas. Laboratory validations were done using parallelism and recovery checks (extraction efficiency) of the cortisol standard against pooled Koala faecal extracts. Greater than 99% recovery of the cortisol standard was obtained as well as a parallel displacement curve against Koala faecal extracts. FCM levels of the captive Koalas (n=10 males and 13 females) significantly differed by sex, reproductive condition (lactating versus non-lactating Koalas) and the handling groups. Handled male Koalas had 200% higher FCM levels than their non-handled counterparts, while females

  18. A non-invasive method for measuring cardiac output: the effect of Christmas lunch.

    PubMed

    Cowley, A J; Stainer, K; Murphy, D T; Murphy, J; Hampton, J R

    Cardiac output was measured in ten patients at routine cardiac catheterisation and three patients with severe heart failure by means of a carbon dioxide rebreathing technique with a computer-assisted mass spectrometer and compared with cardiac output measured by thermodilution. There was a close correlation (r = 0.96, p less than 0.01) between the two methods. Cardiac output measured by the carbon dioxide rebreathing technique increased after a typical Christmas lunch by a mean of 1.6 1/min in a group of healthy volunteers.

  19. Early non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in hemodynamically unstable intensive care patients: A multi-center randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute hemodynamic instability increases morbidity and mortality. We investigated whether early non-invasive cardiac output monitoring enhances hemodynamic stabilization and improves outcome. Methods A multicenter, randomized controlled trial was conducted in three European university hospital intensive care units in 2006 and 2007. A total of 388 hemodynamically unstable patients identified during their first six hours in the intensive care unit (ICU) were randomized to receive either non-invasive cardiac output monitoring for 24 hrs (minimally invasive cardiac output/MICO group; n = 201) or usual care (control group; n = 187). The main outcome measure was the proportion of patients achieving hemodynamic stability within six hours of starting the study. Results The number of hemodynamic instability criteria at baseline (MICO group mean 2.0 (SD 1.0), control group 1.8 (1.0); P = .06) and severity of illness (SAPS II score; MICO group 48 (18), control group 48 (15); P = .86)) were similar. At 6 hrs, 45 patients (22%) in the MICO group and 52 patients (28%) in the control group were hemodynamically stable (mean difference 5%; 95% confidence interval of the difference -3 to 14%; P = .24). Hemodynamic support with fluids and vasoactive drugs, and pulmonary artery catheter use (MICO group: 19%, control group: 26%; P = .11) were similar in the two groups. The median length of ICU stay was 2.0 (interquartile range 1.2 to 4.6) days in the MICO group and 2.5 (1.1 to 5.0) days in the control group (P = .38). The hospital mortality was 26% in the MICO group and 21% in the control group (P = .34). Conclusions Minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring added to usual care does not facilitate early hemodynamic stabilization in the ICU, nor does it alter the hemodynamic support or outcome. Our results emphasize the need to evaluate technologies used to measure stroke volume and cardiac output--especially their impact on the process of care--before any large

  20. Mechanography: a non-invasive technique for the evaluation of cardiac function in children

    PubMed Central

    Spitaels, Silja; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Davignon, André

    1972-01-01

    Experience in the pediatric age group with mechanography, an indirect method of cardiovascular investigation, is described with emphasis on the recording technique and on the analysis of the tracings. A few examples are presented with comments on the morphological aspects and the time characteristics of the pulse curves, showing how much information about cardiac disease and especially myocardial function in children may be obtained. PMID:4640813

  1. Investigating Cardiac MRI Based Right Ventricular Contractility As A Novel Non-Invasive Metric of Pulmonary Arterial Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prahlad G; Adhypak, Srilakshmi M; Williams, Ronald B; Doyle, Mark; Biederman, Robert WW

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We test the hypothesis that cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging-based indices of four-dimensional (4D) (three dimensions (3D) + time) right ventricle (RV) function have predictive values in ascertaining invasive pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) measurements from right heart catheterization (RHC) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). METHODS We studied five patients with idiopathic PAH and two age and sex-matched controls for RV function using a novel contractility index (CI) for amplitude and phase to peak contraction established from analysis of regional shape variation in the RV endocardium over 20 cardiac phases, segmented from CMR images in multiple orientations. RESULTS The amplitude of RV contractility correlated inversely with RV ejection fraction (RVEF; R2 = 0.64, P = 0.03) and PASP (R2 = 0.71, P = 0.02). Phase of peak RV contractility also correlated inversely to RVEF (R2 = 0.499, P = 0.12) and PASP (R2 = 0.66, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS RV contractility analyzed from CMR offers promising non-invasive metrics for classification of PAH, which are congruent with invasive pressure measurements. PMID:25624777

  2. (Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  3. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  4. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    C-11 hydroxy ephedrine, introduced as the first clinically usable norepinephrine analogue, studies employing normal volunteers and patients with various cardiac disorders was found to valuable as a nonadreneric tracer. Simultaneously, animal studies been used to assess its use following ischemic injury in order to define neuronal damage. Current research focuses on the comparison of C-11 hydroxyephedrine with other neurotransmitters such as C-11 epinephrine and C-11 threohydroxyephedrine. Epinephrine is primarily stored in vesicles of the nerve terminal, while threo-hydroxyephedrine is only substrate to uptake I mechanism. Such a combination of radiotracers may allow the dissection of uptake I mechanism as well as vesicular storage. In parallel to the refinement of presynaptic tracers for the sympathetic nervous system, we are developing radiopharmaceuticals to delineate the adrenergic receptors in the heart. The combined evaluation of pre- and postsynaptic nerve function will improve our ability to identify abnormalides. We are currently developing a new radiosynthesis of the hydrophilic adrenergic receptor antagonist C-11 CGP-12177 which has been used by others for the visualization of adrenergic receptors in the heart. We are developing radiopharmaceuticals, for the delineation of presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals. Derivatives of benzovesamicol have been labeled in our institution and are currently under investigation. The most promising agent is F-18 benzovesamicol (FEBOBV) which allows the visualization of parasympathetic nerve terminals in the canine heart as demonstrated by, preliminary PET data.

  5. First in vivo application and evaluation of a novel method for non-invasive estimation of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Theodore G; Soulis, Dimitrios; Vardoulis, Orestis; Protogerou, Athanase; Sfikakis, Petros P; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2014-10-01

    Surgical or critically ill patients often require continuous assessment of cardiac output (CO) for diagnostic purposes or for guiding therapeutic interventions. A new method of non-invasive CO estimation has been recently developed, which is based on pressure wave analysis. However, its validity has been examined only in silico. Aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the reproducibility and accuracy of the "systolic volume balance" method (SVB). Twenty two subjects underwent 2-D transthoracic echocardiography for CO measurement (reference value of CO). The application of SVB method required aortic pressure wave analysis and estimation of total arterial compliance. Aortic pulses were derived by mathematical transformation of radial pressure waves recorded by applanation tonometry. Total compliance was estimated by the "pulse pressure" method. The agreement, association, variability, bias and precision between Doppler and SVB measures of CO were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), mean difference, SD of differences, percentage error (PR) and Bland-Altman analysis. SVB yielded very reproducible CO estimates (ICC=0.84, mean difference 0.27 ± 0.73 L/min, PR = 16.7%). SVB-derived CO was comparable with Doppler measurements, indicating a good agreement and accuracy (ICC = 0.74, mean difference = -0.22 ± 0.364 L/min, PR ≈ 15). The basic mathematical and physical principles of the SVB method provide highly reproducible and accurate estimates of CO compared with echocardiography. PMID:25108554

  6. Validation of the use of foreign gas rebreathing method for non-invasive determination of cardiac output in heart disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Jian-an; Jiang, Chen-yang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare a new device (Innocor) for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output (CO) by foreign gas rebreathing method with conventional techniques used in the measurements of cardiac function. Methods: Cardiac outputs measured by Innocor (CORB) were compared with CO obtained by echocardiography (COEC), Swan-Ganz thermodilution (COTD), and left ventricle radiography (COLVR) in 34 patients subjected to cardiac catheterization. Values obtained from the four methods were analyzed by linear regression and paired values were compared by the method of Bland and Altman in SPSS. Results: There was strong positive correlation (r=0.94) between Innocor cardiac output values and the corresponding values obtained by thermodilution and between COEC and COLVR values. Thermodilution appears to overestimate cardiac output when compared to the values obtained with Innocor by (0.66±0.22) L/min (P<0.0001). There was no correlation between data obtained by Innocor and the corresponding COEC and COLVR values. Conclusion: Innocor CORB is an easy, safe and well established method for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output with good prospects for clinical application in heart disease patients. PMID:16358372

  7. Enabling non-invasive assessment of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE vascular grafts without increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Perrin, Louisiane; Kats, Dina; Meade, Thomas; Ameer, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with contrast enhancement is a potentially powerful tool to non-invasively monitor cell distribution in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The most commonly used contrast agent for cell labeling is super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). However, uptake of SPIONs triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells often leading to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a labeling system to non-invasively visualize an engineered endothelium in vascular grafts without creating excessive oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated: (1) chitosan-coated SPIONs (CSPIONs) as an antioxidant contrast agent for contrast enhancement, and (2) poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate) (POC) as an antioxidant interface to support cell adhesion and function of labeled cells on the vascular graft. While SPION-labeled endothelial cells (ECs) experienced elevated ROS formation and altered cell morphology, CSPION-labeled ECs cultured on POC-coated surfaces mitigated SPION-induced ROS formation and maintained EC morphology, phenotype, viability and functions. A monolayer of labeled ECs exhibited sufficient contrast with T2-weighed MR imaging. CSPION labeling of endothelial cells in combination with coating the graft wall with POC allows non-invasive monitoring of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE grafts without increasing oxidative stress. PMID:26283158

  8. Enabling Non-invasive Assessment of an Engineered Endothelium on ePTFE Vascular Grafts without Increasing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Perrin, Louisiane; Kats, Dina; Meade, Thomas; Ameer, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with contrast enhancement is a potentially powerful tool to non-invasively monitor cell distribution in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The most commonly used contrast agent for cell labeling is super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). However, uptake of SPIONs triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells often leading to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a labeling system to non-invasively visualize an engineered endothelium in vascular grafts without creating excessive oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated: (1) chitosan-coated SPIONs (CSPIONs) as an antioxidant contrast agent for contrast enhancement, and (2) poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate) (POC) as an antioxidant interface to support cell adhesion and function of labeled cells on the vascular graft. While SPION-labeled endothelial cells (ECs) experienced elevated ROS formation and altered cell morphology, CSPION-labeled ECs cultured on POC-coated surfaces mitigated SPION-induced ROS formation and maintained EC morphology, phenotype, viability and functions. A monolayer of labeled ECs exhibited sufficient contrast with T2-weighed MR imaging. CSPION labeling of endothelial cells in combination with coating the graft wall with POC allows non-invasive monitoring of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE grafts without increasing oxidative stress. PMID:26283158

  9. An open-source framework for stress-testing non-invasive foetal ECG extraction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Fernando; Behar, Joachim; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Oster, Julien; Clifford, Gari D

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decades, many studies have been published on the extraction of non-invasive foetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) from abdominal recordings. Most of these contributions claim to obtain excellent results in detecting foetal QRS (FQRS) complexes in terms of location. A small subset of authors have investigated the extraction of morphological features from the NI-FECG. However, due to the shortage of available public databases, the large variety of performance measures employed and the lack of open-source reference algorithms, most contributions cannot be meaningfully assessed. This article attempts to address these issues by presenting a standardised methodology for stress testing NI-FECG algorithms, including absolute data, as well as extraction and evaluation routines. To that end, a large database of realistic artificial signals was created, totaling 145.8 h of multichannel data and over one million FQRS complexes. An important characteristic of this dataset is the inclusion of several non-stationary events (e.g. foetal movements, uterine contractions and heart rate fluctuations) that are critical for evaluating extraction routines. To demonstrate our testing methodology, three classes of NI-FECG extraction algorithms were evaluated: blind source separation (BSS), template subtraction (TS) and adaptive methods (AM). Experiments were conducted to benchmark the performance of eight NI-FECG extraction algorithms on the artificial database focusing on: FQRS detection and morphological analysis (foetal QT and T/QRS ratio). The overall median FQRS detection accuracies (i.e. considering all non-stationary events) for the best performing methods in each group were 99.9% for BSS, 97.9% for AM and 96.0% for TS. Both FQRS detections and morphological parameters were shown to heavily depend on the extraction techniques and signal-to-noise ratio. Particularly, it is shown that their evaluation in the source domain, obtained after using a BSS technique, should be

  10. Non-invasive technology that improves cardiac function after experimental myocardial infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz).

    PubMed

    Uryash, Arkady; Bassuk, Jorge; Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R; Adams, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  11. Non-Invasive Technology That Improves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz)

    PubMed Central

    Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  12. A pilot study of prognostic value of non-invasive cardiac parameters for major adverse cardiac events in patients with acute coronary syndrome treated with percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Min-Jie; Pan, Ye-Sheng; Hu, Wei-Guo; Lu, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Qing-Yong; Huang, Dong; Huang, Xiao-Li; Wei, Meng; Li, Jing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and individual electrocardiographic parameters related to abnormal depolarization/repolarization or baroreceptor sensitivity that had the best predictive value for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients with ACS who underwent coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were included in this prospective study. Ventricular late potential (VLP), heart rate turbulence (HRT), heart rate variability (HRV), and T wave alternans (TWA) parameters were measured using 24 h Holter monitoring 2-4 weeks after onset of ACS. Initial and follow-up LVEF was measured by ultrasound. Patients were followed for at least 6 months to record the occurrence of MACE. Models using combinations of the individual independent prognostic factors found by multivariate analysis were then constructed to use for estimation of risk of MACE. In multivariate analysis, VLP measured as QRS duration, HRV measured as standard deviation of normal RR intervals, and followup LVEF, but none of the other parameters studied, were independent risk factors for MACE. Areas under ROC curve (AUCs) for combinations of 2 or all 3 factors ranged from 0.73 to 0.76. Combinations of any of the three independent risk factors for MACE in ACS patients with PCI improved prediction and, because these risk factors were obtained non-invasively, may have future clinical usefulness. PMID:26885226

  13. Non-invasive assessment of reproductive status and stress in captive Asian elephants in three south Indian zoos.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Palugulla Reddy, Vivekananda; Kokkiligadda, Adiseshu; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2014-05-15

    Asian elephants in captivity need immediate attention to be bred so as to meet the increasing demand for captive elephants and to overcome the dependence on supplementing the captive stock with wild animals. Unfortunately, captive breeding programs across the globe have met with limited success and therefore more effort is needed to improve breeding in captivity. Endocrine profiling of reproductive hormones (progestagens and androgens) and the stress hormone (glucocorticoids) could facilitate better management and breeding strategies. In the present study, we investigated reproductive and stress physiology of 12 captive Asian elephants for 10-27 months using a non-invasive method based on steroid analysis of 1700 elephant dung samples. Most of the elephants were cycling regularly. Males during musth showed increased fecal androgen metabolite concentrations and exhibited a slight increase in fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels. Elephants used in public festivals and processions showed significantly increased in faecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels. The results indicate that captive elephants require periodic health care, better husbandry practices and scientific management for sustainable captive population.

  14. Non-Invasive Drosophila ECG Recording by Using Eutectic Gallium-Indium Alloy Electrode: A Feasible Tool for Future Research on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hung; Tzeng, Te-Hsuen; Huang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yu-Hao; Chang, Yi-Chung; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wu, June-Tai; Lee, Hsiu-Hsian; Lai, Po-Jung; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Cheng, Ya-Chen; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2014-01-01

    Background Drosophila heart tube is a feasible model for cardiac physiological research. However, obtaining Drosophila electrocardiograms (ECGs) is difficult, due to the weak signals and limited contact area to apply electrodes. This paper presents a non-invasive Gallium-Indium (GaIn) based recording system for Drosophila ECG measurement, providing the heart rate and heartbeat features to be observed. This novel, high-signal-quality system prolongs the recording time of insect ECGs, and provides a feasible platform for research on the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. Methods In this study, two types of electrode, tungsten needle probes and GaIn electrodes, were used respectively to noiselessly conduct invasive and noninvasive ECG recordings of Drosophila. To further analyze electrode properties, circuit models were established and simulated. By using electromagnetic shielded heart signal acquiring system, consisted of analog amplification and digital filtering, the ECG signals of three phenotypes that have different heart functions were recorded without dissection. Results and Discussion The ECG waveforms of different phenotypes of Drosophila recorded invasively and repeatedly with n value (n>5) performed obvious difference in heart rate. In long period ECG recordings, non-invasive method implemented by GaIn electrodes acts relatively stable in both amplitude and period. To analyze GaIn electrode, the correctness of GaIn electrode model established by this paper was validated, presenting accuracy, stability, and reliability. Conclusions Noninvasive ECG recording by GaIn electrodes was presented for recording Drosophila pupae ECG signals within a limited contact area and signal strength. Thus, the observation of ECG changes in normal and SERCA-depleted Drosophila over an extended period is feasible. This method prolongs insect survival time while conserving major ECG features, and provides a platform for electrophysiological signal research

  15. Identifying Model Inaccuracies and Solution Uncertainties in Non-Invasive Activation-Based Imaging of Cardiac Excitation using Convex Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Erem, Burak; van Dam, Peter M.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrical function has begun to move towards clinical adoption. Here we consider one common formulation of the problem, in which the goal is to estimate the spatial distribution of electrical activation times during a cardiac cycle. We address the challenge of understanding the robustness and uncertainty of solutions to this formulation. This formulation poses a non-convex, non-linear least squares optimization problem. We show that it can be relaxed to be convex, at the cost of some degree of physiological realism of the solution set, and that this relaxation can be used as a framework to study model inaccuracy and solution uncertainty. We present two examples, one using data from a healthy human subject and the other synthesized with the ECGSIM software package. In the first case, we consider uncertainty in the initial guess and regularization parameter. In the second case, we mimic the presence of an ischemic zone in the heart in a way which violates a model assumption. We show that the convex relaxation allows understanding of spatial distribution of parameter sensitivity in the first case, and identification of model violation in the second. PMID:24710159

  16. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report, September 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  17. SU-C-303-06: Treatment Planning Study for Non-Invasive Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation with Scanned Carbon Ions in An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, A; Constantinescu, A; Prall, M; Kaderka, R; Durante, M; Graeff, C; Lehmann, H I; Takami, M; Packer, D L; Lugenbiel, P; Thomas, D; Richter, D; Bert, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Scanned carbon ion beams might offer a non-invasive alternative treatment for cardiac arrhythmia, which are a major health-burden. We studied the feasibility of this procedure in an animal model. The underlying treatment planning and motion mitigation strategies will be presented. Methods: The study was carried out in 15 pigs, randomly distributed to 3 target groups: atrioventricular node (AVN, 8 animals with 25, 40, and 55 Gy target dose), left ventricular free-wall (LV, 4 animals with 40 Gy) and superior pulmonary vein (SPV, 3 animals with 40 Gy). Breathing motion was suppressed by repeated enforced breathholds at end exhale. Cardiac motion was mitigated by an inhomogeneous rescanning scheme with up to 15 rescans. The treatment planning was performed using the GSI in-house software TRiP4D on cardiac-gated 4DCTs, applying a range-considering ITV based on an extended CTV. For AVN and SPV isotropic 5 mm margins were applied to the CTV, while for the LV 2mm+2% range margins were used. The opposing fields for AVN and LV targets were optimized independently (SFUD), while SPV treatments were optimized as IMPT deliveries, including dose restrictions to the radiosensitive AVN. Results: Median value of D{sub 95} over all rescanning simulations was 99.1% (AVN), 98.0% (SPV) and 98.3% (LV) for the CTV and 94.7% (AVN) and 92.7% (SPV) for the PTV, respectively. The median D{sub 5}-D{sub 95} was improved with rescanning compared to unmitigated delivery from 13.3 to 6.5% (CTV) and from 23.4 to 11.6% (PTV). ICRP dose limits for aorta, trachea, esophagus and skin were respected. The maximal dose in the coronary arteries was limited to 30 Gy. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of a homogeneous dose delivery to different cardiac structures in a porcine model using a time-optimized inhomogeneous rescanning scheme. The presented treatment planning strategies were applied in a pig study with the analysis ongoing. Funding: This work was supported in part by the

  18. Holter monitoring for the screening of cardiac disease in diabetes mellitus: The non-invasive Holter monitoring observation of new cardiac events in diabetics study.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoko M; Ueshima, Kenji; Nohara, Ryuji; Mizunuma, Yoshimi; Segawa, Ikuo; Tanaka-Mizuno, Sachiko; Yasuno, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa; Hiramori, Katsuhiko; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the usefulness of Holter monitoring to detect cardiac disease and predict future cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic diabetic patients. This is a multi-centre, prospective study in 406 asymptomatic diabetic patients. They were categorized into three groups based on findings of Holter monitoring. A total of 377 met inclusion criteria and were classified as low (n = 172), moderate (n = 136) and high risk (n = 69). In total, 86 in moderate and 53 in high risk receive further evaluation. In total, 29 in moderate and 25 in high risk were diagnosed as cardiac disease and 12 required additional treatment, including coronary intervention. Over 1.8 years of mean follow-up, 11 (16.5 per 1000 person-years) experienced cardiovascular events. The cumulative incidence in moderate and high risk was higher than that in low risk (p = 0.029 and p = 0.014, respectively). Our study suggests that Holter monitoring may be a useful screening tool to detect cardiac disease and predict future cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic diabetic patients.

  19. Prediction of rectal temperature using non-invasive physiologic variable measurements in hair pregnant ewes subjected to natural conditions of heat stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Pérez, Ricardo; Avendaño-Reyes, Leonel; Mejía-Vázquez, Ángel; Álvarez-Valenzuela, F Daniel; Correa-Calderón, Abelardo; Mellado, Miguel; Meza-Herrera, Cesar A; Guerra-Liera, Juan E; Robinson, P H; Macías-Cruz, Ulises

    2016-01-01

    Rectal temperature (RT) is the foremost physiological variable indicating if an animal is suffering hyperthermia. However, this variable is traditionally measured by invasive methods, which may compromise animal welfare. Models to predict RT have been developed for growing pigs and lactating dairy cows, but not for pregnant heat-stressed ewes. Our aim was to develop a prediction equation for RT using non-invasive physiological variables in pregnant ewes under heat stress. A total of 192 records of respiratory frequency (RF) and hair coat temperature in various body regions (i.e., head, rump, flank, shoulder, and belly) obtained from 24 Katahdin × Pelibuey pregnant multiparous ewes were collected during the last third of gestation (i.e., d 100 to lambing) with a 15 d sampling interval. Hair coat temperatures were taken using infrared thermal imaging technology. Initially, a Pearson correlation analysis examined the relationship among variables, and then multiple linear regression analysis was used to develop the prediction equations. All predictor variables were positively correlated (P<0.01; r=0.59-0.67) with RT. The adjusted equation which best predicted RT (P<0.01; Radj(2)=56.15%; CV=0.65%) included as predictors RF and head and belly temperatures. Comparison of predicted and observed values for RT indicates a suitable agreement (P<0.01) between them with moderate accuracy (Radj(2)=56.15%) when RT was calculated with the adjusted equation. In general, the final equation does not violate any assumption of multiple regression analysis. The RT in heat-stressed pregnant ewes can be predicted with an adequate accuracy using non-invasive physiologic variables, and the final equation was: RT=35.57+0.004 (RF)+0.067 (heat temperature)+0.028 (belly temperature).

  20. Non-Invasive Assessment of the Interrelationships of Diet, Pregnancy Rate, Group Composition, and Physiological and Nutritional Stress of Barren-Ground Caribou in Late Winter.

    PubMed

    Joly, Kyle; Wasser, Samuel K; Booth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The winter diet of barren-ground caribou may affect adult survival, timing of parturition, neonatal survival, and postpartum mass. We used microhistological analyses and hormone levels in feces to determine sex-specific late-winter diets, pregnancy rates, group composition, and endocrine-based measures of physiological and nutritional stress. Lichens, which are highly digestible but contain little protein, dominated the diet (> 68%) but were less prevalent in the diets of pregnant females as compared to non-pregnant females and males. The amount of lichens in the diets of pregnant females decreased at higher latitudes and as winter progressed. Pregnancy rates (82.1%, 95% CI = 76.0 - 88.1%) of adult cows were within the expected range for a declining herd, while pregnancy status was not associated with lichen abundance in the diet. Most groups (80%) were of mixed sex. Male: female ratios (62:100) were not skewed enough to affect the decline. Levels of hormones indicating nutritional stress were detected in areas of low habitat quality and at higher latitudes. Levels of hormones indicated that physiological stress was greatest for pregnant cows, which faced the increasing demands of gestation in late winter. These fecal-based measures of diet and stress provided contextual information for the potential mechanisms of the ongoing decline. Non-invasive techniques, such as monitoring diets, pregnancy rates, sex ratios and stress levels from fecal samples, will become increasingly important as monitoring tools as the industrial footprint continues to expand in the Arctic.

  1. Aerial Imagery and Other Non-invasive Approaches to Detect Nitrogen and Water Stress in a Potato Crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigon, Tyler John

    Post-emergence nitrogen (N) fertilizer is typically split applied to irrigated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in Minnesota in order to minimize the likelihood of nitrate leaching and to best match N availability to crop demands. Petiole nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentration is often used as a diagnostic test to determine the rate and timing of split applications, but using this approach for variable rate applications is difficult. Canopy-level spectral measurements, such as hyperspectral and multispectral imagery, have the potential to be a reliable tool for making in-season N management decisions for precision agriculture applications. The objectives of this two year field study were to evaluate the effects of variety, N treatment, and water stress on growth characteristics and the ability of and canopy-level reflectance to predict N stress in potato. Treatments included two irrigation regimes (unstressed and stressed), five N regimes categorized by three N rates (34 kg N ha-1, 180 kg N ha-1, and 270 kg N ha-1) in which the 270 kg N ha-1 rate had post-emergence N either split applied or applied early in the season, and two potato varieties (Russet Burbank and Alpine Russet). Higher N rates and split applications generally resulted in higher tuber yield for both varieties. Insufficient supplemental water was found to reduce tuber yield and plant N uptake. Of the broadband indices, narrowband indices, and partial least squares regression (PLS) models evaluated, the best predictor of N stress as measured by leaf N concentration was the PLS model using derivative reflectance (r2 of 0.79 for RB and 0.77 for AR). However, the best technique for determining N stress level for variable rate application of N fertilizer was MTCI (MERIS Terrestrial Chlorophyll Index) due to its good relationship with leaf N concentration and high accuracy. As a final aspect of the study, results from the experimental plots were used to predict N stress in a

  2. Hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography combined with automated functional imaging non-invasively detected vasospastic angina

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Mizukoshi, Kei; Kou, Seisyou; Takai, Manabu; Izumo, Masaki; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Ohtaki, Eiji; Nobuoka, Sachihiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with chest discomfort while sleeping. The patient was suspected of having vasospastic angina (VSA) and underwent hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography. No chest pain, ECG changes or decreased wall motion was found. However, automated function imaging (AFI) showed decreased peak systolic strain at the apex and postsystolic shortening at both the apex and inferior wall, which was not found before the test. The provocation test revealed 99% stenosis in the right coronary artery #2 at a dose of 50 μg acetylcholine and 90% stenosis in the left coronary artery #8 at a dose of 100 μg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having VSA. The present case demonstrates the usefulness of AFI combined with hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography as a screening examination for VSA. PMID:22798093

  3. Hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography combined with automated functional imaging non-invasively detected vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Mizukoshi, Kei; Kou, Seisyou; Takai, Manabu; Izumo, Masaki; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Ohtaki, Eiji; Nobuoka, Sachihiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2010-11-29

    A 47-year-old male presented with chest discomfort while sleeping. The patient was suspected of having vasospastic angina (VSA) and underwent hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography. No chest pain, ECG changes or decreased wall motion was found. However, automated function imaging (AFI) showed decreased peak systolic strain at the apex and postsystolic shortening at both the apex and inferior wall, which was not found before the test. The provocation test revealed 99% stenosis in the right coronary artery #2 at a dose of 50 μg acetylcholine and 90% stenosis in the left coronary artery #8 at a dose of 100 μg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having VSA. The present case demonstrates the usefulness of AFI combined with hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography as a screening examination for VSA.

  4. Portable oxidative stress sensor: dynamic and non-invasive measurements of extracellular H₂O₂ released by algae.

    PubMed

    Koman, Volodymyr B; Santschi, Christian; von Moos, Nadia R; Slaveykova, Vera I; Martin, Olivier J F

    2015-06-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by aerobic organisms are essential for physiological processes such as cell signaling, apoptosis, immune defense and oxidative stress mechanisms. Unbalanced oxidant/antioxidant budgets are involved in many diseases and, therefore, the sensitive measurement of ROS is of great interest. Here, we present a new device for the real-time monitoring of oxidative stress by measuring one of the most stable ROS, namely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This portable oxidative stress sensor contains the heme protein cytochrome c (cyt c) as sensing element whose spectral response enables the detection of H2O2 down to a detection limit of 40 nM. This low detection limit is achieved by introducing cyt c in a random medium, enabling multiscattering that enhances the optical trajectory through the cyt c spot. A contact microspotting technique is used to produce reproducible and reusable cyt c spots which are stable for several days. Experiments in static and microfluidic regimes, as well as numerical simulations demonstrate the suitability of the cyt c/H2O2 reaction system for the real-time sensing of the kinetics of biological processes without H2O2 depletion in the measurement chamber. As an example, we detect the release of H2O2 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to either 180 nM functionalized CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots, or to 10 mg/l TiO2 nanoparticles. The continuous measurement of extracellular H2O2 by this optical sensor with high sensitivity is a promising new means for real-time cytotoxicity tests, the investigation of oxidative stress and other physiological cell processes. PMID:25588702

  5. Non-Invasive Assessment of the Interrelationships of Diet, Pregnancy Rate, Group Composition, and Physiological and Nutritional Stress of Barren-Ground Caribou in Late Winter

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Kyle; Wasser, Samuel K.; Booth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The winter diet of barren-ground caribou may affect adult survival, timing of parturition, neonatal survival, and postpartum mass. We used microhistological analyses and hormone levels in feces to determine sex-specific late-winter diets, pregnancy rates, group composition, and endocrine-based measures of physiological and nutritional stress. Lichens, which are highly digestible but contain little protein, dominated the diet (> 68%) but were less prevalent in the diets of pregnant females as compared to non-pregnant females and males. The amount of lichens in the diets of pregnant females decreased at higher latitudes and as winter progressed. Pregnancy rates (82.1%, 95% CI = 76.0 – 88.1%) of adult cows were within the expected range for a declining herd, while pregnancy status was not associated with lichen abundance in the diet. Most groups (80%) were of mixed sex. Male: female ratios (62:100) were not skewed enough to affect the decline. Levels of hormones indicating nutritional stress were detected in areas of low habitat quality and at higher latitudes. Levels of hormones indicated that physiological stress was greatest for pregnant cows, which faced the increasing demands of gestation in late winter. These fecal-based measures of diet and stress provided contextual information for the potential mechanisms of the ongoing decline. Non-invasive techniques, such as monitoring diets, pregnancy rates, sex ratios and stress levels from fecal samples, will become increasingly important as monitoring tools as the industrial footprint continues to expand in the Arctic. PMID:26061003

  6. Non-Invasive Assessment of the Interrelationships of Diet, Pregnancy Rate, Group Composition, and Physiological and Nutritional Stress of Barren-Ground Caribou in Late Winter.

    PubMed

    Joly, Kyle; Wasser, Samuel K; Booth, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The winter diet of barren-ground caribou may affect adult survival, timing of parturition, neonatal survival, and postpartum mass. We used microhistological analyses and hormone levels in feces to determine sex-specific late-winter diets, pregnancy rates, group composition, and endocrine-based measures of physiological and nutritional stress. Lichens, which are highly digestible but contain little protein, dominated the diet (> 68%) but were less prevalent in the diets of pregnant females as compared to non-pregnant females and males. The amount of lichens in the diets of pregnant females decreased at higher latitudes and as winter progressed. Pregnancy rates (82.1%, 95% CI = 76.0 - 88.1%) of adult cows were within the expected range for a declining herd, while pregnancy status was not associated with lichen abundance in the diet. Most groups (80%) were of mixed sex. Male: female ratios (62:100) were not skewed enough to affect the decline. Levels of hormones indicating nutritional stress were detected in areas of low habitat quality and at higher latitudes. Levels of hormones indicated that physiological stress was greatest for pregnant cows, which faced the increasing demands of gestation in late winter. These fecal-based measures of diet and stress provided contextual information for the potential mechanisms of the ongoing decline. Non-invasive techniques, such as monitoring diets, pregnancy rates, sex ratios and stress levels from fecal samples, will become increasingly important as monitoring tools as the industrial footprint continues to expand in the Arctic. PMID:26061003

  7. Non-invasive diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence sub types using wavelet analysis, shannon entropy and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Kadir; Kara, Sadık; Latifoğlu, Fatma; Aydın, Sinem; Kırış, Adem; Ozkuvancı, Unsal

    2012-08-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common female disorder. Although generally not a serious condition, it negatively affects the lifestyle and daily activity of subjects. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most versatile of several incontinence types and is distinguished by physical degeneration of the continence-providing mechanism. Some surgical treatment methods exist, but the success of the surgery mainly depends upon a correct diagnosis. Diagnosis has two major steps: subjects who are suffering from true SUI must be identified, and the SUI sub-type must be determined, because each sub-type is treated with a different surgery. The first step is straightforward and uses standard identification methods. The second step, however, requires invasive, uncomfortable urodynamic studies that are difficult to apply. Many subjects try to cope with the disorder rather than seek treatment from health care providers, in part because of the invasive diagnostic methods. In this study, a diagnostic method with a success rate comparable to that of urodynamic studies is presented. This new method has some advantages over the current one. First, it is noninvasive; data are collected using Doppler ultrasound recording. Second, it requires no special tools and is easy to apply, relatively inexpensive, faster and more hygienic.

  8. Non-invasive monitoring of reproductive and stress hormones in the endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens).

    PubMed

    Beaulah Budithi, Neema Raja; Kumar, Vinod; Yalla, Suneel Kumar; Rai, Upashna; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2016-09-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) is classified as endangered due to its declining population, habitat fragmentation and poaching. Efforts are being made to breed them in captivity as part of nationwide conservation breeding program. This study aimed to standardize Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) to monitor reproductive (Progesterone metabolite, Testosterone) and stress hormone (Cortisol) in red panda. For this purpose, we collected 1471 faecal samples from four females and one male over a period of one year from Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, Darjeeling, India. HPLC confirmed the presence of immunoreactive 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one, testosterone and cortisol metabolites in faecal samples. Using 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one EIA, we were able to monitor reproduction and detect pregnancy in one of the females, which successfully conceived and delivered during the study period. We were also able to monitor testosterone and cortisol in faecal samples of the red panda. Faecal testosterone levels were found in higher concentration in breeding season than in non-breeding season. Faecal cortisol concentrations showed a negative relationship with ambient temperature and peaked during winter months in all animals. Standardization of EIAs and faecal hormone monitoring would facilitate red panda conservation breeding programs in India and elsewhere.

  9. Non-invasive monitoring of reproductive and stress hormones in the endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens).

    PubMed

    Beaulah Budithi, Neema Raja; Kumar, Vinod; Yalla, Suneel Kumar; Rai, Upashna; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2016-09-01

    The red panda (Ailurus fulgens fulgens) is classified as endangered due to its declining population, habitat fragmentation and poaching. Efforts are being made to breed them in captivity as part of nationwide conservation breeding program. This study aimed to standardize Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) to monitor reproductive (Progesterone metabolite, Testosterone) and stress hormone (Cortisol) in red panda. For this purpose, we collected 1471 faecal samples from four females and one male over a period of one year from Padmaja Naidu Himalayan Zoological Park, Darjeeling, India. HPLC confirmed the presence of immunoreactive 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one, testosterone and cortisol metabolites in faecal samples. Using 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one EIA, we were able to monitor reproduction and detect pregnancy in one of the females, which successfully conceived and delivered during the study period. We were also able to monitor testosterone and cortisol in faecal samples of the red panda. Faecal testosterone levels were found in higher concentration in breeding season than in non-breeding season. Faecal cortisol concentrations showed a negative relationship with ambient temperature and peaked during winter months in all animals. Standardization of EIAs and faecal hormone monitoring would facilitate red panda conservation breeding programs in India and elsewhere. PMID:27481551

  10. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  11. Autocalibrating pulse contour analysis based on radial artery applanation tonometry for continuous non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in intensive care unit patients after major gastrointestinal surgery--a prospective method comparison study.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Y; Langemann, M; Schön, G; Kluge, S; Reuter, D A; Saugel, B

    2016-05-01

    The T-Line(®) system (Tensys(®) Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) non-invasively estimates cardiac output (CO) using autocalibrating pulse contour analysis of the radial artery applanation tonometry-derived arterial waveform. We compared T-Line CO measurements (TL-CO) with invasively obtained CO measurements using transpulmonary thermodilution (TDCO) and calibrated pulse contour analysis (PC-CO) in patients after major gastrointestinal surgery. We compared 1) TL-CO versus TD-CO and 2) TL-CO versus PC-CO in 27 patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after major gastrointestinal surgery. For the assessment of TD-CO and PC-CO we used the PiCCO(®) system (Pulsion Medical Systems SE, Feldkirchen, Germany). Per patient, we compared two sets of TD-CO and 30 minutes of PC-CO measurements with the simultaneously recorded TL-CO values using Bland-Altman analysis. The mean of differences (± standard deviation; 95% limits of agreement) between TL-CO and TD-CO was -0.8 (±1.6; -4.0 to +2.3) l/minute with a percentage error of 45%. For TL-CO versus PC-CO, we observed a mean of differences of -0.4 (±1.5; -3.4 to +2.5) l/minute with a percentage error of 43%. In ICU patients after major gastrointestinal surgery, continuous non-invasive CO measurement based on autocalibrating pulse contour analysis of the radial artery applanation tonometry-derived arterial waveform (TL-CO) is feasible in a clinical study setting. However, the agreement of TL-CO with TD-CO and PC-CO observed in our study indicates that further improvements are needed before the technology can be recommended for clinical use in these patients.

  12. Speckle tracking echocardiography in the critically ill: enticing research with minimal clinical practicality or the answer to non-invasive cardiac assessment?

    PubMed

    S, Orde; Sj, Huang; As, Mclean

    2016-09-01

    Echocardiography is developing rapidly. Speckle tracking echocardiography is the latest semi-automatic tool that has potential to quantitatively describe cardiac dysfunction that may be unrecognised by conventional echocardiography. It is a non-Doppler, angle-independent, feasible and reproducible method to evaluate myocardial function in both non-critically ill and critically ill populations. Increasingly it has become a standard measure of both left and right ventricle function in specific patient groups, e.g. chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy or pulmonary hypertension. To date there are few studies in the critically ill, predominantly in sepsis, yet all describe dysfunction beyond standard measures. Other areas of interest include heart-lung interactions, right ventricle function and twist and torsion of the heart. A word of caution is required, however, in that speckle tracking echocardiography is far from perfect and is more challenging, particularly in the critically ill, than implied by many published studies. It takes time to learn and perform and most values are not validated, particularly in the critically ill. We should be cautious in accepting that the latest software used in cardiology cohorts will automatically be the answer in the critically ill. Even with these limitations the technology is enticing and results fascinating. We are uncovering previously undescribed dysfunction and although it currently is essentially a research-based activity, there is great promise as a clinical tool as echocardiography analysis becomes more automated, and potentially speckle tracking echocardiography could help describe cardiac function in critical illness more accurately than is possible with current techniques. PMID:27608336

  13. Non invasive continuous hemodynamic evaluation of cirrhotic patients after postural challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tarquini, Roberto; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusi, Fulvio; Laffi, Giacomo; Gensini, Gian Franco; Romano, Salvatore Mario

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether Most Care is able to detect the cardiovascular alterations in response to physiological stress (posture). METHODS: Non invasive hemodynamic was assessed in 26 cirrhotic patients compared to healthy subjects, both in the supine and standing positions. RESULTS: In baseline conditions, when compared to healthy subjects, cirrhotic patients showed significantly lower values of dicrotic and diastolic pressures and systemic vascular resistance. While in the standing position, cirrhotic patients showed higher values of cardiac index, stroke volume index and cardiac cycle efficiency. When returning to the supine position, cirrhotic patients exhibited lower values of dicrotic and diastolic pressures and systemic vascular resistance in the presence of higher values of cardiac index, stroke volume index and cardiac cycle efficiency. CONCLUSION: Most Care proved to be able to detect cardiovascular abnormalities bedside in the resting state and after postural challenge in cirrhotic patients. PMID:22567187

  14. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  15. An autocalibrating algorithm for non-invasive cardiac output determination based on the analysis of an arterial pressure waveform recorded with radial artery applanation tonometry: a proof of concept pilot analysis.

    PubMed

    Saugel, Bernd; Meidert, Agnes S; Langwieser, Nicolas; Wagner, Julia Y; Fassio, Florian; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Prechtl, Luisa M; Huber, Wolfgang; Schmid, Roland M; Gödje, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to describe and evaluate an autocalibrating algorithm for determination of cardiac output (CO) based on the analysis of an arterial pressure (AP) waveform recorded using radial artery applanation tonometry (AT) in a continuous non-invasive manner. To exemplarily describe and evaluate the CO algorithm, we deliberately selected 22 intensive care unit patients with impeccable AP waveforms from a database including AP data obtained with AT (T-Line system; Tensys Medical Inc.). When recording AP data for this prospectively maintained database, we had simultaneously noted CO measurements obtained from just calibrated pulse contour analysis (PiCCO system; Pulsion Medical Systems) every minute. We applied the autocalibrating CO algorithm to the AT-derived AP waveforms and noted the computed CO values every minute during a total of 15 min of data recording per patient (3 × 5-min intervals). These 330 AT-derived CO (AT-CO) values were then statistically compared to the corresponding pulse contour CO (PC-CO) values. Mean ± standard deviation for PC-CO and AT-CO was 7.0 ± 2.0 and 6.9 ± 2.1 L/min, respectively. The coefficient of variation for PC-CO and AT-CO was 0.280 and 0.299, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a bias of +0.1 L/min (standard deviation 0.8 L/min; 95% limits of agreement -1.5 to 1.7 L/min, percentage error 23%). CO can be computed based on the analysis of the AP waveform recorded with AT. In the selected patients included in this pilot analysis, a percentage error of 23% indicates clinically acceptable agreement between AT-CO and PC-CO.

  16. Acute emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2007-07-18

    Episodes of acute emotional stress can have significant adverse effects on the heart. Acute emotional stress can produce left ventricular contractile dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, or disturbances of cardiac rhythm. Although these abnormalities are often only transient, their consequences can be gravely damaging and sometimes fatal. Despite the many descriptions of catastrophic cardiovascular events in the setting of acute emotional stress, the anatomical substrate and physiological pathways by which emotional stress triggers cardiovascular events are only now being characterized, aided by the advent of functional neuroimaging. Recent evidence indicates that asymmetric brain activity is particularly important in making the heart more susceptible to ventricular arrhythmias. Lateralization of cerebral activity during emotional stress may stimulate the heart asymmetrically and produce areas of inhomogeneous repolarization that create electrical instability and facilitate the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with ischemic heart disease who survive an episode of sudden cardiac death in the setting of acute emotional stress should receive a beta-blocker. Nonpharmacological approaches to manage emotional stress in patients with and without coronary artery disease, including social support, relaxation therapy, yoga, meditation, controlled slow breathing, and biofeedback, are also appropriate to consider and merit additional investigation in randomized trials.

  17. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  18. Non-invasive assessment of animal exercise stress: real-time PCR of GLUT4, COX2, SOD1 and HSP70 in avalanche military dog saliva.

    PubMed

    Diverio, S; Guelfi, G; Barbato, O; Di Mari, W; Egidi, M G; Santoro, M M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase mRNA expression of a growing number of genes. The aim of this study was to assess if mRNA expression of the metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4), COX2 (cyclooxygenase 2), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) and HSP70 (heat shock protein 70) in saliva changes following acute exercise stress in dogs. For this purpose, 12 avalanche dogs of the Italian Military Force Guardia di Finanza were monitored during simulation of a search for a buried person in an artificial avalanche area. Rectal temperature (RT) and saliva samples were collected the day before the trial (T0), immediately after the descent from a helicopter at the onset of a simulated avalanche search and rescue operation (T1), after the discovery of the buried person (T2) and 2 h later (T3). Expressions of GLUT4, SOD1, COX2 and HSP70 were measured by real-time PCR. The simulated avalanche search and rescue operation was shown to exert a significant effect on RT, as well as on the expression of all metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes investigated, which peaked at T2. The observed expression patterns indicate an acute exercise stress-induced upregulation, as confirmed by the reductions in expression at T3. Moreover, our findings indicate that saliva is useful for assessing metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes without the need for restraint, which could affect working dog performance.

  19. Non-invasive assessment of animal exercise stress: real-time PCR of GLUT4, COX2, SOD1 and HSP70 in avalanche military dog saliva.

    PubMed

    Diverio, S; Guelfi, G; Barbato, O; Di Mari, W; Egidi, M G; Santoro, M M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase mRNA expression of a growing number of genes. The aim of this study was to assess if mRNA expression of the metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4), COX2 (cyclooxygenase 2), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase 1) and HSP70 (heat shock protein 70) in saliva changes following acute exercise stress in dogs. For this purpose, 12 avalanche dogs of the Italian Military Force Guardia di Finanza were monitored during simulation of a search for a buried person in an artificial avalanche area. Rectal temperature (RT) and saliva samples were collected the day before the trial (T0), immediately after the descent from a helicopter at the onset of a simulated avalanche search and rescue operation (T1), after the discovery of the buried person (T2) and 2 h later (T3). Expressions of GLUT4, SOD1, COX2 and HSP70 were measured by real-time PCR. The simulated avalanche search and rescue operation was shown to exert a significant effect on RT, as well as on the expression of all metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes investigated, which peaked at T2. The observed expression patterns indicate an acute exercise stress-induced upregulation, as confirmed by the reductions in expression at T3. Moreover, our findings indicate that saliva is useful for assessing metabolism- and oxidative stress-related genes without the need for restraint, which could affect working dog performance. PMID:25245143

  20. Oxidative stress response in the skin mucus layer of Goodea gracilis (Hubbs and Turner, 1939) exposed to crude oil: A non-invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Dzul-Caamal, Ricardo; Salazar-Coria, Lucia; Olivares-Rubio, Hugo F; Rocha-Gómez, Maria Alejandra; Girón-Pérez, Manuel Iván; Vega-López, Armando

    2016-10-01

    The skin of the fish is the foremost target of oxidative stress due to the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) originated in the environment and in the skin itself. In this study, a non-destructive assay was developed to evaluate the effects of crude oil (0.0001-0.1mg/L, 96h) on oxidative stress response in the Skin Mucus Layer (SML) of the dusky splitfin goodeid (Goodea gracilis). The response in the SML was compared with recognized target organs through the Integrated Biomarker Response (IBRv2) and a slight addition to the method was proposed. Crude oil was extremely toxic and elicited a clear induction of ROS in the SML, as in the brain, liver and muscle. By the exposure to crude, a significant change in the activities of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) as well as on lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and carbonyl protein (RCO) levels was detected. Also, increases in the activity of EROD were found. The general IBRv2 proposed in this study (gIBRv2) showed that oil causes the higher oxidative response in the SML (60.049) under different concentrations of petroleum, which was greater in the brain (56.749), muscle (56.561) and liver (55.775). The results of the study revealed an organ-specific antioxidant defense response that was dependent on the load of petroleum. These results contributed to the understanding of the complexity of oxidative stress response in fish exposed to crude oil using the Skin Mucus Layer as a target for environmental monitoring studies. PMID:27164488

  1. Oxidative stress response in the skin mucus layer of Goodea gracilis (Hubbs and Turner, 1939) exposed to crude oil: A non-invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Dzul-Caamal, Ricardo; Salazar-Coria, Lucia; Olivares-Rubio, Hugo F; Rocha-Gómez, Maria Alejandra; Girón-Pérez, Manuel Iván; Vega-López, Armando

    2016-10-01

    The skin of the fish is the foremost target of oxidative stress due to the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) originated in the environment and in the skin itself. In this study, a non-destructive assay was developed to evaluate the effects of crude oil (0.0001-0.1mg/L, 96h) on oxidative stress response in the Skin Mucus Layer (SML) of the dusky splitfin goodeid (Goodea gracilis). The response in the SML was compared with recognized target organs through the Integrated Biomarker Response (IBRv2) and a slight addition to the method was proposed. Crude oil was extremely toxic and elicited a clear induction of ROS in the SML, as in the brain, liver and muscle. By the exposure to crude, a significant change in the activities of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) as well as on lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and carbonyl protein (RCO) levels was detected. Also, increases in the activity of EROD were found. The general IBRv2 proposed in this study (gIBRv2) showed that oil causes the higher oxidative response in the SML (60.049) under different concentrations of petroleum, which was greater in the brain (56.749), muscle (56.561) and liver (55.775). The results of the study revealed an organ-specific antioxidant defense response that was dependent on the load of petroleum. These results contributed to the understanding of the complexity of oxidative stress response in fish exposed to crude oil using the Skin Mucus Layer as a target for environmental monitoring studies.

  2. The fear-factor stress test: an ethical, non-invasive laboratory method that produces consistent and sustained cortisol responding in men and women.

    PubMed

    du Plooy, Christopher; Thomas, Kevin G F; Henry, Michelle; Human, Robyn; Jacobs, W Jake

    2014-06-01

    We describe a method to administer a controlled, effective stressor to humans in the laboratory. The method combines the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and the Cold Pressor Test into a single, believable procedure called the Fear-Factor Stress Test (FFST). In the procedure, participants imagine auditioning for the reality television show Fear Factor. They stand before a video recorder and a panel of judges while (a) delivering a motivational speech, (b) performing a verbal arithmetic task, and (c) placing one hand into a bucket of ice water for up to 2 min. We measured subjective anxiety, heart rate, and salivary cortisol in three groups of young adults (n = 30 each, equal numbers of men and women): FFST, TSST, and Control (a placebo version of the FFST). Although the FFST and TSST groups were not distinguishable at the cortisol measure taken 5 min post-manipulation, at 35 min postmanipulation average cortisol levels in the TSST group had returned to baseline, whereas those in the FFST group continued to rise. The proportion of individual cortisol responders (≥ 2 nmol/l increase over baseline) in the TSST and FFST groups did not differ at the 5-min measure, but at the 35-min measure the FFST group contained significantly more responders. The findings indicate that the FFST induces a more robust and sustained cortisol response (which we assume is a marker of an HPA-axis response) than the TSST, and that it does so without increasing participant discomfort or incurring appreciably greater resource and time costs. PMID:24435939

  3. A Reporting System for Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Covvey, H.D.; Van Horik, M.; Hum, J.; Sole, M.J.; Schwartz, L.; Rakowski, H.; Wigle, E.D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer-based system has been developed to support the collection, reporting and storage of data acquired during non-invasive cardiac investigations. Currently the system serves 1-D echocardiography and graded exercise testing. Optical mark forms are used to record information in computer-readable form. A terminal station consisting of a CRT terminal, an optical mark reader and a printer is used for input and output from a central minicomputer database management system. Even when the costs associated with database storage are included, the overall cost of the system compares favorably with the option of using typists to produce reports.

  4. How to reduce invasiveness in non-invasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chiandotto, Valeria

    2012-10-01

    Non invasive ventilation plays a key role in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) activity and several instruments have recently been developed that are designed to maintain positive pressure in order to improve functional residual capacity of the lung. However, devices used to provide non-invasive respiratory assistance are frequently a cause of discomfort when applied to a fragile neonate. Indeed, they are applied for lengthy periods in low birth weight (VLBW) infants. In addition to these side effects we have to consider several other stressful events. In our opinion, reducing invasiveness in the NICU is a process where the main steps are recognizing a need for the organization of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with respect for the rhythm of the newborn, recognizing the fragility of preterm newborns and their brain plasticity, improving environmental standards in both structural terms and staff behaviour, and promoting the active role of parents in supporting the development of the newborn.

  5. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance.

  6. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance. PMID:26835653

  7. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress in the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): validation of a fecal glucocorticoid assay and methods for practical application in the field.

    PubMed

    Shutt, Kathryn; Setchell, Joanna M; Heistermann, Michael

    2012-11-01

    variation in FGCMs in samples from wild gorillas. Our study highlights the importance of thorough biological and immunological validation of FGCM assays, and presents validated, practical methods for the application of non-invasive adrenocortical monitoring techniques to field conservation contexts where it is crucially needed.

  8. Non-invasive monitoring of spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Bastany, Zoya J R; Askari, Shahbaz; Dumont, Guy A; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Spreading depression (SD), a slow propagating depolarization wave, plays an important role in pathophysiology of different neurological disorders. Yet, research into SD-related disorders has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive recording techniques of SD. Here we compared the manifestations of SD in continuous non-invasive electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings to invasive electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings in order to obtain further insights into generator structures and electrogenic mechanisms of surface recording of SD. SD was induced by KCl application and simultaneous SD recordings were performed by scalp EEG as well as ECoG electrodes of somatosensory neocortex of rats using a novel homemade EEG amplifier, AgCl recording electrodes, and high chloride conductive gel. Different methods were used to analyze the data; including the spectrogram, bi-spectrogram, pattern distribution, relative spectrum power, and multivariable Gaussian fit analysis. The negative direct current (DC) shifts recorded by scalp electrodes exhibited a high homogeneity to those recorded by ECoG electrodes. Furthermore, this novel method of recording and analysis was able to separate SD recorded by scalp electrodes from non-neuronal DC shifts induced by other potential generators, such as the skin, muscles, arteries, dura, etc. These data suggest a novel application for continuous non-invasive monitoring of DC potential changes, such as SD. Non-invasive monitoring of SD would allow early intervention and improve outcome in SD-related neurological disorders. PMID:27397413

  9. Modelflow underestimates cardiac output in heat-stressed individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H.

    2011-01-01

    An estimation of cardiac output can be obtained from arterial pressure waveforms using the Modelflow method. However, whether the assumptions associated with Modelflow calculations are accurate during whole body heating is unknown. This project tested the hypothesis that cardiac output obtained via Modelflow accurately tracks thermodilution-derived cardiac outputs during whole body heat stress. Acute changes of cardiac output were accomplished via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during normothermic and heat-stressed conditions. In nine healthy normotensive subjects, arterial pressure was measured via brachial artery cannulation and the volume-clamp method of the Finometer. Cardiac output was estimated from both pressure waveforms using the Modeflow method. In normothermic conditions, cardiac outputs estimated via Modelflow (arterial cannulation: 6.1 ± 1.0 l/min; Finometer 6.3 ± 1.3 l/min) were similar with cardiac outputs measured by thermodilution (6.4 ± 0.8 l/min). The subsequent reduction in cardiac output during LBNP was also similar among these methods. Whole body heat stress elevated internal temperature from 36.6 ± 0.3 to 37.8 ± 0.4°C and increased cardiac output from 6.4 ± 0.8 to 10.9 ± 2.0 l/min when evaluated with thermodilution (P < 0.001). However, the increase in cardiac output estimated from the Modelflow method for both arterial cannulation (2.3 ± 1.1 l/min) and Finometer (1.5 ± 1.2 l/min) was attenuated compared with thermodilution (4.5 ± 1.4 l/min, both P < 0.01). Finally, the reduction in cardiac output during LBNP while heat stressed was significantly attenuated for both Modelflow methods (cannulation: −1.8 ± 1.2 l/min, Finometer: −1.5 ± 0.9 l/min) compared with thermodilution (−3.8 ± 1.19 l/min). These results demonstrate that the Modelflow method, regardless of Finometer or direct arterial waveforms, underestimates cardiac output during heat stress and during subsequent reductions in cardiac output via LBNP. PMID

  10. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  11. [Non-invasive assessment of fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2015-04-01

    As the result of various harmful effects (infectious agents, metabolic diseases, unhealthy diet, obesity, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) hepatic damage may develop, which can progress towards liver steatosis, and fibrosis as well. The most common etiological factors of liver damages are hepatitis B and C infection, alcohol consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic liver diseases. Due to the dangers and complications of liver biopsy, studies are focused on non-invasive markers and radiological imaging for liver steatosis, progression of fatty liver, activity of the necroinflammation and the severity of the fibrosis. Authors review the possibilities of non-invasive assessment of liver steatosis. The statistical features of the probes (positive, negative predictive values, sensitivity, specificity) are reviewed. The role of radiological imaging is also discussed. Although the non-invasive methods discussed in this article are useful to assess liver steatosis, further studies are needed to validate to follow progression of the diseases and to control therapeutic response.

  12. Instrumentation for Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiovascular Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    It is critically important to be able to assess alterations in cardiovascular regulation during and after space flight. We propose to develop an instrument for the non-invasive assessment of such alterations that can be used on the ground and potentially during space flight. This instrumentation would be used by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team at multiple sites for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system and the evaluation of countermeasures. In particular, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team will use this instrumentation in conjunction with ground-based human bed-rest studies and during application of acute stresses e.g., tilt, lower body negative pressure, and exercise. In future studies, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team anticipates using this instrumentation to study astronauts before and after space flight and ultimately, during space flight. The instrumentation may also be used by the Bone Demineralization/Calcium Metabolism Team, the Neurovestibular Team and the Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team to measure changes in autonomic nervous function. The instrumentation will be based on a powerful new technology - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - which has been developed in our laboratory. CSI provides a non-invasive approach for the study of alterations in cardiovascular regulation. This approach involves the analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in physiologic signals such as heart rate and non-invasively measured arterial blood pressure in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of multiple physiologic mechanisms, CSI provides a closed-loop model of the cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject.

  13. [Non invasive ventilation in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Laetitia; Della Santa, Vincent; Hanhart, Walter-Alexandre

    2015-08-12

    Before the development of non invasive ventilation (NIV), endotracheal intubation was the only ventilatory therapy available in case of severe respiratory distress and acute respiratory failure. NIV used to be employed in intensive care settings only. Nowadays, the use of NIV has been democratized to include the emergency room, and the pre-hospital care setting for treatment of acute respiratory failure. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute exacerbation of COPD are indications of choice, since NIV improves mortality. The efficiency of the therapy depends on early treatment; however, endotracheal intubation should not be delayed when it becomes necessary. PMID:26449102

  14. Non-Invasive Assessment of Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    cardiac susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in subjects exposed to simulated space flight in the Human Studies Core protocol being conducted by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team, which involves sixteen days .of bed rest. In particular, we are applying a powerful new non-invasive technology, developed in Professor Cohen's laboratory at MIT for the quantitative assessment of the risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This technology involves the measurement of microvolt levels of T wave alternans (TWA) during exercise stress, and was recently granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration to be used for the clinical evaluation of patients suspected to be at risk of ventricular arrhythmias. In addition, we are obtaining 24 hour Holter monitoring (to detect non-sustained ventricular tachycardia and to assess heart rate variability). We are also conducting protocols to obtain these same measures on a monthly basis for up to four months in subjects in the Bone Demineralization/calcium Metaboloism Team's long term bed rest study.

  15. Non-invasive Evaluation for Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    IWASAKI, Masaki; JIN, Kazutaka; NAKASATO, Nobukazu; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is aimed to remove the brain tissues that are indispensable for generating patient’s epileptic seizures. There are two purposes in the pre-operative evaluation: localization of the epileptogenic zone and localization of function. Surgery is planned to remove possible epileptogenic zone while preserving functional area. Since no single diagnostic modality is superior to others in identifying and localizing the epileptogenic zone, multiple non-invasive evaluations are performed to estimate the location of the epileptogenic zone after concordance between evaluations. Essential components of non-invasive pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy include detailed clinical history, long-term video-electroencephalography monitoring, epilepsy-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropsychological testing. However, a significant portion of drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with no or subtle MRI lesions or with ambiguous electro-clinical signs. Additional evaluations including fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetoencephalography and ictal single photon emission computed tomography can play critical roles in planning surgery. FDG-PET should be registered on three-dimensional MRI for better detection of focal cortical dysplasia. All diagnostic tools are complementary to each other in defining the epileptogenic zone, so that it is always important to reassess the data based on other results to pick up or confirm subtle abnormalities. PMID:27627857

  16. The challenge to detect heart transplant rejection and transplant vasculopathy non-invasively - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Engin; Burgstahler, Christof; Aebert, Hermann; Schroeder, Stephen; Helber, Uwe; Kopp, Andreas F; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft rejection and vasculopathy are the main factors limiting long-term survival after heart transplantation. In this pilot study we investigated whether non-invasive methods are beneficial to detect cardiac allograft rejection (Grade 0-3 R) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Thus we compared multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with invasive methods like coronary angiography and left endomyocardial biopsy. Methods 10 asymptomatic long-term survivors after heart transplantation (8 male, 2 female, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years, 73 ± 11 months after transplantation) were included. In a blinded fashion, coronary angiography and multi-slice computed tomography and ventricular endomyocardial biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging were compared against each other. Results Cardiac allograft vasculopathy and atherosclerosis were correctly detected by multi-slice computed tomography and coronary angiography with positive correlation (r = 1). Late contrast enchancement found by magnetic resonance imaging correlated positively (r = 0.92, r2 = 0.85, p < 0.05) with the histological diagnosis of transplant rejection revealed by myocardial biopsy. None of the examined endomyocardial specimen revealed cardiac allograft rejection greater than Grade 1 R. Conclusion A combined non-invasive approach using multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may help to assess cardiac allograft vasculopathy and cardiac allograft rejection after heart transplantation before applying more invasive methods. PMID:19682394

  17. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  18. AVE 0991 attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuedong; Huang, Huiling; Jiang, Jingzhou; Wu, Lingling; Lin, Chunxi; Tang, Anli; Dai, Gang; He, Jiangui; Chen, Yili

    2016-06-10

    AVE 0991, the nonpeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) analog, is recognized as having beneficial cardiovascular effects. However, the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of AVE 0991 on cardiac hypertrophy and the mechanisms involved. Mice were underwent aortic banding to induce cardiac hypertrophy followed by the administration of AVE 0991 (20 mg kg·day (-1)) for 4 weeks. It was shown that AVE 0991 reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and improved heart function, characterized by decreases in left ventricular weight and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and increases in ejection fraction. Moreover, AVE 0991 significantly down-regulated mean myocyte diameter and attenuate the gene expression of the hypertrophic markers. Furthermore, AVE 0991 inhibited the expression of NOX 2 and NOX 4, meaning that AVE 0991 reduced oxidative stress of cardiac hypertrophy mice. Our data showed that AVE 0991 treatment could attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and improve heart function, which may be due to reduce oxidative stress. PMID:26403967

  19. Carbon monoxide exposure enhances arrhythmia after cardiac stress: involvement of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    André, Lucas; Gouzi, Fares; Thireau, Jérôme; Meyer, Gregory; Boissiere, Julien; Delage, Martine; Abdellaoui, Aldja; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacampagne, Alain; Obert, Philippe; Reboul, Cyril; Fauconnier, Jérémy; Hayot, Maurice; Richard, Sylvain; Cazorla, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Arrhythmias following cardiac stress are a key predictor of death in healthy population. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous pollutant promoting oxidative stress and associated with hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and cardiac mortality. We investigated the effect of chronic CO exposure on the occurrence of arrhythmic events after a cardiac stress test and the possible involvement of related oxidative stress. Wistar rats exposed chronically (4 weeks) to sustained urban CO pollution presented more arrhythmic events than controls during recovery after cardiac challenge with isoprenaline in vivo. Sudden death occurred in 22% of CO-exposed rats versus 0% for controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of lipid peroxidation, was increased in left ventricular tissue of CO-exposed rats. Cardiomyocytes isolated from CO-exposed rats showed higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (measured with MitoSox Red dye), higher diastolic Ca(2+) resulting from SR calcium leak and an higher occurrence of irregular Ca(2+) transients (measured with Indo-1) in comparison to control cells after a high pacing sequence. Acute treatment with a ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine, 20 mmol/L, 1 h) prevented this sequence of alterations and decreased the number of arrhythmic cells following high pacing. Chronic CO exposure promotes oxidative stress that alters Ca(2+) homeostasis (through RYR2 and SERCA defects) and thereby mediates the triggering of ventricular arrhythmia after cardiac stress that can lead to sudden death.

  20. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  1. Tissue-Informative Mechanism for Wearable Non-invasive Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Bien, Franklin; Kim, Jae Joon

    2014-10-01

    Accurate continuous direct measurement of the blood pressure is currently available thru direct invasive methods via intravascular needles, and is mostly limited to use during surgical procedures or in the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive methods that are mostly based on auscultation or cuff oscillometric principles do provide relatively accurate measurement of blood pressure. However, they mostly involve physical inconveniences such as pressure or stress on the human body. Here, we introduce a new non-invasive mechanism of tissue-informative measurement, where an experimental phenomenon called subcutaneous tissue pressure equilibrium is revealed and related for application in detection of absolute blood pressure. A prototype was experimentally verified to provide an absolute blood pressure measurement by wearing a watch-type measurement module that does not cause any discomfort. This work is supposed to contribute remarkably to the advancement of continuous non-invasive mobile devices for 24-7 daily-life ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring.

  2. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  3. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  4. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  5. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  6. Non-invasive assessment of hemodynamics: a comparative analysis of fingertip pulse contour analysis and impedance cardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; Pokorney, Paige E.; McCrea, Cindy E.; Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Systemic hemodynamic assessment is useful for characterizing the underlying physiology of hypertension, selecting individualized treatment approaches, and understanding the underlying mechanisms of action of interventions. Invasive methods are not suitable for routine clinic or research use, and non-invasive methods such as impedance cardiography have technical and practical limitations. Fingertip pulse contour analysis measured with the Nexfin device is a novel alternative for non-invasive assessment of blood pressure and hemodynamics. While both impedance cardiography and the Nexfin have been validated against invasive methods, the extent to which they correlate with each other is unknown. This study is a comparative analysis of data simultaneously obtained with impedance cardiography and the Nexfin device. Methods As part of a larger clinical trial, 13 adults with type 2 diabetes completed cardiovascular reactivity testing on three occasions: at study baseline and after two 4-week dietary treatment periods. Blood pressure, hemodynamics, and heart rate variability were assessed at rest and during acute mental stress. Results Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability data were significantly correlated between the two devices, but hemodynamic data (stroke volume, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance) were not significantly correlated. Both techniques detected treatment-related changes in blood pressure and total peripheral resistance, but significantly differed in magnitude and/or direction of the treatment effects. Conclusions We conclude that Nexfin is not an appropriate alternative to impedance cardiography for measurement of underlying hemodynamics in psychophysiological research, but may be useful for beat-to-beat monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate variability. PMID:25815738

  7. The role of stress cardiac magnetic resonance in women.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Andrea; Zareba, Karolina M; Raman, Subha V

    2016-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in women. Nevertheless, extensive evidence demonstrates under-diagnosis and under-treatment of women for suspected or known ischemic heart disease (IHD). Stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is becoming readily available and offers significant advantages over other stress imaging modalities. The high spatial and temporal resolution of CMR provides the unique ability to identify subendocardial ischemia, viability, and the presence of microvascular disease. Furthermore, CMR is free from ionizing radiation, and image quality is not compromised by attenuation artifacts or patient size. Over the past two decades, evidence-based data have demonstrated the high diagnostic and prognostic performance of stress CMR in the context of IHD, often superior to other stress imaging techniques. Importantly, ad hoc studies confirmed these results in women with known or suspected IHD. Stress CMR warrants consideration as the modality of choice for women requiring an imaging test for ischemia given its strong evidence base, superior test characteristics, comprehensive nature, and unique ability to characterize both epicardial and microvascular disease.

  8. Non-invasive monitoring of endocrine status in laboratory primates: methods, guidelines and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heistermann, M.

    2010-11-01

    During the past three decades, non-invasive methods for assessing physiological, in particular endocrine, status have revolutionized almost all areas of primatology, including behavioural ecology, reproductive biology, stress research, conservation and last but not least management of primates in captivity where the technology plays an integral role in assisting the husbandry, breeding and welfare of many species. Non-invasive endocrine methods make use of the fact that hormones circulating in blood are secreted into saliva or deposited in hair and are eliminated from the body via urinary and faecal excretion. The choice of which matrix to use for hormonal assessment depends on a range of factors, including the type of information required, the measurement techniques involved, species differences in hormone metabolism and route of excretion and the practicality of sample collection. However, although sample collection is usually relatively easy, analysing hormones from these non-invasively collected samples is not as easy as many people think, particularly not when dealing with a new species. In this respect, the importance of a careful validation of each technique is essential in order to generate meaningful and accurate results. This paper aims to provide an overview of the available non-invasive endocrine-based methodologies, their relative merits and their potential areas of application for assessing endocrine status in primates, with special reference to captive environments. In addition, general information is given about the most important aspects and caveats researchers have to be aware of when using these methodologies.

  9. [Non-invasive explorations of the carotid arteries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Persson, A V; Dyer, V E

    1981-01-01

    For the non-invasive evaluation of patients suspected of having extracranial carotid artery disease, the non-invasive vascular laboratory at the Lahey Clinic, Boston, Massachusetts uses three tests. Carotid phonoangiography (C.P.A.) by itself is 60% accurate, the Kartchner-McRae Oculoplethysmograph (O.P.G.) by itself 80% accurate, and the Echoflow doppler arterial imager, by itself 90% accurate. These examinations are used for surveillance of high-risk patients and to determine the need for carotid arteriography. In a series of 94 patients, the combination of these non-invasive methods yielded one false negative and 2 false positive studies, for an overall accuracy of 95%.

  10. Improving non-invasive ventilation documentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew; Elkheir, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Record keeping for patients on non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at St. Georges Hospital is poor. The initial NIV prescription is often not recorded, and changes to the NIV prescription or the rationale for the changes (ABG results) are also poorly documented. This leads to confusion for nurses/doctors as to what the correct settings are, meaning patients could receive ineffective ventilation. The use of NIV is also poorly recorded by nursing staff meaning that doctors are unsure if the prescribed NIV is being achieved. This can lead to treatment being escalated unnecessarily in the event of treatment failure. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is the provision of ventilatory support in the form of positive pressure via the patient's upper airway using a mask or similar device. NIV is indicated for treatment of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, of which there are many causes, though COPD is the indication in up to 70% of cases.[1] British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines for NIV suggest that the rationale for commencing a patient on NIV and the proposed settings should be clearly documented.[2] Clinicians cannot effectively tailor changes to the patients NIV settings if this information is not clearly recorded, which could lead to increased time requiring NIV or NIV failure. Three main areas were considered important to measure for this project. The initial prescription of the NIV, changes to the NIV settings, and nursing documentation surrounding NIV. A baseline measurement of NIV documentation for two weeks found NIV documentation to globally very poor. NIV was formally prescribed 29% of the time, full detail of intended settings were documented 57% of the time, the decision to commence NIV was discussed with the respiratory consultant/SpR just 29% of the time and on no occasion was a decision regarding escalation of treatment recorded. Eighteen changes were made to the NIV settings. These were formally prescribed 22% of the time and detail of the intended

  11. The impact of cardiac perception on emotion experience and cognitive performance under mental stress.

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Nicole K; Werner, Natalie S

    2014-12-01

    Mental stress evokes several physiological responses such as the acceleration of heart rate, increase of electrodermal activity and the release of adrenaline. Moreover, physiological stress responses interact with emotional and behavioral stress responses. In the present study we provide evidence that viscero-sensory feedback from the heart (cardiac perception) is an important factor modulating emotional and cognitive stress responses. In our study, we compared participants with high versus low cardiac perception using a computerized mental stress task, in which they had to respond to rapidly presented visual and acoustic stimuli. Additionally, we assessed physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance). Participants high in cardiac perception reported more negative emotions and showed worse task performance under the stressor than participants low in cardiac perception. These results were not moderated by physiological responses. We conclude that cardiac perception modulates stress responses by intensifying negative emotions and by impairing cognitive performance. PMID:24719221

  12. Apocynin Attenuates Cardiac Injury in Type 4 Cardiorenal Syndrome via Suppressing Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 With Oxidative Stress Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xun; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Feifei; Wang, Jing-Feng; Tang, Wanchun; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 4 cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) refers to the cardiac injury induced by chronic kidney disease. We aimed to assess oxidative stress and cardiac injury in patients with type 4 CRS, determine whether the antioxidant apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in rats with type 4 CRS, and explore potential mechanisms. Methods and Results A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with type 4 CRS (n=17) and controls (n=16). Compared with controls, patients with type 4 CRS showed elevated oxidative stress, which was significantly correlated with cardiac hypertrophy and decreased ejection fraction. In vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy and sham surgery, followed with apocynin or vehicle treatment for 8 weeks. Eight weeks after surgery, the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats mimicked type 4 CRS, showing increased serum creatinine, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and decreased ejection fraction compared with sham-operated animals. Cardiac malondialdehyde, NADPH oxidase activity, fibroblast growth factor-2, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation increased significantly in the 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy rats. These changes were significantly attenuated by apocynin. In vitro study showed that apocynin reduced angiotensin II–induced NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress, upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cardiac fibroblasts. Importantly, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 reduced the upregulation of fibroblast growth factor-2 and fibrosis biomarkers in angiotensin II–treated fibroblasts. Conclusions Oxidative stress is a candidate mediator for type 4 CRS. Apocynin attenuated cardiac injury in type 4 CRS rats via inhibiting NADPH oxidase–dependent oxidative stress-activated ERK1/2 pathway and subsequent fibroblast growth factor-2 upregulation. Our study added evidence to the beneficial effect of apocynin in type 4 CRS. PMID:26109504

  13. Cardiac oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines response after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Fineschi, Vittorio; Di Paolo, Marco; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Cerretani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in heart failure or during ischemia/reperfusion occurs as a result of the excessive generation or accumulation of free radicals or their oxidation products. Free radicals formed during oxidative stress can initiate lipid peroxidation, oxidize proteins to inactive states and cause DNA strand breaks. Oxidative stress is a condition in which oxidant metabolites exert toxic effects because of their increased production or an altered cellular mechanism of protection. In the early phase of acute heart ischemia cytokines have the feature to be functional pleiotropy and redundancy, moreover, several cytokines exert similar and overlapping actions on the same cell type and one cytokine shows a wide range of biological effects on various cell types. Activation of cytokine cascades in the infarcted myocardium was established in numerous studies. In experimental models of myocardial infarction, induction and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor α), IL-1β (Interleukin- 1β) and IL-6 (Interleukin-6) and chemokines are steadily described. The current review examines the role of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines response following acute myocardial infarction and explores the inflammatory mechanisms of cardiac injury.

  14. Modern non-invasive mechanical ventilation turns 25.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-11-01

    The history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation goes back more than 100 years, but it was not until 1987 when what we could call "modern" non-invasive mechanical ventilation was developed. The description of Delaubier and Rideau of a patient with Duchenne's disease who had been effectively ventilated through a nasal mask marked the start of a new era in the history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Over these last 25years, we have witnessed exponential growth in its use, field of activity and technological advances on an exciting fast-paced track. We believe that it is time to review the main milestones that have marked the development of non-invasive mechanical ventilation to date, while paying homage to this therapeutic method that has contributed so much to the advancement of respiratory medicine in the last 25years.

  15. Non-invasive electrocardiogram detection of in vivo zebrafish embryos using electric potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon-Morales, E.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Aviles-Espinosa, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this letter, we report the continuous detection of the cardiac electrical activity in embryonic zebrafish using a non-invasive approach. We present a portable and cost-effective platform based on the electric potential sensing technology, to monitor in vivo electrocardiogram activity from the zebrafish heart. This proof of principle demonstration shows how electrocardiogram measurements from the embryonic zebrafish may become accessible by using electric field detection. We present preliminary results using the prototype, which enables the acquisition of electrophysiological signals from in vivo 3 and 5 days-post-fertilization zebrafish embryos. The recorded waveforms show electrocardiogram traces including detailed features such as QRS complex, P and T waves.

  16. Cardiac Aging in Mice and Humans: the Role of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    Age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, not only because it prolongs exposure to several other cardiovascular risks, but also owing to intrinsic cardiac aging, which reduces cardiac functional reserve, predisposes the heart to stress and contributes to increased cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans, including left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Cardiac aging in mice is accompanied by accumulation of mitochondrial protein oxidation, increased mitochondrial DNA mutations, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, as well as decreased cardiac SERCA2 protein. All of these age-related changes are significantly attenuated in mice overexpressing catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT). These findings demonstrate the critical role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiac aging and support the potential application of mitochondrial antioxidants to cardiac aging and age-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20382344

  17. A-kinase anchoring proteins: molecular regulators of the cardiac stress response.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Maric, Darko; Pérez López, Irene; Cavin, Sabrina; Del Vescovo, Cosmo D

    2013-04-01

    In response to stress or injury the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process, associated with hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte death and fibrosis, that ultimately causes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. It has become increasingly clear that signaling events associated with these pathological cardiac remodeling events are regulated by scaffolding and anchoring proteins, which allow coordination of pathological signals in space and time. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) constitute a family of functionally related proteins that organize multiprotein signaling complexes that tether the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) as well as other signaling enzymes to ensure integration and processing of multiple signaling pathways. This review will discuss the role of AKAPs in the cardiac response to stress. Particular emphasis will be given to the adaptative process associated with cardiac hypoxia as well as the remodeling events linked to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction. PMID:22889610

  18. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Minjie; DiPetrillo, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure and represents a serious medical issue worldwide. The genetic basis of hypertension is well-established, but few causal genes have been identified thus far. Non-invasive blood pressure measurements are a critical component of high-throughput genetic studies to identify genes controlling blood pressure. Whereas this technique is fairly routine for blood pressure measurements in rats, non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice has proven to be more challenging. This chapter describes an experimental protocol measuring blood pressure in mice using a CODA non-invasive blood pressure monitoring system. This method enables accurate blood pressure phenotyping in mice for linkage or mutagenesis studies, as well as for other experiments requiring high-throughput blood pressure measurement.

  19. Non-invasive wearable electrochemical sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Wang, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    Wearable sensors have garnered considerable recent interest owing to their tremendous promise for a plethora of applications. Yet the absence of reliable non-invasive chemical sensors has greatly hindered progress in the area of on-body sensing. Electrochemical sensors offer considerable promise as wearable chemical sensors that are suitable for diverse applications owing to their high performance, inherent miniaturization, and low cost. A wide range of wearable electrochemical sensors and biosensors has been developed for real-time non-invasive monitoring of electrolytes and metabolites in sweat, tears, or saliva as indicators of a wearer's health status. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive electrochemical sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of wearable wireless sensing devices and body-sensor networks, and thus find considerable use in a wide range of personal health-care monitoring applications, as well as in sport and military applications.

  20. Non-invasive Assessments of Adipose Tissue Metabolism In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Borowsky, Francis E; Quinn, Kyle P; Bernstein, David L; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L

    2016-03-01

    Adipose tissue engineering is a diverse area of research where the developed tissues can be used to study normal adipose tissue functions, create disease models in vitro, and replace soft tissue defects in vivo. Increasing attention has been focused on the highly specialized metabolic pathways that regulate energy storage and release in adipose tissues which affect local and systemic outcomes. Non-invasive, dynamic measurement systems are useful to track these metabolic pathways in the same tissue model over time to evaluate long term cell growth, differentiation, and development within tissue engineering constructs. This approach reduces costs and time in comparison to more traditional destructive methods such as biochemical and immunochemistry assays and proteomics assessments. Towards this goal, this review will focus on important metabolic functions of adipose tissues and strategies to evaluate them with non-invasive in vitro methods. Current non-invasive methods, such as measuring key metabolic markers and endogenous contrast imaging will be explored.

  1. Non-invasive molecular imaging for preclinical cancer therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, AC; Shnyder, SD; Marston, G; Coletta, PL; Gill, JH

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and non-invasive imaging are rapidly emerging fields in preclinical cancer drug discovery. This is driven by the need to develop more efficacious and safer treatments, the advent of molecular-targeted therapeutics, and the requirements to reduce and refine current preclinical in vivo models. Such bioimaging strategies include MRI, PET, single positron emission computed tomography, ultrasound, and optical approaches such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging. These molecular imaging modalities have several advantages over traditional screening methods, not least the ability to quantitatively monitor pharmacodynamic changes at the cellular and molecular level in living animals non-invasively in real time. This review aims to provide an overview of non-invasive molecular imaging techniques, highlighting the strengths, limitations and versatility of these approaches in preclinical cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:23488622

  2. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  3. Non-invasive assessment of adrenocortical function in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus).

    PubMed

    Ganswindt, Stefanie B; Myburgh, Jan G; Cameron, Elissa Z; Ganswindt, Andre

    2014-11-01

    The occurrence of stress-inducing factors in captive crocodilians is a concern, since chronic stress can negatively affect animal health and reproduction, and hence production. Monitoring stress in wild crocodiles could also be beneficial for assessing the state of health in populations which are potentially threatened by environmental pollution. In both cases, a non-invasive approach to assess adrenocortical function as a measure of stress would be preferable, as animals are not disturbed during sample collection, and therefore sampling is feedback-free. So far, however, such a non-invasive method has not been established for any crocodilian species. As an initial step, we therefore examined the suitability of two enzyme-immunoassays, detecting faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGMs) with a 11β,21-diol-20-one and 5β-3α-ol-11-one structure, respectively, for monitoring stress-related physiological responses in captive Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus). An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was performed on 10 sub-adult crocodiles, resulting in an overall increase in serum corticosterone levels of 272% above the pre-injection levels 5h post-injection. Saline-treated control animals (n=8) showed an overall increase of 156% in serum corticosterone levels 5h post-administration. Faecal samples pre- and post-injection could be obtained from three of the six individually housed crocodiles, resulting in FGM concentrations 136-380% above pre-injection levels, always detected in the first sample collected post-treatment (7-15 days post-injection). FGM concentrations seem comparatively stable at ambient temperatures for up to 72 h post-defaecation. In conclusion, non-invasive hormone monitoring can be used for assessing adrenocortical function in captive Nile crocodiles based on FGM analysis.

  4. Non-invasive, energy-based assessment of patient-specific material properties of arterial tissue.

    PubMed

    Smoljkić, M; Vander Sloten, J; Segers, P; Famaey, N

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties of human biological tissue vary greatly. The determination of arterial material properties should be based on experimental data, i.e. diameter, length, intramural pressure, axial force and stress-free geometry. Currently, clinical data provide only non-invasively measured pressure-diameter data for superficial arteries (e.g. common carotid and femoral artery). The lack of information forces us to take into account certain assumptions regarding the in situ configuration to estimate material properties in vivo. This paper proposes a new, non-invasive, energy-based approach for arterial material property estimation. This approach is compared with an approach proposed in the literature. For this purpose, a simplified finite element model of an artery was used as a mock experimental situation. This method enables exact knowledge of the actual material properties, thereby allowing a quantitative evaluation of material property estimation approaches. The results show that imposing conditions on strain energy can provide a good estimation of the material properties from the non-invasively measured pressure and diameter data.

  5. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  6. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  7. Non-invasive Prediction of Pork Loin Tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to develop a non-invasive method to predict tenderness of pork loins. Boneless pork loins (n = 901) were evaluated either on line on the loin boning and trimming line of large-scale commercial plants (n = 465) or at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center abattoir ...

  8. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  9. Non-invasive method of measuring cerebral spinal fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor); Lambert, James L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of non-invasively determining intracranial pressure from measurements of an eye. A parameter of an optic nerve of the eye is determined, along with an intraocular pressure of the eye. The intracranial pressure may be determined from the intraocular pressure and the parameter.

  10. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  11. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, Richard M.; Packer, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  12. Non-invasive mouse models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, B A; Guilak, F; Lockwood, K A; Olson, S A; Pitsillides, A A; Sandell, L J; Silva, M J; van der Meulen, M C H; Haudenschild, D R

    2015-10-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) are essential tools for investigating the development of the disease on a more rapid timeline than human OA. Mice are particularly useful due to the plethora of genetically modified or inbred mouse strains available. The majority of available mouse models of OA use a joint injury or other acute insult to initiate joint degeneration, representing post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). However, no consensus exists on which injury methods are most translatable to human OA. Currently, surgical injury methods are most commonly used for studies of OA in mice; however, these methods may have confounding effects due to the surgical/invasive injury procedure itself, rather than the targeted joint injury. Non-invasive injury methods avoid this complication by mechanically inducing a joint injury externally, without breaking the skin or disrupting the joint. In this regard, non-invasive injury models may be crucial for investigating early adaptive processes initiated at the time of injury, and may be more representative of human OA in which injury is induced mechanically. A small number of non-invasive mouse models of PTOA have been described within the last few years, including intra-articular fracture of tibial subchondral bone, cyclic tibial compression loading of articular cartilage, and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture via tibial compression overload. This review describes the methods used to induce joint injury in each of these non-invasive models, and presents the findings of studies utilizing these models. Altogether, these non-invasive mouse models represent a unique and important spectrum of animal models for studying different aspects of PTOA. PMID:26003950

  13. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-19

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  14. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  15. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  16. Limitations of Stroke Volume Estimation by Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Monitoring in Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Altitude and gravity changes during aeromedical evacuations induce exacerbated cardiovascular responses in unstable patients. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is difficult to perform in this environment with limited access to the patient. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of stroke volume estimation by finger photoplethysmography (SVp) in hypergravity. Methods Finger arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveforms were recorded continuously in ten healthy subjects before, during and after exposure to +Gz accelerations in a human centrifuge. The protocol consisted of a 2-min and 8-min exposure up to +4 Gz. SVp was computed from ABP using Liljestrand, systolic area, and Windkessel algorithms, and compared with reference values measured by echocardiography (SVe) before and after the centrifuge runs. Results The ABP signal could be used in 83.3% of cases. After calibration with echocardiography, SVp changes did not differ from SVe and values were linearly correlated (p<0.001). The three algorithms gave comparable SVp. Reproducibility between SVp and SVe was the best with the systolic area algorithm (limits of agreement −20.5 and +38.3 ml). Conclusions Non-invasive ABP photoplethysmographic monitoring is an interesting technique to estimate relative stroke volume changes in moderate and sustained hypergravity. This method may aid physicians for aeronautic patient monitoring. PMID:25798613

  17. Monitoring high-risk patients: minimally invasive and non-invasive possibilities.

    PubMed

    Renner, Jochen; Grünewald, Matthias; Bein, Berthold

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, there has been considerable progress in the field of less invasive haemodynamic monitoring technologies. Substantial evidence has accumulated, which supports the continuous measurement and optimization of flow-based variables such as stroke volume, that is, cardiac output, in order to prevent occult hypoperfusion and consequently to improve patients' outcome in the perioperative setting. However, there is a striking gap between the developments in haemodynamic monitoring and the increasing evidence to implement defined treatment protocols based on the measured variables, and daily clinical routine. Recent trials have shown that perioperative morbidity and mortality is higher than anticipated. This emphasizes the need for the anaesthesia community to address this issue and promotes the implementation of proven concepts into clinical practice in order to improve patients' outcome, especially in high-risk patients. The advances in minimally invasive and non-invasive monitoring techniques can be seen as a driving force in this respect, as the degree of invasiveness of any monitoring tool determines the frequency of its application, especially in the operating room (OR). From this point of view, we are very confident that some of these minimally invasive and non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring technologies will become an inherent part of our monitoring armamentarium in the OR and in the intensive care unit (ICU). PMID:27396807

  18. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira; Santos, Bruno F. de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M. Francisco; de Oliveira, Daniel Pio; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all‑cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 – 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 – 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. PMID:25352460

  19. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  20. Non-invasive diagnosis of internal carotid artery dissections.

    PubMed Central

    Müllges, W; Ringelstein, E B; Leibold, M

    1992-01-01

    Arteriography is thought to be mandatory for the diagnosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection. With the introduction of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, this is no longer the case. In 13 consecutive patients with ICA dissections the diagnosis was made by means of non-invasive tests including extracranial and transcranial Doppler sonography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (ceCT), and, in five patients, MRI. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography used as the gold standard in all cases was confirmative. Extracranial and transcranial ultrasound findings indicative of the diagnosis could be identified. MRI directly demonstrated the intramural haematoma and the false lumen of the dissected artery. These non-invasive techniques also allowed for repetitive follow up examinations. They were, however, unable to demonstrate false aneurysms in the chronic state. Results show that the diagnosis of carotid dissection can be made by means of cerebrovascular ultrasound and MRI. Images PMID:1538235

  1. Non-invasive microsensors for studying cell/tissue physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Taguchi, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Burrs, S.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive tools that allow real-time quantification of molecules relevant to metabolism, homeostasis, and cell signaling in cells and tissue are of great importance for studying physiology. Several microsensor technologies have been developed to monitor concentration of molecules such as ions, oxygen, electroactive molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide), and biomolecules (e.g., sugars, hormones). The major challenges for microsensors are overcoming relatively low sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio. Modern approaches for enhancing microsensor performance focus on the incorporation of catalytic nanomaterials to increase sensitivity, reduce response time, and increase operating range. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, a non-invasive microsensor modality called self-referencing (SR) is being applied. The SR technique allows measurement of temporal and spatial transport dynamics at the cell, tissue, organ, and organismal level.

  2. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  3. Non invasive ventilation as an additional tool for exercise training.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Nicolino; Cigni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of non invasive ventilation (NIV) to increase exercise capacity. In individuals with COPD, NIV during exercise reduces dyspnoea and increases exercise tolerance. Different modalities of mechanical ventilation have been used non-invasively as a tool to increase exercise tolerance in COPD, heart failure and lung and thoracic restrictive diseases. Inspiratory support provides symptomatic benefit by unloading the ventilatory muscles, whereas Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) counterbalances the intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure in COPD patients. Severe stable COPD patients undergoing home nocturnal NIV and daytime exercise training showed some benefits. Furthermore, it has been reported that in chronic hypercapnic COPD under long-term ventilatory support, NIV can also be administered during walking. Despite these results, the role of NIV as a routine component of pulmonary rehabilitation is still to be defined. PMID:25874110

  4. The potential of label-free nonlinear optical molecular microscopy to non-invasively characterize the viability of engineered human tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Lloyd, William R.; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical molecular imaging and quantitative analytic methods were developed to non-invasively assess the viability of tissue-engineered constructs manufactured from primary human cells. Label-free optical measures of local tissue structure and biochemistry characterized morphologic and functional differences between controls and stressed constructs. Rigorous statistical analysis accounted for variability between human patients. Fluorescence intensity-based spatial assessment and metabolic sensing differentiated controls from thermally-stressed and from metabolically-stressed constructs. Fluorescence lifetime-based sensing differentiated controls from thermally-stressed constructs. Unlike traditional histological (found to be generally reliable, but destructive) and biochemical (non-invasive, but found to be unreliable) tissue analyses, label-free optical assessments had the advantages of being both non-invasive and reliable. Thus, such optical measures could serve as reliable manufacturing release criteria for cell-based tissue-engineered constructs prior to human implantation, thereby addressing a critical regulatory need in regenerative medicine. PMID:24854093

  5. Stress-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and preclinical atherosclerosis: does arterial elasticity modify the association?

    PubMed

    Chumaeva, Nadja; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Merjonen, Päivi; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acute mental stress on atherosclerosis can be estimated using arterial elasticity measured by carotid artery distensibility (Cdist). We examined the interactive effect of acute stress-induced cardiac reactivity and Cdist to preclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in 58 healthy adults aged 24-39 years participated in the epidemiological Young Finns Study. Cdist and IMT were measured ultrasonographically. Impedance electrocardiography was used to measure acute mental stress-induced cardiac autonomic responses: heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period after the mental arithmetic and the public speaking tasks. Interactions between HR reactivity and Cdist in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis were found. The results imply that elevated HR reactivity to acute mental stress is related to less atherosclerosis among healthy participants with higher arterial elasticity. Possibly, increased cardiac reactivity in response to challenging tasks is an adaptive reaction related to better cardiovascular health.

  6. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  7. Non-invasive, investigative methods in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Longo, C; Ciardo, S; Pellacani, G

    2015-12-01

    A precise and noninvasive quantification of aging is of outmost importance for in vivo assessment of the skin aging "stage", and thus acts to minimize it. Several bioengineering methods have been proposed to objectively, precisely, and non-invasively measure skin aging, and to detect early skin damage, that is sub-clinically observable. In this review we have described the most relevant methods that have emerged from recently introduced technologies, aiming at quantitatively assessing the effects of aging on the skin.

  8. Cellular Phone Enabled Non-Invasive Tissue Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Shlomi; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Cellular phone technology is emerging as an important tool in the effort to provide advanced medical care to the majority of the world population currently without access to such care. In this study, we show that non-invasive electrical measurements and the use of classifier software can be combined with cellular phone technology to produce inexpensive tissue characterization. This concept was demonstrated by the use of a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to distinguish through the cellular phone between heart and kidney tissue via the non-invasive multi-frequency electrical measurements acquired around the tissues. After the measurements were performed at a remote site, the raw data were transmitted through the cellular phone to a central computational site and the classifier was applied to the raw data. The results of the tissue analysis were returned to the remote data measurement site. The classifiers correctly determined the tissue type with a specificity of over 90%. When used for the detection of malignant tumors, classifiers can be designed to produce false positives in order to ensure that no tumors will be missed. This mode of operation has applications in remote non-invasive tissue diagnostics in situ in the body, in combination with medical imaging, as well as in remote diagnostics of biopsy samples in vitro. PMID:19365554

  9. Non-invasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Khalili, Korosh; Nguyen, Geoffrey Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a common and growing public health problem globally. The diagnosis of cirrhosis portends an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Liver biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of cirrhosis and staging of fibrosis. However, despite its universal use, liver biopsy is an invasive and inaccurate gold standard with numerous drawbacks. In order to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, a number of non-invasive techniques have been investigated for the assessment of cirrhosis. This review will focus on currently available non-invasive markers of cirrhosis. The evidence behind the use of these markers will be highlighted, along with an assessment of diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics of each test. Non-invasive markers of cirrhosis can be radiologic or serum-based. Radiologic techniques based on ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and elastography have been used to assess liver fibrosis. Serum-based biomarkers of cirrhosis have also been developed. These are broadly classified into indirect and direct markers. Indirect biomarkers reflect liver function, which may decline with the onset of cirrhosis. Direct biomarkers, reflect extracellular matrix turnover, and include molecules involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. On the whole, radiologic and serum markers of fibrosis correlate well with biopsy scores, especially when excluding cirrhosis or excluding fibrosis. This feature is certainly clinically useful, and avoids liver biopsy in many cases.

  10. Cardiac oxidative stress in a mouse model of neutral lipid storage disease.

    PubMed

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Winkler, Sarah; Haemmerle, Guenter; Stessel, Heike; Wölkart, Gerald; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Systemic deletion of the gene encoding adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a phenotype characterized by severe steatotic cardiac dysfunction. The objective of the present study was to investigate a potential role of oxidative stress in cardiac ATGL deficiency. Hearts of mice with global ATGL knockout were compared to those of mice with cardiomyocyte-restricted overexpression of ATGL and to those of wildtype littermates. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress, measured as lucigenin chemiluminescence, was increased ~6-fold in ATGL-deficient hearts. In parallel, cytosolic NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox and p47phox were upregulated 4-5-fold at the protein level. Moreover, a prominent upregulation of different inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactant protein-1, interleukin 6, and galectin-3) was observed in those hearts. Both the oxidative and inflammatory responses were abolished upon cardiomyocyte-restricted overexpression of ATGL. Investigating the effect of oxidative and inflammatory stress on nitric oxide/cGMP signal transduction we observed a ~2.5-fold upregulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity and a ~2-fold increase in cardiac tetrahydrobiopterin levels. Systemic treatment of ATGL-deficient mice with the superoxide dismutase mimetic Mn(III)tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin did not ameliorate but rather aggravated cardiac oxidative stress. Our data suggest that oxidative and inflammatory stress seems involved in lipotoxic heart disease. Upregulation of soluble guanylate cyclase and cardiac tetrahydrobiopterin might be regarded as counterregulatory mechanisms in cardiac ATGL deficiency. PMID:23867907

  11. Non-invasive Chamber-Specific Identification of Cardiomyocytes in Differentiating Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brauchle, Eva; Knopf, Anne; Bauer, Hannah; Shen, Nian; Linder, Sandra; Monaghan, Michael G.; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Layland, Shannon L.; Brucker, Sara Y.; Nsair, Ali; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Summary One major obstacle to the application of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) for disease modeling and clinical therapies is the inability to identify the developmental stage of these cells without the need for genetic manipulation or utilization of exogenous markers. In this study, we demonstrate that Raman microspectroscopy can non-invasively identify embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived chamber-specific CMs and monitor cell maturation. Using this marker-free approach, Raman peaks were identified for atrial and ventricular CMs, ESCs were successfully discriminated from their cardiac derivatives, a distinct phenotypic spectrum for ESC-derived CMs was confirmed, and unique spectral differences between fetal versus adult CMs were detected. The real-time identification and characterization of CMs, their progenitors, and subpopulations by Raman microspectroscopy strongly correlated to the phenotypical features of these cells. Due to its high molecular resolution, Raman microspectroscopy offers distinct analytical characterization for differentiating cardiovascular cell populations. PMID:26777059

  12. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside abrogates oxidative stress-induced damage in cardiac iron overload condition.

    PubMed

    Puukila, Stephanie; Bryan, Sean; Laakso, Anna; Abdel-Malak, Jessica; Gurney, Carli; Agostino, Adrian; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Prasad, Kailash; Khaper, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac iron overload is directly associated with cardiac dysfunction and can ultimately lead to heart failure. This study examined the effect of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), a component of flaxseed, on iron overload induced cardiac damage by evaluating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Cells were incubated with 50 μ5M iron for 24 hours and/or a 24 hour pre-treatment of 500 μ M SDG. Cardiac iron overload resulted in increased oxidative stress and gene expression of the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and interferon γ, as well as matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Increased apoptosis was evident by increased active caspase 3/7 activity and increased protein expression of Forkhead box O3a, caspase 3 and Bax. Cardiac iron overload also resulted in increased protein expression of p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased expression of AMP-activated protein kinase. Pre-treatment with SDG abrogated the iron-induced increases in oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, as well as the increased p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased AMP-activated protein kinase expression. The decrease in superoxide dismutase activity by iron treatment was prevented by pre-treatment with SDG in the presence of iron. Based on these findings we conclude that SDG was cytoprotective in an in vitro model of iron overload induced redox-inflammatory damage, suggesting a novel potential role for SDG in cardiac iron overload.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: The Link with Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yan, Bryan P.; Chan, Yin W. F.; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrhythmias represent a significant problem globally, leading to cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. There is increasing evidence to suggest that increased oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is elevated in conditions such as diabetes and hypertension, can lead to arrhythmogenesis. Method: A literature review was undertaken to screen for articles that investigated the effects of ROS on cardiac ion channel function, remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Results: Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress is observed in heart failure, leading to increased production of ROS. Mitochondrial ROS, which is elevated in diabetes and hypertension, can stimulate its own production in a positive feedback loop, termed ROS-induced ROS release. Together with activation of mitochondrial inner membrane anion channels, it leads to mitochondrial depolarization. Abnormal function of these organelles can then activate downstream signaling pathways, ultimately culminating in altered function or expression of cardiac ion channels responsible for generating the cardiac action potential (AP). Vascular and cardiac endothelial cells become dysfunctional, leading to altered paracrine signaling to influence the electrophysiology of adjacent cardiomyocytes. All of these changes can in turn produce abnormalities in AP repolarization or conduction, thereby increasing likelihood of triggered activity and reentry. Conclusion: ROS plays a significant role in producing arrhythmic substrate. Therapeutic strategies targeting upstream events include production of a strong reducing environment or the use of pharmacological agents that target organelle-specific proteins and ion channels. These may relieve oxidative stress and in turn prevent arrhythmic complications in patients with diabetes, hypertension, and heart failure. PMID:27536244

  14. Evaluation of carotenoid level in schizophrenic patients using non-invasive measurement.

    PubMed

    Chow, Tze Jen; Loh, Han Chern; Tee, Shiau Foon; Tang, Pek Yee

    2010-12-01

    Free radicals are produced as part of the body immune response triggered by exogenous oxidants. In excess, they impair antioxidant defence system and cause oxidative stress. Antioxidants are hypothesised as antidotes to counteract oxidative stress and improve immune function. Carotenoids serve as a reliable indicator of overall antioxidant level in humans. This study investigated the possible relationship of carotenoid antioxidant levels in schizophrenia. A total of 351 schizophrenic subjects from Hospital Bahagia Ulu Kinta, Malaysia and 247 healthy controls were recruited. Subjects' skin carotenoid levels were measured using a non-invasive technique, Raman spectroscopy. The results showed significant (P<0.01) reduction of carotenoid level in patient compared to healthy controls, suggesting higher levels of oxidative stress in schizophrenia. Comparison between gender, age, subtypes, antipsychotic drug treatments, and duration of illness was investigated, but none was significantly associated with carotenoid score. Antipsychotics were suggested to be the possible causes of reduced antioxidant level in schizophrenia.

  15. Cardiac CT vs. Stress Testing in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Review and Expert Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease represent a major challenge to our health care systems affecting millions of patients each year. Until recently, the diagnosis of coronary artery disease could be conclusively determined only by invasive coronary angiography. To avoid risks from cardiac catheterization, many healthcare systems relied on stress testing as gatekeeper for coronary angiography. Advancements in cardiac computed tomography angiography technology now allows to noninvasively visualize coronary artery disease, challenging the role of stress testing as the default noninvasive imaging tool for evaluating patients with chest pain. In this review, we summarize current data on the clinical utility of cardiac computed tomography and stress testing in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. PMID:26500716

  16. Characterization of cardiac oxidative stress levels in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ayako; Kashima, Yuichiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Aizawa, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with oxidative stress and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. However, the exact cardiac origin of oxidative stress and its association with BNP levels in AF patients remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the chamber-specific plasma oxidative stress levels in patients with paroxysmal AF (PAF) and persistent AF (PSAF). Diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite (dROM) levels were measured in patients with PAF (n = 50) and PSAF (n = 35) at different cardiac sites before ablation and in peripheral vein 3 months after ablation. For all sites, dROM levels were higher in PSAF patients than in PAF patients; the levels were the highest in the coronary sinus at 429.0 (interquartile range: 392.0-449.0) vs. 374.0 (357.0-397.8) Carratelli units (P < 0.05). dROM levels in the coronary sinus were related to the BNP levels (r = 0.436, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the reduction in the peripheral dROM levels was related to that in the peripheral BNP levels in patients with symptomatic improvement (r = 0.473, P < 0.001). Cardiac oxidative stress may either be a cause or consequence of prolonged AF, and cardiac oxidative stress levels correlated with BNP levels, though a possible source of oxidative stress in AF patients may be systemic circulation.

  17. Diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of non-invasive imaging tests in patients presenting with chronic stable chest pain with suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic overview.

    PubMed

    van Waardhuizen, Claudia N; Langhout, Marieke; Ly, Felisia; Braun, Loes; Genders, Tessa S S; Petersen, Steffen E; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Nieman, Koen; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Several non-invasive imaging techniques are currently in use for the diagnostic workup of adult patients with stable chest pain suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). In this paper, we present a systematic overview of the evidence on diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of new modalities in comparison to established technologies. A literature search for English language studies from 2009 to 2013 was performed, and two investigators independently extracted data on patient and study characteristics. The reviewed published evidence on diagnostic performance and cost-effectiveness support a strategy of CTCA as a rule out (gatekeeper) test of CAD in low- to intermediate-risk patients since it has excellent diagnostic performance and as initial imaging test is cost-effective under different willingness-to-pay thresholds. More cost-effectiveness research is needed in order to define the role and choice of cardiac stress imaging tests. PMID:25301401

  18. Myocardial stress and hypertrophy: a complex interface between biophysics and cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Grossman, William; Paulus, Walter J

    2013-09-01

    Pressure and volume overload results in concentric and eccentric hypertrophy of cardiac ventricular chambers with, respectively, parallel and series replication of sarcomeres. These divergent patterns of hypertrophy were related 40 years ago to disparate wall stresses in both conditions, with systolic wall stress eliciting parallel replication of sarcomeres and diastolic wall stress, series replication. These observations are relevant to clinical practice, as they relate to the excessive hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction regularly observed in patients with aortic stenosis. Stress-sensing mechanisms in cardiomyocytes and activation of cardiomyocyte death by elevated wall stress continue to intrigue cardiovascular scientists.

  19. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods.

    PubMed

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  20. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  1. Non-invasive quantification of lower limb mechanical alignment in flexion

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Angela; Fogg, Quentin A.; Picard, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-invasive navigation techniques have recently been developed to determine mechanical femorotibial alignment (MFTA) in extension. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of an image-free navigation system with new software designed to provide multiple kinematic measurements of the knee. The secondary aim was to test two types of strap material used to attach optical trackers to the lower limb. Methods Seventy-two registrations were carried out on 6 intact embalmed cadaveric specimens (mean age: 77.8 ± 12 years). A validated fabric strap, bone screws and novel rubber strap were used to secure the passive tracker baseplate for four full experiments with each knee. The MFTA angle was measured under the conditions of no applied stress, valgus stress, and varus stress. These measurements were carried out at full extension and at 30°, 40°, 50° and 60° of flexion. Intraclass correlation coefficients, repeatability coefficients, and limits of agreement (LOA) were used to convey precision and agreement in measuring MFTA with respect to each of the independent variables, i.e., degree of flexion, applied coronal stress, and method of tracker fixation. Based on the current literature, a repeatability coefficient and LOA of ≤3° were deemed acceptable. Results The mean fixed flexion for the 6 specimens was 12.8° (range: 6–20°). The mean repeatability coefficient measuring MFTA in extension with screws or fabric strapping of the baseplate was ≤2°, compared to 2.3° using rubber strapping. When flexing the knee, MFTA measurements taken using screws or fabric straps remained precise (repeatability coefficient ≤3°) throughout the tested range of flexion (12.8–60°); however, using rubber straps, the repeatability coefficient was >3° beyond 50° flexion. In general, applying a varus/valgus stress while measuring MFTA decreased precision beyond 40° flexion. Using fabric strapping, excellent repeatability

  2. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João C P; Fujihara, Caroline J; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C; Teixeira, Carlos R; Pantoja, José C F; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3-9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  3. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, João C. P.; Fujihara, Caroline J.; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C.; Teixeira, Carlos R.; Pantoja, José C. F.; Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots’ physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3–9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  4. Non-Invasive Measurement of Adrenocortical Activity in Blue-Fronted Parrots (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João C P; Fujihara, Caroline J; Fruhvald, Erika; Trevisol, Eduardo; Destro, Flavia C; Teixeira, Carlos R; Pantoja, José C F; Schmidt, Elizabeth M S; Palme, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Parrots kept in zoos and private households often develop psychological and behavioural disorders. Despite knowing that such disorders have a multifactorial aetiology and that chronic stress is involved, little is known about their development mainly due to a poor understanding of the parrots' physiology and the lack of validated methods to measure stress in these species. In birds, blood corticosterone concentrations provide information about adrenocortical activity. However, blood sampling techniques are difficult, highly invasive and inappropriate to investigate stressful situations and welfare conditions. Thus, a non-invasive method to measure steroid hormones is critically needed. Aiming to perform a physiological validation of a cortisone enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to measure glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in droppings of 24 Blue-fronted parrots (Amazona aestiva), two experiments were designed. During the experiments all droppings were collected at 3-h intervals. Initially, birds were sampled for 24 h (experiment 1) and one week later assigned to four different treatments (experiment 2): Control (undisturbed), Saline (0.2 mL of 0.9% NaCl IM), Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg IM) and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 25 IU IM). Treatments (always one week apart) were applied to all animals in a cross-over study design. A daily rhythm pattern in GCM excretion was detected but there were no sex differences (first experiment). Saline and dexamethasone treatments had no effect on GCM (not different from control concentrations). Following ACTH injection, GCM concentration increased about 13.1-fold (median) at the peak (after 3-9 h), and then dropped to pre-treatment concentrations. By a successful physiological validation, we demonstrated the suitability of the cortisone EIA to non-invasively monitor increased adrenocortical activity, and thus, stress in the Blue-fronted parrot. This method opens up new perspectives for investigating the connection between behavioural

  5. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  6. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B.; Oldham, Helen M.; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 and 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with exception of IOS (81.8%–18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including > 95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38–44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory volume total (72.8 ± 6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5 ± 16.5 Degrees), %Rib Cage (41.6 ± 12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in one second/forced expiratory volume total (110.0 ± 3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs

  7. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio patients.

    PubMed

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B; Oldham, Helen M; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 to 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with the exception of IOS (81.8%-18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including >95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38-44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in the impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory total (72.8±6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5±16.5°), %rib cage (41.6±12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced expiratory volume total (110.0±3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs of restrictive and

  8. Non-invasive techniques for determining musculoskeleton body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma spectrometry, has ushered in a new era of clinical diagnosis and evaluation of therapies, as well as investigation into and modelling of body composition in both normal individuals and patients suffering from various diseases and dysfunctions. Body composition studies have provided baseline data on such vital constituents as nitrogen, potassium and calcium. The non-invasive measurement techniques are particularly suitable for study of the musculo-skeletal changes in body composition. Of particular relevance here is the measurement of calcium loss in astronauts during prolonged space flights.

  9. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  10. Non-invasive tissue temperature measurements based on quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) of water

    PubMed Central

    Chung, SH; Cerussi, AE; Merritt, SI; Ruth, J; Tromberg, BJ

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development of a non-invasive method for quantitative tissue temperature measurements using Broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Our approach is based on well-characterized opposing shifts in near-infrared (NIR) water absorption spectra that appear with temperature and macromolecular binding state. Unlike conventional reflectance methods, DOS is used to generate scattering-corrected tissue water absorption spectra. This allows us to separate the macromolecular bound water contribution from the thermally induced spectral shift using the temperature isosbestic point at 996 nm. The method was validated in intralipid tissue phantoms by correlating DOS with thermistor measurements (R = 0.96) with a difference of 1.1 ± 0.91 °C over a range of 28–48 °C. Once validated, thermal and hemodynamic (i.e. oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration) changes were measured simultaneously and continuously in human subjects (forearm) during mild cold stress. DOS-measured arm temperatures were consistent with previously reported invasive deep tissue temperature studies. These results suggest that DOS can be used for non-invasive, co-registered measurements of absolute temperature and hemoglobin parameters in thick tissues, a potentially important approach for optimizing thermal diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:20551502

  11. Non-invasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Yoav; Webb, Muriel; Cytter-Kuint, Ruth; Shteingart, Shimon; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation and follow up of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis have been traditionally performed by liver biopsy. However, during the last 20 years, it has become evident that this “gold-standard” is imperfect; even according to its proponents, it is only “the best” among available methods. Attempts at uncovering non-invasive diagnostic tools have yielded multiple scores, formulae, and imaging modalities. All are better tolerated, safer, more acceptable to the patient, and can be repeated essentially as often as required. Most are much less expensive than liver biopsy. Consequently, their use is growing, and in some countries the number of biopsies performed, at least for routine evaluation of hepatitis B and C, has declined sharply. However, the accuracy and diagnostic value of most, if not all, of these methods remains controversial. In this review for the practicing physician, we analyze established and novel biomarkers and physical techniques. We may be witnessing in recent years the beginning of the end of the first phase for the development of non-invasive markers. Early evidence suggests that they might be at least as good as liver biopsy. Novel experimental markers and imaging techniques could produce a dramatic change in diagnosis in the near future. PMID:26556987

  12. Examination of postmortem retinal folds: A non-invasive study.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Toru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-02-01

    The postmortem retinal fold has been previously documented, but its mechanism of formation is not known. All previous studies of the fold involved invasive techniques and the postmortem ocular fundus has yet to be non-invasively examined. Our study used the non-invasive techniques of monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy and ocular echography to examine 79 postmortem eyes of 42 bodies. We examined whether the postmortem retinal fold was associated with postmortem time, position, and/or age. Age was significantly associated with postmortem retinal fold formation (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.013), which led us to examine the effect of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on retinal folds. The absence of a PVD was statistically associated with the presence of a retinal fold (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the presence of a PVD was also significantly correlated with retinal fold height (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal folds result from postmortem vitreoretinal traction caused by eyeball flaccidity. We also believe that the loss of retinochoroidal hydrostatic pressure plays a role. It is important that forensic pathologists not confuse a postmortem retinal fold with traumatic retinal detachment or perimacular retinal folds caused by child abuse. When child abuse is suspected, forensic pathologists should perform enucleation and a subsequent histological examination for confirmation. PMID:25623189

  13. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  14. Non-invasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Yoav; Webb, Muriel; Cytter-Kuint, Ruth; Shteingart, Shimon; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation and follow up of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis have been traditionally performed by liver biopsy. However, during the last 20 years, it has become evident that this "gold-standard" is imperfect; even according to its proponents, it is only "the best" among available methods. Attempts at uncovering non-invasive diagnostic tools have yielded multiple scores, formulae, and imaging modalities. All are better tolerated, safer, more acceptable to the patient, and can be repeated essentially as often as required. Most are much less expensive than liver biopsy. Consequently, their use is growing, and in some countries the number of biopsies performed, at least for routine evaluation of hepatitis B and C, has declined sharply. However, the accuracy and diagnostic value of most, if not all, of these methods remains controversial. In this review for the practicing physician, we analyze established and novel biomarkers and physical techniques. We may be witnessing in recent years the beginning of the end of the first phase for the development of non-invasive markers. Early evidence suggests that they might be at least as good as liver biopsy. Novel experimental markers and imaging techniques could produce a dramatic change in diagnosis in the near future.

  15. Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Caroline B.; Carlson, Monica L.; Toda, Koji; DeWind, Nicholas K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The success of many neuroscientific studies depends upon adequate head fixation of awake, behaving animals. Typically, this is achieved by surgically affixing a head-restraint prosthesis to the skull. New Method Here we report the use of thermoplastic masks to non-invasively restrain monkeys’ heads. Mesh thermoplastic sheets become pliable when heated and can then be molded to an individual monkey’s head. After cooling, the custom mask retains this shape indefinitely for day-to-day use. Results We successfully trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to perform cognitive tasks while wearing thermoplastic masks. Using these masks, we achieved a level of head stability sufficient for high-resolution eye-tracking and intracranial electrophysiology. Comparison with Existing Method Compared with traditional head-posts, we find that thermoplastic masks perform at least as well during infrared eye-tracking and single-neuron recordings, allow for clearer magnetic resonance image acquisition, enable freer placement of a transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, and impose lower financial and time costs on the lab. Conclusions We conclude that thermoplastic masks are a viable non-invasive form of primate head restraint that enable a wide range of neuroscientific experiments. PMID:26112334

  16. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive pressure gradients in aortic arch obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wisotzkey, Bethany L.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Green, Amanda S.; Barker, Piers C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic arch obstruction can be evaluated by catheter peak-to-peak gradient or by Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient. Previous studies have shown moderate correlation in discrete coarctation, but few have assessed correlation in patients with more complex aortic reconstruction. Methods We carried out retrospective comparison of cardiac catheterisations and pre- and post-catheterisation echocardiograms in 60 patients with native/recurrent coarctation or aortic reconstruction. Aortic arch obstruction was defined as peak-to-peak gradient ≥25 mmHg in patients with native/recurrent coarctation and ≥10 mmHg in aortic reconstruction. Results Diastolic continuation of flow was not associated with aortic arch obstruction in either group. Doppler peak instantaneous pressure gradient, with and without the expanded Bernoulli equation, weakly correlated with peak-to-peak gradient even in patients with a normal cardiac index (r=0.36, p=0.016, and r=0.49, p=0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified an area under the curve of 0.61 for patients with all types of obstruction, with a cut-off point of 45 mmHg correctly classifying 64% of patients with arch obstruction (sensitivity 39%, specificity 89%). In patients with aortic arch reconstruction who had a cardiac index ≥3 L/min/m2, a cut-off point of 23 mmHg correctly classified 69% of patients (71% sensitivity, 50% specificity) with an area under the curve of 0.82. Conclusion The non-invasive assessment of aortic obstruction remains challenging. The greatest correlation of Doppler indices was noted in patients with aortic reconstruction and a normal cardiac index. PMID:25602135

  17. The Impact of Stress Hormones on Post-traumatic Stress Disorders Symptoms and Memory in Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Kolesnikov, Sergei; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    The relationship and interactions between stress hormones and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are well established from both animal and human research studies. This interaction is especially important in the post-operative phase of cardiac surgery where the development of PTSD symptoms will result in increased morbidity and mortality and prolong length of stay for critically ill cardiac surgery patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass itself will independently result in massive inflammation response and release of stress hormones in the perioperative period. Glucocorticoid may reduce this response and result in reduction of PTSD symptom clusters and therefore improve health outcome. In this review, we plan to conduct a systemic review and analysis of the literatures on this topic. PMID:25031821

  18. Taxifolin protects against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis during biomechanical stress of pressure overload

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yuqian; Zhou, Heng; Xu, Dachun; Shan, Tichao; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Yuan; Chen, Yuguo; Wu, Dawei

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathophysiological component to biomechanical stress, which has been considered to be an independent and predictive risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events. Taxifolin (TAX) is a typical plant flavonoid, which has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether TAX can influence the development of cardiac hypertrophy. In vitro studies, we found that TAX concentration-dependently inhibited angiotensin II (Ang II) induced hypertrophy and protein synthesis in cardiac myocytes. Then we established a mouse model by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) to further confirm our findings. It was demonstrated that TAX prevented pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice, as assessed by ventricular mass/body weight, echocardiographic parameters, myocyte cross-sectional area, and the expression of ANP, BNP and β-MHC. The excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) played critical role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. TAX arrested oxidative stress and decreased the expression of 4-HNE induced by pressure overload. Moreover, TAX negatively modulated TAC-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. Further studies showed that TAX significantly attenuated left ventricular fibrosis and collagen synthesis through abrogating the phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad2/3 nuclear translocation. These results demonstrated that TAX could inhibit cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate ventricular fibrosis after pressure overload. These beneficial effects were at least through the inhibition of the excess production of ROS, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Smad signaling pathways. Therefore, TAX might be a potential candidate for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. - Highlights: • We focus on the protective effect of taxifolin on cardiac remodeling. • Taxifolin inhibited cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated ventricular fibrosis. • Taxifolin

  19. Rationale and Design of the Dual Energy Computed Tomography for Ischemia Determination Compared to “Gold Standard” Non-invasive and Invasive Techniques (DECIDE-Gold): A Multicenter International Efficacy Diagnostic Study of Rest-Stress Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Angiography with Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Knaapen, Paul; Pontone, Gianluca; Andreini, Daniele; Leipsic, Jonathon; Carrascosa, Patricia; Lu, Bin; Branch, Kelley; Raman, Subha; Bloom, Stephen; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dual-energy CT (DECT) has potential to improve myocardial perfusion for physiologic assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Diagnostic performance of rest-stress DECT perfusion (DECTP) is unknown. OBJECTIVE DECIDE-Gold is a prospective multicenter study to evaluate the accuracy of DECT to detect hemodynamic (HD) significant CAD, as compared to fractional flow reserve (FFR) as a reference standard. METHODS Eligible participants are subjects with symptoms of CAD referred for invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Participants will undergo DECTP, which will be performed by pharmacological stress, and participants will subsequently proceed to ICA and FFR. HD-significant CAD will be defined as FFR ≥ 0.80. In those undergoing myocardial stress imaging (MPI) by positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, ischemia will be graded by % ischemic myocardium. Blinded core laboratory interpretation will be performed for CCTA, DECTP, MPI, ICA and FFR. RESULTS Primary endpoint is accuracy of DECTP to detect ≥ 1 HD-significant stenosis at the subject-level when compared to FFR. Secondary and tertiary endpoints are accuracies of combinations of DECTP at the subject and vessel levels compared to FFR and MPI. CONCLUSION DECIDE-Gold will determine the performance of DECTP for diagnosing ischemia. PMID:25549826

  20. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7–1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects. PMID:26365299

  1. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7-1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects.

  2. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  3. Diosmin pretreatment improves cardiac function and suppresses oxidative stress in rat heart after ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Senthamizhselvan, Oomaidurai; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-08-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic tissue leads to the generation of oxygen derived free radicals which plays an important role in cellular damage. Objective of the current study is to evaluate the cardio-protective and antioxidant effect of diosmin on ischemia-reperfusion related cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Diosmin (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight (bw)) was given every day to the rats orally throughout the experimental period. Ischemia/reperfusion protocol was carried out ex vivo using langendorff perfusion method and the cardiac functional recovery was assessed in terms of percentage rate pressure product. Coronary effluents of LDH and CK-MB activities, antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation products, activity of TCA cycle enzymes were evaluated. Moreover, in vitro superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of diosmin was also quantified. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR was used for assessing Bcl-2 mRNA expression in heart. Cardiac functional recovery was impaired after reperfusion compared with continuously perfused heart. It was significantly prevented by diosmin treatment. Impaired antioxidant enzyme activities and elevated lipid peroxidation products level were also significantly suppressed. The activity of TCA cycle enzymes was protected against reperfusion stress. Down regulated Bcl-2 was also significantly increased. This study concluded that diosmin pretreatment prevents all the impaired patterns including cardiac function, oxidative stress and apoptosis associated with reperfusion in control heart by its antioxidant role.

  4. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    PubMed

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making. PMID:26530119

  5. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of the information produced by science and technology for the knowledge of the cultural heritage depends on the quality of the feedback and, consequently, on the "cultural" distance between scientists and end-users. In particular, the solution to this problem mainly resides in the capability of end-users' capability to assess and transform the knowledge produced by diagnostics with regard to: information on both cultural objects and sites (decay patterns, vulnerability, presence of buried archaeological remains); decision making (management plan, conservation project, and excavation plan). From our experience in the field of the cultural heritage and namely the conservation, of monuments, there is a significant gap of information between technologists (geophysicists/physicists/engineers) and end-users (conservators/historians/architects). This cultural gap is due to the difficulty to interpret "indirect data" produced by non invasive diagnostics (i.e. radargrams/thermal images/seismic tomography etc..) in order to provide information useful to improve the historical knowledge (e.g. the chronology of the different phases of a building), to characterise the state of conservation (e.g. detection of cracks in the masonry) and to monitor in time cultural heritage artifacts and sites. The possible answer to this difficulty is in the set-up of a knowledge chain regarding the following steps: - Integrated application of novel and robust data processing methods; - Augmented reality as a tool for making easier the interpretation of non invasive - investigations for the analysis of decay pathologies of masonry and architectural surfaces; - The comparison between direct data (carrots, visual inspection) and results from non-invasive tests, including geophysics, aims to improve the interpretation and the rendering of the monuments and even of the archaeological landscapes; - The use of specimens or test beds for the detection of archaeological features and

  6. Non-invasive imaging of microcirculation: a technology review

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sam; Nilsson, Jan; Sturesson, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microcirculation plays a crucial role in physiological processes of tissue oxygenation and nutritional exchange. Measurement of microcirculation can be applied on many organs in various pathologies. In this paper we aim to review the technique of non-invasive methods for imaging of the microcirculation. Methods covered are: videomicroscopy techniques, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, and laser speckle contrast imaging. Videomicroscopy techniques, such as orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark-field imaging, provide a plentitude of information and offer direct visualization of the microcirculation but have the major drawback that they may give pressure artifacts. Both laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging allow non-contact measurements but have the disadvantage of their sensitivity to motion artifacts and that they are confined to relative measurement comparisons. Ideal would be a non-contact videomicroscopy method with fully automatic analysis software. PMID:25525397

  7. Ultrahigh-speed non-invasive widefield angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Klein, Thomas; Grajciar, Branislav; Schmoll, Tilman; Wieser, Wolfgang; Andre, Raphael; Huber, Robert; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2012-07-01

    Retinal and choroidal vascular imaging is an important diagnostic benefit for ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. The current gold standard for vessel visualization is fluorescence angiography. We present a potential non-invasive alternative to image blood vessels based on functional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). For OCT to compete with the field of view and resolution of angiography while maintaining motion artifacts to a minimum, ultrahigh-speed imaging has to be introduced. We employ Fourier domain mode locking swept source technology that offers high quality imaging at an A-scan rate of up to 1.68 MHz. We present retinal angiogram over ˜48 deg acquired in a few seconds in a single recording without the need of image stitching. OCT at 1060 nm allows for high penetration in the choroid and efficient separate characterization of the retinal and choroidal vascularization.

  8. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  9. Non-invasive distress evaluation in preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, C; Bocchi, L; Orlandi, S; Calisti, M; Spaccaterra, L; Donzelli, G P

    2008-01-01

    With the increased survival of very preterm infants, there is a growing concern for their developmental outcomes. Infant cry characteristics reflect the development and possibly the integrity of the central nervous system. In this paper, relationships between fundamental frequency (F(0)) and vocal tract resonance frequencies (F(1)-F(3)) are investigated for a set of preterm newborns, by means of a multi-purpose voice analysis tool (BioVoice), characterised by high-resolution and tracking capabilities. Also, first results about possible distress occurring during cry in preterm newborn infants, as related to the decrease of central blood oxygenation, are presented. To this aim, a recording system (Newborn Recorder) has been developed, that allows synchronised, non-invasive monitoring of blood oxygenation and audio recordings of newborn infant's cry. The method has been applied to preterm newborns at the Intensive Care Unit, A.Meyer Children Hospital, Firenze, Italy.

  10. Hybrid CARS for Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Pestov, Dmitry; Zhang, Aihua; Murawski, Robert; Sokolov, Alexei; Welch, George; Laane, Jaan; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    We develop a spectroscopy technique that combines the advantages of both the frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the time-resolved CARS. We use broadband preparation pulses to get an instantaneous coherent excitation of multiplex molecular vibration levels and subsequent optically shaped time-delayed narrowband probing pulse to detect these vibrations. This technique can suppress the nonresonant background and retrieve the molecular fingerprint signal efficiently and rapidly. We employ this technique to glucose detection, the final goal of which is accurate, non-invasive (i.e. painless) and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration in the Diabetes diagnosis to replace the current glucose measurement process, which requires painful fingerpricks and therefore cannot be performed more than a few times a day. We have gotten the CARS spectra of glucose aqueous solution down to 2 mM.

  11. Non-invasive neuroimaging using near-infrared light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Boas, David A.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared light to non-invasively probe the brain for changes in parameters relating to brain function. We describe the general methodology, including types of measurements and instrumentation (including the tradeoffs inherent in the various instrument components), and the basic theory required to interpret the recorded data. A brief review of diffuse optical applications is included, with an emphasis on research that has been done with psychiatric populations. Finally, we discuss some practical issues and limitations that are relevant when conducting diffuse optical experiments. We find that, while diffuse optics can provide substantial advantages to the psychiatric researcher relative to the alternative brain imaging methods, the method remains substantially underutilized in this field.

  12. Non-invasive Respiratory Support and Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Rahul; Fisher, Marilyn; Cerone, Jennifer; Barry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe two premature infants who developed stage 3, zone I retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with plus disease in both eyes, despite limited exposure to supra-ambient oxygen. Both infants received noninvasive respiratory support for several weeks. Both cases are notable because the ROP was more posterior and aggressive than is typical for the gestational ages or birth weights. These cases are insufficient to make definitive conclusions regarding the factors that cause ROP. Further investigation is required to determine if there is an association between the use of non-invasive respiratory support, even in the absence of supra-ambient oxygen, and severe ROP development. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e47-e50.]. PMID:27537495

  13. Non-Invasive Tension Measurement Devices for Parachute Cordage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litteken, Douglas A.; Daum, Jared S.

    2016-01-01

    The need for lightweight and non-intrusive tension measurements has arisen alongside the development of high-fidelity computer models of textile and fluid dynamics. In order to validate these computer models, data must be gathered in the operational environment without altering the design, construction, or performance of the test article. Current measurement device designs rely on severing a cord and breaking the load path to introduce a load cell. These load cells are very reliable, but introduce an area of high stiffness in the load path, directly affecting the structural response, adding excessive weight, and possibly altering the dynamics of the parachute during a test. To capture the required data for analysis validation without affecting the response of the system, non-invasive measurement devices have been developed and tested by NASA. These tension measurement devices offer minimal impact to the mass, form, fit, and function of the test article, while providing reliable, axial tension measurements for parachute cordage.

  14. Eyeblink conditioning: a non-invasive biomarker for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-02-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition, abnormalities in the cerebellum, a region of the brain highly involved in EBC, have been implicated in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the current paper, we review studies that have employed EBC as a biomarker for several neurodevelopmental disorders including fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, specific language impairment, and schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the benefits of using such a tool in individuals with ASD.

  15. Non-invasive exploration in an environmentally sensitive world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livo, K.E.; Knepper, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Modern remote sensing provides a means for locating and characterizing exposed mineralized systems in many parts of the world. These capabilities are non-invasive and help target specific areas for more detailed exploration. An example of how remote sensing technology can be used is evident from a study of the Questa Mining District, New Mexico. Analysis of low spectral resolution data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite system clearly shows the regional distribution of two broad mineral groups often associated with mineralized systems: clay-carbonate-sulfate and iron oxides-iron hydroxides. Analysis of high spectral resolution data from the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging System (AVIRIS) shows the occurrence and distribution of many individual mineral species that characterize the pattern of hydrothermally altered rocks in the district.

  16. Non-invasive brain stimulation in neglect rehabilitation: an update.

    PubMed

    Müri, René Martin; Cazzoli, Dario; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P; Hopfner, Simone; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies) fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living measures such as the Barthel Index or, more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in three studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence. The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta-burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients.

  17. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Neglect Rehabilitation: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Müri, René Martin; Cazzoli, Dario; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P.; Hopfner, Simone; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies) fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living measures such as the Barthel Index or, more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in three studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence. The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta-burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients. PMID:23772209

  18. Non-invasive glucose determination in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Wolfgang; Meuer, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Kiefer, Wolfgang; Menzebach, Johannes-Ulrich; Schrader, Bernhard

    2005-02-01

    For non-invasive in vivo glucose determinations by means of near-infrared spectroscopy, the anterior chamber of the human eye is a promising site. An optical set-up for the non-invasive glucose determination in the human eye precisely in the anterior chamber with a beam reflected from the surface of the eye lens is presented here. As the anterior chamber has a depth of 3.13±0.50 mm, the beam follows an optical path of 5.3-7.3 mm depending on the angle of incidence, which is individually constant. We will show that it is possible to acquire good concentration predictions for physiological glucose concentrations with such a long optical path. A chemometric study of NIR glucose spectra with concentrations of glucose in water of 10-350 mg/dL (0.56-1.94 mmol/L) resulted in a calibration model which was able to predict physiological glucose concentrations with a root mean square error of prediction RMSEPTest=15.41 mg/dL. The Clarke error grid diagram shows that the model performs well according to medical impact. Using a first in vivo set-up, the precision is not sufficient for a reliable prediction of glucose concentration, especially due to the flickering of the patient's eye and the low reflectivity of the eye lens. Therefore, we have designed a new in vivo set-up: a prototype for a self-monitoring device with controlled geometry and laser radiation at several distinct wavelengths instead of the halogen lamp as light source. This allows a far higher signal/noise ratio under much better reproducible geometrical conditions and at the same time a much smaller necessary light flux.

  19. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    TRUTA, ANAMARIA; POPON, TUDOR ADRIAN HODOR; SARACI, GEORGE; GHERVAN, LIVIU; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, −145, −222, −210, −10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population. PMID:27152066

  20. Non-invasive diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sebastian; Seitz, Helmut Karl; Rausch, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world. For many reasons, it is underestimated and underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis is absolutely essential since it (1) helps to identify patients at genetic risk for ALD; (2) can trigger efficient abstinence namely in non-addicted patients; and (3) initiate screening programs to prevent life-threatening complications such as bleeding from varices, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or hepatocellular cancer. The two major end points of ALD are alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the rare and clinically-defined alcoholic hepatitis (AH). The prediction and early diagnosis of both entities is still insufficiently solved and usually relies on a combination of laboratory, clinical and imaging findings. It is not widely conceived that conventional screening tools for ALD such as ultrasound imaging or routine laboratory testing can easily overlook ca. 40% of manifest alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Non-invasive methods such as transient elastography (Fibroscan), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging or shear wave elastography have significantly improved the early diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis. Present algorithms allow either the exclusion or the exact definition of advanced fibrosis stages in ca. 95% of patients. The correct interpretation of liver stiffness requires a timely abdominal ultrasound and actual transaminase levels. Other non-invasive methods such as controlled attenuation parameter, serum levels of M30 or M65, susceptometry or breath tests are under current evaluation to assess the degree of steatosis, apoptosis and iron overload in these patients. Liver biopsy still remains an important option to rule out comorbidities and to confirm the prognosis namely for patients with AH. PMID:25356026

  1. Disruption of calpain reduces lipotoxicity-induced cardiac injury by preventing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengcun; Zhang, Lulu; Ni, Rui; Cao, Ting; Zheng, Dong; Xiong, Sidong; Greer, Peter A.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Peng, Tianqing

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are prevalent in westernized countries. In both conditions, excessive fatty acid uptake by cardiomyocytes induces cardiac lipotoxicity, an important mechanism contributing to diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study investigated the effect of calpain disruption on cardiac lipotoxicity. Cardiac-specific capns1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates (male, age of 4 weeks) were fed a high fat diet (HFD) or normal diet for 20 weeks. HFD increased body weight, altered blood lipid profiles and impaired glucose tolerance comparably in both capns1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Calpain activity, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas, collagen deposition and triglyceride were significantly increased in HFD-fed mouse hearts, and these were accompanied by myocardial dysfunction and up-regulation of hypertrophic and fibrotic collagen genes as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines. These effects of HFD were attenuated by disruption of calpain in capns1 knockout mice. Mechanistically, deletion of capns1 in HFD-fed mouse hearts and disruption of calpain with calpain inhibitor-III, silencing of capn1, or deletion of capns1 in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes prevented endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, cleavage of caspase-12 and junctophilin-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress diminished palmitate-induced apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in cardiomyocytes. In summary, disruption of calpain prevents lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes and cardiac injury in mice fed a HFD. The role of calpain is mediated, at least partially, through endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thus, calpain/endoplasmic reticulum stress may represent a new mechanism and potential therapeutic targets for cardiac lipotoxicity. PMID:27523632

  2. Analysis of uncultured extremophilic snow algae by non-invasive single cell Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Thomas; Tanaka, Zuki; Netzter, Nathan; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Chen, Bin

    2011-10-01

    The study of life in extreme environments is a critical component of Astrobiology. But many of the so-called "extremophiles" are not readily cultivatable and therefore difficult to study under laboratory conditions. An example of such an extremophile is the snow alga Chlamydomonas cd. nivalis which expresses still unstudied secondary metabolites within its life cycle. In this paper, we present the first time the non-invasive single cell Raman spectroscopy of the life cycle dependent metabolite composition of C. nivalis. These secondary metabolites are likely related to the adaptation of C. nivalis to various stress factors. Normalized carotenoid Raman spectra intensities reveal characteristic ratio differences that allow identification of life cycle stages and putative secondary metabolites.

  3. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Matches Energetic Supply with Cardiac Workload during Stress and Modulates Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Timothy S; Lambert, Jonathan P; Yuan, Ancai; Zhang, Xueqian; Gross, Polina; Song, Jianliang; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Gao, Erhe; Jain, Mohit; Houser, Steven R; Koch, Walter J; Cheung, Joseph Y; Madesh, Muniswamy; Elrod, John W

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac contractility is mediated by a variable flux in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), thought to be integrated into mitochondria via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) channel to match energetic demand. Here, we examine a conditional, cardiomyocyte-specific, mutant mouse lacking Mcu, the pore-forming subunit of the MCU channel, in adulthood. Mcu(-/-) mice display no overt baseline phenotype and are protected against mCa(2+) overload in an in vivo myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury model by preventing the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, decreasing infarct size, and preserving cardiac function. In addition, we find that Mcu(-/-) mice lack contractile responsiveness to acute β-adrenergic receptor stimulation and in parallel are unable to activate mitochondrial dehydrogenases and display reduced bioenergetic reserve capacity. These results support the hypothesis that MCU may be dispensable for homeostatic cardiac function but required to modulate Ca(2+)-dependent metabolism during acute stress.

  4. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Matches Energetic Supply with Cardiac Workload during Stress and Modulates Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Timothy S; Lambert, Jonathan P; Yuan, Ancai; Zhang, Xueqian; Gross, Polina; Song, Jianliang; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Gao, Erhe; Jain, Mohit; Houser, Steven R; Koch, Walter J; Cheung, Joseph Y; Madesh, Muniswamy; Elrod, John W

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac contractility is mediated by a variable flux in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), thought to be integrated into mitochondria via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) channel to match energetic demand. Here, we examine a conditional, cardiomyocyte-specific, mutant mouse lacking Mcu, the pore-forming subunit of the MCU channel, in adulthood. Mcu(-/-) mice display no overt baseline phenotype and are protected against mCa(2+) overload in an in vivo myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury model by preventing the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, decreasing infarct size, and preserving cardiac function. In addition, we find that Mcu(-/-) mice lack contractile responsiveness to acute β-adrenergic receptor stimulation and in parallel are unable to activate mitochondrial dehydrogenases and display reduced bioenergetic reserve capacity. These results support the hypothesis that MCU may be dispensable for homeostatic cardiac function but required to modulate Ca(2+)-dependent metabolism during acute stress. PMID:26119731

  5. Impact of weightlessness on cardiac shape and left ventricular stress/strain distributions.

    PubMed

    Iskovitz, Ilana; Kassemi, Mohammad; Thomas, James D

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a finite element model of the heart is developed to investigate the impact of different gravitational loadings of Earth, Mars, Moon, and microgravity on the cardiac shape and strain/stress distributions in the left ventricle. The finite element model is based on realistic 3D heart geometry, detailed fiber/sheet micro-architecture, and a validated orthotropic cardiac tissue model and constitutive relationship that capture the passive behavior of the heart at end-diastole. The model predicts the trend and magnitude of cardiac shape change at different gravitational levels with great fidelity in comparison to recent cardiac sphericity measurements performed during simulated reduced-gravity parabolic flight experiments. Moreover, the numerical predictions indicate that although the left ventricular strain distributions remain relatively unaltered across the gravitational fields and the strain extrema values occur at the same relative locations, their values change noticeably with decreasing gravity. As for the stress, however, both the magnitude and location of the extrema change with a decrease in the gravitational field. Consequently, tension regions of the heart on Earth can change into compression regions in space.

  6. Identification of the proteomic variations of invasive relative to non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianquan; Desiderio, Dominic M; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhan, Xiaohan; Guo, Tianyao; Li, Maoyu; Peng, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Xuejun; Chen, Zhuchu

    2014-08-01

    The incomplete surgery section of invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) carries the increased risks of complications and requires adjuvant radiotherapy and medications. It is necessary to clarify the molecular mechanisms and markers of invasiveness to guide the management of NFPA patients. The study aimed to proteomic variations of invasive and non-invasive NFPAs and sought the protein markers for invasive NFPAs. Invasive (n = 4) and non-invasive (n = 4) NFPA tissues were analyzed (n = 3-5/each tissue) with 2DE and PDQuest software. Twenty-four high-resolution 2DE gels were quantitatively compared to determine differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) between invasive and non-invasive NFPAs. Approximately 1200 protein spots were detected in each 2DE map, and 103 differential spots (64 upregulated and 39 downregulated) were identified. Among those 103 differential spots, 57 DEPs (30 upregulated and 27 downregulated) were characterized with peptide mass fingerprint and MS/MS. Gene-ontology (GO) and ingenuity pathway analyses of those DEPs revealed pathway networks including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling abnormality, TR/RXR activation, proteolysis abnormality, ketogenesis and ketolysis, cyclin-dependent kinase C signaling abnormality, and amyloid processing that were significantly associated with invasive characteristics of invasive NFPA. Those data demonstrate that proteomic variations exist between invasive and non-invasive NFPAs. 2DE-based comparative proteomics is an effective approach to identify proteomic variations and pathway network variations. Those findings will serve as a basis to understand the molecular mechanisms of invasive NFPAs and to discover protein markers to effectively manage patients with invasive NFPAs. PMID:24729304

  7. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  8. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  9. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  10. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  11. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p < 0.05). Burn depth and viable vessel density were estimated via histological samples. 42% of vessels in the dermal layer were viable for superficial burns, compared to 25% for deep burns. The differences detected in optical properties and hemoglobin content by optical measurements

  12. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  13. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  14. Non-invasive techniques for the measurement of bone mineral.

    PubMed

    Seeman, E; Martin, T J

    1989-05-01

    Non-invasive, safe and precise techniques for measuring bone mineral density are available and have an important role in the detection, prevention and treatment of bone loss associated with aging, menopause and many illnesses affecting women and men. The three most widely accessible and established techniques for measuring regional bone mineral density are single and dual photon absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography. A technique of greater accuracy, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, has only recently become available. These techniques have made it possible to measure the magnitude, time course and regional specificity of the skeleton's response to ageing, menopause and illness. A better understanding of the clinical epidemiology of fractures and the mechanisms responsible for bone loss has been obtained. Practical information has been obtained about the dose, duration and efficacy of oestrogen replacement therapy in preventing perimenopausal bone loss and the benefits and limitations of different forms of exercise on bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. The beneficial effect of dietary calcium on peak bone mineral density and in decreasing bone loss in cortical bone has been documented. Information regarding the prevention and treatment of bone loss in exogenous hypercortisolism and the magnitude and reversibility of bone loss associated with many diseases which affect bone has been obtained. One of the most important clinical applications of these techniques is the assessment of the efficacy of treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. As antifracture efficacy is not readily measurable, considerable information is being obtained about many potentially useful forms of therapy that may prevent bone loss and increase bone mineral density. The role of these non-invasive methods in the assessment of fracture risk and the need for oestrogen or other therapy in an individual who has attained a low peak bone mass or has risk

  15. Non invasive analysis of miniature paintings: proposal for an analytical protocol.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Gulmini, Monica; Bianco, Valentina; Pellizzi, Eleonora

    2012-06-01

    The characterisation of palettes used in manuscript illumination is a hard analytical task, due to value and fragility of the analysed items. Analysis on miniatures must be necessarily non-invasive and fast and requires the use of several techniques since no single technique is able to provide all information needed. In this work a four-step analytical protocol is proposed for non-invasive in situ characterisation of miniature paintings. The protocol allows the identification of coloured materials through the use in sequence of complementary techniques, so as to fully exploit the information given by each instrument. Preliminarily to the instrumental investigations on ancient books and miniatures is the compilation of spectroscopic databases obtained from "standard" samples prepared on parchment, according to recipes described in medieval artistic treatises. The protocol starts with an extensive investigation with UV-visible spectrophotometry in reflectance mode, collecting spectra from all the most significant painted areas in the manuscript; chemometric classification is then performed on the spectra to highlight areas possibly containing the same materials. The second step involves in-depth inspection of miniatures under optical microscopy that guides the interpretation of reflectance spectra. XRF spectrometry is then performed to characterise pigments and metal layers, to verify the presence of overlapping layers, to identify mordants in lakes and to recognise minor components that may yield information concerning provenance; in addition, chemometric classification can be performed on element concentrations to highlight similar areas. Finally, Raman spectroscopy is used to shed light on the uncertain cases, if still present. Such a procedure offers a wealth of information without causing stress to the manuscripts under analysis. PMID:22391225

  16. Non invasive analysis of miniature paintings: Proposal for an analytical protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Gulmini, Monica; Bianco, Valentina; Pellizzi, Eleonora

    2012-06-01

    The characterisation of palettes used in manuscript illumination is a hard analytical task, due to value and fragility of the analysed items. Analysis on miniatures must be necessarily non-invasive and fast and requires the use of several techniques since no single technique is able to provide all information needed. In this work a four-step analytical protocol is proposed for non-invasive in situ characterisation of miniature paintings. The protocol allows the identification of coloured materials through the use in sequence of complementary techniques, so as to fully exploit the information given by each instrument. Preliminarily to the instrumental investigations on ancient books and miniatures is the compilation of spectroscopic databases obtained from "standard" samples prepared on parchment, according to recipes described in medieval artistic treatises. The protocol starts with an extensive investigation with UV-visible spectrophotometry in reflectance mode, collecting spectra from all the most significant painted areas in the manuscript; chemometric classification is then performed on the spectra to highlight areas possibly containing the same materials. The second step involves in-depth inspection of miniatures under optical microscopy that guides the interpretation of reflectance spectra. XRF spectrometry is then performed to characterise pigments and metal layers, to verify the presence of overlapping layers, to identify mordants in lakes and to recognise minor components that may yield information concerning provenance; in addition, chemometric classification can be performed on element concentrations to highlight similar areas. Finally, Raman spectroscopy is used to shed light on the uncertain cases, if still present. Such a procedure offers a wealth of information without causing stress to the manuscripts under analysis.

  17. A prenatal case with discrepant findings between non-invasive prenatal testing and fetal genetic testings.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Sun, Baojuan; Huang, Xiaoli; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Jiang, Fuman; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Mengmeng; Yue, Hongni; Hu, Ping; Ning, Ying

    2014-01-01

    At 17(+4) week, non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) results of a 24-years-old mother showed high risk of monosomy X (45, X). Abnormally shaped head and cardiac defects were observed in prenatal ultrasound scan at 19(+3) week. Amniocentesis conducted at 19(+3) week identified karyotype 47, XX, +18, which suggested that the NIPT failed to detect trisomy 18 (T18) in this case. With a further massively parallel sequencing (MPS) of maternal blood, fetal and placental tissues, we found a confined placental mosaicism (CPM) with non-mosaic T18 fetus and multiclonal placenta with high prevalence of 45, X and low level of T18 cells. FISH and SNP-array evidence from the placental tissue confirmed genetic discrepancy between the fetus and placenta. Because the primary source of the fetal cell-free DNA that NIPT assesses is mostly originated from trophoblast cells, the level of T18 placental mosaicism may cause false negative NIPT result in this rare case of double aneuploidy.

  18. Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Keissar, K; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T; Gilad, O

    2010-07-01

    A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time-frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance. PMID:20585147

  19. Non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, D; Diebold, B; Peronneau, P; Foult, J M; Nee, M; Guermonprez, J L; Maurice, P

    1981-01-01

    The value of Doppler echocardiography for the non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation was studied blindly in 161 consecutive invasively investigated adult patients. Regurgitation was graded from 0 to 3 at selective left ventricular angiography. The Doppler echocardiographic examination was considered to be positive when a disturbed systolic flow was found within the left atrium behind the aorta or the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The test was considered to be negative in the absence of a regurgitant jet. The level of the signal to noise ratio was checked by the recording of the ventricular filling flow. The study was performed in 131 cases from the left side of the sternum and in 101 cases from the apex. There were no false positives and thus the specificity was 100 per cent. The 20 false negatives were all in patients with grade 1 regurgitation. Thus only some (33%) instances of mild regurgitation were misdiagnosed, and the sensitivity for moderate to severe mitral regurgitation was 100 per cent. PMID:7236465

  20. Non-invasive biosensor and wilreless interrogating system for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Saukesi, K.

    2002-11-01

    Hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease in blood sugar - is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This paper presents the development of a non-invasive sensor with miniaturized telemetry device in a wrist-watch for monitoring glucose concentration in blood. The sensor concept is based on optical chiralit of glucose level in the interstitial fluid. The wrist watch consists of a laser power source of the wavelength compatible with the glucose. A nanofilm with specific chirality is placed at the bottom of the watch. The light then passes through the film and illuminates a small area on the skin.It has been documented that there is certain concentration of sugar level is taken by the intertitial fluid from the blood stream and deposit a portion of it at the dead skin. The wrist-watch when in contact with the outer skin of the human will thus monitor the glucose concentration. A wireless monitoring system in the watch then downloads the data from the watch to a Palm or laptop computer.

  1. Facilitate Insight by Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard P.; Snyder, Allan W.

    2011-01-01

    Our experiences can blind us. Once we have learned to solve problems by one method, we often have difficulties in generating solutions involving a different kind of insight. Yet there is evidence that people with brain lesions are sometimes more resistant to this so-called mental set effect. This inspired us to investigate whether the mental set effect can be reduced by non-invasive brain stimulation. 60 healthy right-handed participants were asked to take an insight problem solving task while receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL). Only 20% of participants solved an insight problem with sham stimulation (control), whereas 3 times as many participants did so (p = 0.011) with cathodal stimulation (decreased excitability) of the left ATL together with anodal stimulation (increased excitability) of the right ATL. We found hemispheric differences in that a stimulation montage involving the opposite polarities did not facilitate performance. Our findings are consistent with the theory that inhibition to the left ATL can lead to a cognitive style that is less influenced by mental templates and that the right ATL may be associated with insight or novel meaning. Further studies including neurophysiological imaging are needed to elucidate the specific mechanisms leading to the enhancement. PMID:21311746

  2. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  3. Non invasive tools for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Cervello, Melchiorre; Licata, Anna; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC), the end stage of many forms of chronic hepatitis of different etiologies is a diffuse process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules surrounded by annular fibrosis. This chronic progressive clinical condition, leads to liver cell failure and portal hypertension, which can favour the onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Defining the phase of the natural history is crucial for therapeutic choice and prognosis. Liver biopsy is currently considered the best available standard of reference but it has some limits, so alternative tools have been developed to substitute liver biopsy when assessing liver fibrosis. Serum markers offer a cost-effective alternative to liver biopsy being less invasive and theoretically without complications. They can be classified into direct and indirect markers which may be used alone or in combination to produce composite scores. Diagnostic imaging includes a number of instruments and techniques to estimate liver fibrosis and cirrhosis like ultrasound (US), US Doppler, contrast enhanced US and Elastography. US could be used for the diagnosis of advanced LC while is not able to evaluate progression of fibrosis, in this case Elastography is more reliable. This review aims to revise the most recent data from the literature about non invasive methods useful in defining liver fibrosis. PMID:25561782

  4. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders.

  5. Exploring non-invasive methods to assess pain in sheep.

    PubMed

    Stubsjøen, Solveig M; Flø, Andreas S; Moe, Randi O; Janczak, Andrew M; Skjerve, Eystein; Valle, Paul S; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in eye temperature, measured using infrared thermography (IRT), and heart rate variability (HRV) can detect moderate levels of pain in sheep. Six ewes received the following treatments: 1) noxious ischaemic stimulus by application of a forelimb tourniquet (S), 2) noxious ischaemic stimulus and flunixin meglumine (S+F), and 3) flunixin meglumine (F). Maximum eye temperature, HRV, mechanical nociceptive threshold, blood pressure and behaviour were recorded for up to 60 min, including 15 min of baseline, 30 min during intervention and 15 min post-intervention. There was a tendency towards a decrease in the heart rate variability parameters RMSSD (the root mean square of successive R-R intervals) and SDNN (the standard deviation of all interbeat intervals) in treatment S compared to treatment F, and a significant increase in the same parameters between test day 1 and 3. A reduction in eye temperature was detected for all treatments during intervention, but no difference was found between S and F and S+N and F during intervention. The eye temperature decreased more in test day 2 and 3 compared to test day 1 during intervention. A significant reduction for both lip licking and vocalisation was observed between test day 1 and 3, and forward facing ears was the ear posture most frequently recorded in test day 1. We suggest that HRV is a sensitive, non-invasive method to assess mild to moderate pain in sheep, whereas IRT is a less sensitive method.

  6. Application of optical non-invasive methods in skin physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Darvin, M.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper the application of optical non-invasive methods in dermatology and cosmetology is discussed. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) are the most promising methods for this application. Using these methods, the analysis of different skin parameters like dryness and oiliness of the skin, the barrier function and the structure of furrows and wrinkles are discussed. Additionally the homogeneity of distribution of topically applied creams, as well as their penetration into the skin were investigated. It is shown that these methods are highly valuable in dermatology for diagnostic and therapy control and for basic research, for instance in the field of structure analysis of hair follicles and sweat glands. The vertical images of the tissue produced by OCT can be easily compared with histological sections. Unfortunately, the resolution of the OCT technique is not high enough to carry out measurements on a cellular level, as is possible by LSM. LSM has the advantage that it can be used for the investigation of penetration and storage processes of topically applied substances, if these substances have fluorescent properties or if they are fluorescent-labelled.

  7. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to.

  8. Non-Invasive Gait Monitoring in a Ubiquitous Computing House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yuji; Motooka, Nobuhisa; Siio, Itiro; Tsukada, Koji; Kambara, Keisuke

    Computers become smaller and cheaper from day to day, and the utilization, as daily life equipments, is now becoming ubiquitous. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the development of applications, as well as the installation of ubiquitous computing technologies into our daily living environments. Based on this idea, in order to investigate how ubiquitous computing can be used in the most efficient way, an experimental house, Ocha House, has been constructed in the campus of Ochanomizu university in 2009. In this study, we described the feature of the design of the experimental house and proposed a non-invasive gait monitoring technique as a healthcare application. Specifically, five wireless accelerometers were fixed on the floor of the house, and the floor vibration was measured when the subject walked along the accelerometers. As a result, the floor acceleration intensity was found to surge at the ground contact, and the gait cycle could be detected. By combining the simple acceleration sensors and the housing structures, human motion monitoring would become less invasive.

  9. Non invasive tools for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Cervello, Melchiorre; Licata, Anna; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-12-28

    Liver cirrhosis (LC), the end stage of many forms of chronic hepatitis of different etiologies is a diffuse process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules surrounded by annular fibrosis. This chronic progressive clinical condition, leads to liver cell failure and portal hypertension, which can favour the onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Defining the phase of the natural history is crucial for therapeutic choice and prognosis. Liver biopsy is currently considered the best available standard of reference but it has some limits, so alternative tools have been developed to substitute liver biopsy when assessing liver fibrosis. Serum markers offer a cost-effective alternative to liver biopsy being less invasive and theoretically without complications. They can be classified into direct and indirect markers which may be used alone or in combination to produce composite scores. Diagnostic imaging includes a number of instruments and techniques to estimate liver fibrosis and cirrhosis like ultrasound (US), US Doppler, contrast enhanced US and Elastography. US could be used for the diagnosis of advanced LC while is not able to evaluate progression of fibrosis, in this case Elastography is more reliable. This review aims to revise the most recent data from the literature about non invasive methods useful in defining liver fibrosis.

  10. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to. PMID:26834603

  11. Bioengineering approach to non-invasive measurement of body composition.

    PubMed

    Dubin, S; Nissanov, J; Zietz, S; Schrope, B; Naim, A; Morano, R; Hanania, R

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of body fat percentage is essential for medical care and research. The "gold standard" method for humans is underwater weighing, which is clearly inappropriate for infants, sick people and non-human animals. The corresponding criterion method for animals is comminution of the carcass followed by extraction of the fat with a volatile solvent such as ether. Our goal has been to develop a method for body composition (fat percentage) for use in animals and humans which is non-invasive and minimally intrusive, independent of variation in body conformation and fat distribution, and reasonable in cost. In one variant, our approach to this problem has been to move Archimedes' principle "on to dry land." The subject's volume is determined by measuring the differential buoyancy in comfortably breathable light (low density) and heavy atmospheres. In another, we use "structured light," in which a pattern of illumination is cast on the patient. The image is acquired using a video camera and the geometrical spatial coordinates of a large number of points on the surface of the subject are acquired. This permits the computation of the surface area and volume of the subject; which, combined with the weight, determines the fat percentage. PMID:7948641

  12. Minocycline suppresses oxidative stress and attenuates fetal cardiac myocyte apoptosis triggered by in utero cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Shen, Ruoqing; Nzenwa, Ify; Gelfand, Robert; Mahata, Sushil K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the molecular mechanisms by which minocycline, a second generation tetracycline, prevents cardiac myocyte death induced by in utero cocaine exposure. Timed mated pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats received one of the following treatments twice daily from embryonic (E) day 15–21 (E15–E21): (i) intraperitoneal (IP) injections of saline (control); (ii) IP injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg BW); and (iii) IP injections of cocaine + oral administration of 25 mg/kg BW of minocycline. Pups were killed on postnatal day 15 (P15). Additional pregnant dams received twice daily IP injections of cocaine (from E15–E21) + oral administration of a relatively higher (37.5 mg/kg BW) dose of minocycline. Minocycline treatment continued from E15 until the pups were sacrificed on P15. In utero cocaine exposure resulted in an increase in oxidative stress and fetal cardiac myocyte apoptosis through activation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway. Continued minocycline treatment from E15 through P15 significantly prevented oxidative stress, kinase activation, perturbation of BAX/BCL-2 ratio, cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and attenuated fetal cardiac myocyte apoptosis after prenatal cocaine exposure. These results demonstrate in vivo cardioprotective effects of minocycline in preventing fetal cardiac myocyte death after prenatal cocaine exposure. Given its proven clinical safety and ability to cross the placental barrier and enter into the fetal circulation, minocycline may be an effective therapy for preventing cardiac consequences of in utero cocaine exposure. PMID:21424555

  13. Thallium-201 perfusion imaging with atrial pacing or dipyridamole stress testing for evaluation of cardiac risk prior to nonvascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Williams, G.A. )

    1990-09-01

    Preoperative assessment of cardiac risk using thallium-201 scintigraphy and atrial pacing (n = 42) or dipyridamole stress testing (n = 35) was performed in 77 patients (mean age 65 +/- 7 years), who subsequently underwent elective nonvascular surgery. All patients were at low cardiac risk by clinical criteria; none could perform exercise stress testing due to physical limitations. ST depression consistent with ischemia occurred in 11 patients during atrial pacing and in 1 patient during dipyridamole stress testing (p less than 0.01). Nine patients had reversible perfusion defects with atrial pacing, and 10 patients with dipyridamole stress testing; fixed defects were present in 15 and 8 patients, respectively. Only one patient (fixed perfusion defect with atrial pacing, left main disease on coronary angiography) underwent preoperative coronary revascularization. Two patients subsequently had postoperative cardiac events. One patient (reversible perfusion defect with dipyridamole stress testing) experienced sudden death after a nonvascular procedure, while a second patient (normal thallium images with dipyridamole testing) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction. In patients having atrial pacing or dipyridamole stress testing, thallium-201 scans that are normal or show only a fixed perfusion defect confirm a low risk of cardiac complications following nonvascular surgery. The presence of a reversible perfusion defect does not preclude a postoperative course free of cardiac complications in patients at low cardiac risk by clinical criteria.

  14. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. PMID:27591472

  15. [Non-invasive Genetic Prenatal Testing - A Serious Challenge for Society as a Whole].

    PubMed

    Zerres, K

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive genetic prenatal tests nowadays allow a highly reliable identification of pregnancies with foetal aneuploidies. Due to the general availability of these tests for all pregnant women, non-invasive genetic prenatal testing raises many ethical questions whieh can only be answered by a debate focused on society as a whole.

  16. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery.

  17. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery.

  18. Hyperpulsatile pressure, systemic inflammation and cardiac stress are associated with cardiac wall remodeling in an African male cohort: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    van Vuren, Esmé Jansen; Malan, Leoné; von Känel, Roland; Cockeran, Marike; Malan, Nicolaas T

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation may contribute to an increase in cardiac wall stress through pathways related to cardiac remodeling. Cardiac remodeling is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy, myocyte death and modifications of the extracellular matrix. We sought to explore associations among cardiac remodeling, inflammation and myocardial cell injury in a bi-ethnic cohort of South African men and women. We included 165 men (76 African and 89 Caucasian) and 174 women (80 African and 94 Caucasian) between 20 and 65 years of age. Inflammatory markers used were C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), whereas troponin T (Trop T) and the N-terminal of pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were used as cardiac markers. The frequency of ischemic events (ST segment depression) and left ventricular strain (left ventricular hypertrophy: LVH) were monitored by a 24-h recording of ambulatory blood pressure (BP), ECG and 12-lead standard ECG. Hypertension diagnosed with ambulatory monitoring was more frequent in Africans (53.85 vs. 24.59%; P<0.001), as was the number of ischemic events (6±15 (1; 5) vs. 3±6 (0; 3)). Inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α) and the degree of LVH were all significantly higher in Africans (P<0.05). BP was associated (P<0.05) with Trop T in men across ethnic groups. In African men, cardiac stress (NT-proBNP) was associated with TNF-alpha (P<0.001), Trop T (P<0.001) and pulse pressure (P=0.048; adjusted R(2)=0.45). The susceptibility for cardiac wall remodeling appears to increase with hyperpulsatile pressure, low-grade systemic inflammation and ventricular stress, and may lead to the development of future cardiovascular events in African men. PMID:27169396

  19. Saliva as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for inflammation and insulin-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Gauri S; Mathews, Suresh T

    2014-01-01

    Saliva has been progressively studied as a non-invasive and relatively stress-free diagnostic alternative to blood. Currently, saliva testing is used for clinical assessment of hormonal perturbations, detection of HIV antibodies, DNA analysis, alcohol screening, and drug testing. Recently, there has been increasing interest in evaluating the diagnostic potential of saliva in obesity, inflammation, and insulin-resistance. Current literature has demonstrated elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers including C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interferon-γ in saliva of obese/overweight children and adults. Salivary antioxidant status has also been studied as a measure of oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Further, several studies have demonstrated correlations of salivary markers of stress and insulin resistance including cortisol, insulin, adiponectin, and resistin with serum concentrations. These findings suggest the potential diagnostic value of saliva in health screening and risk stratification studies, particularly in the pediatric population, with implications for inflammatory, metabolic and cardiovascular conditions. However, additional studies are required to standardize saliva collection and storage procedures, validate analytical techniques for biomarker detection, and establish reference ranges for routine clinical use. The purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate recent advancements in using saliva as a diagnostic tool for inflammation and insulin-resistance. PMID:25512775

  20. Nobiletin attenuates cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory in streptozotocin: induced diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Xiang, Shi-Zhao; Jin, Ya-Ge; Wei, Wen-Ying; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Deng, Wei; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by the presence of diastolic and/or systolic myocardial dysfunction, is one of the major causes of heart failure. Nobiletin, which is extracted from the fruit peel of citrus, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and hypolipidemic properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether nobiletin exerts the therapeutic effect on streptozotocin-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) in mice. 80 experimental male C57BL mice were randomly assigned into four groups: sham + vehicle (VEH/SH), sham + nobiletin (NOB/SH), DCM + vehicle (VEH/DM), and DCM + nobiletin (NOB/DM). Nobiletin treatment ameliorated cardiac dysfunction in the DCM group, as shown by the result of echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements. Nobiletin treatment also blunted the mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase isoforms p67(phox), p22(phox), and p91(phox), and abated oxidative stress. Although administration of diabetic mice with nobiletin did not significantly effect the level of blood glucose, it decreased the TGF-β1, CTGF, fibronectin, and collagen Iα expressions and blunted cardiac fibrosis. In addition, nobiletin inhibited the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), P38, and NF-κB in the cardiac tissue of diabetic mice. Collectively, our study indicates that treatment with nobiletin mitigates cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis, and these beneficial of nobiletin may belong to the suppression of JNK, P38, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  1. Changing trends of hemodynamic monitoring in ICU - from invasive to non-invasive methods: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shubhangi; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Goudra, Basavana G; Sinha, Ashish C

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring in the form of invasive arterial, central venous pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure monitoring may be required in seriously ill Intensive care unit patients, in patients undergoing surgeries involving gross hemodynamic changes and in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. These techniques are considered the gold standards of hemodynamic monitoring but are associated with their inherent risks. A number of non-invasive techniques based on various physical principles are under investigation at present. The goal is to not only avoid the risk of invasive intervention, but also to match the gold standard set by them as far as possible. Techniques based on photoplethysmography, arterial tonometry and pulse transit time analysis have come up for continuous arterial pressure monitoring. Of these the first has been studied most extensively and validated, however it has been shown to be substandard in patients with gross hemodynamic instability. The other two still need further evaluation. While the non-invasive methods for arterial blood pressure monitoring are based on diverse technologies, those for measurement of central venous and pulmonary pressures are mostly based on imaging techniques such as echocardiography, Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography scan and chest X ray. Most of these techniques are based on measurement of the dimensions of the great veins. This makes them operator and observer dependent. However, studies done till now have revealed adequate inter-observer agreement. These techniques are still in their incipience and although initial studies are encouraging, further research is needed on this front. PMID:25024945

  2. Relationship of radionuclide indexes of cardiac function during interventions: volume loading, afterload stress, exercise, and pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.A.

    1983-04-01

    We compared three radionuclide index of cardiac function: 1) the ejection fraction (EF), 2) the mean ejection rate (ER), and 3) the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (MVCF) during volume loading, phenylephrine hydrochloride stress, exercise, and atrial pacing. All behaved in a similar (linear) fashion, allowing appropriate hemodynamic conclusions to be drawn using either index. During atrial pacing, the ejection fraction declined when velocity indexes increased, suggesting that the ejection fraction may not be a suitable index to characterize alterations in inotropic state during rapid alterations in heart rate, particular in the absence of angina pectoris. This may result from the reductions in cardiac volume for the duration of pacing, where the velocity index is preserved. In most circumstances excluding atrial pacing, ejection fraction during interventions is an adequate index of the change of myocardial contractile state. Overall, radionuclide angiography is an excellent technique to characterize acute hemodynamic interventions, with ejection fraction, in general, the simplest and most reliable of cardiac indexes during stress interventions.

  3. Using new non-invasive quick method to detect Borrelia Burgdorferi (B.B.) infection from specific parts of the heart in "seemingly normal" ECGs, and from the ECGs of Atrial Fibrillation (AF), a majority of AF ECGs are found to have: 1) Significant B.B. infection, 2) Markedly increased ANP, 3) Increased Cardiac Troponin I & 4) Markedly reduced Taurine. These 4 factors were mainly localized at infected areas of the SA node area, R-&L-Atria & pulmonary veins at the L-atrium.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Lu, Dominic; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Abdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Yapor, Dario; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is found in a majority of people we tested. Once Borrelia Burgdorferi (B.B.) spirochete enters human body, it not only causes pain by infecting joints, but it also often enters the brain and the heart. Infection of brain can be quickly detected from the pupil and infection of the heart by ECGs non-invasively. By evaluating recorded ECGs of atrial fibrillation (AF), using U.S. patented non-invasive highly sensitive electromagnetic field (EMF) resonance phenomenon between 2 identical molecules or between a molecule and its antibody, we examined 25 different AF patients' ECGs and found the majority of them suffer from various degrees of B.B. spirochete infection in SA node areas, also in the right & left atria, and pulmonary vein near and around its junction at left atrium & lesser degrees of infection at the AV node & His Bundle. When B.B. infection reaches over 224-600ng or higher at these areas, AF often appears in the majority of all AF analyzed. In order to develop AF, the 4 abnormal factors must be present simultaneously: 1) B.B. infection must be increased to 224-600ng or higher, 2) Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) must be markedly reduced from normal value of less than 4ng to over 100-400ng, 3) A significant increase of Cardiac Troponin I from normal value of less than 3ng to over 12ng and 4) Taurine must also be markedly reduced from normal value of 4-6ng to 0.25ng. These 4 changes were mainly found only at infected sites of the SA node area, both atria and between the end of the T wave & the beginning of the SA node area, which corresponds to U waves at recorded ECG. Origin of the U wave is mainly due to abnormal electrical potential of pulmonary vein at L-atrium. If all 4 factors do not occur at the infection site, no AF will develop. In seemingly normal ECGs, if using this method, one can detect invisible B.B. infection in early stages. Long before AF appears, AF can be prevented by improved treatment with Amoxicillin 500ng 3 times

  4. Seasonal and latitudinal acclimatization of cardiac transcriptome responses to thermal stress in porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Tagmount, Abderrahmane

    2009-10-01

    Central predictions of climate warming models include increased climate variability and increased severity of heat waves. Physiological acclimatization in populations across large-scale ecological gradients in habitat temperature fluctuation is an important factor to consider in detecting responses to climate change related increases in thermal fluctuation. We measured in vivo cardiac thermal maxima and used microarrays to profile transcriptome heat and cold stress responses in cardiac tissue of intertidal zone porcelain crabs across biogeographic and seasonal gradients in habitat temperature fluctuation. We observed acclimatization dependent induction of heat shock proteins, as well as unknown genes with heat shock protein-like expression profiles. Thermal acclimatization had the largest effect on heat stress responses of extensin-like, beta tubulin, and unknown genes. For these genes, crabs acclimatized to thermally variable sites had higher constitutive expression than specimens from low variability sites, but heat stress dramatically induced expression in specimens from low variability sites and repressed expression in specimens from highly variable sites. Our application of ecological transcriptomics has yielded new biomarkers that may represent sensitive indicators of acclimatization to habitat temperature fluctuation. Our study also has identified novel genes whose further description may yield novel understanding of cellular responses to thermal acclimatization or thermal stress.

  5. Non-invasive Thrombolysis using Microtripsy: A Parameter Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Jin, Lifang; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Owens, Gabe E.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue by well-controlled acoustic cavitation using microsecond-long, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. The feasibility of using histotripsy as a non-invasive, drug-free, and image-guided thrombolysis method has been shown previously. A new histotripsy approach, termed Microtripsy, has recently been investigated for the thrombolysis application to improve treatment accuracy and avoid potential vessel damage. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulse repetition frequency (PRF) on microtripsy thrombolysis. Microtripsy thrombolysis treatments using different PRFs (5, 50, and 100 Hz) and doses (20, 50, and 100 pulses) were performed on blood clots in an in vitro vessel flow model. To quantitatively evaluate the microtripsy thrombolysis effect, the location of focal cavitation, the incident rate of pre-focal cavitation on the vessel wall, the size and location of the resulting flow channel, and the generated clot debris particles were measured. The results demonstrated that focal cavitation was always well-confined in the vessel lumen without contacting the vessel wall for all PRFs. Pre-focal cavitation on the front vessel wall was never observed at 5Hz PRF, but occasionally observed at PRFs of 50 Hz (1.2%) and 100 Hz (5.4%). However, the observed pre-focal cavitation was weak and didn’t significantly impact the focal cavitation. Results further demonstrated that, although the extent of clot fractionation per pulse was the highest at 5 Hz PRF at the beginning of treatment (<20 pulses), 100 Hz PRF generated the largest flow channels with a much shorter treatment time. Finally, results showed fewer large debris particles were generated at a higher PRF. Overall, the results of this study suggest that a higher PRF (50 or 100 Hz) may be a better choice for microtripsy thrombolysis to use clinically due to the larger resulting flow channel, shorter treatment time, and smaller debris particles. PMID:26670850

  6. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start.

  7. Non-invasive methods of assessing the tear film.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Norihiko; Komuro, Aoi

    2004-03-01

    The interaction between the tear film and the ocular surface epithelium is crucial for the maintenance of ocular surface health; interference with this relationship may cause dry eye. Several diagnostic techniques have been developed to assess the tear film and diagnose dry eye but many of these tests are invasive and modify the parameter which they are designed to measure. Non-invasive or minimally invasive tests may overcome this problem and provide more reproducible and objective data. One test of this kind is meniscometry, which is particularly useful in assessing tear volume indirectly by measuring tear meniscus radius. The newly developed video-meniscometer, which enables calculation of the meniscus radius digitally, is useful for the diagnosis of tear-deficient dry eye. Video-meniscometry also has other applications, to the study of tear and eye drop turnover, determining the indication for punctal plugs and in demonstrating dysfunction of the tear meniscus. Interferometry of the tear film lipid layer is useful in screening and evaluating dry eye severity and in selecting dry eye candidates for punctal occlusion. It is also useful for analysing tear lipid layer pathophysiology more clearly, especially in combination with meniscometry. Meibometry is a minimally invasive technique to quantify the amount of meibomian lipid on the lid margin. Lipid is blotted onto a plastic tape and the change in optical density is used to calculate lipid uptake. Laser meibometry has increased the scope of this technique for the assessment of meibomian gland dysfunction; also, the delivery of lipids from the lid reservoir to the preocular tear film can be analysed using interferometry and laser meibometry. The present report reviews the application of these techniques to the study of tear film physiology and dry eye.

  8. Non-invasive prenatal testing: ethical issues explored.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Antina; Dondorp, Wybo J; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Frints, Suzanne G M; de Wert, Guido M W R

    2010-03-01

    This paper explores the ethical implications of introducing non-invasive prenatal diagnostic tests (NIPD tests) in prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities. NIPD tests are easy and safe and can be performed early in pregnancy. Precisely because of these features, it is feared that informed consent may become more difficult, that both testing and selective abortion will become 'normalized', and that there will be a trend towards accepting testing for minor abnormalities and non-medical traits as well. In our view, however, the real moral challenge of NIPD testing consists in the possibility of linking up a technique with these features (easy, safe and early) with new genomic technologies that allow prenatal diagnostic testing for a much broader range of abnormalities than is the case in current procedures. An increase in uptake and more selective abortions need not in itself be taken to signal a thoughtless acceptance of these procedures. However, combining this with considerably enlarging the scope of NIPD testing will indeed make informed consent more difficult and challenge the notion of prenatal screening as serving reproductive autonomy. If broad NIPD testing includes later-onset diseases, the 'right not to know' of the future child will become a new issue in the debate about prenatal screening. With regard to the controversial issue of selective abortion, it may make a morally relevant difference that after NIPD testing, abortion can be done early. A lower moral status may be attributed to the foetus at that moment, given the dominant opinion that the moral status of the foetus progressively increases with its development. PMID:19953123

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Multimodality non-invasive imaging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Canestrini, Stefano; Zamboni, Giulia; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by obstructive jaundice, a dramatic clinical response to steroids and pathologically by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with or without a pancreatic mass. Type 1 AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-related systemic disease and is characterized by elevated IgG4 serum levels, infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and extrapancreatic lesions. Type 2 AIP usually has none or very few IgG4-positive plasma cells, no serum IgG4 elevation and appears to be a pancreas-specific disorder without extrapancreatic involvement. AIP is diagnosed in approximately 2%-6% of patients that undergo pancreatic resection for suspected pancreatic cancer. There are three patterns of autoimmune pancreatitis: diffuse disease is the most common type, with a diffuse, “sausage-like” pancreatic enlargement with sharp margins and loss of the lobular contours; focal disease is less common and manifests as a focal mass, often within the pancreatic head, mimicking a pancreatic malignancy. Multifocal involvement can also occur. In this paper we describe the features of AIP at ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging, focusing on diagnosis and differential diagnosis with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. It is of utmost importance to make an early correct differential diagnosis between these two diseases in order to identify the optimal therapeutic strategy and to avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection in AIP patients. Non-invasive imaging plays also an important role in therapy monitoring, in follow-up and in early identification of disease recurrence. PMID:25493001

  10. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Jacob B.; Traberg, Marie S.; Pihl, Michael J.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2013-03-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. The method relies on in-plane vector velocity elds acquired using the Transverse Oscillation method. The pressure gradients are estimated by applying the Navier-Stokes equations for isotropic uids to the estimated velocity elds. The velocity elds were measured for a steady ow on a carotid bifurcation phantom (Shelley Medical, Canada) with a 70% constriction on the internal branch. Scanning was performed with a BK8670 linear transducer (BK Medical, Denmark) connected to a BK Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The results are validated through nite element simulations of the carotid ow model where the geometry is determined from MR images. This proof of concept study was conducted at nine ultrasound frames per second. Estimated pressure gradients along the longitudinal direction of the constriction varied from 0 kPa/m to 10 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -9.1% for the axial component and -7.9% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator, given in reference to the peak gradient, was 28.4% in the axial direction and 64.5% in the lateral direction. A study made across the constriction was also conducted. This yielded magnitudes from 0 kPa/m to 7 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -5.7% and 13.9% for the axial and lateral component, respectively. The relative standard deviations of this study were 45.2% and 83.2% in the axial and lateral direction, respectively.

  11. Stress cardiac MR imaging: the role of stress functional assessment and perfusion imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Al Sayari, Saeed; Kopp, Sebastien; Bremerich, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can provide valuable information for the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease (IHD). It plays an important role in the initial diagnosis in patients with acute chest pain, in the diagnosis of complications post myocardial infarction (MI), in the assessment of the right ventricle after an acute MI, to detect complications due to or after interventions, in prediction of myocardial recovery, to detect inducible ischemia in patients with known IHD, in differentiating ischemic from non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, and in risk stratification.

  12. Stress cardiac MR imaging: the role of stress functional assessment and perfusion imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Al Sayari, Saeed; Kopp, Sebastien; Bremerich, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can provide valuable information for the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease (IHD). It plays an important role in the initial diagnosis in patients with acute chest pain, in the diagnosis of complications post myocardial infarction (MI), in the assessment of the right ventricle after an acute MI, to detect complications due to or after interventions, in prediction of myocardial recovery, to detect inducible ischemia in patients with known IHD, in differentiating ischemic from non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, and in risk stratification. PMID:25727000

  13. Regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress by β-arrestins in cultured human cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Philip, Jennifer L; Razzaque, Md Abdur; Han, Mei; Li, Jinju; Theccanat, Tiju; Xu, Xianyao; Akhter, Shahab A

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) promotes transformation to myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis leading to myocardial fibrosis, a precursor to heart failure (HF). NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is a major source of cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, mechanisms of Nox4 regulation are unclear. β-arrestins are scaffold proteins that signal in G-protein-dependent and -independent pathways; for example, in ERK activation. We hypothesize that β-arrestins regulate oxidative stress in a Nox4-dependent manner and increase fibrosis in HF. CFs were isolated from normal and failing adult human left ventricles. Mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production was quantitated using MitoSox. β-arrestin and Nox4 expressions were manipulated using adenoviral overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and Nox4 expression in CFs were significantly increased in HF. Nox4 knockdown resulted in inhibition of mitochondrial superoxide production and decreased basal and TGF-β-stimulated collagen and α-SMA expression. CF β-arrestin expression was upregulated fourfold in HF. β-arrestin knockdown in failing CFs decreased ROS and Nox4 expression by 50%. β-arrestin overexpression in normal CFs increased mitochondrial superoxide production twofold. These effects were prevented by inhibition of either Nox or ERK. Upregulation of Nox4 seemed to be a primary mechanism for increased ROS production in failing CFs, which stimulates collagen deposition. β-arrestin expression was upregulated in HF and plays an important and newly identified role in regulating mitochondrial superoxide production via Nox4. The mechanism for this effect seems to be ERK-mediated. Targeted inhibition of β-arrestins in CFs might decrease oxidative stress as well as pathological cardiac fibrosis.

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress by β-arrestins in cultured human cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Jennifer L.; Razzaque, Md. Abdur; Han, Mei; Li, Jinju; Theccanat, Tiju; Xu, Xianyao; Akhter, Shahab A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stress in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) promotes transformation to myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis leading to myocardial fibrosis, a precursor to heart failure (HF). NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is a major source of cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, mechanisms of Nox4 regulation are unclear. β-arrestins are scaffold proteins that signal in G-protein-dependent and -independent pathways; for example, in ERK activation. We hypothesize that β-arrestins regulate oxidative stress in a Nox4-dependent manner and increase fibrosis in HF. CFs were isolated from normal and failing adult human left ventricles. Mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production was quantitated using MitoSox. β-arrestin and Nox4 expressions were manipulated using adenoviral overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and Nox4 expression in CFs were significantly increased in HF. Nox4 knockdown resulted in inhibition of mitochondrial superoxide production and decreased basal and TGF-β-stimulated collagen and α-SMA expression. CF β-arrestin expression was upregulated fourfold in HF. β-arrestin knockdown in failing CFs decreased ROS and Nox4 expression by 50%. β-arrestin overexpression in normal CFs increased mitochondrial superoxide production twofold. These effects were prevented by inhibition of either Nox or ERK. Upregulation of Nox4 seemed to be a primary mechanism for increased ROS production in failing CFs, which stimulates collagen deposition. β-arrestin expression was upregulated in HF and plays an important and newly identified role in regulating mitochondrial superoxide production via Nox4. The mechanism for this effect seems to be ERK-mediated. Targeted inhibition of β-arrestins in CFs might decrease oxidative stress as well as pathological cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26449263

  15. Update on pharmacological cardiac stress testing: efficacy, risk stratification and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Cannon, Christopher; Udelson, James

    2014-11-01

    Despite greater control of risk factors and improved treatments, coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a significant cause of mortality with 1 in every 4 deaths in the United States due to this disorder.(1) Cardiac stress tests have long been one of the most often utilized testing modalities used to identify patients suspected of having CHD, specifically coronary artery disease (CAD). These tests allow for noninvasive assessment of the coronary circulation and its ability to augment flow in response to physiologic demand. As with any diagnostic testing however, potential health risks as well as the financial burden of cardiovascular stress testing, must be weighed against the benefits and utility of the data procured. Given the rapidly evolving field of cardiac stress testing with respect to new risk stratification guidelines, new agents, and new assessment methods, it is difficult for physicians to remain up to date on the latest research and the benefits and risks of different testing modalities. A recent survey of primary care physicians and cardiologists conducted by the Elsevier Office of Continuing Medical Education found that approximately one-quarter of the cardiologists and primary care physicians surveyed do not feel confident identifying the factors which should be considered before ordering a cardiac stress test as part of pre-operative screening for a patient. Additionally, this survey also reported that primary care physicians reported a high degree of confidence in ordering the appropriate cardiac screening tests for patients yet, cardiologists reported that they frequently/somewhat frequently felt the need to change the test ordered by the internist. This educational intervention focuses on patient selection, exercise vs. pharmacologic stress testing, pharmacologic agents, and the importance of patient and doctor communication in ensuring the right test is recommended for the right patient. This CME Multimedia Activity is also available through the

  16. Label-free imaging of metabolism and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupsa; Heylman, Christopher; George, Steven C.; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate a label-free optical imaging technique to assess metabolic status and oxidative stress in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes by two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous fluorophores. Our results show the sensitivity of this method to detect shifts in metabolism and oxidative stress in the cardiomyocytes upon pathological stimuli of hypoxia and cardiotoxic drugs. This non-invasive imaging technique could prove beneficial for drug development and screening, especially for in vitro cardiac models created from stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and to study the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases and therapy. PMID:27231614

  17. Nebulette knockout mice have normal cardiac function, but show Z-line widening and up-regulation of cardiac stress markers

    PubMed Central

    Mastrototaro, Giuseppina; Liang, Xingqun; Li, Xiaodong; Carullo, Pierluigi; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Tesi, Chiara; Gu, Yusu; Dalton, Nancy D.; Peterson, Kirk L.; Poggesi, Corrado; Sheikh, Farah; Chen, Ju; Bang, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    Aims Nebulette is a 109 kDa modular protein localized in the sarcomeric Z-line of the heart. In vitro studies have suggested a role of nebulette in stabilizing the thin filament, and missense mutations in the nebulette gene were recently shown to be causative for dilated cardiomyopathy and endocardial fibroelastosis in human and mice. However, the role of nebulette in vivo has remained elusive. To provide insights into the function of nebulette in vivo, we generated and studied nebulette-deficient (nebl−/−) mice. Methods and results Nebl−/− mice were generated by replacement of exon 1 by Cre under the control of the endogenous nebulette promoter, allowing for lineage analysis using the ROSA26 Cre reporter strain. This revealed specific expression of nebulette in the heart, consistent with in situ hybridization results. Nebl−/− mice exhibited normal cardiac function both under basal conditions and in response to transaortic constriction as assessed by echocardiography and haemodynamic analyses. Furthermore, histological, IF, and western blot analysis showed no cardiac abnormalities in nebl−/− mice up to 8 months of age. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed Z-line widening starting from 5 months of age, suggesting that nebulette is important for the integrity of the Z-line. Furthermore, up-regulation of cardiac stress responsive genes suggests the presence of chronic cardiac stress in nebl−/− mice. Conclusion Nebulette is dispensable for normal cardiac function, although Z-line widening and up-regulation of cardiac stress markers were found in nebl−/− heart. These results suggest that the nebulette disease causing mutations have dominant gain-of-function effects. PMID:25987543

  18. Volatile organic compounds as non-invasive markers for plant phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Niederbacher, B; Winkler, J B; Schnitzler, J P

    2015-09-01

    Plants emit a great variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can actively participate in plant growth and protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. VOC emissions are strongly dependent on environmental conditions; the greatest ambiguity is whether or not the predicted change in climate will influence and modify plant-pest interactions that are mediated by VOCs. The constitutive and induced emission patterns between plant genotypes, species, and taxa are highly variable and can be used as pheno(chemo)typic markers to distinguish between different origins and provenances. In recent years significant progress has been made in molecular and genetic plant breeding. However, there is actually a lack of knowledge in functionally linking genotypes and phenotypes, particularly in analyses of plant-environment interactions. Plant phenotyping, the assessment of complex plant traits such as growth, development, tolerance, resistance, etc., has become a major bottleneck, and quantitative information on genotype-environment relationships is the key to addressing major future challenges. With increasing demand to support and accelerate progress in breeding for novel traits, the plant research community faces the need to measure accurately increasingly large numbers of plants and plant traits. In this review article, we focus on the promising outlook of VOC phenotyping as a fast and non-invasive measure of phenotypic dynamics. The basic principle is to define plant phenotypes according to their disease resistance and stress tolerance, which in turn will help in improving the performance and yield of economically relevant plants. PMID:25969554

  19. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have identified peak cyclic forces, number of loading cycles, and loading rate as contributors to the regulation of bone metabolism. We have proposed a theoretical model that relates bone density to a mechanical stimulus derived from average daily cumulative peak cyclic 'effective' tissue stresses. In order to develop a non-invasive experimental model to test the theoretical model we need to: (1) monitor daily cumulative loading on a bone, (2) compute the internal stress state(s) resulting from the imposed loading, and (3) image volumetric bone density accurately, precisely, and reproducibly within small contiguous volumes throughout the bone. We have chosen the calcaneus (heel) as an experimental model bone site because it is loaded by ligament, tendon and joint contact forces in equilibrium with daily ground reaction forces that we can measure; it is a peripheral bone site and therefore more easily and accurately imaged with computed tomography; it is composed primarily of cancellous bone; and it is a relevant site for monitoring bone loss and adaptation in astronauts and the general population. This paper presents an overview of our recent advances in the areas of monitoring daily ground reaction forces, biomechanical modeling of the forces on the calcaneus during gait, mathematical modeling of calcaneal bone adaptation in response to cumulative daily activity, accurate and precise imaging of the calcaneus with quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and application to long duration space flight.

  20. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Deficiency Aggravates Cardiac Dysfunction Elicited by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jianquan; Sun, Aijun; Xie, Yeqing; Isse, Toyoshi; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) has been characterized as an important mediator of endogenous cytoprotection in the heart. This study was designed to examine the role of ALDH2 knockout (KO) in the regulation of cardiac function after endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to a tunicamycin challenge, and the echocardiographic property was examined. Protein levels of six items—78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit α (p-eIF2α), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), phosphorylation of Akt, p47phox nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal—were determined by using Western blot analysis. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were estimated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and caspase-3 activity, respectively. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated cardiac contractile dysfunction and promoted ER stress after ER stress induction, manifested by the changes of ejection fraction and fractional shortening. In vitro study revealed that tunicamycin significantly upregulated the levels of GRP78, p-eIF2α, CHOP, p47phox NADPH oxidase and 4-hydroxynonenal, which was exacerbated by ALDH2 knockdown and abolished by ALDH2 overexpression, respectively. Overexpression of ALDH2 abrogated tunicamycin-induced dephosphorylation Akt. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase using LY294002 did not affect ALDH2-conferred protection against ER stress, although LY294002 reversed the antiapoptotic action of ALDH2 associated with p47phox NADPH oxidase. These results suggest a pivotal role of ALDH2 in the regulation of ER stress and ER stress–induced apoptosis. The protective role of ALDH2 against ER stress–induced cell death was probably mediated by Akt via a p47phox NADPH oxidase-dependent manner. These findings indicate the critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of ER stress

  1. A new electric method for non-invasive continuous monitoring of stroke volume and ventricular volume-time curves

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this paper a new non-invasive, operator-free, continuous ventricular stroke volume monitoring device (Hemodynamic Cardiac Profiler, HCP) is presented, that measures the average stroke volume (SV) for each period of 20 seconds, as well as ventricular volume-time curves for each cardiac cycle, using a new electric method (Ventricular Field Recognition) with six independent electrode pairs distributed over the frontal thoracic skin. In contrast to existing non-invasive electric methods, our method does not use the algorithms of impedance or bioreactance cardiography. Instead, our method is based on specific 2D spatial patterns on the thoracic skin, representing the distribution, over the thorax, of changes in the applied current field caused by cardiac volume changes during the cardiac cycle. Since total heart volume variation during the cardiac cycle is a poor indicator for ventricular stroke volume, our HCP separates atrial filling effects from ventricular filling effects, and retrieves the volume changes of only the ventricles. Methods ex-vivo experiments on a post-mortem human heart have been performed to measure the effects of increasing the blood volume inside the ventricles in isolation, leaving the atrial volume invariant (which can not be done in-vivo). These effects have been measured as a specific 2D pattern of voltage changes on the thoracic skin. Furthermore, a working prototype of the HCP has been developed that uses these ex-vivo results in an algorithm to decompose voltage changes, that were measured in-vivo by the HCP on the thoracic skin of a human volunteer, into an atrial component and a ventricular component, in almost real-time (with a delay of maximally 39 seconds). The HCP prototype has been tested in-vivo on 7 human volunteers, using G-suit inflation and deflation to provoke stroke volume changes, and LVot Doppler as a reference technique. Results The ex-vivo measurements showed that ventricular filling caused a pattern over the

  2. Stress testing for risk stratification of patients with low to moderate probability of acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chandra, A; Rudraiah, L; Zalenski, R J

    2001-02-01

    In summary, this article focused on the use of stress testing to risk-stratify patients at the conclusion of their emergency evaluation for ACI. As discussed, those patients in the probably not ACI category require additional risk stratification prior to discharge. It should be kept in mind that patients in this category are heterogeneous, containing subgroups at both higher and lower risk of ACI and cardiac events. The patients with lower pretest probability for ACI may only need exercise testing in the ED. Patients with higher pretest probability should undergo myocardial perfusion or echocardiographic stress testing to maximize diagnostic and prognostic information. Prognostic information is the key to provocative testing in the ED. Prognostic information is the component that will help emergency physicians identify the patients who may be discharged home safely without having to worry about a 6% annual cardiac death rate and a 10% overall death rate over the next 30 months. Stress testing provides this key prognostic data, and it can be obtained in short-stay chest pain observation units in a safe, timely, and cost-effective fashion. PMID:11214405

  3. Dobutamine stress echocardiography after cardiac transplantation: implications of donor-recipient age difference.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Patrick H; Riesgo, Fernando; Choy, Jonathan B; Kim, Daniel H; Becher, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is widely used during follow-up after cardiac transplant for the diagnosis of allograft vasculopathy. We investigated the effect of donor-recipient age difference on the ability to reach target heart rate (HR) during DSE. All cardiac transplant patients who were undergoing DSE over a 3-year period in a single institution were reviewed. Target HR was specified as 85%×(220 - patient age). Further patient and donor demographics were obtained from the local transplant database. 61 patients (45 male, 55±12 years) were stressed with a median dose of 40 mcg/kg per min dobutamine. Only 37 patients (61%) achieved target HR. Donor hearts were mostly younger (mean 41±14 years, P<0.001), with only 11 patients (18%) having donors who were older than they were. Patients with older donors required higher doses of dobutamine (median 50 vs 30 mcg/kg per min, P<0.001) but achieved a lower percentage target HR (mean 93% vs 101%, P=0.003) than those with younger donors did. Patients with older donors were less likely to achieve target HR (18% vs 67%, P=0.003). In conclusion, donor-recipient age difference affects the likelihood of achieving target HR and should be considered when a patient is consistently unable to achieve 'adequate' stress according to the patient's age.

  4. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  5. Evaluation of Stress Intensity and Anxiety Level in Preoperative Period of Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosiek, Anna; Kornatowski, Tomasz; Rosiek-Kryszewska, Aleksandra; Leksowski, Łukasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The stress related to patient's stay in a hospital increases when it is necessary to perform a surgery. Therefore, the study of the phenomenon of stress intensity in hospitalized patients has become an important issue for public health. Material and Method. The study was conducted in University Hospital No. 1 in the cardiosurgery clinic. The study involved 58 patients who were admitted as planned to the hospital. The study used a standardized questionnaire measuring intensity of the stress and also deepened interviews with patients about stress and anxiety felt before the surgery. Results. The greater the patient's anxiety resulting from his state of health, the greater the intensity of stress in the preoperative period. This relationship is linear. The results of the study also made it possible to see intrapersonal factors (pain, illness, and suffering) and extrapersonal factors (anesthesia, surgery, and complications after surgery), which are causes of anxiety before surgery. Conclusion. The research showed high (negative) results of anxiety and stress associated with the disease, surgery, and complications after cardiac surgery. Active involvement in hospitalization elements, such as patient education before surgery, psychological support, and medical care organization taking into account patient's preferences, reduces the impact of stressors. PMID:27042655

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Improves Cardiac Function following Myocardial Ischemia by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Issan, Yossi; Kornowski, Ran; Aravot, Dan; Shainberg, Asher; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Sodhi, Komal; Abraham, Nader G.; Hochhauser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI) and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation. Methods In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured. Results HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospho kinase (CK), decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS) was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05). CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01), reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively). CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05). The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05). CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05) in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects. Conclusions HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by

  7. Hemoglobin-associated Oxidative Stress in the Pericardial Compartment of Post-operative Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Philip A.; Chacko, Balu K.; Ravi, Saranya; Johnson, Michelle S.; Mitchell, Tanecia; Barnes, Stephen; Arabshahi, Alireza; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; George, David J.; Steele, Chad; George, James F.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Melby, Spencer J.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and valvular heart disease often require treatment with corrective surgery to prevent future myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Mechanisms underlying the development of the associated complications of surgery are multifactorial and have been linked to inflammation and oxidative stress, classically as measured in the blood or plasma of patients. Post-operative pericardial fluid (PO-PCF) has not been investigated in depth with respect to the potential to induce oxidative stress. This is important since cardiac surgery disrupts the integrity of the pericardial membrane surrounding the heart, and causes significant alterations in the composition of the pericardial fluid (PCF). This includes contamination with hemolyzed blood and high concentrations of oxidized hemoglobin, which suggests that cardiac surgery results in oxidative stress within the pericardial space. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that PO-PCF is highly pro-oxidant and that the potential interaction between inflammatory cell-derived hydrogen peroxide with hemoglobin is associated with oxidative stress. Blood and PCF were collected from 31 patients at the time of surgery and postoperatively from 4 to 48 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or valve repair (mitral or aortic). PO-PCF contained high concentrations of neutrophils and monocytes which are capable of generating elevated amounts of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide through the oxidative burst. In addition, PO-PCF primed naïve neutrophils resulting in an enhanced oxidative burst upon stimulation. The PO-PCF also contained increased concentrations of cell-free oxidized hemoglobin which was associated with elevated levels of F2α-isoprostanes and prostaglandins, consistent with both oxidative stress and activation of cyclooxygenase. Lastly, protein analysis of the PO-PCF revealed evidence of protein thiol oxidation and protein carbonylation. We conclude that PO-PCF is

  8. Appropriate Use of Cardiac Stress Testing with Imaging: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ladapo, Joseph A.; Blecker, Saul; O'Donnell, Michael; Jumkhawala, Saahil A.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Appropriate use criteria (AUC) for cardiac stress tests address concerns about utilization growth and patient safety. We systematically reviewed studies of appropriateness, including within physician specialties; evaluated trends over time and in response to AUC updates; and characterized leading indications for inappropriate/rarely appropriate testing. Methods We searched PubMed (2005–2015) for English-language articles reporting stress echocardiography or myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) appropriateness. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results Thirty-four publications of 41,578 patients were included, primarily from academic centers. Stress echocardiography appropriate testing rates were 53.0% (95% CI, 45.3%–60.7%) and 50.9% (42.6%–59.2%) and inappropriate/rarely appropriate rates were 19.1% (11.4%–26.8%) and 28.4% (23.9%–32.8%) using 2008 and 2011 AUC, respectively. Stress MPI appropriate testing rates were 71.1% (64.5%–77.7%) and 72.0% (67.6%–76.3%) and inappropriate/rarely appropriate rates were 10.7% (7.2%–14.2%) and 15.7% (12.4%–19.1%) using 2005 and 2009 AUC, respectively. There was no significant temporal trend toward rising rates of appropriateness for stress echocardiography or MPI. Unclassified stress echocardiograms fell by 79% (p = 0.04) with updated AUC. There were no differences between cardiac specialists and internists. Conclusions Rates of appropriate use tend to be lower for stress echocardiography compared to MPI, and updated AUC reduced unclassified stress echocardiograms. There is no conclusive evidence that AUC improved appropriate use over time. Further research is needed to determine if integration of appropriateness guidelines in academic and community settings is an effective approach to optimizing inappropriate/rarely appropriate use of stress testing and its associated costs and patient harms. PMID:27536775

  9. A signature pattern of stress-responsive microRNAs that can evoke cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    van Rooij, Eva; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Liu, Ning; Williams, Andrew H.; McAnally, John; Gerard, Robert D.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2006-01-01

    Diverse forms of injury and stress evoke a hypertrophic growth response in adult cardiac myocytes, which is characterized by an increase in cell size, enhanced protein synthesis, assembly of sarcomeres, and reactivation of fetal genes, often culminating in heart failure and sudden death. Given the emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in modulation of cellular phenotypes, we searched for miRNAs that were regulated during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We describe >12 miRNAs that are up- or down-regulated in cardiac tissue from mice in response to transverse aortic constriction or expression of activated calcineurin, stimuli that induce pathological cardiac remodeling. Many of these miRNAs were similarly regulated in failing human hearts. Forced overexpression of stress-inducible miRNAs was sufficient to induce hypertrophy in cultured cardiomyocytes. Similarly, cardiac overexpression of miR-195, which was up-regulated during cardiac hypertrophy, resulted in pathological cardiac growth and heart failure in transgenic mice. These findings reveal an important role for specific miRNAs in the control of hypertrophic growth and chamber remodeling of the heart in response to pathological signaling and point to miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in heart disease. PMID:17108080

  10. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Cardiac Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Considerations for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Heather; Greenman, Paul S.; Tassé, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the impact of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on physical health, particularly cardiovascular disease. We review the literature on the role of trauma in the development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease, aftermath of a cardiac event, and risk for recurrence in cardiac patients. We explore possible mechanisms to explain these relationships, as well as appropriate assessment and treatment strategies for this population. Our main conclusion is that screening and referral for appropriate treatments are important given the high prevalence rates of PTSD in cardiac populations and the associated impact on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25545708

  11. Automated Non-invasive Video-Microscopy of Oyster Spat Heart Rate during Acute Temperature Change: Impact of Acclimation Temperature.

    PubMed

    Domnik, Nicolle J; Polymeropoulos, Elias T; Elliott, Nicholas G; Frappell, Peter B; Fisher, John T

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated, non-invasive method to detect real-time cardiac contraction in post-larval (1.1-1.7 mm length), juvenile oysters (i.e., oyster spat) via a fiber-optic trans-illumination system. The system is housed within a temperature-controlled chamber and video microscopy imaging of the heart was coupled with video edge-detection to measure cardiac contraction, inter-beat interval, and heart rate (HR). We used the method to address the hypothesis that cool acclimation (10°C vs. 22°C-Ta10 or Ta22, respectively; each n = 8) would preserve cardiac phenotype (assessed via HR variability, HRV analysis and maintained cardiac activity) during acute temperature changes. The temperature ramp (TR) protocol comprised 2°C steps (10 min/experimental temperature, Texp) from 22°C to 10°C to 22°C. HR was related to Texp in both acclimation groups. Spat became asystolic at low temperatures, particularly Ta22 spat (Ta22: 8/8 vs. Ta10: 3/8 asystolic at Texp = 10°C). The rate of HR decrease during cooling was less in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat when asystole was included in analysis (P = 0.026). Time-domain HRV was inversely related to temperature and elevated in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat (P < 0.001), whereas a lack of defined peaks in spectral density precluded frequency-domain analysis. Application of the method during an acute cooling challenge revealed that cool temperature acclimation preserved active cardiac contraction in oyster spat and increased time-domain HRV responses, whereas warm acclimation enhanced asystole. These physiologic changes highlight the need for studies of mechanisms, and have translational potential for oyster aquaculture practices. PMID:27445833

  12. Automated Non-invasive Video-Microscopy of Oyster Spat Heart Rate during Acute Temperature Change: Impact of Acclimation Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Domnik, Nicolle J.; Polymeropoulos, Elias T.; Elliott, Nicholas G.; Frappell, Peter B.; Fisher, John T.

    2016-01-01

    We developed an automated, non-invasive method to detect real-time cardiac contraction in post-larval (1.1–1.7 mm length), juvenile oysters (i.e., oyster spat) via a fiber-optic trans-illumination system. The system is housed within a temperature-controlled chamber and video microscopy imaging of the heart was coupled with video edge-detection to measure cardiac contraction, inter-beat interval, and heart rate (HR). We used the method to address the hypothesis that cool acclimation (10°C vs. 22°C—Ta10 or Ta22, respectively; each n = 8) would preserve cardiac phenotype (assessed via HR variability, HRV analysis and maintained cardiac activity) during acute temperature changes. The temperature ramp (TR) protocol comprised 2°C steps (10 min/experimental temperature, Texp) from 22°C to 10°C to 22°C. HR was related to Texp in both acclimation groups. Spat became asystolic at low temperatures, particularly Ta22 spat (Ta22: 8/8 vs. Ta10: 3/8 asystolic at Texp = 10°C). The rate of HR decrease during cooling was less in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat when asystole was included in analysis (P = 0.026). Time-domain HRV was inversely related to temperature and elevated in Ta10 vs. Ta22 spat (P < 0.001), whereas a lack of defined peaks in spectral density precluded frequency-domain analysis. Application of the method during an acute cooling challenge revealed that cool temperature acclimation preserved active cardiac contraction in oyster spat and increased time-domain HRV responses, whereas warm acclimation enhanced asystole. These physiologic changes highlight the need for studies of mechanisms, and have translational potential for oyster aquaculture practices. PMID:27445833

  13. Diagnosis of Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Non-invasive techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Valecillos, R.; Hirschhaut, E.; Giordano, H.; Boccalandro, I.; Suárez, C.; Aparicio, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The natural history of Chagas' disease and its manifestations when the heart is involved are detailed clinically and pathologically. Three phases are recognized: the acute phase, lasting from 1-3 months, the latent phase, which may last from 10-20 years, and the chronic phase, which has the most serious manifestations. This phase is subdivided into three clinical stages. An analysis of the varied cardiac manifestations on 235 patients is included. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:412174

  14. Nobiletin attenuates cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory in streptozotocin: induced diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yang, Zheng; Xiang, Shi-Zhao; Jin, Ya-Ge; Wei, Wen-Ying; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Deng, Wei; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by the presence of diastolic and/or systolic myocardial dysfunction, is one of the major causes of heart failure. Nobiletin, which is extracted from the fruit peel of citrus, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and hypolipidemic properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether nobiletin exerts the therapeutic effect on streptozotocin-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) in mice. 80 experimental male C57BL mice were randomly assigned into four groups: sham + vehicle (VEH/SH), sham + nobiletin (NOB/SH), DCM + vehicle (VEH/DM), and DCM + nobiletin (NOB/DM). Nobiletin treatment ameliorated cardiac dysfunction in the DCM group, as shown by the result of echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements. Nobiletin treatment also blunted the mRNA expression of NADPH oxidase isoforms p67(phox), p22(phox), and p91(phox), and abated oxidative stress. Although administration of diabetic mice with nobiletin did not significantly effect the level of blood glucose, it decreased the TGF-β1, CTGF, fibronectin, and collagen Iα expressions and blunted cardiac fibrosis. In addition, nobiletin inhibited the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), P38, and NF-κB in the cardiac tissue of diabetic mice. Collectively, our study indicates that treatment with nobiletin mitigates cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis, and these beneficial of nobiletin may belong to the suppression of JNK, P38, and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:27160937

  15. Estimating Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties From Non-Invasive Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.; Webster, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    An important component in developing countermeasures for maintaining musculoskeletal integrity during long-term space flight is an effective and meaningful method of monitoring skeletal condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive non-invasive approach because it avoids the exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based imaging and also provides measures related to bone microstructure rather than just density. The purpose of the research for the 1996 Summer Faculty Fellowship period was to extend the usefulness of the MRI data to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The main mechanical properties of interest are the elastic modulus and ultimate strength. Correlations are being investigated between these and fractal analysis parameters, MRI relaxation times, apparent densities, and bone mineral densities. Bone specimens from both human and equine donors have been studied initially to ensure high-quality MR images. Specimens were prepared and scanned from human proximal tibia bones as well as the equine distal radius. The quality of the images from the human bone appeared compromised due to freezing artifact, so only equine bone was included in subsequent procedures since these specimens could be acquired and imaged fresh before being frozen. MRI scans were made spanning a 3.6 cm length on each of 5 equine distal radius specimens. The images were then sent to Dr. Raj Acharya of the State University of New York at Buffalo for fractal analysis. Each piece was cut into 3 slabs approximately 1.2 cm thick and high-resolution contact radiographs were made to provide images for comparing fractal analysis with MR images. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were also made of each slab for subsequent bone mineral density determination. Slabs were cut into cubes for mechanical using a slow-speed diamond blade wafering saw (Buehler Isomet). The dimensions and wet weights of each cube specimen were measured and recorded. Wet weights

  16. Influence of ovariectomy on cardiac oxidative stress in a renovascular hypertension model.

    PubMed

    Barp, Jaqueline; Sartório, Carmem Luiza; Campos, Cristina; Llesuy, Susana Francisca; Araujo, Alex Sander; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential influence of endogenous ovarian hormones on cardiac oxidative stress in renovascular hypertension. Female Wistar rats (N = 10 per group) were divided among 4 groups: (i) normotensive control; (ii) hypertensive control; (iii) normotensive ovariectomized; and (iv) hypertensive ovariectomized rats. To induce hypertension, 2-kidney 1-clip (2K1C) Goldblatt's method was followed. Blood pressure (BP) was enhanced (25%) in 2K1C and it was not further altered in hypertensive ovariectomized animals. Lipid peroxidation (measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) increased in heart homogenates after ovariectomy (253%) and was additionally augmented when associated with hypertension (by 28%). Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were similar in both hypertensive groups. Hypertension enhanced glutathione peroxidase activity (75%), but the association with ovariectomy prevented this change. Total radical trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP) decreased in hypertensive rats (34%) and was recovered when associated with ovariectomy. However, this adaptation seems not to be sufficient to avoid the increased oxidative damage in ovariectomized hypertensive animals. These results suggest a protective role for physiological ovarian hormones in the cardiac oxidative stress induced by 2K1C hypertension.

  17. Nano-titanium dioxide induced cardiac injury in rat under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sha, BaoYong; Gao, Wei; Wang, ShuQi; Li, Wei; Liang, Xuan; Xu, Feng; Lu, Tian Jian

    2013-08-01

    Heart diseases, which are related to oxidative stress (OS), negatively affect millions of people from kids to the elderly. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has widespread applications in our daily life, especially nanoscale TiO2. Compared to the high risk of particulate matter (≤2.5μm) in air to heart disease patients, related research of TiO2 on diseased body is still unknown, which suggest us to explore the potential effects of nanoscale and microscale TiO2 to heart under OS conditions. Here, we used alloxan to induce OS conditions in rat, and investigated the response of heart tissue to TiO2 in healthy and alloxan treated rats. Compared with NMs treatment only, the synergistic interaction between OS conditions and nano-TiO2 significantly reduced the heart-related function indexes, inducing pathological changes of myocardium with significantly increased levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB. In contrast with the void response of micro-TiO2 to heart functions in alloxan treated rats, aggravation of OS conditions might play an important role in cardiac injury after alloxan and nano-TiO2 dual exposure. Our results demonstrated that OS conditions enhanced the adverse effects of nano-TiO2 to heart, suggesting that the use of NMs in stressed conditions (e.g., drug delivery) needs to be carefully monitored. PMID:23665316

  18. Non-invasive monitoring of glucocorticoid metabolites in brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea) feces.

    PubMed

    Hulsman, A; Dalerum, F; Ganswindt, A; Muenscher, S; Bertschinger, H J; Paris, M

    2011-01-01

    The brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea) is the least known of the large predators of southern Africa. The current IUCN status of the brown hyaena is "Near Threatened", and there are conservation concerns related to a general lack of biological knowledge of the species. For instance, a better knowledge of the responses to environmental and social stressors would improve our abilities to sustainably manage brown hyaena populations in both captive and free-ranging environments. We conducted adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) challenges in one female and one male adult brown hyaena at Lion Park Zoo, South Africa, to validate measurements of glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in brown hyaena feces via an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). We also measured gastrointestinal transit times (GIT times) and the GCM degradation in feces left in ambient temperature for up to 32 hr to more reliably assess the use of this assay as a tool for non-invasive glucocorticoid measurements. Intramuscular injections of synthetic ACTH yielded GCM levels of 388% (female) and 2,682% (male) above baseline with peak increases occurring 25- to 40-hr after injection. The time delay of fecal GCM excretion approximately corresponded with food transit time in the brown hyaenas. Fecal GCM levels declined significantly over time since defecation. Our results provided a good validation that fecal GCMs accurately reflect circulating glucocorticoid stress hormones in brown hyaenas, but we highlight that samples have to be frozen immediately after defecation to avoid bias in the measurements as a result of bacterial degredation. PMID:21538501

  19. Non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, Marianthi; Sofogianni, Areti; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest chronic liver disease and includes simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Since NASH progresses to cirrhosis more frequently and increases liver-related and cardiovascular disease risk substantially more than simple steatosis, there is a great need to differentiate the two entities. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD but its disadvantages, including the risk of complications and sampling bias, stress the need for developing alternative diagnostic methods. Accordingly, several non-invasive markers have been evaluated for the diagnosis of simple steatosis and NASH, including both serological indices and imaging methods. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of these markers in the diagnosis of NAFLD. Current data suggest that ultrasound and the fibrosis-4 score are probably the most appealing methods for detecting steatosis and for distinguishing NASH from simple steatosis, respectively, because of their low cost and relatively high accuracy. However, currently available methods, both serologic and imaging, cannot obviate the need for liver biopsy for diagnosing NASH due to their substantial false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, the current role of these methods is probably limited in patients who are unwilling or have contraindications for undergoing biopsy. PMID:25866601

  20. Non-invasive monitoring of glucocorticoid metabolites in brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea) feces.

    PubMed

    Hulsman, A; Dalerum, F; Ganswindt, A; Muenscher, S; Bertschinger, H J; Paris, M

    2011-01-01

    The brown hyaena (Hyaena brunnea) is the least known of the large predators of southern Africa. The current IUCN status of the brown hyaena is "Near Threatened", and there are conservation concerns related to a general lack of biological knowledge of the species. For instance, a better knowledge of the responses to environmental and social stressors would improve our abilities to sustainably manage brown hyaena populations in both captive and free-ranging environments. We conducted adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) challenges in one female and one male adult brown hyaena at Lion Park Zoo, South Africa, to validate measurements of glucocorticoid metabolites (GCM) in brown hyaena feces via an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). We also measured gastrointestinal transit times (GIT times) and the GCM degradation in feces left in ambient temperature for up to 32 hr to more reliably assess the use of this assay as a tool for non-invasive glucocorticoid measurements. Intramuscular injections of synthetic ACTH yielded GCM levels of 388% (female) and 2,682% (male) above baseline with peak increases occurring 25- to 40-hr after injection. The time delay of fecal GCM excretion approximately corresponded with food transit time in the brown hyaenas. Fecal GCM levels declined significantly over time since defecation. Our results provided a good validation that fecal GCMs accurately reflect circulating glucocorticoid stress hormones in brown hyaenas, but we highlight that samples have to be frozen immediately after defecation to avoid bias in the measurements as a result of bacterial degredation.

  1. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z.; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  2. Multiscattering-enhanced optical biosensor: multiplexed, non-invasive and continuous measurements of cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Koman, Volodymyr B.; Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J. F.

    2015-01-01

    The continuous measurement of uptake or release of biomarkers provides invaluable information for understanding and monitoring the metabolism of cells. In this work, a multiscattering-enhanced optical biosensor for the multiplexed, non-invasive, and continuous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), lactate and glucose is presented. The sensing scheme is based on optical monitoring of the oxidation state of the metalloprotein cytochrome c (cyt c). The analyte of interest is enzymatically converted into H2O2 leading to an oxidation of the cyt c. Contact microspotting is used to prepare nanoliter-sized sensing spots containing either pure cyt c, a mixture of cyt c with glucose oxidase (GOx) to detect glucose, or a mixture of cyt c with lactate oxidase (LOx) to detect lactate. The sensing spots are embedded in a multiscattering porous medium that enhances the optical signal. We achieve limits of detection down to 240 nM and 110 nM for lactate and glucose, respectively. A microfluidic embodiment enables multiplexed and crosstalk-free experiments on living organisms. As an example, we study the uptake of exogenously supplied glucose by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and simultaneously monitor the stress-related generation of H2O2. This multifunctional detection scheme provides a powerful tool to study biochemical processes at cellular level. PMID:26203366

  3. Multiscattering-enhanced optical biosensor: multiplexed, non-invasive and continuous measurements of cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Koman, Volodymyr B; Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J F

    2015-07-01

    The continuous measurement of uptake or release of biomarkers provides invaluable information for understanding and monitoring the metabolism of cells. In this work, a multiscattering-enhanced optical biosensor for the multiplexed, non-invasive, and continuous detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), lactate and glucose is presented. The sensing scheme is based on optical monitoring of the oxidation state of the metalloprotein cytochrome c (cyt c). The analyte of interest is enzymatically converted into H2O2 leading to an oxidation of the cyt c. Contact microspotting is used to prepare nanoliter-sized sensing spots containing either pure cyt c, a mixture of cyt c with glucose oxidase (GOx) to detect glucose, or a mixture of cyt c with lactate oxidase (LOx) to detect lactate. The sensing spots are embedded in a multiscattering porous medium that enhances the optical signal. We achieve limits of detection down to 240 nM and 110 nM for lactate and glucose, respectively. A microfluidic embodiment enables multiplexed and crosstalk-free experiments on living organisms. As an example, we study the uptake of exogenously supplied glucose by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and simultaneously monitor the stress-related generation of H2O2. This multifunctional detection scheme provides a powerful tool to study biochemical processes at cellular level. PMID:26203366

  4. Spectrophotometric system to develop a non-invasive method for monitoring of posidonia oceanica meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menesatti, P.; Urbani, G.; Dolce, T.

    2007-09-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) is an endemic phanerogam of the Mediterranean Sea. It lives between 0.2 and 40 m depth and make up extensive meadows that play a fundamental role in the marine coast ecosystem. Near the coasts at higher anthropic pressure, Posidonia meadows present both quality and quantity damages (regression) due to the mechanical operations on the seabed (anchoring, drag netting, pipe lines) and the sea pollution. Nowadays, the seagrass regression is monitored by different systems: aereophotografic, side scan sonar, underwater television camera, direct underwater visual inspection. Scientific community is looking for to develop monitoring systems more reliable, rapid and non invasive. Aim of this study is to evaluate the application of a new spectrophotometric imaging system based on the acquisition of reflectance spectral images with a good optical (250 Kpixels) and spectral resolution (spectral range 400-970 nm, a total of 115 single wavelength, 5 nm step each one). First trials were made on Posidonia's leafs to evaluate the system capacity to recognize spectral differences between samples picked up at two different depths (0.3 - 4 m). High discrimination percentage (90%) were found between leaf samples as function of the different depths, analyzing the spectral data by Partial Least Squares model. Forward activities will stress the system capability also to evaluate different phenol concentrations on Posidonia leaves, an important index of physiologic vegetal damage, through direct underwater spectrophotometric monitoring.

  5. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  6. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  7. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  8. Haplotype-assisted accurate non-invasive fetal whole genome recovery through maternal plasma sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The applications of massively parallel sequencing technology to fetal cell-free DNA (cff-DNA) have brought new insight to non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. However, most previous research based on maternal plasma sequencing has been restricted to fetal aneuploidies. To detect specific parentally inherited mutations, invasive approaches to obtain fetal DNA are the current standard in the clinic because of the experimental complexity and resource consumption of previously reported non-invasive approaches. Methods Here, we present a simple and effective non-invasive method for accurate fetal genome recovery-assisted with parental haplotypes. The parental haplotype were firstly inferred using a combination strategy of trio and unrelated individuals. Assisted with the parental haplotype, we then employed a hidden Markov model to non-invasively recover the fetal genome through maternal plasma sequencing. Results Using a sequence depth of approximately 44X against a an approximate 5.69% cff-DNA concentration, we non-invasively inferred fetal genotype and haplotype under different situations of parental heterozygosity. Our data show that 98.57%, 95.37%, and 98.45% of paternal autosome alleles, maternal autosome alleles, and maternal chromosome X in the fetal haplotypes, respectively, were recovered accurately. Additionally, we obtained efficient coverage or strong linkage of 96.65% of reported Mendelian-disorder genes and 98.90% of complex disease-associated markers. Conclusions Our method provides a useful strategy for non-invasive whole fetal genome recovery. PMID:23445748

  9. Attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum stress using the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid prevents cardiac fibrosis induced by isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Pedro; Montenegro, José; Vivar, Raúl; Letelier, Alan; Urroz, Pablo Aránguiz; Copaja, Miguel; Pivet, Deisy; Humeres, Claudio; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in various diseases. In the human heart, ischemia/reperfusion has been correlated to ER stress, and several markers of the unfolded protein response (UPR) participate during cardiac remodeling and fibrosis. Here, we used isoproterenol (ISO) injection as a model for in vivo cardiac fibrosis. ISO induced significant cardiomyocyte loss and collagen deposition in the damaged areas of the endocardium. These responses were accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the luminal ER chaperones BIP and PDI, as well as an increase in the UPR effector CHOP. The use of the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) prevented the activation of the UPR, the increase in luminal chaperones and also, leads to decreased collagen deposition, cardiomyocyte loss into the damaged zones. Our results suggest that cardiac damage and fibrosis induced in vivo by the beta-adrenergic agonist ISO are tightly related to ER stress signaling pathways, and that increasing the ER luminal folding capacity with exogenously administrated 4-PBA is a powerful strategy for preventing the development of cardiac fibrosis. Additionally, 4-PBA might prevent the loss of cardiomyocytes. Our data suggests that the attenuation of ER stress pathways with pharmacological compounds such as the chemical chaperone 4-PBA can prevent the development of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling. PMID:22101259

  10. (Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Our research efforts in the first funding year concentrated on animal and clinical studies validating {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine as a marker for norepinephrine uptake and storage in presynaptic sympathetic nerve terminals. In addition to kinetic studies in animals, the first clinical studies have been performed. {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine provides excellent image quality in the human heart with high myocardium to blood ratios. A canine model with transient intracoronary occlusion of the left anterior descending aorta was used to show decreased retention of tracer with ischemia. Clinical studies of patients with acute myocardial infarction showed an area of decreased retention of tracer exceeding the infarct territory as defined by {sup 82}Rb blood flow imaging. We are also developing tracers for the parasympathetic nervous system. It appears that methyl-TRB is a specific tracer for this system. Studies of {sup 11}C- or {sup 18}F-benzovesamicol as a potential tracer for parasympathetic presynaptic nerve terminals are under way. (MHB)

  11. In Emergency Department Patients with Acute Chest Pain, Stress Cardiac MRI Observation Unit Care Reduces 1- year Cardiac-Related Health Care Expenditures: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Case, Doug; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct cost of medical care and clinical events during the first year after patients with intermediate risk acute chest pain were randomized to stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) observation unit (OU) testing, versus inpatient care. Background In a recent study, randomization to OU-CMR reduced median index hospitalization cost compared to inpatient care in patients presenting to the emergency department with intermediate risk acute chest pain. Methods Emergency department patients with intermediate risk chest pain were randomized to OU-CMR (OU care, cardiac markers, stress CMR) or inpatient care (admission, care per admitting provider). This analysis reports the direct cost of cardiac-related care and clinical outcomes (MI, revascularization, cardiovascular death) during the first year of follow-up subsequent to discharge. Consistent with health economics literature, provider cost was calculated from work-related relative value units using the Medicare conversion factor; facility charges were converted to cost using departmental specific cost-to-charge ratios. Linear models were used to compare cost accumulation among study groups. Results One-hundred nine (109) randomized subjects were included in this analysis (52 OU-CMR, 57 inpatient care). The median age was 56 years; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. At 1 year, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72) with 1 patient in each group experiencing a cardiac event after discharge. First-year cardiac-related costs were significantly lower for participants randomized to OU-CMR compared to participants receiving inpatient care (geometric mean = $3101 vs $4742 including the index visit (p = .004) and $29 vs $152 following discharge (p = .012)). During the year following randomization, 6% of OU-CMR and 9% of inpatient care participants experienced a major cardiac event (p=0.72). Conclusions An OU-CMR strategy

  12. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? The TRAILS Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Karin A. M.; Riese, Harriëtte; Van Roon, Arie M.; Hunfeld, Joke A. M.; Groot, Paul F. C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS). However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) levels during a standardized stressful situation, and whether these associations are symptom-specific. Methods We examined 715 adolescents (16.1 years, 51.3% girls) from the Dutch cohort study Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Sample during the Groningen Social Stress Test (GSST). FSS were assessed by the Youth Self-Report, and clustered into a cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain and a cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Perceived stress levels (i.e. unpleasantness and arousal) were assessed by the Self-Assessment Manikin, and cardiac ANS activity by assessing heart rate variability (HRV-HF) and pre-ejection period (PEP). Perceived stress and cardiac ANS levels before, during, and after the GSST were studied as well as cardiac ANS reactivity. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the associations. Results Perceived arousal levels during (beta = 0.09, p = 0.04) and after (beta = 0.07, p = 0.047) the GSST, and perceived unpleasantness levels before (beta = 0.07, p = 0.048) and during (beta = 0.12, p = 0.001) the GSST were related to FSS during the past couple of months. The association between perceived stress and FSS was stronger for the FSS cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain than for the cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Neither ANS activity levels before, during, and after the GSST, nor maximal HF-HRV and PEP reactivity were related to FSS. Conclusions This study suggests that perceived stress levels during social stress are related to FSS, whereas cardiac ANS activity and reactivity are not related to FSS. PMID:27089394

  13. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Carlos; Fraile, Juan-Carlos; Pérez-Turiel, Javier; Damm, Ellen; Schneider, Jochen G.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Schmitt, Daniel; Ihmig, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC) sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram). First experimental results are shown. PMID:27399713

  14. Capacitive Sensing for Non-Invasive Breathing and Heart Monitoring in Non-Restrained, Non-Sedated Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Carlos; Fraile, Juan-Carlos; Pérez-Turiel, Javier; Damm, Ellen; Schneider, Jochen G; Zimmermann, Heiko; Schmitt, Daniel; Ihmig, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Animal testing plays a vital role in biomedical research. Stress reduction is important for improving research results and increasing the welfare and the quality of life of laboratory animals. To estimate stress we believe it is of great importance to develop non-invasive techniques for monitoring physiological signals during the transport of laboratory animals, thereby allowing the gathering of information on the transport conditions, and, eventually, the improvement of these conditions. Here, we study the suitability of commercially available electric potential integrated circuit (EPIC) sensors, using both contact and contactless techniques, for monitoring the heart rate and breathing rate of non-restrained, non-sedated laboratory mice. The design has been tested under different scenarios with the aim of checking the plausibility of performing contactless capture of mouse heart activity (ideally with an electrocardiogram). First experimental results are shown. PMID:27399713

  15. HACE1-dependent protein degradation provides cardiac protection in response to haemodynamic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liyong; Chen, Xin; Sharma, Parveen; Moon, Mark; Sheftel, Alex D.; Dawood, Fayez; Nghiem, Mai P.; Wu, Jun; Li, Ren-Ke; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Penninger, Josef M.; Brumell, John H.; Liu, Peter P.

    2014-03-01

    The HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is a tumour suppressor known to regulate Rac1 activity under stress conditions. HACE1 is increased in the serum of patients with heart failure. Here we show that HACE1 protects the heart under pressure stress by controlling protein degradation. Hace1 deficiency in mice results in accelerated heart failure and increased mortality under haemodynamic stress. Hearts from Hace1-/- mice display abnormal cardiac hypertrophy, left ventricular dysfunction, accumulation of LC3, p62 and ubiquitinated proteins enriched for cytoskeletal species, indicating impaired autophagy. Our data suggest that HACE1 mediates p62-dependent selective autophagic turnover of ubiquitinated proteins by its ankyrin repeat domain through protein-protein interaction, which is independent of its E3 ligase activity. This would classify HACE1 as a dual-function E3 ligase. Our finding that HACE1 has a protective function in the heart in response to haemodynamic stress suggests that HACE1 may be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease.

  16. Increased carbonyl protein level in the stratum corneum of inflammatory skin disorders: A non-invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Ichiro; Shimadzu, Kiyo; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Hirao, Tetsuji; Etou, Takafumi

    2010-08-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the interface of body and environment, and is continuously exposed to oxidative stress, resulting in carbonyl modification of proteins. We have developed a simple and non-invasive method to assess carbonyl protein (CP) level in the SC, applied it to various kinds of skin, and revealed a link between the stratum corneum carbonylated protein (SCCP) level and water content in the SC. The purpose of the present study is to examine the SCCP level in inflammatory skin disorders associated with xerosis. Psoriasis vulgaris (PV) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are typical inflammatory skin disorders, of which the stratum corneum shows markedly low water content. SC samples were non-invasively collected from the lesional and non-lesional areas of PV and AD by adhesive tape stripping, and their carbonyl groups were determined by reaction with fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide. The average fluorescence intensity of the SC was calculated as SCCP level. Higher SCCP level was observed in the lesional area of PV as compared with non-lesional area or healthy control. Lesional area of AD also exhibited higher SCCP level than corresponding non-lesional area, of which SCCP level was slightly higher than the healthy control. These data suggest the involvement of oxidative modification of the SC protein, at least in part, in generation of xerotic skin in inflammatory skin disorders as well as dry skin in healthy subjects.

  17. Prenatal Stress and Balance of the Child's Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System at Age 5-6 Years

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aimée E.; van Eijsden, Manon; Stronks, Karien; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Autonomic nervous system (ANS) misbalance is a potential causal factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. The ANS may be programmed during pregnancy due to various maternal factors. Our aim is to study maternal prenatal psychosocial stress as a potential disruptor of cardiac ANS balance in the child. Methods Mothers from a prospective birth cohort (ABCD study) filled out a questionnaire at gestational week 16 [IQR 12–20], that included validated instruments for state anxiety, depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related anxiety, parenting daily hassles and job strain. A cumulative stress score was also calculated (based on 80th percentiles). Indicators of cardiac ANS in the offspring at age 5–6 years are: pre-ejection period (PEP), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and cardiac autonomic balance (CAB), measured with electrocardiography and impedance cardiography in resting supine and sitting positions. Results 2,624 mother-child pairs, only single births, were available for analysis. The stress scales were not significantly associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.17). Accumulation of maternal stress was also not associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.07). Conclusion Results did not support the hypothesis that prenatal maternal psychosocial stress deregulates cardiac ANS balance in the offspring, at least in rest, and at the age of five-six years. PMID:22272345

  18. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos têm demonstrado a acurácia diagnóstica e o valor prognóstico da ecocardiografia com estresse f

  19. Physical Stress Echocardiography: Prediction of Mortality and Cardiac Events in Patients with Exercise Test showing Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ana Carla Pereira de; Santos, Bruno F de Oliveira; Calasans, Flavia Ricci; Pinto, Ibraim M Francisco; Oliveira, Daniel Pio de; Melo, Luiza Dantas; Andrade, Stephanie Macedo; Tavares, Irlaneide da Silva; Sousa, Antonio Carlos Sobral; Oliveira, Joselina Luzia Menezes

    2014-11-01

    Background: Studies have demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value of physical stress echocardiography in coronary artery disease. However, the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of physical stress echocardiography in the prediction of mortality and major cardiac events in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort in which 866 consecutive patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia, and who underwent physical stress echocardiography were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: with physical stress echocardiography negative (G1) or positive (G2) for myocardial ischemia. The endpoints analyzed were all-cause mortality and major cardiac events, defined as cardiac death and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Results: G2 comprised 205 patients (23.7%). During the mean 85.6 ± 15.0-month follow-up, there were 26 deaths, of which six were cardiac deaths, and 25 non-fatal myocardial infarction cases. The independent predictors of mortality were: age, diabetes mellitus, and positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.69; 95% confidence interval: 1.20 - 6.01; p = 0.016). The independent predictors of major cardiac events were: age, previous coronary artery disease, positive physical stress echocardiography (hazard ratio: 2.75; 95% confidence interval: 1.15 - 6.53; p = 0.022) and absence of a 10% increase in ejection fraction. All-cause mortality and the incidence of major cardiac events were significantly higher in G2 (p < 0. 001 and p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Physical stress echocardiography provides additional prognostic information in patients with exercise test positive for myocardial ischemia.Fundamento: Estudos têm demonstrado a acurácia diagnóstica e o valor prognóstico da ecocardiografia com estresse f

  20. Clinical evaluation of a novel technology for non-invasive and continuous measurement of plasma haemoglobin concentration.

    PubMed

    Broderick, A J; Desmond, F; Leen, G; Shorten, G

    2015-10-01

    We undertook the first clinical evaluation of a novel, non-invasive device for the continuous measurement of plasma haemoglobin concentration in 25 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. At four pre-determined intervals, samples of blood were taken for plasma haemoglobin estimation on a blood gas analyser and a laboratory device and were compared with the plasma haemoglobin estimation on the novel device using the Bland-Altman method. The 95% limits of agreement for estimation of plasma haemoglobin concentration for the device vs. laboratory, the device vs. the blood gas analyser and the blood gas analyser vs. the laboratory were 101.3 g.l(-1) , 103.1 g.l(-1) and 14.5 g.l(-1) , respectively. The bias (mean difference) in each case was 27.4 g.l(-1) , 25.1 g.l(-1) and 2.4 g.l(-1) , respectively. We conclude that the novel device in its current form is not a suitable replacement for more invasive methods of determining plasma haemoglobin concentration in patients in the setting of cardiac surgery; however, lessons learnt from the study will help to improve the device's future performance.

  1. Cardiac Repolarization Instability during Psychological Stress in Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Abisse, Saddam S.; Lampert, Rachel; Burg, Mattew; Soufer, Robert; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Changes in the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS) are a major trigger of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA). Mental arithmetic, a condition administered in a laboratory setting, can provide insight into the ANS effects on cardiac physiology. We examined the responses of cardiac repolarization to laboratory-induced psychological stressors in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) with the objective of identifying the indices that differentiate patients with and without subsequent VTA in follow-up. Methods Continuous ECG signals were recorded using 3 standard bipolar (Holter) leads in 56 patients (age: 63.6±11.9, female: 12%, LVEF: 32.3±11) with ICDs during mental arithmetic. The patients were separated into those with subsequent VTA during 3–4 years of follow-up (Group 1: N=9 pts) and those without VTA (Group 2: N=47 pts). Changes in repolarization (QT-interval, mean T-wave amplitude (Tamp), and T-wave area (Tarea) were analyzed during 5min of baseline, stress and recovery. The temporal instability of Tamp and Tarea was examined using the range (Δ) and variance (σ2) of beat-to-beat variations of the corresponding parameters. Results There were no significant differences in HR between the two groups at baseline (61 vs. 63 bpm, p=0.97), during stress (64 vs. 65 bpm, p=0.40), and recovery (62 vs. 61 bpm, p= 0.88). However, during mental stress and post-stress recovery ΔTamp was almost 2-fold greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (111 (57–203)) vs. 68 (44–94) μV p=0.04, respectively). Changes in QT-intervals were also greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p=0.02). Conclusion Among patients with ICDs, changes of T-wave amplitude after psychological stress were greater in those with subsequent arrhythmic events. This might signal proarrhythmic repolarization response and help identify patients who would benefit the most from ICD implantation and proactive management. PMID:21920534

  2. Glucose deprivation causes oxidative stress and stimulates aggresome formation and autophagy in cultured cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Marambio, Paola; Toro, Barbra; Sanhueza, Carlos; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo; García, Lorena; Quiroga, Clara; Munafo, Daniela; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Bravo, Roberto; González, María-Julieta; Diaz-Araya, Guilermo; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Colombo, María Isabel; Lavandero, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Aggresomes are dynamic structures formed when the ubiquitin-proteasome system is overwhelmed with aggregation-prone proteins. In this process, small protein aggregates are actively transported towards the microtubule-organizing center. A functional role for autophagy in the clearance of aggresomes has also been proposed. In the present work we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved on aggresome formation in cultured rat cardiac myocytes exposed to glucose deprivation. Confocal microscopy showed that small aggregates of polyubiquitinated proteins were formed in cells exposed to glucose deprivation for 6 h. However, at longer times (18 h), aggregates formed large perinuclear inclusions (aggresomes) which colocalized with gamma-tubulin (a microtubule-organizing center marker) and Hsp70. The microtubule disrupting agent vinblastine prevented the formation of these inclusions. Both small aggregates and aggresomes colocalized with autophagy markers such as GFP-LC3 and Rab24. Glucose deprivation stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreases intracellular glutathione levels. ROS inhibition by N-acetylcysteine or by the adenoviral overexpression of catalase or superoxide dismutase disrupted aggresome formation and autophagy induced by glucose deprivation. In conclusion, glucose deprivation induces oxidative stress which is associated with aggresome formation and activation of autophagy in cultured cardiac myocytes. PMID:20176105

  3. A Cycling Movement Based System for Real-Time Muscle Fatigue and Cardiac Stress Monitoring and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chiu, Li-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we defined a new parameter, referred to as the cardiac stress index (CSI), using a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of heart rate (HR). Our study aimed to incorporate the CSI into a cycling based fatigue monitoring system developed in our previous work so the muscle fatigue and cardiac stress can be both continuously and quantitatively assessed for subjects undergoing the cycling exercise. By collecting electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, the DFA scaling exponent α was evaluated on the RR time series extracted from a windowed ECG segment. We then obtained the running estimate of α by shifting a one-minute window by a step of 20 seconds so the CSI, defined as the percentage of all the less-than-one α values, can be synchronously updated every 20 seconds. Since the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale is considered as a convenient index which is commonly used to monitor subjective perceived exercise intensity, we then related the Borg RPE scale value to the CSI in order to investigate and quantitatively characterize the relationship between exercise-induced fatigue and cardiac stress. Twenty-two young healthy participants were recruited in our study. Each participant was asked to maintain a fixed pedaling speed at a constant load during the cycling exercise. Experimental results showed that a decrease in DFA scaling exponent α or an increase in CSI was observed during the exercise. In addition, the Borg RPE scale and CSI were positively correlated, suggesting that the factors due to cardiac stress might also contribute to fatigue state during physical exercise. Since the CSI can effectively quantify the cardiac stress status during physical exercise, our system may be used in sports medicine, or used by cardiologists who carried out stress tests for monitoring heart condition in patients with heart diseases. PMID:26115515

  4. The early identification of psychosis: can lessons be learnt from cardiac stress testing?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Swapnil; Ranganathan, Mohini; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic disorders including schizophrenia are amongst the most debilitating psychiatric disorders. There is an urgent need to develop methods to identify individuals at risk with greater precision and as early as possible. At present, a prerequisite for a diagnosis of schizophrenia is the occurrence of a psychotic episode. Therefore, attempting to detect schizophrenia on the basis of psychosis is analogous to diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD) after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction (MI). The introduction of cardiac stress testing (CST) has revolutionized the detection of CAD and the prevention and management of angina and MI. In this paper, we attempt to apply lessons learnt from CST to the early detection of psychosis by proposing the development of an analogous psychosis stress test. We discuss in detail the various parameters of a proposed psychosis stress test including the choice of a suitable psychological or psychopharmacological "stressor," target population, outcome measures, safety of the approach, and the necessary evolution of test to become clinically informative. The history of evolution of CST may guide the development of a similar approach for the detection and management of psychotic disorders. The initial development of a test to unmask latent risk for schizophrenia will require the selection of a suitable and safe stimulus and the development of outcome measures as a prelude to testing in populations with a range of risk to determine predictive value. The use of CST in CAD offers the intriguing possibility that a similar approach may be applied to the detection and management of schizophrenia.

  5. Resveratrol ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress in diabetes through deacetylation of NFkB-p65 and histone 3.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Pankaj K; Deepthi, Nancy; Sultana, Razia; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2015-11-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has recently gained attention for protective effects against metabolic and cardiac diseases. The beneficial effects of resveratrol have been linked to sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1) activation. However, little is known about the effect of resveratrol in cardiac complications associated with diabetes. Here, we have demonstrated that resveratrol ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy, electrocardiographic abnormalities and oxidative stress in the fructose-fed diabetic rat heart. Mechanistic studies revealed that fructose feeding to Sprague-Dawley rats over a period of 8 weeks leads to cardiac hypertrophy and increased oxidative stress through increased activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX) and reactive oxygen species production. We found increased activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) p-65 along with decreased SIRT-1 activity in the diabetic heart. Resveratrol activates SIRT-1, which deacetylates NFkB-p65 at lysine 310 and histone 3 (H3) at lysine 9 position. SIRT1 activation leads to decreased binding of NFkB-p65 to DNA and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and oxidative stress through reduced transcription of NADPH oxidase subunits. In vitro analysis also revealed that SIRT-1 activation by resveratrol is associated with decreased NFkB-p65 activity and NOX transcription. Similarly, knockdown or inhibition of SIRT1 in H9C2 cells increased acetylation of NFkB-p65 K310 and H3K9. Overall, our data demonstrated that SIRT-1 activation by resveratrol leads to deacetylation of both NFkB-p65 and H3, thereby attenuating cardiac oxidative stress and complications in diabetes. PMID:26298192

  6. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  7. Non-Invasive Measurement of Pulsatile Intracranial Pressures Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, John H.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1997-01-01

    Early detection of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) will aid clinical decision-making for head trauma, brain tumor and other cerebrovascular diseases. Conventional methods, however, require surgical procedures which take time and are accompanied by increased risk of infection. Accordingly we have developed and refined a new ultrasound device to measure skull movements which are known to occur in conjunction with altered ICP. The principle of this device is based upon pulse phase locked loop (PPLL), which enables us to detect changes in distance on the order of microns between an ultrasound transducer on one side of the skull and the opposite inner surface of the cranium. The present study was designed to verify this measurement technique in cadavera. Transcranial distance was increased in steps of 10 mmHg from zero to 50 mmHg by saline infusion into the lateral ventricle of two cadavera. In separate experiments, pulsations of ICP with the amplitudes of zero to 2 mmHg were generated by rhythmic injections of saline using a syringe. When the ICP was stepwise increased from zero to 50 mmHg, transcranial distance increased in proportion with the ICP increase (y=12 x - 76, r=0.938), where y is changes in transcranial distance in microns and x is ICP in mmHg. In the data recorded while ICP pulsations were generated, fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrated that cranial pulsations were clearly associated with ICP pulsations. The results indicate that changes in transcranial distance is linearly correlated with those in ICP, and also that the PPLL device has sufficient sensitivity to detect transcranial pulsations which occur in association with the cardiac cycle. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsations, we may be able to estimate the pressure-volume index in the cranium. As a result, estimates of intracranial compliance may be possible by using the PPLL device. Further studies are necessary in normal subjects and patients.

  8. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone.

  9. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone. PMID:26509576

  10. Binge Ethanol and MDMA Combination Exacerbates Toxic Cardiac Effects by Inducing Cellular Stress.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Ros-Simó, Clara; Milanés, María-Victoria; Valverde, Olga; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Binge drinking is a common pattern of ethanol consumption among young people. Binge drinkers are especially susceptible to brain damage when other substances are co-administered, in particular 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The aim of the present work was to study the mechanisms implicated in the adaptive changes observed after administration of these drugs of abuse. So, we have evaluated the cardiac sympathetic activity and the expression and activation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), after voluntary binge ethanol consumption, alone and in combination with MDMA. Both parameters are markers of stressful situations and they could be modified inducing several alterations in different systems. Adolescent mice received MDMA, ethanol or both (ethanol plus MDMA). Drinking in the dark (DID) procedure was used as a model of binge. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), TH phosphorylated at serine 31 and HSP27 expression and its phosphorylation at serine 82 were evaluated in adolescent mice 48 h, 72 h, and 7 days after treatments in the left ventricle. NA and normetanephrine (NMN) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); TH and HSP27 expression and phosphorylation were measured by quantitative blot immunollabeling using specific antibodies. Ethanol and MDMA co-administration increased NA turnover and TH expression and phosphorylation versus the consumption of each one of these drugs. In parallel with the described modifications in the cardiac sympathetic activity, our results showed that binge ethanol+MDMA exposure is associated with an increase in HSP27 expression and phosphorylation in the left ventricle, supporting the idea that the combination of both drugs exacerbates the cellular stress induced by ethanol or MDMA alone. PMID:26509576

  11. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Daniele; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach. PMID:25692133

  12. Cardiac energy metabolism and oxidative stress biomarkers in diabetic rat treated with resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Carolo dos Santos, Klinsmann; Pereira Braga, Camila; Octavio Barbanera, Pedro; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Fernandes Junior, Ary; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), polyphenol from grape, was studied to evaluate its effects on calorimetric parameters, energy metabolism, and antioxidants in the myocardium of diabetic rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8): C (control group): normal rats; C-RSV: normal rats receiving RSV; DM: diabetic rats; and DM-RSV: diabetics rats receiving RSV. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced with administration of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg(-1) body weight, single dose, i.p.). After 48 hours of STZ administration, the animals received RSV (1.0 mg/kg/day) for gavage for 30 days. Food, water, and energy intake were higher in the DM group, while administration of RSV caused decreases (p<0.05) in these parameters. The glycemia decreased and higher final body weight increased in DM-RSV when compared with the DM group. The diabetic rats showed higher serum-free fatty acid, which was normalized with RSV. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) decreased (p<0.05) in the DM group. This was accompanied by reductions in RQ. The C-RSV group showed higher VO2 and VCO2 values. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was lower in the DM group and normalizes with RSV. The DM group exhibited higher myocardial β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme-A dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activity, and RSV decreased the activity of these enzymes. The DM group had higher cardiac lactate dehydrogenase compared to the DM-RSV group. Myocardial protein carbonyl was increased in the DM group. RSV increased reduced glutathione in the cardiac tissue of diabetic animals. The glutathione reductase activity was higher in the DM-RSV group compared to the DM group. In conclusion, diabetes is accompanied by cardiac energy metabolism dysfunction and change in the biomarkers of oxidative stress. The cardioprotective effect may be mediated through RVS's ability to normalize free fatty acid oxidation, enhance utilization glucose, and control the biomarkers' level of oxidative stress under

  13. Cardiac Energy Metabolism and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Diabetic Rat Treated with Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Carolo dos Santos, Klinsmann; Pereira Braga, Camila; Octavio Barbanera, Pedro; Rodrigues Ferreira Seiva, Fábio; Fernandes Junior, Ary; Fernandes, Ana Angélica Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), polyphenol from grape, was studied to evaluate its effects on calorimetric parameters, energy metabolism, and antioxidants in the myocardium of diabetic rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8): C (control group): normal rats; C-RSV: normal rats receiving RSV; DM: diabetic rats; and DM-RSV: diabetics rats receiving RSV. Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced with administration of streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg−1 body weight, single dose, i.p.). After 48 hours of STZ administration, the animals received RSV (1.0 mg/kg/day) for gavage for 30 days. Food, water, and energy intake were higher in the DM group, while administration of RSV caused decreases (p<0.05) in these parameters. The glycemia decreased and higher final body weight increased in DM-RSV when compared with the DM group. The diabetic rats showed higher serum-free fatty acid, which was normalized with RSV. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) decreased (p<0.05) in the DM group. This was accompanied by reductions in RQ. The C-RSV group showed higher VO2 and VCO2 values. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was lower in the DM group and normalizes with RSV. The DM group exhibited higher myocardial β-hydroxyacyl coenzyme-A dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activity, and RSV decreased the activity of these enzymes. The DM group had higher cardiac lactate dehydrogenase compared to the DM-RSV group. Myocardial protein carbonyl was increased in the DM group. RSV increased reduced glutathione in the cardiac tissue of diabetic animals. The glutathione reductase activity was higher in the DM-RSV group compared to the DM group. In conclusion, diabetes is accompanied by cardiac energy metabolism dysfunction and change in the biomarkers of oxidative stress. The cardioprotective effect may be mediated through RVS's ability to normalize free fatty acid oxidation, enhance utilization glucose, and control the biomarkers' level of oxidative stress under

  14. Non-invasive Central and Peripheral Stimulation: New Hope for Essential Tremor?

    PubMed Central

    Chalah, Moussa A.; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Ayache, Samar S.

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is among the most frequent movement disorders. It usually manifests as a postural and kinematic tremor of the arms, but may also involve the head, voice, lower limbs, and trunk. An oscillatory network has been proposed as a neural correlate of ET, and is mainly composed of the olivocerebellar system, thalamus, and motor cortex. Since pharmacological agents have limited benefits, surgical interventions like deep brain stimulation are the last-line treatment options for the most severe cases. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, particularly transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation, are used to ameliorate ET. Their non-invasiveness, along with their side effects profile, makes them an appealing treatment option. In addition, peripheral stimulation has been applied in the same perspective. Hence, the aim of the present review is to shed light on the emergent use of non-invasive central and peripheral stimulation techniques in this interesting context. PMID:26635516

  15. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients.

  16. Imaging human brain networks to improve the clinical efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sale, Martin V; Mattingley, Jason B; Zalesky, Andrew; Cocchi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    The flexible integration of segregated neural processes is essential to healthy brain function. Advances in neuroimaging techniques have revealed that psychiatric and neurological disorders are characterized by anomalies in the dynamic integration of widespread neural populations. Re-establishing optimal neural activity is an important component of the treatment of such disorders. Non-invasive brain stimulation is emerging as a viable tool to selectively restore both local and widespread neural activity in patients affected by psychiatric and neurological disorders. Importantly, the different forms of non-invasive brain stimulation affect neural activity in distinct ways, which has important ramifications for their clinical efficacy. In this review, we discuss how non-invasive brain stimulation techniques influence widespread neural integration across brain regions. We suggest that the efficacy of such techniques in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological conditions is contingent on applying the appropriate stimulation paradigm to restore specific aspects of altered neural integration. PMID:26409343

  17. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients. PMID:25702198

  18. Chronic non-invasive corticosterone administration abolishes the diurnal pattern of tph2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Montoya, Christian D.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Both hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and serotonergic systems are commonly dysregulated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We describe here a non-invasive rat model for hypercortisolism, as observed in major depression, and its effects on physiology, behavior, and the expression of tph2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) synthesis. We delivered corticosterone (40 µg/ml, 100 µg/ml or 400 µg/ml) or vehicle to adrenal-intact adult, male rats via the drinking water for three weeks. On days 15, 16, 17 and 18, respectively, the rats’ emotionality was assessed in the open-field (OF), social interaction (SI), elevated plus-maze (EPM), and forced swim tests (FST). On day 21, half of the rats in each group were killed 2 h into the dark phase of a 12/12 h reversed light/dark cycle; the other half were killed 2 h into the light phase. We then measured indices of HPA axis activity, plasma glucose and interleukin-6 (IL-6) availability, and neuronal tph2 expression at each time point. Chronic corticosterone intake was sufficient to cause increased anxiety- and depressive-like behavior in a dose-dependent manner. It also disrupted the diurnal pattern of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), corticosterone, and glucose concentrations, caused adrenal atrophy, and prevented regular weight gain. No diurnal or treatment-dependent changes were found for plasma levels of IL-6. Remarkably, all doses of corticosterone treatment abolished the diurnal variation of tph2 mRNA expression in the brainstem dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) by elevating the gene’s expression during the animals’ inactive (light) phase. Our data demonstrate that chronic elevation of corticosterone creates a vulnerability to a depression-like syndrome that is associated with increased tph2 expression, similar to that observed in depressed patients. PMID:21924839

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates High Fat Diet-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction via the Suppression of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Larry A.; Shimizu, Yuuki; Lambert, Jonathan P.; Nicholson, Chad K.; Calvert, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a significant contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to its development have not been fully elucidated. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced signaling molecule that is critical for the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis. Recently, therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing its levels have proven cardioprotective in models of acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and heart failure. The precise role of H2S in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy has not yet been established. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to evaluate circulating and cardiac H2S levels in a murine model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced cardiomyopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was produced by feeding mice HFD (60% fat) chow for 24 weeks. HFD feeding reduced both circulating and cardiac H2S and induced hallmark features of type-2 diabetes. We also observed marked cardiac dysfunction, evidence of cardiac enlargement, cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis. H2S therapy (SG-1002, an orally active H2S donor) restored sulfide levels, improved some of the metabolic perturbations stemming from HFD feeding, and attenuated HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction. Additional analysis revealed that H2S therapy restored adiponectin levels and suppressed cardiac ER stress stemming from HFD feeding. These results suggest that diminished circulating and cardiac H2S levels play a role in the pathophysiology of HFD-induced cardiomyopathy. Additionally, these results suggest that H2S therapy may be of clinical importance in the treatment of cardiovascular complications stemming from diabetes. PMID:25575644

  20. [Design of Non-Invasive Blood Oxygen Measurement Based on AFE4490].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinsong; Wu, Shouhao; Guo, Wenxiu; Zheng, Hui; Tang, Dong

    2015-09-01

    From the perspective of portable monitoring devices,we use an analog front-end AFE4490 design a module of Non-invasive blood oxygen measurement, used to collect human pulse wave signal and peak (valley) value detection and then use the principles of non-invasive oximetry calculated oxygen saturation (SPO2). This design of noninvasive oximetry module has the characteristics of small size, low power consumption, and the results of test show that the measurement of oxygen saturation are correct. PMID:26904876

  1. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view.

  2. Non-invasive Ventilation in Premature Infants: Based on Evidence or Habit

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shalabh; Sinha, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Despite surfactant and mechanical ventilation being the standard of care for preterm infants with respiratory failure, non-invasive respiratory support is increasingly being employed in neonatal units. The latter can be accomplished in a variety of ways but none of them have been proven so far to be superior to intubation and mechanical ventilation. Nonetheless, they appear to be safe and effective in experienced hands. This article relates to the use of non-invasive forms of respiratory support and evidence is reviewed from the clinical trials which have evaluated the use of these techniques. PMID:24404523

  3. Oxidative stress and redox signalling in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Mike; Looi, Yee H; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and its antecedent conditions such as cardiac hypertrophy and adverse remodelling after MI. Oxidative stress describes an imbalance between antioxidant defences and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which at high levels cause cell damage but at lower levels induce subtle changes in intracellular signalling pathways (termed redox signalling). ROS are derived from many sources including mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases and NADPH oxidases. The latter enzymes are especially important in redox signalling, being implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension and atherosclerosis, and activated by diverse pathologically relevant stimuli. We review the contribution of ROS to heart failure pathophysiology and discuss potential therapies that may specifically target detrimental redox signalling. Indeed, drugs such as ACE inhibitors and statins may act in part through such mechanisms. A better understanding of redox signalling mechanisms may enable the development of new targeted therapeutic strategies rather than the non‐specific antioxidant approaches that have to date been disappointing in clinical trials. PMID:16670100

  4. Relationship between post-cardiac arrest myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reperfusion after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA) is an event that increases reactive oxygen species production leading to oxidative stress. More specifically, myocardial oxidative stress may play a role in the severity of post-CA myocardial dysfunction. This study investigated the relationship between myocardial oxidative stress and post-CA myocardial injury and dysfunction in a rat model of CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 26 rats and was untreated for 6 min. CPR, including mechanical chest compression, ventilation, and epinephrine, was then initiated and continued for additional 6 min prior to defibrillations. Resuscitated animals were sacrificed at two h (n = 9), 4 h (n = 6) and 72 h (n = 8) following resuscitation, and plasma collected for assessment of: high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), as marker of myocardial injury; isoprostanes (IsoP), as marker of lipid peroxidation; and 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHG), as marker of DNA oxidative damage. Hearts were also harvested for measurement of tissue IsoP and 8-OHG. Myocardial function was assessed by echocardiography at the corresponding time points. Additional 8 rats were not subjected to CA and served as baseline controls. Results Compared to baseline, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was reduced at 2 and 4 h following resuscitation (p < 0.01), while it was similar at 72 h. Inversely, plasma hs-cTnT increased, compared to baseline, at 2 and 4 h post-CA (p < 0.01), and then recovered at 72 h. Similarly, plasma and myocardial tissue IsoP and 8-OHG levels increased at 2 and 4 h post-resuscitation (p < 0.01 vs. baseline), while returned to baseline 72 h later. Myocardial IsoP were directly related to hs-cTnT levels (r = 0.760, p < 0.01) and inversely related to LVEF (r = -0.770, p < 0.01). Myocardial 8-OHG were also directly related to hs-cTnT levels (r = 0.409, p < 0.05) and

  5. A simple non-invasive field based method for examining and parameterizing root-water-uptake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, y.; Guan, h.; Huston, J.; Wang, h.; Ewenz, C.; Shang, s.; Simmons, C.

    2012-04-01

    A simple non-invasive field based method for directly parameterizing root-water-uptake models is proposed. Stem psychrometers and sap flow meters are used to measure stem water potential and plant transpiration rate continuously and simultaneously. Predawn stem water potential is selected as a surrogate for root-zone soil water potential to examine and parameterize the root water-uptake water stress response functions. The method is applied to two drooping sheoak (Allocasuarina verticillata) trees for a period of 80 days, covering both a dry season and a wet season. The result indicates that the S-shape function is more appropriate than the Feddes piecewise linear function for drooping sheoak to explain the effect of soil moisture stress on its root water uptake performance. Besides, the water stress function was found to be not only the function of soil moisture, but also dependent on the atmospheric demand. As the result, the S-shape water stress function is corrected considering the effect of atmospheric conditions. The soil moisture modeling results indicated that the proposed method is capable in correctly choosing and calibrating the root-water-uptake models. In addition, the S-shape water stress function with atmospheric correction performed better than the classical S-shape function in modeling both root zone soil water potential and plant transpiration rate.

  6. Cardiac and pulmonary oxidative stress in rats exposed to realistic emissions of source aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Miriam; Diaz, Edgar A.; Gupta, Tarun; Kang, Choong-Min; Ruiz, Pablo; Coull, Brent A.; Godleski, John J.; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    In vivo chemiluminescence (CL) is a measure of reactive oxygen species in tissues. CL was used to assess pulmonary and cardiac responses to inhaled aerosols derived from aged emissions of three coal-fired power plants in the USA. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to either filtered air or: (1) primary emissions (P); (2) ozone oxidized emissions (PO); (3) oxidized emissions + secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (POS); (4) neutralized oxidized emissions + SOA (PONS); and (5) control scenarios: oxidized emissions + SOA in the absence of primary particles (OS), oxidized emissions alone (O), and SOA alone (S). Immediately after 6 hours of exposure, CL in the lung and heart was measured. Tissues were also assayed for thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Exposure to P or PO aerosols led to no changes compared to filtered air in lung or heart CL at any individual plant or when all data were combined. POS caused significant increases in lung CL and TBARS at only one plant, and not in combined data from all plants; PONS resulted in increased lung CL only when data from all plants were combined. Heart CL was also significantly increased with exposure to POS only when data from all plants were combined. PONS increased heart CL significantly in one plant with TBARS accumulation, but not in combined data. Exposure to O, OS, and S had no CL effects. Univariate analyses of individual measured components of the exposure atmospheres did not identify any component associated with increased CL. These data suggest that coal-fired power plant emissions combined with other atmospheric constituents produce limited pulmonary and cardiac oxidative stress. PMID:21913821

  7. Routine initial exercise stress testing for treatment stratification in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Annett; Rieck, Angelika; Reibis, Rona K; Völler, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence of substantial benefit of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients with low exercise capacity at admission. Nevertheless, some patients are not able to perform an initial exercise stress test (EST). We aimed to describe this group using data of 1094 consecutive patients after a cardiac event (71±7 years, 78% men) enrolled in nine centres for inpatient CR. We analysed sociodemographic and clinical variables (e.g. cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, complications at admission), amount of therapy (e.g. exercise training, nursing care) and the results of the initial and the final 6-min walking test (6MWT) with respect to the application of an EST. Fifteen per cent of patients did not undergo an EST (non-EST group). In multivariable analysis, the probability of obtaining an EST was higher for men [odds ratio (OR) 1.89, P=0.01], a 6MWT (per 10 m, OR 1.07, P<0.01) and lower for patients with diabetes mellitus (OR 0.48, P<0.01), NYHA-class III/IV (OR 0.27, P<0.01), osteoarthritis (OR 0.39, P<0.01) and a longer hospital stay (per 5 days, OR 0.87, P=0.02). The non-EST group received fewer therapy units of exercise training, but more units of nursing care and physiotherapy than the EST group. However, there were no significant differences between both groups in the increase of the 6MWT during CR (123 vs. 108 m, P=0.122). The present study confirms the feasibility of an EST at the start of CR as an indicator of disease severity. Nevertheless, patients without EST benefit from CR even if exercising less. Thus, there is a justified need for individualized, comprehensive and interdisciplinary CR.

  8. [ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTEACTIVATING FACTOR II CANCELS OXIDATIVE STRESS, CONSTITUTIVE NOS UNCOUPLING AND INDUCED VIOLATIONS OF CARDIAC HEMODYNAMICS IN HYPERTENSION (PART II)].

    PubMed

    Dorofeyeva, N A; Kotsuruba, A V; Mogilnitskaya, L A; Malyna, A E; Kornelyuk, A I; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of EMAP II on free radical state of the heart and blood vessels, to restore cNOS coupling and cardiac hemodynamics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. It was found that, due to the combined inhibition of oxidative and nitrosative stress, EMAP I quickly restores impaired in hypertension constitutive de novo synthesis of NO by restoring cNOS coupling. Restoration by EMAP II of constitutive de novo synthesis NO abolished cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In hypertension, the introduction of EMAP II helped to improve the performance of the pumping function of the heart (stroke volume increased by 18.2 %, cardiac output -22 %), an arterial stiffness decreased by 23.2 %, process of relaxation of the left ventricle improved, due to decreased in 4,7 times myocardial end-diastolic stiffness. PMID:26495731

  9. A systematic literature review on the effectiveness of non-invasive therapy for cervicobrachial pain.

    PubMed

    Salt, Emma; Wright, Chris; Kelly, Sue; Dean, Allison

    2011-02-01

    Cervicobrachial pain is a common cervical spine disorder. It is frequently managed through non-invasive therapy. The objective of this systematic review was to assess effectiveness of non-invasive therapy for the management of cervicobrachial pain, in terms of pain, function and disability. Computerised searches were performed to January 2010. Studies were selected using pre-specified criteria. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using PEDro and level of inter-reviewer agreement reported using Kappa values. Meta-analyses were conducted on pain scores for similar interventions using DerSimonian-Laird random-effects model to allow for heterogeneity. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals were reported. Qualitative analyses, based on Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence, were conducted for function and disability. Eleven studies were included in the review. Interventions included general physiotherapy, cervical traction, manual therapy, exercise therapy, and behavioural change approaches. There was inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of non-invasive management of cervicobrachial pain. Potential benefits were indicated in the provision of manual therapy and exercise and behavioural change approaches to reduce pain. General physiotherapy and traction were no more effective than comparators in reducing pain (level A evidence). Effects of non-invasive management on function and disability were mixed. Future studies should identify which sub-groups of cervicobrachial pain respond to specific interventions.

  10. Factors affecting the clinical use of non-invasive prenatal testing: a mixed methods systematic review.

    PubMed

    Skirton, Heather; Patch, Christine

    2013-06-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing has been in clinical use for a decade; however, there is evidence that this technology will be more widely applied within the next few years. Guidance is therefore required to ensure that the procedure is offered in a way that is evidence based and ethically and clinically acceptable. We conducted a systematic review of the current relevant literature to ascertain the factors that should be considered when offering non-invasive prenatal testing in a clinical setting. We undertook a systematic search of relevant databases, journals and reference lists, and from an initial list of 298 potential papers, identified 11 that were directly relevant to the study. Original data were extracted and presented in a table, and the content of all papers was analysed and presented in narrative form. Four main themes emerged: perceived attributes of the test, regulation and ethical issues, non-invasive prenatal testing in practice and economic considerations. However, there was a basic difference in the approach of actual or potential service users, who were very positive about the benefits of the technology, compared with other research participants, who were concerned with the potential moral and ethical outcomes of using this testing method. Recommendations for the appropriate use of non-invasive prenatal testing are made.

  11. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    PubMed Central

    Moissidou, Despina; Day, Jasmine; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification). Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry), although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts. PMID:26345295

  12. Invasive versus Non Invasive Methods Applied to Mummy Research: Will This Controversy Ever Be Solved?

    PubMed

    Moissidou, Despina; Day, Jasmine; Shin, Dong Hoon; Bianucci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of non invasive techniques to mummified remains have shed new light on past diseases. The virtual inspection of a corpse, which has almost completely replaced classical autopsy, has proven to be important especially when dealing with valuable museum specimens. In spite of some very rewarding results, there are still many open questions. Non invasive techniques provide information on hard and soft tissue pathologies and allow information to be gleaned concerning mummification practices (e.g., ancient Egyptian artificial mummification). Nevertheless, there are other fields of mummy studies in which the results provided by non invasive techniques are not always self-explanatory. Reliance exclusively upon virtual diagnoses can sometimes lead to inconclusive and misleading interpretations. On the other hand, several types of investigation (e.g., histology, paleomicrobiology, and biochemistry), although minimally invasive, require direct contact with the bodies and, for this reason, are often avoided, particularly by museum curators. Here we present an overview of the non invasive and invasive techniques currently used in mummy studies and propose an approach that might solve these conflicts.

  13. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  14. Application of quantum dot nanoparticles for potential non-invasive bio-imaging of mammalian spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various obstacles are encountered by mammalian spermatozoa during their journey through the female genital tract, and only few or none will reach the site of fertilization. Currently, there are limited technical approaches for non-invasive investigation of spermatozoa migration after insemination. A...

  15. Can non-invasive measurement of gut oxygenation predict necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that contribute to the development of NEC include hypoperfusion or decreased oxygenation of splanchnic tissue. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) will be used to assess gut oxygenation non-invasively. Typically NIRS is primarily used for cerebral hemodynamic monitoring; we intend to apply it ...

  16. Non Invasive Biomedical Analysis - Breath Networking Session at PittCon 2011, Atlanta, Georgia

    EPA Science Inventory

    This was the second year that our breath colleagues organized a networking session at the Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition or ''PittCon'' (http://www.pincon.org/).This time it was called "Non-invasive Biomedical Analysis" to broaden the scope a bit, but the primary focus rema...

  17. Differential radioactivity monitor for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1982-09-23

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  18. Who is who? Non-invasive methods to individually sex and mark altricial chicks.

    PubMed

    Adam, Iris; Scharff, Constance; Honarmand, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    Many experiments require early determination of offspring's sex as well as early marking of newborns for individual recognition. According to animal welfare guidelines, non-invasive techniques should be preferred whenever applicable. In our group, we work on different species of song birds in the lab and in the field, and we successfully apply non-invasive methods to sex and individually mark chicks. This paper presents a comprehensive non-invasive tool-box. Sexing birds prior to the expression of secondary sexual traits requires the collection of DNA-bearing material for PCR. We established a quick and easy method to sex birds of any age (post hatching) by extracting DNA from buccal swabs. Results can be obtained within 3 hours. For individual marking chick's down feathers are trimmed in specific patterns allowing fast identification within the hatching order. This set of methods is easily applicable in a standard equipped lab and especially suitable for working in the field as no special equipment is required for sampling and storage. Handling of chicks is minimized and marking and sexing techniques are non-invasive thereby supporting the RRR-principle of animal welfare guidelines. PMID:24893585

  19. Non-Invasive Microbial Metabolic Activity Sensing at Single Cell Level by Perfusion of Calcein Acetoxymethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Christina E. M.; Singh, Abhijeet; Helfrich, Stefan; Grünberger, Alexander; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast microscopy cannot give sufficient information on bacterial metabolic activity, or if a cell is dead, it has the fate to die or it is in a viable but non-growing state. Thus, a reliable sensing of the metabolic activity helps to distinguish different categories of viability. We present a non-invasive instantaneous sensing method using a fluorogenic substrate for online monitoring of esterase activity and calcein efflux changes in growing wild type bacteria. The fluorescent conversion product of calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CAM) and its efflux indicates the metabolic activity of cells grown under different conditions at real-time. The dynamic conversion of CAM and the active efflux of fluorescent calcein were analyzed by combining microfluidic single cell cultivation technology and fluorescence time lapse microscopy. Thus, an instantaneous and non-invasive sensing method for apparent esterase activity was created without the requirement of genetic modification or harmful procedures. The metabolic activity sensing method consisting of esterase activity and calcein secretion was demonstrated in two applications. Firstly, growing colonies of our model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum were confronted with intermittent nutrient starvation by interrupting the supply of iron and carbon, respectively. Secondly, bacteria were exposed for one hour to fatal concentrations of antibiotics. Bacteria could be distinguished in growing and non-growing cells with metabolic activity as well as non-growing and non-fluorescent cells with no detectable esterase activity. Microfluidic single cell cultivation combined with high temporal resolution time-lapse microscopy facilitated monitoring metabolic activity of stressed cells and analyzing their descendants in the subsequent recovery phase. Results clearly show that the combination of CAM with a sampling free microfluidic approach is a powerful tool to gain insights in the metabolic activity of growing and non

  20. QT interval dispersion: a non-invasive marker of susceptibility to arrhythmia in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias?

    PubMed Central

    Pye, M.; Quinn, A. C.; Cobbe, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess QT interval dispersion on the surface electrocardiogram in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias. DESIGN--A retrospective and prospective blinded controlled study of patients referred for investigation of ventricular arrhythmias at a tertiary cardiac centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS--89 consecutive patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias due to chronic ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, or ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a normal heart. 32 patients did not meet the inclusion criteria; therefore 57 patients were compared with a control group of 40 patients with myocardial disease but no history of arrhythmias and 12 normal controls with no myocardial disease. Standard 12 lead electrocardiograms were enlarged, the QT intervals for each lead measured, and QT dispersion calculated. RESULTS--There was a significantly greater mean QT dispersion (77 ms) in patients with sustained ventricular arrhythmias compared with the control group (38 ms, p < 0.01). This held for all groups; after myocardial infarction VT (82 (22) ms v control 38 (10) ms; p < 0.01), dilated cardiomyopathy VT (76 (18) ms v control 40 (11) ms, p < 0.01), and normal heart VT (65 (7) ms v control 32 (8), p < 0.05). There was also a greater QT dispersion in patients with impaired left ventricular function and VT, with a correlation between left ventricular function and QT dispersion in patients with VT (r = 0.56, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--QT interval dispersion may be a further non-invasive marker of susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:8043329

  1. Distinctive cardiac autonomic dysfunction following stress exposure in both sexes in an animal model of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Koresh, Ori; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Matar, Michael A; Geva, Amir B; Cohen, Hagit

    2016-07-15

    It is unclear whether the poor autonomic flexibility or dysregulation observed in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents a pre-trauma vulnerability factor or results from exposure to trauma. We used an animal model of PTSD to assess the association between the behavioral response to predator scent stress (PSS) and the cardiac autonomic modulation in male and female rats. The rats were surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices to measure their electrocardiograms and locomotor activity (LMA). Following baseline telemetric monitoring, the animals were exposed to PSS or sham-PSS. Continuous telemetric monitoring (24h/day sampling) was performed over the course of 7days. The electrocardiographic recordings were analyzed using the time- and frequency-domain indexes of heart rate variability (HRV). The behavioral response patterns were assessed using the elevated plus maze and acoustic startle response paradigms for the retrospective classification of individuals according to the PTSD-related cut-off behavioral criteria. During resting conditions, the male rats had significantly higher heart rates (HR) and lower HRV parameters than the female rats during both the active and inactive phases of the daily cycle. Immediately after PSS exposure, both the female and male rats demonstrated a robust increase in HR and a marked drop in HRV parameters, with a shift of sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance. In both sexes, autonomic system habituation and recovery were selectively inhibited in the rats whose behavior was extremely disrupted after exposure to PSS. However, in the female rats, exposure to the PSS produced fewer EBR rats, with a more rapid recovery curve than that of the male rats. PSS did not induce changes to the circadian rhythm of the LMA. According to our results, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder that is related to failure-of-recovery mechanisms that impede the restitution of physiological homeostasis. PMID

  2. Stress response and cardiac activity of term and preterm calves in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Christina; Aurich, Jörg; Trenk, Lisa; Ille, Natascha; Drillich, Marc; Pohl, Werner; Aurich, Christine

    2016-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis of gestational age affecting fetal cardiac activity and the stress response at birth. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability variables, SD of the beat-to-beat interval and root mean square of successive beat-to-beat differences, and postnatal salivary cortisol concentration were studied in calves born at term (Term, n = 7, gestation length 286.3 ± 2.1 days) or after induction of parturition (Preterm, n = 7, gestation length 279.6 ± 0.2 days). Observation periods covered the last month of gestation (phase A), the last hours before birth including the first stage of labor (phase B), and the neonatal period (phase C). Fetal HR decreased in phase A (P < 0.001) and did not differ between groups. During phase B, HR increased (P < 0.05) and was higher in Preterm than in Term calves in phases B (P < 0.05) and C (P < 0.01). In Term calves, heart rate variability increased from Day 6 until birth (P < 0.05). At birth, SD of the beat-to-beat interval was higher in Term than in Preterm calves (P < 0.01). On Day 1 after birth (phase C), HR accelerations were more frequent in Term than Preterm calves (P < 0.01), whereas decelerations were more frequent in Preterm calves (P < 0.05). Cortisol concentration increased postnatally (P < 0.001) and was correlated with gestation length (r ≥ 0.68, P < 0.01). Because of a certain degree of immaturity, the ability to cope with the stress of birth may be impaired in calves born 1 week before term. PMID:27312949

  3. Low Intensity Physical Exercise Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling and Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, C.; Gimenes, R.; Rosa, C. M.; Xavier, N. P.; Campos, D. H. S.; Fernandes, A. A. H.; Cezar, M. D. M.; Guirado, G. N.; Cicogna, A. C.; Takamoto, A. H. R.; Okoshi, M. P.; Okoshi, K.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a low intensity aerobic exercise protocol on cardiac remodeling and myocardial function in diabetic rats. Wistar rats were assigned into four groups: sedentary control (C-Sed), exercised control (C-Ex), sedentary diabetes (DM-Sed), and exercised diabetes (DM-Ex). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats exercised for 9 weeks in treadmill at 11 m/min, 18 min/day. Myocardial function was evaluated in left ventricular (LV) papillary muscles and oxidative stress in LV tissue. Statistical analysis was given by ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis. Echocardiogram showed diabetic groups with higher LV diastolic diameter-to-body weight ratio and lower posterior wall shortening velocity than controls. Left atrium diameter was lower in DM-Ex than DM-Sed (C-Sed: 5.73 ± 0.49; C-Ex: 5.67 ± 0.53; DM-Sed: 6.41 ± 0.54; DM-Ex: 5.81 ± 0.50 mm; P < 0.05 DM-Sed vs C-Sed and DM-Ex). Papillary muscle function was depressed in DM-Sed compared to C-Sed. Exercise attenuated this change in DM-Ex. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in DM-Sed than C-Sed and DM-Ex. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were lower in diabetics than controls and higher in DM-Ex than DM-Sed. Glutathione peroxidase activity was lower in DM-Sed than C-Sed and DM-Ex. Conclusion. Low intensity exercise attenuates left atrium dilation and myocardial oxidative stress and dysfunction in type 1 diabetic rats. PMID:26509175

  4. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05) and sarcomere length (3.3 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P < 0.05). To determine whether these species-dependent differences in length were related to diastolic interaction of the contractile elements or differences in relative passive stiffness, cardiocytes were subjected to the osmolarity gradient 1) during treatment with 7 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), which inhibits cross-bridge interaction, or 2) after pretreatment with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), a bivalent Ca2+ chelator. Treatment with EGTA or BDM abolished the differences between cat and rat cardiocytes. Species-dependent differences therefore appeared to be related to the degree of diastolic cross-bridge association and not differences in relative passive stiffness. In conclusion, the osmolarity vs. cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  5. Inadequate Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients Referred for Cardiac Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Akinseye, Oluwaseun A; Kerwin, Todd C

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the degree of blood pressure (BP) control and incidence of myocardial ischemia in hypertensive patients (n=2039) referred for cardiac stress test. Patients were categorized into well-controlled (<140/90 mm Hg), poorly controlled (140-160/90-100 mm Hg), and very poorly controlled (>160/100 mm Hg) groups according to their resting BP. The mean age[±standard error of the mean] of the patients was 68±13 years, and 885 (43.4%) were men. The prevalence of well-controlled hypertension (HTN) was 47.2%, poorly controlled HTN was 29.5%, and very poorly controlled HTN was 23.3%. Evidence of ischemia was seen in 19.8% and 19.3% of the well-controlled and poorly controlled groups, respectively. The very poorly controlled group had the lowest incidence of ischemia (14.3%) (P<.05) compared with the other two groups. Symptoms that mimic ischemic heart disease in hypertensive patients may be partly explained by poorly controlled BP. Quality of care might be improved by optimally controlling BP in patients with angina symptoms prior to ordering diagnostic testing associated with radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26011137

  6. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Children

    PubMed Central

    van Eijsden, Manon; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.; de Geus, Eco J.

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls mainly automatic bodily functions that are engaged in homeostasis, like heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration and renal function. The ANS has two main branches: the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the human body for action in times of danger and stress, and the parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the resting state of the body. ANS activity can be measured invasively, for instance by radiotracer techniques or microelectrode recording from superficial nerves, or it can be measured non-invasively by using changes in an organ's response as a proxy for changes in ANS activity, for instance of the sweat glands or the heart. Invasive measurements have the highest validity but are very poorly feasible in large scale samples where non-invasive measures are the preferred approach. Autonomic effects on the heart can be reliably quantified by the recording of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in combination with the impedance cardiogram (ICG), which reflects the changes in thorax impedance in response to respiration and the ejection of blood from the ventricle into the aorta. From the respiration and ECG signals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia can be extracted as a measure of cardiac parasympathetic control. From the ECG and the left ventricular ejection signals, the preejection period can be extracted as a measure of cardiac sympathetic control. ECG and ICG recording is mostly done in laboratory settings. However, having the subjects report to a laboratory greatly reduces ecological validity, is not always doable in large scale epidemiological studies, and can be intimidating for young children. An ambulatory device for ECG and ICG simultaneously resolves these three problems. Here, we present a study design for a minimally invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in children, using a validated ambulatory device 1-5, the VU University Ambulatory Monitoring System (VU

  7. High Order Statistics and Time-Frequency Domain to Classify Heart Sounds for Subjects under Cardiac Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Moukadem, Ali; Schmidt, Samuel; Dieterlen, Alain

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of classification of the first and the second heart sounds (S1 and S2) under cardiac stress test. The main objective is to classify these sounds without electrocardiogram (ECG) reference and without taking into consideration the systolic and the diastolic time intervals criterion which can become problematic and useless in several real life settings as severe tachycardia and tachyarrhythmia or in the case of subjects being under cardiac stress activity. First, the heart sounds are segmented by using a modified time-frequency based envelope. Then, to distinguish between the first and the second heart sounds, new features, named αopt, β, and γ, based on high order statistics and energy concentration measures of the Stockwell transform (S-transform) are proposed in this study. A study of the variation of the high frequency content of S1 and S2 over the HR (heart rate) is also discussed. The proposed features are validated on a database that contains 2636 S1 and S2 sounds corresponding to 62 heart signals and 8 subjects under cardiac stress test collected from healthy subjects. Results and comparisons with existing methods in the literature show a large superiority for our proposed features. PMID:26089957

  8. Hrd1 and ER-Associated Protein Degradation, ERAD, Are Critical Elements of the Adaptive ER Stress Response in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Doroudgar, Shirin; Völkers, Mirko; Thuerauf, Donna J; Khan, Mohsin; Mohsin, Sadia; Respress, Jonathan L; Wang, Wei; Gude, Natalie; Müller, Oliver J; Wehrens, Xander HT; Sussman, Mark A; Glembotski, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Hrd1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been studied in yeast, where it contributes to ER protein quality control by ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of misfolded proteins that accumulate during ER stress. Neither Hrd1 nor ERAD have been studied in the heart, or in cardiac myocytes, where protein quality control is critical for proper heart function. Objective The objectives of this study were to elucidate roles for Hrd1 in ER stress, ERAD, and viability in cultured cardiac myocytes and in the mouse heart, in vivo. Methods and Results The effects of siRNA-mediated Hrd1 knockdown were examined in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. The effects of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated Hrd1 knockdown and overexpression were examined in the hearts of mice subjected to pressure-overload induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy, which challenges protein-folding capacity. In cardiac myocytes, the ER stressors, thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (TM) increased ERAD, as well as adaptive ER stress proteins, and minimally affected cell death. However, when Hrd1 was knocked down, TG and TM dramatically decreased ERAD, while increasing maladaptive ER stress proteins and cell death. In vivo, Hrd1 knockdown exacerbated cardiac dysfunction, and increased apoptosis and cardiac hypertrophy, while Hrd1 overexpression preserved cardiac function, and decreased apoptosis and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in the hearts of mice subjected to pressure-overload. Conclusions Hrd1 and ERAD are essential components of the adaptive ER stress response in cardiac myocytes. Hrd1 contributes to preserving heart structure and function in a mouse model of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26137860

  9. Aurora-A/STK-15 is a predictive factor for recurrent behaviour in non-invasive bladder carcinoma: a study of 128 cases of non-invasive neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Compérat, E; Camparo, P; Haus, R; Chartier-Kastler, E; Radenen, B; Richard, F; Capron, F; Paradis, V

    2007-04-01

    Aurora-A, a member of serine/threonine kinase, is implied in mitosis and centrosome maturation. Increasing levels of Aurora-A have been shown to be present in several malignancies and especially in bladder cancer. No immunohistochemical marker has shown to be able to predict the clinical outcome of patients with superficial bladder cancer, except MIB-1, as a predictive marker of relapse and progression. The aim was to investigate the expression of Aurora-A and MIB-1 in tissue micro arrays of superficial bladder cancer representative of pTa papillary urothelial neoplasm with different degrees of aggressiveness (low malignant potential [PUNLMP], non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma low grade [NILGC], non-invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma high grade [NIHGC] and carcinoma in situ). We analysed predictive values of both markers, their specificity and sensitivity in tumor recurrence. Aurora-A was a sensitive marker to predict tumor recurrence especially for pTa (PUNLMP, NILGC; PUNLMP p<0.001, NILGC p<0.001) with statistical significant correlation between immunohistochemical staining and clinical outcome. MIB-1 expression displayed statistical difference p=0.002 in the PUNLMP group and p=0.03 in the NILGC group. Aurora-A is a more sensitive marker than MIB-1 to predict relapse in pTa bladder neoplasias. The combination of both markers seems to have a very powerful predictive value of recurrence (p<0.001).

  10. Cardiac-Specific Deletion of the Pdha1 Gene Sensitizes Heart to Toxicological Actions of Ischemic Stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Yang, Hui; Chu, Dongyang; Liu, Quan; Zhao, Xuezhong; Leng, Jiyan; Li, Ji

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays a key role in aerobic energy metabolism and occupies a central crossroad between glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We generated inducible cardiac-specific PDH E1α knockout (CreER(T2)-PDH(flox/flox)) mice that demonstrated a high mortality rate. It was hypothesized that PDH modulating cardiac glucose metabolism is crucial for heart functions under normal physiological and/or stress conditions. The myocardial infarction was conducted by a ligation of the left anterior descending coronary arteries. Cardiac PDH E1α deficiency caused large myocardial infarcts size and macrophage infiltration in the hearts (P < .01 vs wild-type [WT]). Wheat germ agglutinin and Masson trichrome staining revealed significantly increased hypertrophy and fibrosis in PDH E1α-deficient hearts (P < .05 vs WT). Measurements of heart substrate metabolism in an ex vivo working heart perfusion system demonstrated a significant impairment of glucose oxidation in PDH E1α-deficient hearts during ischemia/reperfusion (P < .05 vs WT). Dichloroacetate, a PDH activator, increased glucose oxidation in WT hearts during ischemia/reperfusion and reduced myocardial infarct size in WT, but not in PDH E1α-deficient hearts. Immunoblotting results demonstrated that cardiac PDH E1α deficiency leads to an impaired ischemic AMP-activated protein kinase activation through Sestrin2-liver kinase B1 interaction which is responsible for an increased susceptibility of PDH E1α-deficient heart to ischemic insults. Thus, cardiac PDH E1α deficiency impairs ischemic AMP-activated protein kinase signaling and sensitizes hearts to the toxicological actions of ischemic stress.

  11. Attitudes Towards Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing for Aneuploidy Among United States Adults of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Sayres, Lauren C.; Goodspeed, Taylor A.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s) To determine how adults in the United States (US) view non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA testing) in order to help estimate uptake. Study Design A national sample of 1,861 US-based adults was surveyed using a validated online survey instrument. The survey was administered by a commercial survey research company. Respondents were randomized to receive a survey about prenatal testing for trisomy 13 and 18 or trisomy 21. Participants were asked to select among testing modalities, including cffDNA testing, and rank the features of testing that they considered most important to decision making. Results There was substantive interest in the use of cffDNA testing rather than traditional screening mechanisms with a minority of respondents reporting that they would support the use of both methods in combination. The lower rates of false negative and false positive test results and the ability to use the test earlier in the pregnancy were the most highly rated benefits of cffDNA testing. Participants expressed strong support for diagnostic confirmation via invasive testing after a positive result from either screening or cffDNA testing. However, almost one-third of participants reported that they would not endorse the use of either invasive or non-invasive prenatal testing. Conclusion(s) There appears to be support for uptake of non-invasive prenatal tests. Clinical guidelines should therefor go forward in providing guidance on how to integrate non-invasive methods into current standard of care. However, our findings indicate that even when accuracy, which is rated by patients as the most important aspect of prenatal testing, is significantly improved over existing screening methods and testing is offered non-invasively, the number of individuals who reported that they would decline any testing remained the same. Attention should therefor be directed at ensuring that the right of informed refusal of prenatal testing is not impacted

  12. Non-invasive diagnosis of arterial patency after thrombolytic treatment and its relation to prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, R M; White, H D; Cross, D B; Woo, K S; Elliott, J M; Twigden, D; Williams, B; Johnson, R N

    1993-01-01

    /37 patients with initially patent infarct related coronary arteries (sensitivity 92%), and a rise to < 20% of peak occurred in 21/23 patients with initially occluded arteries (specificity 91%). In the prognostic study, 30 day mortality was 2.1% in the 191 patients with three hour creatine kinase > 20% of peak and 8.7% in the 127 patients with three hour creatine kinase < 20% of peak (p < 0.01). Angiocardiography in three week survivors of anterior infarction (n = 95) showed better left ventricular function when three hour creatine kinase was > or = 20% than when it was < 20% of peak (mean (SEM) end systolic volume 71 (5) v 96 (9) ml, p < 0.02; ejection fraction 56% (2%) v 51% (2%), NS). CONCLUSION--Non-invasive determination of early patency of the infarct related artery by the normalised rate of rise of creatine kinase activity at three hours seems to be reliable, and may be prognostically important and of value for use in clinical trials. PMID:8343313

  13. Non-invasive monitoring of oxygen delivery in acutely ill patients: new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Perel, Azriel

    2015-12-01

    Hypovolemia, anemia and hypoxemia may cause critical deterioration in the oxygen delivery (DO2). Their early detection followed by a prompt and appropriate intervention is a cornerstone in the care of critically ill patients. And yet, the remedies for these life-threatening conditions, namely fluids, blood and oxygen, have to be carefully titrated as they are all associated with severe side-effects when administered in excess. New technological developments enable us to monitor the components of DO2 in a continuous non-invasive manner via the sensor of the traditional pulse oximeter. The ability to better assess oxygenation, hemoglobin levels and fluid responsiveness continuously and simultaneously may be of great help in managing the DO2. The non-invasive nature of this technology may also extend the benefits of advanced monitoring to wider patient populations. PMID:26380992

  14. Non-invasive blood glucose monitor based on spectroscopy using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Dantu, Vishnu; Vempati, Jagannadh; Srivilliputhur, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Development of a novel method for non-invasive measurement of blood glucose concentration using smartphone is discussed. Our research work has three major contributions to society and science. First, we modified and extended the Beer-Lambert's law in physics to accommodate for multiple wavelengths. This extension can aid researchers who wish to perform optical spectroscopy. Second, we successfully developed a creative and non-invasive way for diabetic patients to measure glucose levels via a smartphone. Researchers and chemists can now use their smartphones to determine the absorbance and, therefore, concentration of a chemical. Third, we created an inexpensive way to perform optical spectroscopy by using a smartphone. Monitoring blood glucose using a smartphone application that simply uses equipment already available on smartphones will improve the lives of diabetic patients who can continuously check their blood glucose levels while avoiding the current inconvenient, unhygienic, and costly invasive glucose meters.

  15. Non-invasive online detection of microbial lysine formation in stirred tank bioreactors by using calorespirometry.

    PubMed

    Regestein, Lars; Maskow, Thomas; Tack, Andreas; Knabben, Ingo; Wunderlich, Martin; Lerchner, Johannes; Büchs, Jochen

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive methods for online monitoring of biotechnological processes without compromising the integrity of the reactor system are very important to generate continuous data. Even though calorimetry has been used in conventional biochemical analysis for decades, it has not yet been specifically applied for online detection of product formation at technical scale. Thus, this article demonstrates a calorespirometric method for online detection of microbial lysine formation in stirred tank bioreactors. The respective heat generation of two bacterial strains, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 (wild-type) and C. glutamicum DM1730 (lysine producer), was compared with the O2 -consumption in order to determine whether lysine was formed. As validation of the proposed calorespirometric method, the online results agreed well with the offline measured data. This study has proven that calorespirometry is a viable non-invasive technique to detect product formation at any time point.

  16. Non-invasive imaging of atherosclerosis regression with magnetic resonance to guide drug development.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Paolo; Baldassarre, Damiano; Day, Simon; de Groot, Eric; Fayad, Z A

    2016-08-01

    Slowing of progression and inducing the regression of atherosclerosis with medical therapy have been shown to be associated with an extensive reduction in risk of cardiovascular events. This proof of concept was obtained with invasive angiographic studies but these are, for obvious reasons, impractical for sequential investigations. Non-invasive imaging has henceforth replaced the more cumbersome invasive studies and has proven extremely valuable in numerous occasions. Because of excellent reproducibility and no radiation exposure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the non-invasive method of choice to assess the efficacy of anti-atherosclerotic drugs. The high accuracy of this technology is particularly helpful in rare diseases where the small number of affected patients makes the conduct of outcome-trials in large cohorts impractical. With MRI it is possible to assess the extent, as well as the composition, of atherosclerotic plaques and this further enhances the utility of this technology. PMID:27341753

  17. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, B. M.; O'Flynn, B.; Mathewson, A.

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  18. Heating properties of non-invasive hyperthermia treatment for abdominal deep tumors by 3-D FEM.

    PubMed

    Morita, E; Kato, K; Ono, S; Shindo, Y; Tsuchiya, K; Kubo, M

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the heating properties of a new type of hyperthermia system composed of a re-entrant type resonant cavity applicator for deep tumors of the abdominal region. In this method, a human body is placed in the gap of two inner electrodes and is non-invasively heated with electromagnetic fields stimulated in the cavity. Here, we calculated temperature distributions of a simple human abdominal phantom model that we constructed to examine the heating properties of the developed hyperthermia system. First, the proposed heating method and a simple abdominal model to calculate the temperature distribution are presented. Second, the computer simulation results of temperature distribution by 3-D FEM are presented. From these results, it was found that the proposed simple human abdominal phantom model composed of muscle, fat and lung was useful to test the heating properties of our heating method. Our heating method was also effective to non-invasively heat abdominal deep tumors.

  19. Non-invasive brain stimulation in children: applications and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Thilinie; Kirton, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a neurostimulation and neuromodulation technique that has provided over two decades of data in focal, non-invasive brain stimulation based on the principles of electromagnetic induction. Its minimal risk, excellent tolerability and increasingly sophisticated ability to interrogate neurophysiology and plasticity make it an enviable technology for use in pediatric research with future extension into therapeutic trials. While adult trials show promise in using TMS as a novel, non-invasive, non-pharmacologic diagnostic and therapeutic tool in a variety of nervous system disorders, its use in children is only just emerging. TMS represents an exciting advancement to better understand and improve outcomes from disorders of the developing brain. PMID:24163755

  20. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view. PMID:24930085

  1. [Non-invasive transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation facilitates locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal cats].

    PubMed

    Musienko, P E; Bogacheva, I N; Savochin, A A; Kilimnik, V A; Gorskiĭ, O V; Nikitin, O A; Gerasimenko, Ia P

    2013-08-01

    It is known that spinal neuronal networks activated by epidural electrical stimulation (EES) can produce the stepping EMG pattern and control the locomotor behavior. At present study we showed that non-invasive transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation (tESCS) applied to the lumbar-sacral enlargement can facilitate the locomotor activity in decerebrated and spinal animals. The comparison of the motor responses evoked by EES vs tESCS showed that both methods produce the locomotor patterns with close properties and similar reflex mechanisms. The data obtained suggest that tESCS is an efficient approach for investigation of the locomotor control in acute and chronic experiments as well as facilitates of the locomotor abilities after spinal cord injury. Taking to account the non-invasivity and easement of tESCS, this approach could be further implemented in clinical practice for rehabilitation of the patient with spinal cord injury.

  2. Alu methylation serves as a biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hao; Zhao, Longxiang; Huang, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiaojiang; Hou, Shiqiang; Qi, Jing; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing glioma are invasive and do not accurately predict prognosis. We developed a novel, non-invasive liquid chip assay to diagnose glioma and predict prognosis. Using this method, we determined the methylation state of the Alu element in cell-free DNA extracted from the serum of 109 glioma patients. Controls included 56 patients with benign intracranial tumors and 50 healthy subjects. Matched tumor tissues were processed for 36 patients. The cfDNA from glioma patients showed lower levels of Alu methylation than the controls (P<0.01). Alu methylation was also lower in high-grade than low-grade gliomas (P<0.01), indicating that Alu methylation correlates negatively with disease severity. Moreover, Alu methylation correlated positively with survival (P<0.01). These findings suggest high-throughput liquid chip could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic assay for glioma. PMID:27028997

  3. A non-invasive method of qualitative and quantitative measurement of drugs.

    PubMed

    Westerman, S T; Gilbert, L M

    1981-09-01

    Methods for quick qualitative and quantitative evaluation of drug intake are needed, especially during emergency situations such as drug overdose and alcohol intoxication. The electronystagmograph was used in an attempt to develop a non-invasive method for identification of drug intake, and to study the effects of alcohol and other drugs on the vestibular system. Results of the study reveal that alcohol, diazepam, opiates, barbiturates, cocaine, marijuana, and hallucinogenic drugs produce a characteristic printout pattern which can be evaluated qualitatively. This method is a practical, non-invasive, objective procedure that provides rapid assessment of quality of drug intake. Its potential uses are extensive, including such possibilities as evaluation of drug intake in emergency drug overdose situations, monitoring anesthesia during surgery, evaluating drug intake in women about to deliver, (as well as the effects on the newborn), and determining whether or not persons who are being tested on a polygraph are under the influence of drugs.

  4. Sarcolemmal dependence of cardiac protection and stress-resistance: roles in aged or diseased hearts.

    PubMed

    See Hoe, Louise E; May, Lauren T; Headrick, John P; Peart, Jason N

    2016-10-01

    Disruption of the sarcolemmal membrane is a defining feature of oncotic death in cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R), and its molecular makeup not only fundamentally governs this process but also affects multiple determinants of both myocardial I-R injury and responsiveness to cardioprotective stimuli. Beyond the influences of membrane lipids on the cytoprotective (and death) receptors intimately embedded within this bilayer, myocardial ionic homeostasis, substrate metabolism, intercellular communication and electrical conduction are all sensitive to sarcolemmal makeup, and critical to outcomes from I-R. As will be outlined in this review, these crucial sarcolemmal dependencies may underlie not only the negative effects of age and common co-morbidities on myocardial ischaemic tolerance but also the on-going challenge of implementing efficacious cardioprotection in patients suffering accidental or surgically induced I-R. We review evidence for the involvement of sarcolemmal makeup changes in the impairment of stress-resistance and cardioprotection observed with ageing and highly prevalent co-morbid conditions including diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia. A greater understanding of membrane changes with age/disease, and the inter-dependences of ischaemic tolerance and cardioprotection on sarcolemmal makeup, can facilitate the development of strategies to preserve membrane integrity and cell viability, and advance the challenging goal of implementing efficacious 'cardioprotection' in clinically relevant patient cohorts. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  5. Naringin Reduces Hyperglycemia-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis by Relieving Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Adebiyi, Olubunmi A.; Adebiyi, Oluwafeyisetan O.; Owira, Peter M. O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycemia promotes myocardial fibrotic lesions through upregulation of PKC and p38 in response to redox changes. The effects of naringin on hyperglycemia-induced myocardial fibrotic changes and its putative effects on PKC-β and p38 protein expression in type 1 rat model of diabetes are hereby investigated. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups I-VI. Groups I and II, were orally treated with distilled water {3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW)} and naringin (50 mg/kg BW), respectively. Groups III, IV, V and VI were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, BW) and were similarly treated with subcutaneous insulin (8.0 I.U/kg BW, twice daily), naringin (50 mg/kg BW), distilled water (3.0 ml/Kg BW) and ramipril (3.0 mg/kg/BW), respectively. The animals were sacrificed after 56 days by halothane overdose; blood and heart samples removed for further analysis. Results The untreated diabetic rats exhibited significantly increased oxidative stress, NADPH oxidase activity, increased cardiac fibrosis, PKC-β and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase expression compared to controls. Naringin treatment significantly ameliorated these changes in diabetic rats compared to the untreated diabetic controls. Conclusions Naringin’s amelioration of myocardial fibrosis by modulating p38 and PKC-β protein expression possibly through its known antioxidant actions and may therefore be useful in retarding the progression of fibrosis in a diabetic heart. PMID:26967518

  6. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brösel, Doreen; Bola, Michał; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain.

  7. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, a Tool to Revert Maladaptive Plasticity in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Naro, Antonino; Milardi, Demetrio; Russo, Margherita; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Cacciola, Alberto; Marino, Silvia; Calabro, Rocco S.; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulatory effects of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) have been extensively studied in chronic pain. A hypothetic mechanism of action would be to prevent or revert the ongoing maladaptive plasticity within the pain matrix. In this review, the authors discuss the mechanisms underlying the development of maladaptive plasticity in patients with chronic pain and the putative mechanisms of NIBS in modulating synaptic plasticity in neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:27512368

  8. [Isolated left ventricular muscular diverticulum in an adult. Value of non-invasive examinations].

    PubMed

    Holeman, A; Bellorini, M; Lefevre, T; Lévy, M; Loiret, J; Huerta, F; Thébault, B; Funck, F

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a case of ventriculum in a 45 year old women investigated for chest pain. This was a congenital muscular left ventricular diverticulum confirmed by a complete imaging series including echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, angio-scintigraphy and conventional angiography. This diverticulum was unusual due to the fact that there was no associated congenital disease and that it was discovered in an adult. The authors review the literature and discuss the value of non-invasive imaging procedures.

  9. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy for non-invasive, micro-vascular cerebral blood flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) uses the temporal fluctuations of near-infrared (NIR) light to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) non-invasively. Here, we provide a brief history of DCS applications in brain with an emphasis on the underlying physical ideas, common instrumentation and validation. Then we describe recent clinical research that employs DCS-measured CBF as a biomarker of patient well-being, and as an indicator of hemodynamic and metabolic response to functional stimuli. PMID:23770408

  10. Non invasive indexes for the assessment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Handberg, Aase; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects about 20%-30% of the general population, and its clinical relevance arises from the fact that 20%-30% of these subjects develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition at risk of cirrhosis progression. In addition NAFLD, and in particular NASH patients, are also at high risk of cardiovascular alterations, suffering overall from an increased liver and no liver-related events of risk and death. At the moment liver biopsy is the gold standard for a correct evaluation of NASH and fibrosis among NAFLD patients. However, the high and increasing prevalence of NAFLD has triggered an intensive search for alternative and non-invasive methods for evaluating disease severity. Specifically we can distinguish two main groups of non-invasive methodologies, namely 'serum markers' that use clinical and/or biochemical variables, and methodologies derived from elaboration of parameters arising from liver imaging techniques. All these tools showed encouraging results, even though their utility in clinical practice in the individual patients is still under debate. Therefore further efforts are needed in order to generate non-invasive algorithms that correctly assess liver damage in NAFLD patients. In particular, it should be interesting to perform gender-specific analysis, by combining old and new tools, with the aim to generate more accurate scores. Finally we think that non-invasive scores should not only be able to correctly classify the severity of liver disease in NAFLD patients, but also predict liver and non-liver related morbidity and mortality, further acting as time-dependent markers of liver and systemic disease activity. This review summarizes the present knowledge on noninvasive diagnosis in NAFLD patients, and suggest future directions for this complex research area. PMID:23394090

  11. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment.

  12. Non-invasive, non-radiological quantification of anteroposterior knee joint ligamentous laxity

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D. F.; Deakin, A. H.; Fogg, Q. A.; Picard, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We performed in vitro validation of a non-invasive skin-mounted system that could allow quantification of anteroposterior (AP) laxity in the outpatient setting. Methods A total of 12 cadaveric lower limbs were tested with a commercial image-free navigation system using trackers secured by bone screws. We then tested a non-invasive fabric-strap system. The lower limb was secured at 10° intervals from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and 100 N of force was applied perpendicular to the tibia. Acceptable coefficient of repeatability (CR) and limits of agreement (LOA) of 3 mm were set based on diagnostic criteria for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency. Results Reliability and precision within the individual invasive and non-invasive systems was acceptable throughout the range of flexion tested (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.88, CR 1.6 mm). Agreement between the two systems was acceptable measuring AP laxity between full extension and 40° knee flexion (LOA 2.9 mm). Beyond 40° of flexion, agreement between the systems was unacceptable (LOA > 3 mm). Conclusions These results indicate that from full knee extension to 40° flexion, non-invasive navigation-based quantification of AP tibial translation is as accurate as the standard validated commercial system, particularly in the clinically and functionally important range of 20° to 30° knee flexion. This could be useful in diagnosis and post-operative evaluation of ACL pathology. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:233–7. PMID:24184443

  13. Non-invasive electric current stimulation for restoration of vision after unilateral occipital stroke.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carolin; Silvennoinen, Katri; Granata, Giuseppe; de Rossi, Francesca; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Brösel, Doreen; Bola, Michał; Sailer, Michael; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J; Rossini, Paolo M; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2015-07-01

    Occipital stroke often leads to visual field loss, for which no effective treatment exists. Little is known about the potential of non-invasive electric current stimulation to ameliorate visual functions in patients suffering from unilateral occipital stroke. One reason is the traditional thinking that visual field loss after brain lesions is permanent. Since evidence is available documenting vision restoration by means of vision training or non-invasive electric current stimulation future studies should also consider investigating recovery processes after visual cortical strokes. Here, protocols of repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are presented and the European consortium for restoration of vision (REVIS) is introduced. Within the consortium different stimulation approaches will be applied to patients with unilateral occipital strokes resulting in homonymous hemianopic visual field defects. The aim of the study is to evaluate effects of current stimulation of the brain on vision parameters, vision-related quality of life, and physiological parameters that allow concluding about the mechanisms of vision restoration. These include EEG-spectra and coherence measures, and visual evoked potentials. The design of stimulation protocols involves an appropriate sham-stimulation condition and sufficient follow-up periods to test whether the effects are stable. This is the first application of non-invasive current stimulation for vision rehabilitation in stroke-related visual field deficits. Positive results of the trials could have far-reaching implications for clinical practice. The ability of non-invasive electrical current brain stimulation to modulate the activity of neuronal networks may have implications for stroke rehabilitation also in the visual domain. PMID:26072125

  14. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427

  15. Serine 105 phosphorylation of transcription factor GATA4 is necessary for stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Berlo, Jop H; Elrod, John W; Aronow, Bruce J; Pu, William T; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2011-07-26

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive growth process that occurs in response to stress stimulation or injury wherein multiple signal transduction pathways are induced, culminating in transcription factor activation and the reprogramming of gene expression. GATA4 is a critical transcription factor in the heart that is known to induce/regulate the hypertrophic program, in part, by receiving signals from MAPKs. Here we generated knock-in mice in which a known MAPK phosphorylation site at serine 105 (S105) in Gata4 that augments activity was mutated to alanine. Homozygous Gata4-S105A mutant mice were viable as adults, although they showed a compromised stress response of the myocardium. For example, cardiac hypertrophy in response to phenylephrine agonist infusion for 2 wk was largely blunted in Gata4-S105A mice, as was the hypertrophic response to pressure overload at 1 and 2 wk of applied stimulation. Gata4-S105A mice were also more susceptible to heart failure and cardiac dilation after 2 wk of pressure overload. With respect to the upstream pathway, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice did not efficiently hypertrophy following direct ERK1/2 activation using an activated MEK1 transgene in vivo. Mechanistically, GATA4 mutant protein from these hearts failed to show enhanced DNA binding in response to hypertrophic stimulation. Moreover, hearts from Gata4-S105A mice had significant changes in the expression of hypertrophy-inducible, fetal, and remodeling-related genes.

  16. Downstream Procedures and Outcomes After Stress Testing For Suspected Coronary Artery Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mudrick, Daniel W; Cowper, Patricia A; Shah, Bimal R; Patel, Manesh R; Jensen, Neil C; Drawz, Matthew J; Peterson, Eric D; Douglas, Pamela S

    2013-01-01

    Background Millions of Americans with suspected coronary artery disease undergo non-invasive cardiac stress testing annually. Downstream procedures and subsequent outcomes among symptomatic patients without known coronary disease referred for stress testing are not well characterized in contemporary community practice. Methods We examined administrative insurance billing data from a national insurance provider from November 2004 through June 2007. After excluding patients with prior cardiac disease or chest pain evaluation, we identified 80,676 people age 40–64 years with outpatient cardiac stress testing within 30 days after an office visit for chest pain. We evaluated rates of invasive coronary angiography, coronary revascularization, and cardiovascular events after stress testing. Results Within 60 days, only 8.8% of stress test patients underwent cardiac catheterization and only 2.7% underwent revascularization; within one year only 0.5% suffered death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. There were marked geographic variations in one-year rates of catheterization (3.8–14.8%) and revascularization (1.2–3.0%) across 20 hospital referral regions. Conclusions In this large national cohort of middle-aged patients without previously coded cardiac diagnosis who were referred for stress testing after outpatient chest pain evaluation, few proceeded to invasive angiography or revascularization, and subsequent cardiovascular events were infrequent. PMID:22424017

  17. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation.

    PubMed

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A

    2015-12-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  18. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P.; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  19. Non-Invasive Techniques for Detection and Diagnosis of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongjuan; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Dan, Hongxia; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common oral and maxillofacial malignancy, and its morbidity and mortality rates are still high in most countries. Oral potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) are used to refer to a heterogeneous group of conditions that are characterized by increased risk for malignant transformation to OSCC. Currently identified oral PMDs include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, palatal lesions associated with reverse smoking, oral lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis, actinic keratosis, and discoid lupus erythematosus. The early detection and diagnosis of these lesions are important for cancer prevention and disease management. In recent years, there has been a growing and persistent demand for new non-invasive, practical diagnostic techniques that might facilitate the early detection of oral PMDs. The non-invasive detection techniques evaluated in this review are divided into four categories: vital staining with a solution that can be used as a mouth rinse or applied onto a suspected area of the mouth, light-based detection systems, optical diagnostic technologies that employ returned optical signals to reflect structural and morphological changes within tissues, and salivary biomarkers. Most of these techniques have shown great potential for screening and monitoring oral PMDs. In this review article, the authors critically assess these non-invasive detection techniques for oral PMDs. We also provide a summary of the sensitivity and specificity of each technique in detecting oral PMDs and oral cancer, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, clinical applications, and indications. PMID:26888696

  20. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  1. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation. PMID:25755423

  2. Promoting social plasticity in developmental disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Boggio, Paulo S.; Asthana, Manish K.; Costa, Thiago L.; Valasek, Cláudia A.; Osório, Ana A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Being socially connected directly impacts our basic needs and survival. People with deficits in social cognition might exhibit abnormal behaviors and face many challenges in our highly social-dependent world. These challenges and limitations are associated with a substantial economical and subjective impact. As many conditions where social cognition is affected are highly prevalent, more treatments have to be developed. Based on recent research, we review studies where non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques have been used to promote Social Plasticity in developmental disorders. We focused on three populations where non-invasive brain stimulation seems to be a promising approach in inducing social plasticity: Schizophrenia, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Williams Syndrome (WS). There are still very few studies directly evaluating the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the social cognition of these populations. However, when considering the promising preliminary evidences presented in this review and the limited amount of clinical interventions available for treating social cognition deficits in these populations today, it is clear that the social neuroscientist arsenal may profit from non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for rehabilitation and promotion of social plasticity. PMID:26388712

  3. From promise to practice: pairing non-invasive sampling with genomics in conservation

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, Matthew D.; Etter, Paul D.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation genomics has become an increasingly popular term, yet it remains unclear whether the non-invasive sampling that is essential for many conservation-related studies is compatible with the minimum requirements for harnessing next-generation sequencing technologies. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using genotyping-by-sequencing of non-invasively collected hair samples to simultaneously identify and genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a climate-sensitive mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps). We identified and genotyped 3,803 high-confidence SNPs across eight sites distributed along two elevational transects using starting DNA amounts as low as 1 ng. Fifty-five outlier loci were detected as candidate gene regions under divergent selection, constituting potential targets for future validation. Genome-wide estimates of gene diversity significantly and positively correlated with elevation across both transects, with all low elevation sites exhibiting significant heterozygote deficit likely due to inbreeding. More broadly, our results highlight a range of issues that must be considered when pairing genomic data collection with non-invasive sampling, particularly related to field sampling protocols for minimizing exogenous DNA, data collection strategies and quality control steps for enhancing target organism yield, and analytical approaches for maximizing cost-effectiveness and information content of recovered genomic data. PMID:26244114

  4. Best Ethical Practices for Clinicians and Laboratories in the Provision of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Allyse, MA; Sayres, LC; Havard, M; King, JS; Greely, HT; Hudgins, L; Taylor, J; Norton, ME; Cho, MK; Magnus, D; Ormond, KE

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an ethical framework for clinicians and companies providing non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free fetal DNA or whole fetal cells. Method In collaboration with an NIH-supported research ethics consultation committee, together with feedback from an inter-disciplinary group of clinicians, members of industry, legal experts and genetic counselors we developed a set of best practices for the provision of non-invasive prenatal genetic testing. Results Principal recommendations include the amendment of current informed consent procedures to include attention to the non-invasive nature of new testing and the potential for a broader range of results earlier in the pregnancy. We strongly recommend that tests should only be provided through licensed medical providers and not direct-to-consumer. Conclusion Prenatal tests, including new methods using cell-free fetal DNA, are not currently regulated by government agencies and limited professional guidance is available. In the absence of regulation, companies and clinicians should cooperate to adopt responsible best ethical practices in the provision of these tests. PMID:23613322

  5. Non-drug Non-invasive Treatment in the Management of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, RL

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is a major medical problem. World-wide, from 60% to 80% of people will have it during their lifetime and 2-5% will have it at any given time. The disease impacts upon activities of daily living ultimately leading to a loss of functional independence and quality of life. Aim: The main purpose of this study was to assess the results of non-drug non-invasive treatment in the management of LBP. Subjects and Methods: This was prospective study conducted in the Department of Orthopedics in M. M. Medical College, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India from June 2005 to June 2010. A total of 251 out-patients of LBP with a mean age of 45 years were studied. They were managed with non-invasive treatment and were followed for 24 months. Results: Objective Lumbar Spine Assessments up to the age of 40 years at 2 years were excellent. At 40-60 years of age, it was good to excellent. Over the age of 60 years, it was good. The back pain functional scale were found very good up to the age of 40 years at 2-year follow-up, good to very good between 40 and 60 years and over the age of 60 years it was good. Conclusions: Non-drug non-invasive interventions can reduce pain and improve function in LBP. PMID:25328793

  6. SNP-based non-invasive prenatal testing detects sex chromosome aneuploidies with high accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Banjevic, Milena; Ryan, Allison; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Hill, Matthew; Hall, Megan P.; Westemeyer, Margaret; Saucier, Jennifer; Demko, Zachary; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a single nucleotide polymorphism- and informatics-based non-invasive prenatal test that detects sex chromosome aneuploidies early in pregnancy. Methods Fifteen aneuploid samples, including thirteen 45,X, two 47,XXY, and one 47,XYY, along with 185 euploid controls, were analyzed. Cell-free DNA was isolated from maternal plasma, amplified in a single multiplex PCR assay that targeted 19,488 polymorphic loci covering chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y, and sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using a Bayesian-based maximum likelihood statistical method to determine copy number of interrogated chromosomes, calculating sample-specific accuracies. Results Of the samples that passed a stringent quality control metric (93%), the algorithm correctly identified copy number at all five chromosomes in all 187 samples, for 934/935 correct calls as early as 9.4 weeks of gestation. We detected 45,X with 91.7% sensitivity (CI: 61.5-99.8%) and 100% specificity (CI: 97.9-100%), and 47,XXY and 47,XYY. The average calculated accuracy was 99.78%. Conclusion This method non-invasively detected 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XYY fetuses from cfDNA isolated from maternal plasma with high calculated accuracies, and thus offers a non-invasive method with the potential to function as a routine screen allowing for early prenatal detection of rarely diagnosed yet commonly occurring sex aneuploidies. PMID:23712453

  7. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Branchi, Federica; Conti, Clara Benedetta; Baccarin, Alessandra; Lampertico, Pietro; Conte, Dario; Fraquelli, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive picture of the role, clinical applications and future perspectives of the most widely used non-invasive techniques for the evaluation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. During the past decade many non-invasive methods have been developed to reduce the need for liver biopsy in staging fibrosis and to overcome whenever possible its limitations, mainly: invasiveness, costs, low reproducibility, poor acceptance by patients. Elastographic techniques conceived to assess liver stiffness, in particular transient elastography, and the most commonly used biological markers will be assessed against their respective role and limitations in staging hepatic fibrosis. Recent evidence highlights that both liver stiffness and some bio-chemical markers correlate with survival and major clinical end-points such as liver decompensation, development of hepatocellular carcinoma and portal hypertension. Thus the non-invasive techniques here discussed can play a major role in the management of patients with chronic HBV-related hepatitis. Given their prognostic value, transient elastography and some bio-chemical markers can be used to better categorize patients with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis and assign them to different classes of risk for clinically relevant outcomes. Very recent data indicates that the combined measurements of liver and spleen stiffness enable the reliable prediction of portal hypertension and esophageal varices development. PMID:25356021

  8. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jun L.; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced clinical decision making in patients with chronic liver disease, allowing a rapid and informed judgment of disease stage and prognosis. Should a liver biopsy be required, the appropriateness is clearer and the diagnostic yield is greater with the use of these adjuncts. While a number of non-invasive liver fibrosis markers are now used in routine practice, a steady stream of innovative approaches exists. With improvement in the reliability, reproducibility and feasibility of these markers, their potential role in disease management is increasing. Moreover, their adoption into clinical trials as outcome measures reflects their validity and dynamic nature. This review will summarize and appraise the current and novel non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, both blood and imaging based, and look at their prospective application in everyday clinical care. PMID:27378924

  9. Markers for the non-invasive diagnosis of mesothelioma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van der Bij, S; Schaake, E; Koffijberg, H; Burgers, J A; de Mol, B A J M; Moons, K G M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Numerous markers have been evaluated to facilitate the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of mesothelioma. The purpose of this study was to conduct a structured review of the diagnostic performance of non-invasive marker tests for the detection of mesothelioma in patients with suspected mesothelioma. Methods: Studies on the diagnostic accuracy of serum and cytological markers published till 31 December 2009, available in either PUBMED or Embase, to detect or exclude the presence of mesothelioma were extracted. Study quality was assessed with use of the Quadas criteria. Results: In total, 82 articles were included in this systemic review. Overall, quality of the incorporated studies to address our objective was poor. The most frequently studied immunohistochemical markers for cytological analysis were EMA, Ber-Ep4, CEA, and calretinin. The most frequently investigated serum marker was soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP). The markers CEA, Ber-EP4, and calretinin were most valuable in discriminating mesothelioma from other malignant diseases. Markers EMA and SMRP were most valuable in discriminating mesothelioma from non-malignant diseases. No marker performed well in discriminating between mesothelioma and all other diseases. Conclusion: Currently, there is only limited evidence to properly assess the value of non-invasive marker tests in the diagnosis of mesothelioma. Studies were of limited value to address our objective and results showed considerable unexplained study heterogeneity. PMID:21448170

  10. A non-invasive method for the determination of liquid injectables by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ji, Nan; Yin, Lihui; Wang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Drug safety has become a very important subject, and more countries have joined in the fight against counterfeit drugs. This study demonstrated a non-invasive Raman spectroscopy method that could be utilized for screening liquid injectable drugs for spurious/falsely-labeled/falsified/counterfeit medical products (SFFCs). Two problems were solved to remove the blocks in identification and quantitation: one problem was the weak API signal extraction from the non-invasive Raman spectra and the other was the problem of Raman absolute measurement. Principal component analysis (PCA) and classical least square (CLS) algorithms were performed to establish the models. Water was chosen as the "internal standard" to normalize the spectra to solve the problem of Raman absolute measurement. The results showed that the 11 positive samples and 66 negative samples were all well identified with a threshold of 0.95. One of the positive samples contained the excipient propylene glycol, which was identified successfully at the same time. The accuracy of quantitative results was approximately 5% for doxofylline liquid injectables and about 10% for the low-concentration and big glass bottle-containers of Levofloxacin Lactate and Sodium Chloride Injections as compared to the results using an HPLC method, this is satisfactory for fast screening of SFFCs. In conclusion, with the development of a database of identification and quantitation models, this method may determine liquid injectable drugs in a fast and non-invasive way and become one of the most powerful weapons against SFFCs. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:25588367

  11. A non-invasive method for the determination of liquid injectables by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ji, Nan; Yin, Lihui; Wang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Drug safety has become a very important subject, and more countries have joined in the fight against counterfeit drugs. This study demonstrated a non-invasive Raman spectroscopy method that could be utilized for screening liquid injectable drugs for spurious/falsely-labeled/falsified/counterfeit medical products (SFFCs). Two problems were solved to remove the blocks in identification and quantitation: one problem was the weak API signal extraction from the non-invasive Raman spectra and the other was the problem of Raman absolute measurement. Principal component analysis (PCA) and classical least square (CLS) algorithms were performed to establish the models. Water was chosen as the "internal standard" to normalize the spectra to solve the problem of Raman absolute measurement. The results showed that the 11 positive samples and 66 negative samples were all well identified with a threshold of 0.95. One of the positive samples contained the excipient propylene glycol, which was identified successfully at the same time. The accuracy of quantitative results was approximately 5% for doxofylline liquid injectables and about 10% for the low-concentration and big glass bottle-containers of Levofloxacin Lactate and Sodium Chloride Injections as compared to the results using an HPLC method, this is satisfactory for fast screening of SFFCs. In conclusion, with the development of a database of identification and quantitation models, this method may determine liquid injectable drugs in a fast and non-invasive way and become one of the most powerful weapons against SFFCs. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Promoting social plasticity in developmental disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques.

    PubMed

    Boggio, Paulo S; Asthana, Manish K; Costa, Thiago L; Valasek, Cláudia A; Osório, Ana A C

    2015-01-01

    Being socially connected directly impacts our basic needs and survival. People with deficits in social cognition might exhibit abnormal behaviors and face many challenges in our highly social-dependent world. These challenges and limitations are associated with a substantial economical and subjective impact. As many conditions where social cognition is affected are highly prevalent, more treatments have to be developed. Based on recent research, we review studies where non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques have been used to promote Social Plasticity in developmental disorders. We focused on three populations where non-invasive brain stimulation seems to be a promising approach in inducing social plasticity: Schizophrenia, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Williams Syndrome (WS). There are still very few studies directly evaluating the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the social cognition of these populations. However, when considering the promising preliminary evidences presented in this review and the limited amount of clinical interventions available for treating social cognition deficits in these populations today, it is clear that the social neuroscientist arsenal may profit from non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for rehabilitation and promotion of social plasticity. PMID:26388712

  13. Do imaging studies performed in physician offices increase downstream utilization? An empiric analysis of cardiac stress testing with imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jersey; Fazel, Reza; Ross, Joseph S.; McNamara, Robert L.; Einstein, Andrew J.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare patterns of downstream testing and procedures after stress testing with imaging performed at physician offices versus at hospital-outpatient facilities. Background Stress testing with imaging has grown dramatically in recent years, but whether the location of where the test is performed correlates with different patterns for subsequent cardiac testing and procedures is unknown. Methods We identified 82,178 adults with private health insurance from 2005–2007 who underwent ambulatory myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) or stress echocardiography (SE). Subsequent MPI, SE, cardiac catheterization or revascularization within 6 months were compared between physician office and hospital-outpatient settings. Results Overall, 84.5% of MPI and 84.9% of SE were performed in physician offices. The proportion of patients who underwent subsequent MPI, SE or cardiac catheterization was not statistically different between physician office and hospital-outpatient settings for MPI (14.2% v 14.1%, p=0.80) or SE (7.9% v 8.6%, p=0.21). However, patients with physician-office imaging had slightly higher rates of repeat MPI within 6 months compared with hospital-outpatient imaging for both index MPI (3.5% v 2.0%, p<0.001) and SE (3.4% v 2.1%, p<0.001), and slightly lower rates of cardiac catheterization after index MPI (11.5% v 12.3, p=0.01) and SE (4.5% v 7.0%, p<0.001). Differences in 6-month utilization were observed across the 5 healthcare markets after index MPI but not after index SE. Conclusions Physician office imaging is associated with slightly higher repeat MPI and fewer cardiac catheterizations than hospital outpatient imaging, but no overall difference in the proportion of patients undergoing additional further testing or procedures. While regional variation exists, especially for MPI, the relationship between physician-office location of stress testing with imaging and greater downstream resource utilization appears modest. PMID:21679898

  14. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  15. Non-invasive optical detection of glucose in cell culture nutrient medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin the development of a non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose concentration in the output medium of cell cultures grown in a unique NASA bioreactor referred to as an integrated rotating-wall vessel (IRWV). The input, a bovine serum based nutrient media, has a known glucose concentration. The cells within the bioreactor digest a portion of the glucose. Thus, the non-invasive optical sensor is needed to monitor the decrease in glucose due to cellular consumption since the critical parameters for sustained cellular productivity are glucose and pH. Previous glucose sensing techniques have used chemical reactions to quantify the glucose concentration. Chemical reactions, however, cannot provide for continuous, real time, non-invasive measurement as is required in this application. Our effort while in the fellowship program was focused on the design, optical setup, and testing of one bench top prototype non-invasive optical sensor using a mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy technique. Glucose has a fundamental vibrational absorption peak in the mid-infrared wavelength range at 9.6 micron. Preliminary absorption data using a CO2 laser were collected at this wavelength for water based glucose solutions at different concentrations and one bovine serum based nutrient medium (GTSF) with added glucose. The results showed near linear absorption responses for the glucose-in-water data with resolutions as high at 108 mg/dl and as low as 10 mg/dl. The nutrient medium had a resolution of 291 mg/dl. The variability of the results was due mainly to thermal and polarization drifts of the laser while the decrease in sensitivity to glucose in the nutrient medium was expected due to the increase in the number of confounders present in the nutrient medium. A multispectral approach needs to be used to compensate for these confounders. The CO2 laser used for these studies was wavelength tunable (9.2 to 10.8 micrometers), however

  16. Non-neuronal cardiac cholinergic system influences CNS via the vagus nerve to acquire a stress-refractory propensity.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Shino; Kai, Yuko; Tsuda, Masayuki; Ohata, Hisayuki; Mano, Asuka; Mizoguchi, Naoko; Sugama, Shuei; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Muramoto, Kazuyo; Kaneda, Makoto; Kakinuma, Yoshihiko

    2016-11-01

    We previously developed cardiac ventricle-specific choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene-overexpressing transgenic mice (ChAT tgm), i.e. an in vivo model of the cardiac non-neuronal acetylcholine (NNA) system or non-neuronal cardiac cholinergic system (NNCCS). By using this murine model, we determined that this system was responsible for characteristics of resistance to ischaemia, or hypoxia, via the modulation of cellular energy metabolism and angiogenesis. In line with our previous study, neuronal ChAT-immunoreactivity in the ChAT tgm brains was not altered from that in the wild-type (WT) mice brains; in contrast, the ChAT tgm hearts were the organs with the highest expression of the ChAT transgene. ChAT tgm showed specific traits in a central nervous system (CNS) phenotype, including decreased response to restraint stress, less depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviours and anti-convulsive effects, all of which may benefit the heart. These phenotypes, induced by the activation of cardiac NNCCS, were dependent on the vagus nerve, because vagus nerve stimulation (VS) in WT mice also evoked phenotypes similar to those of ChAT tgm, which display higher vagus nerve discharge frequency; in contrast, lateral vagotomy attenuated these traits in ChAT tgm to levels observed in WT mice. Furthermore, ChAT tgm induced several biomarkers of VS responsible for anti-convulsive and anti-depressive-like effects. These results suggest that the augmentation of the NNCCS transduces an effective and beneficial signal to the afferent pathway, which mimics VS. Therefore, the present study supports our hypothesis that activation of the NNCCS modifies CNS to a more stress-resistant state through vagus nerve activity. PMID:27528769

  17. Association of neuropeptide Y promoter polymorphism (rs16147) with perceived stress and cardiac vagal outflow in humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-An; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Tieh-Ching; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia

    2016-08-16

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in resilience to stress, and higher vagal (parasympathetic) activity has been associated with greater stress resilience. Thus, we examined whether rs16147, a functional promoter polymorphism (C>T) of the NPY gene, could influence vagal tone during chronic high stress levels. NPY genotyping, chronic psychological stress level measurement (using the Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]), cardiac autonomic function assessment (using short-term heart rate variability [HRV]) were performed in 1123 healthy, drug-free Han Chinese participants who were divided into low- and high-PSS groups. In the high-PSS group (n = 522), the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences and high frequency power (both HRV indices of parasympathetic activity) were significantly increased in T/T homozygotes compared to C/C homozygotes. However, no significant between-genotype difference was found in any HRV variable in the low-PSS group (n = 601). Our results are the first to demonstrate that functional NPY variation alters chronic stress-related vagal control, suggesting a potential parasympathetic role for NPY gene in stress regulation.

  18. Association of neuropeptide Y promoter polymorphism (rs16147) with perceived stress and cardiac vagal outflow in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin-An; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Tieh-Ching; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in resilience to stress, and higher vagal (parasympathetic) activity has been associated with greater stress resilience. Thus, we examined whether rs16147, a functional promoter polymorphism (C>T) of the NPY gene, could influence vagal tone during chronic high stress levels. NPY genotyping, chronic psychological stress level measurement (using the Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]), cardiac autonomic function assessment (using short-term heart rate variability [HRV]) were performed in 1123 healthy, drug-free Han Chinese participants who were divided into low- and high-PSS groups. In the high-PSS group (n = 522), the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences and high frequency power (both HRV indices of parasympathetic activity) were significantly increased in T/T homozygotes compared to C/C homozygotes. However, no significant between-genotype difference was found in any HRV variable in the low-PSS group (n = 601). Our results are the first to demonstrate that functional NPY variation alters chronic stress-related vagal control, suggesting a potential parasympathetic role for NPY gene in stress regulation. PMID:27527739

  19. Association of neuropeptide Y promoter polymorphism (rs16147) with perceived stress and cardiac vagal outflow in humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-An; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Tieh-Ching; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in resilience to stress, and higher vagal (parasympathetic) activity has been associated with greater stress resilience. Thus, we examined whether rs16147, a functional promoter polymorphism (C>T) of the NPY gene, could influence vagal tone during chronic high stress levels. NPY genotyping, chronic psychological stress level measurement (using the Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]), cardiac autonomic function assessment (using short-term heart rate variability [HRV]) were performed in 1123 healthy, drug-free Han Chinese participants who were divided into low- and high-PSS groups. In the high-PSS group (n = 522), the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences and high frequency power (both HRV indices of parasympathetic activity) were significantly increased in T/T homozygotes compared to C/C homozygotes. However, no significant between-genotype difference was found in any HRV variable in the low-PSS group (n = 601). Our results are the first to demonstrate that functional NPY variation alters chronic stress-related vagal control, suggesting a potential parasympathetic role for NPY gene in stress regulation. PMID:27527739

  20. Algorithms Based on CWT and Classifiers to Control Cardiac Alterations and Stress Using an ECG and a SCR

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG) for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and J48) have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%), arrhythmia (93.48%) and extrasystoles (99.29%). The detection of stress level is complemented with Skin Conductance Response (SCR), whose success is 94.02%. The heart rate variability does not show added value to the stress detection in this case. With this pulsimeter, it is possible to prevent and detect anomalies for a non-intrusive way associated to a telemedicine system. It is also possible to use it during physical activity due to the fact the CWT minimizes the motion artifacts. PMID:23666135

  1. Algorithms based on CWT and classifiers to control cardiac alterations and stress using an ECG and a SCR.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, María Viqueira; Zapirain, Begoña García; Zorrilla, Amaia Méndez

    2013-05-10

    This paper presents the results of using a commercial pulsimeter as an electrocardiogram (ECG) for wireless detection of cardiac alterations and stress levels for home control. For these purposes, signal processing techniques (Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and J48) have been used, respectively. The designed algorithm analyses the ECG signal and is able to detect the heart rate (99.42%), arrhythmia (93.48%) and extrasystoles (99.29%). The detection of stress level is complemented with Skin Conductance Response (SCR), whose success is 94.02%. The heart rate variability does not show added value to the stress detection in this case. With this pulsimeter, it is possible to prevent and detect anomalies for a non-intrusive way associated to a telemedicine system. It is also possible to use it during physical activity due to the fact the CWT minimizes the motion artifacts.

  2. What is role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients under Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Saeidi, Mozhgan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the role of sex and age differences in marital conflict and stress of patients who were under cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. METHODS The data of this cross-sectional study were collected from the database of the CR Department of Imam Ali Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran. The demographics and medical data of 683 persons were collected from January 2003 and January 2010 using medical records, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Hudson’s Index of Marital Stress, and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis I disorders. Data were analyzed through Analysis of Covariance and Bonferroni test. RESULTS About 74.8% of the subjects were male. After adjustment for age, educational level, anxiety, and depression-the findings showed that women in CR program had a higher level of marital stress compared to men (54.75 ± 2.52 vs. 49.30 ± 0.89; P = 0.042). Furthermore, it was revealed that women who aged 56-65 years and more experienced higher level of marital stress compared to younger patients (P < 0.050); however, no significant difference was observed between different age groups in male patients (P > 0.050). CONCLUSION Marital conflict and stress threaten healthiness of women who aged 56-65 years more prominently than does in males or younger patients. Regarding the effect of marital stress on recurrence of the disease and cardiac-related morbidity and mortality in women, providing effective education and interventions to this group of patients, especially older women and even their spouses could be one of the useful objectives of CR programs. PMID:27752271

  3. Olmesartan, an AT1 Antagonist, Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cardiac Inflammatory Mediators in Rats with Heart Failure Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Vijayakumar; Watanabe, Kenichi; Veeraveedu, Punniyakoti T.; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Ma, Meilei; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Lakshmanan, Arun Prasath; Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Kodama, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II has been involved in immune and inflammatory responses which might contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in myocarditis. Here, we investigated whether olmesartan, an AT1R antagonist protects against experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) by suppression of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory cytokines. EAM was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin, were divided into two groups and treated with either olmesartan (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for a period of 21 days. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic analyses were significantly improved by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with olmesartan attenuated the myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, [Interleukin (IL)-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ)] and the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Myocardial protein expressions of AT1R, NADPH oxidase subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox) and the expression of markers of oxidative stress (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal), and the cardiac apoptosis were also significantly decreased by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment down-regulated the myocardial expressions of glucose regulated protein-78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene, caspase-12, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phospho-JNK. These findings suggest that olmesartan protects against EAM in rats, at least in part via suppression of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21383952

  4. Effects of psychological stress test on the cardiac response of public safety workers: alternative parameters to autonomic balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Franco, M. R.; Vargas-Luna, F. M.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that public safety workers (PSW) face many stressful situations that yield them as high-risk population for suffering chronic stress diseases. In this multidisciplinary research the cardiac response to induced psychological stress by a short duration Stroop test was evaluated in 20 female and 19 male PSW, in order to compare traditionally used cardiac response parameters with alternative ones. Electrocardiograms have been recorded using the Eindhoven electrodes configuration for 1 min before, 3 min during and 1 min after the test. Signals analysis has been performed for the heart rate and the power spectra of its variability and of the variability of the amplitude of the R-wave, i.e. the highest peak of the electrocardiographic signal periodic sequence. The results demonstrated that the traditional autonomic balance index shows no significant differences between stages. In contrast, the median of the area of the power spectrum of the R-wave amplitude variability in the frequency region dominated by the autonomous nervous system (0.04-to-0.4 Hz) is the more sensitive parameter. Moreover, this parameter allows to identify gender differences consistent with those encountered in other studies.

  5. Non invasive Measurements of Myocardial Hypertrophy in Patients with Essential Hypertension Treated with Eprosartan: Contribution of the Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera Sole, Ricardo

    2007-04-28

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the treatment with eprosartan on cardiac hypertrophy in hypertensive patients using the echocardiogram to measure the hypertrophy of left ventricle. We studied 60 untreated patients diagnosed of mild to moderate hypertension which received after the diagnosis 600 mg/day of eprosartan, a novel direct angiotensin inhibitor recently introduced to treat hypertension. All patients were submitted to a standard echocardiographic study before the treatment and after 6 months of it We evaluated by echocardiogram the following parameters: left ventricular septum and posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass, E/A index of mitral flow considering abnormal when this index was less than 1, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Results: at the beginning we found a systolic/diastolic pressures of 165{+-}9/ 96{+-}4 mmHg compared with the end of study of 124{+-}2/79{+-}3 mmHg (p<0.05). Septum and posterior wall thickness were respectively at baseline 13.2{+-}2 and 12.1{+-}1.1 mmHg and at the end 11.5{+-}1.2 and 10.5{+-}1.3 mmHg (p<0.05 for both of them). The E/A mitral flow index was less than 1 at baseline in 45 patients compared with 19 patients after treatment (p<0.05). Respect to left ventricular mass we found at the beginning 232{+-}7.5 gr., compared to 194{+-}9 gr., at the end of this study (p<0.05). We did not find any significant differences regarding left ventricular ejection fraction between both groups. Conclusions: we can remark that eprosartan is a very useful drug to reduce not only blood pressure but also left ventricular hypertrophy and improve left ventricular diastolic function in patients with essential hypertension according with parameters measured with non invasive methods.

  6. Non invasive Measurements of Myocardial Hypertrophy in Patients with Essential Hypertension Treated with Eprosartan: Contribution of the Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera Solé, Ricardo

    2007-04-01

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the treatment with eprosartan on cardiac hypertrophy in hypertensive patients using the echocardiogram to measure the hypertrophy of left ventricle. We studied 60 untreated patients diagnosed of mild to moderate hypertension which received after the diagnosis 600 mg/day of eprosartan, a novel direct angiotensin inhibitor recently introduced to treat hypertension. All patients were submitted to a standard echocardiographic study before the treatment and after 6 months of it We evaluated by echocardiogram the following parameters: left ventricular septum and posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass, E/A index of mitral flow considering abnormal when this index was less than 1, and left ventricular ejection fraction. Results: at the beginning we found a systolic/diastolic pressures of 165±9/ 96±4 mmHg compared with the end of study of 124±2/79±3 mmHg (p<0.05). Septum and posterior wall thickness were respectively at baseline 13.2±2 and 12.1±1.1 mmHg and at the end 11.5±1.2 and 10.5±1.3 mmHg (p<0.05 for both of them). The E/A mitral flow index was less than 1 at baseline in 45 patients compared with 19 patients after treatment (p<0.05). Respect to left ventricular mass we found at the beginning 232±7.5 gr., compared to 194±9 gr., at the end of this study (p<0.05). We did not find any significant differences regarding left ventricular ejection fraction between both groups. Conclusions: we can remark that eprosartan is a very useful drug to reduce not only blood pressure but also left ventricular hypertrophy and improve left ventricular diastolic function in patients with essential hypertension according with parameters measured with non invasive methods.

  7. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  8. Ambulatory and Challenge-Associated Heart Rate Variability Measures Predict Cardiac Responses to “Real-World” Acute Emotional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dikecligil, GN; Mujica-Parodi, LR

    2010-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) measures homeostatic regulation of the autonomic nervous system in response to perturbation, and has been previously shown to quantify risk for cardiac events. In spite of known interactions between stress vulnerability, psychiatric illness, and cardiac health, however, to our knowledge this is the first study to directly compare the value of laboratory HRV in predicting autonomic modulation of “real-world” emotional stress. Methods We recorded ECG on 56 subjects: first, within the laboratory, and then during an acute emotional stressor: a first-time skydive. Laboratory sessions included two five-minute ECG recordings separated by one ambulatory 24-hour recording. To test the efficacy of introducing a mild emotional challenge, during each of the five-minute laboratory recordings subjects viewed either aversive or benign images. Following the laboratory session, subjects participated in the acute stressor wearing a holter ECG. Artifact-free ECGs (N=33) were analyzed for HRV, then statistically compared across laboratory and acute stress sessions. Results There were robust correlations (r=0.7-0.8) between the laboratory and acute stress HRV, indicating that the two most useful paradigms (long-term wake, followed by short-term challenge) also were most sensitive to distinct components of the acute stressor: the former correlated with the fine-tuned regulatory modulation occurring immediately prior and following the acute stressor, while the latter correlated with gross amplitude and recovery. Conclusions Our results confirmed the efficacy of laboratory-acquired HRV in predicting autonomic response to acute emotional stress, and suggest that ambulatory and challenge protocols enhance predictive value. PMID:20299007

  9. Regulation of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo by the stress-activated protein kinases/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases

    PubMed Central

    Choukroun, Gabriel; Hajjar, Roger; Fry, Stefanie; del Monte, Federica; Haq, Syed; Guerrero, J. Luis; Picard, Michael; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Force, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy often presages the development of heart failure. Numerous cytosolic signaling pathways have been implicated in the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes in culture, but their roles in the hypertrophic response to physiologically relevant stimuli in vivo is unclear. We previously reported that adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of SEK-1(KR), a dominant inhibitory mutant of the immediate upstream activator of the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), abrogates the hypertrophic response of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to endothelin-1 in culture. We now report that gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) to the adult rat heart blocks SAPK activation by pressure overload, demonstrating that the activity of cytosolic signaling pathways can be inhibited by gene transfer of loss-of-function mutants in vivo. Furthermore, gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) inhibited pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, as determined by echocardiography and several postmortem measures including left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, the ratio of LV weight to body weight, cardiomyocyte diameter, and inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor expression. Our data suggest that the SAPKs are critical regulators of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, and therefore may serve as novel drug targets in the treatment of hypertrophy and heart failure. J. Clin. Invest. 104:391–398 (1999). PMID:10449431

  10. Cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression is modulated by oxidative stress in acutely infrasound-exposed cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Meng, Rongsen; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yiqiao; Liu, Fangpeng; Zhu, Miao-Zhang; Li, Ruiman

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of acute infrasound exposure on oxidative damage and investigate the underlying mechanisms in rat cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were cultured and exposed to infrasound for several days. In the study, the expression of CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes in infrasound exposure groups were significantly decreased compared to those in the various time controls, along with significantly higher levels of O2 (-) and H2O2. Decreased cardiac cell viability was not observed in various time controls. A significant reduction in cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound group compared to the control, while significantly increased cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound exposure and rosiglitazone pretreatment group. Compared to the control, rosiglitazone significantly upregulated CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 expression and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes exposed to infrasound, while the levels of O2 (-) or H2O2 were significantly decreased. A potential link between a significant downregulation of PPAR-γ expression in rat cardiomyocytes in the infrasound group was compared to the control and infrasound-induced oxidative stress. These findings indicate that infrasound can induce oxidative damage in rat cardiomyocytes by inactivating PPAR-γ. PMID:23632742

  11. Intrapartum ST segment analyses (STAN) using simultaneous invasive and non-invasive fetal electrocardiography: a report of 6 cases.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, J; Hayes-Gill, B; Yuan, J; Schiermeier, S; Louwen, F

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze ST segment analyses (STAN) using simultaneous traditional - gold standard invasive (fetal scalp electrode) and newly available non-invasive abdominal fetal electrocardiography (fECG) during delivery.This was a prospective observational study of non-invasive fetal ECG using 5 abdominally sited electrodes (Monica AN24) against the traditional fetal scalp electrodes (STAN S31) on 6 patients. Data were analyzed when the STAN S31 found the baseline and when there was a baseline rise.Successful fECG signal acquisition was achieved in 6/6 (100%) patients. Using the non-invasive fECG, P and QRS waves were seen in all cases, and T waves in 3/6 (50%). ST segment analysis analysis was possible in 6/6 (100%) and 3/6 (50%) using invasive and non-invasive fECG, respectively.This study demonstrates that ST segment analysis is feasible using invasive and non-invasive fECG. Further studies are warranted to confirm the preliminary results and improve ECG morphology of non-invasive fECG.

  12. Non-Invasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia by Targeted Capture Sequencing of Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaoshen; Chen, Chao; Gao, Changxin; Yu, Song; Liu, Yan; Song, Wei; Asan; Zhu, Hongmei; Yang, Ling; Deng, Hongmei; Su, Yue; Yi, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the discovery of cell-free foetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women, many non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed. In the area of skeletal dysplasia diagnosis, some PCR-based non-invasive prenatal testing assays have been developed to facilitate the ultrasound diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias that are caused by de novo mutations. However, skeletal dysplasias are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases, the PCR-based method is hard to detect multiple gene or loci simultaneously, and the diagnosis rate is highly dependent on the accuracy of the ultrasound diagnosis. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using targeted capture sequencing to detect foetal de novo pathogenic mutations responsible for skeletal dysplasia. Methodology/Principal Findings Three families whose foetuses were affected by skeletal dysplasia and two control families whose foetuses were affected by other single gene diseases were included in this study. Sixteen genes related to some common lethal skeletal dysplasias were selected for analysis, and probes were designed to capture the coding regions of these genes. Targeted capture sequencing was performed on the maternal plasma DNA, the maternal genomic DNA, and the paternal genomic DNA. The de novo pathogenic variants in the plasma DNA data were identified using a bioinformatical process developed for low frequency mutation detection and a strict variant interpretation strategy. The causal variants could be specifically identified in the plasma, and the results were identical to those obtained by sequencing amniotic fluid samples. Furthermore, a mean of 97% foetal specific alleles, which are alleles that are not shared by maternal genomic DNA and amniotic fluid DNA, were identified successfully in plasma samples. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that capture sequencing of maternal plasma DNA can be used to non-invasive detection of de novo pathogenic variants. This method has the potential

  13. Health technology assessment of non-invasive interventions for weight loss and body shape in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nojomi, Marzieh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Velayati, Ashraf; Naghibzadeh-Tahami, Ahmad; Dadgostar, Haleh; Ghorabi, Gholamhossein; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Yaghoubi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The burden of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases is increasing in Iran, and prevention and treatment strategies are needed to address this problem. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome, cost, safety and cost-consequence of non-invasive weight loss interventions in Iran. Methods: We performed a systematic review to compare non-invasive interventions (cryolipolysis and radiofrequency/ ultrasonic cavitation) with semi-invasive (lipolysis) and invasive (liposuction). A sensitive electronic searching was done to find available interventional studies. Reduction of abdomen circumference (cm), reduction in fat layer thickness (%) and weight reduction (kg) were outcomes of efficacy. Meta-analysis with random models was used for pooling efficacy estimates among studies with the same follow-up duration. Average cost per intervention was estimated based on the capital, maintenance, staff, consumable and purchase costs. Results: Of 3,111 studies identified in our reviews, 13 studies assessed lipolysis, 10 cryolipolysis and 8 considered radiofrequency. Nine studies with the same follow-up duration in three different outcome group were included in meta-analysis. Radiofrequency showed an overall pooled estimate of 2.7 cm (95% CI; 2.3-3.1) of mean reduction in circumference of abdomen after intervention. Pooled estimate of reduction in fat layer thickness was 78% (95% CI; 73%-83%) after Lipolysis and a pooled estimate of weight loss was 3.01 kg (95% CI; 2.3-3.6) after lipousuction. The cost analysis revealed no significant differences between the costs of these interventions. Conclusion: The present study showed that non-invasive interventions appear to have better clinical efficacy, specifically in the body shape measurement, and less cost compared to invasive intervention (liposuction) PMID:27390717

  14. Comparison of Non-Invasive Methods for the Detection of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bampi, Angela Bacelar Albuquerque; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Favarato, Desiderio; Lemos, Pedro Alves; da Luz, Protásio Lemos

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive detection of atherosclerosis is critical for its prevention. Objective: To correlate non-invasively detectable indicators of coronary atherosclerosis, or Coronary Artery Disease (i.e., classical risk factors, hs-CRP test results, carotid intima-media thickness, endothelial function, ankle-brachial index and calcium score by computed tomography) with the extent of coronary disease assessed by the Friesinger index from conventional coronary angiography. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 100 consecutive patients, mean age 55.1 ± 10.7 years, 55% men and 45% women. Patients with acute coronary syndrome, renal dialytic insufficiency, collagen disease and cancer were not included. All patients were subjected to clinical evaluation and laboratory tests. Endothelial function of the brachial artery and carotid artery were evaluated by high-resolution ultrasound; ankle-brachial index and computed tomography for coronary determination of calcium score were also performed, and non-HDL cholesterol and TG/HDL-c ratio were calculated. All patients were subjected to coronary angiography at the request of the assistant physician. We considered patients without an obstructive lesion (< 29% stenosis) demonstrated by coronary angiography to be normal. RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed that calcium score, HDL-c, TG/HDL ratio and IMT were significantly correlated with the Friesinger index. However, multivariate analysis indicated that only calcium score and low HDL-c levels correlated significantly with the extension of CAD. On the other hand, hs-CRP, LDL-c, flow-mediated dilation, and Framingham score did not correlate with the Friesinger index. ROC analysis showed that calcium score, HDL-c and TG-HDL ratio accurately predicted extensive CAD in a statistically significant manner. CONCLUSION: It is possible to approximately determine the presence and extent of CAD by non-invasive methods, especially by calcium score, HDL-c and TG/HDL-c ratio assays

  15. Non-Invasive Brain-to-Brain Interface (BBI): Establishing Functional Links between Two Brains

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Kim, Hyungmin; Filandrianos, Emmanuel; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Park, Shinsuk

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is capable of modulating the neural activity of specific brain regions, with a potential role as a non-invasive computer-to-brain interface (CBI). In conjunction with the use of brain-to-computer interface (BCI) techniques that translate brain function to generate computer commands, we investigated the feasibility of using the FUS-based CBI to non-invasively establish a functional link between the brains of different species (i.e. human and Sprague-Dawley rat), thus creating a brain-to-brain interface (BBI). The implementation was aimed to non-invasively translate the human volunteer’s intention to stimulate a rat’s brain motor area that is responsible for the tail movement. The volunteer initiated the intention by looking at a strobe light flicker on a computer display, and the degree of synchronization in the electroencephalographic steady-state-visual-evoked-potentials (SSVEP) with respect to the strobe frequency was analyzed using a computer. Increased signal amplitude in the SSVEP, indicating the volunteer’s intention, triggered the delivery of a burst-mode FUS (350 kHz ultrasound frequency, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, given for 300 msec duration) to excite the motor area of an anesthetized rat transcranially. The successful excitation subsequently elicited the tail movement, which was detected by a motion sensor. The interface was achieved at 94.0±3.0% accuracy, with a time delay of 1.59±1.07 sec from the thought-initiation to the creation of the tail movement. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a computer-mediated BBI that links central neural functions between two biological entities, which may confer unexplored opportunities in the study of neuroscience with potential implications for therapeutic applications. PMID:23573251

  16. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  17. The immunological response created by interstitial and non-invasive laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Feifan; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; West, Connor L.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is an innovative cancer modality that uses laser irradiation and immunological stimulation to treat late-stage, metastatic cancers. LIT can be performed through either interstitial or non-invasive laser irradiation. Although LIT is still in development, recent clinical trials have shown that it can be used to successfully treat patients with late-stage breast cancer and melanoma. The development of LIT has been focused on creating an optimal immune response created by irradiating the tumor. One important factor that could enhance the immune response is the duration of laser irradiation. Irradiating the tumor for a shorter or longer amount of time could weaken the immune response created by LIT. Another factor that could weaken this immune response is the proliferation of regulatory T cells (TRegs) in response to the laser irradiation. However, low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) can help suppress the proliferation of TRegs and help create a more optimal immune response. An additional factor that could weaken the effectiveness of LIT is the selectivity of the laser. If LIT is performed non-invasively, then deeply embedded tumors and highly pigmented skin could cause an uneven temperature distribution inside the tumor. To solve this problem, an immunologically modified carbon nanotube system was created by using an immunoadjuvant known as glycated chitosan (GC) as a surfactant for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to immunologically modify SWNTs. SWNT-GC retains the optical properties of SWNTs and the immunological functions of GC to help increase the selectivity of the laser and create a more optimal immune response. In this preliminary study, tumor-bearing rats were treated with LIT either interstitially by an 805-nm laser with GC and low-dose CY, or non-invasively by a 980-nm laser with SWNT-GC. The goal was to observe the effects of CY on the immune response induced by LIT and to also determine the effect of irradiation duration for

  18. Comparison between invasive and non-invasive blood pressure in young, middle and old age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Li, Qiao; Qiu, Peng

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to compare simultaneous invasive and non-invasive blood pressure (IBP and NIBP) measurements in young, middle and old age using the data from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) database. In total, 23,679 blood pressure measurements were extracted from 742 patients, divided into three groups of young, middle and old age. IBP-NIBP differences in systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) were 0.1 ± 16.5 mmHg/11.0 ± 12.2 mmHg in young age, -2.9 ± 19.8 mmHg/6.9 ± 17.5 mmHg in middle age and -3.2 ± 29.3 mmHg/8.5 ± 19.8 mmHg in old age. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of invasive systolic blood pressure (ISBP)-non-invasive systolic blood pressure (NISBP) differences increased from young to middle then to old age, and the SD of invasive diastolic blood pressure (IDBP)-non-invasive diastolic blood pressure (NIDBP) differences also increased with age. In young, middle and old age, the correlation coefficients were 0.86, 0.79 and 0.53, respectively, between ISBP and NISBP, and 0.78, 0.78 and 0.41 between IDBP and NIDBP. In conclusion, IBP showed good correlation with NIBP in each age category. The agreement between IBP and NIBP measurements was influenced by age category.

  19. Non-invasive measurements of granular flows by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.; Jeong, E.K.

    1993-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to measure granular-flow in a partially filled, steadily rotating, long, horizontal cylinder. This non-invasive technique can yield statistically averaged two-dimensional concentrations and velocity profiles anywhere in the flow of suitable granular materials. First, rigid body motion of a cylinder fill with granular material was studied to confirm the validity of this method. Then, the density variation of the flowing layer where particles collide and dilate, and the depth of the flowing layer and the flow velocity profile were obtained as a function of the cylinder rotation rate.

  20. Non-invasive estimation of dissipation from non-equilibrium fluctuations in chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Muy, S; Kundu, A; Lacoste, D

    2013-09-28

    We show how to extract an estimate of the entropy production from a sufficiently long time series of stationary fluctuations of chemical reactions. This method, which is based on recent work on fluctuation theorems, is direct, non-invasive, does not require any knowledge about the underlying dynamics and is applicable even when only partial information is available. We apply it to simple stochastic models of chemical reactions involving a finite number of states, and for this case, we study how the estimate of dissipation is affected by the degree of coarse-graining present in the input data.

  1. A new antenna system for microwave non-invasive hyperthermia lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangbok; Hwang, Joosung; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an antenna system for microwave non-invasive hyperthermia lipolysis. The antenna system consists of a circular waveguide antenna radiating electromagnetic waves, AlN (Aluminum Nitride) radome and heat sink. The AlN radome with heat sink helps to extract heat from the skin to keep skin temperature not to rise during heating the lipolysis. The antenna was designed to be operated with TE(21) mode to maintain uniform temperature over wider area. The usability of the proposed system was verified by performing numerical simulation and hyperthermia lipolysis experiments on rats.

  2. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy: From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Monitillo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction. However, this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification. The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients. PMID:25068017

  3. Method for Non-Invasive Determination of Chemical Properties of Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul W. (Inventor); Jones, Alan (Inventor); Thomas, Nathan A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for non-invasively determining a chemical property of an aqueous solution is provided. The method provides the steps of providing a colored solute having a light absorbance spectrum and transmitting light through the colored solute at two different wavelengths. The method further provides the steps of measuring light absorbance of the colored solute at the two different transmitted light wavelengths, and comparing the light absorbance of the colored solute at the two different wavelengths to determine a chemical property of an aqueous solution.

  4. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  5. Novel multi wavelength sensor concept to measure carboxy- and methemoglobin concentration non-invasively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Kraitl, Jens; Gewiss, Helge; Kamysek, Svend; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    This paper will describe a novel multi-wavelength photometric method to measure carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) concentration non-invasively. COHb and MetHb are so called dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives and they are not able to carry oxygen. Standard pulse oximeters are only able to measure two derivatives, namely oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) but the presence of other derivatives in the blood may distort the readings. The paper presents a new approach of a noninvasive sensor system to measure COHb and MetHb and the validation in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Non-invasive respiratory support for infants in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Erik A; Chaudhary, Aasma; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Kirpalani, Haresh

    2016-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of neonatal deaths worldwide occur in low- and middle-income countries. Most of these deaths are attributable to respiratory illnesses and complications of preterm birth. The available data suggest that non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a safe and cost-effective therapy to reduce neonatal morbidity and mortality in these settings. Bubble CPAP compared to mechanical ventilator-generated CPAP reduces the need for subsequent invasive ventilation in newborn infants. There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of high-flow nasal cannulae in low- and middle-income countries, requiring further study prior to widespread implementation. PMID:26915655

  7. Urine Exosomes for Non-Invasive Assessment of Gene Expression and Mutations of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Neda; Salazar, Guillermo; Shapiro, Edan; Ahn, Jennifer; Lipsky, Michael; Lin, James; Hruby, Greg W.; Badani, Ketan K.; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Benson, Mitchell C.; Donovan, Michael J.; Comper, Wayne D.; McKiernan, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analysis of exosome/microvesicle (extracellular vesicles (EVs)) and the RNA packaged within them (exoRNA) has the potential to provide a non-invasive platform to detect and monitor disease related gene expression potentially in lieu of more invasive procedures such as biopsy. However, few studies have tested the diagnostic potential of EV analysis in humans. Experimental Design The ability of EV analysis to accurately reflect prostate tissue mRNA expression was examined by comparing urinary EV TMPRSS2:ERG exoRNA from pre-radical prostatectomy (RP) patients versus corresponding RP tissue in 21 patients. To examine the differential expression of TMPRSS2:ERG across patient groups a random urine sample was taken without prostate massage from a cohort of 207 men including prostate biopsy negative (Bx Neg, n = 39), prostate biopsy positive (Bx Pos, n = 47), post-radical prostatectomy (post-RP, n = 37), un-biopsied healthy age-matched men (No Bx, n = 44), and young male controls (Cont, n = 40). The use of EVs was also examined as a potential platform to non-invasively differentiate Bx Pos versus Bx Neg patients via the detection of known prostate cancer genes TMPRSS2:ERG, BIRC5, ERG, PCA3 and TMPRSS2. Results In this technical pilot study urinary EVs had a sensitivity: 81% (13/16), specificity: 80% (4/5) and an overall accuracy: 81% (17/21) for non-invasive detection of TMPRSS2:ERG versus RP tissue. The rate of TMPRSS2:ERG exoRNA detection was found to increase with age and the expression level correlated with Bx Pos status. Receiver operator characteristic analyses demonstrated that various cancer-related genes could differentiate Bx Pos from Bx Neg patients using exoRNA isolated from urinary EVs: BIRC5 (AUC 0.674 (CI:0.560–0.788), ERG (AUC 0.785 (CI:0.680–0.890), PCA3 (AUC 0.681 (CI:0.567–0.795), TMPRSS2:ERG (AUC 0.744 (CI:0.600–0.888), and TMPRSS2 (AUC 0.637 (CI:0.519–0.754). Conclusion This pilot study suggests that urinary EVs have the potential

  8. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Treatment of Focal Hand Dystonia: Update and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHD) is characterized by excessive and unwanted muscle activation in both the hand and arm resulting in impaired performance in particular tasks. Understanding the pathophysiology of FHD has progressed significantly for several decades and this has led to consideration of other potential therapies such as non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). A number of studies have been conducted to develop new therapy for FHD using transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. In this paper, we review previous studies and describe the potential therapeutic use of NIBS for FHD. We also discuss the future direction of NIBS to treat FHD. PMID:27240806

  9. Classification and grading of the non-invasive urothelial neoplasms: recent advances and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Montironi, R; Lopez-Beltran, A; Mazzucchelli, R; Bostwick, D G

    2003-01-01

    The classification and grading of the non-invasive, intraepithelial neoplasms of the urothelium are based on the morphological pattern of growth—that is, papillary or flat (and endophytic)—and on their degree of architectural and cytological abnormalities. Recent advances in the morphological, molecular, and quantitative evaluation of these lesions have contributed to the refinement of the current classification and grading schemes. However, some controversies on the precise criteria and terminology, especially when the papillary lesions are concerned, are still present. PMID:12560385

  10. [Amyotrophic neuralgia associated with bilateral phrenic paralysis treated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    García García, María Del Carmen; Hernández Borge, Jacinto; Antona Rodríguez, María José; Pires Gonçalves, Pedro; García García, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic neuralgia is an uncommon neuropathy characterized by severe unilateral shoulder pain. Isolated or concomitant involvement of other peripheral motor nerves depending on the brachial plexus such as phrenic or laryngeal nerves is unusual(1). Its etiology is unknown, yet several explanatory factors have been proposed. Phrenic nerve involvement, either unilateral or bilateral, is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis relies on anamnesis, functional and imaging investigations and electromyogram. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a past history of renal transplantation due to proliferative glomerulonephritis with subsequent transplant rejection, who was eventually diagnosed with amyotrophic neuralgia with bilateral phrenic involvement, and who required sustained non-invasive mechanical ventilation.

  11. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period.

  12. Multiphoton excited hemoglobin fluorescence and third harmonic generation for non-invasive microscopy of stored blood

    PubMed Central

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Glenn, Rachel; Murashova, Gabrielle A.; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy usually appear as dark disks because of their low fluorescent signal. Here we use 15fs 800nm pulses for TPEF, 45fs 1060nm pulses for three-photon excited fluorescence, and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging. We find sufficient fluorescent signal that we attribute to hemoglobin fluorescence after comparing time and wavelength resolved spectra of other expected RBC endogenous fluorophores: NADH, FAD, biliverdin, and bilirubin. We find that both TPEF and THG microscopy can be used to examine erythrocyte morphology non-invasively without breaching a blood storage bag. PMID:27699111

  13. Epigastric impedance: a non-invasive method for the assessment of gastric emptying and motility.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, G R; Sutton, J A

    1985-01-01

    The impedance of the epigastrium to a 4 mA, 100 KHz AC current increases while liquids of low electrical conductivity are being drunk. Logically, the decline which follows occurs as the liquid leaves the stomach. This impedance measurement of gastric emptying proved comparable with the dye dilution method. In a placebo controlled trial the impedance method recorded significantly faster gastric emptying rates after metoclopramide. The impedance trace contains regular activity in the 2-4 cycle/min range consistent with gastric contractions. This non-invasive and technically simple method may thus provide a measure of simultaneous gastric emptying rates and motility. PMID:3891533

  14. Multiphoton excited hemoglobin fluorescence and third harmonic generation for non-invasive microscopy of stored blood

    PubMed Central

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Glenn, Rachel; Murashova, Gabrielle A.; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy usually appear as dark disks because of their low fluorescent signal. Here we use 15fs 800nm pulses for TPEF, 45fs 1060nm pulses for three-photon excited fluorescence, and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging. We find sufficient fluorescent signal that we attribute to hemoglobin fluorescence after comparing time and wavelength resolved spectra of other expected RBC endogenous fluorophores: NADH, FAD, biliverdin, and bilirubin. We find that both TPEF and THG microscopy can be used to examine erythrocyte morphology non-invasively without breaching a blood storage bag.

  15. Non-invasive optical mapping of the piglet brain in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Enrico; Hueber, Dennis; Rosenfeld, Warren; Maulik, Dev; Stubblefield, Phillip; Stankovic, Mikjan

    1999-04-01

    We have performed non-invasive, real-time optical mapping of the piglet brain during a subcortical injection of autologous blood. The time resolution of the optical maps is 192 ms, thus allowing us to generate a real-time video of the growing subcortical hematoma. The increased absorption at the site of blood injection is accompanied by a decreased absorption at the contralateral brain side. This contralateral decrease in the optical absorption and the corresponding time traces of the cerebral hemoglobin parameters are consistent with a reduced cerebral blood flow caused by the increased intracranial pressure.

  16. A new antenna system for microwave non-invasive hyperthermia lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangbok; Hwang, Joosung; Kwon, Youngwoo; Cheon, Changyul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an antenna system for microwave non-invasive hyperthermia lipolysis. The antenna system consists of a circular waveguide antenna radiating electromagnetic waves, AlN (Aluminum Nitride) radome and heat sink. The AlN radome with heat sink helps to extract heat from the skin to keep skin temperature not to rise during heating the lipolysis. The antenna was designed to be operated with TE(21) mode to maintain uniform temperature over wider area. The usability of the proposed system was verified by performing numerical simulation and hyperthermia lipolysis experiments on rats. PMID:23367220

  17. Luminescent Tension-Indicating Orthopedic Strain Gauges for Non-Invasive Measurements Through Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anker, Jeffrey (Inventor); Rogalski, Melissa (Inventor); Anderson, Dakota (Inventor); Heath, Jonathon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Strain gauges that can provide information with regard to the state of implantable devices are described. The strain gauges can exhibit luminescence that is detectable through living tissue, and the detectable luminescent emission can vary according to the strain applied to the gauge. A change in residual strain of the device can signify a loss of mechanical integrity and/or loosening of the implant, and this can be non-invasively detected either by simple visual detection of the luminescent emission or through examination of the emission with a detector such as a spectrometer or a camera.

  18. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  19. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period. PMID:25892605

  20. Non-invasive neuromagnetic monitoring of nerve and muscle injury currents.

    PubMed

    Curio, G; Erné, S N; Burghoff, M; Wolff, K D; Pilz, A

    1993-06-01

    Structural damage inflicted on membranes of excitable cells may evoke quasi-DC injury currents driven by the transmembrane resting potential gradient. In contrast to the usually invasive electrophysiological approaches, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) measure the concomitant weak biomagnetic fields non-invasively as is shown here for acutely excised rat nerves or muscles. Analysis of the field distributions showed slowly decaying equivalent current dipole moments in the nanoampmeter range as generated by microamp nerve injury currents extending intra-axonally over millimeter distances. The geometric and kinetic parameters of this experimental design may allow in vivo recordings in human patients.

  1. The Cardiac Stress Response Factor Ms1 Can Bind to DNA and Has a Function in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zaleska, Mariola; Fogl, Claudia; Kho, Ay Lin; Ababou, Abdessamad; Ehler, Elisabeth; Pfuhl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ms1 (also known as STARS and ABRA) has been shown to act as an early stress response gene in processes as different as hypertrophy in skeletal and cardiac muscle and growth of collateral blood vessels. It is important for cardiac development in zebrafish and is upregulated in mouse models for cardiac hypertrophy as well as in human failing hearts. Ms1 possesses actin binding sites at its C-terminus and is usually found in the cell bound to actin filaments in the cytosol or in sarcomeres. We determined the NMR structure of the only folded domain of Ms1 comprising the second actin binding site called actin binding domain 2 (ABD2, residues 294-375), and found that it is similar to the winged helix-turn-helix fold adopted mainly by DNA binding domains of transcriptional factors. In vitro experiments show specific binding of this domain, in combination with a newly discovered AT-hook motif located N-terminally, to the sequence (A/C/G)AAA(C/A). NMR and fluorescence titration experiments confirm that this motif is indeed bound specifically by the recognition helix. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes endogenous Ms1 is found in the nucleus in a spotted pattern, reminiscent of PML bodies. In adult rat cardiomyocytes Ms1 is exclusively found in the sarcomere. A nuclear localisation site in the N-terminus of the protein is required for nuclear localisation. This suggests that Ms1 has the potential to act directly in the nucleus through specific interaction with DNA in development and potentially as a response to stress in adult tissues. PMID:26656831

  2. Cardiac Oxidative Stress and Dysfunction by Fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) are Mediated by Angiotensin-II

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine Concentrated Ambient Particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine PM exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (Benazepril ®), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB, Valsartan ®) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard Fine Particle Concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 ± 80 μg/m3). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, TBARS and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous ECG measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pretreatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARs), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  3. The Cardiac Stress Response Factor Ms1 Can Bind to DNA and Has a Function in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Ay Lin; Ababou, Abdessamad; Ehler, Elisabeth; Pfuhl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ms1 (also known as STARS and ABRA) has been shown to act as an early stress response gene in processes as different as hypertrophy in skeletal and cardiac muscle and growth of collateral blood vessels. It is important for cardiac development in zebrafish and is upregulated in mouse models for cardiac hypertrophy as well as in human failing hearts. Ms1 possesses actin binding sites at its C-terminus and is usually found in the cell bound to actin filaments in the cytosol or in sarcomeres. We determined the NMR structure of the only folded domain of Ms1 comprising the second actin binding site called actin binding domain 2 (ABD2, residues 294–375), and found that it is similar to the winged helix-turn-helix fold adopted mainly by DNA binding domains of transcriptional factors. In vitro experiments show specific binding of this domain, in combination with a newly discovered AT-hook motif located N-terminally, to the sequence (A/C/G)AAA(C/A). NMR and fluorescence titration experiments confirm that this motif is indeed bound specifically by the recognition helix. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes endogenous Ms1 is found in the nucleus in a spotted pattern, reminiscent of PML bodies. In adult rat cardiomyocytes Ms1 is exclusively found in the sarcomere. A nuclear localisation site in the N-terminus of the protein is required for nuclear localisation. This suggests that Ms1 has the potential to act directly in the nucleus through specific interaction with DNA in development and potentially as a response to stress in adult tissues. PMID:26656831

  4. A rare case of primary cardiac lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Khan-Kheil, Ayisha Mehtab; Mustafa, Hanif Muhammad; Anand, Dhakshinamurthy Vijay; Banerjee, Prithwish

    2015-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with shortness of breath and tachycardia along with systemic symptoms of weight loss and lethargy. A pulmonary embolus was the initial suspected diagnosis but through extensive investigations a rarer cause of his symptoms was identified. This case demonstrates the importance of cardiac imaging in the assessment and non-invasive tissue characterisation of a suspected cardiac tumour; in our case, this was subsequently confirmed by careful histological/immunocytochemical evaluation of the pericardial effusion as a primary cardiac B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, thus enabling appropriate management leading to an excellent clinical outcome. PMID:26538249

  5. Cardioprotective role of Syzygium cumini against glucose-induced oxidative stress in H9C2 cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Atale, Neha; Chakraborty, Mainak; Mohanty, Sujata; Bhattacharya, Susinjan; Nigam, Darshika; Sharma, Manish; Rani, Vibha

    2013-09-01

    Diabetic patients are known to have an independent risk of cardiomyopathy. Hyperglycemia leads to upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Thus, agents that suppress glucose-induced intracellular ROS levels can have therapeutic potential against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Syzygium cumini is well known for its anti-diabetic potential, but its cardioprotective properties have not been evaluated yet. The aim of the present study is to analyze cardioprotective properties of methanolic seed extract (MSE) of S. cumini in diabetic in vitro conditions. ROS scavenging activity of MSE was studied in glucose-stressed H9C2 cardiac myoblasts after optimizing the safe dose of glucose and MSE by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein diacetate staining and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the suppression of ROS production by MSE in glucose-induced cells. The intracellular NO and H2O2 radical-scavenging activity of MSE was found to be significantly high in glucose-induced cells. Exposure of glucose-stressed H9C2 cells to MSE showed decline in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes and collagen content. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, propidium iodide and 10-N-nonyl-3,6-bis (dimethylamino) acridine staining revealed that MSE protects myocardial cells from glucose-induced stress. Taken together, our findings revealed that the well-known anti-diabetic S. cumini can also protect the cardiac cells from glucose-induced stress. PMID:23512199

  6. Non-invasive determination of conjugative transfer of plasmids bearing antibiotic-resistance genes in biofilm-bound bacteria: effects of substrate loading and antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyan; Bryers, James D

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms cause much of all human microbial infections. Attempts to eradicate biofilm-based infections rely on disinfectants and antibiotics. Unfortunately, biofilm bacteria are significantly less responsive to antibiotic stressors than their planktonic counterparts. Sublethal doses of antibiotics can actually enhance biofilm formation. Here, we have developed a non-invasive microscopic image analyses to quantify plasmid conjugation within a developing biofilm. Corroborating destructive samples were analyzed by a cultivation-independent flow cytometry analysis and a selective plate count method to cultivate transconjugants. Increases in substrate loading altered biofilm 3-D architecture and subsequently affected the frequency of plasmid conjugation (decreases at least two times) in the absence of any antibiotic selective pressure. More importantly, donor populations in biofilms exposed to a sublethal dose of kanamycin exhibited enhanced transfer efficiency of plasmids containing the kanamycin resistance gene, up to tenfold. However, when stressed with a different antibiotic, imipenem, transfer of plasmids containing the kan(R+) gene was not enhanced. These preliminary results suggest biofilm bacteria "sense" antibiotics to which they are resistant, which enhances the spread of that resistance. Confocal scanning microscopy coupled with our non-invasive image analysis was able to estimate plasmid conjugative transfer efficiency either averaged over the entire biofilm landscape or locally with individual biofilm clusters.

  7. Frontal Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Modulates Antisaccade Preparation in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Cabre, Antoni; Wattiez, Nicolas; Monfort, Morgane; François, Chantal; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Gaymard, Bertrand; Pouget, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A combination of oculometric measurements, invasive electrophysiological recordings and microstimulation have proven instrumental to study the role of the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) in saccadic activity. We hereby gauged the ability of a non-invasive neurostimulation technology, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), to causally interfere with frontal activity in two macaque rhesus monkeys trained to perform a saccadic antisaccade task. We show that online single pulse TMS significantly modulated antisaccade latencies. Such effects proved dependent on TMS site (effects on FEF but not on an actively stimulated control site), TMS modality (present under active but not sham TMS on the FEF area), TMS intensity (intensities of at least 40% of the TMS machine maximal output required), TMS timing (more robust for pulses delivered at 150 ms than at 100 post target onset) and visual hemifield (relative latency decreases mainly for ipsilateral AS). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using TMS to causally modulate antisaccade-associated computations in the non-human primate brain and support the use of this approach in monkeys to study brain function and its non-invasive neuromodulation for exploratory and therapeutic purposes. PMID:22701691

  8. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼ 20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  9. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  10. Non-invasive ultrasonic measurement of the elastic properties of the human abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Imura, T; Yamamoto, K; Kanamori, K; Mikami, T; Yasuda, H

    1986-03-01

    A new echo tracking device linked to real time ultrasonic B mode equipment was developed to measure non-invasively the elastic properties of the human abdominal aorta. Pulsatile diameter change and mean diameter of the abdominal aorta were measured in 61 subjects with this ultrasonic device. Strain and pressure-strain elastic modulus Ep were calculated from pulsatile diameter change, diameter, and pulse pressure obtained by the auscultatory method. Strain significantly decreased with age; 0.076(0.024) (mean(SD)) in group 1 (20 young adults below the age of 35 years); 0.048(0.024) in group 2 (21 middle aged subjects between the ages of 35 and 60 years); and 0.030(0.010) in group 3 (20 elderly subjects over the age of 60 years). Ep values were 0.99(0.34) X 10(5), 1.55(0.68) X 10(5), and 3.80(2.05) X 10(5) N X m-2 in groups 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Ep in group 3 was significantly higher than in groups 1 and 2. The regression equation relating Ep to age was Ep = (-0.72 + 0.058 X age) X 10(5) N X m-2 (r = 0.73). The Ep value and its age related increase agreed with the findings in postmortem arteries. The elastic properties of the abdominal aorta could, therefore, be determined non-invasively by this ultrasonic method.

  11. Development of a Portable Non-Invasive Swallowing and Respiration Assessment Device †

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR) to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG) to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders. PMID:26024414

  12. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    PubMed

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants.

  13. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of non-invasive imaging in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Barsanti, Cristina; Lenzarini, Francesca; Kusmic, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging technologies are acquiring an increasing relevance to assist clinicians in diagnosis and to guide management and therapeutic treatment of patients, thanks to their non invasive and high resolution properties. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography are the most used imaging modalities to provide detailed morphological reconstructions of tissues and organs. In addition, the use of contrast dyes or radionuclide-labeled tracers permits to get functional and quantitative information about tissue physiology and metabolism in normal and disease state. In recent years, the development of multimodal and hydrid imaging techniques is coming to be the new frontier of medical imaging for the possibility to overcome limitations of single modalities and to obtain physiological and pathophysiological measurements within an accurate anatomical framework. Moreover, the employment of molecular probes, such as ligands or antibodies, allows a selective in vivo targeting of biomolecules involved in specific cellular processes, so expanding the potentialities of imaging techniques for clinical and research applications. This review is aimed to give a survey of characteristics of main diagnostic non-invasive imaging techniques. Current clinical appliances and future perspectives of imaging in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of diabetic complications affecting different organ systems will be particularly addressed. PMID:26131322

  14. Reactivity of Dogs' Brain Oscillations to Visual Stimuli Measured with Non-Invasive Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Törnqvist, Heini; Somppi, Sanni; Hänninen, Laura; Krause, Christina M.; Vainio, Outi; Kujala, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Studying cognition of domestic dogs has gone through a renaissance within the last decades. However, although the behavioral studies of dogs are beginning to be common in the field of animal cognition, the neural events underlying cognition remain unknown. Here, we employed a non-invasive electroencephalography, with adhesive electrodes attached to the top of the skin, to measure brain activity of from 8 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) while they stayed still to observe photos of dog and human faces. Spontaneous oscillatory activity of the dogs, peaking in the sensors over the parieto-occipital cortex, was suppressed statistically significantly during visual task compared with resting activity at the frequency of 15–30 Hz. Moreover, a stimulus-induced low-frequency (∼2–6 Hz) suppression locked to the stimulus onset was evident at the frontal sensors, possibly reflecting a motor rhythm guiding the exploratory eye movements. The results suggest task-related reactivity of the macroscopic oscillatory activity in the dog brain. To our knowledge, the study is the first to reveal non-invasively measured reactivity of brain electrophysiological oscillations in healthy dogs, and it has been based purely on positive operant conditional training, without the need for movement restriction or medication. PMID:23650504

  15. Non-invasive screening of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in children using a dipstick immunocapture assay.

    PubMed

    Rodinová, M; Trefilová, E; Honzík, T; Tesařová, M; Zeman, J; Hansíková, H

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) deficiency is among the most common childhood mitochondrial disorders. The diagnosis of this deficiency is complex, and muscle biopsy is used as the gold standard of diagnosis. Our aim was to minimize the patient burden and to test the use of a dipstick immunocapture assay (DIA) to determine the amount of CIV in non-invasively obtained buccal epithelial cells. Buccal smears were obtained from five children with Leigh syndrome including three children exhibiting a previously confirmed CIV deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts and two children who were clinical suspects for CIV deficiency; the smear samples were analysed using CI and CIV human protein quantity dipstick assay kits. Samples from five children of similar age and five adults were used as controls. Analysis of the controls demonstrated that only samples of buccal cells that were frozen for a maximum of 4 h after collection provide accurate results. All three patients with confirmed CIV deficiency due to mutations in the SURF1 gene exhibited significantly lower amounts of CIV than the similarly aged controls; significantly lower amounts were also observed in two new patients, for whom later molecular analysis also confirmed pathologic mutations in the SURF1 gene. We conclude that DIA is a simple, fast and sensitive method for the determination of CIV in buccal cells and is suitable for the screening of CIV deficiency in non-invasively obtained material from children who are suspected of having mitochondrial disease. PMID:25629267

  16. Modelling, verification, and calibration of a photoacoustics based continuous non-invasive blood glucose monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Praful P.; Sanki, Pradyut K.; Sarangi, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    This paper examines the use of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) at an excitation wavelength of 905 nm for making continuous non-invasive blood glucose measurements. The theoretical background of the measurement technique is verified through simulation. An apparatus is fabricated for performing photoacoustic measurements in vitro on glucose solutions and in vivo on human subjects. The amplitude of the photoacoustic signals measured from glucose solutions is observed to increase with the solution concentration, while photoacoustic amplitude obtained from in vivo measurements follows the blood glucose concentration of the subjects, indicating a direct proportionality between the two quantities. A linear calibration method is applied separately on measurements obtained from each individual in order to estimate the blood glucose concentration. The estimated glucose values are compared to reference glucose concentrations measured using a standard glucose meter. A plot of 196 measurement pairs taken over 30 normal subjects on a Clarke error grid gives a point distribution of 82.65% and 17.35% over zones A and B of the grid with a mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) of 11.78% and a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 15.27 mg/dl (0.85 mmol/l). The results obtained are better than or comparable to those obtained using photoacoustic spectroscopy based methods or other non-invasive measurement techniques available. The accuracy levels obtained are also comparable to commercially available continuous glucose monitoring systems.

  17. Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Non-Invasive Diabetes Sensing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Makaram, Prashanth; Owens, Dawn; Aceros, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Blood glucose monitoring is considered the gold standard for diabetes diagnostics and self-monitoring. However, the underlying process is invasive and highly uncomfortable for patients. Furthermore, the process must be completed several times a day to successfully manage the disease, which greatly contributes to the massive need for non-invasive monitoring options. Human serums, such as saliva, sweat, breath, urine and tears, contain traces of glucose and are easily accessible. Therefore, they allow minimal to non-invasive glucose monitoring, making them attractive alternatives to blood measurements. Numerous developments regarding noninvasive glucose detection techniques have taken place over the years, but recently, they have gained recognition as viable alternatives, due to the advent of nanotechnology-based sensors. Such sensors are optimal for testing the amount of glucose in serums other than blood thanks to their enhanced sensitivity and selectivity ranges, in addition to their size and compatibility with electronic circuitry. These nanotechnology approaches are rapidly evolving, and new techniques are constantly emerging. Hence, this manuscript aims to review current and future nanomaterial-based technologies utilizing saliva, sweat, breath and tears as a diagnostic medium for diabetes monitoring. PMID:26852676

  18. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  19. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    PubMed

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-01

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  20. Chromatibody, a novel non-invasive molecular tool to explore and manipulate chromatin in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Denis; Vignard, Julien; Fedor, Yoann; Béry, Nicolas; Olichon, Aurélien; Crozatier, Michèle; Erard, Monique; Cassard, Hervé; Ducommun, Bernard; Salles, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin function is involved in many cellular processes, its visualization or modification being essential in many developmental or cellular studies. Here, we present the characterization of chromatibody, a chromatin-binding single-domain, and explore its use in living cells. This non-intercalating tool specifically binds the heterodimer of H2A–H2B histones and displays a versatile reactivity, specifically labeling chromatin from yeast to mammals. We show that this genetically encoded probe, when fused to fluorescent proteins, allows non-invasive real-time chromatin imaging. Chromatibody is a dynamic chromatin probe that can be modulated. Finally, chromatibody is an efficient tool to target an enzymatic activity to the nucleosome, such as the DNA damage-dependent H2A ubiquitylation, which can modify this epigenetic mark at the scale of the genome and result in DNA damage signaling and repair defects. Taken together, these results identify chromatibody as a universal non-invasive tool for either in vivo chromatin imaging or to manipulate the chromatin landscape. PMID:27206857

  1. Fur: A non-invasive approach to monitor metal exposure in bats.

    PubMed

    Hernout, Béatrice V; McClean, Colin J; Arnold, Kathryn E; Walls, Michael; Baxter, Malcolm; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel assessment of the use of fur as a non-invasive proxy to biomonitor metal contamination in insectivorous bats. Concentrations of metals (cadmium, copper, lead and zinc) were measured using ICP-MS in tissues (kidneys, liver, stomach and stomach content, bones and fur) obtained from 193 Pipistrellus pipistrellus/pygmaeus bats. The bats were collected across a gradient of metal pollution in England and Wales. The utility of small samples of fur as an indicator of metal exposure from the environment was demonstrated with strong relationships obtained between the concentrations of non-essential metals in fur with concentrations in stomach content, kidneys, liver and bones. Stronger relationships were observed for non-essential metals than for essential metals. Fur analyses might therefore be a useful non-invasive proxy for understanding recent, as well as long term and chronic, metal exposure of live animals. The use of fur may provide valuable information on the level of endogenous metal exposure and contamination of bat populations and communities.

  2. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  3. A Non-Invasive Handheld Assistive Device to Accommodate Essential Tremor: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anupam; Redmond, John A.; Allen, Michael; Chou, Kelvin L.

    2014-01-01

    Background We explored whether a non-invasive, handheld device using Active Cancellation of Tremor (ACT) technology could stabilize tremor-induced motion of a spoon in individuals with essential tremor (ET). Methods Fifteen ET subjects (9M/6F) performed 3 tasks with the ACT device turned on and off. Tremor severity was rated with the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (TRS). Subjective improvement was rated by subjects with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI-S). Tremor amplitude was measured using device-embedded accelerometers in 11 subjects. Results TRS scores improved with ACT on (versus off) in all 3 tasks: holding (1.00±0.76 vs. 0.27±0.70, p=0.016), eating (1.47±1.06 vs. 0.13±0.64, p=0.001) and transferring (1.33±0.82 vs. 0.27±0.59, p=0.001). CGI-S improved with eating and transferring, but not the holding task. Accelerometer measurements demonstrated 71-76% reduction in tremor with ACT device on. Conclusions This non-invasive, handheld ACT device can reduce tremor amplitude and severity for eating and transferring tasks in individuals with ET. PMID:24375570

  4. The biological basis of non-invasive strategies for selection of human oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lynette

    2003-01-01

    There is a need for more accurate embryo selection in human assisted reproduction, if the goal of reducing the number of embryos used in embryo transfer is to be realized. Furthermore, any selection strategy should be non-invasive if the embryos are to be used in embryo transfer. Currently, the strategy is selection by one to three parameters in the cleaving- and blastocyst-stage embryo, sometimes with additional pronuclear selection. It is clear that no one system is ideal, as the vast majority of transferred embryos do not implant. As the health of the embryo is largely dictated by the originating gametes, the very early events in oocyte development should be considered. This review will point to the early biological events in the unfertilized and fertilized oocyte that can be scored non-invasively and which can have a profound effect on the later developmental stages. Using a sequential scoring system, with emphasis on the oocyte, a system for selecting the most viable single embryo for transfer may hopefully be achieved.

  5. Non-invasive, serum DNA pregnancy testing leading to incidental discovery of cancer: a good thing?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay

    2015-11-01

    Cell-free DNA for perinatal screening is a growing industry. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is based on the premise that foetal DNA is able to cross the placental barrier and enter the mother's circulation, where it can be examined for chromosomal abnormalities, such as trisomy 13, 18 or 21. Such tests are expected to be widely used by pregnant women, with the annual market expected to surpass $1 billion. Recently, a number of case reports have emerged in the haematology-oncology literature. The routine use of NIPT has led to the discovery of maternal neoplasms. Most writers have concluded that this is yet another benefit of the test; however, a closer examination of the cases reveals that this incidental detection may not improve patient outcomes. In some cases, early detection provides lead time bias, but does not change the ultimate clinical outcome, and in other cases, detection constitutes earlier knowledge of a cancer whose natural history cannot be altered. Here, we explore in detail cases where cancer was incidentally discovered among women undergoing routine non-invasive pregnancy testing, and investigate whether or not these women were benefitted by the discovery.

  6. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  7. Development of a portable non-invasive swallowing and respiration assessment device.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Wann-Yun; Wang, Chin-Man; Chang, Chia-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a condition that happens when a person cannot smoothly swallow food from the mouth to the stomach. It causes malnourishment in patients, or can even cause death due to aspiration pneumonia. Recently, more and more researchers have focused their attention on the importance of swallowing and respiration coordination, and the use of non-invasive assessment systems has become a hot research trend. In this study, we aimed to integrate the timing and pattern monitoring of respiration and swallowing by using a portable and non-invasive approach which can be applied at the bedside in hospitals or institutions, or in a home environment. In this approach, we use a force sensing resistor (FSR) to detect the motions of the thyroid cartilage in the pharyngeal phase. We also use the surface electromyography (sEMG) to detect the contraction of the submental muscle in the oral phase, and a nasal cannula to detect nasal airflow for respiration monitoring during the swallowing process. All signals are received and processed for swallowing event recognition. A total of 19 volunteers participated in the testing and over 57 measurements were made. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively distinguish the swallowing function in people of different ages and genders.

  8. Deconstructing autofluorescence: non-invasive detection and monitoring of biochemistry in cells and tissues (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Cassano, Juan C.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Pernichery, Sandeep M.; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol; Sutton-Mcdowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.

    2016-03-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous fluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from imaging of native fluorescence has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Multispectral intrinsic fluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. The versatility of our method is further illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent.

  9. The quest for non-invasive delivery of bioactive macromolecules: A focus on heparins

    PubMed Central

    Motlekar, Nusrat A.; Youan, Bi-Botti C.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a non-invasive drug delivery system for unfractionated heparin (UFH) and low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) has been the elusive goal of several research groups since the initial discovery of this glycosaminogylcan by McLean in 1916. After a brief update on current parenteral formulations of UFH and LMWHs, this review revisits past and current strategies intended to identify alternative routes of administration (e.g. oral, sublingual, rectal, nasal, pulmonary and transdermal). The following strategies have been used to improve the bioavailability of this bioactive macromolecule by various routes: (i) enhancement in cell-membrane permeabilization, (ii) modification of the tight-junctions, (iii) increase in lipophilicity and (iv) protection against acidic pH of the stomach. Regardless of the route of administration, a simplified unifying principle for successful non-invasive macromolecular drug delivery may be: “to reversibly overcome the biological, biophysical and biochemical barriers and to safely and efficiently improve the in vivo spatial and temporal control of the drug in order to achieve a clinically acceptable therapeutic advantage”. Future macromolecular drug delivery research should embrace a more systemic approach taking into account recent advances in genomics/proteomics and nanotechnology. PMID:16777255

  10. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: non-invasive investigation and risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Dyson, J K; McPherson, S; Anstee, Q M

    2013-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a histological spectrum of liver disease, from simple steatosis through to cirrhosis. As the worldwide rates of obesity have increased, NAFLD has become the commonest cause of liver disease in many developed countries, affecting up to a third of the population. The majority of patients have simple steatosis that carries a relatively benign prognosis. However, a significant minority have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and have increased liver related and cardiovascular mortality. Identifying those at risk of progressive disease is crucial. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard investigation for assessing stage of disease but its invasive nature makes it impractical for widespread use as a prognostic tool. Non-invasive tools for diagnosis and disease staging are required, reserving liver biopsy for those patients where it offers clinically relevant additional information. This review discusses the non-invasive modalities available for assessing steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis. We propose a pragmatic approach for the assessment of patients with NAFLD to identify those at high risk of progressive disease who require referral to specialist services. PMID:23940130

  12. Quantitative non-invasive cell characterisation and discrimination based on multispectral autofluorescence features

    PubMed Central

    Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Menon Perinchery, Sandeep; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol A.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous autofluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from autofluorescence imaging has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent. Label-free classifications are validated by the analysis of Classification Determinant (CD) antigen expression. The versatility of our method is illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. PMID:27029742

  13. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge; Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Cavaco, Carina; Taunk, Khushman; Rapole, Srikanth; Dhakne, Rahul; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu; Câmara, José S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs), oncologic (ODs), neurodegenerative (NDDs), chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB) that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction) coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc.) allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases. PMID:25584743

  14. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J.; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D.; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  15. Non-invasive health status detection system using Gabor filters based on facial block texture features.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ting; Zhang, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Blood tests allow doctors to check for certain diseases and conditions. However, using a syringe to extract the blood can be deemed invasive, slightly painful, and its analysis time consuming. In this paper, we propose a new non-invasive system to detect the health status (Healthy or Diseased) of an individual based on facial block texture features extracted using the Gabor filter. Our system first uses a non-invasive capture device to collect facial images. Next, four facial blocks are located on these images to represent them. Afterwards, each facial block is convolved with a Gabor filter bank to calculate its texture value. Classification is finally performed using K-Nearest Neighbor and Support Vector Machines via a Library for Support Vector Machines (with four kernel functions). The system was tested on a dataset consisting of 100 Healthy and 100 Diseased (with 13 forms of illnesses) samples. Experimental results show that the proposed system can detect the health status with an accuracy of 93 %, a sensitivity of 94 %, a specificity of 92 %, using a combination of the Gabor filters and facial blocks. PMID:25722202

  16. Non-Invasive Assessment of Viability in Human Embryos Fertilized in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Montskó, Gergely; Zrínyi, Zita; Farkas, Nelli; Várnagy, Ákos; Bódis, József

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a relatively inefficient process and therefore the number of infertile couples is high. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have facilitated the birth of over five million children worldwide. ART, however, superimposes its own relative inefficiency on the preexisting inefficiency of normal reproduction. The efficiency (expressed as pregnancy rate) is generally not more than 30%. Modern reproductive medicine is gradually moving from multiple embryo transfer to the transfer of a single embryo, mainly because of obvious and unwanted side effects of multiple embryo transfer (e.g. „epidemic” multiple pregnancies). This concept, however, requires a fast, professional selection of the most viable embryo during the first few days of ART. Thus the aim of a modern ART is the safe transfer of a healthy, viable, single embryo. Accurate and rapid methods of quantifying embryo viability are needed to reach this goal. Methodological advances have the potential to make an important contribution, and there has been a drive to develop alternative non-invasive methods to better meet clinical needs. Metabolic and genetic profiling of spent embryo culture (SEC) media should offer an exceptional opportunity for the assessment of embryo viability. The current review focuses on the latest non-invasive diagnostic approaches for pre-implantation viability assessment of in vitro fertilized embryos. PMID:27683524

  17. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  18. Differences in cap formation between invasive Entamoeba histolytica and non-invasive Entamoeba dispar.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; Castañón, Guadalupe; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2012-07-01

    The rapid redistribution of surface antigen-antibody complexes in trophozoites of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, in a process known as capping, has been considered as a means of the parasite to evade the host immune response. So far, capping has been documented in the invasive E. histolytica, whereas the mobility of surface components in the non-invasive Entamoeba dispar is not known. E. dispar does not induce liver lesions in rodent experimental models, in contrast to the liver abscesses produced by E. histolytica in the same animal model. We have therefore analyzed the mobility of surface receptors to the lectin concanavalin A and of Rab11, a membrane-associated protein, in both species of Entamoebae by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The great majority of E. histolytica trophozoites became morphologically polarized through the formation of well-defined caps at the posterior pole of the parasite. Actin colocalized with the lectin caps. Antibodies against the membrane protein Rab 11 also produced capping. In striking contrast, in E. dispar, the mobility of concanavalin A surface receptors was restricted to the formation of irregular surface patches that did no progress to constitute well-defined caps. Also, anti-Rab 11 antibodies did not result in capping in E. dispar. Whether the failure of E. dispar to efficiently mobilize surface molecules in response to lectin or antibodies as shown in the present results is related to its non-invasive character represents an interesting hypothesis requiring further analysis.

  19. A phantom with pulsating artificial vessels for non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Laqua, Daniel; Pollnow, Stefan; Fischer, Jan; Ley, Sebastian; Husar, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Arterial oxygen saturation of the fetus is an important parameter for monitoring its physical condition. During labor and delivery the transabdominal non-invasive fetal pulse oximetry could minimize the risk for mother and fetus, compared to other existing invasive examination methods. In this contribution, we developed a physical-like phantom to investigate new sensor circuits and algorithms of a non-invasive diagnostic method for fetal pulse oximetry. Hence, the developed artificial vascular system consists of two independent tube systems representing the maternal and fetal vessel system. The arterial blood pressure is reproduced with a pre-pressure and an artificial vascular system. Each pulse wave can be reproduced, by digital control of a proportional valve, adjustable viscoelastic elements, and resistances. The measurements are performed by pressure transducers, optical sensor units, and a coplanar capacitive sensor. Transmission and reflection measurements have shown that the fetal and maternal pulse waves can be reproduced qualitatively. The measured light represents the transabdominal modulated signal on an abdomen of a pregnant woman. PMID:25571272

  20. Integrated microsystem for non-invasive electrophysiological measurements on Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dahan, E; Bize, V; Lehnert, T; Horisberger, J-D; Gijs, M A M

    2007-06-15

    We propose a new non-invasive integrated microsystem for electrophysiological measurements on Xenopus laevis oocytes. Xenopus oocyte is a well-known expression system for various kinds of ion channels, that are potential tools in drug screening. In the traditional "Two Electrode Voltage Clamp" (TEVC) method, delicate micromanipulation is required to impale an oocyte with two microelectrodes. In our system, a non-invasive electrical access to the cytoplasm is provided by permeabilizing the cell membrane with an ionophore (e.g. nystatin). Unlike the classical patch-clamp or "macropatch" techniques, this method does not require removal of the vitelline membrane. Cell handling is significantly simplified, resulting in more robust recordings with increased throughput. Moreover, because only part of the oocyte surface is exposed to reagents, the required volume of reagent solutions could be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to the TEVC method. The fabrication process for this disposable microchip, based on poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molding and glass/PDMS bonding, is cost-efficient and simple. We tested this new microdevice by recording currents in oocytes expressing the human Epithelial Sodium Channel (hENaC) for membrane potentials between -100 and +50 mV. We recorded benzamil-sensitive currents with a large signal-to-noise ratio and we also obtained a benzamil concentration-inhibition curve displaying an inhibition constant IC(50) of about 50 nM, comparable to previously published values obtained with the TEVC technique.

  1. Non-Invasive Assessment of Viability in Human Embryos Fertilized in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gábor L; Montskó, Gergely; Zrínyi, Zita; Farkas, Nelli; Várnagy, Ákos; Bódis, József

    2016-04-01

    Human reproduction is a relatively inefficient process and therefore the number of infertile couples is high. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have facilitated the birth of over five million children worldwide. ART, however, superimposes its own relative inefficiency on the preexisting inefficiency of normal reproduction. The efficiency (expressed as pregnancy rate) is generally not more than 30%. Modern reproductive medicine is gradually moving from multiple embryo transfer to the transfer of a single embryo, mainly because of obvious and unwanted side effects of multiple embryo transfer (e.g. "epidemic" multiple pregnancies). This concept, however, requires a fast, professional selection of the most viable embryo during the first few days of ART. Thus the aim of a modern ART is the safe transfer of a healthy, viable, single embryo. Accurate and rapid methods of quantifying embryo viability are needed to reach this goal. Methodological advances have the potential to make an important contribution, and there has been a drive to develop alternative non-invasive methods to better meet clinical needs. Metabolic and genetic profiling of spent embryo culture (SEC) media should offer an exceptional opportunity for the assessment of embryo viability. The current review focuses on the latest non-invasive diagnostic approaches for pre-implantation viability assessment of in vitro fertilized embryos. PMID:27683524

  2. Non-Invasive Health Diagnostics using Eye as a 'Window to the Body'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.

    2002-01-01

    As a 'window to the body', the eye offers the opportunity to use light in various forms to detect ocular and systemic abnormalities long before clinical symptoms appear and help develop preventative/therapeutic countermeasures early. The effects of space travel on human body are similar to those of normal aging. For example, radiation exposure in space could lead to formation of cataracts and cancer by damaging the DNA and causing gene mutation. Additionally, the zero-gravity environment causes fluid shifts in the upper extremities of the body and changes the way blood flows and organ system performs. Here on Earth, cataract, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy (DR), and glaucoma are major eye diseases and are expected to double in next two decades. To detect, prevent, and treat untoward effects of prolonged space travel in real-time requires the development of non-invasive diagnostic technologies that are compact and powerful. We are developing fiber-optic sensors to evaluate the ocular tissues in health, aging, and disease employing the techniques of dynamic light scattering (cataract, uveitis, Alzheimer's, glaucoma, DR, radiation damage, refractive surgery outcomes), auto-fluorescence (aging, DR), laser-Doppler flowmetry (choroidal blood flow), Raman spectroscopy (AMD), polarimetry (diabetes), and retinal oximetry (occult blood loss). The non-invasive feature of these technologies integrated in a head-mounted/goggles-like device permits frequent repetition of tests, enabling evaluation of the results to therapy that may ultimately be useful in various telemedicine applications on Earth and in space.

  3. Non-invasive Investigations of Paintings by Portable Instrumentation: The MOLAB Experience.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, B; Miliani, C; Rosi, F; Doherty, B; Monico, L; Romani, A; Sgamellotti, A

    2016-02-01

    The in situ non invasive methods have experienced a significant development in the last decade because they meet specific needs of analytical chemistry in the field of cultural heritage where  artworks are rarely moved from their locations, sampling is rarely permitted, and analytes are a wide range of inorganic, organic and organometallic substances in complex and precious matrices. MOLAB, a unique collection of integrated mobile instruments, has greatly contributed to demonstrate that it is now possible to obtain satisfactory results in the study of a variety of heritage objects without sampling or moving them to a laboratory. The current chapter describes an account of these results with particular attention to ancient, modern, and contemporary paintings. Several non-invasive methods by portable equipment, including XRF, mid- and near-FTIR, UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy, as well as XRD, are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of painting materials and execution techniques. Examples of successful applications are given, both for point analyses and hyperspectral imaging approaches. Lines for future perspectives are finally drawn. PMID:27572993

  4. Non-invasive and in vivo assessment of osteoarthritic articular cartilage: a review on MRI investigations.

    PubMed

    Hani, Ahmad Fadzil Mohd; Kumar, Dileep; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ahmad, Raja Mohd Kamil Raja; Razak, Ruslan; Kiflie, Azman

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is of great interest to orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, radiologists, and researchers because it would allow physicians to provide patients with treatments and advice to slow the onset or progression of the disease. Early detection can be achieved by identifying early changes in selected features of degenerative articular cartilage (AC) using non-invasive imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the standard for assessment of OA. The aim of this paper was to review the influence of MRI on the selection, detection, and measurement of AC features associated with early OA. Our review of the literature indicates that the changes associated with early OA are in cartilage thickness, cartilage volume, cartilage water content, and proteoglycan content that can be accurately, consistently, and non-invasively measured using MRI. Choosing an MR pulse sequence that provides the capability to assess cartilage physiology and morphology in a single acquisition and advanced multi-nuclei MRI is desirable. The results of the review indicate that using an ultra-high magnetic strength, MR imager does not affect early OA detection. In conclusion, MRI is currently the most suitable modality for early detection of knee OA, and future research should focus on the quantitative evaluation of early OA features using advances in MR hardware, software, and data processing with sophisticated image/pattern recognition techniques.

  5. Non-Invasive Assessment of Viability in Human Embryos Fertilized in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Montskó, Gergely; Zrínyi, Zita; Farkas, Nelli; Várnagy, Ákos; Bódis, József

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a relatively inefficient process and therefore the number of infertile couples is high. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have facilitated the birth of over five million children worldwide. ART, however, superimposes its own relative inefficiency on the preexisting inefficiency of normal reproduction. The efficiency (expressed as pregnancy rate) is generally not more than 30%. Modern reproductive medicine is gradually moving from multiple embryo transfer to the transfer of a single embryo, mainly because of obvious and unwanted side effects of multiple embryo transfer (e.g. „epidemic” multiple pregnancies). This concept, however, requires a fast, professional selection of the most viable embryo during the first few days of ART. Thus the aim of a modern ART is the safe transfer of a healthy, viable, single embryo. Accurate and rapid methods of quantifying embryo viability are needed to reach this goal. Methodological advances have the potential to make an important contribution, and there has been a drive to develop alternative non-invasive methods to better meet clinical needs. Metabolic and genetic profiling of spent embryo culture (SEC) media should offer an exceptional opportunity for the assessment of embryo viability. The current review focuses on the latest non-invasive diagnostic approaches for pre-implantation viability assessment of in vitro fertilized embryos.

  6. Using Diagnostic Radioentomology for Non-Invasive Observations of Colonies of the Bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Mark K.; Sadd, Ben M.

    2012-01-01

    Bumblebees have been the focus of a broad range of scientific research due to their behavior, social life, and a number of other intriguing traits. Current methods for examining their nest structure, such as natal cells and contents of storage cells, are destructive in nature because the cells need to be opened for physical inspections. This research describes how the internal structures of the artificial nests of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris L. (Hymentoptera: Apidae) were non-invasively viewed and assessed by using diagnostic radioentomology. For the first time, B. terrestris nest structures, and their contents such as larvae, pupae and eggs, were non-invaseively viewed and assessed. This technique will enable future experiments to take morphological measurements of egg, larval, and pupal development over time. Moreover, combining these measurements with measures of food-storage will provide a good assessment of colony health. The method will also allow tracking of individually marked adults, to monitor their behaviour and help gain a better understanding of the processes involved in the global declines of B. terrestris, which will in turn promote better management of these valuable pollinators. PMID:23421622

  7. [Non invasive intracranial hyperthermia with Electric Capacitive Transference -ECT- Intratumoral and cerebral thermometry results].

    PubMed

    Ley-Valle, A

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this work is to present the results of thermic increase obtained at the brain and intratumoral levels through a non invasive technique -Electric Capacitive Transference- (ECT), developed in 1985 by Indiba. A review of the literature does not provide any reference of cerebral and intratumoral thermometry in real time with a non invasive technique of intracranial hyperthermia. In the 8 studied patients, the increases of temperature in the brain, ranged between 0.7 and 1.5 degrees C in relation to the depth of the thermometric probe and the incidence angle of the external electrode. Between tumoral and perilesional brain tissues, thermic increase was 0.3 to 0.7 degrees C greater at tumoral level. The observation that in no case the surrounding brain tissue registered a temperature over 39.2 degrees C supports the harmlessness of the technique regarding the potential damage to healthy brain tissue and seems to confirm previous data obtained in anatomopathological studies in animal experimentation performed in 1990, which showed an absence of lesions in tissues and organs. The greater and somewhat more prolonged thermic increase observed at tumoral level has been called the "greenhouse effect".

  8. Non-invasive investigations successfully select patients for temporal lobe surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, C.; Cook, M.; Kaye, A.; Murphy, M.; Matkovic, Z.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—There is controversy regarding the need for invasive monitoring in the preoperative assessment of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The use of a series of non-invasive investigations in identifying the seizure focus is reported in 75 consecutive adults referred for epilepsy surgery.
METHODS—All had video-EEG monitoring using scalp electrodes, high resolution MRI, and neuropsychology assessment. Other investigations included volumetric MRI, PET, and ictal and interictal SPECT. The seizure focus was localised and surgery offered if MRI disclosed unilateral hippocampal atrophy or a foreign tissue lesion and other investigations were either concordant or not discordant.
RESULTS—In 68 patients the seizure focus was localised and three patients were inoperable. Sixty five patients have been offered surgery and 50 have undergone temporal lobe surgery and have a follow up of at least 12 months (mean 24 months). All had pathology: hippocampal sclerosis 34, dysembryoblastic neuroepithelial tumour six, cavernoma four, dysplasia two, low grade glioma two, ganglioglioma two. Thirty nine patients (78%) are seizure free postoperatively, 29/34 with hippocampal sclerosis and 10/16 with a foreign tissue lesion. Of the 11 patients with postoperative recurrent seizures, eight have a >90% reduction in seizure frequency and three have <90% reduction in seizure frequency but a worthwhile improvement.
CONCLUSIONS—Non-invasive investigations successfully select most patients for temporal lobe surgery.

 PMID:9328249

  9. Non-invasive method and apparatus for monitoring intracranial pressure and pressure volume index in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, Jr., John H. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Non-invasive measuring devices responsive to changes in a patient's intracranial pressure (ICP) can be accurately calibrated for monitoring purposes by providing known changes in ICP by non-invasive methods, such as placing the patient on a tilting bed and calculating a change in ICP from the tilt angle and the length of the patient's cerebrospinal column, or by placing a pressurized skull cap on the patient and measuring the inflation pressure. Absolute values for the patient's pressure-volume index (PVI) and the steady state ICP can then be determined by inducing two known changes in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid while recording the corresponding changes in ICP by means of the calibrated measuring device. The two pairs of data for pressure change and volume change are entered into an equation developed from an equation describing the relationship between ICP and cerebrospinal fluid volume. PVI and steady state ICP are then determined by solving the equation. Methods for inducing known changes in cerebrospinal fluid volume are described.

  10. Portable, Non-Invasive Fall Risk Assessment in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Thurmon E; Barth, Adam T; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Songra, Rahul; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad; Lach, John

    2010-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) have high morbidity and mortality due to multiple causes, one of which is dramatically higher fall rates than the general population. The mobility mechanisms that contribute to falls in this population must be understood if adequate interventions for fall prevention are to be achieved. This study utilizes emerging non-invasive, portable gait, posture, strength, and stability assessment technologies to extract various mobility parameters that research has shown to be predictive of fall risk in the general population. As part of an ongoing human subjects study, mobility measures such as postural and locomotion profiles were obtained from five (5) ESRD patients undergoing HD treatments. To assess the effects of post-HD-fatigue on fall risk, both the pre- and post-HD measurements were obtained. Additionally, the effects of inter-HD periods (two days vs. three days) were investigated using the non-invasive, wireless, body-worn motion capture technology and novel signal processing algorithms. The results indicated that HD treatment influenced strength and mobility (i.e., weaker and slower after the dialysis, increasing the susceptibility to falls while returning home) and inter-dialysis period influenced pre-HD profiles (increasing the susceptibility to falls before they come in for a HD treatment). Methodology for early detection of increased fall risk - before a fall event occurs - using the portable mobility assessment technology for out-patient monitoring is further explored, including targeting interventions to identified individuals for fall prevention.

  11. Development of non-invasive method for assessment of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, H; Mano, K; Horinaka, H; Matsunaka, T; Matsumoto, Y; Ida, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Wada, K; Kawada, N

    2016-12-01

    Steatosis is a critical feature of liver disease and is considered to play a pivotal role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as being a surrogate marker of metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic method for assessment of liver steatosis. It is well known that ultrasonic velocity depends on materials and temperature. For example, the ultrasonic velocity in water is 1530m/s at 37°C and 1534m/s at 39°C, while that in fat is 1412m/s at 37°C and 1402m/s at 39°C. On this basis, we thought that the percentage of fat in hepatic steatosis could be assessed by detecting changes of ultrasonic in the liver, caused by warming. In order to confirm the effectiveness of this method, we obtained the ultrasonic velocity changes of tissue phantom including lard oil and the liver of living rabbit by ultrasonic warming, and then succeeded in 2-D imaging of ultrasonic velocity changes of the phantom and the liver of living rabbit. We named this the ultrasonic velocity-change method. The experimental results show the possibility that hepatic steatosis could be characterized using our novel, non-invasive method. PMID:27567038

  12. Non-invasive ventilation in prone position for refractory hypoxemia after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Serra, Eugenio; Barbieri, Stefania; Persona, Paolo; Rea, Federico; Loy, Monica; Ori, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Temporary graft dysfunction with gas exchange abnormalities is a common finding during the postoperative course of a lung transplant and is often determined by the post-reimplantation syndrome. Supportive measures including oxygen by mask, inotropes, diuretics, and pulmonary vasodilators are usually effective in non-severe post-reimplantation syndromes. However, in less-responsive clinical pictures, tracheal intubation with positive pressure ventilation, or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV), is necessary. We report on the clinical course of two patients suffering from refractory hypoxemia due to post-reimplantation syndrome treated with NIV in the prone and Trendelenburg positions. NIV was well tolerated and led to resolution of atelectactic areas and dishomogeneous lung infiltrates. Repeated turning from supine to prone under non invasive ventilation determined a stable improvement of gas exchange and prevented a more invasive approach. Even though NIV in the prone position has not yet entered into clinical practice, it could be an interesting option to achieve a better match between ventilation and perfusion. This technique, which we successfully applied in lung transplantation, can be easily extended to other lung diseases with non-recruitable dorso-basal areas.

  13. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  14. Non-invasive, serum DNA pregnancy testing leading to incidental discovery of cancer: a good thing?

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay

    2015-11-01

    Cell-free DNA for perinatal screening is a growing industry. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is based on the premise that foetal DNA is able to cross the placental barrier and enter the mother's circulation, where it can be examined for chromosomal abnormalities, such as trisomy 13, 18 or 21. Such tests are expected to be widely used by pregnant women, with the annual market expected to surpass $1 billion. Recently, a number of case reports have emerged in the haematology-oncology literature. The routine use of NIPT has led to the discovery of maternal neoplasms. Most writers have concluded that this is yet another benefit of the test; however, a closer examination of the cases reveals that this incidental detection may not improve patient outcomes. In some cases, early detection provides lead time bias, but does not change the ultimate clinical outcome, and in other cases, detection constitutes earlier knowledge of a cancer whose natural history cannot be altered. Here, we explore in detail cases where cancer was incidentally discovered among women undergoing routine non-invasive pregnancy testing, and investigate whether or not these women were benefitted by the discovery. PMID:26278647

  15. Electromyography data for non-invasive naturally-controlled robotic hand prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Castellini, Claudio; Caputo, Barbara; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Elsig, Simone; Giatsidis, Giorgio; Bassetto, Franco; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in rehabilitation robotics suggest that it may be possible for hand-amputated subjects to recover at least a significant part of the lost hand functionality. The control of robotic prosthetic hands using non-invasive techniques is still a challenge in real life: myoelectric prostheses give limited control capabilities, the control is often unnatural and must be learned through long training times. Meanwhile, scientific literature results are promising but they are still far from fulfilling real-life needs. This work aims to close this gap by allowing worldwide research groups to develop and test movement recognition and force control algorithms on a benchmark scientific database. The database is targeted at studying the relationship between surface electromyography, hand kinematics and hand forces, with the final goal of developing non-invasive, naturally controlled, robotic hand prostheses. The validation section verifies that the data are similar to data acquired in real-life conditions, and that recognition of different hand tasks by applying state-of-the-art signal features and machine-learning algorithms is possible. PMID:25977804

  16. Iron Oxide-labeled Collagen Scaffolds for Non-invasive MR Imaging in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Hermann, Alina; Bühren, Anne; Olde-Damink, Leon; Möckel, Diana; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging holds significant potential for implementation in tissue engineering. It can e.g. be used to monitor the localization and function of tissue-engineered implants, as well as their resorption and remodelling. Thus far, however, the vast majority of efforts in this area of research have focused on the use of ultrasmall super-paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle-labeled cells, colonizing the scaffolds, to indirectly image the implant material. Reasoning that directly labeling scaffold materials might be more beneficial (enabling imaging also in case of non-cellularized implants), more informative (enabling the non-invasive visualization and quantification of scaffold degradation) and more easy to translate into the clinic (since cell-free materials are less complex from a regulatory point-of-view), we here prepared three different types of USPIO nanoparticles, and incorporated them both passively and actively (via chemical conjugation; during collagen crosslinking) into collagen-based scaffold materials. We furthermore optimized the amount of USPIO incorporated into the scaffolds, correlated the amount of entrapped USPIO with MR signal intensity, showed that the labeled scaffolds are highly biocompatible, demonstrated that scaffold degradation can be visualized using MRI and provided initial proof-of-principle for the in vivo visualization of the scaffolds. Consequently, USPIO-labeled scaffold materials seem to be highly suitable for image-guided tissue engineering applications. PMID:24569840

  17. Non-invasive and micro-destructive investigation of the Domus Aurea wall painting decorations.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Catia; Ciocan, Valeria; Vagnini, Manuela; Doherty, Brenda; Tabasso, Marisa Laurenzi; Conti, Cinzia; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Miliani, Costanza

    2011-10-01

    The paper reports on the exploitation of an educated multi-technique analytical approach based on a wide non invasive step followed by a focused micro-destructive step, aimed at the minimally invasive identification of the pigments decorating the ceiling of the Gilded Vault of the Domus Aurea in Rome. The combination of elemental analysis with molecular characterization provided by X-ray fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopies, respectively, allowed for the in situ non-invasive identification of a remarkable number of pigments, namely Egyptian blue, green earth, cinnabar, red ochre and an anthraquinonic lake. The study was completed with the Raman analysis of two bulk samples, in particular, SERS measurements allowed for the speciation of the anthraquinonic pigment. Elemental mapping by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer combined with micro-fluorimetry on cross-section gave an insight into both the distribution of different blend of pigments and on the nature of the inorganic support of the red dye. PMID:21805319

  18. Invasive clonal plant species have a greater root-foraging plasticity than non-invasive ones.

    PubMed

    Keser, Lidewij H; Dawson, Wayne; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai; Fischer, Markus; Dong, Ming; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Clonality is frequently positively correlated with plant invasiveness, but which aspects of clonality make some clonal species more invasive than others is not known. Due to their spreading growth form, clonal plants are likely to experience spatial heterogeneity in nutrient availability. Plasticity in allocation of biomass to clonal growth organs and roots may allow these plants to forage for high-nutrient patches. We investigated whether this foraging response is stronger in species that have become invasive than in species that have not. We used six confamilial pairs of native European clonal plant species differing in invasion success in the USA. We grew all species in large pots under homogeneous or heterogeneous nutrient conditions in a greenhouse, and compared their nutrient-foraging response and performance. Neither invasive nor non-invasive species showed significant foraging responses to heterogeneity in clonal growth organ biomass or in aboveground biomass of clonal offspring. Invasive species had, however, a greater positive foraging response in terms of root and belowground biomass than non-invasive species. Invasive species also produced more total biomass. Our results suggest that the ability for strong root foraging is among the characteristics promoting invasiveness in clonal plants. PMID:24352844

  19. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry. PMID:26848316