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Sample records for non-invasive fluoroscopic imaging

  1. In-vitro validation of a non-invasive dual fluoroscopic imaging technique for measurement of the hip kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Wang, Shaobai; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Guoan; Kwon, Young-Min

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of accurate in vivo hip joint kinematics in 6-DOF is difficult. Few studies have reported non-invasive measurements of the hip kinematics. The objective of this study was to validate a non-invasive dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS) for measurement of hip kinematics. Bi-lateral hip joints of a cadaveric pelvic specimen were CT scanned to create bone models of the femur and pelvis, and subsequently tested in static and dynamic conditions inside the DFIS. The poses of the hip in space were then determined by matching the bone models with the fluoroscopic images. The pose data was compared to those obtained using a radio-stereometric analysis to determine the accuracy of the DFIS. The accuracy ± precision for measuring the hip kinematics were less than 0.93 ± 1.13 mm for translations and 0.59 ± 0.82° for rotations in all conditions. The repeatability of the DFIS technique was less than ± 0.77 mm and ± 0.64° in position and orientation for measuring hip kinematics in both static and dynamic positions. This technique could thus be a promising tool for determining 6-DOF poses of the hip during functional activities, which may help to understand biomechanical factors in hip pathologic conditions such as osteoarthritis and femoroacetabular impingement before and after surgical treatment.

  2. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  3. Non-invasive molecular imaging for preclinical cancer therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    O'Farrell, AC; Shnyder, SD; Marston, G; Coletta, PL; Gill, JH

    2013-01-01

    Molecular and non-invasive imaging are rapidly emerging fields in preclinical cancer drug discovery. This is driven by the need to develop more efficacious and safer treatments, the advent of molecular-targeted therapeutics, and the requirements to reduce and refine current preclinical in vivo models. Such bioimaging strategies include MRI, PET, single positron emission computed tomography, ultrasound, and optical approaches such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging. These molecular imaging modalities have several advantages over traditional screening methods, not least the ability to quantitatively monitor pharmacodynamic changes at the cellular and molecular level in living animals non-invasively in real time. This review aims to provide an overview of non-invasive molecular imaging techniques, highlighting the strengths, limitations and versatility of these approaches in preclinical cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:23488622

  4. Non-Invasive Imaging of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Rangavajla, Gautam; Mokarram, Nassir; Masoodzadehgan, Nazanin; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of peripheral nerve imaging extend the capabilities of imaging modalities to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peripheral nerve maladies. Methods such as MRI and its derivative DTI, ultrasound, and PET are capable of assessing nerve structure and function following injury and relating the state of the nerve to electrophysiological and histological analysis. Of the imaging methods surveyed here, each offered unique and interesting advantages related to the field. MRI offered the opportunity to visualize immune activity on the injured nerve throughout the course of the regeneration process, and DTI offered numerical characterization of the injury and the ability to develop statistical bases for diagnosing injury. Ultrasound extends imaging to the treatment phase by enabling more precise analgesic applications following surgery, and PET represents a novel method of assessing nerve injury through analysis of relative metabolism rates in injured and healthy tissue. Exciting new possibilities to enhance and extend the abilities of imaging methods are also discussed here, including innovative contrast agents, some of which enable multimodal imaging approaches and present opportunities for treatment application. PMID:25766202

  5. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data for digital reconstruction of objects from their projections is examined. The fluoroscopic and the scanning apparatus used for the experiments are of a commercial type already in existence in most hospitals. It is shown that for beams with divergence up to about 15 deg, one can use a convolution algorithm designed for the parallel radiation case with negligible degradation both quantitatively and from a visual quality standpoint. This convolution algorithm is computationally more efficient than either the algebraic techniques or the convolution algorithms for radially diverging data. Results from studies on Lucite phantoms and a freshly sacrificed rat are included.

  6. Non-invasive imaging of microcirculation: a technology review

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sam; Nilsson, Jan; Sturesson, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Microcirculation plays a crucial role in physiological processes of tissue oxygenation and nutritional exchange. Measurement of microcirculation can be applied on many organs in various pathologies. In this paper we aim to review the technique of non-invasive methods for imaging of the microcirculation. Methods covered are: videomicroscopy techniques, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, and laser speckle contrast imaging. Videomicroscopy techniques, such as orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and sidestream dark-field imaging, provide a plentitude of information and offer direct visualization of the microcirculation but have the major drawback that they may give pressure artifacts. Both laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging allow non-contact measurements but have the disadvantage of their sensitivity to motion artifacts and that they are confined to relative measurement comparisons. Ideal would be a non-contact videomicroscopy method with fully automatic analysis software. PMID:25525397

  7. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  8. Fluoroscopic image-guided intervention system for transbronchial localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Keast, Thomas M.; Wibowo, Henky; Yu, Kun-Chang; Draper, Jeffrey W.; Gibbs, Jason D.

    2012-02-01

    Reliable transbronchial access of peripheral lung lesions is desirable for the diagnosis and potential treatment of lung cancer. This procedure can be difficult, however, because accessory devices (e.g., needle or forceps) cannot be reliably localized while deployed. We present a fluoroscopic image-guided intervention (IGI) system for tracking such bronchoscopic accessories. Fluoroscopy, an imaging technology currently utilized by many bronchoscopists, has a fundamental shortcoming - many lung lesions are invisible in its images. Our IGI system aligns a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) defined from a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scan with live fluoroscopic images. Radiopaque accessory devices are readily apparent in fluoroscopic video, while lesions lacking a fluoroscopic signature but identifiable in the CT scan are superimposed in the scene. The IGI system processing steps consist of: (1) calibrating the fluoroscopic imaging system; (2) registering the CT anatomy with its depiction in the fluoroscopic scene; (3) optical tracking to continually update the DRR and target positions as the fluoroscope is moved about the patient. The end result is a continuous correlation of the DRR and projected targets with the anatomy depicted in the live fluoroscopic video feed. Because both targets and bronchoscopic devices are readily apparent in arbitrary fluoroscopic orientations, multiplane guidance is straightforward. The system tracks in real-time with no computational lag. We have measured a mean projected tracking accuracy of 1.0 mm in a phantom and present results from an in vivo animal study.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis: Multimodality non-invasive imaging diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosara, Stefano; D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Canestrini, Stefano; Zamboni, Giulia; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by obstructive jaundice, a dramatic clinical response to steroids and pathologically by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, with or without a pancreatic mass. Type 1 AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4-related systemic disease and is characterized by elevated IgG4 serum levels, infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and extrapancreatic lesions. Type 2 AIP usually has none or very few IgG4-positive plasma cells, no serum IgG4 elevation and appears to be a pancreas-specific disorder without extrapancreatic involvement. AIP is diagnosed in approximately 2%-6% of patients that undergo pancreatic resection for suspected pancreatic cancer. There are three patterns of autoimmune pancreatitis: diffuse disease is the most common type, with a diffuse, “sausage-like” pancreatic enlargement with sharp margins and loss of the lobular contours; focal disease is less common and manifests as a focal mass, often within the pancreatic head, mimicking a pancreatic malignancy. Multifocal involvement can also occur. In this paper we describe the features of AIP at ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging, focusing on diagnosis and differential diagnosis with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. It is of utmost importance to make an early correct differential diagnosis between these two diseases in order to identify the optimal therapeutic strategy and to avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection in AIP patients. Non-invasive imaging plays also an important role in therapy monitoring, in follow-up and in early identification of disease recurrence. PMID:25493001

  10. Estimating Trabecular Bone Mechanical Properties From Non-Invasive Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.; Webster, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    An important component in developing countermeasures for maintaining musculoskeletal integrity during long-term space flight is an effective and meaningful method of monitoring skeletal condition. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive non-invasive approach because it avoids the exposure to radiation associated with X-ray based imaging and also provides measures related to bone microstructure rather than just density. The purpose of the research for the 1996 Summer Faculty Fellowship period was to extend the usefulness of the MRI data to estimate the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. The main mechanical properties of interest are the elastic modulus and ultimate strength. Correlations are being investigated between these and fractal analysis parameters, MRI relaxation times, apparent densities, and bone mineral densities. Bone specimens from both human and equine donors have been studied initially to ensure high-quality MR images. Specimens were prepared and scanned from human proximal tibia bones as well as the equine distal radius. The quality of the images from the human bone appeared compromised due to freezing artifact, so only equine bone was included in subsequent procedures since these specimens could be acquired and imaged fresh before being frozen. MRI scans were made spanning a 3.6 cm length on each of 5 equine distal radius specimens. The images were then sent to Dr. Raj Acharya of the State University of New York at Buffalo for fractal analysis. Each piece was cut into 3 slabs approximately 1.2 cm thick and high-resolution contact radiographs were made to provide images for comparing fractal analysis with MR images. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans were also made of each slab for subsequent bone mineral density determination. Slabs were cut into cubes for mechanical using a slow-speed diamond blade wafering saw (Buehler Isomet). The dimensions and wet weights of each cube specimen were measured and recorded. Wet weights

  11. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  15. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1660 - Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A non-image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device... of x-radiation into a visible image. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  20. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  1. 21 CFR 892.1650 - Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. 892... fluoroscopic x-ray system. (a) Identification. An image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system is a device intended to visualize anatomical structures by converting a pattern of x-radiation into a visible...

  2. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data. PMID:20879411

  3. Image-based respiratory motion compensation for fluoroscopic coronary roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Tsin, Yanghai; Sundar, Hari; Sauer, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a new image-based respiratory motion compensation method for coronary roadmapping in fluoroscopic images. A temporal analysis scheme is proposed to identify static structures in the image gradient domain. An extended Lucas-Kanade algorithm involving a weighted sum-of-squared-difference (WSSD) measure is proposed to estimate the soft tissue motion in the presence of static structures. A temporally compositional motion model is used to deal with large image motion incurred by deep breathing. Promising results have been shown in the experiments conducted on clinical data.

  4. Non-invasive imaging of atherosclerosis regression with magnetic resonance to guide drug development.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Paolo; Baldassarre, Damiano; Day, Simon; de Groot, Eric; Fayad, Z A

    2016-08-01

    Slowing of progression and inducing the regression of atherosclerosis with medical therapy have been shown to be associated with an extensive reduction in risk of cardiovascular events. This proof of concept was obtained with invasive angiographic studies but these are, for obvious reasons, impractical for sequential investigations. Non-invasive imaging has henceforth replaced the more cumbersome invasive studies and has proven extremely valuable in numerous occasions. Because of excellent reproducibility and no radiation exposure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the non-invasive method of choice to assess the efficacy of anti-atherosclerotic drugs. The high accuracy of this technology is particularly helpful in rare diseases where the small number of affected patients makes the conduct of outcome-trials in large cohorts impractical. With MRI it is possible to assess the extent, as well as the composition, of atherosclerotic plaques and this further enhances the utility of this technology. PMID:27341753

  5. Diagnostic and prognostic utility of non-invasive imaging in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Barsanti, Cristina; Lenzarini, Francesca; Kusmic, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging technologies are acquiring an increasing relevance to assist clinicians in diagnosis and to guide management and therapeutic treatment of patients, thanks to their non invasive and high resolution properties. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography are the most used imaging modalities to provide detailed morphological reconstructions of tissues and organs. In addition, the use of contrast dyes or radionuclide-labeled tracers permits to get functional and quantitative information about tissue physiology and metabolism in normal and disease state. In recent years, the development of multimodal and hydrid imaging techniques is coming to be the new frontier of medical imaging for the possibility to overcome limitations of single modalities and to obtain physiological and pathophysiological measurements within an accurate anatomical framework. Moreover, the employment of molecular probes, such as ligands or antibodies, allows a selective in vivo targeting of biomolecules involved in specific cellular processes, so expanding the potentialities of imaging techniques for clinical and research applications. This review is aimed to give a survey of characteristics of main diagnostic non-invasive imaging techniques. Current clinical appliances and future perspectives of imaging in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of diabetic complications affecting different organ systems will be particularly addressed. PMID:26131322

  6. Cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzendorfer, Tanja; Brost, Alexander; Jakob, Carolin; Mewes, Philip W.; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation has become the preferred treatment option for atrial fibrillation. Although the standard ablation procedure involves ablation points set by radio-frequency catheters, cryo-balloon catheters have even been reported to be more advantageous in certain cases. As electro-anatomical mapping systems do not support cryo-balloon ablation procedures, X-ray guidance is needed. However, current methods to provide support for cryo-balloon catheters in fluoroscopically guided ablation procedures rely heavily on manual user interaction. To improve this, we propose a first method for automatic cryo-balloon catheter localization in fluoroscopic images based on a blob detection algorithm. Our method is evaluated on 24 clinical images from 17 patients. The method successfully detected the cryoballoon in 22 out of 24 images, yielding a success rate of 91.6 %. The successful localization achieved an accuracy of 1.00 mm +/- 0.44 mm. Even though our methods currently fails in 8.4 % of the images available, it still offers a significant improvement over manual methods. Furthermore, detecting a landmark point along the cryo-balloon catheter can be a very important step for additional post-processing operations.

  7. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼ 20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  8. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J.; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D.; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  9. Non-invasive, Multimodal Functional Imaging of the Intestine with Frozen Micellar Naphthalocyanines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J.; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D.; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Overview There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and give rise to good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ~20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibited non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution with 0.5 cm depth, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole body imaging. PMID:24997526

  10. Non-invasive fluorescence imaging under ambient light conditions using a modulated ICCD and laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    One limitation of fluorescence molecular imaging that can limit clinical implementation and hamper small animal imaging is the inability to eliminate ambient light. Herein, we demonstrate the ability to conduct rapid non-invasive, far-red and near-infrared fluorescence imaging in living animals and a phantom under ambient light conditions using a modulated image intensified CCD (ICCD) and a laser diode operated in homodyne detection. By mapping AC amplitude from three planar images at varying phase delays, we show improvement in target-to-background ratios (TBR) and reasonable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) over continuous wave measurements. The rapid approach can be used to accurately collect fluorescence in situations where ambient light cannot be spectrally conditioned or controlled, such as in the case of fluorescent molecular image-guided surgery. PMID:24575349

  11. Iron Oxide-labeled Collagen Scaffolds for Non-invasive MR Imaging in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Marianne E.; Hermann, Alina; Bühren, Anne; Olde-Damink, Leon; Möckel, Diana; Gremse, Felix; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging holds significant potential for implementation in tissue engineering. It can e.g. be used to monitor the localization and function of tissue-engineered implants, as well as their resorption and remodelling. Thus far, however, the vast majority of efforts in this area of research have focused on the use of ultrasmall super-paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle-labeled cells, colonizing the scaffolds, to indirectly image the implant material. Reasoning that directly labeling scaffold materials might be more beneficial (enabling imaging also in case of non-cellularized implants), more informative (enabling the non-invasive visualization and quantification of scaffold degradation) and more easy to translate into the clinic (since cell-free materials are less complex from a regulatory point-of-view), we here prepared three different types of USPIO nanoparticles, and incorporated them both passively and actively (via chemical conjugation; during collagen crosslinking) into collagen-based scaffold materials. We furthermore optimized the amount of USPIO incorporated into the scaffolds, correlated the amount of entrapped USPIO with MR signal intensity, showed that the labeled scaffolds are highly biocompatible, demonstrated that scaffold degradation can be visualized using MRI and provided initial proof-of-principle for the in vivo visualization of the scaffolds. Consequently, USPIO-labeled scaffold materials seem to be highly suitable for image-guided tissue engineering applications. PMID:24569840

  12. Non-invasive measurements of granular flows by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.; Jeong, E.K.

    1993-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to measure granular-flow in a partially filled, steadily rotating, long, horizontal cylinder. This non-invasive technique can yield statistically averaged two-dimensional concentrations and velocity profiles anywhere in the flow of suitable granular materials. First, rigid body motion of a cylinder fill with granular material was studied to confirm the validity of this method. Then, the density variation of the flowing layer where particles collide and dilate, and the depth of the flowing layer and the flow velocity profile were obtained as a function of the cylinder rotation rate.

  13. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour. PMID:26963393

  14. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Flaschberger, Ingo; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i) milk allergy, ii) peanut allergy and iii) egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  15. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  16. The response of fluoroscopic image intensifier-TV systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Three different types of X-ray fluoroscopic TV chains were investigated: two standard clinical units, one with a vidicon camera tube, the other with a plumbicon camera tube; and the third was a large flat-screen unit. In each an X-ray beam generated at 100 kVp was passed through 10 cm of H2O before aluminum absorbers of varying thickness were introduced. Five video recordings were made at each absorber thickness. The video image was digitized directly from the disk recording and quantized into 128 gray levels. The five recordings were averaged on a point-to-point basis, and the central 900 averaged points were again averaged to yield a value for the gray level assigned to each particular image. This 30 by 30 matrix of points corresponds to input screen areas of 29, 8.2, and 3.6 sq cm for the three units investigated.

  17. [The Time Sequence Noise Characteristics of the X- ray Fluoroscopic Image].

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Kazuma; Fujita, Tomoko; Maeda, Katsuhiko; Ikeuchi, Youko; Hagihara, Yoshiaki; Fujikawa, Keita

    2016-01-01

    The role of the X-ray fluoroscopic image during interventional radiology (IVR) is not only the real-time dynamic image for the catheter operation but also to confirm the vascular anatomy using stored image, so that the importance increases more. For the purpose of measuring the time sequence characteristics of X-ray fluoroscopic image, we sampled the digital value of the same coordinate from each X-ray fluoroscopic image and calculated the frequency properties of the noise for the time sequence order as NPStime by performing Fourier transform on the digital value. The parameters, except k-factor which is the time sequence filter, did not influence NPStime. NPStime, which was examined in this study, showed that it is valuable for the method to analyze the time sequence noise characteristics. And, it also showed that it is possible to evaluate the time sequence image processing parameters of X-ray fluoroscopic image by NPStime. Nowadays, each manufacture of the X-ray angiographic system performs the original image processing to their own X-ray fluoroscopic images. The results of the discussion in this study could show the quantitative analysis on the frequency modulation. And it is possible to calculate NPStime by measuring the digital value of stored X-ray fluoroscopic image. The analysis by this method is also technically convenient for the time sequence noise characteristics of the X-ray fluoroscopic image. PMID:26796929

  18. Non-invasive imaging of flow and vascular function in disease of the aorta

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Matthew C.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    With advancements in technology and a better understanding of human cardiovascular physiology, research as well as clinical care can go beyond dimensional anatomy offered by traditional imaging and investigate aortic functional properties and the impact disease has on this function. Linking the knowledge of the histopathological changes with the alterations in aortic function observed on noninvasive imaging results in a better understanding of disease pathophysiology. Translating this to clinical medicine, these noninvasive imaging assessments of aortic function are proving to be able to diagnosis disease, better predict risk, and assess response to therapies. This review is designed to summarize the various hemodynamic measures that can characterize the aorta, the various non-invasive techniques, and applications for various disease states. PMID:26381770

  19. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-09-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Non-invasive detection of murals with pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Minjie; Sun, Wenfeng; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Qunxi; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Pulsed terahertz reflected imaging technology has been expected to have great potential for the non-invasive analysis of artworks. In this paper, three types of defects hidden in the plaster used to simulate the cases of defects in the murals, have been investigated by a pulsed terahertz reflected imaging system. These preset defects include a circular groove, a cross-shaped slit and a piece of "Y-type" metal plate built in the plaster. With the terahertz reflective tomography, information about defects has been determined involving the thickness from the surface of sample to the built-in defect, the profile and distribution of the defect. Additionally, three-dimensional analyses have been performed in order to reveal the internal structure of defects. Terahertz reflective imaging can be applied to the defect investigation of the murals.

  1. Non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium castaneum embryos.

    PubMed

    Strobl, Frederic; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2014-06-01

    Insect development has contributed significantly to our understanding of metazoan development. However, most information has been obtained by analyzing a single species, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Embryonic development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum differs fundamentally from that of Drosophila in aspects such as short-germ development, embryonic leg development, extensive extra-embryonic membrane formation and non-involuted head development. Although Tribolium has become the second most important insect model organism, previous live imaging attempts have addressed only specific questions and no long-term live imaging data of Tribolium embryogenesis have been available. By combining light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy with a novel mounting method, we achieved complete, continuous and non-invasive fluorescence live imaging of Tribolium embryogenesis at high spatiotemporal resolution. The embryos survived the 2-day or longer imaging process, developed into adults and produced fertile progeny. Our data document all morphogenetic processes from the rearrangement of the uniform blastoderm to the onset of regular muscular movement in the same embryo and in four orientations, contributing significantly to the understanding of Tribolium development. Furthermore, we created a comprehensive chronological table of Tribolium embryogenesis, integrating most previous work and providing a reference for future studies. Based on our observations, we provide evidence that serosa window closure and serosa opening, although deferred by more than 1 day, are linked. All our long-term imaging datasets are available as a resource for the community. Tribolium is only the second insect species, after Drosophila, for which non-invasive long-term fluorescence live imaging has been achieved.

  2. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  3. Non-invasive imaging of cellulose microfibril orientation within plant cell walls by polarized Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Singh, Seema; Joo, Michael; Vega-Sanchez, Miguel; Ronald, Pamela; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul; Auer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose microfibrils represent the major scaffold of plant cell walls. Different packing and orientation of the microfibrils at the microscopic scale determines the macroscopic properties of cell walls and thus affect their functions with a profound effect on plant survival. We developed a polarized Raman microspectroscopic method to determine cellulose microfibril orientation within rice plant cell walls. Employing an array of point measurements as well as area imaging and subsequent Matlab-assisted data processing, we were able to characterize the distribution of cellulose microfibril orientation in terms of director angle and anisotropy magnitude. Using this approach we detected differences between wild type rice plants and the rice brittle culm mutant, which shows a more disordered cellulose microfibril arrangement, and differences between different tissues of a wild type rice plant. This novel non-invasive Raman imaging approach allows for quantitative assessment of cellulose fiber orientation in cell walls of herbaceous plants, an important advancement in cell wall characterization.

  4. Quantitative non-invasive intracellular imaging of Plasmodium falciparum infected human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-05-01

    Malaria is a virulent pathological condition which results in over a million annual deaths. The parasitic agent Plasmodium falciparum has been extensively studied in connection with this epidemic but much remains unknown about its development inside the red blood cell host. Optical and fluorescence imaging are among the two most common procedures for investigating infected erythrocytes but both require the introduction of exogenous contrast agents. In this letter, we present a procedure for the non-invasive in situ imaging of malaria infected red blood cells. The procedure is based on the utilization of simultaneously acquired quantitative phase and independent topography data to extract intracellular information. Our method allows for the identification of the developmental stages of the parasite and facilitates in situ analysis of the morphological changes associated with the progression of this disease. This information may assist in the development of efficacious treatment therapies for this condition.

  5. Non-invasive diagnostics in pathological fossils by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Keupp, H.; Manz, B.; Volke, F.

    2005-03-01

    For more than a decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been routinely employed in clinical diagnostics because it allows to non-invasively study anatomical structures and physiological processes in vivo and to differentiate between healthy and pathological states, particularly in soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate that MRI can likewise be applied to fossilized biological samples and help in elucidating paleopathological and paleoecological questions: Five anomalous guards of Jurassic and Cretaceous belemnites are presented along with putative paleopathological scenarios directly derived from 3D Magnetic Resonance images with microscopic resolution. These syn vivo deformities of both the mineralized internal rostrum and the surrounding former soft tissue can be traced back in part to traumatic events of predator-prey-interactions, and partly to parasitism. Evidence is presented that the frequently observed anomalous apical collar might be indicative of an inflammatory disease. Finally, the potential of Magnetic Resonance techniques for further paleontological applications is being discussed.

  6. Non-invasive diagnostics in fossils - Magnetic Resonance Imaging of pathological belemnites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mietchen, D.; Keupp, H.; Manz, B.; Volke, F.

    2005-06-01

    For more than a decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been routinely employed in clinical diagnostics because it allows non-invasive studies of anatomical structures and physiological processes in vivo and to differentiate between healthy and pathological states, particularly of soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate that MRI can likewise be applied to fossilized biological samples and help in elucidating paleopathological and paleoecological questions: Five anomalous guards of Jurassic and Cretaceous belemnites are presented along with putative paleopathological diagnoses directly derived from 3D MR images with microscopic resolution. Syn vivo deformities of both the mineralized internal rostrum and the surrounding former soft tissue can be traced back in part to traumatic events of predator-prey-interactions, and partly to parasitism. Besides, evidence is presented that the frequently observed anomalous apical collar might be indicative of an inflammatory disease. These findings highlight the potential of Magnetic Resonance techniques for further paleontological applications.

  7. Auto-shape lossless compression of pharynx and esophagus fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Arif, Arif Sameh; Mansor, Sarina; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran; Karim, Hezerul Abdul

    2015-02-01

    The massive number of medical images produced by fluoroscopic and other conventional diagnostic imaging devices demand a considerable amount of space for data storage. This paper proposes an effective method for lossless compression of fluoroscopic images. The main contribution in this paper is the extraction of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluoroscopic images using appropriate shapes. The extracted ROI is then effectively compressed using customized correlation and the combination of Run Length and Huffman coding, to increase compression ratio. The experimental results achieved show that the proposed method is able to improve the compression ratio by 400 % as compared to that of traditional methods.

  8. The AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: general overview of fluoroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schueler, B A

    2000-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is used to visualize the motion of internal fluids, structures, and devices. During a fluoroscopic examination, the operator controls activation of the x-ray tube for real-time imaging of the patient. The article provides a general overview of fluoroscopic imaging from its initial development to modern use. Early fluoroscopes produced a dim image on a fluorescent screen that required dark adaptation of the physician's eyes to optimize viewing conditions. Image intensifiers were later developed to replace the fluorescent screen and increase image brightness. Modern fluoroscopy systems include an image intensifier with television image display and a choice of several different types of image recording devices. Fluoroscopic equipment is available in many different configurations for use in a wide variety of clinical applications.

  9. Optimal Non-Invasive Fault Classification Model for Packaged Ceramic Tile Quality Monitoring Using MMW Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Smriti; Singh, Dharmendra

    2016-04-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) frequency has emerged as an efficient tool for different stand-off imaging applications. In this paper, we have dealt with a novel MMW imaging application, i.e., non-invasive packaged goods quality estimation for industrial quality monitoring applications. An active MMW imaging radar operating at 60 GHz has been ingeniously designed for concealed fault estimation. Ceramic tiles covered with commonly used packaging cardboard were used as concealed targets for undercover fault classification. A comparison of computer vision-based state-of-the-art feature extraction techniques, viz, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), wavelet transform (WT), principal component analysis (PCA), gray level co-occurrence texture (GLCM), and histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) has been done with respect to their efficient and differentiable feature vector generation capability for undercover target fault classification. An extensive number of experiments were performed with different ceramic tile fault configurations, viz., vertical crack, horizontal crack, random crack, diagonal crack along with the non-faulty tiles. Further, an independent algorithm validation was done demonstrating classification accuracy: 80, 86.67, 73.33, and 93.33 % for DFT, WT, PCA, GLCM, and HOG feature-based artificial neural network (ANN) classifier models, respectively. Classification results show good capability for HOG feature extraction technique towards non-destructive quality inspection with appreciably low false alarm as compared to other techniques. Thereby, a robust and optimal image feature-based neural network classification model has been proposed for non-invasive, automatic fault monitoring for a financially and commercially competent industrial growth.

  10. Thermal Imaging to Study Stress Non-invasively in Unrestrained Birds.

    PubMed

    Jerem, Paul; Herborn, Katherine; McCafferty, Dominic; McKeegan, Dorothy; Nager, Ruedi

    2015-11-06

    Stress, a central concept in biology, describes a suite of emergency responses to challenges. Among other responses, stress leads to a change in blood flow that results in a net influx of blood to key organs and an increase in core temperature. This stress-induced hyperthermia is used to assess stress. However, measuring core temperature is invasive. As blood flow is redirected to the core, the periphery of the body can cool. This paper describes a protocol where peripheral body temperature is measured non-invasively in wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) using infrared thermography. In the field we created a set-up bringing the birds to an ideal position in front of the camera by using a baited box. The camera takes a short thermal video recording of the undisturbed bird before applying a mild stressor (closing the box and therefore capturing the bird), and the bird's response to being trapped is recorded. The bare skin of the eye-region is the warmest area in the image. This allows an automated extraction of the maximum eye-region temperature from each image frame, followed by further steps of manual data filtering removing the most common sources of errors (motion blur, blinking). This protocol provides a time series of eye-region temperature with a fine temporal resolution that allows us to study the dynamics of the stress response non-invasively. Further work needs to demonstrate the usefulness of the method to assess stress, for instance to investigate whether eye-region temperature response is proportional to the strength of the stressor. If this can be confirmed, it will provide a valuable alternative method of stress assessment in animals and will be useful to a wide range of researchers from ecologists, conservation biologists, physiologists to animal welfare researchers.

  11. Thermal Imaging to Study Stress Non-invasively in Unrestrained Birds

    PubMed Central

    Jerem, Paul; Herborn, Katherine; McCafferty, Dominic; McKeegan, Dorothy; Nager, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    Stress, a central concept in biology, describes a suite of emergency responses to challenges. Among other responses, stress leads to a change in blood flow that results in a net influx of blood to key organs and an increase in core temperature. This stress-induced hyperthermia is used to assess stress. However, measuring core temperature is invasive. As blood flow is redirected to the core, the periphery of the body can cool. This paper describes a protocol where peripheral body temperature is measured non-invasively in wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) using infrared thermography. In the field we created a set-up bringing the birds to an ideal position in front of the camera by using a baited box. The camera takes a short thermal video recording of the undisturbed bird before applying a mild stressor (closing the box and therefore capturing the bird), and the bird’s response to being trapped is recorded. The bare skin of the eye-region is the warmest area in the image. This allows an automated extraction of the maximum eye-region temperature from each image frame, followed by further steps of manual data filtering removing the most common sources of errors (motion blur, blinking). This protocol provides a time series of eye-region temperature with a fine temporal resolution that allows us to study the dynamics of the stress response non-invasively. Further work needs to demonstrate the usefulness of the method to assess stress, for instance to investigate whether eye-region temperature response is proportional to the strength of the stressor. If this can be confirmed, it will provide a valuable alternative method of stress assessment in animals and will be useful to a wide range of researchers from ecologists, conservation biologists, physiologists to animal welfare researchers. PMID:26575985

  12. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s.

  13. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    PubMed

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s. PMID:23286091

  14. Non-invasive PET Imaging of PARP1 Expression in Glioblastoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Brandon; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Salinas, Beatriz; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Kossatz, Susanne; Vansteene, Axel; Longo, Valerie A.; Bolaender, Alexander; Chiosis, Gabriela; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study presents [18F]PARPi as imaging agent for PARP1 expression. Procedures [18F]PARPi was generated by conjugating a 2H-phthalazin-1-one scaffold to 4-[18F]fluorobenzoic acid. Biochemical assays, optical in vivo competition, biodistribution analysis, positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography, and PET/ magnetic resonance imaging studies were performed in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of glioblastoma. Results [18F]PARPi shows suitable pharmacokinetic properties for brain tumor imaging (IC50=2.8±1.1 nM; logPCHI=2.15±0.41; plasma-free fraction=63.9±12.6 %) and accumulates selectively in orthotopic brain tumor tissue. Tracer accumulation in subcutaneous brain tumors was 1.82±0.21 %ID/g, whereas in healthy brain, the uptake was only 0.04±0.01 %ID/g. Conclusions [18F]PARPi is a selective PARP1 imaging agent that can be used to visualize glioblastoma in xenograft and orthotopic mouse models with high precision and good signal/noise ratios. It offers new opportunities to non-invasively image tumor growth and monitor interventions. PMID:26493053

  15. Using Non-Invasive Multi-Spectral Imaging to Quantitatively Assess Tissue Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A; Chernomordik, V; Riley, J; Hassan, M; Amyot, F; Dasgeb, B; Demos, S G; Pursley, R; Little, R; Yarchoan, R; Tao, Y; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2007-10-04

    This research describes a non-invasive, non-contact method used to quantitatively analyze the functional characteristics of tissue. Multi-spectral images collected at several near-infrared wavelengths are input into a mathematical optical skin model that considers the contributions from different analytes in the epidermis and dermis skin layers. Through a reconstruction algorithm, we can quantify the percent of blood in a given area of tissue and the fraction of that blood that is oxygenated. Imaging normal tissue confirms previously reported values for the percent of blood in tissue and the percent of blood that is oxygenated in tissue and surrounding vasculature, for the normal state and when ischemia is induced. This methodology has been applied to assess vascular Kaposi's sarcoma lesions and the surrounding tissue before and during experimental therapies. The multi-spectral imaging technique has been combined with laser Doppler imaging to gain additional information. Results indicate that these techniques are able to provide quantitative and functional information about tissue changes during experimental drug therapy and investigate progression of disease before changes are visibly apparent, suggesting a potential for them to be used as complementary imaging techniques to clinical assessment.

  16. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1)H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1)H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  17. Visualization and quantification of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected cells using non-invasive molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiasheng; Cai, Zhengxin; White, Alexander G; Jin, Tao; Wang, Xiaolei; Kadayakkara, Deepak; Anderson, Carolyn J; Ambrose, Zandrea; Young, Won-Bin

    2015-10-01

    In vivo imaging can provide real-time information and three-dimensional (3D) non-invasive images of deep tissues and organs, including the brain, whilst allowing longitudinal observation of the same animals, thus eliminating potential variation between subjects. Current in vivo imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI), can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of target cells, which is urgently needed for revealing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dissemination in real-time and HIV-1 reservoirs during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). To demonstrate that in vivo imaging can be used to visualize and quantify simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-transduced cells, we genetically engineered SIV to carry different imaging reporters. Based on the expression of the reporter genes, we could visualize and quantify the SIV-transduced cells via vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyping in a mouse model using BLI, PET-CT or MRI. We also engineered a chimeric EcoSIV for in vivo infection study. Our results demonstrated that BLI is sensitive enough to detect as few as five single cells transduced with virus, whilst PET-CT can provide 3D images of the spatial location of as few as 10 000 SIV-infected cells. We also demonstrated that MRI can provide images with high spatial resolution in a 3D anatomical context to distinguish a small population of SIV-transduced cells. The in vivo imaging platform described here can potentially serve as a powerful tool to visualize lentiviral infection, including when and where viraemia rebounds, and how reservoirs are formed and maintained during latency or suppressive ART. PMID:26297664

  18. Visualization and quantification of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected cells using non-invasive molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiasheng; Cai, Zhengxin; White, Alexander G.; Jin, Tao; Wang, Xiaolei; Kadayakkara, Deepak; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Ambrose, Zandrea

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging can provide real-time information and three-dimensional (3D) non-invasive images of deep tissues and organs, including the brain, whilst allowing longitudinal observation of the same animals, thus eliminating potential variation between subjects. Current in vivo imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI), can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of target cells, which is urgently needed for revealing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) dissemination in real-time and HIV-1 reservoirs during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). To demonstrate that in vivo imaging can be used to visualize and quantify simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-transduced cells, we genetically engineered SIV to carry different imaging reporters. Based on the expression of the reporter genes, we could visualize and quantify the SIV-transduced cells via vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyping in a mouse model using BLI, PET-CT or MRI. We also engineered a chimeric EcoSIV for in vivo infection study. Our results demonstrated that BLI is sensitive enough to detect as few as five single cells transduced with virus, whilst PET-CT can provide 3D images of the spatial location of as few as 10 000 SIV-infected cells. We also demonstrated that MRI can provide images with high spatial resolution in a 3D anatomical context to distinguish a small population of SIV-transduced cells. The in vivo imaging platform described here can potentially serve as a powerful tool to visualize lentiviral infection, including when and where viraemia rebounds, and how reservoirs are formed and maintained during latency or suppressive ART. PMID:26297664

  19. Non-invasive mechanical properties estimation of embedded objects using tactile imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleheen, Firdous; Oleksyuk, Vira; Sahu, Amrita; Won, Chang-Hee

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive mechanical property estimation of an embedded object (tumor) can be used in medicine for characterization between malignant and benign lesions. We developed a tactile imaging sensor which is capable of detecting mechanical properties of inclusions. Studies show that stiffness of tumor is a key physiological discerning parameter for malignancy. As our sensor compresses the tumor from the surface, the sensing probe deforms, and the light scatters. This forms the tactile image. Using the features of the image, we can estimate the mechanical properties such as size, depth, and elasticity of the embedded object. To test the performance of the method, a phantom study was performed. Silicone rubber balls were used as embedded objects inside the tissue mimicking substrate made of Polydimethylsiloxane. The average relative errors for size, depth, and elasticity were found to be 67.5%, 48.2%, and 69.1%, respectively. To test the feasibility of the sensor in estimating the elasticity of tumor, a pilot clinical study was performed on twenty breast cancer patients. The estimated elasticity was correlated with the biopsy results. Preliminary results show that the sensitivity of 67% and the specificity of 91.7% for elasticity. Results from the clinical study suggest that the tactile imaging sensor may be used as a tumor malignancy characterization tool.

  20. Dosimetric properties of the Theraview fluoroscopic electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, A G; Bonnett, D E

    2000-05-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) can be used for non-imaging applications in radiotherapy such as patient dosimetry. Of the systems available, the fluoroscopic camera-based EPID Theraview (InfiMed Inc.) has not been studied to date, and a review of the dosimetric properties of the system is presented here. In the "single set-up" mode of image acquisition, pixel intensity increases sublinearly with applied dose. The response was dependent on the system's video signal gain and showed a threshold dose to the detector in the range 0.05-0.35 cGy, and pixel saturation at detector doses in the range 1.2-1.6 cGy. Repeated exposures of the EPID were observed to be extremely reproducible (standard deviation 0.5%). The sensitivity of the system showed a linear decline of 0.04% day-1 over a 68-day period, during which time the relative off-axis response within 10 x 10 cm2 field was constant to within a standard deviation of 0.56%. The system shows spatial non-uniformity, which requires correction for application to dose measurements in two-dimensions. Warm-up of the camera control unit required a period of at least 40 min and was associated with an enhancement in pixel intensity of up to 12%. A radiation dose history effect was observed at doses as low as 0.2 Gy. Camera dark current was shown to be negligible at normal accelerator operation. No discernible image distortion was found. Mechanical stability on gantry rotation was also assessed and image displacement of up to 5 mm at the isocentre was observed. It was concluded that the device could be used for dosimetry provided necessary precautions were observed and corrections made. PMID:10884749

  1. Non-invasive imaging of oxygen extraction fraction in adults with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Lori C; Gindville, Melissa C; Scott, Allison O; Juttukonda, Meher R; Strother, Megan K; Kassim, Adetola A; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Lu, Hanzhang; Pruthi, Sumit; Shyr, Yu; Donahue, Manus J

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell anaemia is a monogenetic disorder with a high incidence of stroke. While stroke screening procedures exist for children with sickle cell anaemia, no accepted screening procedures exist for assessing stroke risk in adults. The purpose of this study is to use novel magnetic resonance imaging methods to evaluate physiological relationships between oxygen extraction fraction, cerebral blood flow, and clinical markers of cerebrovascular impairment in adults with sickle cell anaemia. The specific goal is to determine to what extent elevated oxygen extraction fraction may be uniquely present in patients with higher levels of clinical impairment and therefore may represent a candidate biomarker of stroke risk. Neurological evaluation, structural imaging, and the non-invasive T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging magnetic resonance imaging method were applied in sickle cell anaemia (n = 34) and healthy race-matched control (n = 11) volunteers without sickle cell trait to assess whole-brain oxygen extraction fraction, cerebral blood flow, degree of vasculopathy, severity of anaemia, and presence of prior infarct; findings were interpreted in the context of physiological models. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction were elevated (P < 0.05) in participants with sickle cell anaemia (n = 27) not receiving monthly blood transfusions (interquartile range cerebral blood flow = 46.2-56.8 ml/100 g/min; oxygen extraction fraction = 0.39-0.50) relative to controls (interquartile range cerebral blood flow = 40.8-46.3 ml/100 g/min; oxygen extraction fraction = 0.33-0.38). Oxygen extraction fraction (P < 0.0001) but not cerebral blood flow was increased in participants with higher levels of clinical impairment. These data provide support for T2-relaxation-under-spin-tagging being able to quickly and non-invasively detect elevated oxygen extraction fraction in individuals with sickle cell anaemia with higher levels of clinical impairment. Our results support the

  2. Monitoring molecular, functional and morphologic aspects of bone metastases using non-invasive imaging.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Semmler, Wolfhard

    2012-03-01

    Bone is among the most common locations of metastasis and therefore represents an important clinical target for diagnostic follow-up in cancer patients. In the pathogenesis of bone metastases, disseminated tumor cells proliferating in bone interact with the local microenvironment stimulating or inhibiting osteoclast and osteoblast activity. Non-invasive imaging methods monitor molecular, functional and morphologic changes in both compartments of these skeletal lesions - the bone and the soft tissue tumor compartment. In the bone compartment, morphologic information on skeletal destruction is assessed by computed tomography (CT) and radiography. Pathogenic processes of osteoclast and osteoblast activity, however, can be imaged using optical imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission CT (SPECT) and skeletal scintigraphy. Accordingly, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT as well as diffusion- weighted MRI and optical imaging are used to assess morphologic aspects on the macroscopic and cellular level of the soft tissue tumor compartment. Imaging methods such as PET, MR spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced techniques and vessel size imaging further elucidate on pathogenic processes in this compartment including information on metabolism and vascularization. By monitoring these aspects in bone lesions, new insights in the pathogenesis of skeletal metastases can be gained. In translation to the clinical situation, these novel methods for the monitoring of bone metastases might be applied in patients to improve follow-up of these lesions, in particular after therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes established and experimental imaging techniques for the monitoring of tumor and bone cell activity including molecular, functional and morphological aspects in bone metastases. PMID:22214500

  3. Non-invasive mapping of lipids in plant tissue using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Thomas; Rolletschek, Hardy; Webb, Andrew; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2009-01-01

    Plant oil has become an important component in the search for a replacement for non-renewable energy sources, as well as being used for a wide range of industrial purposes, all in addition to its vital importance for human diet. Detailed knowledge of the lipid distribution in plants is fundamental for the understanding of local regulatory networks covering storage metabolism, and for the development of new approaches for plant breeding and transgenic research. We here review a measurement protocol or "tool" based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which allows the non-invasive detection and quantitative visualization of lipid in living plant tissue. The method provides quantitative lipid maps with a resolution close to the cellular level and can be used on a wide range of plants and is applicable at the level of individual tissues, organs, or entire plants during ontogeny. Lipid imaging is designed for both biotechnology and basic science and can be combined with histological, biochemical, and gene expression analysis. Here we present the method as practiced in our group, and discuss unique advantages and limitations of the lipid-imaging tool. Seeds of barley and rapeseed were used as a model for visualization of local oil accumulation at the organ- and tissue-specific scale.

  4. Graft complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: Role of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Boraschi, Piero; Della Pina, Maria Clotilde; Donati, Francescamaria

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in adult patients with endstage liver disease. Survival of both graft and patient has progressively improved over time due to improvements in surgical and medical treatment. However, post-transplant complications still have a significant impact on morbidity and mortality associated with transplant surgery. The most common adverse events of the graft include vascular (arterial and venous stenosis and thrombosis), biliary (leakage, strictures, stones) and parenchymal complications (hepatitis virus C infection, HCC recurrence, liver abscesses). The diagnosis of these adverse events is often challenging because of the low specificity of clinical and biologic findings. Different diagnostic algorithms have been proposed for the detection of graft complications and, in this setting, radiological evaluation plays a key role in differential diagnosis of graft complications and the exclusion of other adverse events. Ultrasound examination is established the first-line method of identifying adverse events in liver transplant recipients but a normal or a technically unsatisfactory study cannot exclude the presence of biliary, vascular and/or parenchymal complications. In these circumstances, before planning any treatment, multi-detector CT and/or MR imaging and MR cholangiography should be performed for the evaluation of vascular structures, biliary system, liver parenchyma and fluid collections. The aim of this review is to illustrate the role and state-of-the-art of non-invasive cross-sectional imaging techniques in the diagnosis and management of complications which primarily affect the graft in patients after liver transplantation. PMID:27235874

  5. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  6. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  7. Non-invasive Imaging of Staphylococcus aureus Infections with a Nuclease-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Frank J.; Huang, Lingyan; Olson, Michael E.; Powers, Kristy M.; Hernandez, Luiza I.; Meyerholz, David K.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Behlke, Mark A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; McNamara, James O.

    2013-01-01

    Technologies that enable the rapid detection and localization of bacterial infections in living animals could address an unmet need for infectious disease diagnostics. We describe a molecular imaging approach for the specific, non-invasive detection of S. aureus based on the activity of its secreted nuclease, micrococcal nuclease (MN). Several short, synthetic oligonucleotides, rendered resistant to mammalian serum nucleases by various chemical modifications, flanked with a fluorophore and quencher, were activated upon degradation by recombinant MN and in S. aureus culture supernatants. A probe consisting of a pair of deoxythymidines flanked by several 2′-O-methyl-modified nucleotides was activated in culture supernatants of S. aureus but not in culture supernatants of several other pathogenic bacteria. Systemic administration of this probe to mice bearing bioluminescent S. aureus muscle infections resulted in probe activation at the infection sites in an MN-dependent manner. This novel bacterial imaging approach has potential clinical applicability for S. aureus and several other medically significant pathogens. PMID:24487433

  8. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  9. Development of an X-ray Computed Tomography System for Non-Invasive Imaging of Industrial Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, J.; Sipaun, S. M.; Mustapha, I.; Zain, R. M.; Rahman, M. F. A.; Mustapha, M.; Shaari, M. R.; Hassan, H.; Said, M. K. M.; Mohamad, G. H. P.; Ibrahim, M. M.

    2008-05-20

    X-ray computed tomography is a powerful non-invasive imaging technique for viewing an object's inner structures in two-dimensional cross-section images without the need to physically section it. The invention of CT techniques revolutionised the field of medical diagnostic imaging because it provided more detailed and useful information than any previous non-invasive imaging techniques. The method is increasingly being used in industry, aerospace, geosciences and archaeology. This paper describes the development of an X-ray computed tomography system for imaging of industrial materials. The theoretical aspects of CT scanner, the system configurations and the adopted algorithm for image reconstruction are discussed. The penetrating rays from a 160 kV industrial X-ray machine were used to investigate structures that manifest in a manufactured component or product. Some results were presented in this paper.

  10. Non-invasive molecular profiling of cancer using photoacoustic imaging of functionalized gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Anant J.; Alles, Erwin J.; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Robinson, Simon P.; deSouza, Nandita; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2014-03-01

    Although molecularly targeted cancer therapies have shown great promise, it is now evident that responses are dependent upon the molecular genetic context. Spatial and temporal tumour heterogeneity renders biopsy of solid tumours unsuitable for determining the genetic profile of the disease, making adaptation of appropriate therapy difficult. We have utilized the tunable optical absorption characteristic of gold nanorods to assess the potential of photoacoustics for non-invasive multiplexed molecular imaging. Gold nanorods with resonance peaks at 700nm and 900nm were functionalised with in-house antibodies ICR55 and ICR62, targeted to HER2 and EGFR transmembrane receptors, respectively. Three human squamous carcinoma cell lines (LICR-LON-HN4 expressing high HER2 and low EGFR, LICR-LON-HN3 expressing intermediate levels of HER2 and EGFR and A431 expressing high EGFR and low HER2) were incubated with the targeted nanorods for 24 hours. Cells were then incorporated as simulated tumours in tissue-like phantoms composed of 7.5% gelatin containing 0.5% Intralipid® for optical scattering and imaged at a depth of 2.5 cm, using a new clinical in-house multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging system. Images were obtained from the cell inclusions for wavelengths ranging from 710 to 950 nm at 40 nm intervals, and the mean amplitude of the photoacoustic image was computed for each wavelength, to determine their relative receptor expression levels. The molecular profile of the cells obtained using multi-wavelength photoacoustics had substantial similarity to that obtained using flow cytometry. These preliminary results confirm selective uptake of the functionalised nanorods, which reflects the cellular expression of therapeutically important oncoproteins, and give an indication of the potential of photoacoustics for multiplexed molecular profiling.

  11. Non-Invasive Imaging of Reactor Cores Using Cosmic Ray Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Cosmic ray muons penetrate deeply in material, with some passing completely through very thick objects. This penetrating quality is the basis of two distinct, but related imaging techniques. The first measures the number of cosmic ray muons transmitted through parts of an object. Relatively fewer muons are absorbed along paths in which they encounter less material, compared to higher density paths, so the relative density of material is measured. This technique is called muon transmission imaging, and has been used to infer the density and structure of a variety of large masses, including mine overburden, volcanoes, pyramids, and buildings. In a second, more recently developed technique, the angular deflection of muons is measured by trajectory-tracking detectors placed on two opposing sides of an object. Muons are deflected more strongly by heavy nuclei, since multiple Coulomb scattering angle is approximately proportional to the nuclear charge. Therefore, a map showing regions of large deflection will identify the location of uranium in contrast to lighter nuclei. This technique is termed muon scattering tomography (MST) and has been developed to screen shipping containers for the presence of concealed nuclear material. Both techniques are a good way of non-invasively inspecting objects. A previously unexplored topic was applying MST to imaging large objects. Here we demonstrate extending the MST technique to the task of identifying relatively thick objects inside very thick shielding. We measured cosmic ray muons passing through a physical arrangement of material similar to a nuclear reactor, with thick concrete shielding and a heavy metal core. Newly developed algorithms were used to reconstruct an image of the ``mock reactor core,'' with resolution of approximately 30 cm.

  12. Non-invasive imaging of transgenic GFP expression in neonatal mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhuo, Lang

    2007-02-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a traditional biomarker for astrocytes of the central nervous system. In this study, non-invasive in vivo imaging of GFAP-GFP (green fluorescent protein) expression in the brain of neonatal transgenic mice is used as a novel method to investigate the relationship between the expression of the transgene at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hr post-treatment in mice subjected to a single administration of 12 mg/kg of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH 3-MPTP). The GFP elevation was found to peak at 6 hr and lasted to at least 8 hr after the toxin treatment. Histological examination of fixed brain sections using immunohistochemistry (IHC) shows an increase in GFP and GFAP signal from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the hippocampus. The results have provided quantitative fluorescence and qualitative histological evidence for the activation of the GFAP-GFP transgene in astrocytes following neurotoxin 2'-CH 3-MPTP administration, suggesting that the model described here could be used to study neuronal degeneration such as Parkinson's disease and in general, developmental neurotoxicity in live animals.

  13. Non-invasive fluorescent imaging of gliosis in transgenic mice for profiling developmental neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Gideon; Zhang Chunyan; Zhuo Lang . E-mail: lzhuo@ibn.a-star.edu.sg

    2007-05-15

    Gliosis is a universal response of Brain to almost all types of neural insults, including neurotoxicity, neurodegeneration, viral infection, and stroke. A hallmark of gliotic reaction is the up-regulation of the astrocytic biomarker GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), which often precedes the anatomically apparent damages in Brain. In this study, neonatal transgenic mice at postnatal day (PD) 4 expressing GFP (green fluorescent protein) under the control of a widely used 2.2-kb human GFAP promoter in Brain are treated with two model neurotoxicants, 1-methyl-4(2'-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (2'-CH{sub 3}-MPTP), and kainic acid (KA), respectively, to induce gliosis. Here we show that the neurotoxicant-induced acute gliosis can be non-invasively imaged and quantified in Brain of conscious (un-anesthetized) mice in real-time, at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h post-toxicant dosing. Therefore the current methodology could be a useful tool for studying the developmental aspects of neuropathies and neurotoxicity.

  14. Non-invasive single-cell biomechanical analysis using live-imaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Yanthe E; Lund, Amanda W; Lin, Alex W H; Ng, Chee P; Alsuwaidi, Aysha; Azzeh, Sara; Gater, Deborah L; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-09-01

    The physiological state of a cell is governed by a multitude of processes and can be described by a combination of mechanical, spatial and temporal properties. Quantifying cell dynamics at multiple scales is essential for comprehensive studies of cellular function, and remains a challenge for traditional end-point assays. We introduce an efficient, non-invasive computational tool that takes time-lapse images as input to automatically detect, segment and analyze unlabeled live cells; the program then outputs kinematic cellular shape and migration parameters, while simultaneously measuring cellular stiffness and viscosity. We demonstrate the capabilities of the program by testing it on human mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) induced to differentiate towards the osteoblastic (huOB) lineage, and T-lymphocyte cells (T cells) of naïve and stimulated phenotypes. The program detected relative cellular stiffness differences in huMSCs and huOBs that were comparable to those obtained with studies that utilize atomic force microscopy; it further distinguished naïve from stimulated T cells, based on characteristics necessary to invoke an immune response. In summary, we introduce an integrated tool to decipher spatiotemporal and intracellular dynamics of cells, providing a new and alternative approach for cell characterization. PMID:27422102

  15. Imaging iron in skin and liver: Non-invasive tools for hemochromatosis therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Fleming, R.; Gonçalves, A.; Neres, M.; Alves, L. C.; Silva, J. N.; Filipe, P.; Silva, R.

    2009-06-01

    Hemochromatosis is a hereditary disease that causes an inappropriate intestinal absorption of Fe resulting in its accumulation in multiple organs, such as liver, heart and skin. Fe metabolism indicators in the circulation do not provide reliable indication of organ overload as they can be influenced by other clinical conditions. Assessing metabolism organs such as liver requires invasive procedures which is not adequate to patient's serial observations. Our aim was establishing cross sectional and longitudinal information on the amount of Fe that deposited in skin and liver during a life period, how iron is cleared out by therapy intervention and study the relationship of these changes between the two organs using non-invasive methods. Results on skin Fe deposition were evaluated by nuclear microscopy techniques and liver Fe concentrations determined by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. Skin and liver Fe concentrations were correlated. Though Fe deposits in the two organs were differently associated with blood Fe metabolism conventional markers. Fe serial variations in skin and liver highlighted the value of assessing Fe organ deposits for estimating hemochromatosis evolution and therapy efficacy.

  16. Development of Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery and Non-invasive Imaging of Therapeutic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P.; Mao, Hui; Wang, Andrew Y.; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by non-invasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine. PMID:19275541

  17. Future Imaging Alternatives: The Clinical Non-invasive Modalities in Diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Esam

    2015-01-01

    Background : Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a remarkably high incidence worldwide, and a fairly serious prognosis. This is encouraging further research into advanced technologies for non-invasive methods of making early diagnoses, ideally in primary care settings. Method : In this article, the available objective Non-imaging methods for diagnosing OSCC have been reviewed. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL have been searched for advanced technologies of non-invasive methods in diagnosis of OSCC, including oral brush biopsy, optical biopsy, saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis and others. Results : Toluidine blue, one of the oldest non-invasive methods for diagnosing OSCC, is unreliable because of its subjectivity, as it is dependent on the experience of the examiner. The diagnosis of Oral carcinoma by Oral brush biopsy with exfoliative cytology based on nano-bio-chip sensor platform shows 97–100% sensitivity and 86% specificity. Another promising non-invasive technique for OSCC diagnosis is saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis, which is an alternative to serum testing. Optical biopsy, which uses the technology of spectroscopy, can be used to detect changes at a sub-cellular level; thus, it provides information that may not be available with conventional histology with reliable sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion : It is clearly evident that screening and early effective detection of cancer and pre-cancerous lesions have the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality of this disease. The imaging technologies are subjective procedures since all of them require interpretation and significantly affected by the examiner experience. These make further research for advanced objective procedures. Saliva-based oral cancer diagnosis and optical biopsy are promising objective non-invasive methods for diagnosing OSCC. They are easy to perform clinically at primary care set. They show promising pathways for future development of more effective

  18. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models.

    PubMed

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Mishra, P; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Li, R; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J H

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  19. Imaging human brain networks to improve the clinical efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sale, Martin V; Mattingley, Jason B; Zalesky, Andrew; Cocchi, Luca

    2015-10-01

    The flexible integration of segregated neural processes is essential to healthy brain function. Advances in neuroimaging techniques have revealed that psychiatric and neurological disorders are characterized by anomalies in the dynamic integration of widespread neural populations. Re-establishing optimal neural activity is an important component of the treatment of such disorders. Non-invasive brain stimulation is emerging as a viable tool to selectively restore both local and widespread neural activity in patients affected by psychiatric and neurological disorders. Importantly, the different forms of non-invasive brain stimulation affect neural activity in distinct ways, which has important ramifications for their clinical efficacy. In this review, we discuss how non-invasive brain stimulation techniques influence widespread neural integration across brain regions. We suggest that the efficacy of such techniques in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological conditions is contingent on applying the appropriate stimulation paradigm to restore specific aspects of altered neural integration. PMID:26409343

  20. Non-Invasive Functional Mapping of the Brain Using Magnetoencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jihong

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI) are two non-invasive techniques that can be used to study brain function. The first part of this dissertation discusses experimental factors that affect the accuracy of MEG source localization. These factors include measurement error, signal to noise ratio, number of measurement points and the local curvature of the head. A skull phantom and computer simulation were used to study the accuracy of MEG localization. It was found that the MEG dipole localization error was approximately 5-10 mm in the temporal region. This localization error was directly proportional to the digitization error. An empirical formula is given for the dependence of the MEG localization accuracy on the signal to noise ratio. The dependence of the MEG localization accuracy on the number of measurement points was also studied. Adequate coverage of extrema is necessary for accurate dipole localizations. The local curvature of the head does not affect localization accuracy as long as the center of the best fit sphere to this local surface is within 4 cm of the center of the best fit sphere to the whole head. The second part of the dissertation presents MEG and FMRI results of motor and auditory stimulation. It was found that the locations of auditory and motor activities as identified by MEG were in agreement with those identified by FMRI within 1-2 cm. The reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The successful FMRI during auditory stimulation is reported. The fundamental aspects of the MEG inverse solution are discussed and a new spatiotemporal inverse solution algorithm is proposed.

  1. Application of quantum dot nanoparticles for potential non-invasive bio-imaging of mammalian spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various obstacles are encountered by mammalian spermatozoa during their journey through the female genital tract, and only few or none will reach the site of fertilization. Currently, there are limited technical approaches for non-invasive investigation of spermatozoa migration after insemination. A...

  2. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun") delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI) methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter) using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs), and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50) at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results demonstrate that

  3. Non-invasive assessment of bone quantity and quality in human trabeculae using scanning ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi

    Fractures and associated bone fragility induced by osteoporosis and osteopenia are widespread health threat to current society. Early detection of fracture risk associated with bone quantity and quality is important for both the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and consequent complications. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is an engineering technology for monitoring bone quantity and quality of humans on earth and astronauts subjected to long duration microgravity. Factors currently limiting the acceptance of QUS technology involve precision, accuracy, single index and standardization. The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy and precision of an image-based QUS technique for non-invasive evaluation of trabecular bone quantity and quality by developing new techniques and understanding ultrasound/tissue interaction. Several new techniques have been developed in this dissertation study, including the automatic identification of irregular region of interest (iROI) in bone, surface topology mapping (STM) and mean scattering spacing (MSS) estimation for evaluating trabecular bone structure. In vitro results have shown that (1) the inter- and intra-observer errors in QUS measurement were reduced two to five fold by iROI compared to previous results; (2) the accuracy of QUS parameter, e.g., ultrasound velocity (UV) through bone, was improved 16% by STM; and (3) the averaged trabecular spacing can be estimated by MSS technique (r2=0.72, p<0.01). The measurement errors of BUA and UV introduced by the soft tissue and cortical shells in vivo can be quantified by developed foot model and simplified cortical-trabecular-cortical sandwich model, which were verified by the experimental results. The mechanisms of the errors induced by the cortical and soft tissues were revealed by the model. With developed new techniques and understanding of sound-tissue interaction, in vivo clinical trail and bed rest study were preformed to evaluate the performance of QUS in

  4. A kernel-based method for markerless tumor tracking in kV fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Abe, Makoto; Sugita, Norihiro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    Markerless tracking of respiration-induced tumor motion in kilo-voltage (kV) fluoroscopic image sequence is still a challenging task in real time image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Most of existing markerless tracking methods are based on a template matching technique or its extensions that are frequently sensitive to non-rigid tumor deformation and involve expensive computation. This paper presents a kernel-based method that is capable of tracking tumor motion in kV fluoroscopic image sequence with robust performance and low computational cost. The proposed tracking system consists of the following three steps. To enhance the contrast of kV fluoroscopic image, we firstly utilize a histogram equalization to transform the intensities of original images to a wider dynamical intensity range. A tumor target in the first frame is then represented by using a histogram-based feature vector. Subsequently, the target tracking is then formulated by maximizing a Bhattacharyya coefficient that measures the similarity between the tumor target and its candidates in the subsequent frames. The numerical solution for maximizing the Bhattacharyya coefficient is performed by a mean-shift algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated by using four clinical kV fluoroscopic image sequences. For comparison, we also implement four conventional template matching-based methods and compare their performance with our proposed method in terms of the tracking accuracy and computational cost. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is superior to conventional template matching-based methods.

  5. Profiling neuronal ion channelopathies with non-invasive brain imaging and dynamic causal models: Case studies of single gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jessica R.; Symmonds, Mkael; Hanna, Michael G.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl J.; Moran, Rosalyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessments of brain function rely upon visual inspection of electroencephalographic waveform abnormalities in tandem with functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, no current technology proffers in vivo assessments of activity at synapses, receptors and ion-channels, the basis of neuronal communication. Using dynamic causal modeling we compared electrophysiological responses from two patients with distinct monogenic ion channelopathies and a large cohort of healthy controls to demonstrate the feasibility of assaying synaptic-level channel communication non-invasively. Synaptic channel abnormality was identified in both patients (100% sensitivity) with assay specificity above 89%, furnishing estimates of neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion throughput of sodium, calcium, chloride and potassium. This performance indicates a potential novel application as an adjunct for clinical assessments in neurological and psychiatric settings. More broadly, these findings indicate that biophysical models of synaptic channels can be estimated non-invasively, having important implications for advancing human neuroimaging to the level of non-invasive ion channel assays. PMID:26342528

  6. Can Image Analysis on High-Resolution Computed Tomography Predict Non-Invasive Growth in Adenocarcinoma of the Lung?

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Miki; Maeda, Eriko; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Ota, Satoshi; Asamura, Hisao; Nakajima, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative radiological predictions of pathological invasiveness must be objective and reproducible in addition to being accurate when considering limited surgery for early lung cancer. Methods: Two cohorts were used for the analysis. Two independent observers traced lesion edges and measured areas and proportions of solid component on tumor images with the largest diameter by high resolution computed tomography images and “Image J” software. Results: The value of the intraclass correlation was 0.997 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.996–0.998) for the area of solid component and 0.979 (95%CI, 0.958–0.986) for the proportion of solid component, suggesting such parameters were reliable in terms of reproducibility. Az value was 0.898 (95%CI, 0.842–0.953) for the area of solid component and 0.882 (95%CI, 0.816–0.949) for the proportion of solid component, demonstrating 2 parameters were both highly predictive of non-invasive adenocarcinoma. The optimal prediction of non-invasive adenocarcinoma with a cut-off value of 7.5 mm2 for the area of solid component resulted in a sensitivity of 85.3% and specificity of 86.2% in Cohort 1 and a sensitivity of 66.7% and specificity of 88.5% in Cohort 2. Conclusion: Image analysis using “Image J” software was promising for predicting non-invasive adenocarcinoma with its limited inter-observer variability and high predictive performance. PMID:24747544

  7. Non-invasive evaluation of arrhythmic risk in dilated cardiomyopathy: From imaging to electrocardiographic measures

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Massimo; Monitillo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Malignant ventricular arrhythmias are a major adverse event and worsen the prognosis of patients affected by ischemic and non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. The main parameter currently used to stratify arrhythmic risk and guide decision making towards the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is the evaluation of the left ventricular ejection fraction. However, this strategy is characterized by several limitations and consequently additional parameters have been suggested in order to improve arrhythmic risk stratification. The aim of this review is to critically revise the prognostic significance of non-invasive diagnostic tools in order to better stratify the arrhythmic risk prognosis of dilated cardiomyopathy patients. PMID:25068017

  8. Non-Invasive MRI and Spectroscopy of mdx Mice Reveal Temporal Changes in Dystrophic Muscle Imaging and in Energy Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; Guerron, Alfredo D.; Korotcov, Alexandru; Lin, Stephen; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Fricke, Stanley; Sze, Raymond W.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Wang, Paul; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disruption of dystrophin protein expression results in repeated muscle injury and chronic inflammation. Magnetic resonance imaging shows promise as a surrogate outcome measure in both DMD and rehabilitation medicine that is capable of predicting clinical benefit years in advance of functional outcome measures. The mdx mouse reproduces the dystrophin deficiency that causes DMD and is routinely used for preclinical drug testing. There is a need to develop sensitive, non-invasive outcome measures in the mdx model that can be readily translatable to human clinical trials. Here we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques for the non-invasive monitoring of muscle damage in mdx mice. Using these techniques, we studied dystrophic mdx muscle in mice from 6 to 12 weeks of age, examining both the peak disease phase and natural recovery phase of the mdx disease course. T2 and fat-suppressed imaging revealed significant levels of tissue with elevated signal intensity in mdx hindlimb muscles at all ages; spectroscopy revealed a significant deficiency of energy metabolites in 6-week-old mdx mice. As the mdx mice progressed from the peak disease stage to the recovery stage of disease, each of these phenotypes was either eliminated or reduced, and the cross-sectional area of the mdx muscle was significantly increased when compared to that of wild-type mice. Histology indicates that hyper-intense MRI foci correspond to areas of dystrophic lesions containing inflammation as well as regenerating, degenerating and hypertrophied myofibers. Statistical sample size calculations provide several robust measures with the ability to detect intervention effects using small numbers of animals. These data establish a framework for further imaging or preclinical studies, and they support the development of MRI as a sensitive, non-invasive outcome measure for muscular dystrophy. PMID:25390038

  9. Fluoroscopic "heart chamber" anatomy - the case for imaging modality-independent terminology.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Mylotte, Darren; Theriault Lauzier, Pascal

    2016-09-18

    Interventional cardiologists have traditionally relied upon fluoro-scopic imaging for percutaneous coronary interventions. Transcatheter structural heart interventions, however, require additional imaging modalities such as echocardiography and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for pre-, intra- and post-procedural assistance. MSCT has emerged as the critical imaging modality for patient and device selection prior to transcatheter structural heart interventions. MSCT is unique as it provides a complete 3-dimensional (3D) dataset of the heart and vasculature that is amenable to multiplanar reconstruction for 2-dimensional (2D) or volume-rendered interpretations. Herein, we present a modality-independent terminology for understanding volumetric images in the context of transcatheter heart valve therapies. The goal of this system is to allow physicians to readily interpret the orientation of fluoroscopic, MSCT, echocardiographic and MRI images, thus generalising their understanding of cardiac anatomy to all imaging modalities. PMID:27640046

  10. Evaluation of Non-Invasive Multispectral Imaging as a Tool for Measuring the Effect of Systemic Therapy in Kaposi Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Rahman, Rafa; Hassan, Moinuddin; Najafizadeh, Laleh; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Aleman, Karen; Smith, Paul D.; Yarchoan, Robert; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse multi-spectral imaging has been evaluated as a potential non-invasive marker of tumor response. Multi-spectral images of Kaposi sarcoma skin lesions were taken over the course of treatment, and blood volume and oxygenation concentration maps were obtained through principal component analysis (PCA) of the data. These images were compared with clinical and pathological responses determined by conventional means. We demonstrate that cutaneous lesions have increased blood volume concentration and that changes in this parameter are a reliable indicator of treatment efficacy, differentiating responders and non-responders. Blood volume decreased by at least 20% in all lesions that responded by clinical criteria and increased in the two lesions that did not respond clinically. Responses as assessed by multi-spectral imaging also generally correlated with overall patient clinical response assessment, were often detectable earlier in the course of therapy, and are less subject to observer variability than conventional clinical assessment. Tissue oxygenation was more variable, with lesions often showing decreased oxygenation in the center surrounded by a zone of increased oxygenation. This technique could potentially be a clinically useful supplement to existing response assessment in KS, providing an early, quantitative, and non-invasive marker of treatment effect. PMID:24386302

  11. Radiation Dose Reduction Methods For Use With Fluoroscopic Imaging, Computers And Implications For Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Hynes, D. M.; Rowlands, J. A.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1988-06-01

    The use of a beam splitting device for medical gastro-intestinal fluoroscopy has demonstrated that clinical images obtained with a 100mm photofluorographic camera, and a 1024 X 1024 digital matrix with pulsed progressive readout acquisition techniques, are identical. In addition, it has been found that clinical images can be obtained with digital systems at dose levels lower than those possible with film. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy with intermittent storage of the fluoroscopic image has also been demonstrated to reduce the fluoroscopy part of the examination to very low dose levels, particularly when low repetition rates of about 2 frames per second (fps) are used. The use of digital methods reduces the amount of radiation required and also the heat generated by the x-ray tube. Images can therefore be produced using a very small focal spot on the x-ray tube, which can produce further improvement in the resolution of the clinical images.

  12. MR cone-beam CT fusion image overlay for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous biopsies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Patel, Premal A; Gu, Richard; Rea, Vanessa; Amaral, Joao; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-03-01

    Lesions only visible on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging cannot easily be targeted for image-guided biopsy using ultrasound or X-rays but instead require MR guidance with MR-compatible needles and long procedure times (acquisition of multiple MR sequences). We developed an alternative method for performing these difficult biopsies in a standard interventional suite, by fusing MR with cone-beam CT images. The MR cone-beam CT fusion image is then used as an overlay to guide a biopsy needle to the target area under live fluoroscopic guidance. Advantages of this technique include (i) the ability for it to be performed in a conventional interventional suite, (ii) three-dimensional planning of the needle trajectory using cross-sectional imaging, (iii) real-time fluoroscopic guidance for needle trajectory correction and (iv) targeting within heterogeneous lesions based on MR signal characteristics to maximize the potential biopsy yield.

  13. Non-invasive fluorescent-protein imaging of orthotopic pancreatic-cancer-patient tumorgraft progression in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Katz, Matthew; Fleming, Jason; Truty, Mark; Thomas, Ryan; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2012-08-01

    In order to individualize and therefore have more effective treatment for pancreatic cancer, we have developed a multicolor, imageable, orthotopic mouse model for individual patients with pancreatic cancer by passaging their tumors through transgenic nude mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP). The tumors acquired brightly fluorescent stroma from the transgenic host mice, which was stably associated with the tumors through multiple passages. In the present study, pancreatic cancer patient tumor specimens were initially established in NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/NcrCrl (NOD/SCID) mice. The tumors were then passaged orthotopically into transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing GFP and subsequently to nude mice ubiquitously expressing RFP. The tumors, with very bright GFP and RFP stroma, were then orthotopically passaged to non-transgenic nude mice. It was possible to image the brightly fluorescent tumors non-invasively longitudinally as they progressed in the non-transgenic nude mice. This non-invasive imageable tumorgraft model will be valuable to screen for effective treatment options for individual patients with pancreatic cancer, as well as for the discovery of improved agents for this treatment-resistant disease.

  14. A New Imaging Platform for Visualizing Biological Effects of Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Electric-Field Cancer Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Stuart J.; Shamsudeen, Sabeel; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J.; Keshishian, Vazrik; Yokoi, Kenji; Savage, David J.; Meraz, Ismail M.; Kaluarachchi, Warna; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Raoof, Mustafa; Nguyen, Duy Trac; Zhang, Yingchun; Wilson, Lon J.; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Curley, Steven A.; Serda, Rita E.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel imaging platform to study the biological effects of non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) electric field cancer hyperthermia. This system allows for real-time in vivo intravital microscopy (IVM) imaging of radiofrequency-induced biological alterations such as changes in vessel structure and drug perfusion. Our results indicate that the IVM system is able to handle exposure to high-power electric-fields without inducing significant hardware damage or imaging artifacts. Furthermore, short durations of low-power (< 200 W) radiofrequency exposure increased transport and perfusion of fluorescent tracers into the tumors at temperatures below 41°C. Vessel deformations and blood coagulation were seen for tumor temperatures around 44°C. These results highlight the use of our integrated IVM-RF imaging platform as a powerful new tool to visualize the dynamics and interplay between radiofrequency energy and biological tissues, organs, and tumors. PMID:26308617

  15. Non-invasive continuous imaging of drug release from soy-based skin equivalent using wide-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Zilberman, Meital; Shaked, Natan T.

    2013-04-01

    We propose an off-axis interferometric imaging system as a simple and unique modality for continuous, non-contact and non-invasive wide-field imaging and characterization of drug release from its polymeric device used in biomedicine. In contrast to the current gold-standard methods in this field, usually based on chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, our method requires no user intervention during the experiment, and only one test-tube is prepared. We experimentally demonstrate imaging and characterization of drug release from soy-based protein matrix, used as skin equivalent for wound dressing with controlled anesthetic, Bupivacaine drug release. Our preliminary results demonstrate the high potential of our method as a simple and low-cost modality for wide-field imaging and characterization of drug release from drug delivery devices.

  16. Non-invasive localization of thymol accumulation in Carum copticum (Apiaceae) fruits by chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, P V; Reddy, N

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the site of essential oil accumulation in fruit of Carum copticum L. (Apiaceae). A chemical shift method is described that utilized the spectral properties of the aromatic monoterpene thymol, the major component of the essential oil, to image thymol selectively. The presence of essential oil secretory structures in the fruit and an essential oil containing a high proportion of thymol were confirmed with optical microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Selective imaging of whole C. copticum fruits showed that thymol accumulation was localized to the secretory structures (canals) situated in the fruit wall. The technique was considered non-invasive as the seeds used in the imaging experiments remained intact and viable.

  17. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and multispectral imaging for non-invasive estimation of GFP transfection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošiūnas, M.; Jakovels, D.; Lihačovs, A.; Kilikevičius, A.; Baltušnikas, J.; Kadikis, R.; Šatkauskas, S.

    2014-10-01

    Electroporation and ultrasound induced sonoporation has been showed to induce plasmid DNA transfection to the mice tibialis cranialis muscle. It offers new prospects for gene therapy and cancer treatment. However, numerous experimental data are still needed to deliver the plausible explanation of the mechanisms governing DNA electro- or sono-transfection, as well as to provide the updates on transfection protocols for transfection efficiency increase. In this study we aimed to apply non-invasive optical diagnostic methods for the real time evaluation of GFP transfection levels at the reduced costs for experimental apparatus and animal consumption. Our experimental set-up allowed monitoring of GFP levels in live mice tibialis cranialis muscle and provided the parameters for DNA transfection efficiency determination.

  18. Simplified Models of Non-Invasive Fractional Flow Reserve Based on CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhong, Liang; Luo, Tong; Lomarda, Aileen Mae; Huo, Yunlong; Yap, Jonathan; Lim, Soo Teik; Tan, Ru San; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Tan, Jack Wei Chieh; Yeo, Khung Keong; Fam, Jiang Ming; Keng, Felix Yung Jih; Wan, Min; Su, Boyang; Zhao, Xiaodan; Allen, John Carson; Kassab, Ghassan S.; Chua, Terrance Siang Jin; Tan, Swee Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) is the gold standard to assess the functional coronary stenosis. The non-invasive assessment of diameter stenosis (DS) using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has high false positive rate in contrast to FFR. Combining CTA with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), recent studies have shown promising predictions of FFRCT for superior assessment of lesion severity over CTA alone. The CFD models tend to be computationally expensive, however, and require several hours for completing analysis. Here, we introduce simplified models to predict noninvasive FFR at substantially less computational time. In this retrospective pilot study, 21 patients received coronary CTA. Subsequently a total of 32 vessels underwent invasive FFR measurement. For each vessel, FFR based on steady-state and analytical models (FFRSS and FFRAM, respectively) were calculated non-invasively based on CTA and compared with FFR. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 90.6% (87.5%), 80.0% (80.0%), 95.5% (90.9%), 88.9% (80.0%) and 91.3% (90.9%) respectively for FFRSS (and FFRAM) on a per-vessel basis, and were 75.0%, 50.0%, 86.4%, 62.5% and 79.2% respectively for DS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.963, 0.954 and 0.741 for FFRSS, FFRAM and DS respectively, on a per-patient level. The results suggest that the CTA-derived FFRSS performed well in contrast to invasive FFR and they had better diagnostic performance than DS from CTA in the identification of functionally significant lesions. In contrast to FFRCT, FFRSS requires much less computational time. PMID:27187726

  19. In vivo imaging of enamel by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM): non-invasive analysis of dental surface.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, Maria; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-07-01

    The aim is to establish the feasibility to image in vivo microscopic dental surface by non-invasive, real-time, en face Reflectance Confocal Microscopy (RCM). Fifteen healthy volunteers referred at the Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy, were enrolled. A commercially available hand-held RCM (Vivascope(®)3000, Lucid, Rochester, NY, USA) was used to image in vivo the dental surface of the upper right and left central incisors of each volunteer. Totally, thirty vestibular surfaces of upper central incisors were imaged in vivo by RCM to preliminary image the dental surface and assess the feasibility of a more extended study on teeth. In vivo RCM was able to image the dental surface within the enamel, at a maximum depth imaging of 300 μm, with images good in quality and the capability to detect enamel structures such as enamel lamellae and enamel damages, such as unevenness and cracks. In conclusion, enamel "optical biopsy", gained by RCM imaging, revealed to be a non-invasive real-time tool valid to obtain architectural details of the dental surface with no need for extraction or processing the samples. RCM appears to be an optimum auxiliary device for investigating the architectural pattern of superficial enamel, therefore inviting further experiments aimed to define our knowledge about damages after etching treatments or bracket removal and the responsiveness to fluoride seals and the morphology of the tooth/restoration interface. Moreover, this device could also be used to detect relevant diseases like caries, or to assess surface properties to evaluate lesion activity.

  20. USPIO-labeled textile materials for non-invasive MR imaging of tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Marianne E; Koch, Sabine; Schuster, Philipp; Wehner, Jakob; Wu, Zhuojun; Gremse, Felix; Schulz, Volkmar; Rongen, Lisanne; Wolf, Frederic; Frese, Julia; Gesché, Valentine N; van Zandvoort, Marc; Mela, Petra; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging might assist in the clinical translation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVG). It can e.g. be used to facilitate the implantation of TEVG, to longitudinally monitor their localization and function, and to provide non-invasive and quantitative feedback on their remodeling and resorption. We here incorporated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles into polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based textile fibers, and used them to prepare imageable tissue-engineered vascular grafts (iTEVG). The USPIO-labeled scaffold materials were molded with a mixture of fibrin, fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells, and then endothelialized in a bioreactor under physiological flow conditions. The resulting grafts could be sensitively detected using T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MRI, both during bioreactor cultivation and upon surgical implantation into sheep, in which they were used as an arteriovenous shunt between the carotid artery and the jugular vein. In vivo, the iTEVG were shown to be biocompatible and functional. Post-mortem ex vivo analyses provided evidence for efficient endothelialization and for endogenous neo-vascularization within the biohybrid vessel wall. These findings show that labeling polymer-based textile materials with MR contrast agents is straightforward and safe, and they indicate that such theranostic tissue engineering approaches might be highly useful for improving the production, performance, personalization and translation of biohybrid vascular grafts.

  1. USPIO-labeled textile materials for non-invasive MR imaging of tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Marianne E; Koch, Sabine; Schuster, Philipp; Wehner, Jakob; Wu, Zhuojun; Gremse, Felix; Schulz, Volkmar; Rongen, Lisanne; Wolf, Frederic; Frese, Julia; Gesché, Valentine N; van Zandvoort, Marc; Mela, Petra; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging might assist in the clinical translation of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVG). It can e.g. be used to facilitate the implantation of TEVG, to longitudinally monitor their localization and function, and to provide non-invasive and quantitative feedback on their remodeling and resorption. We here incorporated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles into polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-based textile fibers, and used them to prepare imageable tissue-engineered vascular grafts (iTEVG). The USPIO-labeled scaffold materials were molded with a mixture of fibrin, fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells, and then endothelialized in a bioreactor under physiological flow conditions. The resulting grafts could be sensitively detected using T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MRI, both during bioreactor cultivation and upon surgical implantation into sheep, in which they were used as an arteriovenous shunt between the carotid artery and the jugular vein. In vivo, the iTEVG were shown to be biocompatible and functional. Post-mortem ex vivo analyses provided evidence for efficient endothelialization and for endogenous neo-vascularization within the biohybrid vessel wall. These findings show that labeling polymer-based textile materials with MR contrast agents is straightforward and safe, and they indicate that such theranostic tissue engineering approaches might be highly useful for improving the production, performance, personalization and translation of biohybrid vascular grafts. PMID:25465443

  2. Reflectance confocal microscopy and dermoscopy for in vivo, non-invasive skin imaging of superficial basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GHITA, MIHAELA A.; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; ROSCA, ADRIAN E.; KALESHI, HARILLAQ; CARUNTU, ANA; MORARU, LILIANA; DOCEA, ANCA OANA; ZURAC, SABINA; BODA, DANIEL; NEAGU, MONICA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) is the second most frequent histological type of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), usually requiring a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. It usually appears on the upper trunk and shoulders as erythematous and squamous lesions. Although it has a slow growth and seldom metastasizes, early diagnosis and management are of crucial importance in preventing local invasion and subsequent disfigurement. Dermoscopy is nowadays an indispensable tool for the dermatologist when evaluating skin tumors. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel imaging technique that allows the non-invasive, in vivo quasi-microscopic morphological and dynamic assessment of superficial skin tumors. Moreover, it offers the advantage of performing infinite repeatable determinations to monitor disease progression and non-surgical treatment for sBCC. Herein, we present three lesions of sBCC evaluated using in vivo and non-invasive imaging techniques, emphasizing the usefulness of combining RCM with dermoscopy for increasing the diagnostic accuracy of sBCC. PMID:27123056

  3. Spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masaru; Sato, Shun; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    To realize the non-invasive blood glucose measurement, it will be effective to acquire the spectroscopic imaging of blood vessels only near the skin surface for eliminating other biological-component's disturbances. Our proposed imaging-type 2-dimensional Fourier spectroscopic imaging can limit the measuring depth into focal plane with high light detection sensitivity. Thus, the proposed method will be suitable for measuring only near the skin surface with detecting weak reflected light from inner biomembrane. But reflectance of skin surface is more than 1000 times larger than inner skin's reflectance. Paying attention on Fresnel reflection, fingers what were illuminated by p-polarized beam from Brewster's angle were observed with crossed-Nicol dark field optics. We successfully acquired spectroscopic characteristics of hemoglobin at vein area near the skin surface.

  4. Non-invasive 3D time-of-flight imaging technique for tumour volume assessment in subcutaneous models.

    PubMed

    Delgado San Martin, J A; Worthington, P; Yates, J W T

    2015-04-01

    Subcutaneous tumour xenograft volumes are generally measured using callipers. This method is susceptible to inter- and intra-observer variability and systematic inaccuracies. Non-invasive 3D measurement using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been considered, but require immobilization of the animal. An infrared-based 3D time-of-flight (3DToF) camera was used to acquire a depth map of tumour-bearing mice. A semi-automatic algorithm based on parametric surfaces was applied to estimate tumour volume. Four clay mouse models and 18 tumour-bearing mice were assessed using callipers (applying both prolate spheroid and ellipsoid models) and 3DToF methods, and validated using tumour weight. Inter-experimentalist variability could be up to 25% in the calliper method. Experimental results demonstrated good consistency and relatively low error rates for the 3DToF method, in contrast to biased overestimation using callipers. Accuracy is currently limited by camera performance; however, we anticipate the next generation 3DToF cameras will be able to support the development of a practical system. Here, we describe an initial proof of concept for a non-invasive, non-immobilized, morphology-independent, economical and potentially more precise tumour volume assessment technique. This affordable technique should maximize the datapoints per animal, by reducing the numbers required in experiments and reduce their distress.

  5. Image-assisted non-invasive and dynamic biomechanical analysis of human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhit, Abdullah A.; Pickering, Mark R.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Ward, Tom; Smith, Paul N.

    2013-07-01

    Kinematic analysis provides a strong link between musculoskeletal injuries, chronic joint conditions, treatment planning/monitoring and prosthesis design/outcome. However, fast and accurate 3D kinematic analysis still remains a challenge in order to translate this procedure into clinical scenarios. 3D computed tomography (CT) to 2D single-plane fluoroscopy registration is a promising non-invasive technology for biomechanical examination of human joints. Although this technique has proven to be very precise in terms of in-plane translation and rotation measurements, out-of-plane motion estimations have been a difficulty so far. Therefore, to enable this technology into clinical translation, precise and fast estimation of both in-plane and out-of-plane movements is crucial, which is the aim of this paper. Here, a fast and accurate 3D/2D registration technique is proposed to evaluate biomechanical/kinematic analysis. The proposed algorithm utilizes a new multi-modal similarity measure called ‘sum of conditional variances’, a coarse-to-fine Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach for robust gradient-descent optimization and a novel technique for the analytic calculation of the required gradients for out-of-plane rotations. Computer simulations and in vitro experiments showed that the new approach was robust in terms of the capture range, required significantly less iterations to converge and achieved good registration and kinematic accuracy when compared to existing techniques and to the ‘gold-standard’ Roentgen stereo analysis.

  6. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p < 0.041). The fact that there is a substantial difference between agar and fat implies that non-invasive all-ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning.

  7. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p < 0.041). The fact that there is a substantial difference between agar and fat implies that non-invasive all-ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning. PMID:26489364

  8. Non-invasive detection of superimposed latent fingerprints and inter-ridge trace evidence by infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Perlman, Rebecca Schwartz; Fernandez, Daniel C; Levin, Ira W; Bartick, Edward G

    2009-08-01

    Current latent print and trace evidence collecting technologies are usually invasive and can be destructive to the original deposits. We describe a non-invasive vibrational spectroscopic approach that yields latent fingerprints that are overlaid on top of one another or that may contain trace evidence that needs to be distinguished from the print. Because of the variation in the chemical composition distribution within the fingerprint, we demonstrate that linear unmixing applied to the spectral content of the data can be used to provide images that reveal superimposed fingerprints. In addition, we demonstrate that the chemical composition of the trace evidence located in the region of the print can potentially be identified by its infrared spectrum. Thus, trace evidence found at a crime scene that previously could not be directly related to an individual, now has the potential to be directly related by its presence in the individual-identifying fingerprints.

  9. Nonrigid 2D registration of fluoroscopic coronary artery image sequence with layered motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taewoo; Jung, Hoyup; Yun, Il Dong

    2016-03-01

    We present a new method for nonrigid registration of coronary artery models with layered motion information. 2D nonrigid registration method is proposed that brings layered motion information into correspondence with fluoroscopic angiograms. The registered model is overlaid on top of interventional angiograms to provide surgical assistance during image-guided chronic total occlusion procedures. The proposed methodology is divided into two parts: layered structures alignments and local nonrigid registration. In the first part, inpainting method is used to estimate a layered rigid transformation that aligns layered motion information. In the second part, a nonrigid registration method is implemented and used to compensate for any local shape discrepancy. Experimental evaluation conducted on a set of 7 fluoroscopic angiograms results in a reduced target registration error, which showed the effectiveness of the proposed method over single layered approach.

  10. Non-invasive detection of liver fibrosis: MR imaging features vs. MR elastography

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Yin, Meng; Takahashi, Naoki; Glockner, James F.; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare accuracy of morphological features of liver on MRI and liver stiffness with MR elastography (MRE) for detection of significant liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, we evaluated 62 patients who underwent liver MRI with MRE and histological confirmation of liver fibrosis within 6 months. Two radiologists, blinded to histology results, independently evaluated liver parenchyma texture, surface nodularity, signs of volumetric changes and portal hypertension for presence of significant fibrosis and cirrhosis. Two more readers independently calculated mean liver stiffness values with MRE. Interobserver agreement was evaluated with kappa and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) analysis. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed with area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) analysis. Comparison of AUROCs of MRI and MRE was performed. Results Liver fibrosis was present in 37 patients. The interobserver agreement was poor to good (kappa= 0.12 - 0.74) for MRI features and excellent for MRE (ICC, 0.97, 95% CI, 0.95-0.98). MRI features had 48.5-87.9%sensitivity, 55.2%-100%specificity and 71.5-81.6% accuracy //for detection of significant fibrosis. MRE performed better with 100% sensitivity, 96.5% specificity and 98.9% accuracy .For the detection of cirrhosis, MRE performed better than MRI features with 88.2% sensitivity (vs.41.2-82.3%), 91.1% specificity (vs. 64.4-95.6%) and 93.5% accuracy (vs. 60.6%-80.5%) Among the MRI features, surface nodularity and overall impression had the best accuracies of 80.3% and 81.6% for detection of significant fibrosis respectively. For cirrhosis, parenchyma texture and overall impression had the best accuracies of 80.5% and 79.7% respectively . Overall, MRE had significantly greater AUROC than MRI features for detection of both significant fibrosis (0.98.9 vs 0.71-0.82, p<0.001) and cirrhosis (0.93.5-vs. 0.61 -0.80.5, p<0.01). Conclusion MRE is superior to MRI for the non-invasive

  11. Dual luciferase labelling for non-invasive bioluminescence imaging of mesenchymal stromal cell chondrogenic differentiation in demineralized bone matrix scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Vilalta, Marta; Jorgensen, Christian; Dégano, Irene R; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Gould, David; Noël, Danièle; Andrades, José A; Becerra, José; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2009-10-01

    Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to monitor changes in gene expression of cells implanted in live animals should facilitate the development of biomaterial scaffolds for tissue regeneration. We show that, in vitro, induction of chondrogenic differentiation in mouse bone marrow stromal cell line (CL1) and human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs), permanently transduced with a procollagen II (COL2A1) promoter driving a firefly luciferase gene reporter (PLuc) (COL2A1p.PLuc), induces PLuc expression in correlation with increases in COL2A1 and Sox9 mRNA expression and acquisition of chondrocytic phenotype. To be able to simultaneously monitor in vivo cell differentiation and proliferation, COL2A1p.PLuc labelled cells were also genetically labelled with a renilla luciferase (RLuc) gene driven by a constitutively active cytomegalovirus promoter, and then seeded in demineralized bone matrix (DBM) subcutaneously implanted in SCID mice. Non-invasive BLI monitoring of the implanted mice showed that the PLuc/RLuc ratio reports on gene expression changes indicative of cell differentiation. Large (CL1) and moderated (hAMSCs) changes in the PLuc/RLuc ratio over a 6 week period, revealed different patterns of in vivo chondrogenic differentiation for the CL1 cell line and primary MSCs, in agreement with in vitro published data and our results from histological analysis of DBM sections. This double bioluminescence labelling strategy together with BLI imaging to analyze behaviour of cells implanted in live animals should facilitate the development of progenitor cell/scaffold combinations for tissue repair.

  12. Non-invasive molecular imaging of prostate cancer lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pouliot, Frédéric; Johnson, Mai; Wu, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Imaging in medicine has been classically based on the anatomical description of organs. In the past 15 years, new imaging techniques based on gene expression that characterize a pathological process have been developed. Molecular imaging is the use of such molecules to image cell-specific characteristics. Here, we review recent advances in molecular imaging, taking as our prime example lymph node (LN) metastasis in prostate cancer. We describe the new techniques and compare their accuracy in detecting LN metastasis in prostate cancer. We also present new molecular strategies for improving tumor detection using adenoviruses, molecular promoters and amplification systems. Finally, we present the concept of ‘in vivo pathology’, which envisages using molecular imaging to accurately localize metastatic lesions based on the molecular signature of the disease. PMID:19482514

  13. Non-invasive imaging of breast cancer with diffusing near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecky, Soren D.

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a new medical imaging technique that combines biomedical optics with the principles of computed tomography. We use DOT to quantitatively reconstruct images of complex phantoms with millimeter sized features located centimeters deep within a highly-scattering medium. A non-contact instrument is employed to collect large data sets consisting of greater than 107 source-detector pairs. Images are reconstructed using a fast image reconstruction algorithm based on an analytic solution to the inverse scattering problem for diffuse light. We also describe a next generation DOT breast imaging device for frequency domain transmission data acquisition in the parallel plate geometry. Frequency domain heterodyne measurements are made by intensity modulating a continuous wave laser source with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and detecting the transmitted light with a gain-modulated image intensifier coupled to a CCD. Finally, we acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using DOT and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images is facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compare DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations are found between both total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake.

  14. Non-invasive imaging and monitoring of rodent retina using simultaneous dual-band optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimalla, Peter; Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Hoefer, Aline; Wittig, Dierk; Funk, Richard; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Spectral domain dual-band optical coherence tomography for simultaneous imaging of rodent retina in the 0.8 μm and 1.3 μm wavelength region and non-invasive monitoring of the posterior eye microstructure in the field of retinal degeneration research is demonstrated. The system is illuminated by a supercontinuum laser source and allows three-dimensional imaging with high axial resolution better than 3.8 μm and 5.3 μm in tissue at 800 nm and 1250 nm, respectively, for precise retinal thickness measurements. A fan-shaped scanning pattern with the pivot point close to the eye's pupil and a contact lens are applied to obtain optical access to the eye's fundus. First in vivo experiments in a RCS (royal college of surgeons) rat model with gene-related degeneration of the photoreceptor cells show good visibility of the retinal microstructure with sufficient contrast for thickness measurement of individual retinal layers. An enhanced penetration depth at 1250 nm is clearly identifiable revealing sub-choroidal structures that are not visible at 800 nm. Furthermore, additional simultaneous imaging at 1250 nm improves image quality by frequency compounding speckle noise reduction. These results are encouraging for time course studies of the rodent retina concerning its development related to disease progression and treatment response.

  15. Multispectral imaging approach for simplified non-invasive in-vivo evaluation of gingival erythema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhard, Timo; Valero, Eva M.; Nieves, Juan L.; Gallegos-Rueda, José M.; Mesa, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Erythema is a common visual sign of gingivitis. In this work, a new and simple low-cost image capture and analysis method for erythema assessment is proposed. The method is based on digital still images of gingivae and applied on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Multispectral images are acquired with a conventional digital camera and multiplexed LED illumination panels at 460nm and 630nm peak wavelength. An automatic work-flow segments teeth from gingiva regions in the images and creates a map of local blood oxygenation levels, which relates to the presence of erythema. The map is computed from the ratio of the two spectral images. An advantage of the proposed approach is that the whole process is easy to manage by dental health care professionals in clinical environment.

  16. Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: Parallel-cascaded linear systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded linear systems based modeling techniques have been used in the past to predict important system parameters that have a direct impact on image quality. Such models are also useful in optimizing system parameters to improve image quality. In this work, detailed analysis of a solid-state fluoroscopic imaging system intended for high-resolution angiography is presented with the use of such a model. The imaging system analyzed through this model uses four 8×8 cm three-side buttable interlined charge-coupled devices (CCDs) specifically designed for high-resolution angiography and tiled in a seamless fashion to achieve a field of view (FOV) of 16×16 cm. Larger FOVs can be achieved by tiling more CCDs in a similar manner. The system employs a CsI:Tl scintillator coupled to the CCDs by straight (nontapering) fiberoptics and can potentially be operated in 78, 156, or 234 μm pixel pitch modes. The system parameters analyzed through this model include presampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The results of the simulations performed indicate that DQE(0) in excess of 0.6 is achievable, with the imager operating at 156 μm pixel pitch, 30 frames/s, and employing a 450-μm-thick CsI:Tl scintillator, even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 μR/frame. Further, at a nominal fluoroscopic exposure rate of 2.5 μR/frame there was no noticeable degradation of the DQE even at the 78 μm pixel pitch mode suggesting that it is feasible to perform high-resolution angiography hitherto unattainable in clinical practice. PMID:15191318

  17. Imaging-Based Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Bone Properties Influenced by Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    Lorbergs, Amanda L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To describe the most common in vivo imaging-based research tools used to assess bone properties that are influenced by mechanical loading associated with exercise, habitual physical activity, or disease states. Bone is a complex metabolically active tissue that adapts to changes in mechanical loading by altering the amount and spatial organization of mineral. Method: Using a narrative review design, the authors provide an overview of bone biology and biomechanics to emphasize the importance of bone size scale, porosity, and degree of mineralization when interpreting measures acquired using quantitative ultrasound (QUS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and finite element analysis (FEA). For each imaging modality, basic imaging principles, typical outcome measures associated with changes in mechanical loading, and salient features for physiotherapists are described. Main Results: While each imaging modality has strengths and limitations, currently CT-based methods are best suited for determining the effects of mechanical loading on bone properties—particularly in the peripheral skeleton. Conclusions: Regardless of the imaging technology used, the physiotherapist must carefully consider the assumptions of the imaging-based method, the clinical context, the nature of the change in mechanical loading, and the expected time course for change in bone properties. PMID:23449969

  18. The utilization of a non-invasive fluorescence imaging system to follow clinical dermatological MAL-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrrell, Jessica; Campbell, Sandra; Curnow, Alison

    2009-06-01

    This study employed a commercially available, non-invasive, fluorescence imaging system (Dyaderm, Biocam, Germany), to measure protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) concentration at several different stages during clinical dermatological methyl aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT). We validated the system prior to use to ensure that the PpIX changes witnessed were accurate and not due to environmental or user induced artifacts. The system was then employed to acquire color (morphological) and fluorescent (physiological) images simultaneously during dermatological PDT. Clinical data was collected from a range of licensed dermatological conditions (actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease and superficial basal cell carcinoma) during initial and subsequent PDT treatment cycles. The initial clinical data indicated that each type of licensed lesion considered responded in a similar manner following the application of Metvix (Galderma, U.K.) and the subsequent light irradiation (Aktilite, Galderma, U.K.). Images acquired three hours after Metvix application showed a significant increase in PpIX concentration within the lesion (P < 0.05), whilst PpIX levels in the surrounding normal tissue remained unaltered. After irradiation, the PpIX concentration was significantly decreased and returned to a level similar to the initial concentration originally observed. Lesions that received subsequent treatment cycles accumulated significantly less PpIX (P < 0.05) prior to irradiation.

  19. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Serkova, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS). Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, standard CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging) have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE). We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation. PMID:26309728

  20. A C-arm calibration method with application to fluoroscopic image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Gibbs, Jason D.; Wibowo, Henky

    2012-02-01

    C-arm fluoroscopy units provide continuously updating X-ray video images during surgical procedure. The modality is widely adopted for its low cost, real-time imaging capabilities, and its ability to display radio-opaque tools in the anatomy. It is, however, important to correct for fluoroscopic image distortion and estimate camera parameters, such as focal length and camera center, for registration with 3D CT scans in fluoroscopic imageguided procedures. This paper describes a method for C-arm calibration and evaluates its accuracy in multiple C-arm units and in different viewing orientations. The proposed calibration method employs a commerciallyavailable unit to track the C-arm and a calibration plate. The method estimates both the internal calibration parameters and the transformation between the coordinate systems of tracker and C-arm. The method was successfully tested on two C-arm units (GE OEC 9800 and GE OEC 9800 Plus) of different image intensifier sizes and verified with a rigid airway phantom model. The mean distortion-model error was found to be 0.14 mm and 0.17 mm for the respective C-arms. The mean overall system reprojection error (which measures the accuracy of predicting an image using tracker coordinates) was found to be 0.63 mm for the GE OEC 9800.

  1. Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Nanoparticle Migration and Water Velocity Inside Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, V. R.; Shukla, M.; Vallatos, A.; Riley, M. S.; Tellam, J. H.; Holmes, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) are already utilized in a diverse array of applications, including cosmetics, optics, medical technology, textiles and catalysts. Problematically, once in the natural environment, NPs can have a wide range of toxic effects. To protect groundwater from detrimental NPs we must be able to predict nanoparticle movement within the aquifer. The often complex transport behavior of nanoparticles ensures the development of NP transport models is not a simple task. To enhance our understanding of NP transport processes, we utilize novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables us to look inside the rock and image the movement of nanoparticles within. For this, we use nanoparticles that are paramagnetic, making them visible to the MRI and enabling us to collect spatially resolved data from which we can develop more robust transport models. In this work, a core of Bentheimer sandstone (3 x 7 cm) was saturated with water and imaged inside a 7Tesla Bruker Biospec MRI. Firstly the porosity of the core was mapped using a MSME MRI sequence. Prior to imaging NP transport, the velocity of water (in absence on nanoparticles) was mapped using an APGSTE-RARE sequence. Nano-magnetite nanoparticles were then pumped into the core and their transport through the core was imaged using a RARE sequence. These images were calibrated using T2 parameter maps to provide fully quantitative maps of nanoparticle concentration at regular time intervals throughout the column (T2 being the spin-spin relaxation time of 1H nuclei). This work demonstrated we are able to spatially resolve porosity, water velocity and nanoparticle movement, inside rock, using a single technique (MRI). Significantly, this provides us with a unique and powerful dataset from which we are now developing new models of nanoparticle transport.

  2. Towards non-invasive diagnostic imaging of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Kirsten L.; Sbarboro, James; Sureka, Ruchi; de, Mrinmoy; Bicca, Maíra A.; Wang, Jane; Vasavada, Shaleen; Satpathy, Sreyesh; Wu, Summer; Joshi, Hrushikesh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Macrenaris, Keith; Waters, E. Alex; Lu, Chang; Phan, Joseph; Lacor, Pascale; Prasad, Pottumarthi; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    One way to image the molecular pathology in Alzheimer's disease is by positron emission tomography using probes that target amyloid fibrils. However, these fibrils are not closely linked to the development of the disease. It is now thought that early-stage biomarkers that instigate memory loss are composed of Aβ oligomers. Here, we report a sensitive molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast probe that is specific for Aβ oligomers. We attach oligomer-specific antibodies onto magnetic nanostructures and show that the complex is stable and binds to Aβ oligomers on cells and brain tissues to give a magnetic resonance imaging signal. When intranasally administered to an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, the probe readily reached hippocampal Aβ oligomers. In isolated samples of human brain tissue, we observed a magnetic resonance imaging signal that distinguished Alzheimer's disease from controls. Such nanostructures that target neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are potentially useful for evaluating the efficacy of new drugs and ultimately for early-stage Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and disease management.

  3. Non-invasive airway health assessment: Synchrotron imaging reveals effects of rehydrating treatments on mucociliary transit in-vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Farrow, Nigel R.; Stahr, Charlene S.; Boucher, Richard C.; Fouras, Andreas; Parsons, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of potential cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies we have developed a novel mucociliary transit (MCT) measurement that uses synchrotron phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) to non-invasively measure the transit rate of individual micron-sized particles deposited into the airways of live mice. The aim of this study was to image changes in MCT produced by a rehydrating treatment based on hypertonic saline (HS), a current CF clinical treatment. Live mice received HS containing a long acting epithelial sodium channel blocker (P308); isotonic saline; or no treatment, using a nebuliser integrated within a small-animal ventilator circuit. Marker particle motion was tracked for 20 minutes using PCXI. There were statistically significant increases in MCT in the isotonic and HS-P308 groups. The ability to quantify in vivo changes in MCT may have utility in pre-clinical research studies designed to bring new genetic and pharmaceutical treatments for respiratory diseases into clinical trials.

  4. Multiparametric Functional MRI: Non-Invasive Imaging of Inflammation and Edema Formation after Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutberlet, Marcel; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Jang, Mi-Sun; Thorenz, Anja; Chen, Rongjun; Hertel, Barbara; Barrmeyer, Amelie; Schmidbauer, Martina; Meier, Martin; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Khalifa, Abedalrazag; Hartung, Dagmar; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (ktx) in mice is used to learn about rejection and to develop new treatment strategies. Past studies have mainly been based on histological or molecular biological methods. Imaging techniques to monitor allograft pathology have rarely been used. Methods Here we investigated mice after isogenic and allogenic ktx over time with functional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and mapping of T2-relaxation time (T2-mapping) to assess graft inflammation and edema formation. To characterize graft pathology, we used PAS-staining, counted CD3-positive T-lymphocytes, analyzed leukocytes by means flow cytometry. Results DWI revealed progressive restriction of diffusion of water molecules in allogenic kidney grafts. This was paralleled by enhanced infiltration of the kidney by inflammatory cells. Changes in tissue diffusion were not seen following isogenic ktx. T2-times in renal cortex were increased after both isogenic and allogenic transplantation, consistent with tissue edema due to ischemic injury following prolonged cold ischemia time of 60 minutes. Lack of T2 increase in the inner stripe of the inner medulla in allogenic kidney grafts matched loss of tubular autofluorescence and may result from rejection-driven reductions in tubular water content due to tubular dysfunction and renal functional impairment. Conclusions Functional MRI is a valuable non-invasive technique for monitoring inflammation, tissue edema and tubular function. It permits on to differentiate between acute rejection and ischemic renal injury in a mouse model of ktx. PMID:27632553

  5. Line-scanning Brillouin microscopy for rapid non-invasive mechanical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jitao; Fiore, Antonio; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Kim, Hanyoup; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy probes the mechanical properties of material by measuring the optical frequency shift induced by photon-phonon scattering interactions. In traditional configurations, Brillouin spectrometers measure only one point of the sample at a time. This results in long acquisition times for mechanical imaging of large areas. In this work, we demonstrate a parallel detection configuration where the Brillouin shift of hundreds of points in a line can be measured simultaneously. In mm-sized samples, this novel configuration effectively shortens the acquisition time of two-dimensional Brillouin imaging from hours to tens of seconds, thus making it a powerful technology for label-free mechanical characterization of tissue and biomaterials. PMID:27739499

  6. A novel indocyanine green nanoparticle probe for non invasive fluorescence imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Fabrice P.; Berger, Michel; Goutayer, Mathieu; Guillermet, Stéphanie; Josserand, Véronique; Rizo, Philippe; Vinet, Françoise; Texier, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Fluorescence imaging (FLI) allows the in vivo monitoring of biological events associated with disease and represents a new promising tool for drug discovery. In particular, it speeds up the development and assessment of new therapies in oncology, helps in diagnosis, and improves surgery by fluorescence-guided tumor resection. This technique is highly sensitive, non-ionizing, easy to use and relatively inexpensive. Nevertheless, the main limitation of FLI lies in the optical properties of biological tissues. Mainly because of haemoglobin and water absorption, only near-infrared (NIR) light is adapted to image tissues in depth. Using a contrasting agent absorbing and emitting in the NIR region is therefore necessary to improve the background signal ratio, and thus the image contrast. Among many commercially available NIR optical contrast agents, only indocyanine green (ICG), has been approved by the United State Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for various medical applications. However, its instability (photo-degradation, thermal-degradation and low aqueous solubility) limits its applications as a fluorescent probe for imaging purposes. In order to improve the effectiveness of ICG, we engineered ICG-doped lipid nanoparticles (LNP). In this communication, we will report the design of these novel fluorescent nanoparticle probes. These low cost nanocarriers have numerous advantages, including their high chemical stability and biocompatibility. The characterization of the optical properties of the nanoparticles entrapping ICG will also be discussed. Finally, the biodistribution in mice of ICG when delivered through nanoparticles in comparison to free ICG in solution is presented. It demonstrates the efficient accumulation of ICG-doped nanoparticles in the tumor site.

  7. Non-invasive optical imaging of tumor growth in intact animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2003-12-01

    We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing tumor growth in intact rodent mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently accessible and repeatable. We have established new rodent tumor cell line -- SP2/0-GFP cells that stably express high level of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by transfected with a plasmid that encoded GFP using electroporation and selected with G418 for 3 weeks. 1 x 104 - 1x107 SP2/0-GFP mouse melanoma cells were injected s.c. in the ears and legs of 6- to 7-week-old syngeneic male BALB/c mice, and optical images visualized real-time the engrafted tumor growth. The tumor burden was monitored over time by cryogenically cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera focused through a stereo microscope. The results show that the fluorescence intensity of GFP-expressing tumor is comparably with the tumor growth and/or depress. This in vivo optical imaging based on GFP is sensitive, external, and noninvasive. It affords continuous visual monitoring of malignant growth within intact animals, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies.

  8. Non-invasive Imaging of Stem Cells by Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy: Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Julia; Ali, Nadire N.; Abdul Kadir, Siti H. Sheikh; Lab, Max; Stojkovic, Petra; Armstrong, Lyle; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Klenerman, David; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Lako, Majlinda; Harding, Sian E.; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Korchev, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    The most valuable property of stem cells (SCs) is their potential to differentiate into many or all cell types of the body. So far, monitoring SC differentiation has only been possible after cells were fixed or destroyed during sample preparation. It is, however, important to develop nondestructive methods of monitoring SCs. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a unique imaging technique that uses similar principles to the atomic force microscope, but with a pipette for the probe. This allows scanning of the surface of living cells noninvasively and enables measurement of cellular activities under more physiological conditions than is possible with other high-resolution microscopy techniques. We report here the novel use of the SICM for studying SCs to assess and monitor the status of SCs and various cell types differentiated from SCs. PMID:19055357

  9. Non-invasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaque macrophage in a rabbit model with F-18 FDG PET: a histopathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuangyu; Machac, Josef; Helft, Gerard; Worthley, Stephen G; Tang, Cheuk; Zaman, Azfar G; Rodriguez, Oswaldo J; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Fuster, Valentin; Badimon, Juan J

    2006-01-01

    Background Coronary atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications are the major cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the industrialized world. Thrombosis on disrupted atherosclerotic plaques plays a key role in the onset of acute coronary syndromes. Macrophages density is one of the most critical compositions of plaque in both plaque vulnerability and thrombogenicity upon rupture. It has been shown that macrophages have a high uptake of 18F-FDG (FDG). We studied the correlation of FDG uptake with histopathological macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques in a rabbit model. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in rabbits (n = 6) by a combination of atherogenic diet and balloon denudation of the aorta. PET imaging was performed at baseline and 2 months after atherogenic diet and coregistered with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Normal (n = 3) rabbits served as controls. FDG uptake by the thoracic aorta was expressed as concentration (μCi/ml) and the ratio of aortic uptake-to-blood radioactivity. FDG uptake and RAM-11 antibody positive areas were analyzed in descending aorta. Results Atherosclerotic aortas showed significantly higher uptake of FDG than normal aortas. The correlation of aortic FDG uptake with macrophage areas assessed by histopathology was statistically significant although it was not high (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001). When uptake was expressed as the ratio of aortic uptake-to-blood activity, it correlated better (r = 0.80, p < 0.0001) with the macrophage areas, due to the correction for residual blood FDG activity. Conclusion PET FDG activity correlated with macrophage content within aortic atherosclerosis. This imaging approach might serve as a useful non-invasive imaging technique and potentially permit monitoring of relative changes in inflammation within the atherosclerotic lesion. PMID:16725052

  10. Non-invasive analysis of root-soil interaction using three complementary imaging approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Tötzke, Christian; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Rudolph-Mohr, Nicole; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Lehmann, Eberhard; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2016-04-01

    Plant roots are known to modify physical, chemical and biological properties of the rhizosphere, thereby, altering conditions for water and nutrient uptake. We aim for capturing the dynamic processes occurring at the soil-root interface in situ. A combination of neutron (NI), magnetic resonance (MRI) and micro-focus X-ray tomography (CT) is applied to monitor the rhizosphere of young plants grown in sandy soil in cylindrical containers (diameter 3 cm). A novel transportable low field MRI system is operated directly at the neutron facility allowing for combined measurements of the very same sample capturing the same hydro-physiological state. The combination of NI, MRI and CT provides three-dimensional access to the root system in respect to structure and hydraulics of the rhizosphere and the transport of dissolved marker substances. The high spatial resolution of neutron imaging and its sensitivity for water can be exploited for the 3D analysis of the root morphology and detailed mapping of three-dimensional water content at the root soil interface and the surrounding soil. MRI has the potential to yield complementary information about the mobility of water, which can be bound in small pores or in the polymeric network of root exudates (mucilage layer). We inject combined tracers (GdDPTA or D2O) to study water fluxes through soil, rhizosphere and roots. Additional CT measurements reveal mechanical impacts of roots on the local microstructure of soil, e.g. showing soil compaction or the formation of cracks. We co-register the NT, MRI and CT data to integrate the complementary information into an aligned 3D data set. This allows, e.g., for co-localization of compacted soil regions or cracks with the specific local soil hydraulics, which is needed to distinguish the contribution of root exudation from mechanical impacts when interpreting altered hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere. Differences between rhizosphere and bulk soil can be detected and interpreted in

  11. Non invasive blood flow assessment in diabetic foot ulcer using laser speckle contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba; Narayanamoorthy, V. B.

    2014-03-01

    Measuring microcirculatory tissue blood perfusion is of interest for both clinicians and researchers in a wide range of applications and can provide essential information of the progress of treatment of certain diseases which causes either an increased or decreased blood flow. Diabetic ulcer associated with alterations in tissue blood flow is the most common cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations. A technique which can detect the onset of ulcer and provide essential information on the progress of the treatment of ulcer would be of great help to the clinicians. A noninvasive, noncontact and whole field laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique has been described in this paper which is used to assess the changes in blood flow in diabetic ulcer affected areas of the foot. The blood flow assessment at the wound site can provide critical information on the efficiency and progress of the treatment given to the diabetic ulcer subjects. The technique may also potentially fulfill a significant need in diabetic foot ulcer screening and management.

  12. Thermal fluctuation based study of aqueous deficient dry eyes by non-invasive thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Azharuddin, Mohammad; Bera, Sumanta Kr; Datta, Himadri; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we have studied the thermal fluctuation patterns occurring at the ocular surface of the left and right eyes for aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) patients and control subjects by thermal imaging. We conducted our experiment on 42 patients (84 eyes) with aqueous deficient dry eyes and compared with 36 healthy volunteers (72 eyes) without any history of ocular surface disorder. Schirmer's test, Tear Break-up Time, tear Meniscus height and fluorescein staining tests were conducted. Ocular surface temperature measurement was done, using an FL-IR thermal camera and thermal fluctuation in left and right eyes was calculated and analyzed using MATLAB. The time series containing the sum of squares of the temperature fluctuation on the ocular surface were compared for aqueous deficient dry eye and control subjects. Significant statistical difference between the fluctuation patterns for control and ADDE was observed (p < 0.001 at 95% confidence interval). Thermal fluctuations in left and right eyes are significantly correlated in controls but not in ADDE subjects. The possible origin of such correlation in control and lack of correlation in the ADDE subjects is discussed in the text.

  13. Non-invasive functional imaging of Cerebral Blood Volume with Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Hua, Jun; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) based on changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) can directly probe vasodilatation and vasoconstriction during brain activation or physiologic challenges, and can provide important insights into the mechanism of Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal changes. At present, the most widely used CBV fMRI technique in humans is called Vascular-Space-Occupancy (VASO) MRI and this article provides a technical review of this method. VASO MRI utilizes T1 differences between blood and tissue to distinguish these two compartments within a voxel and uses blood-nulling inversion recovery sequence to yield an MR signal proportional to 1-CBV. As such, vasodilatation will result in a VASO signal decrease and vasoconstriction will have the reverse effect. The VASO technique can be performed dynamically with a temporal resolution comparable to several other fMRI methods such as BOLD or Arterial-Spin-Labeling (ASL), and is particularly powerful when conducted in conjunction with these complementary techniques. The pulse sequence and imaging parameters of VASO can be optimized such that the signal change is predominantly of CBV origin, but careful considerations should be taken to minimize other contributions, such as those from the BOLD effect, CBF, and CSF. Sensitivity of the VASO technique remains to be the primary disadvantage when compared to BOLD, but this technique is increasingly demonstrating utility in neuroscientific and clinical applications. PMID:23355392

  14. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Anumanchipalli, Gopala K.; Dichter, Benjamin; Chaisanguanthum, Kris S.; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial—especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics. PMID:27019106

  15. High-Resolution, Non-Invasive Imaging of Upper Vocal Tract Articulators Compatible with Human Brain Recordings.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Kristofer E; Conant, David F; Anumanchipalli, Gopala K; Dichter, Benjamin; Chaisanguanthum, Kris S; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    A complete neurobiological understanding of speech motor control requires determination of the relationship between simultaneously recorded neural activity and the kinematics of the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. Many speech articulators are internal to the vocal tract, and therefore simultaneously tracking the kinematics of all articulators is nontrivial--especially in the context of human electrophysiology recordings. Here, we describe a noninvasive, multi-modal imaging system to monitor vocal tract kinematics, demonstrate this system in six speakers during production of nine American English vowels, and provide new analysis of such data. Classification and regression analysis revealed considerable variability in the articulator-to-acoustic relationship across speakers. Non-negative matrix factorization extracted basis sets capturing vocal tract shapes allowing for higher vowel classification accuracy than traditional methods. Statistical speech synthesis generated speech from vocal tract measurements, and we demonstrate perceptual identification. We demonstrate the capacity to predict lip kinematics from ventral sensorimotor cortical activity. These results demonstrate a multi-modal system to non-invasively monitor articulator kinematics during speech production, describe novel analytic methods for relating kinematic data to speech acoustics, and provide the first decoding of speech kinematics from electrocorticography. These advances will be critical for understanding the cortical basis of speech production and the creation of vocal prosthetics. PMID:27019106

  16. Multiresolution parametric estimation of transparent motions and denoising of fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Vincent; Liénard, Jean; Bouthemy, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel multiresolution parametric framework to estimate transparent motions typically present in X-Ray exams. Assuming the presence if two transparent layers, it computes two affine velocity fields by minimizing an appropriate objective function with an incremental Gauss-Newton technique. We have designed a realistic simulation scheme of fluoroscopic image sequences to validate our method on data with ground truth and different levels of noise. An experiment on real clinical images is also reported. We then exploit this transparent-motion estimation method to denoise two layers image sequences using a motion-compensated estimation method. In accordance with theory, we show that we reach a denoising factor of 2/3 in a few iterations without bringing any local artifacts in the image sequence.

  17. On non-invasive 2D and 3D Chromatic White Light image sensors for age determination of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-10-10

    The feasibility of 2D-intensity and 3D-topography images from a non-invasive Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor for the age determination of latent fingerprints is investigated. The proposed method might provide the means to solve the so far unresolved issue of determining a fingerprints age in forensics. Conducting numerous experiments for an indoor crime scene using selected surfaces, different influences on the aging of fingerprints are investigated and the resulting aging variability is determined in terms of inter-person, intra-person, inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Main influence factors are shown to be the sweat composition, temperature, humidity, wind, UV-radiation, surface type, contamination of the finger with water-containing substances, resolution and measured area size, whereas contact time, contact pressure and smearing of the print seem to be of minor importance. Such influences lead to a certain experimental variability in inter-person and intra-person variation, which is higher than the inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Comparing the aging behavior of 17 different features using 1490 time series with a total of 41,520 fingerprint images, the great potential of the CWL technique in combination with the binary pixel feature from prior work is shown. Performing three different experiments for the classification of fingerprints into the two time classes [0, 5 h] and [5, 24 h], a maximum classification performance of 79.29% (kappa=0.46) is achieved for a general case, which is further improved for special cases. The statistical significance of the two best-performing features (both binary pixel versions based on 2D-intensity images) is manually shown and a feature fusion is performed, highlighting the strong dependency of the features on each other. It is concluded that such method might be combined with additional capturing devices, such as microscopes or spectroscopes, to a very promising age estimation scheme. PMID:22658793

  18. On non-invasive 2D and 3D Chromatic White Light image sensors for age determination of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-10-10

    The feasibility of 2D-intensity and 3D-topography images from a non-invasive Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor for the age determination of latent fingerprints is investigated. The proposed method might provide the means to solve the so far unresolved issue of determining a fingerprints age in forensics. Conducting numerous experiments for an indoor crime scene using selected surfaces, different influences on the aging of fingerprints are investigated and the resulting aging variability is determined in terms of inter-person, intra-person, inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Main influence factors are shown to be the sweat composition, temperature, humidity, wind, UV-radiation, surface type, contamination of the finger with water-containing substances, resolution and measured area size, whereas contact time, contact pressure and smearing of the print seem to be of minor importance. Such influences lead to a certain experimental variability in inter-person and intra-person variation, which is higher than the inter-finger and intra-finger variation. Comparing the aging behavior of 17 different features using 1490 time series with a total of 41,520 fingerprint images, the great potential of the CWL technique in combination with the binary pixel feature from prior work is shown. Performing three different experiments for the classification of fingerprints into the two time classes [0, 5 h] and [5, 24 h], a maximum classification performance of 79.29% (kappa=0.46) is achieved for a general case, which is further improved for special cases. The statistical significance of the two best-performing features (both binary pixel versions based on 2D-intensity images) is manually shown and a feature fusion is performed, highlighting the strong dependency of the features on each other. It is concluded that such method might be combined with additional capturing devices, such as microscopes or spectroscopes, to a very promising age estimation scheme.

  19. Contrast changes in fluoroscopic imaging systems and statistical variations of these changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental studies have indicated that: (1) The response of digitized fluoroscopic imaging systems is linear systems is linear with contrast over a rather wide range of absorber and cavity thicknesses. (2) Contrast changes associated with the addition of aluminum, iodine containing contrast agents and air of thicknesses 1mm or less can be detected with a 95% confidence level. (3) The standard deviation associated with such determination using clinically available X-ray generators and video disc recording is less than 1 percent. A large flat screen X-ray image intensifier has been constructed and some preliminary results obtained. Sensitivity achieved makes dose reduction a factor often greater than previously reported for a system using a conventional X-ray image intensifier.

  20. High-resolution harmonics ultrasound imaging for non-invasive characterization of wound healing in a pre-clinical swine model.

    PubMed

    Gnyawali, Surya C; Barki, Kasturi G; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue.

  1. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  2. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review.

    PubMed

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  3. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  4. Non-Invasive Determination of Left Ventricular Workload in Patients with Aortic Stenosis Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Doppler Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Garcia, Julio; Gaillard, Emmanuel; Capoulade, Romain; Le Ven, Florent; Cloutier, Guy; Kadem, Lyes; Pibarot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Early detection and accurate estimation of aortic stenosis (AS) severity are the most important predictors of successful long-term outcomes in patients. Current clinical parameters used for evaluation of the AS severity have several limitations including flow dependency. Estimation of AS severity is specifically challenging in patients with low-flow and low transvalvular pressure gradient conditions. A proper diagnosis in these patients needs a comprehensive evaluation of the left ventricle (LV) hemodynamic loads. This study has two objectives: (1) developing a lumped-parameter model to describe the ventricular-valvular-arterial interaction and to estimate the LV stroke work (SW); (2) introducing and validating a new index, the normalized stroke work (N-SW), to assess the global hemodynamic load imposed on the LV. N-SW represents the global hemodynamic load that the LV faces for each unit volume of blood ejected. The model uses a limited number of parameters which all can be measured non-invasively using current clinical imaging modalities. The model was first validated by comparing its calculated flow waveforms with the ones measured using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in 49 patients and 8 controls. A very good correlation and concordance were found throughout the cycle (median root mean square: 12.21 mL/s) and between the peak values (r = 0.98; SEE = 0.001, p<0.001). The model was then used to determine SW using the parameters measured with transthoracic Doppler-echocardiography (TTE) and CMR. N-SW showed very good correlations with a previously-validated index of global hemodynamic load, the valvular arterial impedance (), using data from both imaging modalities (TTE: r = 0.82, SEE = 0.01, p<0.001; CMR: r = 0.74, SEE = 0.01, p<0.001). Furthermore, unlike , N-SW was almost independent from variations in the flow rate. This study suggests that considering N-SW may provide incremental diagnostic and prognostic information, beyond

  5. X-ray region of interest imaging system for rapid-sequence angiography and fluoroscopy: The micro-angiographic fluoroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ye

    Neuro-endovascular interventional diagnosis and treatment require high resolution x-ray imaging guidance of fluoroscopy and angiography. Our group has developed a small field of view, 5 frames per second, high-resolution micro-angiographic imager. This imager has demonstrated substantial high-resolution advantages for angiography over the conventional image intensifier. The work of this dissertation is to build a new micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) to expand the capabilities of the micro-angiographic imager to include fluoroscopic imaging over a small field of view. The components of the MAF are all commercially available including CsI (T1) scintillator, fiber-optic taper, light image intensifier (LII), mirror, lens, and CCD camera. The critical component is the microchannel plate based LII with very high spatial resolution. The LII has a large range of gain that can be controlled easily by a 5V to 9V DC voltage. This property enables the MAF to be used for angiography with a low gain of the LII, and for fluoroscopy with a high gain of the LII. This design was justified by the quantum accounting diagram calculation. The preliminary experimental results from the test model MAF demonstrated the feasibility of this design. The improved prototype MAF model demonstrates high-resolution imaging for both fluoroscopy and angiography. The performance descriptors of the prototype MAF such as MTF, NPS, and DQE, were measured in both angiographic mode and fluoroscopic mode. For angiographic mode, at spatial frequencies of 4 and 10 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 14% and 1.5% respectively, the DQE for the MAF was 12% and 1.2% respectively, while the DQE (0) was about 60%. For fluoroscopic mode, at spatial frequency of 4 lp/mm, the MTF for the MAF was 11%, and the DQE for the MAF was 9.5%. The image lag for the MAF in fluoroscopic mode at a rate of 30 fps was measured to be minimal. The allowable maximum entrance exposure rate was found to be related with the maximum LII

  6. High-Resolution Harmonics Ultrasound Imaging for Non-Invasive Characterization of Wound Healing in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Dixith, Sriteja; Vanzant, Daniel; Kim, Jayne; Dickerson, Jennifer L.; Datta, Soma; Powell, Heather; Roy, Sashwati; Bergdall, Valerie; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents the first study employing non-invasive high-resolution harmonic ultrasound imaging to longitudinally characterize skin wound healing. Burn wounds (day 0-42), on the dorsum of a domestic Yorkshire white pig were studied non-invasively using tandem digital planimetry, laser speckle imaging and dual mode (B and Doppler) ultrasound imaging. Wound depth, as measured by B-mode imaging, progressively increased until day 21 and decreased thereafter. Initially, blood flow at the wound edge increased up to day 14 and subsequently regressed to baseline levels by day 21, when the wound was more than 90% closed. Coinciding with regression of blood flow at the wound edge, there was an increase in blood flow in the wound bed. This was observed to regress by day 42. Such changes in wound angiogenesis were corroborated histologically. Gated Doppler imaging quantitated the pulse pressure of the primary feeder artery supplying the wound site. This pulse pressure markedly increased with a bimodal pattern following wounding connecting it to the induction of wound angiogenesis. Finally, ultrasound elastography measured tissue stiffness and visualized growth of new tissue over time. These studies have elegantly captured the physiological sequence of events during the process of wound healing, much of which is anticipated based on certain dynamics in play, to provide the framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms driving these processes. We conclude that the tandem use of non-invasive imaging technologies has the power to provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the healing skin tissue. PMID:25799513

  7. Variability in Fluoroscopic Image Acquisition During Operative Fixation of Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Harris, Dorothy Y; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether injury, level of surgeon training, and patient factors are associated with increased use of fluoroscopy during open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. These relationships are not well defined. The study was a retrospective chart review of patients treated at an academic institution with primary open reduction and internal fixation of an ankle. Patient demographics, including sex, age, and body mass index, were collected, as was surgeon year of training (residency and fellowship). Image acquisition data included total number of images, total imaging time, and cumulative dose. Ankle fractures were classified according to the Weber and Lauge-Hansen classifications and the number of fixation points. Bivariate analysis and multiple regression models were used to predict increasing fluoroscopic image acquisition. Alpha was set at 0.05. Of 158 patients identified, 58 were excluded. After bivariate analysis, fracture complexity and year of training showed a significant correlation with increasing image acquisition. After multiple regression analysis, fracture complexity and year of training remained clinically significant and were independent predictors of increased image acquisition. Increasing fracture complexity resulted in 20 additional images, 16 additional seconds, and an increase in radiation of 0.7 mGy. Increasing year of training resulted in an additional 6 images and an increase of 0.35 mGy in cumulative dose. The findings suggest that protocols to educate trainee surgeons in minimizing the use of fluoroscopy would be beneficial at all levels of training and should target multiple fracture patterns.

  8. Image intensifier distortion correction for fluoroscopic RSA: the need for independent accuracy assessment.

    PubMed

    Kedgley, Angela E; Fox, Anne-Marie V; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroscopic images suffer from multiple modes of image distortion. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of correction using a range of two-dimensional polynomials and a global approach. The primary measure of interest was the average error in the distances between four beads of an accuracy phantom, as measured using RSA. Secondary measures of interest were the root mean squared errors of the fit of the chosen polynomial to the grid of beads used for correction, and the errors in the corrected distances between the points of the grid in a second position. Based upon the two-dimensional measures, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and two in the perpendicular axis was preferred. However, based upon the RSA reconstruction, a polynomial of order three in the axis of correction and one in the perpendicular axis was preferred. The use of a calibration frame for these three-dimensional applications most likely tempers the effects of distortion. This study suggests that distortion correction should be validated for each of its applications with an independent "gold standard" phantom.

  9. Non-invasive assessment of elastic modulus of arterial constructs during cell culture using ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debaditya; Lee, Kee-Won; Allen, Robert A; Wang, Yadong; Brigham, John C; Kim, Kang

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical strength is a key design factor in tissue engineering of arteries. Most existing techniques assess the mechanical property of arterial constructs destructively, leading to sacrifice of a large number of animals. We propose an ultrasound-based non-invasive technique for the assessment of the mechanical strength of engineered arterial constructs. Tubular scaffolds made from a biodegradable elastomer and seeded with vascular fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells were cultured in a pulsatile-flow bioreactor. Scaffold distension was computed from ultrasound radiofrequency signals of the pulsating scaffold via 2-D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Young's modulus was then calculated by solving the inverse problem from the distension and the recorded pulse pressure. The stiffness thus computed from ultrasound correlated well with direct mechanical testing results. As the scaffolds matured in culture, ultrasound measurements indicated an increase in Young's modulus, and histology confirmed the growth of cells and collagen fibrils in the constructs. The results indicate that ultrasound elastography can be used to assess and monitor non-invasively the mechanical properties of arterial constructs.

  10. Non-invasive Assessment of Elastic Modulus of Arterial Constructs during Cell Culture using Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debaditya; Lee, Kee-Won; Allen, Robert A.; Wang, Yadong; Brigham, John C.; Kim, Kang

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical strength is a key design factor for engineered arteries. Most existing techniques assess the mechanical property of arterial constructs destructively, leading to a large number of animal sacrifices. We propose an ultrasound-based non-invasive mechanical strength assessment technique for engineered arterial constructs. Tubular scaffolds made from a biodegradable elastomer and seeded with vascular fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells were cultured in a pulsatile-flow bioreactor. Scaffold distension was computed from ultrasound radiofrequency signals of the pulsating scaffold via two-dimensional phase-sensitive speckle tracking. The Young's modulus was then calculated by solving inverse problem from the distension and the recorded pulse pressure. Stiffness thus computed from ultrasound correlated well with direct mechanical testing results. As the scaffolds matured in culture, ultrasound measurements showed increased Young's modulus and histology confirmed the growth of cells and collagen fibrils in the constructs. The results show that ultrasound elastography non-invasively assesses and monitors the mechanical properties of arterial constructs. PMID:23932282

  11. Non-invasive measurements of granular flows by magnetic resonance imaging. Technical progress report for the quarter ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, M.; Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.; Jeong, E.K.

    1993-01-20

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to measure granular-flow in a partially filled, steadily rotating, long, horizontal cylinder. This non-invasive technique can yield statistically averaged two-dimensional concentrations and velocity profiles anywhere in the flow of suitable granular materials. First, rigid body motion of a cylinder fill with granular material was studied to confirm the validity of this method. Then, the density variation of the flowing layer where particles collide and dilate, and the depth of the flowing layer and the flow velocity profile were obtained as a function of the cylinder rotation rate.

  12. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Dandolo, Corinna L.; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-11-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to provide insights as to the limits and potentials of the technique in detecting different kinds of underdrawings and paint layers. Constituent layers, construction techniques, and anomalies were identified and localized by interpreting the extracted THz dielectric stratigraphy.

  13. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch Dandolo, Corinna L.; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-09-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to provide insights as to the limits and potentials of the technique in detecting different kinds of underdrawings and paint layers. Constituent layers, construction techniques, and anomalies were identified and localized by interpreting the extracted THz dielectric stratigraphy.

  14. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo.

  15. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo. PMID:27299677

  16. Visceral anatomy of ocean sunfish (Mola mola (L., 1758), Molidae, Tetraodontiformes) and angler (Lophius piscatorius (L., 1758), Lophiidae, Lophiiformes) investigated by non-invasive imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Chanet, Bruno; Guintard, Claude; Boisgard, Thierry; Fusellier, Marion; Tavernier, Cédric; Betti, Eric; Madec, Stéphane; Richaudeau, Yvan; Raphaël, Christian; Dettaï, Agnès; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the gross visceral anatomy of ocean sunfish and angler using non-invasive imaging techniques: computed tomography imaging (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Similarities and differences in the internal organisation of these two species are verified. Both species lack a swimbladder and present a significant asymmetry in the hepatic lobes, an elongated bile duct terminating close to the stomach, a compact thyroid embedded in a blood lacuna, and very reduced brain and spinal cord. These observations are important in regard to the close relationships between Tetraodontiformes and Lophiiformes, established by several molecular works, but not yet confirmed by morpho-anatomical data. However the occurrence of these features has to be examined in other taxa before phylogenetic hypotheses are proposed.

  17. Optimization of multi-image pose recovery of fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in an image-guided femoroplasty system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen P.; Armand, Mehran; Otake, Yoshito; Taylor, Russell H.

    2011-03-01

    Percutaneous femoroplasty [1], or femoral bone augmentation, is a prospective alternative treatment for reducing the risk of fracture in patients with severe osteoporosis. We are developing a surgical robotics system that will assist orthopaedic surgeons in planning and performing a patient-specific, augmentation of the femur with bone cement. This collaborative project, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been the topic of previous publications [2],[3] from our group. This paper presents modifications to the pose recovery of a fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial during our process of 2D/3D registration of X-ray intraoperative images to preoperative CT data. We show improved automata of the initial pose estimation as well as lower projection errors with the advent of a multiimage pose optimization step.

  18. Raman Microscopy for Non-Invasive Imaging of Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers: Intracellular Distribution of Cationic Liposomes of Different Composition

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, R. R.; Miljkovic, M.; Quintero, L.; Diem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is playing an increasing role in targeted drug delivery into pathological tissues. Drug-loaded pharmaceutical nanocarriers can be delivered into diseased sites by passive targeting (spontaneous accumulation of nanocarriers in the areas with affected vasculature) or by active targeting (via site-specific ligands attached to the surface of drug-loaded nanocarriers). Subsequent level of targeting requires cellular internalization of nanocarriers and their specific association with certain individual cell organelles. The control over intracellular distribution of pharmaceutical nanocarriers requires effective and non-invasive methods of their visualization inside cells. In an attempt to enhance cellular internalization of pharmaceutical nanocarriers and their association with mitochondria specifically, we have prepared three types of cationic liposomes and investigated their intracellular distribution. The analysis was performed using Raman microspectroscopy in combination with optical microscopy, in order to provide morphological information as well as biochemical signatures of the sample. It was demonstrated that the Raman microscopy allows to evaluate the extent of mitochondrial association depending on the liposome composition. PMID:22376068

  19. Non-invasive, photonics-based diagnostic, imaging, monitoring, and light delivery techniques for the recognition, quantification and treatment of malignant and chronic inflammatory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N.; Davies-Shaw, D.; Shaw, J. D.

    2007-02-01

    We report firsthand on innovative developments in non-invasive, biophotonic techniques for a wide range of diagnostic, imaging and treatment options, including the recognition and quantification of cancerous, pre-cancerous cells and chronic inflammatory conditions. These techniques have benefited from the ability to target the affected site by both monochromatic light and broad multiple wavelength spectra. The employment of such wavelength or color-specific properties embraces the fluorescence stimulation of various photosensitizing drugs, and the instigation and detection of identified fluorescence signatures attendant upon laser induced fluorescence (LIF) phenomena as transmitted and propagated by precancerous, cancerous and normal tissue. In terms of tumor imaging and therapeutic and treatment options, we have exploited the abilities of various wavelengths to penetrate to different depths, through different types of tissues, and have explored quantifiable absorption and reflection characteristics upon which diagnostic assumptions can be reliably based and formulated. These biophotonic-based diagnostic, sensing and imaging techniques have also benefited from, and have been further enhanced by, the integrated ability to provide various power levels to be employed at various stages in the procedure. Applications are myriad, including non-invasive, non destructive diagnosis of in vivo cell characteristics and functions; light-based tissue analysis; real-time monitoring and mapping of brain function and of tumor growth; real time monitoring of the surgical completeness of tumor removal during laser-imaged/guided brain resection; diagnostic procedures based on fluorescence life-time monitoring, the monitoring of chronic inflammatory conditions (including rheumatoid arthritis), and continuous blood glucose monitoring in the control of diabetes.

  20. Non-invasive dual fluorescence in vivo imaging for detection of macrophage infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in inflammatory arthritic joints

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hongsik; Bhatti, Fazal-Ur-Rehman; Yoon, Tae Won; Hasty, Karen A.; Stuart, John M.; Yi, Ae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Detection and intervention at an early stage is a critical factor to impede arthritis progress. Here we present a non-invasive method to detect inflammatory changes in joints of arthritic mice. Inflammation was monitored by dual fluorescence optical imaging for near-infrared fluorescent (750F) matrix-metalloproteinase activatable agent and allophycocyanin-conjugated anti-mouse CD11b. Increased intensity of allophycocyanin (indication of macrophage accumulation) and 750F (indication of matrix-metalloproteinase activity) showed a biological relationship with the arthritis severity score and the histopathology score of arthritic joints. Our results demonstrate that this method can be used to detect early stages of arthritis with minimum intervention in small animal models. PMID:27231625

  1. Using non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the reduction of Cr(VI) using a biofilm-palladium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, D A; Yong, P; Macaskie, L E; Johns, M L

    2010-09-01

    Industrial waste streams may contain contaminants that are valuable like Pd(II) and/or toxic and mutagenic like Cr(VI). Using Serratia sp. biofilm the former was biomineralized to produce a supported nanocrystalline Pd(0) catalyst, and this biofilm-Pd heterogeneous catalyst was then used to reduce Cr(VI) to less dangerous Cr(III) at room temperature, with formate as the electron donor. Cr(VI)((aq)) is non-paramagnetic while Cr(III)((aq)) is paramagnetic, which enabled spatial mapping of Cr species concentrations within the reactor cell using non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging experiments. Spatial reactivity heterogeneities were thus examined. In batch reactions, these could be attributed primarily to heterogeneity of Pd(0) distribution and to the development of gas bubbles within the reactor. In continuous flow reactions, spatial reactivity heterogeneities resulted primarily from heterogeneity of Cr(VI) delivery. PMID:20506297

  2. Non-invasive current and voltage imaging techniques for integrated circuits using scanning probe microscopy. Final report, LDRD Project FY93 and FY94

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the first practical, non-invasive technique for detecting and imaging currents internal to operating integrated circuits (ICs). This technique is based on magnetic force microscopy and was developed under Sandia National Laboratories` LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) program during FY 93 and FY 94. LDRD funds were also used to explore a related technique, charge force microscopy, for voltage probing of ICs. This report describes the technical work performed under this LDRD as well as the outcomes of the project in terms of publications and awards, intellectual property and licensing, synergistic work, potential future work, hiring of additional permanent staff, and benefits to DOE`s defense programs (DP).

  3. Rationale and methods of the integrated biomarker and imaging study (IBIS): combining invasive and non-invasive imaging with biomarkers to detect subclinical atherosclerosis and assess coronary lesion biology.

    PubMed

    Van Mieghem, Carlos A G; Bruining, Nico; Schaar, Johannes A; McFadden, Eugene; Mollet, Nico; Cademartiri, Filippo; Mastik, Frits; Ligthart, Jurgen M R; Granillo, Gaston A Rodriguez; Valgimigli, Marco; Sianos, Georgios; van der Giessen, Willem J; Backx, Bianca; Morel, Marie-Angele M; Van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Sawyer, Jonathon D; Kaplow, June; Zalewski, Andrew; van der Steen, Anton F W; de Feyter, Pim; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-08-01

    Death or myocardial infarction, the most serious clinical consequences of atherosclerosis, often result from plaque rupture at non-flow limiting lesions. Current diagnostic imaging with coronary angiography only detects large plaques that already impinge on the lumen and cannot accurately identify those that have a propensity to cause unheralded events. Accurate evaluation of the composition or of the biomechanical characteristics of plaques with invasive or non-invasive methods, alone or in conjunction with assessment of circulating biomarkers, could help identify high-risk patients, thus providing the rationale for aggressive treatments in order to reduce future clinical events. The IBIS (Integrated Biomarker and Imaging Study) study is a prospective, single-center, non-randomized, observational study conducted in Rotterdam. The aim of the IBIS study is to evaluate both invasive (quantitative coronary angiography, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and palpography) and non-invasive (multislice spiral computed tomography) imaging techniques to characterize non-flow limiting coronary lesions. In addition, multiple classical and novel biomarkers will be measured and their levels correlated with the results of the different imaging techniques. A minimum of 85 patients up to a maximum of 120 patients will be included. This paper describes the study protocol and methodological solutions that have been devised for the purpose of comparisons among several imaging modalities. It outlines the analyses that will be performed to compare invasive and non-invasive imaging techniques in conjunction with multiple biomarkers to characterize non-flow limiting subclinical coronary lesions.

  4. A simple method for the generation of organ and vessel contours from roentgenographic or fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. D.; Keller, R. A.; Baily, N. A.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for outlining or contouring any area defined by a change in film density or fluoroscopic screen intensity is described. The entire process, except for the positioning of an electronic window, is accomplished using a small computer having appropriate softwave. The electronic window is operator positioned over the area to be processed. The only requirement is that the window be large enough to encompass the total area to be considered.

  5. Targeted Non-invasive Imaging of EGFR-expressing Orthotopic Pancreatic Cancer using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT)

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Shanice V.; Huang, Justin S.; Yin, Wenyuan; Albeituni, Sabrin; Rush, Jamie; Khanal, Anil; Yan, Jun; Ceresa, Brian P.; Frieboes, Hermann B.; McNally, Lacey R.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of orthotopic xenograft tumors is difficult due to poor spatial resolution and reduced image fidelity with traditional optical imaging modalities. In particular, light scattering and attenuation in tissue at depths beyond subcutaneous implantation hinder adequate visualization. We evaluate the use of multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) to detect upregulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in orthotopic pancreatic xenografts using a near-infrared (NIR) EGF-conjugated CF-750 fluorescent probe. MSOT is based on the photoacoustic effect and thus not limited by photon scattering, resulting in high-resolution tomographic images. Pancreatic tumor-bearing mice with luciferase-transduced S2VP10L tumors were intravenously injected with EGF-750 probe prior to MSOT imaging. We characterized probe specificity and bioactivity via immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometric analysis. In vitro data along with optical bioluminescence/fluorescence imaging were used to validate acquired MSOT in vivo images of probe biodistribution. Indocyanine green dye was used as a non-specific control to define specificity of EGF-probe accumulation. Maximum accumulation occurred at six hours post-injection, demonstrating specific intra-tumoral probe uptake and minimal liver and kidney off-target accumulation. Optical bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging confirmed tumor-specific probe accumulation consistent with MSOT images. These studies demonstrate the utility of MSOT to obtain volumetric images of ligand probe biodistribution in vivo to detect orthotopic pancreatic tumor lesions through active targeting of EGF receptor. PMID:25217521

  6. Application of visible and near infrared hyperspectral imaging for non-invasively measuring distribution of water-holding capacity in salmon flesh.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen

    2013-11-15

    Water-holding capacity (WHC) is a primary quality determinant of salmon flesh. One of the limiting factors for not having a direct measurement of WHC for salmon quality grading is that current WHC measurements are destructive, time-consuming, and inefficient. In this study, two hyperspectral image systems operated in the visible and short-wave near infrared range (400-1000 nm) and the long-wave near infrared range (897-1753 nm) were applied for non-invasive determination of four WHC indices, namely percentage liquid loss (PLL), percentage water loss (PWL), percentage fat loss (PFL), and percentage water remained (PWR) of salmon flesh. Two calibration methods of partial least square regression (PLSR) and least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) were applied, respectively, to establish calibration models of WHC indices based on the spectral signatures of salmon flesh, and the performances of these two methods were compared to determine the optimal spectral calibration strategy. The performances were also compared between two hyperspectral image systems, when full range spectra were considered. Out of 121 wavelength variables, only thirteen (PLL), twelve (PWL), nine (PFL), and twelve variables (PWR) were selected as important variables by using competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm to reduce redundancy and collinearity of hyperspectral images. The CARS-PLSR combination was identified as the optimal method to calibrate the prediction models for WHC determination, resulting in good correlation coefficient of prediction (rP) of 0.941, 0.937, 0.815, and 0.970 for PLL, PWL, PFL, and PWR analysis, respectively. CARS-PLSR equations were obtained according to the regression coefficients of the CARS-PLSR models and were transferred to each pixel in the image for visualizing WHC indices in all portions of the salmon fillet. The overall results show that the laborious, time-consuming, and destructive traditional techniques could be replaced by

  7. Non-invasive parenchymal, vascular and metabolic high-frequency ultrasound and photoacoustic rat deep brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-03-02

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  8. Non-invasive Parenchymal, Vascular and Metabolic High-frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Rat Deep Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  9. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Non-Invasive Microwave Head Imaging System for Intracranial Haemorrhage Detection.

    PubMed

    Mobashsher, A T; Bialkowski, K S; Abbosh, A M; Crozier, S

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial haemorrhage is a life threatening medical emergency, yet only a fraction of the patients receive treatment in time, primarily due to the transport delay in accessing diagnostic equipment in hospitals such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography. A mono-static microwave head imaging system that can be carried in an ambulance for the detection and localization of intracranial haemorrhage is presented. The system employs a single ultra-wideband antenna as sensing element to transmit signals in low microwave frequencies towards the head and capture backscattered signals. The compact and low-profile antenna provides stable directional radiation patterns over the operating bandwidth in both near and far-fields. Numerical analysis of the head imaging system with a realistic head model in various situations is performed to realize the scattering mechanism of haemorrhage. A modified delay-and-summation back-projection algorithm, which includes effects of surface waves and a distance-dependent effective permittivity model, is proposed for signal and image post-processing. The efficacy of the automated head imaging system is evaluated using a 3D-printed human head phantom with frequency dispersive dielectric properties including emulated haemorrhages with different sizes located at different depths. Scattered signals are acquired with a compact transceiver in a mono-static circular scanning profile. The reconstructed images demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting haemorrhages as small as 1 cm3. While quantitative analyses reveal that the quality of images gradually degrades with the increase of the haemorrhage's depth due to the reduction of signal penetration inside the head; rigorous statistical analysis suggests that substantial improvement in image quality can be obtained by increasing the data samples collected around the head. The proposed head imaging prototype along with the processing algorithm demonstrates its feasibility for

  10. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Non-Invasive Microwave Head Imaging System for Intracranial Haemorrhage Detection.

    PubMed

    Mobashsher, A T; Bialkowski, K S; Abbosh, A M; Crozier, S

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial haemorrhage is a life threatening medical emergency, yet only a fraction of the patients receive treatment in time, primarily due to the transport delay in accessing diagnostic equipment in hospitals such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography. A mono-static microwave head imaging system that can be carried in an ambulance for the detection and localization of intracranial haemorrhage is presented. The system employs a single ultra-wideband antenna as sensing element to transmit signals in low microwave frequencies towards the head and capture backscattered signals. The compact and low-profile antenna provides stable directional radiation patterns over the operating bandwidth in both near and far-fields. Numerical analysis of the head imaging system with a realistic head model in various situations is performed to realize the scattering mechanism of haemorrhage. A modified delay-and-summation back-projection algorithm, which includes effects of surface waves and a distance-dependent effective permittivity model, is proposed for signal and image post-processing. The efficacy of the automated head imaging system is evaluated using a 3D-printed human head phantom with frequency dispersive dielectric properties including emulated haemorrhages with different sizes located at different depths. Scattered signals are acquired with a compact transceiver in a mono-static circular scanning profile. The reconstructed images demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting haemorrhages as small as 1 cm3. While quantitative analyses reveal that the quality of images gradually degrades with the increase of the haemorrhage's depth due to the reduction of signal penetration inside the head; rigorous statistical analysis suggests that substantial improvement in image quality can be obtained by increasing the data samples collected around the head. The proposed head imaging prototype along with the processing algorithm demonstrates its feasibility for

  11. Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Non-Invasive Microwave Head Imaging System for Intracranial Haemorrhage Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mobashsher, A. T.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Abbosh, A. M.; Crozier, S.

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial haemorrhage is a life threatening medical emergency, yet only a fraction of the patients receive treatment in time, primarily due to the transport delay in accessing diagnostic equipment in hospitals such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography. A mono-static microwave head imaging system that can be carried in an ambulance for the detection and localization of intracranial haemorrhage is presented. The system employs a single ultra-wideband antenna as sensing element to transmit signals in low microwave frequencies towards the head and capture backscattered signals. The compact and low-profile antenna provides stable directional radiation patterns over the operating bandwidth in both near and far-fields. Numerical analysis of the head imaging system with a realistic head model in various situations is performed to realize the scattering mechanism of haemorrhage. A modified delay-and-summation back-projection algorithm, which includes effects of surface waves and a distance-dependent effective permittivity model, is proposed for signal and image post-processing. The efficacy of the automated head imaging system is evaluated using a 3D-printed human head phantom with frequency dispersive dielectric properties including emulated haemorrhages with different sizes located at different depths. Scattered signals are acquired with a compact transceiver in a mono-static circular scanning profile. The reconstructed images demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting haemorrhages as small as 1 cm3. While quantitative analyses reveal that the quality of images gradually degrades with the increase of the haemorrhage’s depth due to the reduction of signal penetration inside the head; rigorous statistical analysis suggests that substantial improvement in image quality can be obtained by increasing the data samples collected around the head. The proposed head imaging prototype along with the processing algorithm demonstrates its feasibility

  12. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT

  13. Non-invasive identification of traditional red lake pigments in fourteenth to sixteenth centuries paintings through the use of hyperspectral imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, T.; Casini, A.; Cucci, C.; Melo, M. J.; Picollo, M.; Stefani, L.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper, which focuses on the identification of red lake pigments, in particular madder, brazilwood, and cochineal, addresses the advantages and drawbacks of using reflectance hyperspectral imaging in the visible and near-infrared ranges as a non-invasive method of discrimination between different red organic pigments in cultural heritage objects. Based on reconstructions of paints used in the period extending from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century, prepared with as far as possible historical accuracy, the analyses by means of visible/near-infrared reflectance hyperspectral imaging were carried out with the objective of understanding the most significant differences between these vegetal- and animal-based red lake pigments. The paper discusses the results that were obtained on four original Italian and North European paintings and compared with those from the paint reconstructions, in order to demonstrate how the hyperspectral imaging technique can be usefully and effectively applied to the identification and mapping of red lake pigments in painted surfaces of interest in the conservation field.

  14. Non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of presumed intermedioradial carpal bone avascular necrosis in the dog.

    PubMed

    Pownder, Sarah L; Cooley, Stacy; Hayashi, Kei; Bezuidenhout, Abraham; Koff, Matthew F; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old, spayed female Weimaraner dog was evaluated for progressive left forelimb lameness localized to the carpus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to arrive at a presumptive diagnosis of intermedioradial carpal (IRC) bone fracture with avascular necrosis (AVN). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring AVN of the canine IRC diagnosed using MRI.

  15. Nonlinear spectroscopy in the near-field: time resolved spectroscopy and subwavelength resolution non-invasive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namboodiri, Mahesh; Khan, Tahirzeb; Karki, Khadga; Kazemi, Mehdi Mohammad; Bom, Sidhant; Flachenecker, Günter; Namboodiri, Vinu; Materny, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    The combination of near-field microscopy along with nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques is presented here. The scanning near-field imaging technique can be integrated with nonlinear spectroscopic techniques to improve spatial and axial resolution of the images. Additionally, ultrafast dynamics can be probed down to nano-scale dimension. The review shows some examples for this combination, which resulted in an exciton map and vibrational contrast images with sub-wavelength resolution. Results of two-color femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) on thin films of the organic semiconductor 3,4,9,10 Perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) are presented. While nonlinear Raman techniques have been used to obtain highly resolved images in combination with near-field microscopy, the use of femtosecond laser pulses in electronic resonance still constitutes a big challenge. Here, we present our first results on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) with femtosecond laser pulses detected in the near-field using SNOM. We demonstrate that highly spatially resolved images can be obtained from poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nano-structures where the fs-CARS process was in resonance with the P3HT absorption and with characteristic P3HT vibrational modes without destruction of the samples. Sub-diffraction limited lateral resolution is achieved. Especially the height resolution clearly surpasses that obtained with standard microCARS. These results will be the basis for future investigations of mode-selective dynamics in the near-field.

  16. Comparison of Optical and Power Doppler Ultrasound Imaging for Non-Invasive Evaluation of Arsenic Trioxide as a Vascular Disrupting Agent in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alhasan, Mustafa K.; Liu, Li; Lewis, Matthew A.; Magnusson, Jennifer; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Small animal imaging provides diverse methods for evaluating tumor growth and acute response to therapy. This study compared the utility of non-invasive optical and ultrasound imaging to monitor growth of three diverse human tumor xenografts (brain U87-luc-mCherry, mammary MCF7-luc-mCherry, and prostate PC3-luc) growing in nude mice. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence imaging (FLI), and Power Doppler ultrasound (PD US) were then applied to examine acute vascular disruption following administration of arsenic trioxide (ATO). During initial tumor growth, strong correlations were found between manual caliper measured tumor volume and FLI intensity, BLI intensity following luciferin injection, and traditional B-mode US. Administration of ATO to established U87 tumors caused significant vascular shutdown within 2 hrs at all doses in the range 5 to 10 mg/kg in a dose dependant manner, as revealed by depressed bioluminescent light emission. At lower doses substantial recovery was seen within 4 hrs. At 8 mg/kg there was >85% reduction in tumor vascular perfusion, which remained depressed after 6 hrs, but showed some recovery after 24 hrs. Similar response was observed in MCF7 and PC3 tumors. Dynamic BLI and PD US each showed similar duration and percent reductions in tumor blood flow, but FLI showed no significant changes during the first 24 hrs. The results provide further evidence for comparable utility of optical and ultrasound imaging for monitoring tumor growth, More specifically, they confirm the utility of BLI and ultrasound imaging as facile assays of the vascular disruption in solid tumors based on ATO as a model agent. PMID:23029403

  17. Combination of optoacoustics and ultrasound imaging for non-invasive, rapid assessment, and management of circulatory shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.

    2011-03-01

    We developed a noninvasive, optoacoustic diagnostic platform for monitoring of multiple physiologic variables in inpatients and outpatients. One of the most important applications of this platform is noninvasive, rapid assessment and management of circulatory shock, a common condition in critically ill patients. At present, monitoring of circulatory shock requires measurement of central venous blood oxygenation using invasive procedures such as insertion of catheters in central veins. Hemoglobin saturation below 70% in central veins indicates circulatory shock that requires immediate treatment. We built a portable optoacoustic system for noninvasive measurement of central venous oxygenation. In this study we used the optoacoustic system and clinical ultrasound imaging systems for rapid optoacoustic probing of these veins. The optoacoustic system utilizes a custom-made, sensitive optoacoustic probe that was developed in our laboratory for monitoring of blood oxygenation in deep blood vessels. The studies were performed in human subjects with different geometry (depth, size) of the veins. The ultrasound imaging systems permitted rapid identification of specific blood vessels for optoacoustic probing. We developed a novel algorithm for continuous, realtime, and precise measurement of blood oxygenation in blood vessels. Precision of central venous oxygenation measurement obtained in the study was very high: 1%. Our results indicate that the combination of optoacoustics and ultrasound imaging systems can provide more rapid and accurate assessment and management of the circulatory shock.

  18. Non-Invasive imaging of small-animal tumors: high-frequency ultrasound vs. MicroPET.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Li, Chen-Han; Cheng, Weng-Fang; Li, Pai-Chi

    2005-01-01

    Tumor volume measurement on small animals is important but currently invasive. We employ ultrasonic micro-imaging (UMI) in this study and demonstrate its feasibility. In addition, we use small animal positron emission tomography (microPET) as a preliminary effort to develop multi-modality small animal imaging techniques. The tumor growth curve from UMI is also compared to radioactivity from microPET. Both UMI and [18F] FDG microPET imaging were performed on C57BL/6J black mice bearing WF-3 ovary cancer cells at various stages from the second week till up to the eighth week. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction were also done. The growth curve was obtained in vivo noninvasively by UMI. The cell doubling time was 7.46 days according to UMI. This result was compared with vernier caliper measurement and radioactivity counting by microPET. In microPET, we obtained the time-activity curves from the tumor and the tumor-surrounding tissue. The tumor-to-normal-tissues ratios reached maximum at the fifth week after tumor cell implantation. PMID:17281549

  19. Quantitative phase imaging of cellular and subcellular structures for non-invasive screening diagnostics of socially significant diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilenko, Irina; Metelin, Vladislav; Nasyrov, Marat; Belyakov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Sukhenko, Evgeniy

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to increase the quality of the early diagnosis using cytological differential-diagnostic criteria for reactive changes in the nuclear structures of the immunocompetent cells. The morphofunctional status of living cells were estimated in the real time using new technologic platform of the hardware-software complex for phase cell imaging. The level of functional activity for lymphocyte subpopulations was determined on the base of modification of nuclear structures and decreasing of nuclear phase thickness. The dynamics of nuclear parameters was used as the quantitative measuring for cell activating level and increasing of proliferative potential.

  20. Non-invasive depth profile imaging of the stratum corneum using confocal Raman microscopy: first insights into the method.

    PubMed

    Ashtikar, Mukul; Matthäus, Christian; Schmitt, Michael; Krafft, Christoph; Fahr, Alfred; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-12-18

    The stratum corneum is a strong barrier that must be overcome to achieve successful transdermal delivery of a pharmaceutical agent. Many strategies have been developed to enhance the permeation through this barrier. Traditionally, drug penetration through the stratum corneum is evaluated by employing tape-stripping protocols and measuring the content of the analyte. Although effective, this method cannot provide a detailed information regarding the penetration pathways. To address this issue various microscopic techniques have been employed. Raman microscopy offers the advantage of label free imaging and provides spectral information regarding the chemical integrity of the drug as well as the tissue. In this paper we present a relatively simple method to obtain XZ-Raman profiles of human stratum corneum using confocal Raman microscopy on intact full thickness skin biopsies. The spectral datasets were analysed using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The spectral information obtained, highlights the different components of the tissue and the presence of drug. We present Raman images of untreated skin and diffusion patterns for deuterated water and beta-carotene after Franz-cell diffusion experiment.

  1. Hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography combined with automated functional imaging non-invasively detected vasospastic angina

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Mizukoshi, Kei; Kou, Seisyou; Takai, Manabu; Izumo, Masaki; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Ohtaki, Eiji; Nobuoka, Sachihiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with chest discomfort while sleeping. The patient was suspected of having vasospastic angina (VSA) and underwent hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography. No chest pain, ECG changes or decreased wall motion was found. However, automated function imaging (AFI) showed decreased peak systolic strain at the apex and postsystolic shortening at both the apex and inferior wall, which was not found before the test. The provocation test revealed 99% stenosis in the right coronary artery #2 at a dose of 50 μg acetylcholine and 90% stenosis in the left coronary artery #8 at a dose of 100 μg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having VSA. The present case demonstrates the usefulness of AFI combined with hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography as a screening examination for VSA. PMID:22798093

  2. Hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography combined with automated functional imaging non-invasively detected vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Mizukoshi, Kei; Kou, Seisyou; Takai, Manabu; Izumo, Masaki; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Ohtaki, Eiji; Nobuoka, Sachihiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2010-11-29

    A 47-year-old male presented with chest discomfort while sleeping. The patient was suspected of having vasospastic angina (VSA) and underwent hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography. No chest pain, ECG changes or decreased wall motion was found. However, automated function imaging (AFI) showed decreased peak systolic strain at the apex and postsystolic shortening at both the apex and inferior wall, which was not found before the test. The provocation test revealed 99% stenosis in the right coronary artery #2 at a dose of 50 μg acetylcholine and 90% stenosis in the left coronary artery #8 at a dose of 100 μg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having VSA. The present case demonstrates the usefulness of AFI combined with hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography as a screening examination for VSA.

  3. A Biocompatible In Vivo Ligation Reaction and its Application for Non-Invasive Bioluminescent Imaging of Protease Activity in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godinat, Aurélien; Park, Hyo Min; Miller, Stephen C.; Cheng, Ke; Hanahan, Douglas; Sanman, Laura E.; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Nikitin, Gennady F.; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of biocompatible reactions has had a tremendous impact on chemical biology, allowing the study of numerous biological processes directly in complex systems. However, despite the fact that multiple biocompatible reactions have been developed in the past decade, very few work well in living mice. Here we report that D-cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazoles can selectively react with each other in vivo to generate a luciferin substrate for firefly luciferase. The success of this “split luciferin” ligation reaction has important implications for both in vivo imaging and biocompatible labeling strategies. First, the production of a luciferin substrate can be visualized in a live mouse by bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and furthermore allows interrogation of targeted tissues using a “caged” luciferin approach. We therefore applied this reaction to the real-time non-invasive imaging of apoptosis associated with caspase 3/7. Caspase-dependent release of free D-cysteine from the caspase 3/7 peptide substrate Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-D-Cys (DEVD-(D-Cys)) allowed selective reaction with 6-amino-2-cyanobenzothiazole (NH2-CBT) in vivo to form 6-amino-D-luciferin with subsequent light emission from luciferase. Importantly, this strategy was found to be superior to the commercially-available DEVD-aminoluciferin substrate for imaging of caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, the split luciferin approach enables the modular construction of bioluminogenic sensors, where either or both reaction partners could be caged to report on multiple biological events. Lastly, the luciferin ligation reaction is three orders of magnitude faster than Staudinger ligation suggesting further applications for both bioluminescence and specific molecular targeting in vivo. PMID:23463944

  4. Non-invasive skin oxygenation imaging using a multi-spectral camera system: effectiveness of various concentration algorithms applied on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2009-02-01

    This study describes noninvasive noncontact methods to acquire and analyze functional information from the skin. Multispectral images at several selected wavelengths in the visible and near infrared region are collected and used in mathematical methods to calculate concentrations of different chromophores in the epidermis and dermis of the skin. This is based on the continuous wave Near Infrared Spectroscopy method, which is a well known non-invasive technique for measuring oxygenation changes in the brain and in muscle tissue. Concentration changes of hemoglobin (dO2Hb, dHHb and dtHb) can be calculated from light attenuations using the modified Lambert Beer equation. We applied this technique on multi-spectral images taken from the skin surface using different algorithms for calculating changes in O2Hb, HHb and tHb. In clinical settings, the imaging of local oxygenation variations and/or blood perfusion in the skin can be useful for e.g. detection of skin cancer, detection of early inflammation, checking the level of peripheral nerve block anesthesia, study of wound healing and tissue viability by skin flap transplantations. Images from the skin are obtained with a multi-spectral imaging system consisting of a 12-bit CCD camera in combination with a Liquid Crystal Tunable Filter. The skin is illuminated with either a broad band light source or a tunable multi wavelength LED light source. A polarization filter is used to block the direct reflected light. The collected multi-spectral imaging data are images of the skin surface radiance; each pixel contains either the full spectrum (420 - 730 nm) or a set of selected wavelengths. These images were converted to reflectance spectra. The algorithms were validated during skin oxygen saturation changes induced by temporary arm clamping and applied to some clinical examples. The initial results with the multi-spectral skin imaging system show good results for detecting dynamic changes in oxygen concentration. However, the

  5. Identifying Model Inaccuracies and Solution Uncertainties in Non-Invasive Activation-Based Imaging of Cardiac Excitation using Convex Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Erem, Burak; van Dam, Peter M.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrical function has begun to move towards clinical adoption. Here we consider one common formulation of the problem, in which the goal is to estimate the spatial distribution of electrical activation times during a cardiac cycle. We address the challenge of understanding the robustness and uncertainty of solutions to this formulation. This formulation poses a non-convex, non-linear least squares optimization problem. We show that it can be relaxed to be convex, at the cost of some degree of physiological realism of the solution set, and that this relaxation can be used as a framework to study model inaccuracy and solution uncertainty. We present two examples, one using data from a healthy human subject and the other synthesized with the ECGSIM software package. In the first case, we consider uncertainty in the initial guess and regularization parameter. In the second case, we mimic the presence of an ischemic zone in the heart in a way which violates a model assumption. We show that the convex relaxation allows understanding of spatial distribution of parameter sensitivity in the first case, and identification of model violation in the second. PMID:24710159

  6. A pH-activatable nanoparticle with signal-amplification capabilities for non-invasive imaging of tumour malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Cabral, Horacio; Wu, Hailiang; Terada, Yasuko; Saga, Tsuneo; Aoki, Ichio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that respond to pathophysiological parameters, such as pH or redox potential, have been developed as contrast agents for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumours. However, beyond anatomic assessment, contrast agents that can sense these pathological parameters and rapidly amplify their magnetic resonance signals are desirable because they could potentially be used to monitor the biological processes of tumours and improve cancer diagnosis. Here, we report an MRI contrast agent that rapidly amplifies magnetic resonance signals in response to pH. We confined Mn(2+) within pH-sensitive calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles comprising a poly(ethylene glycol) shell. At a low pH, such as in solid tumours, the CaP disintegrates and releases Mn(2+) ions. Binding to proteins increases the relaxivity of Mn(2+) and enhances the contrast. We show that these nanoparticles could rapidly and selectively brighten solid tumours, identify hypoxic regions within the tumour mass and detect invisible millimetre-sized metastatic tumours in the liver. PMID:27183055

  7. A pH-activatable nanoparticle with signal-amplification capabilities for non-invasive imaging of tumour malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Peng; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Cabral, Horacio; Wu, Hailiang; Terada, Yasuko; Saga, Tsuneo; Aoki, Ichio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that respond to pathophysiological parameters, such as pH or redox potential, have been developed as contrast agents for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumours. However, beyond anatomic assessment, contrast agents that can sense these pathological parameters and rapidly amplify their magnetic resonance signals are desirable because they could potentially be used to monitor the biological processes of tumours and improve cancer diagnosis. Here, we report an MRI contrast agent that rapidly amplifies magnetic resonance signals in response to pH. We confined Mn2+ within pH-sensitive calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles comprising a poly(ethylene glycol) shell. At a low pH, such as in solid tumours, the CaP disintegrates and releases Mn2+ ions. Binding to proteins increases the relaxivity of Mn2+ and enhances the contrast. We show that these nanoparticles could rapidly and selectively brighten solid tumours, identify hypoxic regions within the tumour mass and detect invisible millimetre-sized metastatic tumours in the liver.

  8. Comparison of transport in lysimeters with undisturbed loamy sand and silty soil using non invasive imaging with electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Köstel, J.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2009-04-01

    The transport of chemicals through soil is subject to the 3-D structure of the soil hydraulic properties (e.g. unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function) and state variables (e.g. water content). Although this is known for decades, it is still difficult to quantitatively predict solute transport especially when preferential flow or fingering occurs. One reason for this is the shortcoming of 3-D data on both the solute transport process itself and its determining parameters. Lysimeters provide excellent means to control the boundary conditions and are accessible from all sides. Filled with undisturbed soil and equipped with geophysical imaging devices they provide a valuable tool to visualize and better understand solute transport in natural soils. In our study we conducted solute tracer step experiments on two distinct undisturbed unsaturated field soils (gleyic Cambisol and orthic Luvisol). The boundary conditions were set to constant irrigation (1.5 cm/day) at the top and a constant suction at the bottom. Tracer breakthrough was monitored using 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR). We used the effluent tracer breakthrough and TDR measured breakthrough as a ground truth for the ERT data. From these data, apparent convection-dispersion transport parameters were derived. We found considerably different transport velocities and dispersivities for the two soils. In the orthic Luvisol, distinct preferential transport paths were visualized and followed in time. In the gleyic Cambisol we observed minor heterogeneities in the transport front which were aligned to the plowing direction. The study demonstrates the usefulness of ERT to characterize and compare the 3-D spatio-temporal evolution of solute fronts. The results are beneficial to investigate relationships between soil structure and the transport process and to explain the scale dependency of the transport processes from the spatial structure of the process at a smaller

  9. Non-invasive evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates for cerebral infarction by PET imaging of mitochondrial complex-I activity.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Ishii, Takayuki; Koide, Hiroyuki; Kiyokawa, Chiaki; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Harada, Norihiro; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The development of a diagnostic technology that can accurately determine the pathological progression of ischemic stroke and evaluate the therapeutic effects of cerebroprotective agents has been desired. We previously developed a novel PET probe, 2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-(18)F-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one ([(18)F]BCPP-EF) for detecting activity of mitochondrial complex I (MC-I). This probe was shown to visualize neuronal damage in the living brain of rodent and primate models of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, [(18)F]BCPP-EF was applied to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a neuroprotectant, liposomal FK506 (FK506-liposomes), on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The PET imaging using [(18)F]BCPP-EF showed a prominent reduction in the MC-I activity in the ischemic brain hemisphere. Treatment with FK506-liposomes remarkably increased the uptake of [(18)F]BCPP-EF in the ischemic side corresponding to the improvement of blood flow disorders and motor function deficits throughout the 7 days after I/R. Additionally, the PET scan could diagnose the extent of the brain damage accurately and showed the neuroprotective effect of FK506-liposomes at Day 7, at which 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining couldn't visualize them. Our study demonstrated that the PET technology using [(18)F]BCPP-EF has a potent capacity to evaluate the therapeutic effect of drug candidates in living brain. PMID:27440054

  10. Non-invasive evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates for cerebral infarction by PET imaging of mitochondrial complex-I activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Ishii, Takayuki; Koide, Hiroyuki; Kiyokawa, Chiaki; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Harada, Norihiro; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2016-07-01

    The development of a diagnostic technology that can accurately determine the pathological progression of ischemic stroke and evaluate the therapeutic effects of cerebroprotective agents has been desired. We previously developed a novel PET probe, 2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-18F-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one ([18F]BCPP-EF) for detecting activity of mitochondrial complex I (MC-I). This probe was shown to visualize neuronal damage in the living brain of rodent and primate models of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, [18F]BCPP-EF was applied to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a neuroprotectant, liposomal FK506 (FK506-liposomes), on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The PET imaging using [18F]BCPP-EF showed a prominent reduction in the MC-I activity in the ischemic brain hemisphere. Treatment with FK506-liposomes remarkably increased the uptake of [18F]BCPP-EF in the ischemic side corresponding to the improvement of blood flow disorders and motor function deficits throughout the 7 days after I/R. Additionally, the PET scan could diagnose the extent of the brain damage accurately and showed the neuroprotective effect of FK506-liposomes at Day 7, at which 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining couldn’t visualize them. Our study demonstrated that the PET technology using [18F]BCPP-EF has a potent capacity to evaluate the therapeutic effect of drug candidates in living brain.

  11. Non-invasive evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates for cerebral infarction by PET imaging of mitochondrial complex-I activity

    PubMed Central

    Fukuta, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiro; Ishii, Takayuki; Koide, Hiroyuki; Kiyokawa, Chiaki; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kosuke; Harada, Norihiro; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The development of a diagnostic technology that can accurately determine the pathological progression of ischemic stroke and evaluate the therapeutic effects of cerebroprotective agents has been desired. We previously developed a novel PET probe, 2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-18F-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one ([18F]BCPP-EF) for detecting activity of mitochondrial complex I (MC-I). This probe was shown to visualize neuronal damage in the living brain of rodent and primate models of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, [18F]BCPP-EF was applied to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a neuroprotectant, liposomal FK506 (FK506-liposomes), on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion rats. The PET imaging using [18F]BCPP-EF showed a prominent reduction in the MC-I activity in the ischemic brain hemisphere. Treatment with FK506-liposomes remarkably increased the uptake of [18F]BCPP-EF in the ischemic side corresponding to the improvement of blood flow disorders and motor function deficits throughout the 7 days after I/R. Additionally, the PET scan could diagnose the extent of the brain damage accurately and showed the neuroprotective effect of FK506-liposomes at Day 7, at which 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining couldn’t visualize them. Our study demonstrated that the PET technology using [18F]BCPP-EF has a potent capacity to evaluate the therapeutic effect of drug candidates in living brain. PMID:27440054

  12. Non-invasive high-resolution tracking of human neuronal pathways: diffusion tensor imaging at 7T with 1.2 mm isotropic voxel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützkendorf, Ralf; Hertel, Frank; Heidemann, Robin; Thiel, Andreas; Luchtmann, Michael; Plaumann, Markus; Stadler, Jörg; Baecke, Sebastian; Bernarding, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows characterizing and exploiting diffusion anisotropy effects, thereby providing important details about tissue microstructure. A major application in neuroimaging is the so-called fiber tracking where neuronal connections between brain regions are determined non-invasively by DTI. Combining these neural pathways within the human brain with the localization of activated brain areas provided by functional MRI offers important information about functional connectivity of brain regions. However, DTI suffers from severe signal reduction due to the diffusion-weighting. Ultra-high field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should therefore be advantageous to increase the intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This in turn enables to acquire high quality data with increased resolution, which is beneficial for tracking more complex fiber structures. However, UHF MRI imposes some difficulties mainly due to the larger B1 inhomogeneity compared to 3T MRI. We therefore optimized the parameters to perform DTI at a 7 Tesla whole body MR scanner equipped with a high performance gradient system and a 32-channel head receive coil. A Stesjkal Tanner spin-echo EPI sequence was used, to acquire 110 slices with an isotropic voxel-size of 1.2 mm covering the whole brain. 60 diffusion directions were scanned which allows calculating the principal direction components of the diffusion vector in each voxel. The results prove that DTI can be performed with high quality at UHF and that it is possible to explore the SNT benefit of the higher field strength. Combining UHF fMRI data with UHF DTI results will therefore be a major step towards better neuroimaging methods.

  13. A non-invasive in vivo imaging system to study dissemination of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Fitts, Eric C; Kozlova, Elena V; Erova, Tatiana E; Tiner, Bethany L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2013-02-01

    The gold standard in microbiology for monitoring bacterial dissemination in infected animals has always been viable plate counts. This method, despite being quantitative, requires sacrificing the infected animals. Recently, however, an alternative method of in vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria (IVIBB) for monitoring microbial dissemination within the host has been employed. Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague. In this study, we compared the conventional counting of bacterial colony forming units (cfu) in the various infected tissues to IVIBB in monitoring Y. pestis dissemination in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. By using a transposon mutagenesis system harboring the luciferase (luc) gene, we screened approximately 4000 clones and obtained a fully virulent, luc-positive Y. pestis CO92 (Y. pestis-luc2) reporter strain in which transposition occurred within the largest pMT1 plasmid which possesses murine toxin and capsular antigen encoding genes. The aforementioned reporter strain and the wild-type CO92 exhibited similar growth curves, formed capsule based on immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, and had a similar LD(50). Intranasal infection of mice with 15 LD(50) of CO92-luc2 resulted in animal mortality by 72 h, and an increasing number of bioluminescent bacteria were observed in various mouse organs over a 24-72 h period when whole animals were imaged. However, following levofloxacin treatment (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 days 24 h post infection, no luminescence was observed after 72 h of infection, indicating that the tested antimicrobial killed bacteria preventing their detection in host peripheral tissues. Overall, we demonstrated that IVIBB is an effective and non-invasive way of monitoring bacterial dissemination in animals following pneumonic plague having strong correlation with cfu, and our reporter CO92-luc2 strain can be employed as a useful tool to monitor the efficacy

  14. Monitor Therapeutic Response of Human Ovarian Cancer to 17-DMAG by Non-invasive PET imaging with 64Cu-DOTA-Trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Li, Zibo; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purposes 17-DMAG, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, has been intensively investigated for cancer therapy and is undergoing clinical trials. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is one of the client proteins of Hsp90 and its expression is decreased upon 17-DMAG treatment. In this study, we aimed to non-invasively monitor the HER-2 response to 17-DMAG treatment in xenografted mice. Methods The sensitivity of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells to 17-DMAG in vitro was measured by MTT assay. HER-2 expression of SKOV-3 cells was determined by flow cytometry. Nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumors were treated with 17-DMAG and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by tumor size measurement. Both treated and control mice were imaged with microPET using 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab and 18F-FDG. Biodistribution studies, immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the microPET results. Results SKOV-3 cells are sensitive to 17-DMAG treatment, in a dose dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 68.7 nM after 72 h incubation. The tumor growth curve supported the inhibition effect of 17-DMAG on SKOV-3 tumors. Quantitative microPET imaging showed that 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab had prominent tumor activity accumulation in untreated SKOV-3 tumors, which was significantly reduced in 17-DMAG treated tumors. There was no uptake difference detected by FDG PET. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the significant reduction in tumor HER-2 level upon 17-DMAG treatment. Conclusion The early response to anti-Hsp90 therapy was successfully monitored by quantitative PET using 64Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab. This approach may be valuable in monitoring the therapeutic response in HER-2-positive cancer patients under 17-DMAG treatment. PMID:19440708

  15. An advanced design of non-radioactive image capturing and management system for applications in non-invasive skin disorder diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Carol Y. B.; Luk, David C. K.; Zhou, Kany S. Y.; So, Bryan M. K.; Louie, Derek C. H.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the increasing incidences of malignant melanoma, there is a rising demand for assistive technologies for its early diagnosis and improving the survival rate. The commonly used visual screening method is with limited accuracy as the early phase of melanoma shares many clinical features with an atypical nevus, while conventional dermoscopes are not user-friendly in terms of setup time and operations. Therefore, the development of an intelligent and handy system to assist the accurate screening and long-term monitoring of melanocytic skin lesions is crucial for early diagnosis and prevention of melanoma. In this paper, an advanced design of non-invasive and non-radioactive dermoscopy system was reported. Computer-aided simulations were conducted for optimizing the optical design and uniform illumination distribution. Functional prototype and the software system were further developed, which could enable image capturing at 10x amplified and general modes, convenient data transmission, analysis of dermoscopic features (e.g., asymmetry, border irregularity, color, diameter and dermoscopic structure) for assisting the early detection of melanoma, extract patient information (e.g. code, lesion location) and integrate with dermoscopic images, thus further support long term monitoring of diagnostic analysis results. A clinical trial study was further conducted on 185 Chinese children (0-18 years old). The results showed that for all subjects, skin conditions diagnosed based on the developed system accurately confirmed the diagnoses by conventional clinical procedures. Besides, clinical analysis on dermoscopic features and a potential standard approach by the developed system to support identifying specific melanocytic patterns for dermoscopic examination in Chinese children were also reported.

  16. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol. PMID:25767612

  17. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A; Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  18. Non-invasive characterization of polyurethane-based tissue constructs in a rat abdominal repair model using high frequency ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao; Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Lee, Kee-Won; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Wang, Yadong; Wagner, William R; Kim, Kang

    2013-04-01

    The evaluation of candidate materials and designs for soft tissue scaffolds would benefit from the ability to monitor the mechanical remodeling of the implant site without the need for periodic animal sacrifice and explant analysis. Toward this end, the ability of non-invasive ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) to assess temporal mechanical property changes in three different types of porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds was evaluated in a rat abdominal wall repair model. The polymers utilized were salt-leached scaffolds of poly(carbonate urethane) urea, poly(ester urethane) urea and poly(ether ester urethane) urea at 85% porosity. A total of 60 scaffolds (20 each type) were implanted in a full thickness muscle wall replacement in the abdomens of 30 rats. The constructs were ultrasonically scanned every 2 weeks and harvested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 for compression testing or histological analysis. UEI demonstrated different temporal stiffness trends among the different scaffold types, while the stiffness of the surrounding native tissue remained unchanged. The changes in average normalized strains developed in the constructs from UEI compared well with the changes of mean compliance from compression tests and histology. The average normalized strains and the compliance for the same sample exhibited a strong linear relationship. The ability of UEI to identify herniation and to characterize the distribution of local tissue in-growth with high resolution was also investigated. In summary, the reported data indicate that UEI may allow tissue engineers to sequentially evaluate the progress of tissue construct mechanical behavior in vivo and in some cases may reduce the need for interim time point animal sacrifice. PMID:23347836

  19. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  20. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  1. Potential of time series-hyperspectral imaging (TS-HSI) for non-invasive determination of microbial spoilage of salmon flesh.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen

    2013-07-15

    This study investigated the potential of using time series-hyperspectral imaging (TS-HSI) in visible and near infrared region (400-1700 nm) for rapid and non-invasive determination of surface total viable count (TVC) of salmon flesh during spoilage process. Hyperspectral cubes were acquired at different spoilage stages for salmon chops and their spectral data were extracted. The reference TVC values of the same samples were measured using standard plate count method and then calibrated with their corresponding spectral data based on two calibration methods of partial least square regression (PLSR) and least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM), respectively. Competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) was conducted to identify the most important wavelengths/variables that had the greatest influence on the TVC prediction throughout the whole wavelength range. As a result, eight variables representing the wavelengths of 495 nm, 535 nm, 550 nm, 585 nm, 625 nm, 660 nm, 785 nm, and 915 nm were selected, which were used to reduce the high dimensionality of the hyperspectral data. On the basis of the selected variables, the models of PLSR and LS-SVM were established and their performances were compared. The CARS-PLSR model established using Spectral Set I (400-1000 nm) was considered to be the best for the TVC determination of salmon flesh. The model led to a coefficient of determination (rP(2)) of 0.985 and residual predictive deviation (RPD) of 5.127. At last, the best model was used to predict the TVC values of each pixel within the ROI of salmon chops for visualizing the TVC distribution of salmon flesh. The research demonstrated that TS-HSI technique has a potential for rapid and non-destructive determination of bacterial spoilage in salmon flesh during the spoilage process.

  2. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  3. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  4. [Non-invasive assessment of fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2015-04-01

    As the result of various harmful effects (infectious agents, metabolic diseases, unhealthy diet, obesity, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) hepatic damage may develop, which can progress towards liver steatosis, and fibrosis as well. The most common etiological factors of liver damages are hepatitis B and C infection, alcohol consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy is considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic liver diseases. Due to the dangers and complications of liver biopsy, studies are focused on non-invasive markers and radiological imaging for liver steatosis, progression of fatty liver, activity of the necroinflammation and the severity of the fibrosis. Authors review the possibilities of non-invasive assessment of liver steatosis. The statistical features of the probes (positive, negative predictive values, sensitivity, specificity) are reviewed. The role of radiological imaging is also discussed. Although the non-invasive methods discussed in this article are useful to assess liver steatosis, further studies are needed to validate to follow progression of the diseases and to control therapeutic response.

  5. Use of Non-Invasive Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Estimation of Atrial Septal Defect Size and Morphology: A Comparison with Transesophageal Echo

    SciTech Connect

    Piaw, Chin Sze; Kiam, Ong Tiong; Rapaee, Annuar Khoon, Liew Chee; Bang, Liew Houng; Ling, Chan Wei; Samion, Hasri; Hian, Sim Kui

    2006-04-15

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a trusted method of sizing atrial septal defect (ASD) prior to percutaneous closure but is invasive, uncomfortable, and may carry a small risk of morbidity and mortality. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be useful non-invasive alternative in such patients who refuse or are unable to tolerate TEE and may provide additional information on the shape of the A0SD. Purpose: To validate the accuracy of ASD sizing by MRI compared with TEE.Method: Twelve patients (mean age 30 years; range 11-60 years) scheduled for ASD closure underwent TEE, cine balanced fast field echo MRI (bFFE-MRI) in four-chamber and sagittal views and phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) with reconstruction using the two orthogonal planes of T2-weighted images as planning. The average of the three longest measurements for all imaging modalities was calculated for each patient. Results: Mean maximum ASD length on TEE was 18.8 {+-} 4.6 mm, mean length by bFFE-MRI was 20.0 {+-} 5.0 mm, and mean length by PC-MRI was 18.3 {+-} 3.6 mm. The TEE measurement was significantly correlated with the bFFE-MRI and PC-MRI measurements (Pearson r = 0.69, p = 0.02 and r = 0.59, p = 0.04, respectively). The mean difference between TEE and bFFE-MRI measurements was -1.2mm (95% CI: -3.7, 1.3) and between TEE and PC-MRI was 0.5 mm (95% CI: -1.9, 2.9). Bland-Altman analysis also determined general agreement between both MRI methods and TEE. The ASDs were egg-shaped in two cases, circular in 1 patient and oval in the remaining patients. Conclusion: ASD sizing by MRI using bFFE and phase-contrast protocols correlated well with TEE estimations. PC-MRI provided additional information on ASD shapes and proximity to adjacent structures.

  6. [Non-invasive explorations of the carotid arteries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Persson, A V; Dyer, V E

    1981-01-01

    For the non-invasive evaluation of patients suspected of having extracranial carotid artery disease, the non-invasive vascular laboratory at the Lahey Clinic, Boston, Massachusetts uses three tests. Carotid phonoangiography (C.P.A.) by itself is 60% accurate, the Kartchner-McRae Oculoplethysmograph (O.P.G.) by itself 80% accurate, and the Echoflow doppler arterial imager, by itself 90% accurate. These examinations are used for surveillance of high-risk patients and to determine the need for carotid arteriography. In a series of 94 patients, the combination of these non-invasive methods yielded one false negative and 2 false positive studies, for an overall accuracy of 95%.

  7. Investigation of first ray mobility during gait by kinematic fluoroscopic imaging-a novel method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that sagittal instability at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level is a primary factor for hallux valgus and that sagittal instability increases with the progression of the deformity. The assessment of the degree of vertical instability is usually made by clinical evaluation while any measurements mostly refer to a static assessment of medial ray mobility (i.e. the plantar/dorsal flexion in the sagittal plane). Testing methods currently available cannot attribute the degree of mobility to the corresponding anatomical joints making up the medial column of the foot. The aim of this study was to develop a technique which allows for a quantification of the in-vivo sagittal mobility of the joints of the medial foot column during the roll-over process under full weight bearing. Methods Mobility of first ray bones was investigated by dynamic distortion-free fluoroscopy (25 frames/s) of 14 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with manifested clinical instability of the first ray. A CAD-based evaluation method allowed the determination of mobility and relative displacements and rotations of the first ray bones within the sagittal plane during the stance phase of gait. Results Total flexion of the first ray was found to be 13.63 (SD 6.14) mm with the healthy volunteers and 13.06 (SD 8.01) mm with the patients (resolution: 0.245 mm/pixel). The dorsiflexion angle was 5.27 (SD 2.34) degrees in the healthy volunteers and increased to 5.56 (SD 3.37) degrees in the patients. Maximum rotations were found at the naviculo-cuneiform joints and least at the first tarso-metatarsal joint level in both groups. Conclusions Dynamic fluoroscopic assessment has been shown to be a valuable tool for characterisation of the kinematics of the joints of the medial foot column during gait. A significant difference in first ray flexion and angular rotation between the patients and healthy volunteers however could not be found. PMID:22316084

  8. Real-time equalization of region-of-interest fluoroscopic images using binary masks.

    PubMed

    Rudin, S; Bednarek, D R; Yang, C Y

    1999-07-01

    In region-of-interest (ROI) radiologic imaging, the x-ray beam is attenuated peripherally to the region of interest to reduce patient exposure. This attenuation reduces the peripheral image brightness which may cause contrast in the periphery to also be reduced due to video chain nonlinearity. For optimal viewing, it is necessary that the image brightness and contrast in the periphery be brought back to the levels in the ROI. Previously, digital subtraction angiography roadmapping equipment has been used for this equalization; however, the procedure is not independent of patient and gantry motion. A new motion independent method to achieve this equalization involves dividing the real-time video signal into two digital streams one of which is brightness and contrast enhanced. A pre-acquired binary mask image is created by thresholding the image of a uniform object obtained with the ROI filter in place. This binary mask is used to control the recombination of the two image streams in a digital pipeline processor in order to select the ROI from the unprocessed stream and the periphery from the enhanced stream. This system provides image equalization at 30 frame/s for real-time ROI imaging display. Images from this method demonstrate excellent image quality even for peripheral exposure reduction factors exceeding 10. PMID:10435538

  9. Approaches to interventional fluoroscopic dose curves.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    Modern fluoroscopes used for image-based guidance in interventional procedures are complex X-ray machines, with advanced image acquisition and processing systems capable of automatically controlling numerous parameters based on defined protocol settings. This study evaluated and compared approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and variable copper filter thickness over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within each vendor's default abdomen or body imaging protocol. The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ Cu filtration within the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Some vendors have also enhanced the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes which, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these increased output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and may provide opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. PMID

  10. DQE of image-intensifier-CCD fluoroscopic systems: a nonseparable case of the spatial-temporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltschmidt, Rainer G.; Baetz, Lothar; Ludwig, Markus

    2002-05-01

    In a real fluoroscopic system experimental evaluations of the DQE may pretty soon run into difficulties. Easy as it might be to satisfy the need for linearity by means of correction look-up tables, the evaluation of the NPS is more tricky, because of various time integration mechanisms. In order to deal with such effects in a quantitatively correct manner the concept of a spatial-temporal1 DQE has been suggested. We have performed computer-aided DQE-evaluations 2,4,5 on a surgical C-arm, using MTF and NPS. Furthermore, we have attempted to estimate the time behavior of the spatial-temporal system transfer function. Using X-ray pulses in the ms regime, we have generated nearly 'lag-free' flat-field images. Our experiments showed two interesting results. The comparison of flat-field images in the continuous 'Fluoro' mode and the 'lag-free' mode revealed the theoretically expected highly overestimated DQE in the first case. The corresponding scaling factor could be derived quantitatively from the motion experiments with an X-ray contrast pulse (Cu-rod). More worth while noticing is the fact that we observed structural anomalies in the two-dimensional NPS that could not compensated for by a simple scaling factor but vanished only in the 'lag-free' mode. This can be explained theoretically by taking into account a mixing behavior between the spatial and temporal NPS components, i.e. the failure of the spatial-temporal separability of the system transfer function.

  11. Effects of uncertainty in camera geometry on three-dimensional catheter reconstruction from biplane fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Anthony; Kynor, David B.; Friets, Eric; Triedman, John; Hammer, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Clinical procedures that rely on biplane x-ray images for three-dimensional (3-D) information may be enhanced by three-dimensional reconstructions. However, the accuracy of reconstructed images is dependent on the uncertainty associated with the parameters that define the geometry of the camera system. In this paper, we use a numerical simulation to examine the effect of these uncertainties and to determine the limits required for adequate three-dimensional reconstruction. We then test our conclusions with images of a calibration phantom recorded using a clinical system. A set of reconstruction routines, developed for a cardiac mapping system, were used in this evaluation. The routines include procedures for correcting image distortion and for automatically locating catheter electrodes. Test images were created using a numerical simulation of a biplane x-ray projection system. The reconstruction routines were then applied using accurate and perturbed camera geometries and error maps were produced. Our results indicate that useful catheter reconstructions are possible with reasonable bounds on the uncertainty of camera geometry provided the locations of the camera isocenters are accurate. The results of this study provide a guide for the specification of camera geometry display systems and for researchers evaluating possible methodologies for determining camera geometry.

  12. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  13. Non-invasive Evaluation for Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    IWASAKI, Masaki; JIN, Kazutaka; NAKASATO, Nobukazu; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is aimed to remove the brain tissues that are indispensable for generating patient’s epileptic seizures. There are two purposes in the pre-operative evaluation: localization of the epileptogenic zone and localization of function. Surgery is planned to remove possible epileptogenic zone while preserving functional area. Since no single diagnostic modality is superior to others in identifying and localizing the epileptogenic zone, multiple non-invasive evaluations are performed to estimate the location of the epileptogenic zone after concordance between evaluations. Essential components of non-invasive pre-surgical evaluation of epilepsy include detailed clinical history, long-term video-electroencephalography monitoring, epilepsy-protocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropsychological testing. However, a significant portion of drug-resistant epilepsy is associated with no or subtle MRI lesions or with ambiguous electro-clinical signs. Additional evaluations including fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetoencephalography and ictal single photon emission computed tomography can play critical roles in planning surgery. FDG-PET should be registered on three-dimensional MRI for better detection of focal cortical dysplasia. All diagnostic tools are complementary to each other in defining the epileptogenic zone, so that it is always important to reassess the data based on other results to pick up or confirm subtle abnormalities. PMID:27627857

  14. Geometric Verification of Dynamic Wave Arc Delivery With the Vero System Using Orthogonal X-ray Fluoroscopic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Tournel, Koen; Hung, Cecilia; Simon, Viorica; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ridder, Mark de

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to define an independent verification method based on on-board orthogonal fluoroscopy to determine the geometric accuracy of synchronized gantry–ring (G/R) rotations during dynamic wave arc (DWA) delivery available on the Vero system. Methods and Materials: A verification method for DWA was developed to calculate O-ring-gantry (G/R) positional information from ball-bearing positions retrieved from fluoroscopic images of a cubic phantom acquired during DWA delivery. Different noncoplanar trajectories were generated in order to investigate the influence of path complexity on delivery accuracy. The G/R positions detected from the fluoroscopy images (DetPositions) were benchmarked against the G/R angulations retrieved from the control points (CP) of the DWA RT plan and the DWA log files recorded by the treatment console during DWA delivery (LogActed). The G/R rotational accuracy was quantified as the mean absolute deviation ± standard deviation. The maximum G/R absolute deviation was calculated as the maximum 3-dimensional distance between the CP and the closest DetPositions. Results: In the CP versus DetPositions comparison, an overall mean G/R deviation of 0.13°/0.16° ± 0.16°/0.16° was obtained, with a maximum G/R deviation of 0.6°/0.2°. For the LogActed versus DetPositions evaluation, the overall mean deviation was 0.08°/0.15° ± 0.10°/0.10° with a maximum G/R of 0.3°/0.4°. The largest decoupled deviations registered for gantry and ring were 0.6° and 0.4° respectively. No directional dependence was observed between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations. Doubling the dose resulted in a double number of detected points around each CP, and an angular deviation reduction in all cases. Conclusions: An independent geometric quality assurance approach was developed for DWA delivery verification and was successfully applied on diverse trajectories. Results showed that the Vero system is capable of following complex

  15. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  16. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leferink, Anne M; Fratila, Raluca M; Koenrades, Maaike A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs. PMID:25502022

  17. An Open Source Image Processing Method to Quantitatively Assess Tissue Growth after Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Seeded 3D Polymeric Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Anne M.; Fratila, Raluca M.; Koenrades, Maaike A.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)–poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs. PMID:25502022

  18. Diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of non-invasive imaging tests in patients presenting with chronic stable chest pain with suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic overview.

    PubMed

    van Waardhuizen, Claudia N; Langhout, Marieke; Ly, Felisia; Braun, Loes; Genders, Tessa S S; Petersen, Steffen E; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Nieman, Koen; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Several non-invasive imaging techniques are currently in use for the diagnostic workup of adult patients with stable chest pain suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). In this paper, we present a systematic overview of the evidence on diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of new modalities in comparison to established technologies. A literature search for English language studies from 2009 to 2013 was performed, and two investigators independently extracted data on patient and study characteristics. The reviewed published evidence on diagnostic performance and cost-effectiveness support a strategy of CTCA as a rule out (gatekeeper) test of CAD in low- to intermediate-risk patients since it has excellent diagnostic performance and as initial imaging test is cost-effective under different willingness-to-pay thresholds. More cost-effectiveness research is needed in order to define the role and choice of cardiac stress imaging tests. PMID:25301401

  19. Ion Altered Fluorescence Imaging (IAFI): A Non-invasive, Visualization Method Which Simultaneously Images Scalar Fields and Quantifies Local Ion Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Santiago, Juan G.

    2012-11-01

    Electrokinetic flows are leveraged for a wide range of microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip systems, and are often used to mix, preconcentrate, and/or separate analytes. Traditionally, temperature, conductivity, electrochemical, and UV absorbance detectors have been used to indirectly estimate analyte concentration profiles in these flows. However, these typically are point detectors and thus do not permit dynamic, full-field visualization of unsteady scalar fields. To address this, we propose a novel visualization and quantitation method we term ion altered fluorescence imaging (IAFI). IAFI leverages florescence quenching or enhancement of electrically neutral dyes by ions. IAFI therefore provides a non-intrusive quantitation of full-field concentration of non-fluorescent ions endogenous to the flow and its application. We demonstrate this method in visualization of two non-linear electrokinetic flows: isotachophoresis (ITP) and electrokinetic instability (EKI) in an electrokinetic focusing flow. We have quantified shock propagation and ion concentrations upstream and downstream of shocks in cationic and anionic ITP. We quantified and visualized chaotic EKI flow, including complex secondary flows and local ion densities as the flow develops downstream. This work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) grant CBET-0967600-000. V.S. was supported by NSF GRF.

  20. Non-invasive Assessments of Adipose Tissue Metabolism In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Borowsky, Francis E; Quinn, Kyle P; Bernstein, David L; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kaplan, David L

    2016-03-01

    Adipose tissue engineering is a diverse area of research where the developed tissues can be used to study normal adipose tissue functions, create disease models in vitro, and replace soft tissue defects in vivo. Increasing attention has been focused on the highly specialized metabolic pathways that regulate energy storage and release in adipose tissues which affect local and systemic outcomes. Non-invasive, dynamic measurement systems are useful to track these metabolic pathways in the same tissue model over time to evaluate long term cell growth, differentiation, and development within tissue engineering constructs. This approach reduces costs and time in comparison to more traditional destructive methods such as biochemical and immunochemistry assays and proteomics assessments. Towards this goal, this review will focus on important metabolic functions of adipose tissues and strategies to evaluate them with non-invasive in vitro methods. Current non-invasive methods, such as measuring key metabolic markers and endogenous contrast imaging will be explored.

  1. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  2. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  3. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  4. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  5. 21 CFR 1020.32 - Fluoroscopic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... images from the fluoroscopic image receptor, except computed tomography x-ray systems manufactured on or... section of the useful beam at any SID. The x-ray tube used for fluoroscopy shall not produce x-rays unless... manufactured after February 25, 1978, when the angle between the image receptor and the beam axis of the...

  6. Decision analytic model of the diagnostic pathways for patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using non-invasive transient elastography and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Laurence; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The mortality associated with liver disease continues to increase, despite the improvements implemented in the UK healthcare as does the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), given the escalating prevalence of obesity. The currently available methods to assess and monitor the stage of liver disease present several limitations. Recently, multiparametric MRI has been developed to address these limitations. The aim of this study is to develop a decision analytic model for patients with suspected NAFLD, to investigate the effect of adding multiparametric MRI to the diagnostic pathway. Perspective The model takes the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS) as the service provider. Methods A simple decision-tree model was developed to compare the costs associated with 3 diagnostic pathways for NAFLD that use non-invasive techniques. First, using transient elastography alone; second, using multiparametric MRI as an adjunct to transient elastography and third, multiparametric MRI alone. The model was built to capture these clinical pathways, and used to compare the expected diagnostic outcomes and costs associated with each. Results The use of multiparametric MRI as an adjunct to transient elastography, while increasing screening costs, is predicted to reduce the number of liver biopsies required by about 66%. Used as the sole diagnostic scan, there remains an expected 16% reduction in the number of biopsies required. There is a small drop in the overall diagnostic accuracy, as in the current model, liver biopsy is presumed to give a definitive diagnosis. Conclusions The inclusion of multiparametric MRI, either as an adjunct to or replacement of transient elastography, in the diagnostic pathway of NAFLD may lead to cost savings for the NHS if the model presumptions hold. Further high-quality clinical evidence and cost data are required to test the model's predictions. PMID:27650757

  7. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of β-catenin, Tcf4 and β-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of β-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-α, JNK, NF-κB, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of IκBα. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ► Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ► MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ► DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ► DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components β-catenin, Tcf4. ► DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  8. Percutaneous Cervical Vertebroplasty in a MultifunctionalImage-Guided Therapy Suite: Hybrid Lateral Approach to C1 andC4 Under CT and Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R.W. Schaeren, S.; Jacob, A.L.; Martin, J.B.; Wetzel, S.G.

    2005-06-15

    A 76-year-old patient suffering from two painful osteolytic metastases in C1 and C4 underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty by a hybrid technique in a multi-functional image-guided therapy suite (MIGTS). Two trocars were first placed into the respective bodies of C1 and C4 under fluoroscopic computed tomography guidance using a lateral approach. Thereafter, the patient was transferred on a moving table to the digital subtraction angiography unit in the same room for implant injection. Good pain relief was achieved by this minimally invasive procedure without complications. A hybrid approach for vertebroplasty in a MIGTS appears to be safe and feasible and might be indicated in selected cases for difficult accessible lesions.

  9. Novel non-invasive distribution measurement of texture profile analysis (TPA) in salmon fillet by using visible and near infrared hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Sun, Da-Wen; He, Yong

    2014-02-15

    This study developed a pushbroom visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system in the wavelength range of 400-1758 nm to determine the spatial distribution of texture profile analysis (TPA) parameters of salmon fillets. Six TPA parameters (hardness, adhesiveness, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness, and gumminess) were analysed. Five spectral features (mean, standard deviation, skew, energy, and entropy) and 22 image texture features obtained from graylevel co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted from hyperspectral images. Quantitative models were established with the extracted spectral and image texture signatures of samples based on partial least squares regression (PLSR). The results indicated that spectral features had better ability to predict TPA parameters of salmon samples than image texture features, and Spectral Set I (400-1000 nm) performed better than Spectral II (967-1634 nm). On the basis of the wavelengths selected by regression coefficients of PLSR models, instrumental optimal wavelengths (IOW) and predictive optimal wavelengths (POW) were further chosen to reduce the high dimensionality of the hyperspectral image data. Our results show that hyperspectral imaging holds promise as a reliable and rapid alternative to traditional universal testing machines for measuring the spatial distribution of TPA parameters.

  10. High-field (11.75T) multimodal MR imaging of exercising hindlimb mouse muscles using a non-invasive combined stimulation and force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Gondin, Julien; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David; Duhamel, Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and constructed an experimental set-up allowing electrical stimulation of hindlimb mouse muscles and the corresponding force measurements at high-field (11.75T). We performed high-resolution multimodal MRI (including T2 -weighted imaging, angiography and diffusion) and analysed the corresponding MRI changes in response to a stimulation protocol. Mice were tested twice over a 1-week period to investigate the reliability of mechanical measurements and T2 changes associated with the stimulation protocol. Additionally, angiographic images were obtained before and immediately after the stimulation protocol. Finally, multislice diffusion imaging was performed before, during and immediately after the stimulation session. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated on the basis of diffusion weighted images (DWI). Both force production and T2 values were highly reproducible as illustrated by the low coefficient of variation (<8%) and high intraclass correlation coefficient (≥0.75) values. Maximum intensity projection angiographic images clearly showed a strong vascular effect resulting from the stimulation protocol. Although a motion sensitive imaging sequence was used (echo planar imaging) and in spite of the strong muscle contractions, motion artifacts were minimal for DWI recorded under exercising conditions, thereby underlining the robustness of the measurements. Mean ADC values increased under exercising conditions and were higher during the recovery period as compared with the corresponding control values. The proposed experimental approach demonstrates accurate high-field multimodal MRI muscle investigations at a preclinical level which is of interest for monitoring the severity and/or the progression of neuromuscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions.

  11. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  12. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  13. Non-invasive diagnosis of internal carotid artery dissections.

    PubMed Central

    Müllges, W; Ringelstein, E B; Leibold, M

    1992-01-01

    Arteriography is thought to be mandatory for the diagnosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection. With the introduction of transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, this is no longer the case. In 13 consecutive patients with ICA dissections the diagnosis was made by means of non-invasive tests including extracranial and transcranial Doppler sonography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (ceCT), and, in five patients, MRI. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography used as the gold standard in all cases was confirmative. Extracranial and transcranial ultrasound findings indicative of the diagnosis could be identified. MRI directly demonstrated the intramural haematoma and the false lumen of the dissected artery. These non-invasive techniques also allowed for repetitive follow up examinations. They were, however, unable to demonstrate false aneurysms in the chronic state. Results show that the diagnosis of carotid dissection can be made by means of cerebrovascular ultrasound and MRI. Images PMID:1538235

  14. A method for recording resistance changes non-invasively during neuronal depolarization with a view to imaging brain activity with electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ori; Ghosh, Anthony; Oh, Dongin; Holder, David S

    2009-05-30

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed medical imaging method which has the potential to produce images of fast neuronal depolarization in the brain. The principle is that current remains in the extracellular space at rest but passes into the intracellular space during depolarization through open ion channels. As current passes into the intracellular space across the capacitance of cell membranes at higher frequencies, applied current needs to be below 100 Hz. A method is presented for its measurement with subtraction of the contemporaneous evoked potentials which occur in the same frequency band. Neuronal activity is evoked by stimulation and resistance is recorded from the potentials resulting from injection of a constant current square wave at 1 Hz with amplitude less than 25% of the threshold for stimulating neuronal activity. Potentials due to the evoked activity and the injected square wave are removed by subtraction. The method was validated with compound action potentials in crab walking leg nerve. Resistance changes of -0.85+/-0.4% (mean+/-SD) occurred which decreased from -0.97+/-0.43% to -0.46+/-0.16% with spacing of impedance current application electrodes from 2 to 8 mm but did not vary significantly with applied currents of 1-10 microA. These tallied with biophysical modelling, and so were consistent with a genuine physiological origin. This method appears to provide a reproducible and artefact free means for recording resistance changes during neuronal activity which could lead to the long-term goal of imaging of fast neural activity in the brain.

  15. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance.

  16. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    PubMed

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance. PMID:26835653

  17. Design of Experiments to Study the Impact of Process Parameters on Droplet Size and Development of Non-Invasive Imaging Techniques in Tablet Coating.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Thomas J; Smith, Julian; Hofmann, Michael P; Bland, Charlotte E; Badhan, Raj K; Al-Khattawi, Ali; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2016-01-01

    Atomisation of an aqueous solution for tablet film coating is a complex process with multiple factors determining droplet formation and properties. The importance of droplet size for an efficient process and a high quality final product has been noted in the literature, with smaller droplets reported to produce smoother, more homogenous coatings whilst simultaneously avoiding the risk of damage through over-wetting of the tablet core. In this work the effect of droplet size on tablet film coat characteristics was investigated using X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A quality by design approach utilising design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise the conditions necessary for production of droplets at a small (20 μm) and large (70 μm) droplet size. Droplet size distribution was measured using real-time laser diffraction and the volume median diameter taken as a response. DOE yielded information on the relationship three critical process parameters: pump rate, atomisation pressure and coating-polymer concentration, had upon droplet size. The model generated was robust, scoring highly for model fit (R2 = 0.977), predictability (Q2 = 0.837), validity and reproducibility. Modelling confirmed that all parameters had either a linear or quadratic effect on droplet size and revealed an interaction between pump rate and atomisation pressure. Fluidised bed coating of tablet cores was performed with either small or large droplets followed by CLSM and XμCT imaging. Addition of commonly used contrast materials to the coating solution improved visualisation of the coating by XμCT, showing the coat as a discrete section of the overall tablet. Imaging provided qualitative and quantitative evidence revealing that smaller droplets formed thinner, more uniform and less porous film coats. PMID:27548263

  18. Design of Experiments to Study the Impact of Process Parameters on Droplet Size and Development of Non-Invasive Imaging Techniques in Tablet Coating

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Thomas J.; Smith, Julian; Hofmann, Michael P.; Bland, Charlotte E.; Badhan, Raj K.; Al-Khattawi, Ali; Mohammed, Afzal R.

    2016-01-01

    Atomisation of an aqueous solution for tablet film coating is a complex process with multiple factors determining droplet formation and properties. The importance of droplet size for an efficient process and a high quality final product has been noted in the literature, with smaller droplets reported to produce smoother, more homogenous coatings whilst simultaneously avoiding the risk of damage through over-wetting of the tablet core. In this work the effect of droplet size on tablet film coat characteristics was investigated using X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A quality by design approach utilising design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise the conditions necessary for production of droplets at a small (20 μm) and large (70 μm) droplet size. Droplet size distribution was measured using real-time laser diffraction and the volume median diameter taken as a response. DOE yielded information on the relationship three critical process parameters: pump rate, atomisation pressure and coating-polymer concentration, had upon droplet size. The model generated was robust, scoring highly for model fit (R2 = 0.977), predictability (Q2 = 0.837), validity and reproducibility. Modelling confirmed that all parameters had either a linear or quadratic effect on droplet size and revealed an interaction between pump rate and atomisation pressure. Fluidised bed coating of tablet cores was performed with either small or large droplets followed by CLSM and XμCT imaging. Addition of commonly used contrast materials to the coating solution improved visualisation of the coating by XμCT, showing the coat as a discrete section of the overall tablet. Imaging provided qualitative and quantitative evidence revealing that smaller droplets formed thinner, more uniform and less porous film coats. PMID:27548263

  19. Probing the in vivo changes in oxygen saturation with photoacoustic imaging as a non-invasive means of assessing treatment progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; May, Jonathan P.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In vivo photoacoustic estimations of tumor oxygenation were used to assess the therapeutic efficacy of a thermosensitive liposome treatment in a pre-clinical mouse model. The treated group (n = 12) was administered doxorubicin-loaded, heat sensitive liposomes and exposed to mild hyperthermia (43°C) in order to deliver doxorubicin locally within the tumor micro-vessels. Control groups received systemic doxorubicin (n = 7) or saline (n = 12). The changes in tumor blood vessels after treatment were probed by analyzing the frequency content of the photoacoustic radiofrequency signals. Tumor oxygenation dropped by 15-20% during the first 30 minutes post-treatment when the tumors were exposed to encapsulated (Heat-Activated cyToxic - HaT-DOX) or free doxorubicin (DOX). The early (30 minutes to 5 hours) decrease in oxygen saturation strongly correlated to the reduction in tumor size assessed by caliper measurements. Control animals did not exhibit significant changes in tumor oxygenation at the early time points. The oxygenation at 7 days increased significantly for all groups. Measurements of the spectral slope from the normalized power spectra of the photoacoustic signals could also be used to differentiate between responder and non-responder mice. The results of this study suggest that photoacoustic imaging of tumors undergoing vascular-targeted cancer therapy can be used to assess treatment response early (hours) post-treatment through a combined analysis of oxygen saturation and photoacoustic radiofrequency spectroscopy.

  20. Imaging of activated complement using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO) - conjugated vectors: an in vivo in utero non-invasive method to predict placental insufficiency and abnormal fetal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Girardi, G; Fraser, J; Lennen, R; Vontell, R; Jansen, M; Hutchison, G

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we have developed a magnetic resonance imaging-based method for non-invasive detection of complement activation in placenta and foetal brain in vivo in utero. Using this method, we found that anti-complement C3-targeted ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles bind within the inflamed placenta and foetal brain cortical tissue, causing a shortening of the T2* relaxation time. We used two mouse models of pregnancy complications: a mouse model of obstetrics antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB). We found that detection of C3 deposition in the placenta in the APS model was associated with placental insufficiency characterised by increased oxidative stress, decreased vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor levels and intrauterine growth restriction. We also found that foetal brain C3 deposition was associated with cortical axonal cytoarchitecture disruption and increased neurodegeneration in the mouse model of APS and in the PTB model. In the APS model, foetuses that showed increased C3 in their brains additionally expressed anxiety-related behaviour after birth. Importantly, USPIO did not affect pregnancy outcomes and liver function in the mother and the offspring, suggesting that this method may be useful for detecting complement activation in vivo in utero and predicting placental insufficiency and abnormal foetal neurodevelopment that leads to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25245499

  1. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Heba H; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus-specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential. PMID:27589232

  2. Non-invasive Imaging of Sendai Virus Infection in Pharmacologically Immunocompromised Mice: NK and T Cells, but not Neutrophils, Promote Viral Clearance after Therapy with Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Heba H.; Vogel, Peter; Srinivasan, Ashok; Russell, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, parainfluenza virus (PIV) infections have an increased potential to spread to the lower respiratory tract (LRT), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Understanding the immunologic defects that facilitate viral spread to the LRT will help in developing better management protocols. In this study, we immunosuppressed mice with dexamethasone and/or cyclophosphamide then monitored the spread of viral infection into the LRT by using a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging system and a reporter Sendai virus (murine PIV type 1). Our results show that immunosuppression led to delayed viral clearance and increased viral loads in the lungs. After cessation of cyclophosphamide treatment, viral clearance occurred before the generation of Sendai-specific antibody responses and coincided with rebounds in neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. Neutrophil suppression using anti-Ly6G antibody had no effect on infection clearance, NK-cell suppression using anti-NK antibody delayed clearance, and T-cell suppression using anti-CD3 antibody resulted in no clearance (chronic infection). Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect on clearance of infection. In contrast, treatment with Sendai virus—specific polysera or a monoclonal antibody limited viral spread into the lungs and accelerated clearance. Overall, noninvasive bioluminescence was shown to be a useful tool to study respiratory viral progression, revealing roles for NK and T cells, but not neutrophils, in Sendai virus clearance after treatment with dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide. Virus-specific antibodies appear to have therapeutic potential. PMID:27589232

  3. Engraftment and bone mass are enhanced by PTHrP 1-34 in ectopically transplanted vertebrae (vossicle model) and can be non-invasively monitored with bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hildreth, Blake Eason; Williams, Michelle M; Dembek, Katarzyna A; Hernon, Krista M; Rosol, Thomas J; Toribio, Ramiro E

    2015-12-01

    Evidence exists that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) 1-34 may be more anabolic in bone than parathyroid hormone 1-34. While optical imaging is growing in popularity, scant information exists on the relationships between traditional bone imaging and histology and bioluminescence (BLI) and fluorescence (FLI) imaging. We aimed to evaluate the effects of PTHrP 1-34 on bone mass and determine if relationships existed between radiographic and histologic findings in bone and BLI and FLI indices. Vertebrae (vossicles) from mice coexpressing luciferase and green fluorescent protein were implanted subcutaneously into allogenic nude mice. Transplant recipients were treated daily with saline or PTHrP 1-34 for 4 weeks. BLI, FLI, radiography, histology, and µCT of the vossicles were performed over time. PTHrP 1-34 increased bioluminescence the most after 2 weeks, fluorescence at all time points, and decreased the time to peak bioluminescence at 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.027), the latter of which suggesting enhanced engraftment. PTHrP 1-34 maximized vertebral body volume at 4 weeks (P < 0.0001). The total amount of bone observed histologically increased in both groups at 2 and 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.002); however, PTHrP 1-34 exceeded time-matched controls (P ≤ 0.044). A positive linear relationship existed between the percentage of trabecular bone and (1) total bioluminescence (r = 0.595; P = 0.019); (2) total fluorescence (r = 0.474; P = 0.074); and (3) max fluorescence (r = 0.587; P = 0.021). In conclusion, PTHrP 1-34 enhances engraftment and bone mass, which can be monitored non-invasively by BLI and FLI.

  4. Non-invasive monitoring of spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Bastany, Zoya J R; Askari, Shahbaz; Dumont, Guy A; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Spreading depression (SD), a slow propagating depolarization wave, plays an important role in pathophysiology of different neurological disorders. Yet, research into SD-related disorders has been hampered by the lack of non-invasive recording techniques of SD. Here we compared the manifestations of SD in continuous non-invasive electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings to invasive electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings in order to obtain further insights into generator structures and electrogenic mechanisms of surface recording of SD. SD was induced by KCl application and simultaneous SD recordings were performed by scalp EEG as well as ECoG electrodes of somatosensory neocortex of rats using a novel homemade EEG amplifier, AgCl recording electrodes, and high chloride conductive gel. Different methods were used to analyze the data; including the spectrogram, bi-spectrogram, pattern distribution, relative spectrum power, and multivariable Gaussian fit analysis. The negative direct current (DC) shifts recorded by scalp electrodes exhibited a high homogeneity to those recorded by ECoG electrodes. Furthermore, this novel method of recording and analysis was able to separate SD recorded by scalp electrodes from non-neuronal DC shifts induced by other potential generators, such as the skin, muscles, arteries, dura, etc. These data suggest a novel application for continuous non-invasive monitoring of DC potential changes, such as SD. Non-invasive monitoring of SD would allow early intervention and improve outcome in SD-related neurological disorders. PMID:27397413

  5. Non-invasive methods for the determination of body and carcass composition in livestock: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound: invited review.

    PubMed

    Scholz, A M; Bünger, L; Kongsro, J; Baulain, U; Mitchell, A D

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately measure body or carcass composition is important for performance testing, grading and finally selection or payment of meat-producing animals. Advances especially in non-invasive techniques are mainly based on the development of electronic and computer-driven methods in order to provide objective phenotypic data. The preference for a specific technique depends on the target animal species or carcass, combined with technical and practical aspects such as accuracy, reliability, cost, portability, speed, ease of use, safety and for in vivo measurements the need for fixation or sedation. The techniques rely on specific device-driven signals, which interact with tissues in the body or carcass at the atomic or molecular level, resulting in secondary or attenuated signals detected by the instruments and analyzed quantitatively. The electromagnetic signal produced by the instrument may originate from mechanical energy such as sound waves (ultrasound - US), 'photon' radiation (X-ray-computed tomography - CT, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry - DXA) or radio frequency waves (magnetic resonance imaging - MRI). The signals detected by the corresponding instruments are processed to measure, for example, tissue depths, areas, volumes or distributions of fat, muscle (water, protein) and partly bone or bone mineral. Among the above techniques, CT is the most accurate one followed by MRI and DXA, whereas US can be used for all sizes of farm animal species even under field conditions. CT, MRI and US can provide volume data, whereas only DXA delivers immediate whole-body composition results without (2D) image manipulation. A combination of simple US and more expensive CT, MRI or DXA might be applied for farm animal selection programs in a stepwise approach. PMID:25743562

  6. Non-invasive methods for the determination of body and carcass composition in livestock: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound: invited review.

    PubMed

    Scholz, A M; Bünger, L; Kongsro, J; Baulain, U; Mitchell, A D

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately measure body or carcass composition is important for performance testing, grading and finally selection or payment of meat-producing animals. Advances especially in non-invasive techniques are mainly based on the development of electronic and computer-driven methods in order to provide objective phenotypic data. The preference for a specific technique depends on the target animal species or carcass, combined with technical and practical aspects such as accuracy, reliability, cost, portability, speed, ease of use, safety and for in vivo measurements the need for fixation or sedation. The techniques rely on specific device-driven signals, which interact with tissues in the body or carcass at the atomic or molecular level, resulting in secondary or attenuated signals detected by the instruments and analyzed quantitatively. The electromagnetic signal produced by the instrument may originate from mechanical energy such as sound waves (ultrasound - US), 'photon' radiation (X-ray-computed tomography - CT, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry - DXA) or radio frequency waves (magnetic resonance imaging - MRI). The signals detected by the corresponding instruments are processed to measure, for example, tissue depths, areas, volumes or distributions of fat, muscle (water, protein) and partly bone or bone mineral. Among the above techniques, CT is the most accurate one followed by MRI and DXA, whereas US can be used for all sizes of farm animal species even under field conditions. CT, MRI and US can provide volume data, whereas only DXA delivers immediate whole-body composition results without (2D) image manipulation. A combination of simple US and more expensive CT, MRI or DXA might be applied for farm animal selection programs in a stepwise approach.

  7. Cellular Phone Enabled Non-Invasive Tissue Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Shlomi; Rubinsky, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Cellular phone technology is emerging as an important tool in the effort to provide advanced medical care to the majority of the world population currently without access to such care. In this study, we show that non-invasive electrical measurements and the use of classifier software can be combined with cellular phone technology to produce inexpensive tissue characterization. This concept was demonstrated by the use of a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to distinguish through the cellular phone between heart and kidney tissue via the non-invasive multi-frequency electrical measurements acquired around the tissues. After the measurements were performed at a remote site, the raw data were transmitted through the cellular phone to a central computational site and the classifier was applied to the raw data. The results of the tissue analysis were returned to the remote data measurement site. The classifiers correctly determined the tissue type with a specificity of over 90%. When used for the detection of malignant tumors, classifiers can be designed to produce false positives in order to ensure that no tumors will be missed. This mode of operation has applications in remote non-invasive tissue diagnostics in situ in the body, in combination with medical imaging, as well as in remote diagnostics of biopsy samples in vitro. PMID:19365554

  8. Non-invasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Khalili, Korosh; Nguyen, Geoffrey Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a common and growing public health problem globally. The diagnosis of cirrhosis portends an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Liver biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of cirrhosis and staging of fibrosis. However, despite its universal use, liver biopsy is an invasive and inaccurate gold standard with numerous drawbacks. In order to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, a number of non-invasive techniques have been investigated for the assessment of cirrhosis. This review will focus on currently available non-invasive markers of cirrhosis. The evidence behind the use of these markers will be highlighted, along with an assessment of diagnostic accuracy and performance characteristics of each test. Non-invasive markers of cirrhosis can be radiologic or serum-based. Radiologic techniques based on ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and elastography have been used to assess liver fibrosis. Serum-based biomarkers of cirrhosis have also been developed. These are broadly classified into indirect and direct markers. Indirect biomarkers reflect liver function, which may decline with the onset of cirrhosis. Direct biomarkers, reflect extracellular matrix turnover, and include molecules involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. On the whole, radiologic and serum markers of fibrosis correlate well with biopsy scores, especially when excluding cirrhosis or excluding fibrosis. This feature is certainly clinically useful, and avoids liver biopsy in many cases.

  9. Multiparametric [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose/ [18F]Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/ Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer for the Non-Invasive Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, Piotr; Baltzer, Pascal; Polanec, Stephan H.; Sturdza, Alina; Georg, Dietmar; Helbich, Thomas H.; Karanikas, Georgios; Grimm, Christoph; Polterauer, Stephan; Poetter, Richard; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Georg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate fused multiparametric positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MP PET/MRI) at 3T in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, using high-resolution T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and the radiotracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and [18F]fluoromisonidazol ([18F]FMISO) for the non-invasive detection of tumor heterogeneity for an improved planning of chemo-radiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced cervix were enrolled in this IRB approved and were examined with fused MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI and in eleven patients complete data sets were acquired. MP PET/MRI was assessed for tumor volume, enhancement (EH)-kinetics, diffusivity, and [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO-avidity. Descriptive statistics and voxel-by-voxel analysis of MRI and PET parameters were performed. Correlations were assessed using multiple correlation analysis. Results All tumors displayed imaging parameters concordant with cervix cancer, i.e. type II/III EH-kinetics, restricted diffusivity (median ADC 0.80x10-3mm2/sec), [18F]FDG- (median SUVmax16.2) and [18F]FMISO-avidity (median SUVmax3.1). In all patients, [18F]FMISO PET identified the hypoxic tumor subvolume, which was independent of tumor volume. A voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed only weak correlations between the MRI and PET parameters (0.05–0.22), indicating that each individual parameter yields independent information and the presence of tumor heterogeneity. Conclusion MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI in patients with cervical cancer facilitates the acquisition of independent predictive and prognostic imaging parameters. MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI enables insights into tumor biology on multiple levels and provides information on tumor heterogeneity, which has the potential to improve the planning of CRT. PMID:27167829

  10. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  11. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, D. R.; Ionita, Ciprian; Rudin, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 μm thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography.Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles∕mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually.Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state

  12. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  13. Ultrahigh-speed non-invasive widefield angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Klein, Thomas; Grajciar, Branislav; Schmoll, Tilman; Wieser, Wolfgang; Andre, Raphael; Huber, Robert; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2012-07-01

    Retinal and choroidal vascular imaging is an important diagnostic benefit for ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. The current gold standard for vessel visualization is fluorescence angiography. We present a potential non-invasive alternative to image blood vessels based on functional Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). For OCT to compete with the field of view and resolution of angiography while maintaining motion artifacts to a minimum, ultrahigh-speed imaging has to be introduced. We employ Fourier domain mode locking swept source technology that offers high quality imaging at an A-scan rate of up to 1.68 MHz. We present retinal angiogram over ˜48 deg acquired in a few seconds in a single recording without the need of image stitching. OCT at 1060 nm allows for high penetration in the choroid and efficient separate characterization of the retinal and choroidal vascularization.

  14. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  15. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  16. [Non invasive ventilation in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Laetitia; Della Santa, Vincent; Hanhart, Walter-Alexandre

    2015-08-12

    Before the development of non invasive ventilation (NIV), endotracheal intubation was the only ventilatory therapy available in case of severe respiratory distress and acute respiratory failure. NIV used to be employed in intensive care settings only. Nowadays, the use of NIV has been democratized to include the emergency room, and the pre-hospital care setting for treatment of acute respiratory failure. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute exacerbation of COPD are indications of choice, since NIV improves mortality. The efficiency of the therapy depends on early treatment; however, endotracheal intubation should not be delayed when it becomes necessary. PMID:26449102

  17. Non-invasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Yoav; Webb, Muriel; Cytter-Kuint, Ruth; Shteingart, Shimon; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation and follow up of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis have been traditionally performed by liver biopsy. However, during the last 20 years, it has become evident that this “gold-standard” is imperfect; even according to its proponents, it is only “the best” among available methods. Attempts at uncovering non-invasive diagnostic tools have yielded multiple scores, formulae, and imaging modalities. All are better tolerated, safer, more acceptable to the patient, and can be repeated essentially as often as required. Most are much less expensive than liver biopsy. Consequently, their use is growing, and in some countries the number of biopsies performed, at least for routine evaluation of hepatitis B and C, has declined sharply. However, the accuracy and diagnostic value of most, if not all, of these methods remains controversial. In this review for the practicing physician, we analyze established and novel biomarkers and physical techniques. We may be witnessing in recent years the beginning of the end of the first phase for the development of non-invasive markers. Early evidence suggests that they might be at least as good as liver biopsy. Novel experimental markers and imaging techniques could produce a dramatic change in diagnosis in the near future. PMID:26556987

  18. Non-invasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Yoav; Webb, Muriel; Cytter-Kuint, Ruth; Shteingart, Shimon; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation and follow up of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis have been traditionally performed by liver biopsy. However, during the last 20 years, it has become evident that this "gold-standard" is imperfect; even according to its proponents, it is only "the best" among available methods. Attempts at uncovering non-invasive diagnostic tools have yielded multiple scores, formulae, and imaging modalities. All are better tolerated, safer, more acceptable to the patient, and can be repeated essentially as often as required. Most are much less expensive than liver biopsy. Consequently, their use is growing, and in some countries the number of biopsies performed, at least for routine evaluation of hepatitis B and C, has declined sharply. However, the accuracy and diagnostic value of most, if not all, of these methods remains controversial. In this review for the practicing physician, we analyze established and novel biomarkers and physical techniques. We may be witnessing in recent years the beginning of the end of the first phase for the development of non-invasive markers. Early evidence suggests that they might be at least as good as liver biopsy. Novel experimental markers and imaging techniques could produce a dramatic change in diagnosis in the near future.

  19. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  20. SU-E-I-37: Low-Dose Real-Time Region-Of-Interest X-Ray Fluoroscopic Imaging with a GPU-Accelerated Spatially Different Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Lee, J; Pua, R; Cho, S; Jung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to reduce imaging radiation dose while maintaining image quality of region of interest (ROI) in X-ray fluoroscopy. A low-dose real-time ROI fluoroscopic imaging technique which includes graphics-processing-unit- (GPU-) accelerated image processing for brightness compensation and noise filtering was developed in this study. Methods: In our ROI fluoroscopic imaging, a copper filter is placed in front of the X-ray tube. The filter contains a round aperture to reduce radiation dose to outside of the aperture. To equalize the brightness difference between inner and outer ROI regions, brightness compensation was performed by use of a simple weighting method that applies selectively to the inner ROI, the outer ROI, and the boundary zone. A bilateral filtering was applied to the images to reduce relatively high noise in the outer ROI images. To speed up the calculation of our technique for real-time application, the GPU-acceleration was applied to the image processing algorithm. We performed a dosimetric measurement using an ion-chamber dosimeter to evaluate the amount of radiation dose reduction. The reduction of calculation time compared to a CPU-only computation was also measured, and the assessment of image quality in terms of image noise and spatial resolution was conducted. Results: More than 80% of dose was reduced by use of the ROI filter. The reduction rate depended on the thickness of the filter and the size of ROI aperture. The image noise outside the ROI was remarkably reduced by the bilateral filtering technique. The computation time for processing each frame image was reduced from 3.43 seconds with single CPU to 9.85 milliseconds with GPU-acceleration. Conclusion: The proposed technique for X-ray fluoroscopy can substantially reduce imaging radiation dose to the patient while maintaining image quality particularly in the ROI region in real-time.

  1. Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Caroline B.; Carlson, Monica L.; Toda, Koji; DeWind, Nicholas K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The success of many neuroscientific studies depends upon adequate head fixation of awake, behaving animals. Typically, this is achieved by surgically affixing a head-restraint prosthesis to the skull. New Method Here we report the use of thermoplastic masks to non-invasively restrain monkeys’ heads. Mesh thermoplastic sheets become pliable when heated and can then be molded to an individual monkey’s head. After cooling, the custom mask retains this shape indefinitely for day-to-day use. Results We successfully trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to perform cognitive tasks while wearing thermoplastic masks. Using these masks, we achieved a level of head stability sufficient for high-resolution eye-tracking and intracranial electrophysiology. Comparison with Existing Method Compared with traditional head-posts, we find that thermoplastic masks perform at least as well during infrared eye-tracking and single-neuron recordings, allow for clearer magnetic resonance image acquisition, enable freer placement of a transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, and impose lower financial and time costs on the lab. Conclusions We conclude that thermoplastic masks are a viable non-invasive form of primate head restraint that enable a wide range of neuroscientific experiments. PMID:26112334

  2. Non-invasive neuroimaging using near-infrared light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Boas, David A.; Sutton, Jeffrey P.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared light to non-invasively probe the brain for changes in parameters relating to brain function. We describe the general methodology, including types of measurements and instrumentation (including the tradeoffs inherent in the various instrument components), and the basic theory required to interpret the recorded data. A brief review of diffuse optical applications is included, with an emphasis on research that has been done with psychiatric populations. Finally, we discuss some practical issues and limitations that are relevant when conducting diffuse optical experiments. We find that, while diffuse optics can provide substantial advantages to the psychiatric researcher relative to the alternative brain imaging methods, the method remains substantially underutilized in this field.

  3. Implementation of a high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) for in-vivo endovascular image guided interventions (EIGI) and region-of-interest computed tomography (ROI-CT)

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, C N; Keleshis, C.; Patel, V.; Yadava, G.; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R; Jain, A.; Rudin, S

    2008-01-01

    New advances in catheter technology and remote actuation for minimally invasive procedures are continuously increasing the demand for better x-ray imaging technology. The new x-ray high-sensitivity Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (HS-MAF) detector offers high resolution and real-time image-guided capabilities which are unique when compared with commercially available detectors. This detector consists of a 300 μm CsI input phosphor coupled to a dual stage GEN2 micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII), followed by minifying fiber-optic taper coupled to a CCD chip. The HS-MAF detector image array is 1024×1024 pixels, with a 12 bit depth capable of imaging at 30 frames per second. The detector has a round field of view with 4 cm diameter and 35 microns pixels. The LII has a large variable gain which allows usage of the detector at very low exposures characteristic of fluoroscopic ranges while maintaining very good image quality. The custom acquisition program allows real-time image display and data storage. We designed a set of in-vivo experimental interventions in which placement of specially designed endovascular stents were evaluated with the new detector and with a standard x-ray image intensifier (XII). Capabilities such fluoroscopy, angiography and ROI-CT reconstruction using rotational angiography data were implemented and verified. The images obtained during interventions under radiographic control with the HS-MAF detector were superior to those with the XII. In general, the device feature markers, the device structures, and the vessel geometry were better identified with the new detector. High-resolution detectors such as HS-MAF can vastly improve the accuracy of localization and tracking of devices such stents or catheters. PMID:18958294

  4. Non-invasive diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sebastian; Seitz, Helmut Karl; Rausch, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world. For many reasons, it is underestimated and underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis is absolutely essential since it (1) helps to identify patients at genetic risk for ALD; (2) can trigger efficient abstinence namely in non-addicted patients; and (3) initiate screening programs to prevent life-threatening complications such as bleeding from varices, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or hepatocellular cancer. The two major end points of ALD are alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the rare and clinically-defined alcoholic hepatitis (AH). The prediction and early diagnosis of both entities is still insufficiently solved and usually relies on a combination of laboratory, clinical and imaging findings. It is not widely conceived that conventional screening tools for ALD such as ultrasound imaging or routine laboratory testing can easily overlook ca. 40% of manifest alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Non-invasive methods such as transient elastography (Fibroscan), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging or shear wave elastography have significantly improved the early diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis. Present algorithms allow either the exclusion or the exact definition of advanced fibrosis stages in ca. 95% of patients. The correct interpretation of liver stiffness requires a timely abdominal ultrasound and actual transaminase levels. Other non-invasive methods such as controlled attenuation parameter, serum levels of M30 or M65, susceptometry or breath tests are under current evaluation to assess the degree of steatosis, apoptosis and iron overload in these patients. Liver biopsy still remains an important option to rule out comorbidities and to confirm the prognosis namely for patients with AH. PMID:25356026

  5. A robust fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ameet K.; Mustufa, Tabish; Zhou, Yu; Burdette, E. C.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: C-arm fluoroscopy is ubiquitous in contemporary surgery, but it lacks the ability to accurately reconstruct 3D information. A major obstacle in fluoroscopic reconstruction is discerning the pose of the X-ray image, in 3D space. Optical/magnetic trackers are prohibitively expensive, intrusive and cumbersome. Method: We present single-image-based fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) with the use of an external radiographic fiducial consisting of a mathematically optimized set of points, lines, and ellipses. The fiducial encodes six degrees of freedom in a single image by creating a unique view from any direction. A non-linear optimizer can rapidly compute the pose of the fiducial using this image. The current embodiment has salient attributes: small dimensions (3 x 3 x 5 cm), it need not be close to the anatomy of interest and can be segmented automatically. Results: We tested the fiducial and the pose recovery method on synthetic data and also experimentally on a precisely machined mechanical phantom. Pose recovery had an error of 0.56 mm in translation and 0.33° in orientation. Object reconstruction had a mean error of 0.53 mm with 0.16 mm STD. Conclusion: The method offers accuracies similar to commercial tracking systems, and is sufficiently robust for intra-operative quantitative C-arm fluoroscopy.

  6. Non-invasive exploration in an environmentally sensitive world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livo, K.E.; Knepper, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Modern remote sensing provides a means for locating and characterizing exposed mineralized systems in many parts of the world. These capabilities are non-invasive and help target specific areas for more detailed exploration. An example of how remote sensing technology can be used is evident from a study of the Questa Mining District, New Mexico. Analysis of low spectral resolution data from the Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite system clearly shows the regional distribution of two broad mineral groups often associated with mineralized systems: clay-carbonate-sulfate and iron oxides-iron hydroxides. Analysis of high spectral resolution data from the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging System (AVIRIS) shows the occurrence and distribution of many individual mineral species that characterize the pattern of hydrothermally altered rocks in the district.

  7. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: a report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology "automatic dose rate and image quality" (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  8. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: A Report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-15

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology ''automatic dose rate and image quality'' (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  9. The roadmap for estimation of cell-type-specific neuronal activity from non-invasive measurements.

    PubMed

    Uhlirova, Hana; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Tian, Peifang; Sakadžić, Sava; Gagnon, Louis; Thunemann, Martin; Desjardins, Michèle; Saisan, Payam A; Nizar, Krystal; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Hagler, Donald J; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A; Silva, Gabriel A; Masliah, Eliezer; Kleinfeld, David; Vinogradov, Sergei; Buxton, Richard B; Einevoll, Gaute T; Boas, David A; Dale, Anders M; Devor, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The computational properties of the human brain arise from an intricate interplay between billions of neurons connected in complex networks. However, our ability to study these networks in healthy human brain is limited by the necessity to use non-invasive technologies. This is in contrast to animal models where a rich, detailed view of cellular-level brain function with cell-type-specific molecular identity has become available due to recent advances in microscopic optical imaging and genetics. Thus, a central challenge facing neuroscience today is leveraging these mechanistic insights from animal studies to accurately draw physiological inferences from non-invasive signals in humans. On the essential path towards this goal is the development of a detailed 'bottom-up' forward model bridging neuronal activity at the level of cell-type-specific populations to non-invasive imaging signals. The general idea is that specific neuronal cell types have identifiable signatures in the way they drive changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (measurable with quantitative functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and electrical currents/potentials (measurable with magneto/electroencephalography). This forward model would then provide the 'ground truth' for the development of new tools for tackling the inverse problem-estimation of neuronal activity from multimodal non-invasive imaging data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574309

  10. [Isolated left ventricular muscular diverticulum in an adult. Value of non-invasive examinations].

    PubMed

    Holeman, A; Bellorini, M; Lefevre, T; Lévy, M; Loiret, J; Huerta, F; Thébault, B; Funck, F

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a case of ventriculum in a 45 year old women investigated for chest pain. This was a congenital muscular left ventricular diverticulum confirmed by a complete imaging series including echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, angio-scintigraphy and conventional angiography. This diverticulum was unusual due to the fact that there was no associated congenital disease and that it was discovered in an adult. The authors review the literature and discuss the value of non-invasive imaging procedures.

  11. Non invasive sensing technologies for cultural heritage management and fruition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of the information produced by science and technology for the knowledge of the cultural heritage depends on the quality of the feedback and, consequently, on the "cultural" distance between scientists and end-users. In particular, the solution to this problem mainly resides in the capability of end-users' capability to assess and transform the knowledge produced by diagnostics with regard to: information on both cultural objects and sites (decay patterns, vulnerability, presence of buried archaeological remains); decision making (management plan, conservation project, and excavation plan). From our experience in the field of the cultural heritage and namely the conservation, of monuments, there is a significant gap of information between technologists (geophysicists/physicists/engineers) and end-users (conservators/historians/architects). This cultural gap is due to the difficulty to interpret "indirect data" produced by non invasive diagnostics (i.e. radargrams/thermal images/seismic tomography etc..) in order to provide information useful to improve the historical knowledge (e.g. the chronology of the different phases of a building), to characterise the state of conservation (e.g. detection of cracks in the masonry) and to monitor in time cultural heritage artifacts and sites. The possible answer to this difficulty is in the set-up of a knowledge chain regarding the following steps: - Integrated application of novel and robust data processing methods; - Augmented reality as a tool for making easier the interpretation of non invasive - investigations for the analysis of decay pathologies of masonry and architectural surfaces; - The comparison between direct data (carrots, visual inspection) and results from non-invasive tests, including geophysics, aims to improve the interpretation and the rendering of the monuments and even of the archaeological landscapes; - The use of specimens or test beds for the detection of archaeological features and

  12. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  13. Improving non-invasive ventilation documentation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew; Elkheir, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Record keeping for patients on non-invasive ventilation (NIV) at St. Georges Hospital is poor. The initial NIV prescription is often not recorded, and changes to the NIV prescription or the rationale for the changes (ABG results) are also poorly documented. This leads to confusion for nurses/doctors as to what the correct settings are, meaning patients could receive ineffective ventilation. The use of NIV is also poorly recorded by nursing staff meaning that doctors are unsure if the prescribed NIV is being achieved. This can lead to treatment being escalated unnecessarily in the event of treatment failure. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is the provision of ventilatory support in the form of positive pressure via the patient's upper airway using a mask or similar device. NIV is indicated for treatment of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, of which there are many causes, though COPD is the indication in up to 70% of cases.[1] British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines for NIV suggest that the rationale for commencing a patient on NIV and the proposed settings should be clearly documented.[2] Clinicians cannot effectively tailor changes to the patients NIV settings if this information is not clearly recorded, which could lead to increased time requiring NIV or NIV failure. Three main areas were considered important to measure for this project. The initial prescription of the NIV, changes to the NIV settings, and nursing documentation surrounding NIV. A baseline measurement of NIV documentation for two weeks found NIV documentation to globally very poor. NIV was formally prescribed 29% of the time, full detail of intended settings were documented 57% of the time, the decision to commence NIV was discussed with the respiratory consultant/SpR just 29% of the time and on no occasion was a decision regarding escalation of treatment recorded. Eighteen changes were made to the NIV settings. These were formally prescribed 22% of the time and detail of the intended

  14. Prognostic value of non-invasive stress testing for coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Bigvava, Tamar; Zamani, Seyedeh Mahsa; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Gebker, Rolf; Pieske, Burkert; Kelle, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients remains a challenge but can have substantial prognostic implications for this patient group. Until now, sufficient data was not available on which to base the selection of the imaging modality in obese patients. The decision on which imaging modality to use should therefore follow the general guidelines. In this article, the authors discuss the prognostic value of the different non-invasive stress testing methods for CAD in obese patients.

  15. FTRAC--A robust fluoroscope tracking fiducial

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Mustafa, Tabish; Zhou, Yu; Burdette, Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-10-15

    C-arm fluoroscopy is ubiquitous in contemporary surgery, but it lacks the ability to accurately reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) information. A major obstacle in fluoroscopic reconstruction is discerning the pose of the x-ray image, in 3D space. Optical/magnetic trackers tend to be prohibitively expensive, intrusive and cumbersome in many applications. We present single-image-based fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) with the use of an external radiographic fiducial consisting of a mathematically optimized set of ellipses, lines, and points. This is an improvement over contemporary fiducials, which use only points. The fiducial encodes six degrees of freedom in a single image by creating a unique view from any direction. A nonlinear optimizer can rapidly compute the pose of the fiducial using this image. The current embodiment has salient attributes: small dimensions (3x3x5 cm); need not be close to the anatomy of interest; and accurately segmentable. We tested the fiducial and the pose recovery method on synthetic data and also experimentally on a precisely machined mechanical phantom. Pose recovery in phantom experiments had an accuracy of 0.56 mm in translation and 0.33 deg. in orientation. Object reconstruction had a mean error of 0.53 mm with 0.16 mm STD. The method offers accuracies similar to commercial tracking systems, and appears to be sufficiently robust for intraoperative quantitative C-arm fluoroscopy. Simulation experiments indicate that the size can be further reduced to 1x1x2 cm, with only a marginal drop in accuracy.

  16. Development and evaluation of a new radiographic and fluoroscopic imager based on electron-multiplying CCDs: The solid state x-ray image intensifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew Thomas

    A new dual detector system was developed which utilizes a low resolution, large field-of-view x-ray image intensifier (II) and a high resolution, region-of-interest microangiographic (MA) detector on the same c-arm gantry. With this new MA-II system, the larger field-of-view (FOV) II can be operated when the demands of the task are not as high, and a larger imaging area is desired. However, when a higher-resolution image with greater image quality is desired at a targeted region-of-interest (ROI), the MA can be deployed to take on these greater demands. To quantitatively and qualitatively assess the imaging performance of each detector under realistic conditions, angiographic images of simulated vessels and rabbit neurovasculature were acquired with both detectors under nearly identical conditions. With the MA detector deployed, vessels as small as 95 mum were visible, whereas the II could not detect vessels smaller than 235 mum. The ROI MA mode was also shown to provide sharper images with higher contrast-to-noise ratios and was four times as likely to successfully detect overlapping vessels as compared to the II. More accurate three-dimensional center lines of vasculature using multi-view reconstruction techniques were also obtained with the MA. The solid state x-ray image intensifier (SSXII) was developed to provide similar high-resolution imaging capabilities as the MA and a built in adjustable gain to provide high-sensitivity imaging capabilities for operation at all exposures used in medical x-ray imaging procedures. The imaging components used in construction of the prototype SSXII were selected based on a theoretical performance evaluation, using a Fourier-based linear-systems model analysis. The performance of the prototype SSXII was then extensively evaluated. Images of various objects and image comparisons with current state-of-the-art detectors qualitatively demonstrated that the SSXII is capable of providing substantial improvements. A quantitative

  17. Modern non-invasive mechanical ventilation turns 25.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-11-01

    The history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation goes back more than 100 years, but it was not until 1987 when what we could call "modern" non-invasive mechanical ventilation was developed. The description of Delaubier and Rideau of a patient with Duchenne's disease who had been effectively ventilated through a nasal mask marked the start of a new era in the history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Over these last 25years, we have witnessed exponential growth in its use, field of activity and technological advances on an exciting fast-paced track. We believe that it is time to review the main milestones that have marked the development of non-invasive mechanical ventilation to date, while paying homage to this therapeutic method that has contributed so much to the advancement of respiratory medicine in the last 25years.

  18. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  19. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  20. Facilitate Insight by Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard P.; Snyder, Allan W.

    2011-01-01

    Our experiences can blind us. Once we have learned to solve problems by one method, we often have difficulties in generating solutions involving a different kind of insight. Yet there is evidence that people with brain lesions are sometimes more resistant to this so-called mental set effect. This inspired us to investigate whether the mental set effect can be reduced by non-invasive brain stimulation. 60 healthy right-handed participants were asked to take an insight problem solving task while receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL). Only 20% of participants solved an insight problem with sham stimulation (control), whereas 3 times as many participants did so (p = 0.011) with cathodal stimulation (decreased excitability) of the left ATL together with anodal stimulation (increased excitability) of the right ATL. We found hemispheric differences in that a stimulation montage involving the opposite polarities did not facilitate performance. Our findings are consistent with the theory that inhibition to the left ATL can lead to a cognitive style that is less influenced by mental templates and that the right ATL may be associated with insight or novel meaning. Further studies including neurophysiological imaging are needed to elucidate the specific mechanisms leading to the enhancement. PMID:21311746

  1. An optical approach for non-invasive blood clot testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brill, Alexander; Fine, Ilya; Harmelin, Alon

    2007-02-01

    Physiological blood coagulation is an essential biological process. Current tests for plasma coagulation (clotting) need to be performed ex vivo and require fresh blood sampling for every test. A recently published work describes a new, noninvasive, in vivo approach to assess blood coagulation status during mechanical occlusion1. For this purpose, we have tested this approach and applied a controlled laser beam to blood micro-vessels of the mouse ear during mechanical occlusion. Standard setup for intravital transillumination videomicroscopy and laser based imaging techniques were used for monitoring the blood clotting process. Temporal mechanical occlusion of blood vessels in the observed area was applied to ensure blood flow cessation. Subsequently, laser irradiation was used to induce vascular micro-injury. Changes in the vessel wall, as well as in the pattern of blood flow, predispose the area to vascular thrombosis, according to the paradigm of Virchow's triad. In our experiments, two elements of Virchow's triad were used to induce the process of clotting in vivo, and to assess it optically. We identified several parameters that can serve as markers of the blood clotting process in vivo. These include changes in light absorption in the area of illumination, as well as changes in the pattern of the red blood cells' micro-movement in the vessels where blood flow is completely arrested. Thus, our results indicate that blood coagulation status can be characterized by non-invasive, in vivo methodologies.

  2. Non invasive tools for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Cervello, Melchiorre; Licata, Anna; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis (LC), the end stage of many forms of chronic hepatitis of different etiologies is a diffuse process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules surrounded by annular fibrosis. This chronic progressive clinical condition, leads to liver cell failure and portal hypertension, which can favour the onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Defining the phase of the natural history is crucial for therapeutic choice and prognosis. Liver biopsy is currently considered the best available standard of reference but it has some limits, so alternative tools have been developed to substitute liver biopsy when assessing liver fibrosis. Serum markers offer a cost-effective alternative to liver biopsy being less invasive and theoretically without complications. They can be classified into direct and indirect markers which may be used alone or in combination to produce composite scores. Diagnostic imaging includes a number of instruments and techniques to estimate liver fibrosis and cirrhosis like ultrasound (US), US Doppler, contrast enhanced US and Elastography. US could be used for the diagnosis of advanced LC while is not able to evaluate progression of fibrosis, in this case Elastography is more reliable. This review aims to revise the most recent data from the literature about non invasive methods useful in defining liver fibrosis. PMID:25561782

  3. Application of optical non-invasive methods in skin physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Darvin, M.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper the application of optical non-invasive methods in dermatology and cosmetology is discussed. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) are the most promising methods for this application. Using these methods, the analysis of different skin parameters like dryness and oiliness of the skin, the barrier function and the structure of furrows and wrinkles are discussed. Additionally the homogeneity of distribution of topically applied creams, as well as their penetration into the skin were investigated. It is shown that these methods are highly valuable in dermatology for diagnostic and therapy control and for basic research, for instance in the field of structure analysis of hair follicles and sweat glands. The vertical images of the tissue produced by OCT can be easily compared with histological sections. Unfortunately, the resolution of the OCT technique is not high enough to carry out measurements on a cellular level, as is possible by LSM. LSM has the advantage that it can be used for the investigation of penetration and storage processes of topically applied substances, if these substances have fluorescent properties or if they are fluorescent-labelled.

  4. Non invasive tools for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Soresi, Maurizio; Giannitrapani, Lydia; Cervello, Melchiorre; Licata, Anna; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-12-28

    Liver cirrhosis (LC), the end stage of many forms of chronic hepatitis of different etiologies is a diffuse process characterized by fibrosis and the conversion of normal liver architecture into structurally abnormal nodules surrounded by annular fibrosis. This chronic progressive clinical condition, leads to liver cell failure and portal hypertension, which can favour the onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Defining the phase of the natural history is crucial for therapeutic choice and prognosis. Liver biopsy is currently considered the best available standard of reference but it has some limits, so alternative tools have been developed to substitute liver biopsy when assessing liver fibrosis. Serum markers offer a cost-effective alternative to liver biopsy being less invasive and theoretically without complications. They can be classified into direct and indirect markers which may be used alone or in combination to produce composite scores. Diagnostic imaging includes a number of instruments and techniques to estimate liver fibrosis and cirrhosis like ultrasound (US), US Doppler, contrast enhanced US and Elastography. US could be used for the diagnosis of advanced LC while is not able to evaluate progression of fibrosis, in this case Elastography is more reliable. This review aims to revise the most recent data from the literature about non invasive methods useful in defining liver fibrosis.

  5. Bioengineering approach to non-invasive measurement of body composition.

    PubMed

    Dubin, S; Nissanov, J; Zietz, S; Schrope, B; Naim, A; Morano, R; Hanania, R

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of body fat percentage is essential for medical care and research. The "gold standard" method for humans is underwater weighing, which is clearly inappropriate for infants, sick people and non-human animals. The corresponding criterion method for animals is comminution of the carcass followed by extraction of the fat with a volatile solvent such as ether. Our goal has been to develop a method for body composition (fat percentage) for use in animals and humans which is non-invasive and minimally intrusive, independent of variation in body conformation and fat distribution, and reasonable in cost. In one variant, our approach to this problem has been to move Archimedes' principle "on to dry land." The subject's volume is determined by measuring the differential buoyancy in comfortably breathable light (low density) and heavy atmospheres. In another, we use "structured light," in which a pattern of illumination is cast on the patient. The image is acquired using a video camera and the geometrical spatial coordinates of a large number of points on the surface of the subject are acquired. This permits the computation of the surface area and volume of the subject; which, combined with the weight, determines the fat percentage. PMID:7948641

  6. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation.

    PubMed

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A

    2015-12-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  7. Non-invasive pressure difference estimation from PC-MRI using the work-energy equation

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Fabrizio; Figueroa, C. Alberto; Smith, Nicolas P.; Lamata, Pablo; Nordsletten, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure difference is an accepted clinical biomarker for cardiovascular disease conditions such as aortic coarctation. Currently, measurements of pressure differences in the clinic rely on invasive techniques (catheterization), prompting development of non-invasive estimates based on blood flow. In this work, we propose a non-invasive estimation procedure deriving pressure difference from the work-energy equation for a Newtonian fluid. Spatial and temporal convergence is demonstrated on in silico Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Image (PC-MRI) phantoms with steady and transient flow fields. The method is also tested on an image dataset generated in silico from a 3D patient-specific Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation and finally evaluated on a cohort of 9 subjects. The performance is compared to existing approaches based on steady and unsteady Bernoulli formulations as well as the pressure Poisson equation. The new technique shows good accuracy, robustness to noise, and robustness to the image segmentation process, illustrating the potential of this approach for non-invasive pressure difference estimation. PMID:26409245

  8. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Minjie; DiPetrillo, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure and represents a serious medical issue worldwide. The genetic basis of hypertension is well-established, but few causal genes have been identified thus far. Non-invasive blood pressure measurements are a critical component of high-throughput genetic studies to identify genes controlling blood pressure. Whereas this technique is fairly routine for blood pressure measurements in rats, non-invasive blood pressure measurement in mice has proven to be more challenging. This chapter describes an experimental protocol measuring blood pressure in mice using a CODA non-invasive blood pressure monitoring system. This method enables accurate blood pressure phenotyping in mice for linkage or mutagenesis studies, as well as for other experiments requiring high-throughput blood pressure measurement.

  9. Non-invasive wearable electrochemical sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Wang, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    Wearable sensors have garnered considerable recent interest owing to their tremendous promise for a plethora of applications. Yet the absence of reliable non-invasive chemical sensors has greatly hindered progress in the area of on-body sensing. Electrochemical sensors offer considerable promise as wearable chemical sensors that are suitable for diverse applications owing to their high performance, inherent miniaturization, and low cost. A wide range of wearable electrochemical sensors and biosensors has been developed for real-time non-invasive monitoring of electrolytes and metabolites in sweat, tears, or saliva as indicators of a wearer's health status. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive electrochemical sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of wearable wireless sensing devices and body-sensor networks, and thus find considerable use in a wide range of personal health-care monitoring applications, as well as in sport and military applications.

  10. Non-invasive Thrombolysis using Microtripsy: A Parameter Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Jin, Lifang; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Owens, Gabe E.; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue by well-controlled acoustic cavitation using microsecond-long, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. The feasibility of using histotripsy as a non-invasive, drug-free, and image-guided thrombolysis method has been shown previously. A new histotripsy approach, termed Microtripsy, has recently been investigated for the thrombolysis application to improve treatment accuracy and avoid potential vessel damage. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulse repetition frequency (PRF) on microtripsy thrombolysis. Microtripsy thrombolysis treatments using different PRFs (5, 50, and 100 Hz) and doses (20, 50, and 100 pulses) were performed on blood clots in an in vitro vessel flow model. To quantitatively evaluate the microtripsy thrombolysis effect, the location of focal cavitation, the incident rate of pre-focal cavitation on the vessel wall, the size and location of the resulting flow channel, and the generated clot debris particles were measured. The results demonstrated that focal cavitation was always well-confined in the vessel lumen without contacting the vessel wall for all PRFs. Pre-focal cavitation on the front vessel wall was never observed at 5Hz PRF, but occasionally observed at PRFs of 50 Hz (1.2%) and 100 Hz (5.4%). However, the observed pre-focal cavitation was weak and didn’t significantly impact the focal cavitation. Results further demonstrated that, although the extent of clot fractionation per pulse was the highest at 5 Hz PRF at the beginning of treatment (<20 pulses), 100 Hz PRF generated the largest flow channels with a much shorter treatment time. Finally, results showed fewer large debris particles were generated at a higher PRF. Overall, the results of this study suggest that a higher PRF (50 or 100 Hz) may be a better choice for microtripsy thrombolysis to use clinically due to the larger resulting flow channel, shorter treatment time, and smaller debris particles. PMID:26670850

  11. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Jacob B.; Traberg, Marie S.; Pihl, Michael J.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2013-03-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. The method relies on in-plane vector velocity elds acquired using the Transverse Oscillation method. The pressure gradients are estimated by applying the Navier-Stokes equations for isotropic uids to the estimated velocity elds. The velocity elds were measured for a steady ow on a carotid bifurcation phantom (Shelley Medical, Canada) with a 70% constriction on the internal branch. Scanning was performed with a BK8670 linear transducer (BK Medical, Denmark) connected to a BK Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The results are validated through nite element simulations of the carotid ow model where the geometry is determined from MR images. This proof of concept study was conducted at nine ultrasound frames per second. Estimated pressure gradients along the longitudinal direction of the constriction varied from 0 kPa/m to 10 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -9.1% for the axial component and -7.9% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator, given in reference to the peak gradient, was 28.4% in the axial direction and 64.5% in the lateral direction. A study made across the constriction was also conducted. This yielded magnitudes from 0 kPa/m to 7 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -5.7% and 13.9% for the axial and lateral component, respectively. The relative standard deviations of this study were 45.2% and 83.2% in the axial and lateral direction, respectively.

  12. Non-invasive activation of optogenetic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Elisabeth; Berglund, Ken; Klein, Marguerita E.; Augustine, George J.; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2014-03-01

    The manipulation of genetically targeted neurons with light (optogenetics) continues to provide unprecedented avenues into studying the function of the mammalian brain. However, potential translation into the clinical arena faces a number of significant hurdles, foremost among them the need for insertion of optical fibers into the brain to deliver light to opsins expressed on neuronal membranes. In order to overcome these hardware-related problems, we have developed an alternative strategy for delivering light to opsins which does not involve fiber implants. Rather, the light is produced by a protein, luciferase, which oxidizes intravenously applied substrate, thereby emitting bioluminescence. In proof-ofprinciple studies employing a fusion protein of a light-generating luciferase to a light-sensing opsin (luminopsin), we showed that light emitted by Gaussia luciferase is indeed able to activate channelrhodopsin, allowing modulation of neuronal activity when expressed in cultured neurons. Here we assessed applicability of the concept in vivo in mice expressing luminopsins from viral vectors and from genetically engineered transgenes. The experiments demonstrate that intravenously applied substrate reaches neurons in the brain, causing the luciferase to produce bioluminescence which can be imaged in vivo, and that activation of channelrhodopsin by bioluminescence is sufficient to affect behavior. Further developments of such technology based on combining optogenetics with bioluminescence - i.e. combining lightsensing molecules with biologically produced light through luciferases - should bring optogenetics closer to clinical applications.

  13. Eyeblink Conditioning: A Non-Invasive Biomarker for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition,…

  14. Non-invasive treatment options for focal cortical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, DONG

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) presents a strong clinical challenge especially for the treatment of the associated epilepsy. Epilepsy in FCD is often treatment-resistant and constitutes 50% of treatment-resistant cases. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely used in the treatment of FCD. However, evidence to suggest their specific effect on the treatment of FCD remains to be established. In view of this resistance, several alternative treatments have been suggested. Although treatment currently involves surgical management, non-invasive treatments have been identified. The aim of the present review, was to assess non-invasive management strategies including, i) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, ii) ketogenic diet (KD), and iii) vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). In addition, we discussed the literature available regarding the use of AEDs in FCD. Experiments conducted with mammals detailing rapamycin gene mutations in FCD have produced vital information for exploring treatment options using mTOR inhibitors. Of note is the importance of KD in children with FCD. This diet has been shown to modify disease progression by attenuating chromatin modification, a master regulator for gene expression and functional adaptation of the cell. FCD has also been studied widely with neurostimulation techniques. The outcomes of these techniques have been found to be variable. For widespread dysplasias, VNS has been shown to produce responder rates of >50%. Nevertheless, non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation techniques such as transcutaneous VNS and non-invasive VNS are gaining better patient compatibility, albeit their efficacy remains to be established. PMID:27168769

  15. Non-invasive Prediction of Pork Loin Tenderness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present experiment was conducted to develop a non-invasive method to predict tenderness of pork loins. Boneless pork loins (n = 901) were evaluated either on line on the loin boning and trimming line of large-scale commercial plants (n = 465) or at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center abattoir ...

  16. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of macular carotenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive in vivo method for assessing macular carotenoids includes performing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) on a retina of a subject. A spatial representation of carotenoid levels in the macula based on data from the OCT of the retina can be generated.

  17. Non-invasive method of measuring cerebral spinal fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor); Lambert, James L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of non-invasively determining intracranial pressure from measurements of an eye. A parameter of an optic nerve of the eye is determined, along with an intraocular pressure of the eye. The intracranial pressure may be determined from the intraocular pressure and the parameter.

  18. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Packer, S.

    1984-10-30

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate. The apparatus comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67. 2 figs.

  19. Method for non-invasive detection of ocular melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, Richard M.; Packer, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    There is described an apparatus and method for diagnosing ocular cancer that is both non-invasive and accurate which comprises two radiation detectors positioned before each of the patient's eyes which will measure the radiation level produced in each eye after the administration of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical such as gallium-67.

  20. Non-invasive Markers of Liver Fibrosis: Adjuncts or Alternatives to Liver Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jun L.; Pavlides, Michael; Moolla, Ahmad; Ryan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis reflects sustained liver injury often from multiple, simultaneous factors. Whilst the presence of mild fibrosis on biopsy can be a reassuring finding, the identification of advanced fibrosis is critical to the management of patients with chronic liver disease. This necessity has lead to a reliance on liver biopsy which itself is an imperfect test and poorly accepted by patients. The development of robust tools to non-invasively assess liver fibrosis has dramatically enhanced clinical decision making in patients with chronic liver disease, allowing a rapid and informed judgment of disease stage and prognosis. Should a liver biopsy be required, the appropriateness is clearer and the diagnostic yield is greater with the use of these adjuncts. While a number of non-invasive liver fibrosis markers are now used in routine practice, a steady stream of innovative approaches exists. With improvement in the reliability, reproducibility and feasibility of these markers, their potential role in disease management is increasing. Moreover, their adoption into clinical trials as outcome measures reflects their validity and dynamic nature. This review will summarize and appraise the current and novel non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis, both blood and imaging based, and look at their prospective application in everyday clinical care. PMID:27378924

  1. Non invasive indexes for the assessment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Handberg, Aase; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects about 20%-30% of the general population, and its clinical relevance arises from the fact that 20%-30% of these subjects develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition at risk of cirrhosis progression. In addition NAFLD, and in particular NASH patients, are also at high risk of cardiovascular alterations, suffering overall from an increased liver and no liver-related events of risk and death. At the moment liver biopsy is the gold standard for a correct evaluation of NASH and fibrosis among NAFLD patients. However, the high and increasing prevalence of NAFLD has triggered an intensive search for alternative and non-invasive methods for evaluating disease severity. Specifically we can distinguish two main groups of non-invasive methodologies, namely 'serum markers' that use clinical and/or biochemical variables, and methodologies derived from elaboration of parameters arising from liver imaging techniques. All these tools showed encouraging results, even though their utility in clinical practice in the individual patients is still under debate. Therefore further efforts are needed in order to generate non-invasive algorithms that correctly assess liver damage in NAFLD patients. In particular, it should be interesting to perform gender-specific analysis, by combining old and new tools, with the aim to generate more accurate scores. Finally we think that non-invasive scores should not only be able to correctly classify the severity of liver disease in NAFLD patients, but also predict liver and non-liver related morbidity and mortality, further acting as time-dependent markers of liver and systemic disease activity. This review summarizes the present knowledge on noninvasive diagnosis in NAFLD patients, and suggest future directions for this complex research area. PMID:23394090

  2. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment.

  3. Non-invasive, non-radiological quantification of anteroposterior knee joint ligamentous laxity

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D. F.; Deakin, A. H.; Fogg, Q. A.; Picard, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We performed in vitro validation of a non-invasive skin-mounted system that could allow quantification of anteroposterior (AP) laxity in the outpatient setting. Methods A total of 12 cadaveric lower limbs were tested with a commercial image-free navigation system using trackers secured by bone screws. We then tested a non-invasive fabric-strap system. The lower limb was secured at 10° intervals from 0° to 60° of knee flexion and 100 N of force was applied perpendicular to the tibia. Acceptable coefficient of repeatability (CR) and limits of agreement (LOA) of 3 mm were set based on diagnostic criteria for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency. Results Reliability and precision within the individual invasive and non-invasive systems was acceptable throughout the range of flexion tested (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.88, CR 1.6 mm). Agreement between the two systems was acceptable measuring AP laxity between full extension and 40° knee flexion (LOA 2.9 mm). Beyond 40° of flexion, agreement between the systems was unacceptable (LOA > 3 mm). Conclusions These results indicate that from full knee extension to 40° flexion, non-invasive navigation-based quantification of AP tibial translation is as accurate as the standard validated commercial system, particularly in the clinically and functionally important range of 20° to 30° knee flexion. This could be useful in diagnosis and post-operative evaluation of ACL pathology. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:233–7. PMID:24184443

  4. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427

  5. Non-invasive mouse models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, B A; Guilak, F; Lockwood, K A; Olson, S A; Pitsillides, A A; Sandell, L J; Silva, M J; van der Meulen, M C H; Haudenschild, D R

    2015-10-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) are essential tools for investigating the development of the disease on a more rapid timeline than human OA. Mice are particularly useful due to the plethora of genetically modified or inbred mouse strains available. The majority of available mouse models of OA use a joint injury or other acute insult to initiate joint degeneration, representing post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). However, no consensus exists on which injury methods are most translatable to human OA. Currently, surgical injury methods are most commonly used for studies of OA in mice; however, these methods may have confounding effects due to the surgical/invasive injury procedure itself, rather than the targeted joint injury. Non-invasive injury methods avoid this complication by mechanically inducing a joint injury externally, without breaking the skin or disrupting the joint. In this regard, non-invasive injury models may be crucial for investigating early adaptive processes initiated at the time of injury, and may be more representative of human OA in which injury is induced mechanically. A small number of non-invasive mouse models of PTOA have been described within the last few years, including intra-articular fracture of tibial subchondral bone, cyclic tibial compression loading of articular cartilage, and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture via tibial compression overload. This review describes the methods used to induce joint injury in each of these non-invasive models, and presents the findings of studies utilizing these models. Altogether, these non-invasive mouse models represent a unique and important spectrum of animal models for studying different aspects of PTOA. PMID:26003950

  6. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  7. Management of pediatric radiation dose using GE fluoroscopic equipment.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Barry; Boudry, John

    2006-09-01

    In this article, we present GE Healthcare's design philosophy and implementation of X-ray imaging systems with dose management for pediatric patients, as embodied in its current radiography and fluoroscopy and interventional cardiovascular X-ray product offerings. First, we present a basic framework of image quality and dose in the context of a cost-benefit trade-off, with the development of the concept of imaging dose efficiency. A set of key metrics of image quality and dose efficiency is presented, including X-ray source efficiency, detector quantum efficiency (DQE), detector dynamic range, and temporal response, with an explanation of the clinical relevance of each. Second, we present design methods for automatically selecting optimal X-ray technique parameters (kVp, mA, pulse width, and spectral filtration) in real time for various clinical applications. These methods are based on an optimization scheme where patient skin dose is minimized for a target desired image contrast-to-noise ratio. Operator display of skin dose and Dose-Area Product (DAP) is covered, as well. Third, system controls and predefined protocols available to the operator are explained in the context of dose management and the need to meet varying clinical procedure imaging demands. For example, fluoroscopic dose rate is adjustable over a range of 20:1 to adapt to different procedure requirements. Fourth, we discuss the impact of image processing techniques upon dose minimization. In particular, two such techniques, dynamic range compression through adaptive multiband spectral filtering and fluoroscopic noise reduction, are explored in some detail. Fifth, we review a list of system dose-reduction features, including automatic spectral filtration, virtual collimation, variable-rate pulsed fluoroscopic, grid and no-grid techniques, and fluoroscopic loop replay with store. In addition, we describe a new feature that automatically minimizes the patient-to-detector distance, along with an

  8. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  9. The lixiscope: A portable X-ray fluoroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pelt, Bruce; Plevak, Joseph F.

    1986-01-01

    The lixi imaging scope is a portable fluoroscope which is a substantial improvement over the original concept and prototype of the lixiscope invented by NASA . This device has found widespread use in industrial, medical and security screening applications. Users of it have found its small size and high quality real-time image to provide early detection of defects in some cases, save time and money in others, and reduce patient dose and inconvenience in still others. NASA patent 4, 142, 101 July, 1977, Lo I Yin, Lixi, Inc. is the exclusive Licensee of the radioisotope version of the lixiscope.

  10. The investigation of Mitogen-Activated Protein kinase Phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Invasiveness and metastasis are the most common characteristics of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and causes of tumour-related morbidity and mortality. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signalling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in tumorigenesis. However, the precise pathological role(s) of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in different cancers has been controversial such that the up-regulation of MKP-1 in different cancers does not always correlate to a better prognosis. In this study, we showed that the induction of MKP-1 lead to a significant retardation of proliferation and metastasis in NSCLC cells. We also established that rosiglitazone (a PPARγ agonist) elevated MKP-1 expression level in NSCLC cells and inhibited tumour metastasis. Methods Both wildtype and dominant negative forms of MKP-1 were constitutively expressed in NSCLC cell line H441GL. The migration and invasion abilities of these cells were examined in vitro. MKP-1 modulating agents such as rosiglitazone and triptolide were used to demonstrate MKP-1's role in tumorigenesis. Bioluminescent imaging was utilized to study tumorigenesis of MKP-1 over-expressing H441GL cells and anti-metastatic effect of rosiglitazone. Results Over-expression of MKP-1 reduced NSCLC cell proliferation rate as well as cell invasive and migratory abilities, evident by the reduced expression levels of MMP-2 and CXCR4. Mice inoculated with MKP-1 over-expressing H441 cells did not develop NSCLC while their control wildtype H441 inoculated littermates developed NSCLC and bone metastasis. Pharmacologically, rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist appeared to induce MKP-1 expression while reduce MMP-2 and CXCR4 expression. H441GL-inoculated mice receiving daily oral rosiglitazone treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of bone metastasis when compared to mice receiving sham treatment. We found that rosiglitazone treatment

  11. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  12. Non-invasive microsensors for studying cell/tissue physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Taguchi, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Burrs, S.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive tools that allow real-time quantification of molecules relevant to metabolism, homeostasis, and cell signaling in cells and tissue are of great importance for studying physiology. Several microsensor technologies have been developed to monitor concentration of molecules such as ions, oxygen, electroactive molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide), and biomolecules (e.g., sugars, hormones). The major challenges for microsensors are overcoming relatively low sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio. Modern approaches for enhancing microsensor performance focus on the incorporation of catalytic nanomaterials to increase sensitivity, reduce response time, and increase operating range. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, a non-invasive microsensor modality called self-referencing (SR) is being applied. The SR technique allows measurement of temporal and spatial transport dynamics at the cell, tissue, organ, and organismal level.

  13. How to reduce invasiveness in non-invasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chiandotto, Valeria

    2012-10-01

    Non invasive ventilation plays a key role in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) activity and several instruments have recently been developed that are designed to maintain positive pressure in order to improve functional residual capacity of the lung. However, devices used to provide non-invasive respiratory assistance are frequently a cause of discomfort when applied to a fragile neonate. Indeed, they are applied for lengthy periods in low birth weight (VLBW) infants. In addition to these side effects we have to consider several other stressful events. In our opinion, reducing invasiveness in the NICU is a process where the main steps are recognizing a need for the organization of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with respect for the rhythm of the newborn, recognizing the fragility of preterm newborns and their brain plasticity, improving environmental standards in both structural terms and staff behaviour, and promoting the active role of parents in supporting the development of the newborn.

  14. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  15. Non invasive ventilation as an additional tool for exercise training.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Nicolino; Cigni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of non invasive ventilation (NIV) to increase exercise capacity. In individuals with COPD, NIV during exercise reduces dyspnoea and increases exercise tolerance. Different modalities of mechanical ventilation have been used non-invasively as a tool to increase exercise tolerance in COPD, heart failure and lung and thoracic restrictive diseases. Inspiratory support provides symptomatic benefit by unloading the ventilatory muscles, whereas Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) counterbalances the intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure in COPD patients. Severe stable COPD patients undergoing home nocturnal NIV and daytime exercise training showed some benefits. Furthermore, it has been reported that in chronic hypercapnic COPD under long-term ventilatory support, NIV can also be administered during walking. Despite these results, the role of NIV as a routine component of pulmonary rehabilitation is still to be defined. PMID:25874110

  16. SQUID magnetometry applied as non-invasive electroanalytic chemical technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, B.D.; MacVicar, M.L.A. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on a SQUID magnetometer, employed as a highly sensitive ammeter, used to perform standard electroanalytic chemical measurements non- invasively. Specifically, the magnetic fields generated by the net ionic movement in the solution of a driven electrochemical system is detected by the gradiometer coils. The SQUID signal can then be compared to conventional current measurements. One such standard measurement investigated is Cyclic Voltametry (CV) which determines the I-V characteristics of an electrochemical system yielding critical kinetic parameters.

  17. Non-invasive, investigative methods in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Longo, C; Ciardo, S; Pellacani, G

    2015-12-01

    A precise and noninvasive quantification of aging is of outmost importance for in vivo assessment of the skin aging "stage", and thus acts to minimize it. Several bioengineering methods have been proposed to objectively, precisely, and non-invasively measure skin aging, and to detect early skin damage, that is sub-clinically observable. In this review we have described the most relevant methods that have emerged from recently introduced technologies, aiming at quantitatively assessing the effects of aging on the skin.

  18. Deconstructing autofluorescence: non-invasive detection and monitoring of biochemistry in cells and tissues (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldys, Ewa M.; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Cassano, Juan C.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Pernichery, Sandeep M.; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol; Sutton-Mcdowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.

    2016-03-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous fluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from imaging of native fluorescence has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Multispectral intrinsic fluorescence imaging was applied to patient olfactory neurosphere-derived cells, cell model of a human metabolic disease MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like syndrome). By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations have been detected between living cells in their full morphological context which made it possible to distinguish healthy from diseased cells before and after therapy. Cellular maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant cell subpopulations, in particular a subpopulation with compromised mitochondrial function. The versatility of our method is further illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent.

  19. Non-invasive and in vivo assessment of osteoarthritic articular cartilage: a review on MRI investigations.

    PubMed

    Hani, Ahmad Fadzil Mohd; Kumar, Dileep; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ahmad, Raja Mohd Kamil Raja; Razak, Ruslan; Kiflie, Azman

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is of great interest to orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, radiologists, and researchers because it would allow physicians to provide patients with treatments and advice to slow the onset or progression of the disease. Early detection can be achieved by identifying early changes in selected features of degenerative articular cartilage (AC) using non-invasive imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the standard for assessment of OA. The aim of this paper was to review the influence of MRI on the selection, detection, and measurement of AC features associated with early OA. Our review of the literature indicates that the changes associated with early OA are in cartilage thickness, cartilage volume, cartilage water content, and proteoglycan content that can be accurately, consistently, and non-invasively measured using MRI. Choosing an MR pulse sequence that provides the capability to assess cartilage physiology and morphology in a single acquisition and advanced multi-nuclei MRI is desirable. The results of the review indicate that using an ultra-high magnetic strength, MR imager does not affect early OA detection. In conclusion, MRI is currently the most suitable modality for early detection of knee OA, and future research should focus on the quantitative evaluation of early OA features using advances in MR hardware, software, and data processing with sophisticated image/pattern recognition techniques.

  20. The challenge to detect heart transplant rejection and transplant vasculopathy non-invasively - a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Engin; Burgstahler, Christof; Aebert, Hermann; Schroeder, Stephen; Helber, Uwe; Kopp, Andreas F; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft rejection and vasculopathy are the main factors limiting long-term survival after heart transplantation. In this pilot study we investigated whether non-invasive methods are beneficial to detect cardiac allograft rejection (Grade 0-3 R) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Thus we compared multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with invasive methods like coronary angiography and left endomyocardial biopsy. Methods 10 asymptomatic long-term survivors after heart transplantation (8 male, 2 female, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years, 73 ± 11 months after transplantation) were included. In a blinded fashion, coronary angiography and multi-slice computed tomography and ventricular endomyocardial biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging were compared against each other. Results Cardiac allograft vasculopathy and atherosclerosis were correctly detected by multi-slice computed tomography and coronary angiography with positive correlation (r = 1). Late contrast enchancement found by magnetic resonance imaging correlated positively (r = 0.92, r2 = 0.85, p < 0.05) with the histological diagnosis of transplant rejection revealed by myocardial biopsy. None of the examined endomyocardial specimen revealed cardiac allograft rejection greater than Grade 1 R. Conclusion A combined non-invasive approach using multi-slice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may help to assess cardiac allograft vasculopathy and cardiac allograft rejection after heart transplantation before applying more invasive methods. PMID:19682394

  1. [Amyotrophic neuralgia associated with bilateral phrenic paralysis treated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    García García, María Del Carmen; Hernández Borge, Jacinto; Antona Rodríguez, María José; Pires Gonçalves, Pedro; García García, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic neuralgia is an uncommon neuropathy characterized by severe unilateral shoulder pain. Isolated or concomitant involvement of other peripheral motor nerves depending on the brachial plexus such as phrenic or laryngeal nerves is unusual(1). Its etiology is unknown, yet several explanatory factors have been proposed. Phrenic nerve involvement, either unilateral or bilateral, is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis relies on anamnesis, functional and imaging investigations and electromyogram. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a past history of renal transplantation due to proliferative glomerulonephritis with subsequent transplant rejection, who was eventually diagnosed with amyotrophic neuralgia with bilateral phrenic involvement, and who required sustained non-invasive mechanical ventilation.

  2. Multiphoton excited hemoglobin fluorescence and third harmonic generation for non-invasive microscopy of stored blood

    PubMed Central

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Glenn, Rachel; Murashova, Gabrielle A.; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy usually appear as dark disks because of their low fluorescent signal. Here we use 15fs 800nm pulses for TPEF, 45fs 1060nm pulses for three-photon excited fluorescence, and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging. We find sufficient fluorescent signal that we attribute to hemoglobin fluorescence after comparing time and wavelength resolved spectra of other expected RBC endogenous fluorophores: NADH, FAD, biliverdin, and bilirubin. We find that both TPEF and THG microscopy can be used to examine erythrocyte morphology non-invasively without breaching a blood storage bag. PMID:27699111

  3. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here.

  4. Multiphoton excited hemoglobin fluorescence and third harmonic generation for non-invasive microscopy of stored blood

    PubMed Central

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Glenn, Rachel; Murashova, Gabrielle A.; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy usually appear as dark disks because of their low fluorescent signal. Here we use 15fs 800nm pulses for TPEF, 45fs 1060nm pulses for three-photon excited fluorescence, and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging. We find sufficient fluorescent signal that we attribute to hemoglobin fluorescence after comparing time and wavelength resolved spectra of other expected RBC endogenous fluorophores: NADH, FAD, biliverdin, and bilirubin. We find that both TPEF and THG microscopy can be used to examine erythrocyte morphology non-invasively without breaching a blood storage bag.

  5. Understanding and using fluoroscopic dose display information.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Brent D; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Chason, David P; Anderson, Jon A

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopically guided procedures are an area of radiology in which radiation exposure to the patient is highly operator dependent. Modern fluoroscopy machines display a variety of information, including technique factors, field of view, operating geometry, exposure mode, fluoroscopic time, air kerma at the reference point (RAK), and air kerma area-product. However, the presentation of this information is highly vendor specific, and many users are unaware of how to interpret this information and use it to perform a study with the minimum necessary dose. A conceptual framework for understanding the radiation dose readout during a procedure is to compare it to the dashboard of an automobile, where the rate at which radiation is being applied (the RAK rate [mGy/min]) is the dose "speed" and the cumulative amount of radiation applied (cumulative RAK [mGy]) is the dose "odometer." This analogy can be used as a starting point to improve knowledge of these parameters, including how RAK is measured, how RAK correlates with skin dose, and how parameters are displayed differently during fluoroscopy and fluorography. Awareness of these factors is critical to understanding how dose parameters translate to patient risk and the consequences of high-dose studies. With this increased awareness, physicians performing fluoroscopically guided procedures can understand how to use built-in features of the fluoroscopic equipment (pulse rate, beam filtration, and automatic exposure control) and fluoroscopic techniques (procedure planning, patient positioning, proper collimation, and magnification) to reduce patient radiation dose, thereby improving patient safety. PMID:25442356

  6. Automatic detection of multiple and overlapping EP catheters in fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Milletari, Fausto; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to perform automatic detection of electrophysiology (EP) catheters in fluoroscopic sequences. Our approach does not need any initialization, is completely automatic, and can detect an arbitrary number of catheters at the same time. The method is based on the usage of blob detectors and clustering in order to detect all catheter electrodes, overlapping or not, within the X-ray images. The proposed technique is validated on 1422 fluoroscopic images yielding a tip detection rate of 99.3% and mean distance of 0.5mm from manually labeled ground truth centroids for all electrodes. PMID:24505783

  7. Non-invasive measurements of tissue hemodynamics with hybrid diffuse optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durduran, Turgut

    Diffuse optical techniques were used to measure hemodynamics of tissues non-invasively. Spectroscopy and tomography of the brain, muscle and implanted tumors were carried out in animal models and humans. Two qualitatively different methods, diffuse optical tomography and diffuse correlation tomography, were hybridized permitting simultaneous measurement of total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation and blood flow. This combination of information was processed further to derive estimates of oxygen metabolism (e.g. CMRO 2) in tissue. The diffuse correlation measurements of blood flow were demonstrated in human tissues, for the first time, demonstrating continous, non-invasive imaging of oxygen metabolism in large tissue volumes several centimeters below the tissue surface. The bulk of these investigations focussed on cerebral hemodynamics. Extensive validation of this methodology was carried out in in vivo rat brain models. Three dimensional images of deep tissue hemodynamics in middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression (CSD) were obtained. CSD hemodynamics were found to depend strongly on partial pressure of carbon dioxide. The technique was then adapted for measurement of human brain. All optical spectroscopic measurements of CMRO2 during functional activation were obtained through intact human skull non-invasively. Finally, a high spatio-temporal resolution measurement of cerebral blood flow due to somatosensory cortex activation following electrical forepaw stimulation in rats was carried out with laser speckle flowmetry. New analysis methods were introduced for laser speckle flowmetry. In other organs, deep tissue hemodynamics were measured on human calf muscle during exercise and cuff-ischemia and were shown to have some clinical utility for peripheral vascular disease. In mice tumor models, the measured hemodynamics were shown to be predictive of photodynamic therapy efficacy, again suggesting promise of clinical utility

  8. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  9. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  10. Quantitative non-invasive cell characterisation and discrimination based on multispectral autofluorescence features

    PubMed Central

    Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mahbub, Saabah B.; Menon Perinchery, Sandeep; Inglis, David W.; Adhikary, Partho P.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Cahill, Michael A.; Saad, Sonia; Pollock, Carol A.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-01-01

    Automated and unbiased methods of non-invasive cell monitoring able to deal with complex biological heterogeneity are fundamentally important for biology and medicine. Label-free cell imaging provides information about endogenous autofluorescent metabolites, enzymes and cofactors in cells. However extracting high content information from autofluorescence imaging has been hitherto impossible. Here, we quantitatively characterise cell populations in different tissue types, live or fixed, by using novel image processing and a simple multispectral upgrade of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Our optimal discrimination approach enables statistical hypothesis testing and intuitive visualisations where previously undetectable differences become clearly apparent. Label-free classifications are validated by the analysis of Classification Determinant (CD) antigen expression. The versatility of our method is illustrated by detecting genetic mutations in cancer, non-invasive monitoring of CD90 expression, label-free tracking of stem cell differentiation, identifying stem cell subpopulations with varying functional characteristics, tissue diagnostics in diabetes, and assessing the condition of preimplantation embryos. PMID:27029742

  11. NOTE: A feasibility study of markerless fluoroscopic gating for lung cancer radiotherapy using 4DCT templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    A major difficulty in conformal lung cancer radiotherapy is respiratory organ motion, which may cause clinically significant targeting errors. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy allows for more precise delivery of prescribed radiation dose to the tumor, while minimizing normal tissue complications. Gating based on external surrogates is limited by its lack of accuracy, while gating based on implanted fiducial markers is limited primarily by the risk of pneumothorax due to marker implantation. Techniques for fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers (markerless gating) have been developed. These techniques usually require a training fluoroscopic image dataset with marked tumor positions in the images, which limits their clinical implementation. To remove this requirement, this study presents a markerless fluoroscopic gating algorithm based on 4DCT templates. To generate gating signals, we explored the application of three similarity measures or scores between fluoroscopic images and the reference 4DCT template: un-normalized cross-correlation (CC), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI), as well as average intensity (AI) of the region of interest (ROI) in the fluoroscopic images. Performance was evaluated using fluoroscopic and 4DCT data from three lung cancer patients. On average, gating based on CC achieves the highest treatment accuracy given the same efficiency, with a high target coverage (average between 91.9% and 98.6%) for a wide range of nominal duty cycles (20-50%). AI works well for two patients out of three, but failed for the third patient due to interference from the heart. Gating based on NCC and NMI usually failed below 50% nominal duty cycle. Based on this preliminary study with three patients, we found that the proposed CC-based gating algorithm can generate accurate and robust gating signals when using 4DCT reference template. However, this observation is based on results obtained from a very limited

  12. Non-Invasive Detection of Early Retinal Neuronal Degeneration by Ultrahigh Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, Debbie; Kajić, Vedran; Rey, Sara; Erchova, Irina; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Powell, Kate A.; Marshall, David; Rosin, Paul L.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Morgan, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionises the diagnosis of retinal disease based on the detection of microscopic rather than subcellular changes in retinal anatomy. However, currently the technique is limited to the detection of microscopic rather than subcellular changes in retinal anatomy. However, coherence based imaging is extremely sensitive to both changes in optical contrast and cellular events at the micrometer scale, and can generate subtle changes in the spectral content of the OCT image. Here we test the hypothesis that OCT image speckle (image texture) contains information regarding otherwise unresolvable features such as organelle changes arising in the early stages of neuronal degeneration. Using ultrahigh resolution (UHR) OCT imaging at 800 nm (spectral width 140 nm) we developed a robust method of OCT image analyses, based on spatial wavelet and texture-based parameterisation of the image speckle pattern. For the first time we show that this approach allows the non-invasive detection and quantification of early apoptotic changes in neurons within 30 min of neuronal trauma sufficient to result in apoptosis. We show a positive correlation between immunofluorescent labelling of mitochondria (a potential source of changes in cellular optical contrast) with changes in the texture of the OCT images of cultured neurons. Moreover, similar changes in optical contrast were also seen in the retinal ganglion cell- inner plexiform layer in retinal explants following optic nerve transection. The optical clarity of the explants was maintained throughout in the absence of histologically detectable change. Our data suggest that UHR OCT can be used for the non-invasive quantitative assessment of neuronal health, with a particular application to the assessment of early retinal disease. PMID:24776961

  13. Instrumentation for Non-Invasive Assessment of Cardiovascular Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    It is critically important to be able to assess alterations in cardiovascular regulation during and after space flight. We propose to develop an instrument for the non-invasive assessment of such alterations that can be used on the ground and potentially during space flight. This instrumentation would be used by the Cardiovascular Alterations Team at multiple sites for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system and the evaluation of countermeasures. In particular, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team will use this instrumentation in conjunction with ground-based human bed-rest studies and during application of acute stresses e.g., tilt, lower body negative pressure, and exercise. In future studies, the Cardiovascular Alterations Team anticipates using this instrumentation to study astronauts before and after space flight and ultimately, during space flight. The instrumentation may also be used by the Bone Demineralization/Calcium Metabolism Team, the Neurovestibular Team and the Human Performance Factors, Sleep and Chronobiology Team to measure changes in autonomic nervous function. The instrumentation will be based on a powerful new technology - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - which has been developed in our laboratory. CSI provides a non-invasive approach for the study of alterations in cardiovascular regulation. This approach involves the analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in physiologic signals such as heart rate and non-invasively measured arterial blood pressure in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of multiple physiologic mechanisms, CSI provides a closed-loop model of the cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject.

  14. Three-dimensional curvilinear device reconstruction from two fluoroscopic views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Charlotte; Berger, Marie-Odile; Kerrien, Erwan; Riddell, Cyril; Trousset, Yves; Anxionnat, René; Bracard, Serge

    2015-03-01

    In interventional radiology, navigating devices under the sole guidance of fluoroscopic images inside a complex architecture of tortuous and narrow vessels like the cerebral vascular tree is a difficult task. Visualizing the device in 3D could facilitate this navigation. For curvilinear devices such as guide-wires and catheters, a 3D reconstruction may be achieved using two simultaneous fluoroscopic views, as available on a biplane acquisition system. The purpose of this paper is to present a new automatic three-dimensional curve reconstruction method that has the potential to reconstruct complex 3D curves and does not require a perfect segmentation of the endovascular device. Using epipolar geometry, our algorithm translates the point correspondence problem into a segment correspondence problem. Candidate 3D curves can be formed and evaluated independently after identifying all possible combinations of compatible 3D segments. Correspondence is then inherently solved by looking in 3D space for the most coherent curve in terms of continuity and curvature. This problem can be cast into a graph problem where the most coherent curve corresponds to the shortest path of a weighted graph. We present quantitative results of curve reconstructions performed from numerically simulated projections of tortuous 3D curves extracted from cerebral vascular trees affected with brain arteriovenous malformations as well as fluoroscopic image pairs of a guide-wire from both phantom and clinical sets. Our method was able to select the correct 3D segments in 97.5% of simulated cases thus demonstrating its ability to handle complex 3D curves and can deal with imperfect 2D segmentation.

  15. Towards a smart non-invasive fluid loss measurement system.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, N K; Mukhopadhyay, S C; Barrack, L

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a smart wireless sensing non-invasive system for estimating the amount of fluid loss, a person experiences while physical activity is presented. The system measures three external body parameters, Heart Rate, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR, or skin conductance), and Skin Temperature. These three parameters are entered into an empirically derived formula along with the user's body mass index, and estimation for the amount of fluid lost is determined. The core benefit of the developed system is the affluence usage in combining with smart home monitoring systems to care elderly people in ambient assisted living environments as well in automobiles to monitor the body parameters of a motorist.

  16. A Reporting System for Non-Invasive Cardiovascular Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Covvey, H.D.; Van Horik, M.; Hum, J.; Sole, M.J.; Schwartz, L.; Rakowski, H.; Wigle, E.D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer-based system has been developed to support the collection, reporting and storage of data acquired during non-invasive cardiac investigations. Currently the system serves 1-D echocardiography and graded exercise testing. Optical mark forms are used to record information in computer-readable form. A terminal station consisting of a CRT terminal, an optical mark reader and a printer is used for input and output from a central minicomputer database management system. Even when the costs associated with database storage are included, the overall cost of the system compares favorably with the option of using typists to produce reports.

  17. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G.; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B.; Oldham, Helen M.; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 and 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with exception of IOS (81.8%–18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including > 95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38–44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory volume total (72.8 ± 6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5 ± 16.5 Degrees), %Rib Cage (41.6 ± 12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in one second/forced expiratory volume total (110.0 ± 3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs

  18. Non-invasive pulmonary function test on Morquio patients.

    PubMed

    Kubaski, Francyne; Tomatsu, Shunji; Patel, Pravin; Shimada, Tsutomu; Xie, Li; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert; Mackenzie, William G; Theroux, Mary; Bober, Michael B; Oldham, Helen M; Orii, Tadao; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2015-08-01

    In clinical practice, respiratory function tests are difficult to perform in Morquio syndrome patients due to their characteristic skeletal dysplasia, small body size and lack of cooperation of young patients, where in some cases, conventional spirometry for pulmonary function is too challenging. To establish feasible clinical pulmonary endpoints and determine whether age impacts lung function in Morquio patients non-invasive pulmonary tests and conventional spirometry were evaluated. The non-invasive pulmonary tests: impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography in conjunction with conventional spirometry were evaluated in twenty-two Morquio patients (18 Morquio A and 4 Morquio B) (7 males), ranging from 3 to 40 years of age. Twenty-two patients were compliant with non-invasive tests (100%) with the exception of IOS (81.8%-18 patients). Seventeen patients (77.3%) were compliant with spirometry testing. All subjects had normal vital signs at rest including >95% oxygen saturation, end tidal CO2 (38-44 mmHg), and age-appropriate heart rate (mean=98.3, standard deviation=19) (two patients were deviated). All patients preserved normal values in the impulse oscillometry system, pneumotachography, and respiratory inductance plethysmography, although predicted forced expiratory total (72.8±6.9 SE%) decreased with age and was below normal; phase angle (35.5±16.5°), %rib cage (41.6±12.7%), resonant frequency, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced expiratory volume total (110.0±3.2 SE%) were normal and not significantly impacted by age. The proposed non-invasive pulmonary function tests are able to cover a greater number of patients (young patients and/or wheel-chair bound), thus providing a new diagnostic approach for the assessment of lung function in Morquio syndrome which in many cases may be difficult to evaluate. Morquio patients studied herein demonstrated no clinical or functional signs of restrictive and

  19. Non-invasive techniques for determining musculoskeleton body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma spectrometry, has ushered in a new era of clinical diagnosis and evaluation of therapies, as well as investigation into and modelling of body composition in both normal individuals and patients suffering from various diseases and dysfunctions. Body composition studies have provided baseline data on such vital constituents as nitrogen, potassium and calcium. The non-invasive measurement techniques are particularly suitable for study of the musculo-skeletal changes in body composition. Of particular relevance here is the measurement of calcium loss in astronauts during prolonged space flights.

  20. Chromatibody, a novel non-invasive molecular tool to explore and manipulate chromatin in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Denis; Vignard, Julien; Fedor, Yoann; Béry, Nicolas; Olichon, Aurélien; Crozatier, Michèle; Erard, Monique; Cassard, Hervé; Ducommun, Bernard; Salles, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin function is involved in many cellular processes, its visualization or modification being essential in many developmental or cellular studies. Here, we present the characterization of chromatibody, a chromatin-binding single-domain, and explore its use in living cells. This non-intercalating tool specifically binds the heterodimer of H2A–H2B histones and displays a versatile reactivity, specifically labeling chromatin from yeast to mammals. We show that this genetically encoded probe, when fused to fluorescent proteins, allows non-invasive real-time chromatin imaging. Chromatibody is a dynamic chromatin probe that can be modulated. Finally, chromatibody is an efficient tool to target an enzymatic activity to the nucleosome, such as the DNA damage-dependent H2A ubiquitylation, which can modify this epigenetic mark at the scale of the genome and result in DNA damage signaling and repair defects. Taken together, these results identify chromatibody as a universal non-invasive tool for either in vivo chromatin imaging or to manipulate the chromatin landscape. PMID:27206857

  1. Non-invasive health status detection system using Gabor filters based on facial block texture features.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ting; Zhang, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Blood tests allow doctors to check for certain diseases and conditions. However, using a syringe to extract the blood can be deemed invasive, slightly painful, and its analysis time consuming. In this paper, we propose a new non-invasive system to detect the health status (Healthy or Diseased) of an individual based on facial block texture features extracted using the Gabor filter. Our system first uses a non-invasive capture device to collect facial images. Next, four facial blocks are located on these images to represent them. Afterwards, each facial block is convolved with a Gabor filter bank to calculate its texture value. Classification is finally performed using K-Nearest Neighbor and Support Vector Machines via a Library for Support Vector Machines (with four kernel functions). The system was tested on a dataset consisting of 100 Healthy and 100 Diseased (with 13 forms of illnesses) samples. Experimental results show that the proposed system can detect the health status with an accuracy of 93 %, a sensitivity of 94 %, a specificity of 92 %, using a combination of the Gabor filters and facial blocks. PMID:25722202

  2. Non-invasive detection of fatty liver in dairy cows by digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Gerd; Amin, Viren R; Hippen, Arnold R; She, Pengxiang; Young, Jerry W; Beitz, Donald C

    2008-02-01

    During early lactation, many dairy cows develop fatty liver, which is associated with decreased health and reproductive performance. Currently, fatty liver can be detected reliably only by using liver biopsy followed by chemical or histological analysis, which is not practical in most on-farm situations. We tested whether digital analyses of hepatic ultrasonograms can be used to detect non-invasively fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content. A total of 49 liver biopsies and ultrasonograms were taken from 29 dairy cows within 2 weeks postpartum. The usefulness of 17 first- or second-order parameters from digital analysis of B-mode ultrasonograms were evaluated by discriminant, correlation, and regression analyses. A group of linear combinations of the 17 parameters correctly classified 40 of 49 samples into normal liver as well as mild, moderate and severe fatty liver when cut-off values were 1%, 5% and 10% and correctly classified 45 of 49 samples when cut-off values were 5% and 10% triacylglycerol of wet weight. A linear combination of 16 image parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of 38 of the 39 liver samples below the cut-off value of 10% within 2.5% of liver wet weight, and a linear combination of 3 parameters estimated triacylglycerol concentrations of the 10 liver samples above the cut-off value of 10% within 2% of liver wet weight. Therefore, ultrasound imaging followed by digital analysis of sonograms has potential to non-invasively detect fatty liver and estimate liver triacylglycerol content.

  3. A new quantitative method for the non-invasive documentation of morphological damage in paintings using RTI surface normals.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Marcello; Bearman, Greg; Williamson, Greg; Kronkright, Dale; Doehne, Eric; Jacobs, Megan; Marengo, Emilio

    2014-07-09

    In this paper we propose a reliable surface imaging method for the non-invasive detection of morphological changes in paintings. Usually, the evaluation and quantification of changes and defects results mostly from an optical and subjective assessment, through the comparison of the previous and subsequent state of conservation and by means of condition reports. Using quantitative Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) we obtain detailed information on the geometry and morphology of the painting surface with a fast, precise and non-invasive method. Accurate and quantitative measurements of deterioration were acquired after the painting experienced artificial damage. Morphological changes were documented using normal vector images while the intensity map succeeded in highlighting, quantifying and describing the physical changes. We estimate that the technique can detect a morphological damage slightly smaller than 0.3 mm, which would be difficult to detect with the eye, considering the painting size. This non-invasive tool could be very useful, for example, to examine paintings and artwork before they travel on loan or during a restoration. The method lends itself to automated analysis of large images and datasets. Quantitative RTI thus eases the transition of extending human vision into the realm of measuring change over time.

  4. Examination of postmortem retinal folds: A non-invasive study.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Toru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-02-01

    The postmortem retinal fold has been previously documented, but its mechanism of formation is not known. All previous studies of the fold involved invasive techniques and the postmortem ocular fundus has yet to be non-invasively examined. Our study used the non-invasive techniques of monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy and ocular echography to examine 79 postmortem eyes of 42 bodies. We examined whether the postmortem retinal fold was associated with postmortem time, position, and/or age. Age was significantly associated with postmortem retinal fold formation (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.013), which led us to examine the effect of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on retinal folds. The absence of a PVD was statistically associated with the presence of a retinal fold (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Interestingly, the presence of a PVD was also significantly correlated with retinal fold height (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal folds result from postmortem vitreoretinal traction caused by eyeball flaccidity. We also believe that the loss of retinochoroidal hydrostatic pressure plays a role. It is important that forensic pathologists not confuse a postmortem retinal fold with traumatic retinal detachment or perimacular retinal folds caused by child abuse. When child abuse is suspected, forensic pathologists should perform enucleation and a subsequent histological examination for confirmation. PMID:25623189

  5. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  6. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    PubMed

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace.

  7. New Jersey's Thomas Edison and the fluoroscope.

    PubMed

    Tselos, G D

    1995-11-01

    Thomas Edison played a major role in the development of early x-ray technology in 1896, notably increasing tube power and reliability and making the fluoroscope a practical instrument. Eventually, Edison would move x-ray technology from the laboratory to the marketplace. PMID:8570105

  8. A physical comparison of a fluoroscopic CAT system and the EMI head scanner. [Computerized Axial Tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the capabilities to produce computerized tomograms was made between the EMI head scanner and reconstructions from images provided by a large screen low light level-TV camera fluoroscopic system. A phantom made from lucite containing rods of various materials and sizes was used. The computer printout of each was analyzed and a correlation of 0.8 was noted between the results of both systems. The differential attenuation detectability of the fluoroscopic system was found to be comparable to or better than the EMI unit. As expected from a consideration of the quantum statistics for each system, the noise in the obtained reconstructions was also comparable. It is concluded that such a fluoroscopic system performs favorably when compared to the presently available commercial systems.

  9. Inferring 3D kinematics of carpal bones from single view fluoroscopic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Graham, Jim; Hutchinson, Charles; Muir, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel framework for inferring 3D carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes from a single view fluoroscopic sequence. A hybrid statistical model representing both the kinematics and shape variation of the carpal bones is built, based on a number of 3D CT data sets obtained from different subjects at different poses. Given a fluoroscopic sequence, the wrist pose, carpal bone kinematics and bone shapes are estimated iteratively by matching the statistical model with the 2D images. A specially designed cost function enables smoothed parameter estimation across frames. We have evaluated the proposed method on both simulated data and real fluoroscopic sequences. It was found that the relative positions between carpal bones can be accurately estimated, which is potentially useful for detection of conditions such as scapholunate dissociation.

  10. Intrapelvic obturator internus muscle injections: a novel fluoroscopic technique.

    PubMed

    Valovska, Assia; Zaccagnino, Michael P; Weaver, Michael J; Valovski, Ivan; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The obturator internus (OI) muscle is important in adult chronic noninfectious pelvic, perineal, gluteal, and retrotrochanteric pain syndromes. Evaluation and management of these patients' pain can be challenging because of the complex anatomy of this region, broad differential diagnosis, and lack of specific physical examination findings. Consequently, several clinicians have advocated the use of image guided injections to assist in the accurate diagnosis of OI-related symptoms and provide symptomatic relief to affected patients. We present 2 case series describing a novel fluoroscopically guided contrast controlled transpectineal approach to intrapelvic OI injections. Unlike prior fluoroscopically guided OI injection techniques, the approach described in the present 2 cases utilized multiple standard pelvic views, thus facilitating optimal needle positioning in three-dimensional space. This technique utilized standard fluoroscopic pelvic views to accurately measure needle depth within the pelvic cavity permitting the bulk of the OI to be injected in a controlled and safe fashion. The first patient underwent a left intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog pain scale scores were 5 out of 10 and 2 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 75% pain reduction. The second patient underwent a right intrapelvic OI muscle injection with bupivacaine 0.25% and 40 mg methylprednisolone. The average pre- and postprocedural visual analog scale scores were 8 out of 10 and 1 out of 10, respectively, with a self-reported 90% pain reduction. Larger scale studies should be undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and generalized accuracy of this technique.

  11. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  12. Non-invasive Investigations of Paintings by Portable Instrumentation: The MOLAB Experience.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, B; Miliani, C; Rosi, F; Doherty, B; Monico, L; Romani, A; Sgamellotti, A

    2016-02-01

    The in situ non invasive methods have experienced a significant development in the last decade because they meet specific needs of analytical chemistry in the field of cultural heritage where  artworks are rarely moved from their locations, sampling is rarely permitted, and analytes are a wide range of inorganic, organic and organometallic substances in complex and precious matrices. MOLAB, a unique collection of integrated mobile instruments, has greatly contributed to demonstrate that it is now possible to obtain satisfactory results in the study of a variety of heritage objects without sampling or moving them to a laboratory. The current chapter describes an account of these results with particular attention to ancient, modern, and contemporary paintings. Several non-invasive methods by portable equipment, including XRF, mid- and near-FTIR, UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy, as well as XRD, are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of painting materials and execution techniques. Examples of successful applications are given, both for point analyses and hyperspectral imaging approaches. Lines for future perspectives are finally drawn. PMID:27572993

  13. Development of non-invasive method for assessment of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, H; Mano, K; Horinaka, H; Matsunaka, T; Matsumoto, Y; Ida, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Wada, K; Kawada, N

    2016-12-01

    Steatosis is a critical feature of liver disease and is considered to play a pivotal role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as being a surrogate marker of metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-invasive diagnostic method for assessment of liver steatosis. It is well known that ultrasonic velocity depends on materials and temperature. For example, the ultrasonic velocity in water is 1530m/s at 37°C and 1534m/s at 39°C, while that in fat is 1412m/s at 37°C and 1402m/s at 39°C. On this basis, we thought that the percentage of fat in hepatic steatosis could be assessed by detecting changes of ultrasonic in the liver, caused by warming. In order to confirm the effectiveness of this method, we obtained the ultrasonic velocity changes of tissue phantom including lard oil and the liver of living rabbit by ultrasonic warming, and then succeeded in 2-D imaging of ultrasonic velocity changes of the phantom and the liver of living rabbit. We named this the ultrasonic velocity-change method. The experimental results show the possibility that hepatic steatosis could be characterized using our novel, non-invasive method. PMID:27567038

  14. The importance of optical methods for non-invasive measurements in the skin care industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2010-02-01

    Pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries are concerned with treating skin disease, as well as maintaining and promoting skin health. They are dealing with a unique tissue that defines our body in space. As such, skin provides not only the natural boundary with the environment inhibiting body dehydration as well as penetration of exogenous aggressors to the body, it is also ideally situated for optical measurements. A plurality of spectroscopic and imaging methods is being used to understand skin physiology and pathology and document the effects of topically applied products on the skin. The obvious advantage of such methods over traditional biopsy techniques is the ability to measure the cutaneous tissue in vivo and non-invasively. In this work, we will review such applications of various spectroscopy and imaging methods in skin research that is of interest the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry. Examples will be given on the importance of optical techniques in acquiring new insights about acne pathogenesis and infant skin development.

  15. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogou, Sotiria; Lucian, Andrei; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-11-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near-infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the micro-structure and light scattering properties of the substrate, while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty-six nineteenth-century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to examine to what extent the non-invasive analysis techniques employed complement each other and how much useful information about the paintings can be extracted to address art conservation and history questions. A micro-destructive technique of micro-fade spectrometry was used to assess the vulnerability of the paintings to light exposure. Most of the paint and paper substrates were found to be more stable than ISO Blue Wool 3. The palette was found to be composed of mostly traditional Chinese pigments. While the synthetic pigment, Prussian blue, made in Europe, was found on some of the paintings, none was found on the RHS paintings accurately recorded as being between 1817 and 1831 even though it is known that Prussian blue was imported to China during this period. The scale insect dyes, lac and cochineal, were detected on nearly every painting including those that fall within the identified date range. Cochineal is known to have

  16. Non-Invasive Detection of Anaemia Using Digital Photographs of the Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Collings, Shaun; Thompson, Oliver; Hirst, Evan; Goossens, Louise; George, Anup; Weinkove, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Anaemia is a major health burden worldwide. Although the finding of conjunctival pallor on clinical examination is associated with anaemia, inter-observer variability is high, and definitive diagnosis of anaemia requires a blood sample. We aimed to detect anaemia by quantifying conjunctival pallor using digital photographs taken with a consumer camera and a popular smartphone. Our goal was to develop a non-invasive screening test for anaemia. Patients and Methods The conjunctivae of haemato-oncology in- and outpatients were photographed in ambient lighting using a digital camera (Panasonic DMC-LX5), and the internal rear-facing camera of a smartphone (Apple iPhone 5S) alongside an in-frame calibration card. Following image calibration, conjunctival erythema index (EI) was calculated and correlated with laboratory-measured haemoglobin concentration. Three clinicians independently evaluated each image for conjunctival pallor. Results Conjunctival EI was reproducible between images (average coefficient of variation 2.96%). EI of the palpebral conjunctiva correlated more strongly with haemoglobin concentration than that of the forniceal conjunctiva. Using the compact camera, palpebral conjunctival EI had a sensitivity of 93% and 57% and specificity of 78% and 83% for detection of anaemia (haemoglobin < 110 g/L) in training and internal validation sets, respectively. Similar results were found using the iPhone camera, though the EI cut-off value differed. Conjunctival EI analysis compared favourably with clinician assessment, with a higher positive likelihood ratio for prediction of anaemia. Conclusions Erythema index of the palpebral conjunctiva calculated from images taken with a compact camera or mobile phone correlates with haemoglobin and compares favourably to clinician assessment for prediction of anaemia. If confirmed in further series, this technique may be useful for the non-invasive screening for anaemia. PMID:27070544

  17. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    PubMed

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making. PMID:26530119

  18. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  19. Non-invasive distress evaluation in preterm newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, C; Bocchi, L; Orlandi, S; Calisti, M; Spaccaterra, L; Donzelli, G P

    2008-01-01

    With the increased survival of very preterm infants, there is a growing concern for their developmental outcomes. Infant cry characteristics reflect the development and possibly the integrity of the central nervous system. In this paper, relationships between fundamental frequency (F(0)) and vocal tract resonance frequencies (F(1)-F(3)) are investigated for a set of preterm newborns, by means of a multi-purpose voice analysis tool (BioVoice), characterised by high-resolution and tracking capabilities. Also, first results about possible distress occurring during cry in preterm newborn infants, as related to the decrease of central blood oxygenation, are presented. To this aim, a recording system (Newborn Recorder) has been developed, that allows synchronised, non-invasive monitoring of blood oxygenation and audio recordings of newborn infant's cry. The method has been applied to preterm newborns at the Intensive Care Unit, A.Meyer Children Hospital, Firenze, Italy.

  20. Hybrid CARS for Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Pestov, Dmitry; Zhang, Aihua; Murawski, Robert; Sokolov, Alexei; Welch, George; Laane, Jaan; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    We develop a spectroscopy technique that combines the advantages of both the frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the time-resolved CARS. We use broadband preparation pulses to get an instantaneous coherent excitation of multiplex molecular vibration levels and subsequent optically shaped time-delayed narrowband probing pulse to detect these vibrations. This technique can suppress the nonresonant background and retrieve the molecular fingerprint signal efficiently and rapidly. We employ this technique to glucose detection, the final goal of which is accurate, non-invasive (i.e. painless) and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration in the Diabetes diagnosis to replace the current glucose measurement process, which requires painful fingerpricks and therefore cannot be performed more than a few times a day. We have gotten the CARS spectra of glucose aqueous solution down to 2 mM.

  1. Non-invasive Respiratory Support and Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Rahul; Fisher, Marilyn; Cerone, Jennifer; Barry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe two premature infants who developed stage 3, zone I retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with plus disease in both eyes, despite limited exposure to supra-ambient oxygen. Both infants received noninvasive respiratory support for several weeks. Both cases are notable because the ROP was more posterior and aggressive than is typical for the gestational ages or birth weights. These cases are insufficient to make definitive conclusions regarding the factors that cause ROP. Further investigation is required to determine if there is an association between the use of non-invasive respiratory support, even in the absence of supra-ambient oxygen, and severe ROP development. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e47-e50.]. PMID:27537495

  2. Non-Invasive Tension Measurement Devices for Parachute Cordage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litteken, Douglas A.; Daum, Jared S.

    2016-01-01

    The need for lightweight and non-intrusive tension measurements has arisen alongside the development of high-fidelity computer models of textile and fluid dynamics. In order to validate these computer models, data must be gathered in the operational environment without altering the design, construction, or performance of the test article. Current measurement device designs rely on severing a cord and breaking the load path to introduce a load cell. These load cells are very reliable, but introduce an area of high stiffness in the load path, directly affecting the structural response, adding excessive weight, and possibly altering the dynamics of the parachute during a test. To capture the required data for analysis validation without affecting the response of the system, non-invasive measurement devices have been developed and tested by NASA. These tension measurement devices offer minimal impact to the mass, form, fit, and function of the test article, while providing reliable, axial tension measurements for parachute cordage.

  3. Eyeblink conditioning: a non-invasive biomarker for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-02-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) is a classical conditioning paradigm typically used to study the underlying neural processes of learning and memory. EBC has a well-defined neural circuitry, is non-invasive, and can be employed in human infants shortly after birth making it an ideal tool to use in both developing and special populations. In addition, abnormalities in the cerebellum, a region of the brain highly involved in EBC, have been implicated in a number of neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the current paper, we review studies that have employed EBC as a biomarker for several neurodevelopmental disorders including fetal alcohol syndrome, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dyslexia, specific language impairment, and schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the benefits of using such a tool in individuals with ASD.

  4. Non-invasive brain stimulation in neglect rehabilitation: an update.

    PubMed

    Müri, René Martin; Cazzoli, Dario; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P; Hopfner, Simone; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies) fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living measures such as the Barthel Index or, more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in three studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence. The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta-burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients.

  5. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Neglect Rehabilitation: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Müri, René Martin; Cazzoli, Dario; Nef, Tobias; Mosimann, Urs P.; Hopfner, Simone; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the effects of non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the rehabilitation of neglect. We found 12 studies including 172 patients (10 TMS studies and 2 tDCS studies) fulfilling our search criteria. Activity of daily living measures such as the Barthel Index or, more specifically for neglect, the Catherine Bergego Scale were the outcome measure in three studies. Five studies were randomized controlled trials with a follow-up time after intervention of up to 6 weeks. One TMS study fulfilled criteria for Class I and one for Class III evidence. The studies are heterogeneous concerning their methodology, outcome measures, and stimulation parameters making firm comparisons and conclusions difficult. Overall, there are however promising results for theta-burst stimulation, suggesting that TMS is a powerful add-on therapy in the rehabilitation of neglect patients. PMID:23772209

  6. Non-invasive glucose determination in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Wolfgang; Meuer, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Kiefer, Wolfgang; Menzebach, Johannes-Ulrich; Schrader, Bernhard

    2005-02-01

    For non-invasive in vivo glucose determinations by means of near-infrared spectroscopy, the anterior chamber of the human eye is a promising site. An optical set-up for the non-invasive glucose determination in the human eye precisely in the anterior chamber with a beam reflected from the surface of the eye lens is presented here. As the anterior chamber has a depth of 3.13±0.50 mm, the beam follows an optical path of 5.3-7.3 mm depending on the angle of incidence, which is individually constant. We will show that it is possible to acquire good concentration predictions for physiological glucose concentrations with such a long optical path. A chemometric study of NIR glucose spectra with concentrations of glucose in water of 10-350 mg/dL (0.56-1.94 mmol/L) resulted in a calibration model which was able to predict physiological glucose concentrations with a root mean square error of prediction RMSEPTest=15.41 mg/dL. The Clarke error grid diagram shows that the model performs well according to medical impact. Using a first in vivo set-up, the precision is not sufficient for a reliable prediction of glucose concentration, especially due to the flickering of the patient's eye and the low reflectivity of the eye lens. Therefore, we have designed a new in vivo set-up: a prototype for a self-monitoring device with controlled geometry and laser radiation at several distinct wavelengths instead of the halogen lamp as light source. This allows a far higher signal/noise ratio under much better reproducible geometrical conditions and at the same time a much smaller necessary light flux.

  7. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    TRUTA, ANAMARIA; POPON, TUDOR ADRIAN HODOR; SARACI, GEORGE; GHERVAN, LIVIU; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, −145, −222, −210, −10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population. PMID:27152066

  8. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  9. Non-invasive characterization of structure and morphology of silk fibroin biomaterials using non-linear microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William L.; Firdous, Shamaraz; Gupta, Sharad; Hunter, Martin; Foo, Cheryl Wong Po; Wang, Yongzhong; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Kaplan, David L.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Designing biomaterial scaffolds remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Key to this challenge is improved understanding of the relationships between the scaffold properties and its degradation kinetics, as well as the cell interactions and the promotion of new matrix deposition. Here we present the use of non-linear spectroscopic imaging as a non-invasive method to characterize not only morphological, but also structural aspects of silkworm silk fibroin-based biomaterials, relying entirely on endogenous optical contrast. We demonstrate that two photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation are sensitive to the hydration, overall β sheet content and molecular orientation of the sample. Thus, the functional content and high resolution afforded by these non-invasive approaches offer promise for identifying important connections between biomaterial design and functional engineered tissue development. The strategies described also have broader implications for understanding and tracking the remodeling of degradable biomaterials under dynamic conditions both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18291520

  10. Investigating a method for non-invasive ultrasound aberration correction through the skull bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be performed through narrow acoustic windows in the skull in order to minimize skull distortions. Alternatively, passive imaging using a larger aperture array can be used, which affords better resolution at the low frequencies that best penetrate the skull bone. However, to ensure image quality, it is necessary to correct for the distorting effects of the skull. In this study we examine a method to correct the distortions caused by a human skull using passive imaging of single microbubbles. The method is compared with images produced without phase correction, and those produced using a gold-standard invasive phase correction method. Using the non-invasive technique, the -6dB volume was found to vary by less than 22% from the invasive phase correction technique. By comparison, the -6dB volume when no correction was used was almost 300% larger than using the invasive correction technique. The bubblebased method introduced a positional error in the resulting image, which was most prevalent in the axial direction (on the order of 1 mm). The corrected image was biased by the location of the bubble used to calculate the correction terms. In the future, this method might be improved by using multiple bubbles to correct different regions of the image.

  11. Enabling non-invasive assessment of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE vascular grafts without increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Perrin, Louisiane; Kats, Dina; Meade, Thomas; Ameer, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with contrast enhancement is a potentially powerful tool to non-invasively monitor cell distribution in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The most commonly used contrast agent for cell labeling is super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). However, uptake of SPIONs triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells often leading to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a labeling system to non-invasively visualize an engineered endothelium in vascular grafts without creating excessive oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated: (1) chitosan-coated SPIONs (CSPIONs) as an antioxidant contrast agent for contrast enhancement, and (2) poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate) (POC) as an antioxidant interface to support cell adhesion and function of labeled cells on the vascular graft. While SPION-labeled endothelial cells (ECs) experienced elevated ROS formation and altered cell morphology, CSPION-labeled ECs cultured on POC-coated surfaces mitigated SPION-induced ROS formation and maintained EC morphology, phenotype, viability and functions. A monolayer of labeled ECs exhibited sufficient contrast with T2-weighed MR imaging. CSPION labeling of endothelial cells in combination with coating the graft wall with POC allows non-invasive monitoring of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE grafts without increasing oxidative stress. PMID:26283158

  12. Enabling Non-invasive Assessment of an Engineered Endothelium on ePTFE Vascular Grafts without Increasing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Perrin, Louisiane; Kats, Dina; Meade, Thomas; Ameer, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with contrast enhancement is a potentially powerful tool to non-invasively monitor cell distribution in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The most commonly used contrast agent for cell labeling is super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). However, uptake of SPIONs triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells often leading to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a labeling system to non-invasively visualize an engineered endothelium in vascular grafts without creating excessive oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated: (1) chitosan-coated SPIONs (CSPIONs) as an antioxidant contrast agent for contrast enhancement, and (2) poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate) (POC) as an antioxidant interface to support cell adhesion and function of labeled cells on the vascular graft. While SPION-labeled endothelial cells (ECs) experienced elevated ROS formation and altered cell morphology, CSPION-labeled ECs cultured on POC-coated surfaces mitigated SPION-induced ROS formation and maintained EC morphology, phenotype, viability and functions. A monolayer of labeled ECs exhibited sufficient contrast with T2-weighed MR imaging. CSPION labeling of endothelial cells in combination with coating the graft wall with POC allows non-invasive monitoring of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE grafts without increasing oxidative stress. PMID:26283158

  13. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  14. [Radiation exposure from shoe-fitting fluoroscopes].

    PubMed

    Busch, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    It is 40 years ago that a very popular X-ray device disappeared in German shoe shops: the shoe-fitting fluoroscope or Pedoskop. Since the 1930s, these X-ray machines were an integral part of any good shoe business. Following the entry into force X-Ray Regulation (RöV 1973) the use of these devices was prohibited in Germany. PMID:25023417

  15. Non-invasive sex assessment in bovine semen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A. C.; Managó, S.; Ferrara, M. A.; Rendina, I.; Sirleto, L.; Puglisi, R.; Balduzzi, D.; Galli, A.; Ferraro, P.; Coppola, G.

    2014-05-01

    X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cell sorting is of great interest, especially for animal production management systems and genetic improvement programs. Here, we demonstrate an optical method based on Raman spectroscopy to separate X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cells, overcoming many of the limitations associated with current sex-sorting protocols. A priori Raman imaging of bull spermatozoa was utilized to select the sampling points (head-neck region), which were then used to discriminate cells based on a spectral classification model. Main variations of Raman peaks associated with the DNA content were observed together with a variation due to the sex membrane proteins. Next, we used principal component analysis to determine the efficiency of our device as a cell sorting method. The results (>90% accuracy) demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful candidate for the development of a highly efficient, non-invasive, and non-destructive tool for sperm sexing.

  16. Microwave radiometry: a new non-invasive method for the detection of vulnerable plaque

    PubMed Central

    Synetos, Andreas; Nikolaou, Charalampia; Stathogiannis, Konstantinos; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its consequences are the most rapidly growing vascular pathology, with myocardial infarction and ischemic cerebrovascular accident to remain a major cause of premature morbidity and death. In order to detect the morphological and functional characteristics of the vulnerable plaques, new imaging modalities have been developed. Intravascular thermography (IVT) is an invasive method, which provides information on the identification of the high-risk atheromatic plaques in coronary arteries. However, the invasive character of IVT excludes the method from primary prevention. Microwave radiometry (MR) is a new non-invasive method, which detects with high accuracy relative changes of temperature in human tissues whereas this thermal heterogeneity is indicative of inflammatory atherosclerotic plaque. Both experimental and clinical studies have proved the effectiveness of MR in detecting vulnerable plaque whereas recent studies have also revealed its association with plaque neoangiogenesis as assessed by contrast enhanced carotid ultrasound (CEUS). PMID:24282729

  17. Non-invasive classification of microcalcifications with phase-contrast X-ray mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Singer, Gad; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Schneider, Christof W.; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Microcalcifications can be indicative in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Here we report a non-invasive diagnostic method that may potentially distinguish between different types of microcalcifications using X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Our approach exploits the complementary nature of the absorption and small-angle scattering signals of microcalcifications, obtained simultaneously with an X-ray grating interferometer on a conventional X-ray tube. We demonstrate that the new approach has 100% sensitivity and specificity when applied to phantom data, and we provide evidence of the solidity of the technique by showing its discrimination power when applied to fixed biopsies, to non-fixed tissue specimens and to fresh, whole-breast samples. The proposed method might be further developed to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of uncomfortable breast biopsies, or, in case of widespread microcalcifications, to select the biopsy site before intervention.

  18. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  19. [Amyotrophic neuralgia associated with bilateral phrenic paralysis treated with non-invasive mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    García García, María Del Carmen; Hernández Borge, Jacinto; Antona Rodríguez, María José; Pires Gonçalves, Pedro; García García, Gema

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic neuralgia is an uncommon neuropathy characterized by severe unilateral shoulder pain. Isolated or concomitant involvement of other peripheral motor nerves depending on the brachial plexus such as phrenic or laryngeal nerves is unusual(1). Its etiology is unknown, yet several explanatory factors have been proposed. Phrenic nerve involvement, either unilateral or bilateral, is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis relies on anamnesis, functional and imaging investigations and electromyogram. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a past history of renal transplantation due to proliferative glomerulonephritis with subsequent transplant rejection, who was eventually diagnosed with amyotrophic neuralgia with bilateral phrenic involvement, and who required sustained non-invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:26049960

  20. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ross, M.P.

    1996-08-27

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator is disclosed for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator. 11 figs.

  1. Non-invasive hyperthermia apparatus including coaxial applicator having a non-invasive radiometric receiving antenna incorporated therein and method of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    A coaxial hyperthermia applicator for applying non-invasively electromagnetic energy to a body against which it is placed. The coaxial applicator antenna has formed integrally within it a non-invasive radiometric antenna for receiving thermoelectromagnetic emissions. The coaxial-configured applicator produces a bell-shaped radiation pattern symmetric about the axis of symmetry of the coaxial applicator. Integrating the radiometric antenna within the coaxial applicator produces a single device that performs dual functions. The first function is to transmit non-invasively energy for heating a subcutaneous tumor. The second function is to receive non-invasively thermal electromagnetic radiation from the tumor by which temperature is sensed and fed back to control the output of the coaxial applicator.

  2. Tissue Damage Characterization Using Non-invasive Optical Modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, David

    The ability to determine the degree of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue damage is essential for proper wound assessment and a significant factor for determining patient treatment and morbidity. Accurate characterization of tissue damage is critical for a number of medical applications including surgical removal of nonviable tissue, severity assessment of subcutaneous ulcers, and depth assessment of visually open wounds. The main objective of this research was to develop a non-invasive method for identifying the extent of tissue damage underneath intact skin that is not apparent upon visual examination. This work investigated the relationship between tissue optical properties, blood flow, and tissue viability by testing the hypotheses that (a) changes in tissue oxygenation and/or microcirculatory blood flow measurable by Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) differ between healthy and damaged tissue and (b) the magnitude of those changes differs for different degrees of tissue damage. This was accomplished by developing and validating a procedure for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and tissue oxygenation dynamics at multiple depths (up to 1 centimeter) using non-invasive DCS and DNIRS technologies. Due to the lack of pressure ulcer animal models that are compatible with our optical systems, a proof of concept was conducted in a porcine burn model prior to conducting clinical trials in order to assess the efficacy of the system in-vivo. A reduction in total hemoglobin was observed for superficial (5%) and deep burns (35%) along with a statistically significant difference between the optical properties of superficial and deep burns (p < 0.05). Burn depth and viable vessel density were estimated via histological samples. 42% of vessels in the dermal layer were viable for superficial burns, compared to 25% for deep burns. The differences detected in optical properties and hemoglobin content by optical measurements

  3. Non-invasive shallow seismic source comparison for hazardous waste site investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.

    1994-12-31

    Many commonly used shallow seismic sources are unacceptable for hazardous waste site investigations because they risk exhumation of contaminants in the soil, they add contaminants (e.g. lead) which are not allowed by regulations, or they add new migration paths for contaminants. Furthermore, recently developed high frequency vibrators for shallow investigations could be more effective at some sites than non-invasive impulsive sources because of their ability to tailor the source spectrum and reduce interference. The authors show preliminary results of a comparison test of eight non-invasive impulsive and swept sources in preparation for seismic reflection profiling on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. Well log data are used to determine geologic contacts and to generate synthetic seismograms for the site. Common midpoint (CMP) seismic data for each source were collected at 95 geophone groups from 125 shot points along a 400m test line. Hydrophone data were obtained at 1.5m spacing between 61m and 133m depth in a hole near the center of the CMP line. As of March, 1994, brute stacks have been completed for three of the eight sources. Depth penetration is demonstrated in brute stacks and shot gathers, which show a 200ms reflector for all of the sources tested along portions of the line. Source effectiveness will also be evaluated by comparing images of several shallower reflectors (40--150ms) which are apparent in many of the records. Imaging of these reflectors appears to depend upon the ability of the source to generate sufficient high frequency energy (>100 Hz).

  4. The potential of label-free nonlinear optical molecular microscopy to non-invasively characterize the viability of engineered human tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Lloyd, William R.; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical molecular imaging and quantitative analytic methods were developed to non-invasively assess the viability of tissue-engineered constructs manufactured from primary human cells. Label-free optical measures of local tissue structure and biochemistry characterized morphologic and functional differences between controls and stressed constructs. Rigorous statistical analysis accounted for variability between human patients. Fluorescence intensity-based spatial assessment and metabolic sensing differentiated controls from thermally-stressed and from metabolically-stressed constructs. Fluorescence lifetime-based sensing differentiated controls from thermally-stressed constructs. Unlike traditional histological (found to be generally reliable, but destructive) and biochemical (non-invasive, but found to be unreliable) tissue analyses, label-free optical assessments had the advantages of being both non-invasive and reliable. Thus, such optical measures could serve as reliable manufacturing release criteria for cell-based tissue-engineered constructs prior to human implantation, thereby addressing a critical regulatory need in regenerative medicine. PMID:24854093

  5. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  6. Non-invasive techniques for the measurement of bone mineral.

    PubMed

    Seeman, E; Martin, T J

    1989-05-01

    Non-invasive, safe and precise techniques for measuring bone mineral density are available and have an important role in the detection, prevention and treatment of bone loss associated with aging, menopause and many illnesses affecting women and men. The three most widely accessible and established techniques for measuring regional bone mineral density are single and dual photon absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography. A technique of greater accuracy, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, has only recently become available. These techniques have made it possible to measure the magnitude, time course and regional specificity of the skeleton's response to ageing, menopause and illness. A better understanding of the clinical epidemiology of fractures and the mechanisms responsible for bone loss has been obtained. Practical information has been obtained about the dose, duration and efficacy of oestrogen replacement therapy in preventing perimenopausal bone loss and the benefits and limitations of different forms of exercise on bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. The beneficial effect of dietary calcium on peak bone mineral density and in decreasing bone loss in cortical bone has been documented. Information regarding the prevention and treatment of bone loss in exogenous hypercortisolism and the magnitude and reversibility of bone loss associated with many diseases which affect bone has been obtained. One of the most important clinical applications of these techniques is the assessment of the efficacy of treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. As antifracture efficacy is not readily measurable, considerable information is being obtained about many potentially useful forms of therapy that may prevent bone loss and increase bone mineral density. The role of these non-invasive methods in the assessment of fracture risk and the need for oestrogen or other therapy in an individual who has attained a low peak bone mass or has risk

  7. Non-invasive in vivo measurement of the shear modulus of human vocal fold tissue.

    PubMed

    Kazemirad, Siavash; Bakhshaee, Hani; Mongeau, Luc; Kost, Karen

    2014-03-21

    Voice is the essential part of singing and speech communication. Voice disorders significantly affect the quality of life. The viscoelastic mechanical properties of the vocal fold mucosa determine the characteristics of the vocal folds oscillations, and thereby voice quality. In the present study, a non-invasive method was developed to determine the shear modulus of human vocal fold tissue in vivo via measurements of the mucosal wave propagation speed during phonation. Images of four human subjects' vocal folds were captured using high speed digital imaging (HSDI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for different phonation pitches, specifically fundamental frequencies between 110 and 440 Hz. The MRI images were used to obtain the morphometric dimensions of each subject's vocal folds in order to determine the pixel size in the high-speed images. The mucosal wave propagation speed was determined for each subject and at each pitch value using an automated image processing algorithm. The transverse shear modulus of the vocal fold mucosa was then calculated from a surface (Rayleigh) wave propagation dispersion equation using the measured wave speeds. It was found that the mucosal wave propagation speed and therefore the shear modulus of the vocal fold tissue were generally greater at higher pitches. The results were in good agreement with those from other studies obtained via in vitro measurements, thereby supporting the validity of the proposed measurement method. This method offers the potential for in vivo clinical assessments of vocal folds viscoelasticity from HSDI.

  8. Non-invasive Technology to Study Local Passivity Breakdown of Metal Alloys in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M. Shipley

    2005-03-09

    Little is known about the basic mechanisms of passive oxide breakdown, repair, and localized corrosion of metals. A non-invasive instrument and methods have been developed to study local events and mechanisms that initiate passivity breakdown and subsequent corrosion of metals in aqueous media. The ''difference viewer imaging technique'' (DVIT) is a rapid, real time, non-invasive assay to study metal surfaces in corrosive solutions. It has a spatial resolution of less than 10.0 ?m (1cm x 1cm sample, 1000 x 1000 pixel CCD) to observe initial corrosion processes of the order of seconds. DVIT is a software-controlled video microscopy system and methods to collect and analyze pixel changes in video images. These images are recorded from a digital CCD video camera and frame grabber package using visible light for illumination. The DVIT system detects changes in video images that represent initial corrosive events that lead to passivity breakdown and re-passivation on metal surfaces in situ. This visual technique is easy to use and apply. It compliments other metal surface measurement techniques and can be used simultaneously with them. DVIT has proven to be more sensitive in detecting changes than scanning microelectrode techniques. DVIT is also much easier than other methods to apply and operate. It has the further advantage of providing a real time image of the entire metal surface under study instead of waiting for a microelectrode to scan a number of data points over a sample then plot the results. This project has fulfilled all specifications as outlined in the Department of Energy solicitation responsible for this grant application and award and exceeded a number of the specifications. Applicable Electronics, Inc. now has a marketable instrument and software package available for sale now. Further development of the system will be ongoing as driven by customer needs and discoveries. This technology has immediate applications in corrosion labs to further study

  9. Non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, D; Diebold, B; Peronneau, P; Foult, J M; Nee, M; Guermonprez, J L; Maurice, P

    1981-01-01

    The value of Doppler echocardiography for the non-invasive diagnosis of mitral regurgitation was studied blindly in 161 consecutive invasively investigated adult patients. Regurgitation was graded from 0 to 3 at selective left ventricular angiography. The Doppler echocardiographic examination was considered to be positive when a disturbed systolic flow was found within the left atrium behind the aorta or the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. The test was considered to be negative in the absence of a regurgitant jet. The level of the signal to noise ratio was checked by the recording of the ventricular filling flow. The study was performed in 131 cases from the left side of the sternum and in 101 cases from the apex. There were no false positives and thus the specificity was 100 per cent. The 20 false negatives were all in patients with grade 1 regurgitation. Thus only some (33%) instances of mild regurgitation were misdiagnosed, and the sensitivity for moderate to severe mitral regurgitation was 100 per cent. PMID:7236465

  10. Non-invasive biosensor and wilreless interrogating system for hypoglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Saukesi, K.

    2002-11-01

    Hypoglycemia - abnormal decrease in blood sugar - is a major obstacle in the management of diabetes and prevention of long-term complications, and it may impose serious effects on the brain, including impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. This paper presents the development of a non-invasive sensor with miniaturized telemetry device in a wrist-watch for monitoring glucose concentration in blood. The sensor concept is based on optical chiralit of glucose level in the interstitial fluid. The wrist watch consists of a laser power source of the wavelength compatible with the glucose. A nanofilm with specific chirality is placed at the bottom of the watch. The light then passes through the film and illuminates a small area on the skin.It has been documented that there is certain concentration of sugar level is taken by the intertitial fluid from the blood stream and deposit a portion of it at the dead skin. The wrist-watch when in contact with the outer skin of the human will thus monitor the glucose concentration. A wireless monitoring system in the watch then downloads the data from the watch to a Palm or laptop computer.

  11. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  12. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders.

  13. Exploring non-invasive methods to assess pain in sheep.

    PubMed

    Stubsjøen, Solveig M; Flø, Andreas S; Moe, Randi O; Janczak, Andrew M; Skjerve, Eystein; Valle, Paul S; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in eye temperature, measured using infrared thermography (IRT), and heart rate variability (HRV) can detect moderate levels of pain in sheep. Six ewes received the following treatments: 1) noxious ischaemic stimulus by application of a forelimb tourniquet (S), 2) noxious ischaemic stimulus and flunixin meglumine (S+F), and 3) flunixin meglumine (F). Maximum eye temperature, HRV, mechanical nociceptive threshold, blood pressure and behaviour were recorded for up to 60 min, including 15 min of baseline, 30 min during intervention and 15 min post-intervention. There was a tendency towards a decrease in the heart rate variability parameters RMSSD (the root mean square of successive R-R intervals) and SDNN (the standard deviation of all interbeat intervals) in treatment S compared to treatment F, and a significant increase in the same parameters between test day 1 and 3. A reduction in eye temperature was detected for all treatments during intervention, but no difference was found between S and F and S+N and F during intervention. The eye temperature decreased more in test day 2 and 3 compared to test day 1 during intervention. A significant reduction for both lip licking and vocalisation was observed between test day 1 and 3, and forward facing ears was the ear posture most frequently recorded in test day 1. We suggest that HRV is a sensitive, non-invasive method to assess mild to moderate pain in sheep, whereas IRT is a less sensitive method.

  14. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to.

  15. Non-Invasive Gait Monitoring in a Ubiquitous Computing House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yuji; Motooka, Nobuhisa; Siio, Itiro; Tsukada, Koji; Kambara, Keisuke

    Computers become smaller and cheaper from day to day, and the utilization, as daily life equipments, is now becoming ubiquitous. Therefore, it's essential to discuss the development of applications, as well as the installation of ubiquitous computing technologies into our daily living environments. Based on this idea, in order to investigate how ubiquitous computing can be used in the most efficient way, an experimental house, Ocha House, has been constructed in the campus of Ochanomizu university in 2009. In this study, we described the feature of the design of the experimental house and proposed a non-invasive gait monitoring technique as a healthcare application. Specifically, five wireless accelerometers were fixed on the floor of the house, and the floor vibration was measured when the subject walked along the accelerometers. As a result, the floor acceleration intensity was found to surge at the ground contact, and the gait cycle could be detected. By combining the simple acceleration sensors and the housing structures, human motion monitoring would become less invasive.

  16. Alteration of Political Belief by Non-invasive Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chawke, Caroline; Kanai, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    People generally have imperfect introspective access to the mechanisms underlying their political beliefs, yet can confidently communicate the reasoning that goes into their decision making process. An innate desire for certainty and security in ones beliefs may play an important and somewhat automatic role in motivating the maintenance or rejection of partisan support. The aim of the current study was to clarify the role of the DLPFC in the alteration of political beliefs. Recent neuroimaging studies have focused on the association between the DLPFC (a region involved in the regulation of cognitive conflict and error feedback processing) and reduced affiliation with opposing political candidates. As such, this study used a method of non-invasive brain simulation (tRNS) to enhance activity of the bilateral DLPFC during the incorporation of political campaign information. These findings indicate a crucial role for this region in political belief formation. However, enhanced activation of DLPFC does not necessarily result in the specific rejection of political beliefs. In contrast to the hypothesis the results appear to indicate a significant increase in conservative values regardless of participant's initial political orientation and the political campaign advertisement they were exposed to. PMID:26834603

  17. Non invasive in vivo investigation of hepatobiliary structure and function in STII medaka (Oryzias latipes): methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron C; Kullman, Seth W; Hinton, David E

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel transparent stock of medaka (Oryzias latipes; STII), recessive for all pigments found in chromatophores, permits transcutaneous imaging of internal organs and tissues in living individuals. Findings presented describe the development of methodologies for non invasive in vivo investigation in STII medaka, and the successful application of these methodologies to in vivo study of hepatobiliary structure, function, and xenobiotic response, in both 2 and 3 dimensions. Results Using brightfield, and widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, coupled with the in vivo application of fluorescent probes, structural and functional features of the hepatobiliary system, and xenobiotic induced toxicity, were imaged at the cellular level, with high resolution (< 1 μm), in living individuals. The findings presented demonstrate; (1) phenotypic response to xenobiotic exposure can be investigated/imaged in vivo with high resolution (< 1 μm), (2) hepatobiliary transport of solutes from blood to bile can be qualitatively and quantitatively studied/imaged in vivo, (3) hepatobiliary architecture in this lower vertebrate liver can be studied in 3 dimensions, and (4) non invasive in vivo imaging/description of hepatobiliary development in this model can be investigated. Conclusion The non-invasive in vivo methodologies described are a unique means by which to investigate biological structure, function and xenobiotic response with high resolution in STII medaka. In vivo methodologies also provide the future opportunity to integrate molecular mechanisms (e.g., genomic, proteomic) of disease and toxicity with phenotypic changes at the cellular and system levels of biological organization. While our focus has been the hepatobiliary system, other organ systems are equally amenable to in vivo study, and we consider the potential for discovery, within the context of in vivo investigation in STII medaka, as significant. PMID:18838008

  18. Non-invasive quantification of lower limb mechanical alignment in flexion

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Angela; Fogg, Quentin A.; Picard, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-invasive navigation techniques have recently been developed to determine mechanical femorotibial alignment (MFTA) in extension. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of an image-free navigation system with new software designed to provide multiple kinematic measurements of the knee. The secondary aim was to test two types of strap material used to attach optical trackers to the lower limb. Methods Seventy-two registrations were carried out on 6 intact embalmed cadaveric specimens (mean age: 77.8 ± 12 years). A validated fabric strap, bone screws and novel rubber strap were used to secure the passive tracker baseplate for four full experiments with each knee. The MFTA angle was measured under the conditions of no applied stress, valgus stress, and varus stress. These measurements were carried out at full extension and at 30°, 40°, 50° and 60° of flexion. Intraclass correlation coefficients, repeatability coefficients, and limits of agreement (LOA) were used to convey precision and agreement in measuring MFTA with respect to each of the independent variables, i.e., degree of flexion, applied coronal stress, and method of tracker fixation. Based on the current literature, a repeatability coefficient and LOA of ≤3° were deemed acceptable. Results The mean fixed flexion for the 6 specimens was 12.8° (range: 6–20°). The mean repeatability coefficient measuring MFTA in extension with screws or fabric strapping of the baseplate was ≤2°, compared to 2.3° using rubber strapping. When flexing the knee, MFTA measurements taken using screws or fabric straps remained precise (repeatability coefficient ≤3°) throughout the tested range of flexion (12.8–60°); however, using rubber straps, the repeatability coefficient was >3° beyond 50° flexion. In general, applying a varus/valgus stress while measuring MFTA decreased precision beyond 40° flexion. Using fabric strapping, excellent repeatability

  19. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery. PMID:27591472

  20. [Non-invasive Genetic Prenatal Testing - A Serious Challenge for Society as a Whole].

    PubMed

    Zerres, K

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive genetic prenatal tests nowadays allow a highly reliable identification of pregnancies with foetal aneuploidies. Due to the general availability of these tests for all pregnant women, non-invasive genetic prenatal testing raises many ethical questions whieh can only be answered by a debate focused on society as a whole.

  1. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery.

  2. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation and epidural anesthesia for an emergency open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Yurtlu, Bülent Serhan; Köksal, Bengü; Hancı, Volkan; Turan, Işıl Özkoçak

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation is an accepted treatment modality in both acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases and chronic obstructive lung disease. It is commonly utilized in the intensive care units, or for postoperative respiratory support in post-anesthesia care units. This report describes intraoperative support in non-invasive ventilation to neuroaxial anesthesia for an emergency upper abdominal surgery.

  3. Non-invasive diagnosis of hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangheun; Kim, Do Young

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is a major public health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Twenty-three percent of patients with CHB progress naturally to liver cirrhosis, which was earlier thought to be irreversible. However, it is now known that cirrhosis can in fact be reversed by treatment with oral anti-nucleotide drugs. Thus, early and accurate diagnosis of cirrhosis is important to allow an appropriate treatment strategy to be chosen and to predict the prognosis of patients with CHB. Liver biopsy is the reference standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. However, the method is invasive, and is associated with pain and complications that can be fatal. In addition, intra- and inter-observer variability compromises the accuracy of liver biopsy data. Only small tissue samples are obtained and fibrosis is heterogeneous in such samples. This confounds the two types of observer variability mentioned above. Such limitations have encouraged development of non-invasive methods for assessment of fibrosis. These include measurements of serum biomarkers of fibrosis; and assessment of liver stiffness via transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, real-time elastography, or magnetic resonance elastography. Although significant advances have been made, most work to date has addressed the diagnostic utility of these techniques in the context of cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C infection. In the present review, we examine the advantages afforded by use of non-invasive methods to diagnose cirrhosis in patients with CHB infections and the utility of such methods in clinical practice. PMID:24574713

  4. Microwave Radiometry for Non-Invasive Detection of Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Following Bladder Warming.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; De Luca, Valeria; Salahi, Sara; Boico, Alina; Klemetsen, Oystein; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein K; Bardati, Fernando; Tognolatti, Piero; Snow, Brent

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a serious health problem leading to renal scarring in children. Current VUR detection involves traumatic x-ray imaging of kidneys following injection of contrast agent into bladder via invasive Foley catheter. We present an alternative non-invasive approach for detecting VUR by radiometric monitoring of kidney temperature while gently warming the bladder. METHODS: We report the design and testing of: i) 915MHz square slot antenna array for heating bladder, ii) EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip receive antenna, iii) high-sensitivity 1.375GHz total power radiometer, iv) power modulation approach to increase urine temperature relative to overlying perfused tissues, and v) invivo porcine experiments characterizing bladder heating and radiometric temperature of aaline filled 30mL balloon "kidney" implanted 3-4cm deep in thorax and varied 2-6°C from core temperature. RESULTS: SAR distributions are presented for two novel antennas designed to heat bladder and monitor deep kidney temperatures radiometrically. We demonstrate the ability to heat 180mL saline in in vivo porcine bladder to 40-44°C while maintaining overlying tissues <38°C using time-modulated square slot antennas coupled to the abdomen with room temperature water pad. Pathologic evaluations confirmed lack of acute thermal damage in pelvic tissues for up to three 20min bladder heat exposures. The radiometer clearly recorded 2-6°C changes of 30mL "kidney" targets at depth in 34°C invivo pig thorax. CONCLUSION: A 915MHz antenna array can gently warm in vivo pig bladder without toxicity while a 1.375GHz radiometer with log spiral receive antenna detects ≥2°C rise in 30mL "urine" located 3-4cm deep in thorax, demonstrating more than sufficient sensitivity to detect Grade 4-5 reflux of warmed urine for non-invasive detection of VUR.

  5. Non-invasive computation of aortic pressure maps: a phantom-based study of two approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Schalck, Sebastian; Chassein, Yves; Müller, Tobias; Rengier, Fabian; Speidel, Stefanie; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Patient-specific blood pressure values in the human aorta are an important parameter in the management of cardiovascular diseases. A direct measurement of these values is only possible by invasive catheterization at a limited number of measurement sites. To overcome these drawbacks, two non-invasive approaches of computing patient-specific relative aortic blood pressure maps throughout the entire aortic vessel volume are investigated by our group. The first approach uses computations from complete time-resolved, three-dimensional flow velocity fields acquired by phasecontrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), whereas the second approach relies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with ultrasound-based boundary conditions. A detailed evaluation of these computational methods under realistic conditions is necessary in order to investigate their overall robustness and accuracy as well as their sensitivity to certain algorithmic parameters. We present a comparative study of the two blood pressure computation methods in an experimental phantom setup, which mimics a simplified thoracic aorta. The comparative analysis includes the investigation of the impact of algorithmic parameters on the MRI-based blood pressure computation and the impact of extracting pressure maps in a voxel grid from the CFD simulations. Overall, a very good agreement between the results of the two computational approaches can be observed despite the fact that both methods used completely separate measurements as input data. Therefore, the comparative study of the presented work indicates that both non-invasive pressure computation methods show an excellent robustness and accuracy and can therefore be used for research purposes in the management of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Microwave radiometry for non-invasive detection of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) following bladder warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; De Luca, Valeria; Salahi, Sara; Boico, Alina; Klemetsen, Oystein; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein K.; Bardati, Fernando; Tognolotti, Piero; Snow, Brent

    2011-03-01

    Background: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a serious health problem leading to renal scarring in children. Current VUR detection involves traumatic x-ray imaging of kidneys following injection of contrast agent into bladder via invasive Foley catheter. We present an alternative non-invasive approach for detecting VUR by radiometric monitoring of kidney temperature while gently warming the bladder. Methods: We report the design and testing of: i) 915MHz square slot antenna array for heating bladder, ii) EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip receive antenna, iii) high-sensitivity 1.375GHz total power radiometer, iv) power modulation approach to increase urine temperature relative to overlying perfused tissues, and v) invivo porcine experiments characterizing bladder heating and radiometric temperature of aaline filled 30mL balloon "kidney" implanted 3-4cm deep in thorax and varied 2-6°C from core temperature. Results: SAR distributions are presented for two novel antennas designed to heat bladder and monitor deep kidney temperatures radiometrically. We demonstrate the ability to heat 180mL saline in in vivo porcine bladder to 40-44°C while maintaining overlying tissues <38°C using time-modulated square slot antennas coupled to the abdomen with room temperature water pad. Pathologic evaluations confirmed lack of acute thermal damage in pelvic tissues for up to three 20min bladder heat exposures. The radiometer clearly recorded 2-6°C changes of 30mL "kidney" targets at depth in 34°C invivo pig thorax. Conclusion: A 915MHz antenna array can gently warm in vivo pig bladder without toxicity while a 1.375GHz radiometer with log spiral receive antenna detects >=2°C rise in 30mL "urine" located 3-4cm deep in thorax, demonstrating more than sufficient sensitivity to detect Grade 4-5 reflux of warmed urine for non-invasive detection of VUR.

  7. Therapeutic Ultrasound to Non-Invasively Create Intra-Cardiac Communications in an Intact Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gabe E.; Miller, Ryan M.; Ensing, Greg; Ives, Kimberly; Gordon, David; Ludomirsky, Achi; Xu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy (histotripsy) can accurately and safely generate ventricular septal defects (VSDs) through the intact chest of a neonatal animal, with the eventual goal of developing a non-invasive technique of creating intra-cardiac communications in patients with congenital heart disease. Background Histotripsy is an innovative ultrasonic technique that generates demarcated, mechanical tissue fractionation utilizing high intensity ultrasound pulses. Previous work has shown that histotripsy can create atrial septal defects in a beating heart in an open-chest canine model. Methods Nine neonatal pigs were treated with transcutaneous histotripsy targeting the ventricular septum. Ultrasound pulses of 5μs duration at a peak negative pressure of 13 MPa and a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz were generated by a 1 MHz focused transducer. The procedure was guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results VSDs were created in all pigs with diameters ranging from 2–6.5mm. Six pigs were euthanized within 2 hrs of treatment, while 3 were recovered and maintained for 2–3 days to evaluate lesion maturation and clinical side effects. There were only transient clinical effects and pathology revealed mild collateral damage around the VSD with no significant damage to other cardiac or extra-cardiac structures. Conclusions Histotripsy can accurately and safely generate VSDs through the intact chest in a neonatal animal model. These results suggest that with further advances, histotripsy can be a useful, non-invasive technique to create intra-cardiac communications, which currently require invasive catheter-based or surgical procedures, to clinically stabilize newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:20853366

  8. In vivo carbon nanotube-enhanced non-invasive photoacoustic mapping of the sentinel lymph node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Manojit; Song, Kwang Hyun; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-06-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), a less invasive alternative to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), has become the standard of care for patients with clinically node-negative breast cancer. In SLNB, lymphatic mapping with radio-labeled sulfur colloid and/or blue dye helps identify the sentinel lymph node (SLN), which is most likely to contain metastatic breast cancer. Even though SLNB, using both methylene blue and radioactive tracers, has a high identification rate, it still relies on an invasive surgical procedure, with associated morbidity. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) identification of SLN in a rat model. We have successfully imaged the SLN in vivo by PA imaging (793 nm laser source, 5 MHz ultrasonic detector) with high contrast-to-noise ratio (=89) and good resolution (~500 µm). The SWNTs also show a wideband optical absorption, generating PA signals over an excitation wavelength range of 740-820 nm. Thus, by varying the incident light wavelength to the near infrared region, where biological tissues (hemoglobin, tissue pigments, lipids and water) show low light absorption, the imaging depth is maximized. In the future, functionalization of the SWNTs with targeting groups should allow the molecular imaging of breast cancer.

  9. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed.

  10. Challenges for non-invasive brain perfusion quantification using arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Sousa, I; Santos, N; Sanches, J; Figueiredo, P

    2011-03-29

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) sequences for perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have recently become available to be used in the clinical practice, offering a completely non-invasive technique for the quantitative evaluation of brain perfusion. Despite its great potential, ASL perfusion imaging still presents important methodological challenges before its incorporation in routine protocols. Specifically, in some pathological conditions in which the cerebrovascular dynamics is altered, the standard application of ASL may lead to measurement errors. In these cases, it would be possible to estimate perfusion, as well as arterial transit times, by collecting images at multiple time points and then fitting a mathematical model to the data. This approach can be optimized by selecting a set of optimal imaging time points and incorporating knowledge about the physiological distributions of the parameters into the model estimation procedures. In this study, we address the challenges that arise in the measurement of brain perfusion using PASL, due to variations in the arterial transit times, by estimating the errors produced using different types of acquisitions and proposing methods for minimizing such errors. We show by simulation that multiple inversion time ASL acquisitions are expected to reduce measurement errors relative to standard approaches. In data collected from a group of subjects, we further observed reduced inter-subject variability in perfusion measurements when using a multiple versus single inversion time acquisitions. Both measurement errors and variability were further reduced if optimized acquisition and analysis techniques were employed. PMID:24059574

  11. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start.

  12. Non-invasive methods of assessing the tear film.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Norihiko; Komuro, Aoi

    2004-03-01

    The interaction between the tear film and the ocular surface epithelium is crucial for the maintenance of ocular surface health; interference with this relationship may cause dry eye. Several diagnostic techniques have been developed to assess the tear film and diagnose dry eye but many of these tests are invasive and modify the parameter which they are designed to measure. Non-invasive or minimally invasive tests may overcome this problem and provide more reproducible and objective data. One test of this kind is meniscometry, which is particularly useful in assessing tear volume indirectly by measuring tear meniscus radius. The newly developed video-meniscometer, which enables calculation of the meniscus radius digitally, is useful for the diagnosis of tear-deficient dry eye. Video-meniscometry also has other applications, to the study of tear and eye drop turnover, determining the indication for punctal plugs and in demonstrating dysfunction of the tear meniscus. Interferometry of the tear film lipid layer is useful in screening and evaluating dry eye severity and in selecting dry eye candidates for punctal occlusion. It is also useful for analysing tear lipid layer pathophysiology more clearly, especially in combination with meniscometry. Meibometry is a minimally invasive technique to quantify the amount of meibomian lipid on the lid margin. Lipid is blotted onto a plastic tape and the change in optical density is used to calculate lipid uptake. Laser meibometry has increased the scope of this technique for the assessment of meibomian gland dysfunction; also, the delivery of lipids from the lid reservoir to the preocular tear film can be analysed using interferometry and laser meibometry. The present report reviews the application of these techniques to the study of tear film physiology and dry eye.

  13. Non-invasive prenatal testing: ethical issues explored.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Antina; Dondorp, Wybo J; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Frints, Suzanne G M; de Wert, Guido M W R

    2010-03-01

    This paper explores the ethical implications of introducing non-invasive prenatal diagnostic tests (NIPD tests) in prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities. NIPD tests are easy and safe and can be performed early in pregnancy. Precisely because of these features, it is feared that informed consent may become more difficult, that both testing and selective abortion will become 'normalized', and that there will be a trend towards accepting testing for minor abnormalities and non-medical traits as well. In our view, however, the real moral challenge of NIPD testing consists in the possibility of linking up a technique with these features (easy, safe and early) with new genomic technologies that allow prenatal diagnostic testing for a much broader range of abnormalities than is the case in current procedures. An increase in uptake and more selective abortions need not in itself be taken to signal a thoughtless acceptance of these procedures. However, combining this with considerably enlarging the scope of NIPD testing will indeed make informed consent more difficult and challenge the notion of prenatal screening as serving reproductive autonomy. If broad NIPD testing includes later-onset diseases, the 'right not to know' of the future child will become a new issue in the debate about prenatal screening. With regard to the controversial issue of selective abortion, it may make a morally relevant difference that after NIPD testing, abortion can be done early. A lower moral status may be attributed to the foetus at that moment, given the dominant opinion that the moral status of the foetus progressively increases with its development. PMID:19953123

  14. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  15. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7–1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects. PMID:26365299

  16. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7-1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects.

  17. Seeing Through the Surface: Non-invasive Characterization of Biomaterial-Tissue Interactions Using Photoacoustic Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Lihong V; Xia, Younan

    2016-03-01

    At the intersection of life sciences, materials science, engineering, and medicine, regenerative medicine stands out as a rapidly progressing field that aims at retaining, restoring, or augmenting tissue/organ functions to promote the human welfare. While the field has witnessed tremendous advancements over the past few decades, it still faces many challenges. For example, it has been difficult to visualize, monitor, and assess the functions of the engineered tissue/organ constructs, particularly when three-dimensional scaffolds are involved. Conventional approaches based on histology are invasive and therefore only convey end-point assays. The development of volumetric imaging techniques such as confocal and ultrasonic imaging has enabled direct observation of intact constructs without the need of sectioning. However, the capability of these techniques is often limited in terms of penetration depth and contrast. In comparison, the recently developed photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has allowed us to address these issues by integrating optical and ultrasonic imaging to greatly reduce the effect of tissue scattering of photons with one-way ultrasound detection while retaining the high optical absorption contrast. PAM has been successfully applied to a number of studies, such as observation of cell distribution, monitoring of vascularization, and interrogation of biomaterial degradation. In this review article, we highlight recent progress in non-invasive and volumetric characterization of biomaterial-tissue interactions using PAM. We also discuss challenges ahead and envision future directions. PMID:26471785

  18. Non-invasive quantification of small bowel water content by MRI: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoad, C. L.; Marciani, L.; Foley, S.; Totman, J. J.; Wright, J.; Bush, D.; Cox, E. F.; Campbell, E.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Substantial water fluxes across the small intestine occur during digestion of food, but so far measuring these has required invasive intubation techniques. This paper describes a non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring small bowel water content which has been validated using naso-duodenal infusion. Eighteen healthy volunteers were intubated, with the tube position being verified by MRI. After a baseline MRI scan, each volunteer had eight 40 ml boluses of a non-absorbable mannitol and saline solution infused into their proximal small bowel with an MRI scan being acquired after each bolus. The MRI sequence used was an adapted magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography sequence. The image data were thresholded to allow for intra- and inter-subject signal variations. The MRI measured volumes were then compared to the known infused volumes. This MRI technique gave excellent images of the small bowel, which closely resemble those obtained using conventional radiology with barium contrast. The mean difference between the measured MRI volumes and infused volumes was 2% with a standard deviation of 10%. The maximum 95% limits of agreement between observers were -15% to +17% while measurements by the same operator on separate occasions differed by only 4%. This new technique can now be applied to study alterations in small bowel fluid absorption and secretion due to gastrointestinal disease or drug intervention.

  19. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have identified peak cyclic forces, number of loading cycles, and loading rate as contributors to the regulation of bone metabolism. We have proposed a theoretical model that relates bone density to a mechanical stimulus derived from average daily cumulative peak cyclic 'effective' tissue stresses. In order to develop a non-invasive experimental model to test the theoretical model we need to: (1) monitor daily cumulative loading on a bone, (2) compute the internal stress state(s) resulting from the imposed loading, and (3) image volumetric bone density accurately, precisely, and reproducibly within small contiguous volumes throughout the bone. We have chosen the calcaneus (heel) as an experimental model bone site because it is loaded by ligament, tendon and joint contact forces in equilibrium with daily ground reaction forces that we can measure; it is a peripheral bone site and therefore more easily and accurately imaged with computed tomography; it is composed primarily of cancellous bone; and it is a relevant site for monitoring bone loss and adaptation in astronauts and the general population. This paper presents an overview of our recent advances in the areas of monitoring daily ground reaction forces, biomechanical modeling of the forces on the calcaneus during gait, mathematical modeling of calcaneal bone adaptation in response to cumulative daily activity, accurate and precise imaging of the calcaneus with quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and application to long duration space flight.

  20. Non-Invasive Follow-up Evaluation of Post-Embolized AVM with Time-Resolved MRA: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Yong Woon; Kang, Won-Suk; Joo, Jin-Yang; Strecker, Ralph; Hennig, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    We report the hemodynamic assessment in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation using time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (TR-MRA), a non-invasive modality, and catheter-based digital subtraction angiography (DSA), before and after embolization. Comparison of the results showed that TR-MRA produced very fast dynamic images and the findings closely matched those obtained at DSA. For initial work-up and follow-up studies in patients with vascular lesions, TR-MRA and DSA are therefore comparable. PMID:12514347

  1. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    PubMed Central

    Abadesso, Clara; Nunes, Pedro; Silvestre, Catarina; Matias, Ester; Loureiro, Helena; Almeida, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI), to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD) treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156). Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%), and pneumonia in 44 (29%) patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05) in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2) was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001). In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%). Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05). Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42–71.4) and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33–111.11). There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection. PMID:22802994

  2. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  3. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  4. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  5. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Sharp, Gregory C; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-10-21

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  6. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-03-23

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  7. Progress in the Development of a new Angiography Suite including the High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF), a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS), and a New Detector Changer Integrated into a Commercial C-Arm Angiography Unit to Enable Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use. PMID:21243037

  8. Progress in the development of a new angiography suite including the high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF): a control, acquisition, processing, and image display system (CAPIDS), and a new detector changer integrated into a commercial C-arm angiography unit to enable clinical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiyuan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Keleshis, Christos; Kuhls-Gilcrist, Andrew; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2010-04-01

    Due to the high-resolution needs of angiographic and interventional vascular imaging, a Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) detector with a Control, Acquisition, Processing, and Image Display System (CAPIDS) was installed on a detector changer which was attached to the C-arm of a clinical angiographic unit. The MAF detector provides high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time imaging capabilities and consists of a 300 μm-thick CsI phosphor, a dual stage micro-channel plate light image intensifier (LII) coupled to a fiber optic taper (FOT), and a scientific grade frame-transfer CCD camera, providing an image matrix of 1024×1024 35 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The Solid-State X-Ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is an EMCCD (Electron Multiplying charge-coupled device) based detector which provides an image matrix of 1k×1k 32 μm square pixels with 12 bit depth. The changer allows the MAF or a SSXII region-of-interest (ROI) detector to be inserted in front of the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) when higher resolution is needed during angiographic or interventional vascular imaging procedures. The CAPIDS was developed and implemented using LabVIEW software and provides a user-friendly interface that enables control of several clinical radiographic imaging modes of the MAF or SSXII including: fluoroscopy, roadmapping, radiography, and digital-subtraction-angiography (DSA). The total system has been used for image guidance during endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI) using prototype self-expanding asymmetric vascular stents (SAVS) in over 10 rabbit aneurysm creation and treatment experiments which have demonstrated the system's potential benefits for future clinical use.

  9. Non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, Marianthi; Sofogianni, Areti; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest chronic liver disease and includes simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Since NASH progresses to cirrhosis more frequently and increases liver-related and cardiovascular disease risk substantially more than simple steatosis, there is a great need to differentiate the two entities. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD but its disadvantages, including the risk of complications and sampling bias, stress the need for developing alternative diagnostic methods. Accordingly, several non-invasive markers have been evaluated for the diagnosis of simple steatosis and NASH, including both serological indices and imaging methods. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of these markers in the diagnosis of NAFLD. Current data suggest that ultrasound and the fibrosis-4 score are probably the most appealing methods for detecting steatosis and for distinguishing NASH from simple steatosis, respectively, because of their low cost and relatively high accuracy. However, currently available methods, both serologic and imaging, cannot obviate the need for liver biopsy for diagnosing NASH due to their substantial false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, the current role of these methods is probably limited in patients who are unwilling or have contraindications for undergoing biopsy. PMID:25866601

  10. Non-invasive detection of periodontal loss of attachment using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Sarathi, R.; Rao, Suresh Ranga

    2015-06-01

    This study aims at developing a non-invasive technique to evaluate periodontal loss of attachment in the oral cavity. A method of imaging periodontal loss of attachment based on time-domain optical coherence tomography is proposed and studied. Based on measurements, boundaries of gingival tissue and tooth were seen separated by ≈0.3 mm. Further study is in progress to image the anatomical landmarks and evaluate the periodontal loss of attachment. The conventional time domain OCT systems acquisition speed is limited by the speed of the mechanical scanning system. In order to overcome this issue, a novel electro-optic based scanning system is proposed and demonstrated. Studies were performed initially with lithium niobate and potassium titanyl phosphate crystals and the tuning range observed were low. In order to increase the tuning range, a crystal with high electro-optic coefficient - potassium tantalite niobate was identified and experiments were carried out to characterise the crystal and electro-optic based phase tuning is demonstrated.

  11. Towards Effective Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces Dedicated to Gait Rehabilitation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Castermans, Thierry; Duvinage, Matthieu; Cheron, Guy; Dutoit, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the field of walk rehabilitation. Motor cortex signals in bipedal monkeys have been interpreted to predict walk kinematics. Epidural electrical stimulation in rats and in one young paraplegic has been realized to partially restore motor control after spinal cord injury. However, these experimental trials are far from being applicable to all patients suffering from motor impairments. Therefore, it is thought that more simple rehabilitation systems are desirable in the meanwhile. The goal of this review is to describe and summarize the progress made in the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces dedicated to motor rehabilitation systems. In the first part, the main principles of human locomotion control are presented. The paper then focuses on the mechanisms of supra-spinal centers active during gait, including results from electroencephalography, functional brain imaging technologies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron-emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT)] and invasive studies. The first brain-computer interface (BCI) applications to gait rehabilitation are then presented, with a discussion about the different strategies developed in the field. The challenges to raise for future systems are identified and discussed. Finally, we present some proposals to address these challenges, in order to contribute to the improvement of BCI for gait rehabilitation. PMID:24961699

  12. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  13. Spectrophotometric system to develop a non-invasive method for monitoring of posidonia oceanica meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menesatti, P.; Urbani, G.; Dolce, T.

    2007-09-01

    Posidonia oceanica (L.) is an endemic phanerogam of the Mediterranean Sea. It lives between 0.2 and 40 m depth and make up extensive meadows that play a fundamental role in the marine coast ecosystem. Near the coasts at higher anthropic pressure, Posidonia meadows present both quality and quantity damages (regression) due to the mechanical operations on the seabed (anchoring, drag netting, pipe lines) and the sea pollution. Nowadays, the seagrass regression is monitored by different systems: aereophotografic, side scan sonar, underwater television camera, direct underwater visual inspection. Scientific community is looking for to develop monitoring systems more reliable, rapid and non invasive. Aim of this study is to evaluate the application of a new spectrophotometric imaging system based on the acquisition of reflectance spectral images with a good optical (250 Kpixels) and spectral resolution (spectral range 400-970 nm, a total of 115 single wavelength, 5 nm step each one). First trials were made on Posidonia's leafs to evaluate the system capacity to recognize spectral differences between samples picked up at two different depths (0.3 - 4 m). High discrimination percentage (90%) were found between leaf samples as function of the different depths, analyzing the spectral data by Partial Least Squares model. Forward activities will stress the system capability also to evaluate different phenol concentrations on Posidonia leaves, an important index of physiologic vegetal damage, through direct underwater spectrophotometric monitoring.

  14. Phase-Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography: A New Technique for Non-Invasive Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel M.; Fingler, Jeff; Kim, Dae Yu; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Park, Susanna S.; Fraser, Scott E.; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Phase-contrast optical coherence tomography (PC-OCT) provides volumetric imaging of the retinal vasculature without the need for intravenous injection of a fluorophore. Here, we compare images from PC-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA) for normal individuals and patients with age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Design This is an evaluation of a diagnostic technology. Participants 4 patients underwent comparative retinovascular imaging using FA and PC-OCT. Imaging was performed on 1 normal individual, 1 patient with dry age-related macular degeneration, 1 patient with exudative age-related macular degeneration and 1 patient with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods FA imaging was performed using a Topcon (TRC-50IX) camera having resolution of 1280 (H) x 1024 (V) pixels. PC-OCT images were generated by software data processing of the entire cross-sectional image from consecutively acquired B-scans. Bulk axial motion was calculated and corrected for each transverse location, reducing the phase noise introduced from eye motion. Phase contrast was calculated through the variance of the motion-corrected phase changes acquired within multiple B-scans at the same position. Repeating these calculations over the entire volumetric scan produced a three-dimensional PC-OCT representation of the vasculature. Main Outcome Measures Feasibility of rendering retinal and choroidal microvasculature using PC-OCT was compared qualitatively to FA, the current gold standard for retinovascular imaging. Results PC-OCT rendered a two-dimensional depth color-coded vasculature map of the retinal and choroidal vasculature non-invasively. The choriocapillaris was imaged with better resolution of microvascular detail using PC-OCT. Areas of geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization imaged by FA were depicted by PC-OCT. Regions of capillary non-perfusion from diabetic retinopathy were shown by both imaging techniques; there was not complete

  15. Haplotype-assisted accurate non-invasive fetal whole genome recovery through maternal plasma sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The applications of massively parallel sequencing technology to fetal cell-free DNA (cff-DNA) have brought new insight to non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. However, most previous research based on maternal plasma sequencing has been restricted to fetal aneuploidies. To detect specific parentally inherited mutations, invasive approaches to obtain fetal DNA are the current standard in the clinic because of the experimental complexity and resource consumption of previously reported non-invasive approaches. Methods Here, we present a simple and effective non-invasive method for accurate fetal genome recovery-assisted with parental haplotypes. The parental haplotype were firstly inferred using a combination strategy of trio and unrelated individuals. Assisted with the parental haplotype, we then employed a hidden Markov model to non-invasively recover the fetal genome through maternal plasma sequencing. Results Using a sequence depth of approximately 44X against a an approximate 5.69% cff-DNA concentration, we non-invasively inferred fetal genotype and haplotype under different situations of parental heterozygosity. Our data show that 98.57%, 95.37%, and 98.45% of paternal autosome alleles, maternal autosome alleles, and maternal chromosome X in the fetal haplotypes, respectively, were recovered accurately. Additionally, we obtained efficient coverage or strong linkage of 96.65% of reported Mendelian-disorder genes and 98.90% of complex disease-associated markers. Conclusions Our method provides a useful strategy for non-invasive whole fetal genome recovery. PMID:23445748

  16. Detecting Lung Diseases from Exhaled Aerosols: Non-Invasive Lung Diagnosis Using Fractal Analysis and SVM Classification

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Zhao, Weizhong; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Background Each lung structure exhales a unique pattern of aerosols, which can be used to detect and monitor lung diseases non-invasively. The challenges are accurately interpreting the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and quantitatively correlating them to the lung diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, we presented a paradigm of an exhaled aerosol test that addresses the above two challenges and is promising to detect the site and severity of lung diseases. This paradigm consists of two steps: image feature extraction using sub-regional fractal analysis and data classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the breath test in four asthmatic lung models. A high-fidelity image-CFD approach was employed to compute the exhaled aerosol patterns under different disease conditions. Findings By employing the 10-fold cross-validation method, we achieved 100% classification accuracy among four asthmatic models using an ideal 108-sample dataset and 99.1% accuracy using a more realistic 324-sample dataset. The fractal-SVM classifier has been shown to be robust, highly sensitive to structural variations, and inherently suitable for investigating aerosol-disease correlations. Conclusion For the first time, this study quantitatively linked the exhaled aerosol patterns with their underlying diseases and set the stage for the development of a computer-aided diagnostic system for non-invasive detection of obstructive respiratory diseases. PMID:26422016

  17. Non-invasive, label-free cell counting and quantitative analysis of adherent cells using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Mölder, A; Sebesta, M; Gustafsson, M; Gisselson, L; Wingren, A Gjörloff; Alm, K

    2008-11-01

    Manual cell counting is time consuming and requires a high degree of skill on behalf of the person performing the count. Here we use a technique that utilizes digital holography, allowing label-free and completely non-invasive cell counting directly in cell culture vessels with adherent viable cells. The images produced can provide both quantitative and qualitative phase information from a single hologram. The recently constructed microscope Holomonitor (Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund, Sweden) combines the commonly used phase contrast microscope with digital holography, the latter giving us the possibility of achieving quantitative information on cellular shape, area, confluence and optical thickness. This project aimed at determining the accuracy and repeatability of cell counting measurements using digital holography compared to the conventional manual cell counting method using a haemocytometer. The collected data were also used to determine cell size and cellular optical thickness. The results show that digital holography can be used for non-invasive automatic cell counting as precisely as conventional manual cell counting. PMID:19017223

  18. Non invasive real-time monitoring of bacterial infection & therapeutic effect of anti-microbials in five mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Tarani Kanta; Rao, Madhvi; Bhati, Ashish; Kishore, Krishna; Shukla, Gunjan; Kumar, Manoj; Mathur, Tarun; Pandya, Manisha; Upadhyay, Dilip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: In vivo imaging system has contributed significantly to the understanding of bacterial infection and efficacy of drugs in animal model. We report five rapid, reproducible, and non invasive murine pulmonary infection, skin and soft tissue infection, sepsis, and meningitis models using Xenogen bioluminescent strains and specialized in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Methods: The progression of bacterial infection in different target organs was evaluated by the photon intensity and target organ bacterial counts. Genetically engineered bioluminescent bacterial strains viz. Staphylococcus aureus Xen 8.1, 29 and 31; Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen 9 and 10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen-5 were used to induce different target organs infection and were validated with commercially available antibiotics. Results: The lower limit of detection of colony forming unit (cfu) was 1.7-log10 whereas the lower limit of detection of relative light unit (RLU) was 4.2-log10. Recovery of live bacteria from different target organs showed that the bioluminescent signal correlated to the live bacterial count. Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrated the real time monitoring and non-invasive analysis of progression of infection and pharmacological efficacy of drugs. These models may be useful for pre-clinical discovery of new antibiotics. PMID:22199109

  19. Non invasive monitoring of water flow in the vadose zone: the issue of mass balance in controlled tracer injection experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Kemna, A.

    2006-12-01

    The non invasive characterization of the subsurface, with the goal of obtaining data for the calibration of flow and transport hydrologic models, has become very popular in recent years. However, the process of converting geophysical data into quantitative estimates of volumetric water content and/or solute concentrations is not straightforward, as it requires knowledge of (1) resolution and penetration characteristics of the geophysical methods (imaging characteristics); (2) suitable constitutive laws for the conversion of geophysical quantities into hydrologic quantities (petrophysics). In addition, the calibration of flow/transport models on the basis of geophysically-derived data requires that the space/time evolution of these data be summarized in terms that can be directly compared with simulation results. In the case of controlled injection experiments having a point source (e.g. a borehole section), an effective tool is the analysis of spatial moments of the injected slug. However, important issues are still unresolved, particularly with regard to the identifiability of second order spatial moments (spread) and, more disturbing, mass balance. Field experience demonstrates that it is rarely possible to "see" the total injected tracer mass by means of a non invasive method, be it cross-hole ERT or GPR, leading to errors of the order of 50%. The reasons of these limitations lie mostly in the imaging characteristics of the methods. A better understanding of these characteristics can, on the other hand, provide new tools for a more accurate calibration of flow/transport models.

  20. A study of non-invasive Patlak quantification for whole-body dynamic FDG-PET studies of mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Wen, Lingfeng; Yu, Shu-Jung; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Physiological changes in dynamic PET images can be quantitatively estimated by kinetic modeling technique. The process of PET quantification usually requires an input function in the form of a plasma-time activity curve (PTAC), which is generally obtained by invasive arterial blood sampling. However, invasive arterial blood sampling poses many challenges especially for small animal studies, due to the subjects’ limited blood volume and small blood vessels. A simple non-invasive quantification method based on Patlak graphical analysis (PGA) has been recently proposed to use a reference region to derive the relative influx rate for a target region without invasive blood sampling, and evaluated by using the simulation data of human brain FDG-PET studies. In this study, the non-invasive Patlak (nPGA) method was extended to whole-body dynamic small animal FDG-PET studies. The performance of nPGA was systematically investigated by using experimental mouse studies and computer simulations. The mouse studies showed high linearity of relative influx rates between the nPGA and PGA for most pairs of reference and target regions, when an appropriate underlying kinetic model was used. The simulation results demonstrated that the accuracy of the nPGA method was comparable to that of the PGA method, with a higher reliability for most pairs of reference and target regions. The results proved that the nPGA method could provide a non-invasive and indirect way for quantifying the FDG kinetics of tumor in small animal studies. PMID:22956982

  1. Non-invasive methods to study flow and transport at the soil core and lysimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.

    2004-12-01

    Non-invasive methods offer a great potential to study flow and transport processes at the core to the field and regional scale. In this contribution we will focus on the application of selected techniques such as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), X-Ray-Tomography (X-RT), MERIT (Magnetic Electrical Resistivity Imaging Technique), GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) and Spectral Induced Polarisation (SIP) at the core to lysimeter scale. MRI is a powerful tool to derive local scale transport parameters. Based on the imaging of the 3-D temporal evolution of the spatial moments of a solute transport in a soil core, the local scale dispersivity of the soil can be derived. We also use MRI to image the root distribution inside a packed soil column. We employ the effect that the transverse relaxation time of water in the porous medium is considerably smaller than in the root tissue of rizinus communis. Different MRI pulse sequences were tested showing that the best contrast is obtainable by the strongly T2* weighted method CISS. X-RT provides information on the structure of the porous media. By parametrizing this structural information we may obtain an improved description of solute transport in undisturbed soil cores. GPR allows to map the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture in large undisturbed lysimeters. Combined with outflow data, this provides unique information to evaluate and improve mathematical models. New developments like MERIT are on their way which additionally exploits the magnetic information inherent in Electrical Resistivity Tomography-experiments to improve the spatial distribution of solute concentrations at lysimeter scale. SIP methods may be used to derive local scale pore size distribution and hydraulic conductivity. The single relaxation times, deduced from a measured phase spectrum either via multi-Cole-Cole-fits or as a whole relaxation time distribution, are a function of the relaxation length, which is connected to pore space

  2. Robust Fluoroscopic Tracking of Fiducial Markers: Exploiting the Spatial Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the “true” fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to the learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using multiple hypothesis tracking algorithm which is denoted by MHT[19]. Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (μerr: 0.78 – 1.74 mm, σerr: 0.39 – 1.16 mm) for

  3. Microwave Radiometry for Non-Invasive Detection of Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Following Bladder Warming.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo F; Arunachalam, Kavitha; De Luca, Valeria; Salahi, Sara; Boico, Alina; Klemetsen, Oystein; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein K; Bardati, Fernando; Tognolatti, Piero; Snow, Brent

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a serious health problem leading to renal scarring in children. Current VUR detection involves traumatic x-ray imaging of kidneys following injection of contrast agent into bladder via invasive Foley catheter. We present an alternative non-invasive approach for detecting VUR by radiometric monitoring of kidney temperature while gently warming the bladder. METHODS: We report the design and testing of: i) 915MHz square slot antenna array for heating bladder, ii) EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip receive antenna, iii) high-sensitivity 1.375GHz total power radiometer, iv) power modulation approach to increase urine temperature relative to overlying perfused tissues, and v) invivo porcine experiments characterizing bladder heating and radiometric temperature of aaline filled 30mL balloon "kidney" implanted 3-4cm deep in thorax and varied 2-6°C from core temperature. RESULTS: SAR distributions are presented for two novel antennas designed to heat bladder and monitor deep kidney temperatures radiometrically. We demonstrate the ability to heat 180mL saline in in vivo porcine bladder to 40-44°C while maintaining overlying tissues <38°C using time-modulated square slot antennas coupled to the abdomen with room temperature water pad. Pathologic evaluations confirmed lack of acute thermal damage in pelvic tissues for up to three 20min bladder heat exposures. The radiometer clearly recorded 2-6°C changes of 30mL "kidney" targets at depth in 34°C invivo pig thorax. CONCLUSION: A 915MHz antenna array can gently warm in vivo pig bladder without toxicity while a 1.375GHz radiometer with log spiral receive antenna detects ≥2°C rise in 30mL "urine" located 3-4cm deep in thorax, demonstrating more than sufficient sensitivity to detect Grade 4-5 reflux of warmed urine for non-invasive detection of VUR. PMID:22866211

  4. Non invasive blood flow measurement in cerebellum detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy earlier than psychometric tests

    PubMed Central

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Cauli, Omar; Andrés-Costa, Maria-Jesús; González, Olga; Serra, Miguel A; Sánchez-González, Javier; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Belloch, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether non invasive blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling in several brain regions detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood flow (BF) was analyzed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) in different brain areas of 14 controls, 24 cirrhotic patients without and 16 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Images were collected using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Achieva 3T-TX, Philips, Netherlands). Pulsed ASL was performed. Patients showing MHE were detected using the battery Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) consisting of five tests. Different cognitive and motor functions were also assessed: alterations in selective attention were evaluated using the Stroop test. Patients and controls also performed visuo-motor and bimanual coordination tests. Several biochemical parameters were measured: serum pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-18), 3-nitrotyrosine, cGMP and nitrates+nitrites in plasma, and blood ammonia. Bivariate correlations were evaluated. RESULTS: In patients with MHE, BF was increased in cerebellar hemisphere (P = 0.03) and vermis (P = 0.012) and reduced in occipital lobe (P = 0.017). BF in cerebellar hemisphere was also increased in patients without MHE (P = 0.02). Bimanual coordination was impaired in patients without MHE (P = 0.05) and much more in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Visuo-motor coordination was impaired only in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Attention was slightly affected in patients without MHE and more strongly in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). BF in cerebellar hemisphere and vermis correlated with performance in most tests of PHES [(number connection tests A (NCT-A), B (NCT-B)and line tracing test] and in the congruent task of Stroop test. BF in frontal lobe correlated with NCT-A. Performance in bimanual and visuomotor coordination tests correlated only with BF in cerebellar hemisphere. BF in occipital lobe correlates with performance in the PHES battery and with

  5. Microwave Radiometry for Non-Invasive Detection of Vesicoureteral Reflux (VUR) Following Bladder Warming

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; De Luca, Valeria; Salahi, Sara; Boico, Alina; Klemetsen, Oystein; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein K.; Bardati, Fernando; Tognolatti, Piero; Snow, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Background Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a serious health problem leading to renal scarring in children. Current VUR detection involves traumatic x-ray imaging of kidneys following injection of contrast agent into bladder via invasive Foley catheter. We present an alternative non-invasive approach for detecting VUR by radiometric monitoring of kidney temperature while gently warming the bladder. Methods We report the design and testing of: i) 915MHz square slot antenna array for heating bladder, ii) EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip receive antenna, iii) high-sensitivity 1.375GHz total power radiometer, iv) power modulation approach to increase urine temperature relative to overlying perfused tissues, and v) invivo porcine experiments characterizing bladder heating and radiometric temperature of aaline filled 30mL balloon “kidney” implanted 3–4cm deep in thorax and varied 2–6°C from core temperature. Results SAR distributions are presented for two novel antennas designed to heat bladder and monitor deep kidney temperatures radiometrically. We demonstrate the ability to heat 180mL saline in in vivo porcine bladder to 40–44°C while maintaining overlying tissues <38°C using time-modulated square slot antennas coupled to the abdomen with room temperature water pad. Pathologic evaluations confirmed lack of acute thermal damage in pelvic tissues for up to three 20min bladder heat exposures. The radiometer clearly recorded 2–6°C changes of 30mL “kidney” targets at depth in 34°C invivo pig thorax. Conclusion A 915MHz antenna array can gently warm in vivo pig bladder without toxicity while a 1.375GHz radiometer with log spiral receive antenna detects ≥2°C rise in 30mL “urine” located 3–4cm deep in thorax, demonstrating more than sufficient sensitivity to detect Grade 4–5 reflux of warmed urine for non-invasive detection of VUR. PMID:22866211

  6. Development of a non-invasive LED based device for adipose tissue thickness measurements in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volceka, K.; Jakovels, D.; Arina, Z.; Zaharans, J.; Kviesis, E.; Strode, A.; Svampe, E.; Ozolina-Moll, L.; Butnere, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    There are a number of techniques for body composition assessment in clinics and in field-surveys, but in all cases the applied methods have advantages and disadvantages. High precision imaging methods are available, though expensive and non-portable, however, the methods devised for the mass population, often suffer from the lack of precision. Therefore, the development of a safe, mobile, non-invasive, optical method that would be easy to perform, precise and low-cost, but also would offer an accurate assessment of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) both in lean and in obese persons is required. Thereof, the diffuse optical spectroscopy is advantageous over the aforementioned techniques. A prototype device using an optical method for measurement of the SAT thickness in vivo has been developed. The probe contained multiple LEDs (660nm) distributed at various distances from the photo-detector which allow different light penetration depths into the subcutaneous tissue. The differences of the reflected light intensities were used to create a non-linear model, and the computed values were compared with the corresponding thicknesses of SAT, assessed by B-mode ultrasonography. The results show that with the optical system used in this study, accurate results of different SAT thicknesses can be obtained, and imply a further potential for development of multispectral optical system to observe changes of SAT thickness as well as to determine the percentage of total body fat.

  7. Landfills as critical infrastructures: analysis of observational datasets after 12 years of non-invasive monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzari, Andrea; Raco, Brunella; Battaglini, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the results of more than ten years of observations, performed on a regular basis, on a municipal solid waste disposal located in Italy. Observational data are generated by the combination of non-invasive techniques, involving the direct measurement of biogas release to the atmosphere and thermal infrared imaging. In fact, part of the generated biogas tends to escape from the landfill surface even when collecting systems are installed and properly working. Thus, methodologies for estimating the behaviour of a landfill system by means of direct and/or indirect measurement systems have been developed in the last decades. It is nowadays known that these infrastructures produce more than 20% of the total anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere, justifying the need for a systematic and efficient monitoring of such infrastructures. During the last 12 years, observational data regarding a solid waste disposal site located in Tuscany (Italy) have been collected on a regular basis. The collected datasets consist in direct measurements of gas flux with the accumulation chamber method, combined with the detection of thermal anomalies by infrared radiometry. This work discusses the evolution of the estimated performance of the landfill system, its trends, the benefits and the critical aspects of such relatively long-term monitoring activity.

  8. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z.; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  9. Non-invasive classification of microcalcifications with phase-contrast X-ray mammography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Singer, Gad; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; Schneider, Christof W; Stampanoni, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be indicative in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Here we report a non-invasive diagnostic method that may potentially distinguish between different types of microcalcifications using X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Our approach exploits the complementary nature of the absorption and small-angle scattering signals of microcalcifications, obtained simultaneously with an X-ray grating interferometer on a conventional X-ray tube. We demonstrate that the new approach has 100% sensitivity and specificity when applied to phantom data, and we provide evidence of the solidity of the technique by showing its discrimination power when applied to fixed biopsies, to non-fixed tissue specimens and to fresh, whole-breast samples. The proposed method might be further developed to improve early breast cancer diagnosis and has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of uncomfortable breast biopsies, or, in case of widespread microcalcifications, to select the biopsy site before intervention. PMID:24827387

  10. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique for evaluation of hip joint conditions.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Diana; Komistek, Richard D; Cates, Harold E; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2010-02-10

    The performance evaluation of THA outcome is difficult and surgeons often use invasive methods to investigate effectiveness. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique has recently been developed for more-in-depth evaluation of in vivo hip conditions. Gait kinematics, corresponding vibration and sound measurement of five THA subjects were analyzed post-operatively using video-fluoroscopy, sound and accelerometer measurements while walking on a treadmill. The sound sensor and a pair of tri-axial accelerometers, externally attached to the pelvic and femoral bone prominences, detected frequencies that are propagated through the femoral head and acetabular cup interactions. A data acquisition system was used to amplify the signal and filter out noise generated by undesired frequencies. In vivo kinematics and femoral head sliding quantified using video fluoroscopy were correlated to the sound and acceleration measurements. Distinct variations between the different subjects were identified. A correlation of sound and acceleration impulses with separation has been achieved. Although, in vivo sounds are quite variable in nature and all correlated well with the visual images. This is the first study to document and correlate visual and audible effects of THA under in-vivo conditions. This study has shown that the development of the acoustic and vibration technique provides a practical method and generates new possibilities for a better understanding of THA performance.

  11. Measurement of the local aortic stiffness by a non-invasive bioelectrical impedance technique.

    PubMed

    Collette, Mathieu; Lalande, Alain; Willoteaux, Serge; Leftheriotis, Georges; Humeau, Anne

    2011-04-01

    Aortic stiffness measurement is well recognized as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Recently, a simple method has been proposed for the evaluation of the local aortic stiffness (AoStiff) using a non-invasive bioelectrical impedance (BI) technique. This approach relies on a novel interpretation of the arterial stiffness where AoStiff is computed from the measurement of two new BI variables: (1) the local aortic flow resistance (AoRes) exerted by the drag forces onto the flow; (2) the local aortic wall distensibility (AoDist). Herein, we propose to detail and compare these three indices with the reference pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement and the direct assessment of the aortic drag forces (DF) and distensibility (DS) obtained by the magnetic resonance imaging technique. Our results show a significant correlation between AoStiff and PWV (r = 0.79; P < 0.0001; 120 patients at rest; mean age 44 ± 16 years), and also between AoRes and DF (r = 0.95; P = 0.0011) and between AoDist and DS (r = 0.93; P = 0.0022) on eight patients at rest (mean age 52 ± 19 years). These first results suggest that local aortic stiffness can be explored reliably by the BI technique.

  12. A concept for non-invasive temperature measurement during injection moulding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Christian; Spekowius, Marcel; Wipperfürth, Jens; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Current models of the injection moulding process insufficiently consider the thermal interactions between melt, solidified material and the mould. A detailed description requires a deep understanding of the underlying processes and a precise observation of the temperature. Because todays measurement concepts do not allow a non-invasive analysis it is necessary to find new measurement techniques for temperature measurements during the manufacturing process. In this work we present the idea of a set up for a tomographic ultrasound measurement of the temperature field inside a plastics melt. The goal is to identify a concept that can be installed on a specialized mould for the injection moulding process. The challenges are discussed and the design of a prototype is shown. Special attention is given to the spatial arrangement of the sensors. Besides the design of a measurement set up a reconstruction strategy for the ultrasound signals is required. We present an approach in which an image processing algorithm can be used to calculate a temperature distribution from the ultrasound scans. We discuss a reconstruction strategy in which the ultrasound signals are converted into a spartial temperature distribution by using pvT curves that are obtained by dilatometer measurements.

  13. Non-invasive gas monitoring in newborn infants using diode laser absorption spectroscopy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Patrik; Svanberg, Emilie K.; Cocola, Lorenzo; Lewander, Märta; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Jahr, John; Fellman, Vineta; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    2012-03-01

    Non-invasive diode laser spectroscopy was, for the first time, used to assess gas content in the intestines and the lungs of a new-born, 4 kg, baby. Two gases, water vapor and oxygen, were studied with two low-power tunable diode lasers, illuminating the surface skin tissue and detecting the diffusely emerging light a few centimeters away. The light, having penetrated into the tissue, had experienced absorption by gas located in the lungs and in the intestines. Very distinct water vapor signals were obtained from the intestines while imprint from oxygen was lacking, as expected. Detectable, but minor, signals of water vapor were also obtained from the lungs, illuminating the armpit area and detecting below the collar bone. Water vapor signals were seen but again oxygen signals were lacking, now due to the difficulties of penetration of the oxygen probing light into the lungs of this full-term baby. Ultra-sound images were obtained both from the lungs and from the stomach of the baby. Based on dimensions and our experimental findings, we conclude, that for early pre-term babies, also oxygen should be detectable in the lungs, in addition to intestine and lung detection of water vapor. The present paper focuses on the studies of the intestines while the lung studies will be covered in a forthcoming paper.

  14. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique for evaluation of hip joint conditions.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Diana; Komistek, Richard D; Cates, Harold E; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2010-02-10

    The performance evaluation of THA outcome is difficult and surgeons often use invasive methods to investigate effectiveness. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique has recently been developed for more-in-depth evaluation of in vivo hip conditions. Gait kinematics, corresponding vibration and sound measurement of five THA subjects were analyzed post-operatively using video-fluoroscopy, sound and accelerometer measurements while walking on a treadmill. The sound sensor and a pair of tri-axial accelerometers, externally attached to the pelvic and femoral bone prominences, detected frequencies that are propagated through the femoral head and acetabular cup interactions. A data acquisition system was used to amplify the signal and filter out noise generated by undesired frequencies. In vivo kinematics and femoral head sliding quantified using video fluoroscopy were correlated to the sound and acceleration measurements. Distinct variations between the different subjects were identified. A correlation of sound and acceleration impulses with separation has been achieved. Although, in vivo sounds are quite variable in nature and all correlated well with the visual images. This is the first study to document and correlate visual and audible effects of THA under in-vivo conditions. This study has shown that the development of the acoustic and vibration technique provides a practical method and generates new possibilities for a better understanding of THA performance. PMID:19931084

  15. Towards fluoroscopic respiratory gating for lung tumours without radiopaque markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Mostafavi, Hassan; Sharp, Gregory C.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2005-10-01

    Due to the risk of pneumothorax, many clinicians are reluctant to implant radiopaque markers within patients' lungs for the purpose of radiographic or fluoroscopic tumour localization. We propose a method of gated therapy using fluoroscopic information without the implantation of radiopaque markers. The method presented here does not rely on any external motion signal either. Breathing phase information is found by analysing the fluoroscopic intensity fluctuations in the lung. As the lungs fill/empty, the radiological pathlength through them shortens/lengthens, giving brighter/darker fluoroscopic intensities. The phase information is combined with motion-enhanced template matching to turn the beam on when the tumour is in the desired location. A study based on patient data is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this procedure. The resulting beam-on pattern is similar to that produced by an external gating system. The only discrepancies occur briefly and at the gate edges.

  16. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  17. A spatio-temporal detective quantum efficiency and its application to fluoroscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S. N.; Cunningham, I. A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Fluoroscopic x-ray imaging systems are used extensively in spatio-temporal detection tasks and require a spatio-temporal description of system performance. No accepted metric exists that describes spatio-temporal fluoroscopic performance. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is a metric widely used in radiography to quantify system performance and as a surrogate measure of patient ''dose efficiency.'' It has been applied previously to fluoroscopic systems with the introduction of a temporal correction factor. However, the use of a temporally-corrected DQE does not provide system temporal information and it is only valid under specific conditions, many of which are not likely to be satisfied by suboptimal systems. The authors propose a spatio-temporal DQE that describes performance in both space and time and is applicable to all spatio-temporal quantum-based imaging systems. Methods: The authors define a spatio-temporal DQE (two spatial-frequency axes and one temporal-frequency axis) in terms of a small-signal spatio-temporal modulation transfer function (MTF) and spatio-temporal noise power spectrum (NPS). Measurements were made on an x-ray image intensifier-based bench-top system using continuous fluoroscopy with an RQA-5 beam at 3.9 {mu}R/frame and hardened 50 kVp beam (0.8 mm Cu filtration added) at 1.9 {mu}R/frame. Results: A zero-frequency DQE value of 0.64 was measured under both conditions. Nonideal performance was noted at both larger spatial and temporal frequencies; DQE values decreased by {approx}50% at the cutoff temporal frequency of 15 Hz. Conclusions: The spatio-temporal DQE enables measurements of decreased temporal system performance at larger temporal frequencies analogous to previous measurements of decreased (spatial) performance. This marks the first time that system performance and dose efficiency in both space and time have been measured on a fluoroscopic system using DQE and is the first step toward the generalized use of DQE on

  18. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Leon C; Sigal, Ian A; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K; Conner, Ian P; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-08-26

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0-40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments.

  19. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Leon C; Sigal, Ian A; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K; Conner, Ian P; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0-40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments. PMID:27561353

  20. Changing trends of hemodynamic monitoring in ICU - from invasive to non-invasive methods: Are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shubhangi; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Goudra, Basavana G; Sinha, Ashish C

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring in the form of invasive arterial, central venous pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure monitoring may be required in seriously ill Intensive care unit patients, in patients undergoing surgeries involving gross hemodynamic changes and in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. These techniques are considered the gold standards of hemodynamic monitoring but are associated with their inherent risks. A number of non-invasive techniques based on various physical principles are under investigation at present. The goal is to not only avoid the risk of invasive intervention, but also to match the gold standard set by them as far as possible. Techniques based on photoplethysmography, arterial tonometry and pulse transit time analysis have come up for continuous arterial pressure monitoring. Of these the first has been studied most extensively and validated, however it has been shown to be substandard in patients with gross hemodynamic instability. The other two still need further evaluation. While the non-invasive methods for arterial blood pressure monitoring are based on diverse technologies, those for measurement of central venous and pulmonary pressures are mostly based on imaging techniques such as echocardiography, Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography scan and chest X ray. Most of these techniques are based on measurement of the dimensions of the great veins. This makes them operator and observer dependent. However, studies done till now have revealed adequate inter-observer agreement. These techniques are still in their incipience and although initial studies are encouraging, further research is needed on this front. PMID:25024945

  1. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Leon C.; Sigal, Ian A.; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K.; Conner, Ian P.; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X.; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Chan, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0–40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments. PMID:27561353

  2. Non-invasive Presymptomatic Detection of Cercospora beticola Infection and Identification of Early Metabolic Responses in Sugar Beet

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Nadja; Backhaus, Andreas; Döll, Stefanie; Fischer, Sandra; Seiffert, Udo; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cercospora beticola is an economically significant fungal pathogen of sugar beet, and is the causative pathogen of Cercospora leaf spot. Selected host genotypes with contrasting degree of susceptibility to the disease have been exploited to characterize the patterns of metabolite responses to fungal infection, and to devise a pre-symptomatic, non-invasive method of detecting the presence of the pathogen. Sugar beet genotypes were analyzed for metabolite profiles and hyperspectral signatures. Correlation of data matrices from both approaches facilitated identification of candidates for metabolic markers. Hyperspectral imaging was highly predictive with a classification accuracy of 98.5–99.9% in detecting C. beticola. Metabolite analysis revealed metabolites altered by the host as part of a successful defense response: these were L-DOPA, 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid 12-O-β-D-glucoside, pantothenic acid, and 5-O-feruloylquinic acid. The accumulation of glucosylvitexin in the resistant cultivar suggests it acts as a constitutively produced protectant. The study establishes a proof-of-concept for an unbiased, presymptomatic and non-invasive detection system for the presence of C. beticola. The test needs to be validated with a larger set of genotypes, to be scalable to the level of a crop improvement program, aiming to speed up the selection for resistant cultivars of sugar beet. Untargeted metabolic profiling is a valuable tool to identify metabolites which correlate with hyperspectral data. PMID:27713750

  3. Non-invasive airway health measurement using synchrotron x-ray microscopy of high refractive index glass microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye; Farrow, Nigel; Siu, Karen; Parsons, David

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a gene defect that compromises the ability of the mucociliary transit (MCT) system to clear the airways of debris and pathogens. To directly characterise airway health and the effects of treatments we have developed a synchrotron X-ray microscopy method that non-invasively measures the local rate and patterns of MCT behaviour. Although the nasal airways of CF mice exhibit the CF pathophysiology, there is evidence that nasal MCT is not altered in CF mice1. The aim of this experiment was to determine if our non-invasive local airway health assessment method could identify differences in nasal MCT rate between normal and CF mice, information that is potentially lost in bulk MCT measurements. Experiments were performed on the BL20XU beamline at the SPring-8 Synchrotron in Japan. Mice were anaesthetized, a small quantity of micron-sized marker particles were delivered to the nose, and images of the nasal airways were acquired for 15 minutes. The nasal airways were treated with hypertonic saline or mannitol to increase surface hydration and MCT. Custom software was used to locate and track particles and calculate individual and bulk MCT rates. No statistically significant differences in MCT rate were found between normal and CF mouse nasal airways or between treatments. However, we hope that the improved sensitivity provided by this technique will accelerate the ability to identify useful CF lung disease-modifying interventions in small animal models, and enhance the development and efficacy of proposed new therapies.

  4. Development of fluoroscopic registration in spinal neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Hamid R.; Grzeszczuk, Robert; Chin, Shao; Holz, H.; Hariri, Sanaz; Badr, Rana; Kim, Daniel; Adler, John R.; Shahidi, Ramin

    2001-05-01

    We present a system involving a computer-instrumented fluoroscope for the purpose of 3D navigation and guidance using pre-operative diagnostic scans as a reference. The goal of the project is to devise a computer-assisted tool that will improve the accuracy, reduce risk, minimize the invasiveness, and shorten the time it takes to perform a variety of neurosurgical and orthopedic procedures of the spine. For this purpose we propose an apparatus that will track surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy and pre-operative 3D diagnostic scans using intraoperative fluoroscopy for in situ registration and localization of embedded fiducials. Preliminary studies have found a fiducial registration error (FRE) of 1.41 mm and a Target Localization Error (TLE) of 0.48 mm. The resulting system leverages equipment already commonly available in the operating room (OR), providing an important new functionality that is free of many current limitations, such as the inadequacy of skin fiducials for spinal neuronavigation, while keeping costs contained.

  5. TH-C-17A-11: Hyperthermia-Driven Immunotherapy Using Non-Invasive Radiowaves

    SciTech Connect

    Serda, R; Savage, D; Corr, S; Curley, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The sad truth is that cancer is blamed for the death of nearly one in four people in the US. Immunotherapy offers hope for stimulating cancer immunity leading to targeted killing of cancer cells and a preventative measure for cancer recurrence. Unfortunately, the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy has not yet been established, however novel approaches are being developed, including combining immunotherapy with traditional chemotherapy, radiotherapy or thermal therapy. Therapeutics such as radiofrequency (RF) ablation and select chemotherapeutics induce mild anticancer immune responses. This project seeks to enhance the immune responses stimulated by these agents by co-delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics and immune modulators in the presence of RF induced hyperthermia. Methods: A 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer is used to test the ability of RF waves to enhance accumulation of nanoparticles in tumor tissue by increasing blood flow and extravation of nanoparticles from hyperpermeable vessels. Images of particle and cell trafficking in the tumor are captured using an integrated RF and confocal imaging system, and tumor growth is monitored by tumor bioluminescence and caliper measurements. Results: Here we demonstrate enhanced intratumoral blood flow induced by non-invasive RF waves and an increase in nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor. IL-12 is shown to have powerful anti-tumor effects leading to tumor regression and the release of Th1-biased cytokines. Doxorubicin nanoparticles combined with adjuvant nanoparticles exhibited superior antitumor effects to single agent therapy. Conclusion: RF therapy combined with nanotherapeutics is a promising approach to enhance the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor and to stimulate a tumor microenvironment that supports the development of cancer-specific immune responses. This research was supported by the National Institute of Health grant numbers U54 CA143837 and U54 CA151668, and the Kanzius

  6. Non-Invasive Survey of Old Paintings Using Vnir Hyperspectral Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matouskova, E.; Pavelka, K.; Svadlenkova, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is relatively new method developed primarily for army applications with respect to detection of possible chemical weapon existence and as an efficient assistant for a geological survey. The method is based on recording spectral profile for many hundreds of narrow spectral band. The technique gives full spectral curve of explored pixel which is an unparalleled signature of pixels material. Spectral signatures can then be compared with pre-defined spectral libraries or they can be created with respect to application. A new project named "New Modern Methods of Non-invasive Survey of Historical Site Objects" started at CTU in Prague with the New Year. The project is designed for 4 years and is funded by the Ministry of Culture in the Czech Republic. It is focused on material and chemical composition, damage diagnostics, condition description of paintings, images, construction components and whole structure object analysis in cultural heritage domain. This paper shows first results of the project on painting documentation field as well as used instrument. Hyperspec VNIR by Headwall Photonics was used for this analysis. It operates in the spectral range between 400 and 1000 nm. Comparison with infrared photography is discussed. The goal of this contribution is a non-destructive deep exploration of specific paintings. Two original 17th century paintings by Flemish authors Thomas van Apshoven ("On the Road") and David Teniers the Younger ("The Interior of a Mill") were chosen for the first analysis with a kind permission of academic painter Mr. M. Martan. Both paintings oil painted on wooden panel. This combination was chosen because of the possibility of underdrawing visualization which is supposed to be the most uncomplicated painting combination for this type of analysis.

  7. The advance of non-invasive detection methods in osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiao; Chen, Yanping

    2011-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases which badly affected the patients' living quality and economy. Detection and evaluation technology can provide basic information for early treatment. A variety of imaging methods in OA were reviewed, such as conventional X-ray, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Among the existing imaging modalities, the spatial resolution of X-ray is extremely high; CT is a three-dimensional method, which has high density resolution; US as an evaluation method of knee OA discriminates lesions sensitively between normal cartilage and degenerative one; as a sensitive and nonionizing method, MRI is suitable for the detection of early OA, but the cost is too expensive for routine use; NIRS is a safe, low cost modality, and is also good at detecting early stage OA. In a word, each method has its own advantages, but NIRS is provided with broader application prospect, and it is likely to be used in clinical daily routine and become the golden standard for diagnostic detection.

  8. Non-invasive Central and Peripheral Stimulation: New Hope for Essential Tremor?

    PubMed Central

    Chalah, Moussa A.; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Ayache, Samar S.

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is among the most frequent movement disorders. It usually manifests as a postural and kinematic tremor of the arms, but may also involve the head, voice, lower limbs, and trunk. An oscillatory network has been proposed as a neural correlate of ET, and is mainly composed of the olivocerebellar system, thalamus, and motor cortex. Since pharmacological agents have limited benefits, surgical interventions like deep brain stimulation are the last-line treatment options for the most severe cases. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, particularly transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation, are used to ameliorate ET. Their non-invasiveness, along with their side effects profile, makes them an appealing treatment option. In addition, peripheral stimulation has been applied in the same perspective. Hence, the aim of the present review is to shed light on the emergent use of non-invasive central and peripheral stimulation techniques in this interesting context. PMID:26635516

  9. Tissue-Informative Mechanism for Wearable Non-invasive Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sung Hun; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Dae Jung; Bien, Franklin; Kim, Jae Joon

    2014-10-01

    Accurate continuous direct measurement of the blood pressure is currently available thru direct invasive methods via intravascular needles, and is mostly limited to use during surgical procedures or in the intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive methods that are mostly based on auscultation or cuff oscillometric principles do provide relatively accurate measurement of blood pressure. However, they mostly involve physical inconveniences such as pressure or stress on the human body. Here, we introduce a new non-invasive mechanism of tissue-informative measurement, where an experimental phenomenon called subcutaneous tissue pressure equilibrium is revealed and related for application in detection of absolute blood pressure. A prototype was experimentally verified to provide an absolute blood pressure measurement by wearing a watch-type measurement module that does not cause any discomfort. This work is supposed to contribute remarkably to the advancement of continuous non-invasive mobile devices for 24-7 daily-life ambulatory blood-pressure monitoring.

  10. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients.

  11. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period and difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is a method of ventilatory assistance aimed at increasing alveolar ventilation, thus achieving, in selected subjects, the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation, with the consequent improvement in survival. There has been a systematic review and study of the technical, clinical experiences, and recommendations concerning the application of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the pre- and intraoperative period. The use of prophylactic non-invasive mechanical ventilation before surgery that involves significant alterations in the ventilatory function may decrease the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Its intraoperative use will mainly depend on the type of surgery, type of anaesthetic technique, and the clinical status of the patient. Its use allows greater anaesthetic depth without deterioration of oxygenation and ventilation of patients. PMID:25702198

  12. Non-Invasive In Vivo Ultrasound Temperature Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Mahdi

    New emerging technologies in thermal therapy require precise monitoring and control of the delivered thermal dose in a variety of situations. The therapeutic temperature changes in target tissues range from few degrees for releasing chemotherapy drugs encapsulated in the thermosensitive liposomes to boiling temperatures in complete ablation of tumors via cell necrosis. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has emerged as a promising modality for noninvasive surgery due to its ability to create precise mechanical and thermal effects at the target without affecting surrounding tissues. An essential element in all these procedures, however, is accurate estimation of the target tissue temperature during the procedure to ensure its safety and efficacy. The advent of diagnostic imaging tools for guidance of thermal therapy was a key factor in the clinical acceptance of these minimally invasive or noninvasive methods. More recently, ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) thermography techniques have been proposed for guidance, monitoring, and control of noninvasive thermal therapies. MR thermography has shown acceptable sensitivity and accuracy in imaging temperature change and it is currently FDA-approved on clinical HIFU units. However, it suffers from limitations like cost of integration with ultrasound therapy system and slow rate of imaging for real time guidance. Ultrasound, on the other hand, has the advantage of real time imaging and ease of integration with the therapy system. An infinitesimal model for imaging temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound has been demonstrated, including in vivo small-animal imaging. However, this model suffers from limitations that prevent demonstration in more clinically-relevant settings. One limitation stems from the infinitesimal nature of the model, which results in spatial inconsistencies of the estimated temperature field. Another limitation is the sensitivity to tissue motion and deformation during in vivo, which

  13. Diagnosis of Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Non-invasive techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Valecillos, R.; Hirschhaut, E.; Giordano, H.; Boccalandro, I.; Suárez, C.; Aparicio, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The natural history of Chagas' disease and its manifestations when the heart is involved are detailed clinically and pathologically. Three phases are recognized: the acute phase, lasting from 1-3 months, the latent phase, which may last from 10-20 years, and the chronic phase, which has the most serious manifestations. This phase is subdivided into three clinical stages. An analysis of the varied cardiac manifestations on 235 patients is included. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:412174

  14. Non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology in amphibian conservation physiology

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive endocrinology utilizes non-invasive biological samples (such as faeces, urine, hair, aquatic media, and saliva) for the quantification of hormones in wildlife. Urinary-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and radio-immunoassay have enabled the rapid quantification of reproductive and stress hormones in amphibians (Anura: Amphibia). With minimal disturbance, these methods can be used to assess the ovarian and testicular endocrine functions as well as physiological stress in captive and free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine monitoring has therefore greatly advanced our knowledge of the functioning of the stress endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–interrenal axis) and the reproductive endocrine system (the hypothalamo–pituitary–gonadal axis) in the amphibian physiological stress response, reproductive ecology, health and welfare, and survival. Biological (physiological) validation is necessary for obtaining the excretory lag time of hormone metabolites. Urinary-based EIA for the major reproductive hormones, estradiol and progesterone in females and testosterone in males, can be used to track the reproductive hormone profiles in relationship to reproductive behaviour and environmental data in free-living anurans. Urinary-based corticosterone metabolite EIA can be used to assess the sublethal impacts of biological stressors (such as invasive species and pathogenic diseases) as well as anthropogenic induced environmental stressors (e.g. extreme temperatures) on free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine methods can also assist in the diagnosis of success or failure of captive breeding programmes by measuring the longitudinal patterns of changes in reproductive hormones and corticosterone within captive anurans and comparing the endocrine profiles with health records and reproductive behaviour. This review paper focuses on the reproductive and the stress endocrinology of anurans and demonstrates the uses of non-invasive endocrinology

  15. Non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology in amphibian conservation physiology.

    PubMed

    Narayan, E J

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive endocrinology utilizes non-invasive biological samples (such as faeces, urine, hair, aquatic media, and saliva) for the quantification of hormones in wildlife. Urinary-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and radio-immunoassay have enabled the rapid quantification of reproductive and stress hormones in amphibians (Anura: Amphibia). With minimal disturbance, these methods can be used to assess the ovarian and testicular endocrine functions as well as physiological stress in captive and free-living populations. Non-invasive endocrine monitoring has therefore greatly advanced our knowledge of the functioning of the stress endocrine system (the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis) and the reproductive endocrine system (the hypot