Science.gov

Sample records for non-obese diabetic mice

  1. B lymphocytes not required for progression from insulitis to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Charlton, B; Zhang, M D; Slattery, R M

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While it is clear that B lymphocytes are necessary, it has not been clear at which stage of disease they play a role; early, late or both. To clarify when B lymphocytes are needed, T lymphocytes were transferred from 5-week-old NOD female mice to age-matched NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) recipient mice. NOD/SCID mice, which lack functionally mature T and B lymphocytes, do not normally develop insulitis or insulin-dependent diabetes melitus (IDDM). The NOD/SCID mice that received purified T lymphocytes from 5-week-old NOD mice subsequently developed insulitis and diabetes even though they did not have detectable B lymphocytes. This suggests that while B lymphocytes may be essential for an initial priming event they are not requisite for disease progression in the NOD mouse.

  2. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  3. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  4. Protective effect of berberine on serum glucose levels in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Wei-Han; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2012-03-01

    Among the active components in traditional anti-diabetic herbal plants, berberine which is an isoquinoline alkaloid exhibits promising potential for its potent anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic effects. However, the berberine effect on serum glucose levels in type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects still remains unknown. This study investigated berberine's effects on serum glucose levels using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice that spontaneously develop T1D. The NOD mice were randomly divided into four groups, administered water with 50, 150, and 500 mg berberine/kg bw, respectively, through 14 weeks. ICR mice were also selected as a species control group to compare with the NOD mice. Changes in body weight, oral glucose challenge, and serum glucose levels were determined to identify the protective effect of berberine on T1D. After the 14-week oral supplementation, berberine decreased fasting serum glucose levels in NOD mice close to the levels in normal ICR mice in a dose dependent manner. Serum berberine levels showed a significantly (P<0.05) negative and non-linear correlation with fasting glucose levels in berberine-administered NOD mice. Our results suggested that berberine supplemented at appropriate doses for 14 weeks did not cause toxic side effects, but improved hyperglycemia in NOD mice.

  5. Losartan and Ozagrel reverse retinal arteriolar constriction in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungjun; Harris, Norman R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Reductions in retinal blood flow are observed early in diabetes. Venules may influence arteriolar constriction and flow; therefore, we hypothesized that diabetes would induce the constriction of arterioles that are in close proximity to venules, with the constriction mediated by thromboxane and angiotensin II. Methods Using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, retinal measurements were performed 3 weeks following the age at which glucose levels exceeded 200 mg/dl, with accompanying experiments on age-matched normoglycemic NOD mice. The measurements included retinal arteriolar diameters and red blood cell velocities, and were repeated following an injection of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor Ozagrel. Mice were subdivided into equal groups given drinking water with or without the angiotensin II receptor antagonist Losartan. Results Retinal arterioles were constricted in hyperglycemic mice, with a significant reduction in flow. However, not all arterioles were equally affected; the vasoconstriction was limited to arterioles that were in closer proximity to venules. The arteriolar vasoconstriction (mean arteriolar diameters = 51 ± 1 μm vs 61 ± 1 μm in controls; p<0.01) was eliminated by both Ozagrel (61 ± 2 μm) and Losartan (63 ± 2 μm). Conclusion Venule-dependent arteriolar vasoconstriction in NOD mice is mediated by thromboxane and/or angiotensin II. PMID:18574741

  6. Development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice promotes Chlamydia pneumoniae dissemination from lung to peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Ichiro; Osaki, Takako; Kurata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    We examined a possible association between development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and dissemination of Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. By real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers for C. pneumoniae 16S rRNA, following multiple intranasal inoculations, we detected bacteria in lung in NOD mice with diabetes (38.5%) as well as Institute of Cancer Research, USA (ICR) mice (40%), but prevalence of bacteria in NOD mice without diabetes (pre-diabetic NOD mice and non-diabetic retired NOD mice) was very low (4.8%). The bacteria were only detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with hydrocortisone of the NOD mice with diabetes (53.8%). Results of immunostaining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antichlamydia monoclonal antibody also showed the presence of bacterial antigens in the lungs and the PBMCs judged as positive by the RT-PCR. However, C. pneumoniae from cultured PBMCs of all NOD mice was undetected by cultivation method with inclusion-forming units assay. In addition, no influence of C. pneumoniae intranasal inoculation on development of diabetes in NOD mice was confirmed. Thus, the development of diabetes in NOD mouse appears to be one of critical factors for promoting the dissemination of C. pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. PMID:16623756

  7. Changes in the Growth Hormone-IGF-I Axis in Non-obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yael; Eshet, Rina; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Phillip, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the changes in GH-IGF-I axis in non-obese diabetic (NOD)-mice, a model of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Diabetic female NOD mice and their age- and sex-matched controls were sacrificed at 4, 14, 21 and 30 days (30d DM) after the onset of glycosuria. Serum GH levels increased and serum IGF-I levels decreased in the 30d DM group (182 ± 32% and 45 ± 24% of age-matched controls respectively, p < 0.05). Another group (30d DM + I) was given SC insulin, and its serum IGF-I levels remained decreased. Liver GH receptor (GHR) and GH binding protein (GHBP) mRNA levels, as well as liver membrane GH binding assays were deeply decreased in the 30d DM group in comparison to controls. GHR message and binding capacity remained decreased in the 30d DM + I group. Renal GHR mRNA was decreased at 21d DM but not at 14d DM, whereas GHBP mRNA remained unchanged throughout the experiment. In conclusion, increased serum GH levels are documented in NOD diabetic mice, similarly to the changes described in humans. The decrease in GHR levels and decreased serum IGF-I in spite of increased circulating GH suggest a state of GH resistance. PMID:11469393

  8. Studies on the thymus of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice: effect of transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, L A; Healey, D; Simpson, E; Chandler, P; Lund, T; Ritter, M A; Cooke, A

    1994-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a good model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Autoreactive T cells may play a fundamental role in disease initiation in this model, while disregulation of such cells may result from an abnormal thymic microenvironment. Diabetes is prevented in NOD mice by direct introduction of an E alpha d transgene (NOD-E) or a modified I-A beta chain of NOD origin (NOD-PRO or NOD-ASP). To investigate if disease pathology in NOD mice, protection from disease in transgenic NOD-E and NOD-PRO and partial protection from disease in NOD-ASP can be attributed to alterations in the thymic microenvironment, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis of the thymi of these mouse strains was studied. Thymi from NOD and NOD-E mice showed a progressive increase in thymic B-cell percentage from 12 weeks of age. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss in thymic epithelial cells with the appearance of large epithelial-free areas mainly at the corticomedullary junction, which increased in size and number with age and contained the B-cell clusters. Such thymic B cells did not express CD5 and were absent in CBA, NOD-ASP and NOD-PRO mice as were the epithelial cell-free spaces, even at 5 months of age. Therefore the mechanisms of disease protection in the transgenic NOD-E and NOD-ASP/NOD-PRO mice may differ if these thymic abnormalities are related to disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7523287

  9. Boron supplementation improves bone health of non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Dessordi, Renata; Spirlandeli, Adriano Levi; Zamarioli, Ariane; Volpon, José Batista; Navarro, Anderson Marliere

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a condition that predisposes a higher risk for the development of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of boron supplementation on bone microstructure and strength in control and non-obese diabetic mice for 30days. The animals were supplemented with 40μg/0,5ml of boron solution and controls received 0,5ml of distilled water daily. We evaluated the biochemical parameters: total calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and boron; bone analysis: bone computed microtomography, and biomechanical assay with a three point test on the femur. This study consisted of 28 animals divided into four groups: Group water control - Ctrl (n=10), Group boron control - Ctrl±B (n=8), Group diabetic water - Diab (n=5) and Group diabetic boron - Diab±B (n=5). The results showed that cortical bone volume and the trabecular bone volume fraction were higher for Diab±B and Ctrl±B compared to the Diab and Ctrl groups (p≤0,05). The trabecular specific bone surface was greater for the Diab±B group, and the trabecular thickness and structure model index had the worst values for the Diab group. The boron serum concentrations were higher for the Diab±B group compared to non-supplemented groups. The magnesium concentration was lower for Diab and Diab±B compared with controls. The biomechanical test on the femur revealed maintenance of parameters of the bone strength in animals Diab±B compared to the Diab group and controls. The results suggest that boron supplementation improves parameters related to bone strength and microstructure of cortical and trabecular bone in diabetic animals and the controls that were supplemented.

  10. Oxidative stress and susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition precedes the onset of diabetes in autoimmune non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, C; La Guardia, P G; Leite, A C R; Oliveira, D N; de Lima Zollner, R L; Catharino, R R; Vercesi, A E; Oliveira, H C F

    2014-12-01

    Beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes (TID) is associated with cellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are present in T1D model (non-obese diabetic mouse, NOD) and if they are related to the stages of disease development. NOD mice were studied at three stages: non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, and diabetic and compared with age-matched Balb/c mice. Mitochondria respiration rates measured at phosphorylating and resting states in liver and soleus biopsies and in isolated liver mitochondria were similar in NOD and Balb/c mice at the three disease stages. However, NOD liver mitochondria were more susceptible to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition as determined by cyclosporine-A-sensitive swelling and by decreased calcium retention capacity in all three stages of diabetes development. Mitochondria H2O2 production rate was higher in non-diabetic, but unaltered in pre-diabetic and diabetic NOD mice. The global cell reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not specific mitochondria ROS production, was significantly increased in NOD lymphomononuclear and stem cells in all disease stages. In addition, marked elevated rates of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF) oxidation were observed in pancreatic islets from non-diabetic NOD mice. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) and lipidomic approach, we identified oxidized lipid markers in NOD liver mitochondria for each disease stage, most of them being derivatives of diacylglycerols and phospholipids. These results suggest that the cellular oxidative stress precedes the establishment of diabetes and may be the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction that is involved in beta cell death.

  11. Prophylactic fenbendazole therapy does not affect the incidence and onset of type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Franke, Deanna D H; Shirwan, Haval

    2006-03-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is a common, highly efficacious broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug used to treat and limit rodent pinworm infections. However, the effect of its prophylactic use on the immune response of rodents is largely undefined. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a model commonly used to study type 1 diabetes (T1D). Parasitic infections will inhibit diabetes development in NOD mice; thus, in the presence of contamination, prophylactic treatment with anthelmintics must be considered to maintain experimental research. Herein, we investigated the prophylactic use of FBZ in NOD mice to determine its effect on the incidence and onset of diabetes, lymphocyte sub-populations and T cell proliferative responses. NOD mice were separated into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received a diet containing FBZ. Animals were monitored for the incidence and onset of T1D. At matched time points, diabetic and non-diabetic mice were killed and splenic lymphocytes analyzed for various cell sub-populations and mitogen-induced proliferative responses using flow cytometry. Treated and control mice were monitored >23 weeks with no detectable effects on the incidence or onset of diabetes. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in lymphocyte sub-populations and mitogen-induced CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses between control and treatment groups. These results suggest that prophylactic FBZ treatment does not significantly alter the incidence or onset of diabetes in NOD mice. The prophylactic use of FBZ, therefore, presents a viable approach for the prevention of pinworm infection in precious experimental animals with substantial scientific and economic benefits.

  12. Induction of resistance to diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice by targeting CD44 with a specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Weiss, L; Slavin, S; Reich, S; Cohen, P; Shuster, S; Stern, R; Kaganovsky, E; Okon, E; Rubinstein, A M; Naor, D

    2000-01-04

    Inflammatory destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets is the hallmark of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a spontaneous autoimmune disease of non-obese diabetic mice resembling human juvenile (type I) diabetes. Histochemical analysis of diabetic pancreata revealed that mononuclear cells infiltrating the islets and causing autoimmune insulitis, as well as local islet cells, express the CD44 receptor; hyaluronic acid, the principal ligand of CD44, is detected in the islet periphery and islet endothelium. Injection of anti-CD44 mAb 1 hr before cell transfer of diabetogenic splenocytes and subsequently on alternate days for 4 weeks induced considerable resistance to diabetes in recipient mice, reflected by reduced insulitis. Contact sensitivity to oxazolone was not influenced by this treatment. A similar antidiabetic effect was observed even when the anti-CD44 mAb administration was initiated at the time of disease onset: i.e., 4-7 weeks after cell transfer. Administration of the enzyme hyaluronidase also induced appreciable resistance to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, suggesting that the CD44-hyaluronic acid interaction is involved in the development of the disease. These findings demonstrate that CD44-positive inflammatory cells may be a potential therapeutic target in insulin-dependent diabetes.

  13. Histochemical analysis of lymphatic endothelial cells in the pancreas of non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, P; Ji, R C; Kato, S

    2003-01-01

    We studied the relationship between insulitic development and function–structural changes of pancreatic lymphatics in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using combined 5′-nucleotidase (5′-Nase) enzyme histochemical and secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC/CCL21) immunohistochemical methods. Interlobular lymphatic vessels were positive for 5′-Nase throughout the pancreas, and dependent on both blood vessels and pancreatic ducts. Intralobular initial lymphatics were rare and occasionally ran in the neighbourhood of islets. During the non-insulitic stage, the 5′-Nase-reactive product was evenly distributed on the surface of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) with weak expression of CCL21. The activity of 5′-Nase on lymphatic vessels became slightly reduced as insulitis developed. The increasing blood glucose values appeared to be consistent with an increasing CCL21 expression by the endothelial lining, especially on the surface of LECs adjacent to the infiltrated islets and tissues. Lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DCs) were frequently located in the connective tissue, surrounding the lymphatic wall with deposition of 5′-Nase precipitates. As the infiltration became severe, lymphocytes and DCs accumulated within lymphatic vessels and expressed high levels of CCL21. The most significant finding was that many DCs adhered to lymphatic vessels, transmigrating via the thin and indented endothelial walls. The activity of 5′-Nase was increased on the adhesion surface between DCs (or lymphocytes) and LECs. The latter were characterized by open intercellular junctions and obvious cytoplasmic protrusions. These results suggest that LECs closely interact with DCs and lymphocytes, and play a key role in the migration of DCs and lymphocytes via lymphatic vessels during the pathological processes of insulitis in NOD mice. PMID:14635805

  14. Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, L; Zeira, M; Reich, S; Har-Noy, M; Mechoulam, R; Slavin, S; Gallily, R

    2006-03-01

    Cannabidinoids are components of the Cannabis sativa (marijuana) plant that have been shown capable of suppressing inflammation and various aspects of cell-mediated immunity. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabidinoid has been previously shown by us to suppress cell-mediated autoimmune joint destruction in an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. We now report that CBD treatment significantly reduces the incidence of diabetes in NOD mice from an incidence of 86% in non-treated control mice to an incidence of 30% in CBD-treated mice. CBD treatment also resulted in the significant reduction of plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Th1-associated cytokine production of in vitro activated T-cells and peritoneal macrophages was also significantly reduced in CBD-treated mice, whereas production of the Th2-associated cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, was increased when compared to untreated control mice. Histological examination of the pancreatic islets of CBD-treated mice revealed significantly reduced insulitis. Our results indicate that CBD can inhibit and delay destructive insulitis and inflammatory Th1-associated cytokine production in NOD mice resulting in a decreased incidence of diabetes possibly through an immunomodulatory mechanism shifting the immune response from Th1 to Th2 dominance.

  15. The natural killer T lymphocyte: a player in the complex regulation of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Cardell, S L

    2006-01-01

    Manipulation of the immune response to specifically prevent autoaggression requires an understanding of the complex interactions that occur during the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Much attention has been paid to conventional T lymphocytes recognizing peptide antigens presented by classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules, as key players in the destructive autoreactive process. A pivotal role for different types of regulatory T lymphocytes in modulating the development of disease is also well established. Lately, CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) lymphocytes have been the subject of intense investigation because of their ability to regulate a diversity of immune responses. The non-classical antigen presenting molecule CD1d presents lipids and glycolipids to this highly specialized subset of T lymphocytes found in both humans and mice. From experimental models of autoimmunity, evidence is accumulating that NKT cells can protect from disease. One of the best studied is the murine type 1 diabetes model, the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. While the NKT cell population was first recognized to be deficient in NOD mice, augmenting NKT cell activity has been shown to suppress the development of autoimmune disease in this strain. The mechanism by which CD1d-restricted T cells exert this function is still described incompletely, but investigations in NOD mice are starting to unravel specific effects of NKT cell regulation. This review focuses on the role of CD1d-restricted NKT cells in the control of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:16412042

  16. Depletion of IL-2 receptor β-positive cells protects from diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Hanna; Hall, Håkan T; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Kärre, Klas; Höglund, Petter; Johansson, Sofia

    2016-02-01

    The destruction of β-cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) progresses silently until only a minor fraction of the β-cells remain. A late acting therapy leading to the prevention of further β-cell killing would therefore be desirable. CD122, the β chain of the interleukin-2 receptor, is highly expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and on a subpopulation of CD8 T cells. In this study, we have treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with a depleting antibody against CD122. The treatment protected from diabetes, even when initiated just before disease onset. The degree of leukocyte infiltration into islets was unaffected by the treatment, further supporting effectiveness late in the disease process. It effectively removed all NK cells from the spleen, pancreas and pancreatic lymph nodes and abolished NK cell activity. Interestingly, despite the lack of CD122 expression on CD8 T cells in the pancreas, the overall frequency of CD8 cells decreased in this organ, whereas it was unaffected in the spleen. T cells were also still capable to respond against a foreign antigen. Conclusively, targeting of CD122(+) cells could represent a novel treatment strategy against T1D.

  17. Thymus reticulum of autoimmune mice. 3. Ultrastructural study of NOD (non-obese diabetic) mouse thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Nabarra, B.; Andrianarison, I.

    1991-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse develops spontaneous insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Converging lines of evidence indicate that the disease is of autoimmune origin and is primarily mediated by T cells. It thus appeared interesting to study the morphology of the thymic microenvironment in order to determine whether the architecture and/or the cellular components of the organ are altered. In the NOD mouse, significant aspects of involution were observed as early as the first month of life, forming a heterogeneous pattern with non-involuted areas. With time, these involuted aspects increased in surface and severity. In non-involuted zones vacuolization of epithelial cells was noted, as well as infiltration by plasma cells and the presence of numerous macrophages with high phagocytic activity. Involuted areas, forming a cellular layer as if cells had lost their limiting membranes, were crossed by a great number of cystic cavities bordered by epithelial cells and cells containing granulations. Their lumens contained lymphocytes and a few macrophages. These observations, which are reminiscent of similar reports made in other autoimmune mouse strains, may be related to the functional thymic abnormality thought to participate in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:1843256

  18. Exaggerated Increases in Microglia Proliferation, Brain Inflammatory Response and Sickness Behaviour upon Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuiness, Barry; Gibney, Sinead M.; Beumer, Wouter; Versnel, Marjan A.; Sillaber, Inge; Harkin, Andrew; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an established model for autoimmune diabetes, shows an exaggerated reaction of pancreas macrophages to inflammatory stimuli. NOD mice also display anxiety when immune-stimulated. Chronic mild brain inflammation and a pro-inflammatory microglial activation is critical in psychiatric behaviour. Objective To explore brain/microglial activation and behaviour in NOD mice at steady state and after systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Methods Affymetrix analysis on purified microglia of pre-diabetic NOD mice (8-10 weeks) and control mice (C57BL/6 and CD1 mice, the parental non-autoimmune strain) at steady state and after systemic LPS (100 μg/kg) administration. Quantitative PCR was performed on the hypothalamus for immune activation markers (IL-1β, IFNγ and TNFα) and growth factors (BDNF and PDGF). Behavioural profiling of NOD, CD1, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice at steady state was conducted and sickness behaviour/anxiety in NOD and CD1 mice was monitored before and after LPS injection. Results Genome analysis revealed cell cycle/cell death and survival aberrancies of NOD microglia, substantiated as higher proliferation on BrdU staining. Inflammation signs were absent. NOD mice had a hyper-reactive response to novel environments with some signs of anxiety. LPS injection induced a higher expression of microglial activation markers, a higher brain pro-inflammatory set point (IFNγ, IDO) and a reduced expression of BDNF and PDGF after immune stimulation in NOD mice. NOD mice displayed exaggerated and prolonged sickness behaviour after LPS administration. Conclusion After stimulation with LPS, NOD mice display an increased microglial proliferation and an exaggerated inflammatory brain response with reduced BDNF and PDGF expression and increased sickness behaviour as compared to controls. PMID:27529430

  19. The DPP4 inhibitor linagliptin delays the onset of diabetes and preserves β-cell mass in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; van Witteloostuijn, Søren B; Mark, Michael; Klein, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Recent data indicate that dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory and β-cell-sparing effects in animal models of type 1 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of the DPP4 inhibitor linagliptin on β-cell mass and insulinitis, we examined the progression of diabetes (blood glucose >11  mmol/l) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with terminal stereological assessment of cellular pancreatic changes. Female NOD mice were fed a normal chow diet or a diet containing linagliptin 0.083  g/kg chow for 60 days. At study end, the incidence of diabetes in linagliptin-treated mice was reduced by almost 50% compared with vehicle (10 of 31 mice vs 18 of 30 mice, P=0.021). The total islet mass and total β-cell mass, identified by insulin immunoreactivity, were greater in non-diabetic linagliptin-treated mice compared with non-diabetic vehicle-treated mice (P<0.01 for both) but were greatly reduced in diabetic mice irrespective of treatment. No changes were seen in the α, δ and γ endocrine cell pool. Moreover, the total mass of lymphocyte insulinitis was significantly reduced in linagliptin-treated mice compared with vehicle. The data indicate that linagliptin treatment delays the onset of diabetes in NOD mice by protecting β-cell mass.

  20. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  1. Structure modeling and antidiabetic activity of a seed protein of Momordica charantia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Gagan; Dixit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Momordica charantia is a well known medicinal plant used in the traditional medicinal system for the treatment of various diseases including diabetes mellitus. Recently, a novel protein termed as ADMc1 from the seed extract of M. charantia has been identified and isolated showing significant antihyperglycemic activity in type 1 diabetic rats in which diabetes was induced. However, the structure of this protein has not yet been analyzed. Homology modeling approach was used to generate a high quality protein 3D structure for the amino acid sequence of the ADMc1 protein in this study. The comparative assessment of secondary structures revealed ADMc1 as an all-alpha helix protein with random coils. Tertiary structure predicted on the template structure of Napin of B. Napus (PDB ID: 1SM7) with which the ADMc1 showed significant sequence similarity, was validated using protein structure validation tools like PROCHECK, WHAT_CHECK, VERIFY3D and ProSA. Arrangement of disulfide bridges formed by cysteine residues were predicted by the Dianna 1.1 server. The presence of multiple disulfide bond confers the stable nature of the ADMc1 protein. Further, the biological activity of the ADMc1 was assessed in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice which are spontaneous model of type 1 diabetes. Significant reduction in the blood glucose levels of NOD mice was observed up to 8 h post administration of the rADMc1 protein. Overall, the structural characterizations with antihyperglycemic activity of this seed protein of Momordica charantia demonstrate its potential as an antidiabetic agent.

  2. Killer Treg cells ameliorate inflammatory insulitis in non-obese diabetic mice through local and systemic immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S; Mizrahi, Keren; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-08-01

    Treg cells endowed with enhanced killing activity through decoration with Fas-ligand (FasL) protein (killer Treg) have been effective in delay of hyperglycemia in prediabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of these cells, harvested from age-matched euglycemic NOD donors, on the course of disease in new-onset diabetics. One dose of 4 × 10(6) killer Treg cells stabilized blood glucose associated with increased insulin levels in 5 of 9 mice and partially reversed the severity of islet inflammation, whereas naive Treg cells did not modulate the course of disease significantly. Killer Treg cells were shown to operate through induction of cell apoptosis within the pancreatic lymph nodes, resulting in reduced efficiency of adoptive disease transfer to NOD/SCID recipients. A second mechanism of action consisted of increased fractions of CD4(+)CD25(-)FoxP3(+) T cells in the pancreas and all lymphoid organs. Immunomodulation with FasL rather than Treg cells enhanced the expression of CD25 and FoxP3 in the thymus, suggesting a possible contribution of thymic output to prolonged stabilization of the glucose levels. Autologous Treg cells evolve as excellent vehicles for targeted delivery of FasL as an immunomodulatory protein, which delete pathogenic cells at the site of inflammation and induce systemic dominance of suppressor subsets.

  3. Induction of autoimmune cholangitis in non-obese diabetic (NOD).1101 mice following a chemical xenobiotic immunization.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, K; Yoshida, K; Leung, P S C; Moritoki, Y; Yang, G-X; Tsuneyama, K; Lian, Z-X; Hibi, T; Ansari, A A; Wicker, L S; Ridgway, W M; Coppel, R L; Mackay, I R; Gershwin, M E

    2009-03-01

    Our laboratory has suggested that loss of tolerance to pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2) leads to an anti-mitochondrial antibody response and autoimmune cholangitis, similar to human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have suggested that this loss of tolerance can be induced either via chemical xenobiotic immunization or exposure to select bacteria. Our work has also highlighted the importance of genetic susceptibility. Using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) congenic strain 1101 (hereafter referred to as NOD.1101 mice), which has chromosome 3 regions from B6 introgressed onto a NOD background, we exposed animals to 2-octynoic acid (2OA) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA). 2OA has been demonstrated previously by a quantitative structural activity relationship to react as well as or better than lipoic acid to anti-mitochondrial antibodies. We demonstrate herein that NOD.1101 mice immunized with 2OA-BSA, but not with BSA alone, develop high titre anti-mitochondrial antibodies and histological features, including portal infiltrates enriched in CD8(+) cells and liver granulomas, similar to human PBC. We believe this model will allow the rigorous dissection of early immunogenetic cause of biliary damage.

  4. Induction of autoimmune cholangitis in non-obese diabetic (NOD).1101 mice following a chemical xenobiotic immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, K; Yoshida, K; Leung, P S C; Moritoki, Y; Yang, G-X; Tsuneyama, K; Lian, Z-X; Hibi, T; Ansari, A A; Wicker, L S; Ridgway, W M; Coppel, R L; Mackay, I R; Gershwin, M E

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory has suggested that loss of tolerance to pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2) leads to an anti-mitochondrial antibody response and autoimmune cholangitis, similar to human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We have suggested that this loss of tolerance can be induced either via chemical xenobiotic immunization or exposure to select bacteria. Our work has also highlighted the importance of genetic susceptibility. Using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) congenic strain 1101 (hereafter referred to as NOD.1101 mice), which has chromosome 3 regions from B6 introgressed onto a NOD background, we exposed animals to 2-octynoic acid (2OA) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA). 2OA has been demonstrated previously by a quantitative structural activity relationship to react as well as or better than lipoic acid to anti-mitochondrial antibodies. We demonstrate herein that NOD.1101 mice immunized with 2OA-BSA, but not with BSA alone, develop high titre anti-mitochondrial antibodies and histological features, including portal infiltrates enriched in CD8+ cells and liver granulomas, similar to human PBC. We believe this model will allow the rigorous dissection of early immunogenetic cause of biliary damage. PMID:19094117

  5. Maternal dietary n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio affects type 1 diabetes development in the offspring of non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kagohashi, Yukiko; Abiru, Norio; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Michio; Shido, Osamu; Otani, Hiroki

    2010-12-01

    Environment factors, including maternal or infant dietary nutrition have been reported to have an influence on the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. In the present study, to investigate the effect of maternal or post-weaning offspring's nutrition, in particular the essential fatty acid ratio (n-6/n-3) on the development of type 1 diabetes, we prepared two kinds of chows with n-6/n-3 ratios of 3.0 (L) and 14.5 (H), and provided them to mothers of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice during gestation and lactation and to the offspring after weaning. The n-6/n-3 ratios in breast milk and erythrocyte membrane of NOD offspring became nearly the same with that of the maternal diet at 2 weeks after birth. In the L chow-fed offspring from L chow-fed mother (LLL), levels of insulitis were higher than those in the H chow-fed offspring from H chow-fed mother (HHH) at 4 weeks of age, while the levels in the LLL offspring became lower than those in the HHH after 6 weeks. Early insulin autoantibody expressions were found from 2 to 6 weeks in the HHH offspring, but not in the LLL. The LLL offspring exhibited strong suppression of overt diabetes development in regard to the onset and accumulated incidence of diabetes compared to the HHH. The study with combined L and H chows during gestation, lactation in mother and in post-weaning offspring revealed that only the LLH chow significantly suppressed the development of diabetes with similar kinetics to LLL chow, although the other combinations may delay the onset of diabetes. The present findings suggest that n-6/n-3 ratio of the maternal diet during gestation and lactation rather than that of offspring after weaning strongly affects the development of overt diabetes in NOD mice.

  6. The Hsp60 peptide p277 enhances anti-CD3 mediated diabetes remission in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Sachithanantham, Sowbarnika; Miller, Jacqueline F; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken T; von Herrath, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by the immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to inadequate glycemic control. Trials with immunomodulatory monotherapies have shown that the disease course can in principle be altered. The observed preservation of endogenous insulin secretion however is typically transient and chronic treatment is often associated with significant side effects. Here we combined anti-CD3 with the Hsp60 peptide p277, two drugs that have been evaluated in Phase 3 trials, to test for enhanced efficacy. Female NOD mice with recent onset diabetes were given 5 μg anti-CD3 i.v., on three consecutive days in combination with 100 μg of p277 peptide in IFA s.c., once weekly for four weeks. Anti-CD3 alone restored normoglycemia in 44% of the mice while combination therapy with anti-CD3 and p277 induced stable remission in 83% of mice. The observed increase in protection occurred only in part through TLR2 signaling and was characterized by increased Treg numbers and decreased insulitis. These results have important implications for the design of combination therapies for the treatment of T1D.

  7. Nasal administration of CTB-insulin induces active tolerance against autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice

    PubMed Central

    Aspord, C; Thivolet, C

    2002-01-01

    Nasal administration of beta cell-derived auto-antigens has been reported to suppress the development of autoimmune diabetes. We investigated the tolerogenic effects of insulin conjugated to the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Nasal administration of 1 µg of CTB-insulin significantly delayed the incidence of diabetes in comparison to CTB treated mice. However, administration of 4 or 8 µg of the conjugate had no protective effect. Protection induced by CTB-insulin was transferred to naive recipients by splenic CD4+ T cells. This result favours an active cellular mechanism of regulation, which was lost using higher (4–8 µg) or lower (0·1–0·5 µg) amounts of the conjugate. When co-administered with diabetogenic T cells, splenic T cells from CTB-insulin-treated mice reduced the lymphocytic infiltration of the islets. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of recipients’ pancreatic glands revealed an increase of TGF-β and IL-10 transcripts after donor mice tolerization, while levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 RNAs were unchanged. We observed a significant increase of T cell proliferation after unspecific stimulation in the spleen and pancreatic lymph nodes 24 h after CTB-insulin administration in comparison to control treatment. Higher amounts of IL-4 and IFN-γ were noticed in pancreatic lymph nodes of tolerized mice upon in vitro stimulation. Antigen-specific unresponsiveness after immunization and upon subsequent in vitro exposure to homologous antigen was obtained in nasally treated animals. Our results underlined the importance of nasal mucosa as an inducing site of tolerance and provided evidence for similar mechanisms of action to what has been described for the oral route, which favoured a CTB-insulin specific effect. PMID:12390307

  8. Infusion with Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improves β-cell Function in Patients and Non-obese Mice with Severe Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lirong; Hui, Hui; Jia, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Xu, Qianyue; Zhu, Dalong

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, little is known on whether MSC transplantation can benefit T1D patients with ketoacidosis and its potential actions. Here, we show that infusion with bone marrow MSCs preserves β-cell function in some T1D patients with ketoacidosis by decreasing exogenous insulin requirement and increasing plasma C-peptide levels up to 1–2 years. MSC transplantation increased plasma and islet insulin contents in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with severe diabetes. In comparison with severe diabetes controls, MSC infusion reduced insulitis, decreased pancreatic TNF-α, and increased IL-10 and TGF-β1 expression in NOD mice. MSC infusion increased the percentages of splenic Tregs and levels of plasma IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β1, but reduced the percentages of splenic CD8+ T and levels of plasma IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-17A in NOD mice. Finally, infused MSCs predominantly accumulated in pancreatic tissues at 28 days post infusion. The effects of MSCs on preserving β-cell function and modulating inflammation tended to be dose-dependent and multiple doses of MSCs held longer effects in NOD mice. Hence, MSC transplantation preserved β-cell function in T1D patients and NOD mice with severe diabetes by enhancing Treg responses. PMID:27905403

  9. p21 is associated with the proliferation and apoptosis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Z; Jiang, J; Xia, Y; Yue, X; Yan, M; Tao, T; Cao, X; Da, Z; Liu, H; Liu, H; Miao, Y; Li, L; Wang, Z

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that autologous and allogeneic transplantation of the BM-MSCs had therapeutic effects on T1DM, whereas the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice itself did not have this therapeutic effect. We previously demonstrated that Bone Marrow (BM) -MSCs from the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice had the abnormal migration and adhesion. So we hypothesized that the proliferation and apoptosis of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice were dysregulated. Our team compared the proliferation and apoptosis between NOD mice and imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Then we assessed whether the NF-κB-p53/p21 pathway was involved in the process. The cell proliferation ability of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice were significantly decreased, while the percent of apoptotic cells was increased compared to those from the ICR mice. The p21 expression was significantly increased in the NOD-MSCs. The p65 level was enhanced in the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice when compared to the ICR mice, coincided with the expression of p21. Expressions of p65 and p21 were significantly decreased in the -BM-MSCs treated with p65 inhibitor. The knockdown p21 expression reversed the abnormal proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of the BM-MSCs from the NOD mice. These data provide important preclinical references supporting the basis for further development of autologous MSC-based therapies for type1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

  10. Low incidence of spontaneous type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice raised on gluten-free diets is associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Marietta, Eric V; Gomez, Andres M; Yeoman, Carl; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Clark, Chad R; Luckey, David H; Murray, Joseph A; White, Bryan A; Kudva, Yogish C; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Human and animal studies strongly suggest that dietary gluten could play a causal role in the etiopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the mechanisms have not been elucidated. Recent reports indicate that the intestinal microbiome has a major influence on the incidence of T1D. Since diet is known to shape the composition of the intestinal microbiome, we investigated using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice whether changes in the intestinal microbiome could be attributed to the pro- and anti-diabetogenic effects of gluten-containing and gluten-free diets, respectively. NOD mice were raised on gluten-containing chows (GCC) or gluten-free chows (GFC). The incidence of diabetes was determined by monitoring blood glucose levels biweekly using a glucometer. Intestinal microbiome composition was analyzed by sequencing 16S rRNA amplicons derived from fecal samples. First of all, GCC-fed NOD mice had the expected high incidence of hyperglycemia whereas NOD mice fed with a GFC had significantly reduced incidence of hyperglycemia. Secondly, when the fecal microbiomes were compared, Bifidobacterium, Tannerella, and Barnesiella species were increased (p = 0.03, 0.02, and 0.02, respectively) in the microbiome of GCC mice, where as Akkermansia species was increased (p = 0.02) in the intestinal microbiomes of NOD mice fed GFC. Thirdly, both of the gluten-free chows that were evaluated, either egg white based (EW-GFC) or casein based (C-GFC), significantly reduced the incidence of hyperglycemia. Interestingly, the gut microbiome from EW-GFC mice was similar to C-GFC mice. Finally, adding back gluten to the gluten-free diet reversed its anti-diabetogenic effect, reduced Akkermansia species and increased Bifidobacterium, Tannerella, and Barnesiella suggesting that the presence of gluten is directly responsible for the pro-diabetogenic effects of diets and it determines the gut microflora. Our novel study thus suggests that dietary gluten could modulate the incidence of

  11. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing HSP65 and Tandemly Repeated P277 Reduces the Incidence of Type I Diabetes in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanjun; Liu, Jingjing; Hou, Jing; Dong, Yuankai; Lu, Yong; Jin, Liang; Cao, Rongyue; Li, Taiming; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is an autoimmune disease that gradually destroys insulin-producing beta-cells. We have previously reported that mucosal administration of fusion protein of HSP65 with tandem repeats of P277 (HSP65-6P277) can reduce the onset of DM1 in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. To deliver large amounts of the fusion protein and to enhance long-term immune tolerance effects, in the present study, we investigated the efficacy of using orally administrated L. lactis expressing HSP65-6P277 to reduce the incidence of DM1 in NOD mice. L. lactis strain NZ9000 was engineered to express HSP65-6P277 either constitutively or by nisin induction. After immunization via gavage with the recombinant L. lactis strains to groups of 4-week old female NOD mice for 36 weeks, we observed that oral administration of recombinant L. Lactis resulted in the prevention of hyperglycemia, improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulitis. Immunologic analysis showed that treatment with recombinant L. lactis induced HSP65- and P277- specific T cell immuno-tolerance, as well as antigen-specific proliferation of splenocytes. The results revealed that the DM1-preventing function was in part caused by a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ and an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Orally administered recombinant L. lactis delivering HSP65-6P277 may be an effective therapeutic approach in preventing DM1. PMID:25157497

  12. Transcriptomic Insights into the Response of Placenta and Decidua Basalis to the CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Stimulation in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice and Wild-Type Controls

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Rui; Guo, Yu-Na; Qin, Chuan-Mei; Qin, Xiao-Li; Tao, Fei; Su, Fei; Tian, Fu-Ju; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection is one of the most frequent causes of miscarriage. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN) can mimic intrauterine infection. CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption was observed consistently in the NK-cell deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice but not in the wild-type (WT) mice. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of differential pregnancy outcomes, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the placenta and decidua basalis was revealed by RNA-Seq with CpG ODN or control ODN treatment. Common DEGs in the WT and NOD mice were enriched in antimicrobial/antibacterial humoral responses that may be activated as a primary response to bacterial infection. The susceptibility to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption in the NOD mice might mainly be attributed to M1 macrophage polarization and the immunodeficient status, such as the down-regulation in antigen processing and presentation, allograft rejection, and natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, the WT mice with normal immune systems could activate multiple immune responses and be resistant to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption, such as M2 macrophage differentiation and activation regulated by complement component C1q and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways. Collectively, this study suggests that the immunodeficient status of NOD mice and the macrophage polarization regulated by C1q and PPAR signaling might be the basis for differential pregnancy outcomes between the NOD and WT mice. PMID:27527166

  13. Rescuing of deficient killing and phagocytic activities of macrophages derived from non-obese diabetic mice by treatment with geldanamycin or heat shock: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vega, Virginia Loreto; Charles, Wisler; Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Alexander, Laura E Crotty

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DMT1) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to recurrent and uncontrolled infections, with worse prognoses than in healthy individuals. Macrophages (MΦs) derived from DMT1 individuals have compromised mounting of inflammatory and immune responses. The mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain unknown. It has been shown that the presence of extra- and intracellular heat shock proteins (hsp) positively modulates immune cell function. Using naive MΦs derived from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a well-established mouse model for DMT1, we demonstrate that heat shock (HS) as well as treatment with geldanamycin (GA), significantly improves diabetic MΦ activation, resulting in increased phagocytosis and killing of bacteria. Induction of HS did not affect the aberrant NOD-MΦ cytokine profile, which is characterized by elevated IL-10 levels and normal tumor necrosis factor alpha. Our observations were consistent at pre-diabetic (normal random blood glucose) and diabetic (random blood glucose greater than 250 mg/dl) stages, suggesting that HS and GA treatment may compensate for intrinsic genetic alterations present in diabetic cells regardless of the stage of the disease. The mechanisms associated to this phenomenon are unknown, but they may likely be associated with the induction of hsp expression, a common factor between HS and GA treatment. Our results may open a new field for non-classical function of hsp and indicate that hsp expression may be used as a part of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of complications associated with DMT1 as well as other autoimmune diseases.

  14. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull (NOD-SCID IL2Rγnull) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ null mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. PMID:23574330

  15. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-05-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) (NOD-SCID IL2Rγ(null)) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ (null) mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease.

  16. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  17. Expression of cholera toxin B–proinsulin fusion protein in lettuce and tobacco chloroplasts – oral administration protects against development of insulitis in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlman, Tracey; Ahangari, Raheleh; Devine, Andrew; Samsam, Mohtahsem; Daniell, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lettuce and tobacco chloroplast transgenic lines expressing the cholera toxin B subunit–human proinsulin (CTB-Pins) fusion protein were generated. CTB-Pins accumulated up to ~16% of total soluble protein (TSP) in tobacco and up to ~2.5% of TSP in lettuce. Eight milligrams of powdered tobacco leaf material expressing CTB-Pins or, as negative controls, CTB–green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP) or interferon–GFP (IFN-GFP), or untransformed leaf, were administered orally, each week for 7 weeks, to 5-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. The pancreas of CTB-Pins-treated mice showed decreased infiltration of cells characteristic of lymphocytes (insulitis); insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreatic islets of CTB-Pins-treated mice were significantly preserved, with lower blood or urine glucose levels, by contrast with the few β-cells remaining in the pancreatic islets of the negative controls. Increased expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-4 and IL-10), was observed in the pancreas of CTB-Pins-treated NOD mice. Serum levels of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), but not IgG2a, were elevated in CTB-Pins-treated mice. Taken together, T-helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-mediated oral tolerance is a likely mechanism for the prevention of pancreatic insulitis and the preservation of insulin-producing β-cells. This is the first report of expression of a therapeutic protein in transgenic chloroplasts of an edible crop. Transplastomic lettuce plants expressing CTB-Pins grew normally and transgenes were maternally inherited in T1 progeny. This opens up the possibility for the low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins, and a strategy for the treatment of various other autoimmune diseases. PMID:17490448

  18. Broadly impaired NK cell function in non-obese diabetic mice is partially restored by NK cell activation in vivo and by IL-12/IL-18 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sofia E; Hall, Håkan; Björklund, Jens; Höglund, Petter

    2004-01-01

    NK cells represent a link between innate and adaptive immunity, and may play a role in regulating autoimmune disorders. We have characterized the NK cell population in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. The percentage and absolute numbers of NK cells were similar in NOD and control MHC-matched B6.g7 mice. However, the capacity of NOD NK cells to mediate natural cytotoxicity as well as FcR- and Ly49D-mediated killing was compromised in vitro, suggesting a defect affecting multiple activation pathways. The defect was neither linked to the NK gene complex nor to the MHC, as determined by comparison with mice congenic for these regions. Introducing the beta(2)-microglobulin mutation on the NOD background further impaired NK cell function, showing that the compromised cytotoxic capacity in these two strains arises from two independent mechanisms. In vivo rejection responses against tumor cells and against MHC class I-deficient spleen cells were decreased in naive NOD recipients, but restored in mice pre-activated with tilorone, a potent activator of NK cells. In addition, killing of some tumor targets was restored in vitro after activation of NK cells with IL-12 plus IL-18 or with IFN-alpha/beta, but not with IL-2. Interestingly, natural killing of RMA-S targets by NOD NK cells could not be restored in vitro, indicating that restoration of killing capacity was only partial. Our data suggest a severe, but partially restorable, killing defect in NOD NK cells, affecting activation through several pathways.

  19. Suppression of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice by oral administration of a cholera toxin B subunit-insulin B chain fusion protein vaccine produced in silkworm.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhaohui; Jin, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2007-02-09

    Oral tolerance has been applied successfully as a potential therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes. In this paper we constructed an edible vaccine consisting of a fusion protein composed of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and insulin B chain (InsB) that was produced in silkworm larvae. The silkworm larvae produced this fusion protein at levels of up to 0.97mg/ml of hemolymph as the pentameric CTB-InsB form, which retained the GM1-ganglioside binding affinity and the native antigenicity of CTB. Non-obese diabetic mice fed hemolymph containing microgram quantities of the CTB-InsB fusion protein showed a prominent reduction in pancreatic islet inflammation and a delay in the development of diabetic symptoms. This study demonstrates that silkworm-produced CTB-InsB fusion protein can be used as an ideal oral protein vaccine for induction of immunological tolerance against autoimmune diabetes.

  20. Endogenous programmed death ligand-1 restrains the development and onset of Sjӧgren’s syndrome in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Jin, Jun-O.; Kawai, Toshihisa; Yu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) down-modulates various immune responses by engaging the co-inhibitory receptor programmed death-1. Expression of PD-L1 and programmed death-1 is elevated in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). The objective of this study is to define the role of endogenous PD-L1 in SS pathogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of this disease. We inhibited endogenous PD-L1 function by intraperitoneal administration of a blocking antibody to 6 week-old female NOD/ShiLtJ mice repeatedly during a 9-day period. PD-L1 blockade accelerated leukocyte infiltration and caspase-3 activation in the submandibular gland (SMG), production of antinuclear and anti-M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R) autoantibodies and impairment of saliva secretion, indicative of accelerated development and onset of SS. The effect of PD-L1 blockade was associated with increased T- and B cells and T helper 1 cytokine IFN-γ in the SMG. Local administration of exogenous IFN-γ to the SMG led to impaired salivary secretion accompanied by down-regulation of aquaporin 5 and an increase in anti-M3R autoantibodies. Conversely, neutralization of IFN-γ markedly improved salivary secretion and aquaporin 5 expression in anti-PD-L1-treated NOD/ShiLtJ mice. Hence, endogenous PD-L1 hinders the development and onset of SS in NOD mice, in part by suppressing IFN-γ production. PMID:27966604

  1. A gluten-free diet lowers NKG2D and ligand expression in BALB/c and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, E H; Weile, C; Larsen, J; Engkilde, K; Agardh, D; Buschard, K; Antvorskov, J C

    2014-08-01

    The interplay between diet and immune parameters which could affect type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis is not sufficiently clarified. Intestinal up-regulation of the activating receptor natural killer group 2D (NKG2D) (CD314) and its ligands is a hallmark of coeliac disease. However, the direct effect of gluten on NKG2D expression is not known. We studied, by fluorescence activated cell sorter (lymphoid tissues) and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (intestine and pancreatic islets), if a gluten-free diet (GF diet) from 4 weeks of age or a gluten-free diet introduced in breeding pairs (SGF diet), induced changes in NKG2D expression on DX5(+) (CD49b) natural killer (NK) cells, CD8(+) T cells and in intestinal and islet levels of NKG2D and ligands in BALB/c and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Gluten-free NOD mice had lower insulitis (P < 0·0001); reduced expression of NKG2D on DX5(+) NK cells in spleen and auricular lymph nodes (P < 0·05); and on CD8(+) T cells in pancreas-associated lymph nodes (P = 0·04). Moreover, the level of CD71 on DX5(+) NK cells and CD8(+) T cells (P < 0·005) was markedly reduced. GF and SGF mice had reduced expression of NKG2D and DX5 mRNA in intestine (P < 0·05). Differences in intestinal mRNA expression were found in mice at 8, 13 and 20 weeks. Intestinal expression of NKG2D ligands was reduced in SGF mice with lower expression of all ligands. In isolated islets, a SGF diet induced a higher expression of specific NKG2D ligands. Our data show that a gluten-free diet reduces the level of NKG2D and the expression of NKG2D ligands. These immunological changes may contribute to the lower T1D incidence associated with a gluten-free diet.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) on non-obese diabetic mice with Sjogren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomei; Xu, Bei; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) on non-obese diabetic mice (NOD mice) with Sjogren’s syndrome. Methods: 22 eight-week-old female NOD mice were randomly divided into 2 groups. Rosiglitazone and normal saline were administered in the PPAR-γ group and the control group respectively. At the age of 9, 12 and 15 weeks, one mouse in each group was sacrificed respectively, and the remaining mice were sacrificed at the age of 18 weeks. Blood were obtained by cardiac puncture, and salivary glands were resected. The degree of salivary gland damage and infiltration of lymphocytes were examined by H&E staining. The level of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α in serum were measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression level of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6 and TNF-α in MSG were detected by Real-time PCR. Expression of PPAR-γ in the salivary glands was detected by Immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared with the control group, mice in the PPAR-γ group showed that (1) histopathologic changes in the salivary glands were significantly ameliorated; (2) at the age of 18 weeks, IL-6 [(25.86 ± 7.32) vs (37.41 ± 11.34)] and TNF-α [(56.88 ± 22.19) vs (78.61 ± 20.76)] were expressed significantly lower and IL-4 [(25.76 ± 12.65) vs (12.11 ± 3.70)] was expressed significantly higher in serum (P < 0.05); (3) the expression of TNF-α was significantly decreased and the expression of IL-4 was significantly increased in MSG (P < 0.05). Conclusion: PPAR-γ ameliorates Sjogren’s syndrome on NOD mice effectively. The mechanism may be related to the reduction of Th1 cytokines and change of T helper cell balance from Th1 to Th2. PMID:25197359

  3. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells.

  4. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  5. Evaluation of antidiabetic activity of polysaccharide isolated from Phellinus linteus in non-obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan Mook; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Jee Youn; Park, Song-Kyu; Kim, Hyung Sook; Lee, Young June; Yun, Jieun; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Polysaccharide (PLP) isolated from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by enhancing immune functions of macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells, and B cells. Here, we report that PLP can inhibit the development of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although 80% of the NOD mice had developed diabetes by 24 weeks of age, none of the PLP-treated NOD mice developed diabetes. The mean blood glucose levels were 110mg/dl in PLP-treated mice and 499mg/dl in control NOD mice. Histological examination of the pancreatic islets revealed that most of the islets isolated from PLP-treated mice were less infiltrated with lymphocytes compared with those of control mice. Spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice could adaptively transfer diabetes into NOD/SCID mice, but those from PLP-treated NOD mice showed delayed transfer of diabetes. PLP inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha by Th1 cells and macrophages, but up-regulated IL-4 expression by Th2 cells in NOD mice. PLP did not prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetic development in ICR mice. Taken together, these results suggest that PLP inhibits the development of autoimmune diabetes by regulating cytokine expression.

  6. Comparative therapeutic effects of orally administered 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3 on type-1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice fed a normal-calcaemic diet

    PubMed Central

    Driver, J P; Foreman, O; Mathieu, C; van Etten, E; Serreze, D V

    2008-01-01

    Frequent injections of the hormonal form of vitamin D3, 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) reportedly inhibits autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice by correcting some of the abnormalities in antigen-presenting cells which contribute the development of pathogenic T cell responses. This route of administration greatly elevates the levels of these compounds in the bloodstream for hours after treatment, which requires mice to be fed diets formulated to contain much reduced levels of Ca to avoid the toxic effects of hypercalcaemia. In the current work, we demonstrate that feeding 1,25D3 or its synthetic precursor, 1alpha(OH) vitamin D3 (1alphaD3), as part of a T1D supportive chow diet containing normal levels of Ca, is an effective means of reducing the incidence of disease in NOD mice, but the doses required for protection elicited hypercalcaemia. However, T1D protection elicited by D3 analogue feeding appears, at least partially, to have an immunological basis, as splenic T cells from treated mice had a decreased capacity to adoptively transfer disease. Protection is associated with an increased proportion of T cells with CD4+ forkhead box P3+ regulatory phenotype within the islet infiltrate of treated animals. The 1alphaD3 precursor is converted rapidly to the active 1,25D3 isoform in vivo. However, feeding the 1alphaD3 analogue elicited stronger T1D protection than the 1,25D3 compound, but also induced more severe hypercalcaemia. In future, the dietary supplementation of novel low-calcaemic D3 analogues may enable their continuous delivery at levels that inhibit T1D development in susceptible humans consuming normal levels of Ca. PMID:17983444

  7. Liraglutide Enhances the Efficacy of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preserving Islet β-cell Function in Severe Non-obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-rong; Lu, Jing; Jia, Xiao-lei; Hui, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Cui, Wei-juan; Xu, Qian-yue; Zhu, Da-long

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) can promote islet β cell replication and function, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can inhibit T cell autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to test the dynamic distribution of infused human MSCs and the therapeutic effect of combined MSCs and liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1 analog, on preserving β cell function in severe nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that infused MSCs accumulated in the pancreas at 4 wks post infusion, which was not affected by liraglutide treatment. Liraglutide significantly enhanced the function of MSCs to preserve islet β cells by reducing glucose levels 30 min post glucose challenge and increasing the content and secretion of insulin by islet β cells in severely diabetic mice. Infusion with MSCs significantly reduced insulitis scores but increased the frequency of splenic Tregs, accompanied by a reduction in plasma IFN-γ and TNF-α levels and an elevation of plasma IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) levels in NOD mice. Although liraglutide mitigated MSC-mediated changes in the frequency of Tregs and the level of plasma IL-10, it significantly increased the plasma TGF-β1 levels in severely diabetic mice. Therefore, our findings suggest that liraglutide could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs in the treatment of severe type 1 diabetes. PMID:27878211

  8. Bone marrow cells are a source of undifferentiated cells to prevent Sjögren’s syndrome and to preserve salivary glands function in the non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Saeed; Liu, Younan; Sumita, Yoshinori; Maria, Ola M.; Blank, David; Key, Sharon; Mezey, Eva; Tran, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop Sjögren’s-like syndrome (Ss) and a gradual loss of saliva secretory function. Our previous study showed that injections of matched normal spleen cells with Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) reversed salivary gland dysfunction in 14-week-old NOD mice, which had established Ss. The spleen and bone marrow are closely related organs, and both are among the first sites of hematopoiesis during gestation. Noticing a rapidly increasing number of clinical trials using bone marrow (BM) cells treatments for autoimmune diseases, we tested if BM cells can prevent Ss and restore salivary glands’ function. We injected CFA and MHC class I-matched normal BM cells in 7-week-old NOD mice, which had not yet developed Ss. We found at week 52 post-treatment that all NOD mice receiving BM cells and CFA had a recovery of salivary flow and were protected from Ss and diabetes. BM cells-treated mice had their salivary function restored quantitatively and qualitatively. Saliva flow was higher (p < 0.05) in BM cells-transplanted mice when compared to control mice, which continued to deteriorate over time. Total proteins, epidermal growth factor, amylase, and electrolytes concentrations in saliva of BM cells-treated mice were not significantly changed at week 44 and 52 post-therapy when compared to pre-therapy (when the mice did not have Ss). Restoration of salivary flow could have resulted from a combination of rescue and paracrine effects from BM cells. This study suggests that a combined immuno- and cell-based therapy can permanently prevent Ss and restored salivary function in NOD mice. PMID:20732442

  9. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse as a model of human type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kachapati, Kritika; Adams, David; Bednar, Kyle; Ridgway, William M

    2012-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops type 1 diabetes (T1D) and has thus served as a model for understanding the genetic and immunological basis, and treatment, of T1D. Since its initial description in 1980, however, the field has matured and recognized that prevention of diabetes in NOD mice (i.e., preventing the disease from occurring by an intervention prior to frank diabetes) is relatively easy to achieve and does not correlate well with curing the disease (after the onset of frank hyperglycemia). Hundreds of papers have described the prevention of diabetes in NOD mice but only a handful have described its actual reversal. The paradoxical conclusion is that preventing the disease in NOD mice does not necessarily tell us what caused the disease nor how to reverse it. The NOD mouse model is therefore best used now, with respect to human disease, as a way to understand the genetic and immunologic causes of and as a model for trying to reverse disease once hyperglycemia occurs. We describe how genetic approaches to identifying causative gene variants can be adapted to identify novel therapeutic agents for reversing new-onset T1D.

  10. Comprehensive Survey of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Reveals That Ccr7 and Cd247 (CD3 zeta) are Posttranscriptionally Controlled in Pancreas Infiltrating T Lymphocytes of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Claudia; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T.; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Passos, Geraldo A.

    2015-01-01

    In autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), auto-reactive clones of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the periphery evolve into pancreas-infiltrating T lymphocytes (PILs), which destroy insulin-producing beta-cells through inflammatory insulitis. Previously, we demonstrated that, during the development of T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a set of immune/inflammatory reactivity genes were differentially expressed in T lymphocytes. However, the posttranscriptional control involving miRNA interactions that occur during the evolution of thymocytes into PILs remains unknown. In this study, we postulated that miRNAs are differentially expressed during this period and that these miRNAs can interact with mRNAs involved in auto-reactivity during the progression of insulitis. To test this hypothesis, we used NOD mice to perform, for the first time, a comprehensive survey of miRNA and mRNA expression as thymocytes mature into peripheral CD3+ T lymphocytes and, subsequently, into PILs. Reconstruction of miRNA-mRNA interaction networks for target prediction revealed the participation of a large set of miRNAs that regulate mRNA targets related to apoptosis, cell adhesion, cellular regulation, cellular component organization, cellular processes, development and the immune system, among others. The interactions between miR-202-3p and the Ccr7 chemokine receptor mRNA or Cd247 (Cd3 zeta chain) mRNA found in PILs are highlighted because these interactions can contribute to a better understanding of how the lack of immune homeostasis and the emergence of autoimmunity (e.g., T1D) can be associated with the decreased activity of Ccr7 or Cd247, as previously observed in NOD mice. We demonstrate that these mRNAs are controlled at the posttranscriptional level in PILs. PMID:26606254

  11. The importance of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, James A; Wong, F. Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the pancreatic infiltration of immune cells resulting in T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. The successes of the Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model have come in multiple forms including identifying key genetic and environmental risk factors e.g. Idd loci and effects of microorganisms including the gut microbiota, respectively, and how they may contribute to disease susceptibility and pathogenesis. Furthermore, the NOD model also provides insights into the roles of the innate immune cells as well as the B cells in contributing to the T cell-mediated disease. Unlike many autoimmune disease models, the NOD mouse develops spontaneous disease and has many similarities to human T1D. Through exploiting these similarities many targets have been identified for immune-intervention strategies. Although many of these immunotherapies did not have a significant impact on human T1D, they have been shown to be effective in the NOD mouse in early stage disease, which is not equivalent to trials in newly-diagnosed patients with diabetes. However, the continued development of humanized NOD mice would enable further clinical developments, bringing T1D research to a new translational level. Therefore, it is the aim of this review to discuss the importance of the NOD model in identifying the roles of the innate immune system and the interaction with the gut microbiota in modifying diabetes susceptibility. In addition, the role of the B cells will also be discussed with new insights gained through B cell depletion experiments and the impact on translational developments. Finally, this review will also discuss the future of the NOD mice and the development of humanized NOD mice, providing novel insights into human T1D. PMID:26403950

  12. Non-Obese Diabetes and Its Associated Factors in an Underdeveloped Area of South China, Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenzhu; Fang, Zhifeng; Huang, Wei; Liu, Zhanhua; Chen, Yuzhu; Li, Zhongyou; Zhu, Ting; Wang, Qichun; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce V.; Lin, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in underdeveloped areas in China, especially stratified into obesity and non-obese diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of non-obese diabetes in an underdeveloped area in South China, Guangxi. Methods: Data derived from the Chinese Health and Nutrition Survey 2010–2012 involved a sample of 3874 adults from Guangxi. Questionnaires and oral glucose-tolerance tests were conducted, and fasting and 2-h glucose levels and serum lipids were measured. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess associated factors for non-obese diabetes. Results: 68.2% and 62.2% of instances of newly detected diabetes were those of non-obese diabetes based on BMI (NODB) and based on WC (NODW), respectively. The male sex, an age older than 50 years, lower education, hypertension, and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly associated with a higher risk of both NODB and NODW, while some associated factors for NODB were found different from those associated with NODW, and an interaction effect was found to increase the risk of NODW. Conclusions: Our study indicated that non-obese diabetes was highly prevalent in an underdeveloped area of South China. Non-obese diabetes should be considered for increased public attention in these areas. PMID:27706056

  13. Cachexia in the non-obese diabetic mouse is associated with CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfang; Wang, Zhuanzhi; Robertson, Michael W; Davies, Joanna D

    2008-01-01

    One of the long-term consequences of Type I diabetes is weight loss with muscle atrophy, the hallmark phenotype of cachexia. A number of disorders that result in cachexia are associated with immune deficiency. However, whether immune deficiency is a cause or an effect of cachexia is not known. This study examines the non-obese diabetic mouse, the mouse model for spontaneous Type I diabetes, as a potential model to study lymphopenia in cachexia, and to determine whether lymphopenia plays a role in the development of cachexia. The muscle atrophy seen in patients with Type I diabetes involves active protein degradation by activation of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, indicating cachexia. Evidence of cachexia in the non-obese diabetic mouse was determined by measuring skeletal muscle atrophy, activation of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, and apoptosis, a state also described in some models of cachexia. CD4+ T-cell subset lymphopenia was measured in wasting and non-wasting diabetic mice. Our data show that the mechanism of wasting in diabetic mice involves muscle atrophy, a significant increase in ubiquitin conjugation, and upregulation of the ubiquitin ligases, muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F box/atrogin-1 (MAFbx), indicating cachexia. Moreover, fragmentation of DNA isolated from atrophied muscle tissue indicates apoptosis. While CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia is evident in all diabetic mice, CD4+ T cells that express a very low density of CD44 were significantly lost in wasting, but not non-wasting, diabetic mice. These data suggest that CD4+ T-cell subsets are not equally susceptible to cachexia-associated lymphopenia in diabetic mice. PMID:18397274

  14. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad; Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4{sup +} T cells and especially CD8{sup +} T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha} and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells.

  15. Distinct genetic control of autoimmune neuropathy and diabetes in the non-obese diabetic background.

    PubMed

    Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Thompson, Heather L; Giampaolo, Jennifer R; Davini, Dan; Rosenthal, Wendy; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is susceptible to the development of autoimmune diabetes but also multiple other autoimmune diseases. Over twenty susceptibility loci linked to diabetes have been identified in NOD mice and progress has been made in the definition of candidate genes at many of these loci (termed Idd for insulin-dependent diabetes). The susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases in the NOD background is a unique opportunity to examine susceptibility genes that confer a general propensity for autoimmunity versus susceptibility genes that control individual autoimmune diseases. We previously showed that NOD mice deficient for the costimulatory molecule B7-2 (NOD-B7-2KO mice) were protected from diabetes but spontaneously developed an autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Here, we took advantage of multiple NOD mouse strains congenic for Idd loci to test the role of these Idd loci the development of neuropathy and determine if B6 alleles at Idd loci that are protective for diabetes will also be for neuropathy. Thus, we generated NOD-B7-2KO strains congenic at Idd loci and examined the development of neuritis and clinical neuropathy. We found that the NOD-H-2(g7) MHC region is necessary for development of neuropathy in NOD-B7-2KO mice. In contrast, other Idd loci that significantly protect from diabetes did not affect neuropathy when considered individually. However, we found potent genetic interactions of some Idd loci that provided almost complete protection from neuritis and clinical neuropathy. In addition, defective immunoregulation by Tregs could supersede protection by some, but not other, Idd loci in a tissue-specific manner in a model where neuropathy and diabetes occurred concomitantly. Thus, our study helps identify Idd loci that control tissue-specific disease or confer general susceptibility to autoimmunity, and brings insight to the Treg-dependence of autoimmune processes influenced by given Idd region in the NOD background.

  16. Exercise Improves Host Response to Influenza Viral Infection in Obese and Non-Obese Mice through Different Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kristi J.; Olson, Molly M.; Thompson, Nicholas J.; Cahill, Mackenzie L.; Wyatt, Todd A.; Yoon, Kyoungjin J.; Loiacono, Christina M.; Kohut, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with greater severity of influenza virus infection and impaired host defense. Exercise may confer health benefits even when weight loss is not achieved, but it has not been determined if regular exercise improves immune defense against influenza A virus (IAV) in the obese condition. In this study, diet-induced obese mice and lean control mice exercised for eight weeks followed by influenza viral infection. Exercise reduced disease severity in both obese and non-obese mice, but the mechanisms differed. Exercise reversed the obesity-associated delay in bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) cell infiltration, restored BAL cytokine and chemokine production, and increased ciliary beat frequency and IFNα-related gene expression. In non-obese mice, exercise treatment reduced lung viral load, increased Type-I-IFN-related gene expression early during infection, but reduced BAL inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In both obese and non-obese mice, exercise increased serum anti-influenza virus specific IgG2c antibody, increased CD8+ T cell percentage in BAL, and reduced TNFα by influenza viral NP-peptide-responding CD8+ T cells. Overall, the results suggest that exercise “restores” the immune response of obese mice to a phenotype similar to non-obese mice by improving the delay in immune activation. In contrast, in non-obese mice exercise treatment results in an early reduction in lung viral load and limited inflammatory response. PMID:26110868

  17. Construction of adiponectin-encoding plasmid DNA and gene therapy of non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nan, Mei Hua; Park, Jeong-Sook; Myung, Chang-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin (ADN), an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, stimulates glucose uptake, inhibits gluconeogenesis, and plays an important role in improving insulin sensitivity. Since blood levels of ADN are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), this study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of increasing the ADN level through injection of plasmid DNA encoding ADN in type 2 DM. A non-obese type 2 DM mouse model was established via combined administration of streptozotocin with nicotinamide and exhibited significantly higher plasma glucose concentration and insulin resistance compared with normal controls according to oral glucose tolerance and insulin challenge tests. Plasmid DNA encoding mouse ADN from differentiated NIH3T3 adipocytes was constructed in pVAX1 (pVAX/ADN). Transfection of pVAX/ADN into various cell lines including HeLa, HT22, HEK293, HepG2, and SK-Hep1 cells, increased ADN mRNA expression levels in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of pVAX/ADN into non-obese type 2 DM mice via tail vein significantly increased the blood level of ADN and decreased the plasma glucose concentration. Moreover, the parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity (QUICKI) were significantly improved. These results suggest that ADN gene therapy could be a clinically effective tool for the treatment of type 2 DM.

  18. Resveratrol improves salivary dysfunction in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroko; Kishimoto, Atsuhiro; Ushikoshi-Nakayama, Ryoko; Hasaka, Ayaka; Takahashi, Ayako; Ryo, Koufuchi; Muramatsu, Takashi; Ide, Fumio; Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol produced by plants in response to environmental stress. This compound has been shown to have pharmacological effects against a wide range of diseases including neurological, hepatic, cardiovascular and autoimmune conditions. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, in which loss of lacrimal and salivary gland function occurs, has been studied as an animal model for Sjögren’s syndrome. In this study, we confirmed that administration of resveratrol results in increased secretion of saliva in NOD mice. Although resveratrol enhanced Sirt1 activity, inflammatory cell infiltration was not affected. Moreover, expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in salivary glands was enhanced in the resveratrol-administered group. Thus, we confirmed a novel therapeutic effect for resveratrol on salivary dysfunction in Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:27698537

  19. Elevated systemic glutamic acid level in the non-obese diabetic mouse is Idd linked and induces beta cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Banday, Viqar Showkat; Lejon, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Although type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-mediated disease in the effector stage, the mechanism behind the initial beta cell assault is less understood. Metabolomic differences, including elevated levels of glutamic acid, have been observed in patients with T1D before disease onset, as well as in pre-diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Increased levels of glutamic acid damage both neurons and beta cells, implying that this could contribute to the initial events of T1D pathogenesis. We investigated the underlying genetic factors and consequences of the increased levels of glutamic acid in NOD mice. Serum glutamic acid levels from a (NOD×B6)F2 cohort (n = 182) were measured. By genome-wide and Idd region targeted microsatellite mapping, genetic association was detected for six regions including Idd2, Idd4 and Idd22. In silico analysis of potential enzymes and transporters located in and around the mapped regions that are involved in glutamic acid metabolism consisted of alanine aminotransferase, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family, alutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase, glutamic acid transporters GLAST and EAAC1. Increased EAAC1 protein expression was observed in lysates from livers of NOD mice compared with B6 mice. Functional consequence of the elevated glutamic acid level in NOD mice was tested by culturing NOD. Rag2(-/-) Langerhans' islets with glutamic acid. Induction of apoptosis of the islets was detected upon glutamic acid challenge using TUNEL assay. Our results support the notion that a dysregulated metabolome could contribute to the initiation of T1D. We suggest that targeting of the increased glutamic acid in pre-diabetic patients could be used as a potential therapy.

  20. Plasma adipokine and inflammatory marker concentrations are altered in obese, as opposed to non-obese, type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dominique; Dendale, Paul; Beelen, Milou; Jonkers, Richard A M; Mullens, Annelies; Corluy, Luk; Meeusen, Romain; van Loon, Luc J C

    2010-06-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA), inflammatory marker, and altered adipokine concentrations have been observed in obese type 2 diabetes patients. It remains unclear whether these altered plasma concentrations are related to the diabetic state or presence of obesity. In this cross-sectional observational study, we compare basal plasma FFA, inflammatory marker, and adipokine concentrations between obese and non-obese type 2 diabetes patients and healthy, non-obese controls. A total of 20 healthy, normoglycemic males (BMI <30 kg/m(2)), 20 non-obese (BMI <30 kg/m(2)) and 20 obese (BMI >35 kg/m(2)) type 2 diabetes patients were selected to participate in this study. Groups were matched for age and habitual physical activity level. Body composition, glycemic control, and exercise performance capacity were assessed. Basal blood samples were collected to determine plasma leptin, adiponectin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and FFA concentrations. Plasma FFA, inflammatory marker (hsCRP, IL-6, TNFalpha), adipokine (adiponectin, resistin, leptin), and triglyceride concentrations did not differ between non-obese diabetes patients and healthy, normoglycemic controls. Plasma FFA, IL-6, hsCRP, leptin, and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the obese diabetes patients when compared with the healthy normoglycemic controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, plasma hsCRP and leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese versus non-obese diabetes patients (P < 0.05). Significant correlations between plasma parameters and glycemic control were observed, but disappeared after adjusting for trunk adipose tissue mass. Elevated plasma leptin, hsCRP, IL-6, and FFA concentrations are associated with obesity and not necessarily with the type 2 diabetic state.

  1. IL-2 Immunotherapy Reveals Potential for Innate Beta Cell Regeneration in the Non-Obese Diabetic Mouse Model of Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Deborah; Filippi, Christophe; Londei, Marco; McNamara, Peter; Nasoff, Marc; DiDonato, Michael; Glynne, Richard; Herman, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease targeting insulin-producing beta cells, resulting in dependence on exogenous insulin. To date, significant efforts have been invested to develop immune-modulatory therapies for T1D treatment. Previously, IL-2 immunotherapy was demonstrated to prevent and reverse T1D at onset in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model, revealing potential as a therapy in early disease stage in humans. In the NOD model, IL-2 deficiency contributes to a loss of regulatory T cell function. This deficiency can be augmented with IL-2 or antibody bound to IL-2 (Ab/IL-2) therapy, resulting in regulatory T cell expansion and potentiation. However, an understanding of the mechanism by which reconstituted regulatory T cell function allows for reversal of diabetes after onset is not clearly understood. Here, we describe that Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy treatment, given at the time of diabetes onset in NOD mice, not only correlated with reversal of diabetes and expansion of Treg cells, but also demonstrated the ability to significantly increase beta cell proliferation. Proliferation appeared specific to Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy, as anti-CD3 therapy did not have a similar effect. Furthermore, to assess the effect of Ab/IL-2 immunotherapy well after the development of diabetes, we tested the effect of delaying treatment for 4 weeks after diabetes onset, when beta cells were virtually absent. At this late stage after diabetes onset, Ab/IL-2 treatment was not sufficient to reverse hyperglycemia. However, it did promote survival in the absence of exogenous insulin. Proliferation of beta cells could not account for this improvement as few beta cells remained. Rather, abnormal insulin and glucagon dual-expressing cells were the only insulin-expressing cells observed in islets from mice with established disease. Thus, these data suggest that in diabetic NOD mice, beta cells have an innate capacity for regeneration both early and late in disease, which is revealed

  2. Tissue-Specific Stem Cells Obtained by Reprogramming of Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse-Derived Pancreatic Cells Confer Insulin Production in Response to Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Issei; Sato, Masahiro; Soda, Miki; Inada, Emi; Iwase, Yoko; Murakami, Tomoya; Ohshima, Hayato; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes occurs due to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells in islets. Transplantation of islets is a promising option for the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes that experience hypoglycemic unawareness despite maximal care, but the present shortage of donor islets hampers such transplantation. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells derived from the patients themselves would be one of the most promising approaches to cure type 1 diabetes. Previously, we demonstrated that insulin-producing cells could be produced by transfecting murine pancreatic cells with Yamanaka’s reprogramming factors. Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice are naturally occurring mutant mice defective in insulin production due to autoimmune ablation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we showed that glucose-sensitive insulin-producing cells are successfully generated by transfecting primary pancreatic cells from NOD mice (aged 6 months old) with a plasmid harboring the cDNAs for Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Transfection was repeated 4 times in a 2 day-interval. Sixty-five days after final transfection, cobblestone-like colonies appeared. They proliferated in vitro and expressed pluripotency-related genes as well as Pdx1, a transcription factor specific to tissue-specific stem cells for the β-cell lineage. Transplantation of these cells into nude mice failed to produce teratoma unlike induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Induction of these cells to the pancreatic β-cell lineage demonstrated their capability to produce insulin in response to glucose. These findings suggest that functional pancreatic β-cells can be produced from patients with type 1 diabetes. We call these resultant cells as “induced tissue-specific stem cells from the pancreas” (iTS-P) that could be valuable sources of safe and effective materials for cell-based therapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:27662374

  3. Association between Serum Vitamin D Level and Glycemic and Inflammatory Markers in Non-obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Haidari, Fatemeh; Zakerkish, Mehrnoosh; Karandish, Majid; Saki, Azadeh; Pooraziz, Sakineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) has been shown to correlate with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The objective of this study was to investigate the association between serum 25(OH)D and glycemic and inflammatory markers in non-obese patients with T2DM. Methods: Eighty-four non-obese patients with T2DM were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Demographic, anthropometric, and dietary information was obtained from all the participants. The serum concentrations of glucose, HbA1C, insulin, 25(OH)D, and inflammatory markers including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured. A homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was also evaluated. Results: The mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D was 11.01±5.55 ng/mL. Severe deficiency, deficiency, and insufficiency of vitamin D were detected in 60.71%, 35.72%, and 3.57% of the participants, respectively. The results showed that those in the lowest group of serum 25(OH)D had significantly higher TNF-α than did those in the highest group (P=0.026). Although the association between serum 25(OH)D and fasting blood sugar and TNF-α was statistically significant (P=0.049 and P=0.044, respectively), the other glycemic markers and hs-CRP did not have any significant relationships with 25(OH)D. Conclusion: According to the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the diabetic patients and the inverse relationship between serum 25(OH)D and fasting blood sugar and TNF-α in this study, vitamin D status may be a determining factor of systemic inflammation in patients with T2DM. Further studies with larger sample sizes are suggested in this regard. PMID:27582585

  4. Insulin resistance is associated with gallstones even in non-obese, non-diabetic Korean men.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoosoo; Sung, Eunju; Ryu, Seungho; Park, Yong-Woo; Jang, Yu Mi; Park, Minseon

    2008-08-01

    It remains unclear as to whether insulin resistance alone or in the presence of wellknown risk factors, such as diabetes or obesity, is associated with gallstones in men. The aim of this study was to determine whether insulin resistance is associated independently with gallstone disease in non-diabetic men, regardless of obesity. Study subjects were 19,503 Korean men, aged 30-69 yr, with fasting blood glucose level <126 mg/dL and without a documented history of diabetes. Gallbladder status was assessed via abdominal ultrasonography after overnight fast. Body mass index and waist circumference were measured. Insulin resistance was estimated by the Homeostasis Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome in the subjects with gallstones were higher than in those without. The prevalence of elevated HOMA (>75 percentile) in subjects with gallstones was significantly higher than in those without, and this association remained even after the obesity stratification was applied. In multiple logistic regression analyses, only age and HOMA proved to be independent predictors of gallstones. Insulin resistance was positively associated with gallstones in non-diabetic Korean men, and this occurred regardless of obesity. Gallstones appear to be a marker for insulin resistance, even in non-diabetic, nonobese men.

  5. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-11-23

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies.

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus control and atherosclerosis prevention in a non-obese rat model using duodenal-jejunal bypass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Huang, Zhen; Ran, Wenhua; Liao, Gang; Zha, Lang; Wang, Ziwei

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent disease worldwide and during its conventional treatment, vascular complications remain unavoidable. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is able to induce the remission of T2DM. However, studies of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), a modified procedure of GBP, are being carried out to investigate its ability to induce the remission of T2DM and protect the aorta from atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of DJB on the rate of T2DM remission and the prevention of atherosclerosis in the aorta in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes without obesity, and to explore the mechanism of DJB in protecting the aorta from atherosclerosis. A T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Surgery was performed to analyze its effects on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, inflammation and pathological changes. Furthermore, changes in c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKβ) genes in the aorta following DJB surgery were examined. Levels of blood glucose, lipids, insulin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly elevated in the T2DM diabetic model compared with the non-diabetic control. A gradual recovery was observed in the DJB group following surgery. Foam cells and atherosclerotic plaques appeared in the ascending aortic tissue in the sham-surgery and T2DM groups, whereas only slight lesions were observed in the DJB group. The expression levels of JNK1 and IKKβ genes in the aorta were significantly increased in the sham-operated and T2DM groups compared with those in the DJB and normal control groups. The present study demonstrated that DJB caused remission of T2DM without weight loss in non-obese rats. Thus, DJB may delay or prevent the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in the aorta and this may occur through the JNK1 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways.

  7. Genetic interactions of KIR and G1M immunoglobulin allotypes differ in obese from non-obese individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Viviana; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Azocar, Jose; Clavijo, Olga P; Terreros, Daniel; Kidwai, Hassan; Pandey, Janardan P; Yunis, Edmond J

    2008-08-01

    We analyzed the natural killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and immunoglobulin allotypes in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) based on body mass index (BMI) measurements (obese vs. non-obese) in Puerto Rican Americans. Genetic interactions between the KIR haplotype A homozygotes (HAH) and its fraction containing two inhibitory receptors 2DL3 and 2DL1 and the activating receptor 2DS4 with immunoglobulin allotypes were studied. We found a significant association between the HAH and T2D (p=0.002; OR=7.97) and its interaction with the immunoglobulin allotype z: GM f/f (-) (p=<0.0001; OR, not determined) only in non-obese individuals. This association were due to the interactions between the 2DL3/2DL3, 2DL1/2DL1, and 2DS4 fragment with GM f/f (-) in T2D patients (p=0.0017; OR=3.45). Analysis based on BMI demonstrated associations in both obese (p=0.037; OR=2.43; 95% CI=0.97-6.31) and non-obese individuals (p=<0.0001; OR=8.38; 95% CI=2.49-29.31). By contrast, the interaction of the GM allotype f/f (-) with the HAH fragment was associated with T2D only in non-obese individuals (p=<0.0001; OR=18.2; 95% CI=3.71-113.4). As expected, interaction of both HAH and its fragment with HLA-C group's ligands were significant. We used informative short tandem repeats (STRs) that distinguish major populations to determine genetic admixture and found that there was no genetic stratification in our cohort. Our findings are consistent with the possibility of an autoimmune and/or innateimmune component in the pathogenesis of T2D: NK receptors with chronic inflammation in obese and genetic interactions with G1M allotype in T2D non-obese possibly mediating autoimmunity.

  8. Human peripheral blood leucocyte non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene mouse model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease and the role of host major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Covassin, L; Brehm, M A; Racki, W; Pearson, T; Leif, J; Laning, J; Fodor, W; Foreman, O; Burzenski, L; Chase, T H; Gott, B; Rossini, A A; Bortell, R; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L

    2009-01-01

    Immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immune-deficient (scid) mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull) engraft readily with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Here, we report a robust model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease (GVHD) based on intravenous injection of human PBMC into 2 Gy conditioned NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice. These mice develop xenogeneic GVHD consistently (100%) following injection of as few as 5 × 106 PBMC, regardless of the PBMC donor used. As in human disease, the development of xenogeneic GVHD is highly dependent on expression of host major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules and is associated with severely depressed haematopoiesis. Interrupting the tumour necrosis factor-α signalling cascade with etanercept, a therapeutic drug in clinical trials for the treatment of human GVHD, delays the onset and progression of disease. This model now provides the opportunity to investigate in vivo mechanisms of xenogeneic GVHD as well as to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents rapidly. PMID:19659776

  9. [Impaired insulin secretion in isolated islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, an animal model of non obese type 2 diabetes, is a primary event].

    PubMed

    Seiça, Raquel M; Suzuki, K I; Santos, Rosa M; Do Rosário, Luis M

    2004-01-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes is associated with the impairment of insulin secretion. To evaluate the evolution of the secretory response, a chronological study comparing normal Wistar (W) vs Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of non obese type 2 diabetes, was done. Glucose and arginine were tested in collagenase isolated islets of Langerhans with perfusion and ELISA immunoassay techniques. Fasting glycaemia and insulinemia and glucose tolerance were also evaluated. We have seen, in W rats, a mild glucose intolerance in the first two weeks of age. GK rats were always glucose intolerant with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia at fasten after one month old. Wistar islets had a characteristic biphasic response to glucose after the first two weeks of age. GK islets were always glucose irresponsive. Arginine induced an increase in insulin secretion in both animal models, independent of age, although GK rats had always a smaller response when compared to W rats. We concluded that 1) in W rats, a biphasic insulin secretion in response to glucose is observed after the first two weeks of age, simultaneously with glycaemia stabilization 2) in GK rats, both first and second phases of glucose-induced insulin release are significantly reduced and a smaller reduction in response to arginine is observed. This beta-cell disfunction is a primary event in this model of type 2 diabetes, preceding fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  10. A novel ALMS1 splice mutation in a non-obese juvenile-onset insulin-dependent syndromic diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Sanyoura, May; Woudstra, Cédric; Halaby, George; Baz, Patrick; Senée, Valérie; Guillausseau, Pierre-Jean; Zalloua, Pierre; Julier, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-dependent juvenile-onset diabetes may occur in the context of rare syndromic presentations suggesting monogenic inheritance rather than common multifactorial autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Here, we report the case of a Lebanese patient diagnosed with juvenile-onset insulin-dependent diabetes presenting ketoacidosis, early-onset retinopathy with optic atrophy, hearing loss, diabetes insipidus, epilepsy, and normal weight and stature, who later developed insulin resistance. Despite similarities with Wolfram syndrome, we excluded the WFS1 gene as responsible for this disease. Using combined linkage and candidate gene study, we selected ALMS1, responsible for Alström syndrome, as a candidate gene. We identified a novel splice mutation in intron 18 located 3 bp before the intron-exon junction (IVS18-3T>G), resulting in exon 19 skipping and consequent frameshift generating a truncated protein (V3958fs3964X). The clinical presentation of the patient significantly differed from typical Alström syndrome by the absence of truncal obesity and short stature, and by the presence of ketoacidotic insulin-dependent diabetes, optic atrophy and diabetes insipidus. Our observation broadens the clinical spectrum of Alström syndrome and suggests that ALMS1 mutations may be considered in patients who initially present with an acute onset of insulin-dependent diabetes.

  11. Mechanisms of autoimmunity in the non-obese diabetic mouse: effector/regulatory cell equilibrium during peak inflammation.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir

    2016-04-01

    Immune imbalance in autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes may originate from aberrant activities of effector cells or dysfunction of suppressor cells. All possible defective mechanisms have been proposed for diabetes-prone species: (i) quantitative dominance of diabetogenic cells and decreased numbers of regulatory T cells, (ii) excessive aggression of effectors and defective function of suppressors, (iii) perturbed interaction between effector and suppressor cells, and (iv) variations in sensitivity to negative regulation. The experimental evidence available to date presents conflicting information on these mechanisms, with identification of perturbed equilibrium on the one hand and negation of critical role of each mechanism in propagation of diabetic autoimmunity on the other hand. In our analysis, there is no evidence that inherent abnormalities in numbers and function of effector and suppressor T cells are responsible for the immune imbalance responsible for propagation of type 1 diabetes as a chronic inflammatory process. Possibly, the experimental tools for investigation of these features of immune activity are still underdeveloped and lack sufficient resolution, in the presence of the extensive biological viability and functional versatility of effector and suppressor elements.

  12. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice.

  13. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  14. MicroRNA-26a Promotes Regulatory T cells and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Zhang, Shoutao; Shi, Doufei; Mao, Yanhua; Cui, Jianguo

    2016-02-01

    Type-1 diabetes (TID) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune cells attack islet β cells, the cells in the pancreas that produce and release the hormone insulin. Mir-26a has been reported to play functions in cellular differentiation, cell growth, cell apoptosis, and metastasis. However, the role of microRNA-26a (Mir-26a) in autoimmune TID has never been investigated. In our current study, we found that pre-Mir-26a (LV-26a)-treated mice had significantly longer normoglycemic time and lower frequency of autoreactive IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) cells compared with an empty lentiviral vector (LV-Con)-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Mir-26a suppresses autoreactive T cells and expands Tregs in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, in our adoptive transfer study, the groups receiving whole splenocytes and CD25-depleted splenocytes from LV-Con-treated diabetic NOD mice develop diabetes at 3 to 4 weeks of age. In comparison, mice injected with undepleted splenocytes obtained from LV-26a-treated reversal NOD mice develop diabetes after 6-8 weeks. And depletion of CD25(+) cells in the splenocytes of reversed mice abrogates the delay in diabetes onset. In conclusion, Mir-26a suppresses autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice in part through promoted regulatory T cells (Tregs) expression.

  15. Anti-Diabetic Activities of Gastrodia elata Blume Water Extracts Are Mediated Mainly by Potentiating Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Increasing β-Cell Mass in Non-Obese Type 2 Diabetic Animals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Min Jung; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Da Sol; Lee, Young Hyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Park, Sunmin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is an important modulator of glucose metabolism, and is known to respond Gastrodia elata Blume water extract (GEB). Therefore, we examined whether long-term administration of GEB has hypoglycemic activity, and its action mechanism was explored in partially-pancreatectomized rats that exhibit similar characteristics as Asian type 2 diabetes, non-obese insulin-insufficient diabetes. The rats were provided high-fat diets supplemented with either of (1) 0.5% GEB (GEB-L), (2) 2% GEB (GEB-H), (3) 2% dextrin (control), or (4) 2% dextrin with rosiglitazone (20 mg/kg body weight; positive-control) for eight weeks. GEB dose-dependently improved hypothalamic insulin signaling, enhanced whole-body insulin sensitivity during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, and reduced hepatic glucose output in a hyperinsulinemic state. GEB dose-dependently increased the area under the curve of the serum insulin levels at the first and second phases during hyperglycemic clamp compared to the control, whereas the positive control had no effect. Insulin sensitivity during the hyperglycemic state also improved, dose-dependently, in response to GEB compared with that of the control, but was less than the positive control. GEB-H increased the mass of β-cells by potentiating proliferation and decreasing apoptosis. In conclusion, GEB could be a therapeutic agent for treating Asian type 2 diabetes. PMID:26978400

  16. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate

    PubMed Central

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin–testosterone–oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin–testosterone–oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes. PMID:21039986

  17. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate.

    PubMed

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes.

  18. Trichloroethylene Does Not Accelerate Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Guillaume; Christ, Marielle; Perron-Lepage, Marie-France; Condevaux, Fabienne; Descotes, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    Pre-existing or contributing risk factors, including genetic predisposition and environmental influences, are largely thought to play a crucial (though ill-elucidated) role in the development of autoimmunity. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent, which has been suspected of increasing the prevalence of autoimmune diseases, e.g., lupus, following environmental contamination. Although few epidemiological data are available, several studies reported an accelerated and more severe disease in TCE-exposed autoimmunity-prone MRL(+/+) mice. To test whether TCE can exert similar deleterious effects on organ-specific autoimmune diseases, non obese diabetic (NOD) mice were given 5 mg/ml TCE via the drinking water for 12 weeks. TCE administration induced a decrease in CD44(+) splenic T-cells and CD45RB(high), CD54(+) blood and splenic T-cells. Conversely, the number of CD45RB(low) splenocytes was increased. Interestingly, the progressive increase in serum TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels normally seen with age in these mice was inhibited by TCE. There was also a relative lower incidence of histological changes in the pancreas of TCE-exposed NOD mice than in unexposed mice. Contrary to what has been found in systemic models of autoimmunity, TCE did not accelerate the diabetes of NOD mice and may have a protective effect. This finding suggests that comparative studies using different genetically related autoimmune-prone models are needed to investigate the role of xenobiotics in the precipitation of autoimmunity, particularly in sensitive populations.

  19. [Lipid peroxidation and the response of the antioxidant defense system in the obese type 2 diabetic compared with the non-obese type 2 diabetic].

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar Kurt; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; García-González, Adolfo; Ramírez-Jirano, Luis Javier; Veléz-Alavez, Marcela; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2013-11-01

    Introducción: La diabetes se asocia a un incremento en la peroxidación de lípidos, cuantificada a partir del nivel de sustancias reactivas al ácido tiobarbitúrico (TBARS). En paralelo, se activa el sistema de defensa antioxidante (SDA) para delimitar el daño. Objetivo: Determinar el grado de peroxidación de lípidos en individuos obesos diabéticos tipo 2 (DM2) y la respuesta del SDA en comparación con individuos con DM2 sin obesidad. Método: Se evaluó el daño a lípidos a través de la medición de las TBARS en dos grupos de 30 individuos. Se evaluó la respuesta del SDA por medio de la medición de la actividad de las enzimas catalasa (CAT), superóxido dismutasa (SOD) y glutatión peroxidasa (GPx). Resultados: El grupo de DM2 obesos presentó un índice de masa corporal (IMC) promedio de 38.6 ± 3.5 kg m-2 en comparación con el grupo control 24.7 ± 3.6 kg m-2 (p.

  20. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1) accelerates type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan-Ying; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Zheng-Wang

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 is over-expressed in the blood of NOD mice suffering from insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 increases blood glucose levels and triggers type 1 diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 accelerates insulitis, while its antibody prevents insulitis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daintain/AIF-1 enhances the levels of nitric oxide in the pancreases of NOD mice. -- Abstract: A large body of experimental evidence suggests that cytokines trigger pancreatic {beta}-cell death in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Daintain/AIF-1 (Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1), a specific marker for activated macrophages, is accumulated in the pancreatic islets of pre-diabetic BB rats. In the present study, we demonstrate that daintain/AIF-1 is released into blood and the levels of daintain/AIF-1 in the blood of type 1 diabetes-prone non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice suffering from insulitis are significantly higher than that in healthy NOD mice. When injected intravenously into NOD mice, daintain/AIF-1 stimulates white blood cell proliferation, increases the concentrations of blood glucose, impairs insulin expression, up-regulates nitric oxide (NO) production in pancreases and accelerates diabetes in NOD mice, while the antibody against daintain/AIF-1 delays or prevents insulitis in NOD mice. These results imply daintain/AIF-1 triggers type 1 diabetes probably via arousing immune cells activation and induction of NO production in pancreas of NOD mice.

  1. TAK1 inhibition prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Lu, Jingli; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Wei, Shouguo; Liu, Xiulan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Ming

    2015-10-13

    Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1, Map3k7), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family, is essential in innate and adaptive immune responses. We postulated that blockade of TAK1 would affect autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Administration of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol (OZ), a TAK1 inhibitor, decreased the incidence and delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in both spontaneous and accelerated (cyclophosphamide-induced) experimental NOD mice. OZ also reduced insulitis, preserved islet function, increased the expression of α1- antitrypsin (AAT), and severely inhibited NF-κB and JNK/AP-1 signaling pathways in immune organs and pancreatic tissues. Importantly, TAK1 inhibition by OZ elicited a Th1 to Th2 cytokine shift, and increased TGF-β1 production in cultured T lymphocytes supernatants. Systemic TAK1 inhibition induced immature DCs with lower expressions of MHC-II and CD86, attenuated DC-mediated T cell proliferation in allogeneic MLR, and production of cytokine IL-12p70 in DCs suspensions. The results indicate that TAK1 inhibition with OZ was associated with a lower frequency of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. The net effect of TAK1 inhibition in NOD mice therefore appears to be protective rather than disease-enhancing. Strategies targeting TAK1 specifically in NOD mice might prove useful for the treatment of autoimmune diabetes in general.

  2. Gene therapy with neurogenin3, betacellulin and SOCS1 reverses diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Buras, E; Lee, J; Liu, R; Liu, V; Espiritu, C; Ozer, K; Thompson, B; Nally, L; Yuan, G; Oka, K; Chang, B; Samson, S; Yechoor, V; Chan, L

    2015-11-01

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetes is limited by a shortage of donor islets and requirement for immunosuppression. We approached this problem by inducing in vivo islet neogenesis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) diabetic mice, a model of autoimmune diabetes. We demonstrate that gene therapy with helper-dependent adenovirus carrying neurogenin3 (Ngn3), an islet lineage-defining transcription factor, and betacellulin (Btc), an islet growth factor, leads to the induction of periportal insulin-positive cell clusters in the liver, which are rapidly destroyed. To specifically accord protection to these 'neo-islets' from cytokine-mediated destruction, we overexpressed suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) gene, using a rat insulin promoter in combination with Ngn3 and Btc. With this approach, about half of diabetic mice attained euglycemia sustained for over 4 months, regain glucose tolerance and appropriate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Histological analysis revealed periportal islet hormone-expressing 'neo-islets' in treated mouse livers. Despite evidence of persistent 'insulitis' with activated T cells, these 'neo-islets' persist to maintain euglycemia. This therapy does not affect diabetogenicity of splenocytes, as they retain the ability to transfer diabetes. This study thus provides a proof-of-concept for engineering in vivo islet neogenesis with targeted resistance to cytokine-mediated destruction to provide a long-term reversal of diabetes in NOD mice.

  3. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet {beta}-cell line in diabetic NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Sasha P. . E-mail: Sasha.Black@ca.crl.com; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J.; Safley, Susan A.

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic {beta}-cell line ({beta}TC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of {beta}TC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic {beta}-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is First extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  4. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  5. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  6. DNA content, chromatin supraorganization, nuclear glycoproteins and RNA amounts in hepatocytes of mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mello, Maria Luiza S; Aldrovani, Marcela; Moraes, Alberto Silva; Guaraldo, Ana Maria Aparecida; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin supraorganization and extensibility and nuclear glycoprotein content have been reported to change in hepatocytes from mice during development and aging, as well as under starvation and refeeding conditions. In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, the expression of insulin-dependent diabetes may be accompanied by metabolic changes in the liver. These changes are likely to be similar to those involved in the aging processes of non-diabetic animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that the chromatin organization, as well as the physical properties and compositions of hepatocyte nuclei would also be affected in NOD mice in the same way as those in aged non-diabetic mice. Nuclear image parameters were evaluated by image analysis of Feulgen-stained preparations. Chromatin extensibility in response to gravity was observed with polarized light after lysis and toluidine blue staining. The Con-A response of nuclear glycoproteins was evaluated with scanning microspectrophotometry. These characteristics were assessed using hepatocyte imprints from female NOD mice after a 28-day period of diabetes expression. Observations and measurements were made in comparison to healthy BALB/c mice. Total RNA amounts were determined for livers of NOD and BALB/c mice. Enhanced polyploidy levels, a decrease in chromatin higher-order packing states, an increased frequency of extended chromatin fiber formation, and deeper Con-A-responsive chromatin areas were observed in the hepatocytes of the NOD mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes. Reduced amounts of total RNA were also found in the livers of these mice. Our findings for NOD mice expressing insulin-dependent diabetes are consistent with previously reported data for old-aged mice of the inbred strain A/Uni and may reflect changes in transcriptional activities associated with the stressful physiological demands on the liver during the expression of diabetes.

  7. Chronic intake of a high-cholesterol diet resulted in hepatic steatosis, focal nodular hyperplasia and fibrosis in non-obese mice.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Sakanaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol (HC) diet administered long term (25 or 55 weeks) on metabolic disorders including hepatic damage in mice. The mice were fed the HC diet (15 % milk fat, 1.5 % cholesterol and 0.1 % cholic acid, w/w) for 25 or 55 weeks. Body and adipose tissue weights were similar to those of mice fed a control diet. Consumption of the HC diet long term resulted in hypercholesterolaemia, hepatic steatosis and gallstones. In addition, focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and mild fibrosis of the liver developed in all mice fed the HC diet for 55 weeks. Plasma levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 were elevated, and the level of hepatic platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B protein was increased in mice fed the HC diet compared with those fed the control diet. Thus, it seems likely that the liver fibrosis and FNH caused by the long-term consumption of a HC diet may be partly due to an elevation of plasma MCP-1 and hepatic PDGF expression.

  8. Gut microbial markers are associated with diabetes onset, regulatory imbalance, and IFN-γ level in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Krych, Ł; Nielsen, D S; Hansen, A K; Hansen, C H F

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbiota regulated imbalances in the host's immune profile seem to be an important factor in the etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D), and identifying bacterial markers for T1D may therefore be useful in diagnosis and prevention of T1D. The aim of the present study was to investigate the link between the early gut microbiota and immune parameters of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice in order to select alleged bacterial markers of T1D. Gut microbial composition in feces was analyzed with 454/FLX Titanium (Roche) pyro-sequencing and correlated with diabetes onset age and immune cell populations measured in diabetic and non-diabetic mice at 30 weeks of age. The early gut microbiota composition was found to be different between NOD mice that later in life were classified as diabetic or non-diabetic. Those differences were further associated with changes in FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IFN-γ production. The model proposed in this work suggests that operational taxonomic units classified to S24-7, Prevotella, and an unknown Bacteriodales (all Bacteroidetes) act in favor of diabetes protection whereas members of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcus, and Oscillospira (all Firmicutes) promote pathogenesis.

  9. I-E+ nonobese diabetic mice develop insulitis and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The development of type I diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is under the control of multiple genes, one or more of which is linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The MHC class II region has been implicated in disease development, with expression of an I-E transgene in NOD mice shown to provide protection from insulitis and diabetes. To examine the effect of expressing an I-E+ or I-E- non-NOD MHC on the NOD background, three I-E+ and three I-E- NOD MHC congenic strains (NOD.H-2i5, NOD.H-2k, and NOD.H-2h2, and NOD.H-2h4, NOD.H-2i7, and NOD.H-2b, respectively) were developed. Of these strains, both I-E+ NOD.H-2h2 and I-E- NOD.H-2h4 mice developed insulitis, but not diabetes. The remaining four congenic strains were free of insulitis and diabetes. These results indicate that in the absence of the NOD MHC, diabetes fails to develop. Each NOD MHC congenic strain was crossed with the NOD strain to produce I-E+ and I-E- F1 mice; these mice thus expressed one dose of the NOD MHC and one dose of a non-NOD MHC on the NOD background. While a single dose of a non-NOD MHC provided a large degree of disease protection to all of the F1 strains, a proportion of I-E+ and I-E- F1 mice aged 5-12 mo developed insulitis and cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes. When I-E+ F1 mice were aged 9-17 mo, spontaneous diabetes developed as well. These data are the first to demonstrate that I-E+ NOD mice develop diabetes, indicating that expression of I-E in NOD mice is not in itself sufficient to prevent insulitis or diabetes. In fact, I-E- F1 strains were no more protected from diabetes than I-E+ F1 strains, suggesting that other non-NOD MHC- linked genes are important in protection from disease. Finally, transfer of NOD bone marrow into irradiated I-E+ F1 recipients resulted in high incidences of diabetes, indicating that expression of non-NOD MHC products in the thymus, in the absence of expression in bone marrow- derived cells, is not sufficient to provide protection

  10. Impact of T-cell-specific Smad4 deficiency on the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Lee, Song Mi; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is known to play a preventive role in type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Smad4, a key molecule for Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling, in T cells of NOD mice in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. We generated T-cell-specific Smad4 knockout (Smad4 tKO) NOD mice and assessed the pathological and immunological changes. Smad4 tKO showed earlier onset and increased incidence of diabetes than wild type (WT) NOD mice. Pathological features such as insulitis, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase auto-antibody levels and serum IFN-γ levels were significantly increased in Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. Proportion and number of activated/memory CD4+ T cell were significantly increased in pancreatic lymph nodes of Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. However, the proportion and function of regulatory T cells was not different. Effector CD4+ T cells from Smad4 tKO were more resistant to suppression by regulatory T cells than effector cells from WT NOD mice. The proliferative potential of effector T cells from Smad4 tKO was significantly elevated compared with WT NOD mice, and activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in T cells of Smad4 tKO NOD mice was correlated with this proliferative activity. We conclude that Smad4 deletion in T cells of NOD mice accelerated the development of autoimmune diabetes and increased the incidence of the disease by dysregulation of T cell activation at least in part via SREBP-1c activation. PMID:27686408

  11. Ghrelin reverses experimental diabetic neuropathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kyoraku, Itaru; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-11-20

    Ghrelin, an acylated peptide produced in the stomach, increases food intake and growth hormone secretion, suppresses inflammation and oxidative stress, and promotes cell survival and proliferation. We investigated the pharmacological potential of ghrelin in the treatment of polyneuropathy in uncontrolled streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in mice. Ghrelin or desacyl-ghrelin was administered daily for 4 weeks after STZ-induced diabetic polyneuropathy had developed. Ghrelin administration did not alter food intake, body weight gain, blood glucose levels, or plasma insulin levels when compared with mice given saline or desacyl-ghrelin administration. Ghrelin administration ameliorated reductions in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in diabetic mice and normalized their temperature sensation and plasma concentrations of 8-isoprostaglandin {alpha}, an oxidative stress marker. Desacyl-ghrelin failed to have any effect. Ghrelin administration in a mouse model of diabetes ameliorated polyneuropathy. Thus, ghrelin's effects represent a novel therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of this otherwise intractable disorder.

  12. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K.; Kim, S.; Choi, C.S.; Jun, H.S.

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose

  13. Linkage on chromosome 3 of autoimmune diabetes and defective Fc receptor for lgG in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Prins, J.B.; Todd, J.A.; Rodrigues, N.R.; Ghosh, S. ); Hogarth, P.M. ); Wicker, L.S.; Podolin, P.L.; Gaffney, E.; Peterson, L.B.; Fischer, P.A.; Sirotina, A. )

    1993-04-30

    A congenic, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain that contains a segment of chromosome 3 from the diabetes-resistant mouse strain B6.PL-Thy-1[sup a] was less susceptible to diabetes than NOD mice. A fully penetrant immunological defect also mapped to this segment, which encodes the high-affinity Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G (lgG), Fc[gamma]Rl. The NOD Fcgr1 allele, which results in a deletion of the cytoplasmic tail, caused a 73 percent reduction in the turnover of cell surface receptor-antibody complexes. The development of congenic strains and the characterization of Mendelian traits that are specific to the disease phenotype demonstrate the feasibility of dissecting the pathophysiology of complex, non-Mendelian diseases.

  14. Oligofructose as an adjunct in treatment of diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clement; Hyslop, Colin M.; Shrivastava, Vipul; Ochoa, Andrea; Reimer, Raylene A.; Huang, Carol

    2016-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, restoration of normoglycemia can be achieved if the autoimmune attack on beta cells ceases and insulin requirement is met by the residual beta cells. We hypothesize that an adjunctive therapy that reduces insulin demand by increasing insulin sensitivity will improve the efficacy of an immunotherapy in reversing diabetes. We tested the gut microbiota-modulating prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), as the adjunctive therapy. We treated non-obese diabetic mice with an immunotherapy, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (aCD3), with or without concurrent dietary supplement of OFS. After 8 weeks of OFS supplement, the group that received both aCD3 and OFS (aCD3 + OFS) had a higher diabetes remission rate than the group that received aCD3 alone. The aCD3 + OFS group had higher insulin sensitivity accompanied by reduced lymphocytic infiltrate into the pancreatic islets, higher beta-cell proliferation rate, higher pancreatic insulin content, and secreted more insulin in response to glucose. The addition of OFS also caused a change in gut microbiota, with a higher level of Bifidobacterium and lower Clostridium leptum. Hence, our results suggest that OFS can potentially be an effective therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of type 1 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, leading to improved glycemic control. PMID:27874076

  15. Oligofructose as an adjunct in treatment of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Clement; Hyslop, Colin M; Shrivastava, Vipul; Ochoa, Andrea; Reimer, Raylene A; Huang, Carol

    2016-11-22

    In type 1 diabetes, restoration of normoglycemia can be achieved if the autoimmune attack on beta cells ceases and insulin requirement is met by the residual beta cells. We hypothesize that an adjunctive therapy that reduces insulin demand by increasing insulin sensitivity will improve the efficacy of an immunotherapy in reversing diabetes. We tested the gut microbiota-modulating prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), as the adjunctive therapy. We treated non-obese diabetic mice with an immunotherapy, monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody (aCD3), with or without concurrent dietary supplement of OFS. After 8 weeks of OFS supplement, the group that received both aCD3 and OFS (aCD3 + OFS) had a higher diabetes remission rate than the group that received aCD3 alone. The aCD3 + OFS group had higher insulin sensitivity accompanied by reduced lymphocytic infiltrate into the pancreatic islets, higher beta-cell proliferation rate, higher pancreatic insulin content, and secreted more insulin in response to glucose. The addition of OFS also caused a change in gut microbiota, with a higher level of Bifidobacterium and lower Clostridium leptum. Hence, our results suggest that OFS can potentially be an effective therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of type 1 diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function, leading to improved glycemic control.

  16. Characteristics of diabetic osteopenia in KK-Ay diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Satoshi; Miura, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Takenori; Ando, Naoki; Nakao, Haruka; Ishihara, Eriko; Ishida, Torao

    2012-01-01

    We examined the bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal region and the mid-diaphysis of the femur using dual energy X-ray absorption (DXA), the blood osteocalcin level and the blood glucose level every five weeks from 8 to 23 weeks old in KK-Ay diabetic mice. The BMD of the proximal region after 18 weeks old was significantly lower when compared with that at 8 weeks old (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in the BMD of the mid-diaphysis at each week. The BMD of the proximal region at 18 weeks old was significantly lower than that in ddY mice, used as controls (p<0.05). The blood osteocalcin level at 18 weeks old was significantly lower than that at 8 weeks old and that in 18-week-old ddY mice (p<0.05). There was significant negative correlation between the blood glucose level and the BMD of the proximal region (r=-0.64, p<0.05). These results suggest that type 2 diabetes exerts an influence only on spongy bone, not on cortical bone, and that the BMD in the proximal region of the femur seems to be affected by blood glucose level, parallel with the progression of diabetes, through the blood osteocalcin level. In the present study, we show the characteristics of diabetic osteopenia in KK-Ay mice, an animal model of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Coffee improves auditory neuropathy in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bin Na; Yi, Tae Hoo; Park, Raekil; Kim, Sun Yeou; Kang, Tong Ho

    2008-08-29

    Coffee is a widely consumed beverage and has recently received considerable attention for its possible beneficial effects. Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder characterized by an abnormal auditory brainstem response. This study examined the auditory neuropathy induced by diabetes and investigated the action of coffee, trigonelline, and caffeine to determine whether they improved diabetic auditory neuropathy in mice. Auditory brainstem responses, auditory middle latency responses, and otoacoustic emissions were evaluated to assess auditory neuropathy. Coffee or trigonelline ameliorated the hearing threshold shift and delayed latency of the auditory evoked potential in diabetic neuropathy. These findings demonstrate that diabetes can produce a mouse model of auditory neuropathy and that coffee consumption potentially facilitates recovery from diabetes-induced auditory neuropathy. Furthermore, the active constituent in coffee may be trigonelline.

  18. Consumption of acidic water alters the gut microbiome and decreases the risk of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle J; Daft, Joseph G; Tanner, Scott M; Hartmann, Riley; Khafipour, Ehsan; Lorenz, Robin G

    2014-04-01

    Infant formula and breastfeeding are environmental factors that influence the incidence of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) as well as the acidity of newborn diets. To determine if altering the intestinal microbiome is one mechanism through which an acidic liquid plays a role in T1D, we placed non-obese diabetic (NOD)/ShiLtJt mice on neutral (N) or acidified H2O and monitored the impact on microbial composition and diabetes incidence. NOD-N mice showed an increased development of diabetes, while exhibiting a decrease in Firmicutes and an increase in Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria from as early as 2 weeks of age. NOD-N mice had a decrease in the levels of Foxp3 expression in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells, as well as decreased CD4(+)IL17(+) cells, and a lower ratio of IL17/IFNγ CD4+ T-cells. Our data clearly indicates that a change in the acidity of liquids consumed dramatically alters the intestinal microbiome, the presence of protective Th17 and Treg cells, and the incidence of diabetes. This data suggests that early dietary manipulation of intestinal microbiota may be a novel mechanism to delay T1D onset in genetically pre-disposed individuals.

  19. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against diabetes in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Anti-diabetic effects of RHSE were evaluated in both the rat insulinoma-1 cell line (INS-1) and diabetic ICR mice induced by inraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. ...

  20. Bromocriptine-Induced Hyperglycemia in Nonobese Diabetic Mice: Kinetics and Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Sylvie; Coulaud, Josiane; Homo-Delarche, Francoise

    2007-01-01

    The effects of bromocriptine (10 mg/kg), known to inhibit prolactin secretion and lower autoimmune processes, were studied on glucose homeostasis in non-fasted non-obese diabetic mice, a spontaneous model of type 1 diabetes. Hyperglycemia was observed 120 and 240 min after i.p. but not s.c. injection. Bromocriptine administration i.p. led to rapid and marked hyperglycemia characterized by sexual dimorphism with males having higher glycemia than females. Bromocriptine induced a rapid but transient decrease in insulinemia in males only and biphasic increases in glucagon levels and a sustained stimulatory effect on circulating corticosterone in both sexes. Bromocriptine-induced hyperglycemia involved D2-dopaminergic receptors, as demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of the D2-dopamine antagonist, metoclopramide (10 mg/kg). Simultaneous injection of bromocriptine and metoclopramide also blocked the rise in blood corticosterone. In conclusion, by inducing hyperglycemia, i.p. bromocriptine administration to prediabetic autoimmune mice may counteract its beneficial anti-immunostimulatory effects. PMID:18084676

  1. Immune responses to an encapsulated allogeneic islet beta-cell line in diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Black, Sasha P; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Cui, Hong; Tucker-Burden, Carol; Weber, Collin J; Safley, Susan A

    2006-02-03

    Our goal is to develop effective islet grafts for treating type 1 diabetes. Since human islets are scarce, we evaluated the efficacy of a microencapsulated insulin-secreting conditionally transformed allogeneic beta-cell line (betaTC-tet) in non-obese diabetic mice treated with tetracycline to inhibit cell growth. Relatively low serum levels of tetracycline controlled proliferation of betaTC-tet cells without inhibiting effective control of hyperglycemia in recipients. There was no significant host cellular reaction to the allografts or host cell adherence to microcapsules, and host cytokine levels were similar to those of sham-operated controls. We conclude that encapsulated allogeneic beta-cell lines may be clinically relevant, because they effectively restore euglycemia and do not elicit a strong cellular immune response following transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first extensive characterization of the kinetics of host cellular and cytokine responses to an encapsulated islet cell line in an animal model of type 1 diabetes.

  2. Ay allele promotes azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis by macrophage migration in hyperlipidemic/diabetic KK mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kumiko; Ishigamori, Rikako; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ohta, Toshihiro; Imai, Toshio; Takahashi, Mami

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing and is associated with obesity and diabetes. We have found that type 2 diabetes model KK-Ay/TaJcl (KK-Ay) mice develop tumors within a short period after treatment with azoxymethane (AOM). However, factors that contribute to the promotion of carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Therefore, we looked at the genetic background of KK-Ay, including two genetic characteristics of KK/TaJcl (KK) mice and C57BL/6J-Ham-Ay/+ (Ay) mice, compared with other non-obese and non-diabetic mouse strains C57BL/6J and ICR, and induced colorectal premalignant lesions, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and tumors using AOM (150 μg/mouse/week for 4 weeks and 200 μg/mouse/week for 6 weeks, respectively). The mice with a diabetes feature, KK-Ay and KK, developed significantly more ACF, 67 and 61 per mouse, respectively, whereas ICR, Ay, and C57BL/6J mice developed 42, 24, and 18 ACF/mouse, respectively, at 17 weeks of age. Serum insulin and triglyceride levels in KK-Ay and KK mice were quite high compared with other non-diabetic mouse strains. Interestingly, KK-Ay mice developed more colorectal tumors (2.7 ± 2.3 tumor/mouse) than KK mice (1.2 ± 1.1 tumor/mouse) at 25 weeks of age, in spite of similar diabetic conditions. The colon cancers that developed in both KK-Ay and KK mice showed similar activation of β-catenin signaling. However, mRNA levels of inflammatory factors related to the activation of macrophages were significantly higher in colorectal cancer of KK-Ay mice than in KK. These data indicate that factors such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia observed in obese and diabetic patients could be involved in susceptibility to colorectal carcinogenesis. In addition, increase of tumor-associated macrophages may play important roles in the stages of promotion of colorectal cancer.

  3. Therapeutic Impact of Leptin on Diabetes, Diabetic Complications, and Longevity in Insulin-Deficient Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Masaki; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Miyanaga, Fumiko; Yokoi, Hideki; Kusakabe, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji; Son, Cheol; Mukoyama, Masashi; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of the current study was to evaluate the long-term effects of leptin on glucose metabolism, diabetes complications, and life span in an insulin-dependent diabetes model, the Akita mouse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We cross-mated Akita mice with leptin-expressing transgenic (LepTg) mice to produce Akita mice with physiological hyperleptinemia (LepTg:Akita). Metabolic parameters were monitored for 10 months. Pair-fed studies and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The pancreata and kidneys were analyzed histologically. The plasma levels and pancreatic contents of insulin and glucagon, the plasma levels of lipids and a marker of oxidative stress, and urinary albumin excretion were measured. Survival rates were calculated. RESULTS Akita mice began to exhibit severe hyperglycemia and hyperphagia as early as weaning. LepTg:Akita mice exhibited normoglycemia after an extended fast even at 10 months of age. The 6-h fasting blood glucose levels in LepTg:Akita mice remained about half the level of Akita mice throughout the study. Food intake in LepTg:Akita mice was suppressed to a level comparable to that in WT mice, but pair feeding did not affect blood glucose levels in Akita mice. LepTg:Akita mice maintained insulin hypersensitivity and displayed better glucose tolerance than did Akita mice throughout the follow-up. LepTg:Akita mice had normal levels of plasma glucagon, a marker of oxidative stress, and urinary albumin excretion rates. All of the LepTg:Akita mice survived for >12 months, the median mortality time of Akita mice. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that leptin is therapeutically useful in the long-term treatment of insulin-deficient diabetes. PMID:21810600

  4. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B.; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Though murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin binding determinant sialyl Lewisx (sLex), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLex display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating HCELL, the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL+ MSCs showed 3-fold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL−) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays, however, though engraftment was temporary for both HCELL+ and HCELL− MSCs, administration of HCELL+ MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL− MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44−/− mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLex, but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25641589

  5. State of lymphopoiesis in mice with alloxan diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, Yu.A.; Timofeeva, E.E.; Zinger, M.G.

    1986-09-01

    The state of lymphopoiesis was studied in mice with alloxan diabetes. After blood analysis, all the animals were given an intraperitoneal injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine before being killed. It is concluded that the state of alloxan diabetes is characterized by marked disturbances of lymphopoiesis. The total number of leukocytes and absolute number of lymphocytes in the blood of both healthy and diabetic mice is shown. The cytological parameters characterizing the state of lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow of healthy and diabetic mice are presented.

  6. Chronic rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christine E; Partap, Uttara; Patchen, Bonnie K; Swoap, Steven J

    2014-08-15

    Current evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin both increases longevity and, seemingly contradictorily, impairs glucose homeostasis. Most studies exploring the dimensions of this paradox have been based on rapamycin treatment in mice for up to 20 wk. We sought to better understand the metabolic effects of oral rapamycin over a substantially longer period of time in HET3 mice. We observed that treatment with rapamycin for 52 wk induced diabetes in male mice, characterized by hyperglycemia, significant urine glucose levels, and severe glucose and pyruvate intolerance. Glucose intolerance occurred in male mice by 4 wk on rapamycin and could be only partially reversed with cessation of rapamycin treatment. Female mice developed moderate glucose intolerance over 1 yr of rapamycin treatment, but not diabetes. The role of sex hormones in the differential development of diabetic symptoms in male and female mice was further explored. HET3 mice treated with rapamycin for 52 wk were gonadectomized and monitored over 10 wk. Castrated male mice remained glucose intolerant, while ovariectomized females developed significant glucose intolerance over the same time period. Subsequent replacement of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized females promoted a recovery of glucose tolerance over a 4-wk period, suggesting the protective role of E2 against rapamycin-induced diabetes. These results indicate that 1) oral rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice, 2) the diabetes is partially reversible with cessation of treatment, and 3) E2 plays a protective role against the development of rapamycin-induced diabetes.

  7. Glibenclamide Prevents Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Pontes, Helena; Mathieu, Chantal; Meda, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has revealed that Cx36, the sole connexin expressed in the insulin-producing beta cells, enhances the secretion of insulin, and promotes the resistance of beta cells against pro-inflammatory cytokines. In parallel, the anti-diabetic sulphonylurea glibenclamide was shown to promote the assembly and function of Cx36 channels. Here, we assessed whether glibenclamide could protect the insulin-producing cells against conditions mimicking those expected at the onset of type 1 diabetes. We found that the drug 1) protected in vitro the mouse MIN6 cells from the apoptosis and loss of Cx36, which are induced by Th1 cytokines; 2) prevented the development of hyperglycemia as well as the loss of beta cells and Cx36, which rapidly develop with aging in untreated NOD mice; 3) modified the proportion of effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in pancreatic draining lymph nodes. The data imply that an early glibenclamide treatment may help protecting beta cells against the autoimmune attack, which triggers the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:28006000

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Bupleurum Polysaccharides in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Liu, Zhenzhen; Xu, Yanyan; Zhou, Chunjiao; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Su, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yunyi; Chen, Daofeng

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is related to low-grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Bupleurum Polysaccharides (BPs), isolated from Bupleurum smithii var. parvifolium has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. However, little is known about its therapeutic effects on diabetes. In this experiment, the effects of BPs on alleviation of diabetes and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Diabetic mice model was established via successive intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg body weight) for two days. Mice with blood glucose levels higher than 16.8mmol/L were selected for experiments. The diabetic mice were orally administered with BPs (30 and 60 mg/kg) once a day for 35 days. BPs not only significantly decreased levels of blood glucose, but also increased those of serum insulin and liver glycogen in diabetic mice compared to model mice. Additionally, BPs adminstration improved the insulin expression and suppressed the apoptosis in pancreas of the diabetic mice. Histopathological observations further demonstrated that BPs protected the pancreas and liver from oxidative and inflammatory damages. These results suggest that BPs protect pancreatic β cells and liver hepatocytes and ameliorate diabetes, which is associated with its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26176625

  9. Systemic Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Suppresses Experimental Allergic Asthma and Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pham Van, Linh; Bardel, Emilie; Gomez Alcala, Alejandro; Jeannin, Pascale; Akira, Shizuo; Bach, Jean-François; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Background Infections may be associated with exacerbation of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Paradoxically, epidemiological and experimental data have shown that some microorganisms can also prevent these pathologies. This observation is at the origin of the hygiene hypothesis according to which the decline of infections in western countries is at the origin of the increased incidence of both Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases and Th2-mediated allergic diseases over the last decades. We have tested whether Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation can recapitulate the protective effect of infectious agents on allergy and autoimmunity. Methods and Findings Here, we performed a systematic study of the disease-modifying effects of a set of natural or synthetic TLR agonists using two experimental models, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma and spontaneous autoimmune diabetes, presenting the same genetic background of the non obese diabetic mouse (NOD) that is highly susceptible to both pathologies. In the same models, we also investigated the effect of probiotics. Additionally, we examined the effect of the genetic invalidation of MyD88 on the development of allergic asthma and spontaneous diabetes. We demonstrate that multiple TLR agonists prevent from both allergy and autoimmunity when administered parenterally. Probiotics which stimulate TLRs also protect from these two diseases. The physiological relevance of these findings is further suggested by the major acceleration of OVA-induced asthma in MyD88 invalidated mice. Our results strongly indicate that the TLR-mediated effects involve immunoregulatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and different subsets of regulatory T cells, notably CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells for TLR4 agonists and NKT cells for TLR3 agonists. Conclusions/Significance These observations demonstrate that systemic administration of TLR ligands can suppress both allergic and autoimmune responses. They provide a

  10. Decreased thyroidal response to thyrotropin in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, N.; Brown, T.R.; Shivers, B.; Lucas, S.; Mack, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of diabetes mellitus on the synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormone ws investigated in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thyroid glands were labeled in vivo with 131I for 2 h. In control animals, TSH stimulated the synthesis of PB127I and 131I-labeled iodothyronines and simultaneously decreased the proportion of 131I-. These effects of TSH were not observed in diabetic animals but were demonstrable in diabetic animals treated with insulin. For studies of hormone secretion, labeled thyroid glands were cultured in vitro in medium containing 1 mM mononitrotyrosine. The rate of the hydrolysis of labeled thyroglobulin was measured as the proportion of 131I-labeled iodotyrosines and 131I-labeled iodothyronines recovered at the end of culture and was used as an index of thyroid secretion. TSH in vivo stimulated the rate of thyroglobulin hydrolysis for 6 h, with a peak occurring after 2 h. The diabetic mice had a diminished response to TSH, which improved on treatment with insulin. The addition of TSH and insulin to the culture medium significantly increased the rate of thyroglobulin hydrolysis in glands of diabetic mice over that resulting from the addition of dibutyryl cAMP alone. The generation of thyroidal cAMP in response to TSH was higher in diabetic mice than in controls. The rise in plasma T4 and T3 2 h after the administration of TSH was less in diabetic mice than in control mice or diabetic mice treated with insulin. Our studies, therefore, indicate that the thyroidal response to TSH is decreased in diabetes mellitus. The defect appears to be at a step beyond the generation of cAMP.

  11. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haurogné, Karine; Pavlovic, Marija; Rogniaux, Hélène; Bach, Jean-Marie; Lieubeau, Blandine

    2015-01-01

    In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:26230114

  12. Identification and Antioxidant Activity of the Extracts of Eugenia uniflora Leaves. Characterization of the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Aqueous Extract on Diabetes Expression in an Experimental Model of Spontaneous Type 1 Diabetes (NOD Mice)

    PubMed Central

    Simon Gonzalez Schumacher, Nayara; Colomeu, Talita Cristina; de Figueiredo, Daniella; Carvalho, Virginia de Campos; Baú Betim Cazarin, Cinthia; Prado, Marcelo Alexandre; Molina Meletti, Laura Maria; de Lima Zollner, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Medical and folklore reports suggest that Eugenia uniflora (E. uniflora) is a functional food that contains numerous compounds in its composition, with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-diabetic effects. In the present study, we investigated the best solvents (water, ethanol and methanol/acetone) for extracting bioactive compounds of E. uniflora leaves, assessing total phenols and the antioxidant activity of the extracts by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP), 2,2′-Azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assays, identifying hydrolysable tannins and three phenolic compounds (ellagic acid, gallic acid and rutin) present in the leaves. In addition, we evaluated the incidence of diabetes, degree of insulitis, serum insulin, hepatic glutathione and tolerance test glucose in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Our results suggest that the aqueous extract presents antioxidant activity and high total phenols, which were used as a type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1) treatment in NOD mice. We verified that the chronic consumption of aqueous extract reduces the inflammatory infiltrate index in pancreatic islets, maintaining serum insulin levels and hepatic glutathione, and reducing serum lipid peroxidation as well as the risk for diabetes. PMID:26783951

  13. Dendritic epidermal T cells facilitate wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Xu, Yingbin; Chen, Lei; Xie, Julin; Tang, Jinming; Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Qi, Shaohai; Chen, Jian; Liang, Guangping; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; He, Weifeng; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-01-01

    The impairment of skin repair in diabetic patients can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Proper proliferation, apoptosis and migration in keratinocytes are vital for skin repair, but in diabetic patients, hyperglycemia impairs this process. Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are an important part of the resident cutaneous immunosurveillance program. We observed a reduction in the number of DETCs in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. This reduction in DETCs resulted in decreased IGF-1 and KGF production in the epidermis, which is closely associated with diabetic delayed wound closure. DETCs ameliorated the poor wound-healing conditions in diabetic mice by increasing keratinocyte migration and proliferation and decreasing keratinocyte apoptosis in diabetes-like microenvironments. Our results elucidate a new mechanism for diabetic delayed wound closure and point to a new strategy for the treatment of wounds in diabetic patients. PMID:27347345

  14. Involvement of splenic iron accumulation in the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes mice

    PubMed Central

    Murotomi, Kazutoshi; Arai, Shigeyuki; Uchida, Satoko; Endo, Shin; Mitsuzumi, Hitoshi; Tabei, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and can lead to hepatic cirrhosis and cancer. It is considered that NASH is caused by multiple parallel events, including abnormal lipid metabolism, gut-derived-endotoxin-induced inflammation, and adipocytokines derived from adipose tissue, suggesting that other tissues are involved in NASH development. Previous studies demonstrated that spleen enlargement is observed during the course of NASH pathogenesis. However, the involvement of splenic status in the progression of NASH remains unclear. In this study, we examined hepatic and splenic histopathological findings in the early stage of NASH using the Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mouse model established for assessing NASH. We found that 12-week-old TSOD mice clearly exhibited the histopathological features of NASH in the early stage. At this age, the spleen of TSOD mice showed markedly higher iron level than that of control Tsumura Suzuki Non Obesity (TSNO) mice. The level of accumulated iron was significantly decreased by feeding a diet with glucosyl hesperidin, a bioactive flavonoid, accompanied with alleviation of hepatic lesions. Furthermore, we found that splenic iron level was positively correlated with the severity of NASH manifestations, suggesting that abnormalities in the spleen are involved in the development of NASH. PMID:26932748

  15. IFN-{gamma} gene expression in pancreatic islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells correlates with autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, A.; Suarez-Pinzon, W.L.; Sorensen, O.

    1995-05-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice results from selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta}-cells following islet filtration by mononuclear leukocytes. Cytokines produced by islet-infiltrating mononuclear cells may be involved in {beta}-cell destruction. Therefore, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression, by reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay, in mononuclear leukocytes isolated from pancreatic islets of four groups of mice: diabetes-prone female NOD mice; female NOD mice protected from diabetes by injection of CFA at an early age; male NOD mice with a low diabetes incidence; and female BALB/c mice that do not develop diabetes. We found that mRNA levels of IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-{gamma} in mononuclear cells from islets of diabetes-prone female NOD mice increased progressively as these cells infiltrated the islets from age 5 wk to diabetes onset (>13 wk). However, only IFN-{gamma} mRNA levels were significantly higher in islet mononuclear cells from 12-wk-old diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from less diabetes-prone NOD mice (CFA-treated females, and males) and normal mice (BALB/c). In contrast, IL-4 mRNA levels were lower in islet mononuclear cells from diabetes-prone female NOD mice than from NOD mice with low diabetes incidence (CFA-treated females and males). Splenic cell mRNA levels of IFN-{gamma} and IL-4 were not different in the four groups of mice. These results suggest that islet {beta}-cell destruction and diabetes in female NOD mice are dependent upon intra-islet IFN-{gamma} production by mononuclear cells, and that CFA-treated female NOD mice and male NOD mice may be protected from diabetes development by down-regulation of IFN-{gamma} production in the islets. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Preventive Effect of Pine Bark Extract (Flavangenol) on Metabolic Disease in Western Diet-Loaded Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Tsubata, Masahito; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Sameshima, Mayu; Nagamine, Rika; Takagaki, Kinya; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the metabolic syndrome has a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. In this study, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, a mouse model of multi-factorial, hereditary, obese type II diabetes, were given a Western diet (WTD) as an environmental factor to prepare a disease model (TSOD-WTD) and to investigate the preventive effects of Pine bark extract (Flavangenol) against obesity and various features of metabolic disease appearing in this animal model. In contrast to control Tsumura Suzuki Non-obesity (TSNO) mice, TSOD mice were obese and suffered from other metabolic complications. WTD-fed TSOD mice developed additional features such as hyperinsulinemia, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and fatty liver. The treatment with Flavangenol had a suppressive effect on increase in body weight and accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat, and also showed preventive effects on symptoms related to insulin resistance, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and hypertension. Flavangenol also increased the plasma concentration of adiponectin and decreased the plasma concentration of TNF-α. We next investigated the effect of Flavangenol on absorption of meal-derived lipids. Flavangenol suppressed absorption of neutral fat in an olive-oil-loading test (in vivo) and showed an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase (in vitro). The above results suggest that Flavangenol has a preventive effect on severe metabolic disease due to multiple causes that involve both genetic and environmental risk factors. The mechanism of action might involve a partial suppressive effect of meal-derived lipids on absorption. PMID:21607011

  17. Podocyte-specific overexpression of human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Renisha; Milagres, Rosangela; Dilauro, Marc; Gutsol, Alex; Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Kennedy, Chris; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel; Burns, Kevin D

    2012-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin II to angiotensin-(1-7) and is expressed in podocytes. Here we overexpressed ACE2 in podocytes in experimental diabetic nephropathy using transgenic methods where a nephrin promoter drove the expression of human ACE2. Glomeruli from these mice had significantly increased mRNA, protein, and activity of ACE2 compared to wild-type mice. Male mice were treated with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. After 16 weeks, there was no significant difference in plasma glucose levels between wild-type and transgenic diabetic mice. Urinary albumin was significantly increased in wild-type diabetic mice at 4 weeks, whereas albuminuria in transgenic diabetic mice did not differ from wild-type nondiabetic mice. However, this effect was transient and by 16 weeks both transgenic and nontransgenic diabetic mice had similar rates of proteinuria. Compared to wild-type diabetic mice, transgenic diabetic mice had an attenuated increase in mesangial area, decreased glomerular area, and a blunted decrease in nephrin expression. Podocyte numbers decreased in wild-type diabetic mice at 16 weeks, but were unaffected in transgenic diabetic mice. At 8 weeks, kidney cortical expression of transforming growth factor-β1 was significantly inhibited in transgenic diabetic mice as compared to wild-type diabetic mice. Thus, the podocyte-specific overexpression of human ACE2 transiently attenuates the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Influence of whole-wheat consumption on fecal microbial community structure of obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan; Mills, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The digestive tract of mammals and other animals is colonized by trillions of metabolically-active microorganisms. Changes in the gut microbiota have been associated with obesity in both humans and laboratory animals. Dietary modifications can often modulate the obese gut microbial ecosystem towards a more healthy state. This phenomenon should preferably be studied using dietary ingredients that are relevant to human nutrition. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of whole-wheat, a food ingredient with several beneficial properties, on gut microorganisms of obese diabetic mice. Diabetic (db/db) mice were fed standard (obese-control) or whole-wheat isocaloric diets (WW group) for eight weeks; non-obese mice were used as control (lean-control). High-throughput sequencing using the MiSeq platform coupled with freely-available computational tools and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze fecal bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Short-chain fatty acids were measured in caecal contents using quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography photo-diode array analysis. Results showed no statistical difference in final body weights between the obese-control and the WW group. The bacterial richness (number of Operational Taxonomic Units) did not differ among the treatment groups. The abundance of Ruminococcaceae, a family containing several butyrate-producing bacteria, was found to be higher in obese (median: 6.9%) and WW-supplemented mice (5.6%) compared to lean (2.7%, p = 0.02, Kruskal-Wallis test). Caecal concentrations of butyrate were higher in obese (average: 2.91 mmol/mg of feces) but especially in WW-supplemented mice (4.27 mmol/mg) compared to lean controls (0.97 mmol/mg), while caecal succinic acid was lower in the WW group compared to obese but especially to the lean group. WW consumption was associated with ∼3 times higher abundances of Lactobacillus spp. compared to both obese and lean control mice. Analysis of weighted Uni

  19. Influence of whole-wheat consumption on fecal microbial community structure of obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mazcorro, Jose F; Ivanov, Ivan; Mills, David A; Noratto, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    The digestive tract of mammals and other animals is colonized by trillions of metabolically-active microorganisms. Changes in the gut microbiota have been associated with obesity in both humans and laboratory animals. Dietary modifications can often modulate the obese gut microbial ecosystem towards a more healthy state. This phenomenon should preferably be studied using dietary ingredients that are relevant to human nutrition. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of whole-wheat, a food ingredient with several beneficial properties, on gut microorganisms of obese diabetic mice. Diabetic (db/db) mice were fed standard (obese-control) or whole-wheat isocaloric diets (WW group) for eight weeks; non-obese mice were used as control (lean-control). High-throughput sequencing using the MiSeq platform coupled with freely-available computational tools and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze fecal bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Short-chain fatty acids were measured in caecal contents using quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography photo-diode array analysis. Results showed no statistical difference in final body weights between the obese-control and the WW group. The bacterial richness (number of Operational Taxonomic Units) did not differ among the treatment groups. The abundance of Ruminococcaceae, a family containing several butyrate-producing bacteria, was found to be higher in obese (median: 6.9%) and WW-supplemented mice (5.6%) compared to lean (2.7%, p = 0.02, Kruskal-Wallis test). Caecal concentrations of butyrate were higher in obese (average: 2.91 mmol/mg of feces) but especially in WW-supplemented mice (4.27 mmol/mg) compared to lean controls (0.97 mmol/mg), while caecal succinic acid was lower in the WW group compared to obese but especially to the lean group. WW consumption was associated with ∼3 times higher abundances of Lactobacillus spp. compared to both obese and lean control mice. Analysis of weighted Uni

  20. Impaired gastric ulcer healing in diabetic mice: role of methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Takagi, T; Oya-Ito, T; Okada, H; Suzuki, T; Hirata, I; Hirai, M; Uchiyama, K; Handa, O; Uchida, K; Yoshikawa, T

    2009-12-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts non-enzymatically with proteins to form products such as argpyrimidine at arginine residue. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of methylglyoxal in the delayed healing of gastric ulcer in diabetes, and to identify the methylglyoxal-modified proteins as a target molecule of this modification. Using male C57BL/6 mice, diabetes was induced by a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin and gastric ulcers were produced by the focal application of 40% of acetic acid to the serosal surface of the stomach. In order to evaluate the effect of OPB-9195, an inhibitor of methylglyoxal modification, on gastric ulcer healing, mice were given orally OPB-9195 (30 mg/kg) twice daily for 14 days, one week before and after the injection of streptozotocin. The area of gastric ulcer on day 7 was significantly increased in diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice, indicating delayed ulcer healing. This increase in ulcer area in diabetic mice was significantly reversed by the treatment with OPB-9195 without affecting blood glucose levels. Proteomics analysis showed the methylglyoxal-modification of peroxiredoxin 6 proteins in the diabetic gastric mucosa around gastric ulcer, and this modification was markedly inhibited by the treatment with OPB-9195. In conclusion, the present study suggests a link of increased methylglyoxal modification of proteins including peroxiredoxin 6 to the delayed gastric ulcer healing in diabetes, and also shows the therapeutic potential of the inhibitor of methylglyoxal modification for the treatment of diabetic gastric ulcers.

  1. Dimethyl sulfoxide modulation of diabetes onset in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Chirra, A R; DeGruccio, A; Girman, D J

    1989-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a hydroxyl radical scavenger, is known as an immunosuppressive agent and can reduce autoantibody levels in experimental autoimmune diseases. Because classic diabetogens damage the DNA and membrane of the beta-cell by the generation of free radicals, the purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the intake of DMSO or its derivatives methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) could prevent the expression of autoimmune diabetes in the spontaneously diabetic NOD mouse. DMSO (2.5%), MSM (2.5%), and DMS (0.25%) were added to the drinking water of female NOD mice immediately after weaning. Control animals were maintained on regular drinking water. The presence of overt diabetes was monitored from the age of 2 mo by weekly urinary glucose testing until the animals either became overtly glucosuric or were greater than 240 days of age. In contrast to what we expected, DMSO (2.5%) markedly increased the rate at which the animals expressed overt diabetes (P less than .0004, log-rank test). MSM had no effect, whereas DMS reduced the incidence and rate of diabetes onset. When DMSO (2.5%) was administered to male NOD mice and control strains of mice (BALB/c and ICR), the control group did not develop glucosuria or insipidus, whereas DMSO increased the incidence of diabetes in the male NOD mice from 21 to 79%. In contrast, when DMSO was fed to female NOD mice on a purified AIN-76 diet, diabetes onset was reduced to 36%. We conclude that DMSO accelerates the uptake of dietary diabetogens into the beta-cell of genetically susceptible animals (NOD mice). The protective effect of the purified diet in such animals may be due to a lack of putative diabetogens in purified diet, or alternatively, the diet itself contains factor(s) that protect the beta-cell from autoimmune attack and/or destruction.

  2. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  3. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-05-27

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies.

  4. Glycaemic variability affects ischaemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, Federico; Pitocco, Dario; Straface, Giuseppe; Zaccardi, Francesco; de Cristofaro, Raimondo; Rizzo, Paola; Lancellotti, Stefano; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Musella, Tittania; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Flex, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of GV (glycaemic variability) in diabetic vascular complications and to explore the molecular pathways modulated by glycaemic 'swings'. We developed a murine model. A total of 30 diabetic mice received once daily basal insulin administration plus two oral boluses of glucose solution (GV group, named 'V') and 30 diabetic mice received once daily basal insulin plus two oral boluses of saline solution (stable hyperglycaemia group, named 'S') for a period of 30 days. Glycaemia was measured eight times daily to detect GV. Finally, postischaemic vascularization, induced by hindlimb ischaemia 30 days after diabetes onset, was evaluated. We found that GV was significantly different between S and V groups, whereas no significant difference in the mean glycaemic values was detected. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histological analyses revealed that the ischaemia-induced angiogenesis was significantly impaired in V mice compared with S group, after ischaemic injury. In addition, immunostaining and Western blot analyses revealed that impaired angiogenic response in V mice occurred in association with reduced VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) production and decreased eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) and Akt (also called protein kinase B) phosphorylation. In conclusion, we describe a murine model of GV. GV causes an impairment of ischaemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetes, likely to be independent of changes in average blood glucose levels, and this impaired collateral vessel formation is associated with an alteration of the VEGF pathway.

  5. Tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), a novel non-obese animal model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqiang; Wu, Xiaoyun; Liao, Shasha; Li, Yunhai; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chang, Qing; Xiao, Ruyue; Liang, Bin

    2016-10-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a severe public health problem that is affecting a large proportion of the world population. Generally, NAFLD in patients is usually accompanied by obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), for which numerous animal models have been generated in order to explore the pathogenesis and therapies of NAFLD. On the contrary, quite a number of NAFLD subjects, especially in Asian regions, are non-obese and non-diabetic; however, few animal models are available for the research of non-obese NAFLD. Here, four approaches (here called approach 1 to 4) corresponding to the variable compositions of diets were used to treat tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), which have a closer evolutionary relationship to primates than rodents. Analysis of plasma biochemical parameters, hepatic histology, and the expression of hepatic lipid metabolic genes revealed that all four approaches led to hepatic lipid accumulation, liver injury and hypercholesterolemia, but had no effect on body weight and adipose tissue generation, or glycemia. Hepatic gene expression in tree shrews treated by approach 4 might suggest a different or non-canonical pathway leading to hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, the tree shrew displays hepatic steatosis and dyslipidemia, but remains non-obese and non-diabetic under high energy diets, which suggests that the tree shrew may be useful as a novel animal model for the research of human non-obese NAFLD.

  6. Tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), a novel non-obese animal model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linqiang; Wu, Xiaoyun; Liao, Shasha; Li, Yunhai; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chang, Qing; Xiao, Ruyue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a severe public health problem that is affecting a large proportion of the world population. Generally, NAFLD in patients is usually accompanied by obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), for which numerous animal models have been generated in order to explore the pathogenesis and therapies of NAFLD. On the contrary, quite a number of NAFLD subjects, especially in Asian regions, are non-obese and non-diabetic; however, few animal models are available for the research of non-obese NAFLD. Here, four approaches (here called approach 1 to 4) corresponding to the variable compositions of diets were used to treat tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), which have a closer evolutionary relationship to primates than rodents. Analysis of plasma biochemical parameters, hepatic histology, and the expression of hepatic lipid metabolic genes revealed that all four approaches led to hepatic lipid accumulation, liver injury and hypercholesterolemia, but had no effect on body weight and adipose tissue generation, or glycemia. Hepatic gene expression in tree shrews treated by approach 4 might suggest a different or non-canonical pathway leading to hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, the tree shrew displays hepatic steatosis and dyslipidemia, but remains non-obese and non-diabetic under high energy diets, which suggests that the tree shrew may be useful as a novel animal model for the research of human non-obese NAFLD. PMID:27659689

  7. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24633252

  8. Anti-diabetic activity of recombinant irisin in STZ-induced insulin-deficient diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huikun; Ma, Baicheng; Ma, Xiaofeng; Wang, Haisong; Ni, Zaizhong; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiaodan; Jiang, Pingzhe; Umar, Muhammad; Li, Minggang

    2016-03-01

    In order to investigate the hypoglycemic effects and potential mechanism of recombinant irisin on diabetes, STZ-induced diabetic mice were established and treated with irisin. The results showed that daily water and food intake, and blood glucose significantly decreased after various concentrations of recombinant irisin treatment by intraperitoneal injection, of which 1.0 mg/kg was the optimal dose for lowering blood glucose. However, the body weight exhibited no significant difference during the treatment within groups, although the 0.9% NaCl treated group showed a trend of decreased body weight and the irisin treated groups showed a tendency of increasing weight. The oral glucose tolerance was improved, and serum insulin and circulating irisin content were significantly elevated in diabetic mice after 1.0 mg/kg irisin-injection treatment, compared to diabetic mice treated with 0.9% NaCl. 1.0 mg/kg irisin-injection also significantly increased the expression of energy and metabolism-related genes. In addition, oral administration of irisin lowered the blood glucose in diabetic mice. Our data suggested that irisin could lower blood glucose in insulin-deficient diabetic mice, to some extent, through irisin-mediated induction of energy and metabolic genes expression. These observations laid a foundation for the development of irisin-based therapy.

  9. An Abd transgene prevents diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice by inducing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, S M; Tisch, R; Yang, X D; McDevitt, H O

    1993-01-01

    Susceptibility to the human autoimmune disease insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with particular haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Similarly, in a spontaneous animal model of this disease, the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, the genes of the MHC play an important role in the development of diabetes. We have produced transgenic NOD mice that express the class II MHC molecule I-Ad in addition to the endogenous I-Ag7 molecules in order to study the role of these molecules in the disease process. Although the inflammatory lesions within the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas appear similar in transgenic and nontransgenic animals, transgenic mice develop diabetes with greatly diminished frequency compared to their nontransgenic littermates (10% of transgenic females by 30 weeks of age compared to 45% of nontransgenic females). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments show that T cells present in the transgenic mice are able to interfere with the diabetogenic process caused by T cells from nontransgenic mice. Thus, the mechanism by which I-Ad molecules protect mice from diabetes includes selecting in the thymus and/or inducing in the periphery T cells capable of inhibiting diabetes development. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8415742

  10. Anti-diabetic properties of Momordica charantia L. polysaccharide in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Shan, Bin; Liao, Cai-Hu; Xie, Jian-Hua; Wen, Ping-Wei; Shi, Jia-Yi

    2015-11-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (MCP) was isolated from the fruits of Momordica charantia L., and the hypoglycemic effects of MCP were investigated in both normal healthy and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. MCP was orally administered once a day after 3 days of alloxan-induction at 100, 200 and 300mg/kg body weight for 28 day. Results showed that fasting blood glucose level (BGL) was significantly decreased, whereas the glucose tolerance was marked improvement in alloxan-induced diabetic mice, and loss in body weight was also prevented in diabetic mice compared to the diabetic control group. The dosage of 300mg/kg body weight exhibited the best effects. In addition, MCP did not exhibit any toxic symptoms in the limited toxicity evaluation in mice. The results suggest that MCP possess significantly dose-dependent anti-diabetic activity on alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Hence, MCP can be incorporated as a supplement in health-care food, drugs and/or combined with other hypoglycemic drugs.

  11. Anti-diabetic effects of CTB-APSL fusion protein in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-03-13

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  12. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC−/− mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC−/− mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC−/− mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  13. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Models in Mice and Rats.

    PubMed

    Furman, Brian L

    2015-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is an antibiotic that produces pancreatic islet β-cell destruction and is widely used experimentally to produce a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Detailed in this unit are protocols for producing STZ-induced insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia in mice and rats. Also described are protocols for creating animal models for type 2 diabetes using STZ. These animals are employed for assessing the pathological consequences of diabetes and for screening potential therapies for the treatment of this condition.

  14. Experimental diabetes in mice infected with Coxsackie viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, E.F.; Shorin, Yu.P.; Solodovnikova, I.A.; Kazaryan, L.S.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Pal'chikova, N.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors compare the effect of Coxsackie B4 and A13 viruses on the pancreas of strains of mice sensitive and resistant to diabetes, using subdiabetogenic doses of alloxan in the second case. The biochemical investigation included determination of immunoreactive insulin in the blood serum by radioimmunoassay. Biochemical changes were seen such as lowered glucose tolerance and disturbance of immunoreactive insulin synthesis.

  15. Vitamin E and diabetic nephropathy in mice model and humans.

    PubMed

    Farid, Nakhoul; Inbal, Dahan; Nakhoul, Nakhoul; Evgeny, Farber; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Levy, Andrew P; Rabea, Asleh

    2013-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. Glucose promotes glycosylation of both plasma and cellular proteins with increased risk for vascular events. Diabetic patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an antioxidant plasma protein which binds free hemoglobin, thus preventing heme-iron mediated oxidation. Two alleles exist at the Hp gene locus (1 and 2) encoding three possible Hp genotypes that differ in their antioxidant ability, and may respond differently to vitamin E treatment. Several clinical studies to have shown that Hp 1-1 genotype is a superior antioxidant to the Hp 2-2 genotype and Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E was found to have beneficial effect in patient and mice with Hp 2-2 genotype. In this review we have summarized the results of our studies in patients with diabetic nephropathy treated with vitamin E and in diabetic mice with different haptoglobin genotypes.

  16. Neurobehavioral deficits in db/db diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N; Elased, Khalid M; Garrett, Teresa L; Lucot, James B

    2010-10-05

    Recent clinical studies indicate neurobehavioral disturbances in type-2 diabetics. However, there is paucity of preclinical research to support this concept. The validity of db/db mouse as an animal model to study type-2 diabetes and related complications is known. The present study was designed to investigate comprehensively the db/db mouse behavior as preclinical evidence of type-2 diabetes related major neurobehavioral complications. We tested juvenile (5-6weeks) and adult (10-11weeks) db/db mice for behavioral depression in forced swim test (FST), psychosis-like symptoms using pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) test, anxiety behavior employing elevated plus maze (EPM) test, locomotor behavior and thigmotaxis using open field test and working memory deficits in Y-maze test. Both juvenile and adult group db/db mice displayed behavioral despair with increased immobility time in FST. There was an age-dependent progression of psychosis-like symptoms with disrupted PPI in adult db/db mice. In the EPM test, db/db mice were less anxious as observed by increased percent open arms time and entries. They were also hypo-locomotive as evident by a decrease in their basic and fine movements. There was no impairment of working memory in the Y-maze test in db/db mice. This is the first report of depression, psychosis-like symptoms and anxiolytic behavior of db/db mouse strain. It is tempting to speculate that this mouse strain can serve as useful preclinical model to study type-2 diabetes related neurobehavioral complications.

  17. Neurobehavioral deficits in db/db diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N.; Elased, Khalid M.; Garrett, Teresa L.; Lucot, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate neurobehavioral disturbances in type-2 diabetics. However, there is paucity of preclinical research to support this concept. The validity of db/db mouse as an animal model to study type-2 diabetes and related complications is known. The present study was designed to investigate comprehensively the db/db mouse behavior as preclinical evidence of type-2 diabetes related major neurobehavioral complications. We tested juvenile (5–6 weeks) and adult (10–11 weeks) db/db mice for behavioral depression in forced swim test (FST), psychosis-like symptoms using pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) test, anxiety behavior employing elevated plus maze (EPM) test, locomotor behavior and thigmotaxis using open field test and working memory deficits in Y-maze test. Both juvenile and adult group db/db mice displayed behavioral despair with increased immobility time in FST. There was an age-dependent progression of psychosis-like symptoms with disrupted PPI in adult db/db mice. In the EPM test, db/db mice were less anxious as observed by increased percent open arms time and entries. They were also hypolocomotive as evident by a decrease in their basic and fine movements. There was no impairment of working memory in the Y-maze test in db/db mice. This is the first report of depression, psychosis-like symptoms and anxiolytic behavior of db/db mouse strain. It is tempting to speculate that this mouse strain can serve as useful preclinical model to study type-2 diabetes related neurobehavioral complications. PMID:20637218

  18. Anti-diabetic activity of a mineraloid isolate, in vitro and in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Deneau, Joel; Ahmed, Taufeeq; Blotsky, Roger; Bojanowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Type II diabetes is a metabolic disease mediated through multiple molecular pathways. Here, we report anti-diabetic effect of a standardized isolate from a fossil material - a mineraloid leonardite - in in vitro tests and in genetically diabetic mice. The mineraloid isolate stimulated mitochondrial metabolism in human fibroblasts and this stimulation correlated with enhanced expression of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins such as ATP synthases and ribosomal protein precursors, as measured by DNA microarrays. In the diabetic animal model, consumption of the Totala isolate resulted in decreased weight gain, blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin. To our best knowledge, this is the first description ever of a fossil material having anti-diabetic activity in pre-clinical models.

  19. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Posgai, Amanda L.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A.; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3+ and LAP+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28205558

  20. Involvement of suppressive B-lymphocytes in the mechanism of tolerogenic dendritic cell reversal of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Di Caro, Valentina; Phillips, Brett; Engman, Carl; Harnaha, Jo; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to identify immune cell populations, in addition to Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells, that participate in the mechanisms of action of tolerogenic dendritic cells shown to prevent and reverse type 1 diabetes in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse strain. Co-culture experiments using tolerogenic dendritic cells and B-cells from NOD as well as transgenic interleukin-10 promoter-reporter mice along with transfer of tolerogenic dendritic cells and CD19+ B-cells into NOD and transgenic mice, showed that these dendritic cells increased the frequency and numbers of interleukin-10-expressing B-cells in vitro and in vivo. The expansion of these cells was a consequence of both the proliferation of pre-existing interleukin-10-expressing B-lymphocytes and the conversion of CD19+ B-lymphcytes into interleukin-10-expressing cells. The tolerogenic dendritic cells did not affect the suppressive activity of these B-cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the suppressive murine B-lymphocytes expressed receptors for retinoic acid which is produced by the tolerogenic dendritic cells. These data assist in identifying the nature of the B-cell population increased in response to the tolerogenic dendritic cells in a clinical trial and also validate very recent findings demonstrating a mechanistic link between human tolerogenic dendritic cells and immunosuppressive regulatory B-cells.

  1. Atrophy of myoepithelial cells in parotid glands of diabetic mice; detection using skeletal muscle actin, a novel marker☆

    PubMed Central

    Nashida, Tomoko; Yoshie, Sumio; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    In mouse parotid glands, we found expression of skeletal muscle actin (actin-α1) protein and mRNA. We isolated myoepithelial cells from the mouse parotid glands and investigated their actin-α1 expression because smooth muscle actin (actin-α2) has been used as a marker for myoepithelial cells. We used actin-α1 expression to identify pathological changes in diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD; NOD/ShiJcl) mice—a mouse model for Sjögren's syndrome—and found myoepithelial cells to be decreased or atrophied in the diabetic state. PMID:23772384

  2. Regulation of urinary ACE2 in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jan; Garcia-Halpin, Laura; Ye, Minghao; Maier, Christoph; Sowers, Kurt; Burns, Kevin D; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) enhances the degradation of ANG II and its expression is altered in diabetic kidneys, but the regulation of this enzyme in the urine is unknown. Urinary ACE2 was studied in the db/db model of type 2 diabetes and stretozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes during several physiological and pharmacological interventions. ACE2 activity in db/db mice was increased in the serum and to a much greater extent in the urine compared with db/m controls. Neither a specific ANG II blocker, telmisartan, nor an ACE inhibitor, captopril, altered the levels of urinary ACE2 in db/db or db/m control mice. High-salt diet (8%) increased whereas low-salt diet (0.1%) decreased urinary ACE2 activity in the urine of db/db mice. In STZ mice, urinary ACE2 was also increased, and insulin decreased it partly but significantly after several weeks of administration. The increase in urinary ACE2 activity in db/db mice reflected an increase in enzymatically active protein with two bands identified of molecular size at 110 and 75 kDa and was associated with an increase in kidney cortex ACE2 protein at 110 kDa but not at 75 kDa. ACE2 activity was increased in isolated tubular preparations but not in glomeruli from db/db mice. Administration of soluble recombinant ACE2 to db/m and db/db mice resulted in a marked increase in serum ACE2 activity, but no gain in ACE2 activity was detectable in the urine, further demonstrating that urinary ACE2 is of kidney origin. Increased urinary ACE2 was associated with more efficient degradation of exogenous ANG II (10(-9) M) in urine from db/db compared with that from db/m mice. Urinary ACE2 could be a potential biomarker of increased metabolism of ANG II in diabetic kidney disease.

  3. The effect of B vitamin supplementation on wound healing in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Saeka; Takano, Mayuko; Sugano, Naoyuki; Ohtsu, Mariko; Tsunoda, Kou; Koshi, Ryosuke; Yoshinuma, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effects of B-group vitamin supplements on wound healing in diabetic mice. The mice in the experimental group were treated daily with 1 g/L B6, 1.25 mg/L B12, and 62.5 mg/L folic acid in their drinking water. Full-thickness excision wounds were created with 6-mm skin biopsy punches. Each wound closure was digitally photographed. Beginning on day 3 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 42.8 ± 11.3%, p<0.05). On day 9 after wounding, the wound area in the diabetic mice was also statistically larger than that of normal mice (p<0.05 vs diabetic mice). The diabetic mice treated with B vitamins displayed accelerated wound closure on day 3 (wound area 13.2 ± 16.8%, p<0.05). In addition, the high glucose level in the diabetic animals decreased significantly in response to B vitamin treatment. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that B vitamin supplementation may improve wound healing in diabetic mice. PMID:26798199

  4. Berberine improves kidney function in diabetic mice via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Sun, Li-Na; Nie, Hui-Bin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Effective therapies to prevent the development of this disease are required. Berberine (BBR) has several preventive effects on diabetes and its complications. However, the molecular mechanism of BBR on kidney function in diabetes is not well defined. Here, we reported that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is required for BBR-induced improvement of kidney function in vivo. AMPK phosphorylation and activity, productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), kidney function including serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance (Ccr), and urinary protein excretion, morphology of glomerulus were determined in vitro or in vivo. Exposure of cultured human glomerulus mesangial cells (HGMCs) to BBR time- or dose-dependently activates AMPK by increasing the thr172 phosphorylation and its activities. Inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA or mutant abolished BBR-induced AMPK activation. Incubation of cells with high glucose (HG, 30 mM) markedly induced the oxidative stress of HGMCs, which were abolished by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, AMPK gene overexpression or BBR. Importantly, the effects induced by BBR were bypassed by AMPK siRNA transfection in HG-treated HGMCs. In animal studies, streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia dramatically promoted glomerulosclerosis and impaired kidney function by increasing serum BUN, urinary protein excretion, and decreasing Ccr, as well as increased oxidative stress. Administration of BBR remarkably improved kidney function in wildtype mice but not in AMPKα2-deficient mice. We conclude that AMPK activation is required for BBR to improve kidney function in diabetic mice.

  5. Gynura procumbens Extract Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-In; Park, Mi Hwa; Han, Ji-Sook

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effect of Gynura procumbens extract against carbohydrate digesting enzymes and its ability to ameliorate postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. G. procumbens extract showed prominent α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory effects. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of G. procumbens extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase was 0.092±0.018 and 0.084±0.027 mg/mL, respectively, suggesting that the α-amylase inhibition activity of the G. procumbens extract was more effective than that of the positive control, acarbose (IC50=0.164 mg/mL). The increase in postprandial blood glucose levels was more significantly alleviated in the G. procumbens extract group than in the control group of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Moreover, the area under the curve significantly decreased with G. procumbens extract administration in STZ-induced diabetic mice. These results suggest that G. procumbens extract may help alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia by inhibiting carbohydrate digesting enzymes. PMID:27752493

  6. Mice deficient in PAPP-A show resistance to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mader, Jessica R; Resch, Zachary T; McLean, Gary R; Mikkelsen, Jakob H; Oxvig, Claus; Marler, Ronald J; Conover, Cheryl A

    2013-10-01

    We investigated pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in diabetic nephropathy. Normal human kidney showed specific staining for PAPP-A in glomeruli, and this staining was markedly increased in diabetic kidney. To assess the possible contribution of PAPP-A in the development of diabetic nephropathy, we induced diabetes with streptozotocin in 14-month-old WT and Papp-A knockout (KO) mice. Renal histopathology was evaluated after 4 months of stable hyperglycemia. Kidneys from diabetic WT mice showed multiple abnormalities including thickening of Bowman's capsule (100% of mice), increased glomerular size (80% of mice), tubule dilation (80% of mice), and mononuclear cell infiltration (90% of mice). Kidneys of age-matched non-diabetic WT mice had similar evidence of tubule dilation and mononuclear cell infiltration to those of diabetic WT mice, indicating that these changes were predominantly age-related. However, thickened Bowman's capsule and increased glomerular size appeared specific for the experimental diabetes. Kidneys from diabetic Papp-A KO mice had significantly reduced or no evidence of changes in Bowman's capsule thickening and glomerular size. There was also a shift to larger mesangial area and increased macrophage staining in diabetic WT mice compared with Papp-A KO mice. In summary, elevated PAPP-A expression in glomeruli is associated with diabetic nephropathy in humans and absence of PAPP-A is associated with resistance to the development of indicators of diabetic nephropathy in mice. These data suggest PAPP-A as a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Obesity and diabetes in TNF-alpha receptor- deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schreyer, S A; Chua, S C; LeBoeuf, R C

    1998-01-01

    TNF-alpha may play a role in mediating insulin resistance associated with obesity. This concept is based on studies of obese rodents and humans, and cell culture models. TNF elicits cellular responses via two receptors called p55 and p75. Our purpose was to test the involvement of TNF in glucose homeostasis using mice lacking one or both TNF receptors. C57BL/6 mice lacking p55 (p55(-)/-), p75, (p75(-)/-), or both receptors (p55(-)/-p75(-)/-) were fed a high-fat diet to induce obesity. Marked fasting hyperinsulinemia was seen for p55(-)/-p75(-)/- males between 12 and 16 wk of feeding the high-fat diet. Insulin levels were four times greater than wild-type mice. In contrast, p55(-)/- and p75(-)/- mice exhibited insulin levels that were similar or reduced, respectively, as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, high-fat diet-fed p75(-)/- mice had the lowest body weights and leptin levels, and improved insulin sensitivity. Obese (db/db) mice, which are not responsive to leptin, were used to study the role of p55 in severe obesity. Male p55(-)/-db/db mice exhibited threefold higher insulin levels and twofold lower glucose levels at 20 wk of age than control db/db expressing p55. All db/db mice remained severely insulin resistant based on fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Our data do not support the concept that TNF, acting via its receptors, is a major contributor to obesity-associated insulin resistance. In fact, data suggest that the two TNF receptors work in concert to protect against diabetes. PMID:9664082

  8. Diacerhein downregulate proinflammatory cytokines expression and decrease the autoimmune diabetes frequency in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Carina; Vilella, Conceição Aparecida; Vieira, Karla Priscila; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Hyslop, Stephen; Zollner, Ricardo de Lima

    2008-06-01

    NOD mice are used as experimental models as they develop type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1) spontaneously, with a strong similarity to the human disease. Diabetes mellitus type 1 is characterized by the destruction of the islet, orchestrated by T lymphocytes that induce cytokine release like IL-1beta, promoting an inflammatory process. Diacerhein has antiinflammatory properties, inhibiting IL-1. However, the mechanisms involved in immune modulation are not completely understood. In the present study, serum and pancreatic islets were isolated to investigate the relationship between IL-1beta, IFN-gamma, IL-12 and TNF-alpha expression and diabetes onset, morphological aspects, and diacerhein dose dependence in animals treated with different doses (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg/day) and the control group (saline solution). The results demonstrated upregulation of mRNA islets and downregulation of the serum concentration of IL-1beta, IL-12 and TNF-alpha in the group treated with 5 and 10 mg/kg/day diacerhein, when compared with the saline group, and increased IFN-gamma serum concentration in the group treated with 50 mg/kg/day. These results suggest that diacerhein in NOD mice, decreases, in a dose-dependent manner, the diabetes frequency downregulating proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-12 at posttranscriptional or posttranslational level. Furthermore, using the HPLC method, diacerhein and rhein (active metabolite) were detected in serum and pancreas of treated mice.

  9. HoxD3 accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott L.; Myers, Connie A.; Charboneau, Aubri; Young, David M.; and Boudreau, Nancy

    2003-12-01

    Poorly healing diabetic wounds are characterized by diminished collagen production and impaired angiogenesis. HoxD3, a homeobox transcription factor that promotes angiogenesis and collagen synthesis, is up-regulated during normal wound repair whereas its expression is diminished in poorly healing wounds of the genetically diabetic (db/db) mouse. To determine whether restoring expression of HoxD3 would accelerate diabetic wound healing, we devised a novel method of gene transfer, which incorporates HoxD3 plasmid DNA into a methylcellulose film that is placed on wounds created on db/db mice. The HoxD3 transgene was expressed in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes of the wounds for up to 10 days. More importantly, a single application of HoxD3 to db/db mice resulted in a statistically significant acceleration of wound closure compared to control-treated wounds. Furthermore, we also observed that the HoxD3-mediated improvement in diabetic wound repair was accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the HoxD3 target genes, Col1A1 and beta 3-integrin leading to enhanced angiogenesis and collagen deposition in the wounds. Although HoxD3-treated wounds also show improved re-epithelialization as compared to control db/db wounds, this effect was not due to direct stimulation of keratinocyte migration by HoxD3. Finally, we show that despite the dramatic increase in collagen synthesis and deposition in HoxD3-treated wounds, these wounds showed normal remodeling and we found no evidence of abnormal wound healing. These results indicate that HoxD3 may provide a means to directly improve collagen deposition, angiogenesis and closure in poorly healing diabetic wounds.

  10. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seok Jong Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  11. Recombinant soluble CD137 prevents type one diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kachapati, Kritika; Bednar, Kyle J; Adams, David E; Wu, Yuehong; Mittler, Robert S; Jordan, Michael B; Hinerman, Jennifer M; Herr, Andrew B; Ridgway, William M

    2013-12-01

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are genetically programmed to spontaneously develop type one diabetes (T1D). Multiple Insulin dependent diabetes (Idd) genetic loci have been identified but their functional effects are mostly poorly understood. TnfsfR9, expressing the protein product CD137, is a strong candidate gene in the Idd9.3 locus, and NOD.B10 Idd9.3 mice are significantly protected from type one diabetes (T1D). We previously showed that nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a deficiency in the numbers of CD137(pos) T regulatory cells, that CD137(pos) Tregs are the source of soluble CD137 (sCD137), and that NOD mice have low serum levels of sCD137. To test the hypothesis that correcting low levels of sCD137 could affect the disease, we constructed a lentiviral vector producing recombinant sCD137; this physiologic sCD137 is glycosylated and exists primarily as a dimer. NOD mice treated with the recombinant sCD137 are protected from developing T1D. Insulitis is significantly decreased, but not eliminated in the sCD137 treated mice, however insulin producing pancreatic beta cells are preserved despite residual insulitis. To begin to understand the protective immune mechanisms of sCD137, we tested sCD137 in vitro. It was previously suggested that sCD137 simply blocked the interaction between CD137 (on T cells) and CD137 ligand (on antigen presenting cells (APCs)). Here however, we use an APC independent assay and demonstrate that sCD137 can actively suppress highly purified CD4 T cells in a CD137L dependent fashion. These results support the hypothesis that sCD137 acts in a negative feedback loop to actively suppress over-zealous immune responses, and that it can be used clinically to suppress autoimmunity. sCD137 is an important Treg derived natural immunosuppressive molecule that regulates effector T cells to avert diabetes in vivo.

  12. Longitudinal Frequencies of Blood Leukocyte Subpopulations Differ between NOD and NOR Mice but Do Not Predict Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Telieps, Tanja; Köhler, Meike; Treise, Irina; Foertsch, Katharina; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Verschoor, Admar; Adler, Kerstin; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Immune phenotyping provides insight into disease pathogenesis and prognostic markers. Trajectories from age of 4 to 36 weeks were modeled for insulin autoantibodies and for leukocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from female NOD (n = 58) and NOR (n = 22) mice. NOD mice had higher trajectories of insulin autoantibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, IgD+IgM− B lymphocytes, and NK cells and lower trajectories of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, IgM+ B lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes than NOR mice (all p < 0.001). Of these, only the increased IAA trajectory was observed in NOD mice that developed diabetes as compared to NOD mice that remained diabetes-free. Therefore, the profound differences in peripheral blood leukocyte proportions observed between the diabetes-prone NOD mice and the diabetes-resistant mice do not explain the variation in diabetes development within NOD mice and do not provide markers for diabetes prediction in this model. PMID:26966692

  13. The receptor for advanced glycation end products impairs collateral formation in both diabetic and non-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Laura M; Gupta, Divya; Joseph, Giji; Weiss, Daiana; Taylor, W Robert

    2017-01-01

    Diabetics often have poor perfusion in their limbs as a result of peripheral artery disease and an impaired ability to generate collateral vessels. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one protein that is thought to play a detrimental role in collateral development in diabetics due to increased levels of advanced glycation end products (AGE), one of its ligands, in diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAGE in both diabetic and non-diabetic settings in a model of collateral formation in mice. Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes in both wild type and RAGE knockout mice. Increased levels of the AGE, N(ɛ)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML), were confirmed via an ELISA. A hindlimb ischemia model, in which the femoral artery is ligated, was used to drive collateral growth and reperfusion was assessed using laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histological analysis of vessels in the muscle. Both of these measurements showed impaired collateral growth in diabetic compared with wild-type mice as well as improved collateral growth in both diabetic and non-diabetic RAGE knockout mice when compared their wild-type counterparts. Distance on a freely accessed running wheel, used as a measure of perfusion recovery, showed that wild-type diabetic mice had functionally impaired recovery compared with their wild-type counterparts. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting showed that HMGB-1 (high-mobility group box 1), another RAGE ligand, was increased in the ischemic leg compared with the non-ischemic leg in all mice. This increase in HMGB-1 may explain improvement in animals lacking RAGE and its subsequent signaling. In conclusion, this study shows that RAGE impairs collateral growth in a diabetic setting and also in a non-diabetic setting. This demonstrates the importance of RAGE and alternate RAGE ligands in the setting of collateral vessel growth.

  14. Petalonia improves glucose homeostasis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong-Il; Jin, Young-Jun; Ko, Hee-Chul; Choi, Soo-Youn; Hwang, Joon-Ho; Whang, Ilson; Kim, Moo-Han; Shin, Hye-Sun; Jeong, Hyung-Bok; Kim, Se-Jae

    2008-08-22

    The anti-diabetic potential of Petalonia binghamiae extract (PBE) was evaluated in vivo. Dietary administration of PBE to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice significantly lowered blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance. The mode of action by which PBE attenuated diabetes was investigated in vitro using 3T3-L1 cells. PBE treatment stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and terminal marker protein aP2, as well as the mRNA of GLUT4 were up-regulated by PBE. In mature adipocytes, PBE significantly stimulated the uptake of glucose and the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). Furthermore, PBE increased PPAR{gamma} luciferase reporter gene activity in COS-1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo anti-diabetic effect of PBE is mediated by both insulin-like and insulin-sensitizing actions in adipocytes.

  15. Increased Inner Ear Susceptibility to Noise Injury in Mice With Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Sayaka; Hasegawa, Shingo; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated hearing impairment in type 1 diabetes using mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes (C57BL/6J; male). Hearing function was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 months after induction of diabetes (five diabetic and five control animals per time point) using auditory-evoked brain stem responses (ABRs). Mice (four diabetic and four control) were exposed to loud noise (105 dB) 5 months after induction of diabetes. ABRs were measured before and after noise exposure. Cochlear blood flows were measured by laser-Doppler flowmeter. Spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) were counted. Vessel endothelial cells were observed by CD31 immunostaining. Chronologic changes in the ABR threshold shift were not significantly different between the diabetic and control groups. However, vessel walls in the modiolus of the cochleae were significantly thicker in the diabetic group than the control group. Additionally, recovery from noise-induced injury was significantly impaired in diabetic mice. Reduced cochlea blood flows and SGC loss were observed in diabetic mice cochleae after noise exposure. Our data suggest that diabetic cochleae are more susceptible than controls to loud noise exposure, and decreased cochlear blood flow due to sclerosis of the vessels and consequent loss of SGCs are possible mechanisms of hearing impairment in diabetic patients. PMID:22851574

  16. Characterization of peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lepault, F; Gagnerault, M C

    2000-01-01

    The period that precedes onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus corresponds to an active dynamic state in which pathogenic autoreactive T cells are kept from destroying beta cells by regulatory T cells. In prediabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, CD4+ splenocytes were shown to prevent diabetes transfer in immunodeficient NOD recipients. We now demonstrate that regulatory splenocytes belong to the CD4+ CD62Lhigh T cell subset that comprises a vast majority of naive cells producing low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and no IL-4 and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation. Consistently, the inhibition of diabetes transfer was not mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Regulatory cells homed to the pancreas and modified the migration of diabetogenic to the islets, which resulted in a decreased insulitis severity. The efficiency of CD62L+ T cells was dose dependent, independent of sex and disease prevalence. Protection mechanisms did not involve the CD62L molecule, an observation that may relate to the fact that CD4+ CD62Lhigh lymph node cells were less potent than their splenic counterparts. Regulatory T cells were detectable after weaning and persist until disease onset, sustaining the notion that diabetes is a late and abrupt event. Thus, the CD62L molecule appears as a unique marker that can discriminate diabetogenic (previously shown to be CD62L-) from regulatory T cells. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of protective CD4+ CD62L+ cells suggest they are different from Th2-, Tr1-, and NK T-type cells, reported to be implicated in the control of diabetes in NOD mice, and may represent a new immunoregulatory population.

  17. Changes in the pharmacokinetics of digoxin in polyuria in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and lithium carbonate-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Kagami, Mai; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ishii, Makoto; Toda, Takahiro; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    In humans, digoxin is mainly eliminated through the kidneys unchanged, and renal clearance represents approximately 70% of the total clearance. In this study, we used the mouse models to examine digoxin pharmacokinetics in polyuria induced by diabetes mellitus and lithium carbonate (Li(2)CO(3)) administration, including mechanistic evaluation of the contribution of glomerular filtration, tubular secretion, and tubular reabsorption. After digoxin administration to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, digoxin CL/F increased to approximately 2.2 times that in normal mice. After treatment with Li(2)CO(3) (0.2%) for 10 days, the CL/F increased approximately 1.1 times for normal mice and 1.6 times for STZ mice. Creatinine clearance (CLcr) and the renal mRNA expression levels of mdr1a did not differ significantly between the normal, STZ, and Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice. The urine volume of STZ mice was approximately 26 mL/day, 22 times that of normal mice. The urine volume of Li(2)CO(3)-treated mice increased approximately 7.3 times for normal mice and 2.3 times for STZ mice. These results suggest that the therapeutic effect of digoxin may be significantly reduced in the presence of polyuria either induced by diabetes mellitus or manifested as an adverse effect of Li(2)CO(3) in diabetic patients, along with increased urine volume.

  18. Effects of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract in alloxan induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a lack of knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms of the antidiabetic activity of Moringa oleifera. This study investigates the antidiabetic effect of M. oleifera and its impact on the immune tolerance. Methods Alloxan-induced diabetes model for mice was used. A dose of 100 mg/kg of Moringa extract was orally administered to diabetic treated mice. Glucose and insulin levels were evaluated to calculate insulin resistance. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were measured. The relative percentage of CD44, CD69, and IFN-γ was investigated by flow cytometry. Results In diabetic mice, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was increased 4.5-fold than in the control group, and HOMA-IR was decreased 1.3-fold in the Moringa treatment group. The level of TAC was declined 1.94-fold in diabetic mice, and increased 1.67-fold in diabetic treated group. In diabetic mice, creatinine and BUN levels were significantly reduced 1.42- and 1.2-fold, respectively, in Moringa treatment mice. The relative percentage of CD44 was not changed in diabetic mice, but the relative percentage of CD69 was found to be increased. INF-γ was decreased 2.4-fold in diabetic mice and elevated in treated groups. Conclusion Moringa may ameliorate insulin resistance, increase TAC, and improve immune tolerance. PMID:28203392

  19. A study of cardiovascular function in Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetes, a new model mouse of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomie; Miyata, Shigeo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sanzen, Yoshiki; Ito, Minami; Hemmi, Chieko; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Wataru; Mihara, Kiyoshi; Aburada, Masaki; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well known and important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. A new model of Type 2 diabetes, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, was introduced recently into the research field of diabetes. The cardiac functions of TSOD mice were studied in comparison with Tsumura Suzuki Non Obesity (TSNO, non-diabetic control) mice, for the first time. In vivo cardiovascular functions were measured by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization at 7, 12 and 18 months old. TSOD mice had no deterioration of cardiac function despite the long-term persistence of severe obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, including high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. No histopathological abnormalities were observed in the heart of TSOD mice, while several histological abnormalities were observed in the pancreas and kidney of TSOD mice. To investigate vascular endothelium function at 7 months old, intravenous injection of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 3, 10 microg/kg)- and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg)-induced mean blood pressure (BP) changes were used. ACh decreased whereas L-NAME increased BP, and no significant differences in BP changes were observed between TSOD and TSNO mice. Moreover, ACh-induced relaxation of the thoracic aortae isolated from TSOD and TSNO mice with intact endothelium were not significantly different. These findings suggest that vascular endothelial cells in TSOD mice are not impaired. It was clearly demonstrated that despite obvious diabetes, cardiac functions of TSOD mice were not impaired even at 18 months old.

  20. Improvement of skin wound healing in diabetic mice by kinin B2 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Desposito, Dorinne; Chollet, Catherine; Taveau, Christopher; Descamps, Vincent; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine; Waeckel, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Impaired skin wound healing is a major medical problem in diabetic subjects. Kinins exert a number of vascular and other actions limiting organ damage in ischaemia or diabetes, but their role in skin injury is unknown. We investigated, through pharmacological manipulation of bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors (B1R and B2R respectively), the role of kinins in wound healing in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Using two mouse models of diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice) and non-diabetic mice, we assessed the effect of kinin receptor activation or inhibition by subtype-selective pharmacological agonists (B1R and B2R) and antagonist (B2R) on healing of experimental skin wounds. We also studied effects of agonists and antagonist on keratinocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. Levels of Bdkrb1 (encoding B1R) and Bdkrb2 (encoding B2R) mRNAs increased 1-2-fold in healthy and wounded diabetic skin compared with in non-diabetic skin. Diabetes delayed wound healing. The B1R agonist had no effect on wound healing. In contrast, the B2R agonist impaired wound repair in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice, inducing skin disorganization and epidermis thickening. In vitro, B2R activation unbalanced fibroblast/keratinocyte proliferation and increased keratinocyte migration. These effects were abolished by co-administration of B2R antagonist. Interestingly, in the two mouse models of diabetes, the B2R antagonist administered alone normalized wound healing. This effect was associated with the induction of Ccl2 (encoding monocyte chemoattractant protein 1)/Tnf (encoding tumour necrosis factor α) mRNAs. Thus stimulation of kinin B2 receptor impairs skin wound healing in mice. B2R activation occurs in the diabetic skin and delays wound healing. B2R blockade improves skin wound healing in diabetic mice and is a potential therapeutic approach to diabetic ulcers.

  1. The role of mast cells in cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Yoriko; Shiota, Naotaka; Okunishi, Hideki

    2014-11-01

    Mast cells (MCs) reside in cutaneous tissue, and an increment of MCs is suggested to induce vascular regression in the process of wound healing. To clarify participation of MCs in diabetic cutaneous wound healing, we created an excisional wound on diabetic mice 4 weeks after streptozotocin injections and subsequently investigated the healing processes for 49 days, comparing them with control mice. The rate of wound closure was not markedly different between the diabetic and control mice. In the proliferative phase at days 7 and 14, neovascularization in the wound was weaker in diabetic mice than in control mice. In the remodeling phase at day 21 and afterward, rapid vascular regression occurred in control mice; however, neovascularization was still observed in diabetic mice where the number of vessels in granulation tissues was relatively higher than in control mice. In the remodeling phase of the control mice, MCs within the wound began to increase rapidly and resulted in considerable accumulation, whereas the increment of MCs was delayed in diabetic mice. In addition, the number of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)- or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-immunopositive hypertrophic fibroblast-like spindle cells and c-Kit-positive/VEGFR2-positive/FcεRIα-negative endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were higher in diabetic wounds. In conclusion, neovascularization in the proliferative phase and vascular regression in the remodeling phase were impaired in diabetic mice. The delayed increment of MCs and sustained angiogenic stimuli by fibroblast-like spindle cells and EPCs may inhibit vascular regression in the remodeling phase and impair the wound-healing process in diabetic mice.

  2. Overexpression of natural killer T cells protects Valpha14- Jalpha281 transgenic nonobese diabetic mice against diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lehuen, A; Lantz, O; Beaudoin, L; Laloux, V; Carnaud, C; Bendelac, A; Bach, J F; Monteiro, R C

    1998-11-16

    Progression to destructive insulitis in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice is linked to the failure of regulatory cells, possibly involving T helper type 2 (Th2) cells. Natural killer (NK) T cells might be involved in diabetes, given their deficiency in NOD mice and the prevention of diabetes by adoptive transfer of alpha/beta double-negative thymocytes. Here, we evaluated the role of NK T cells in diabetes by using transgenic NOD mice expressing the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) alpha chain Valpha14-Jalpha281 characteristic of NK T cells. Precise identification of NK1.1(+) T cells was based on out-cross with congenic NK1.1 NOD mice. All six transgenic lines showed, to various degrees, elevated numbers of NK1.1(+) T cells, enhanced production of interleukin (IL)-4, and increased levels of serum immunoglobulin E. Only the transgenic lines with the largest numbers of NK T cells and the most vigorous burst of IL-4 production were protected from diabetes. Transfer and cotransfer experiments with transgenic splenocytes demonstrated that Valpha14-Jalpha281 transgenic NOD mice, although protected from overt diabetes, developed a diabetogenic T cell repertoire, and that NK T cells actively inhibited the pathogenic action of T cells. These results indicate that the number of NK T cells strongly influences the development of diabetes.

  3. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  4. Blockade of advanced glycation end-product formation restores ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamarat, Radia; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Huijberts, Maya; Benessiano, Joelle; Ebrahimian, Teni G.; Duriez, Micheline; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Wautier, Jean Luc; Lévy, Bernard I.

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesized that formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) associated with diabetes reduces matrix degradation by metalloproteinases (MMPs) and contributes to the impairment of ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Mice were treated or not with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and streptozotocin plus aminoguanidine (AGEs formation blocker, 50 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, hindlimb ischemia was induced by right femoral artery ligature. Plasma AGE levels were strongly elevated in diabetic mice when compared with control mice (579 ± 21 versus 47 ± 4 pmol/ml, respectively; P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine reduced AGE plasma levels when compared with untreated diabetic mice (P < 0.001). After 28 days of ischemia, ischemic/nonischemic leg angiographic score, capillary density, and laser Doppler skin-perfusion ratios were 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold decreased in diabetic mice in reference to controls (P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine completely normalized ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. We next analyzed the role of proteolysis in AGE formation-induced hampered neovascularization process. After 3 days of ischemia, MMP-2 activity and MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein levels were increased in untreated and aminoguanidine-treated diabetic mice when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Despite this activation of the MMP pathway, collagenolysis was decreased in untreated diabetic mice. Conversely, treatment of diabetic mice with aminoguanidine restored collagenolysis toward levels found in control mice. In conclusion, blockade of AGE formation by aminoguanidine normalizes impaired ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. This effect is probably mediated by restoration of matrix degradation processes that are disturbed as a result of AGE accumulation. PMID:12805564

  5. Blockade of advanced glycation end-product formation restores ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamarat, Radia; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Huijberts, Maya; Benessiano, Joelle; Ebrahimian, Teni G; Duriez, Micheline; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Wautier, Jean Luc; Lévy, Bernard I

    2003-07-08

    We hypothesized that formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) associated with diabetes reduces matrix degradation by metalloproteinases (MMPs) and contributes to the impairment of ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Mice were treated or not with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and streptozotocin plus aminoguanidine (AGEs formation blocker, 50 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of treatment, hindlimb ischemia was induced by right femoral artery ligature. Plasma AGE levels were strongly elevated in diabetic mice when compared with control mice (579 +/- 21 versus 47 +/- 4 pmol/ml, respectively; P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine reduced AGE plasma levels when compared with untreated diabetic mice (P < 0.001). After 28 days of ischemia, ischemic/nonischemic leg angiographic score, capillary density, and laser Doppler skin-perfusion ratios were 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold decreased in diabetic mice in reference to controls (P < 0.01). Treatment with aminoguanidine completely normalized ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. We next analyzed the role of proteolysis in AGE formation-induced hampered neovascularization process. After 3 days of ischemia, MMP-2 activity and MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein levels were increased in untreated and aminoguanidine-treated diabetic mice when compared with controls (P < 0.05). Despite this activation of the MMP pathway, collagenolysis was decreased in untreated diabetic mice. Conversely, treatment of diabetic mice with aminoguanidine restored collagenolysis toward levels found in control mice. In conclusion, blockade of AGE formation by aminoguanidine normalizes impaired ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice. This effect is probably mediated by restoration of matrix degradation processes that are disturbed as a result of AGE accumulation.

  6. Influences of crude extract of tea leaves, Camellia sinensis, on streptozotocin diabetic male albino mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Atef M; Zari, Talal A

    2010-10-01

    Natural remedies from medicinal plants are considered to be effective and safe alternative treatment for diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypoglycemic activity of the crude tea leaves extract on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The average body weight of animals with diabetes and their percentage changes of body weight gain after 15 and 30 days were significantly lower than that of the normal control mice. In diabetic mice, supplementation with tea leaves extract decreased the loss of body weight. After 15 and 30 days, significant increases in the levels of serum glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, creatinine, urea, uric acid, glutamic pyruvic acid transaminase (GPT) and glutamic oxaloacetic acid transaminase (GOT) were noted in STZ-diabetic mice fed with normal diet. Also, the values of total protein in this group were statistically declined after 15 and 30 days. The levels of serum glucose and GPT were significantly elevated after 15 and 30 days in diabetic mice supplemented with tea leaves extract. Moreover, the level of serum GOT was notably increased after 30 days. Insignificant alterations were observed in the levels of serum triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein, creatinine, urea and uric acid in diabetic mice supplemented with tea leaves extract. Thus, the present results have shown that tea leaves extract has the antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and antihyperproteinemic effects and consequently may alleviate liver and kidney damage associated with STZ-induced diabetes in mice.

  7. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Marrotte, Eric J.; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Alex F.

    2010-01-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating EPCs was detected in type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice, and when isolated, these cells exhibited decreased expression and activity of MnSOD. Wound healing and angiogenesis were markedly delayed in diabetic mice compared with normal controls. For cell therapy, topical transplantation of EPCs onto excisional wounds in diabetic mice demonstrated that diabetic EPCs were less effective than normal EPCs at accelerating wound closure. Transplantation of diabetic EPCs after MnSOD gene therapy restored their ability to mediate angiogenesis and wound repair. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knockdown of MnSOD in normal EPCs reduced their activity in diabetic wound healing assays. Increasing the number of transplanted diabetic EPCs also improved the rate of wound closure. Our findings demonstrate that cell therapy using diabetic EPCs after ex vivo MnSOD gene transfer accelerates their ability to heal wounds in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21060152

  8. Autophagy ameliorates cognitive impairment through activation of PVT1 and apoptosis in diabetes mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigui; Hao, Shuang; Yin, Hongqiang; Gao, Jing; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-05-15

    The underlying mechanisms of cognitive impairment in diabetes remain incompletely characterized. Here we show that the autophagic inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) aggravates cognitive impairment in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, including exacerbation of anxiety-like behaviors and aggravation in spatial learning and memory, especially the spatial reversal memory. Further neuronal function identification confirmed that both long term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation (DPT) were exacerbated by autophagic inhibition in diabetic mice, which indicating impairment of synaptic plasticity. However, no significant change of pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) was recorded in diabetic mice with autophagic suppression compared with the diabetic mice, which indicated that presynaptic function was not affected by autophagic inhibition in diabetes. Subsequent hippocampal neuronal cell death analysis showed that the apoptotic cell death, but not the regulated necrosis, significantly increased in autophagic suppression of diabetic mice. Finally, molecular mechanism that may lead to cell death was identified. The long non-coding RNA PVT1 (plasmacytoma variant translocation 1) expression was analyzed, and data revealed that PVT1 was decreased significantly by 3-MA in diabetes. These findings show that PVT1-mediated autophagy may protect hippocampal neurons from impairment of synaptic plasticity and apoptosis, and then ameliorates cognitive impairment in diabetes. These intriguing findings will help pave the way for exciting functional studies of autophagy in cognitive impairment and diabetes that may alter the existing paradigms.

  9. Early-Onset Diabetic E1-DN Mice Develop Albuminuria and Glomerular Injury Typical of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyvönen, Mervi E.; Tienari, Jukka; Lehtonen, Eero; Ustinov, Jarkko; Jalanko, Hannu; Otonkoski, Timo; Miettinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    The transgenic E1-DN mice express a kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor in their pancreatic islets and are diabetic from two weeks of age due to impaired postnatal growth of β-cell mass. Here, we characterize the development of hyperglycaemia-induced renal injury in the E1-DN mice. Homozygous mice showed increased albumin excretion rate (AER) at the age of 10 weeks; the albuminuria increased over time and correlated with blood glucose. Morphometric analysis of PAS-stained histological sections and electron microscopy images revealed mesangial expansion in homozygous E1-DN mice, and glomerular sclerosis was observed in the most hyperglycaemic mice. The albuminuric homozygous mice developed also other structural changes in the glomeruli, including thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and widening of podocyte foot processes that are typical for diabetic nephropathy. Increased apoptosis of podocytes was identified as one mechanism contributing to glomerular injury. In addition, nephrin expression was reduced in the podocytes of albuminuric homozygous E1-DN mice. Tubular changes included altered epithelial cell morphology and increased proliferation. In conclusion, hyperglycaemic E1-DN mice develop albuminuria and glomerular and tubular injury typical of human diabetic nephropathy and can serve as a new model to study the mechanisms leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26000279

  10. Curcumin enhances wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Mani, H; Gaddipati, J P; Singh, A K; Seth, P; Banaudha, K K; Patnaik, G K; Maheshwari, R K

    1999-01-01

    Tissue repair and wound healing are complex processes that involve inflammation, granulation and tissue remodeling. Interactions of different cells, extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in wound healing, and are mediated by cytokines and growth factors. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a natural product obtained from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, enhanced cutaneous wound healing in rats and guinea pigs. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of curcumin treatment by oral and topical applications on impaired wound healing in diabetic rats and genetically diabetic mice using a full thickness cutaneous punch wound model. Wounds of animals treated with curcumin showed earlier re-epithelialization, improved neovascularization, increased migration of various cells including dermal myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and macrophages into the wound bed, and a higher collagen content. Immunohistochemical localization showed an increase in transforming growth factor-beta1 in curcumin-treated wounds compared to controls. Enhanced transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA expression in treated wounds was confirmed by in situ hybridization, and laser scan cytometry. A delay in the apoptosis patterns was seen in diabetic wounds compared to curcumin treated wounds as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridyl triphosphate nick end labeling analysis. Curcumin was effective both orally and topically. These results show that curcumin enhanced wound repair in diabetic impaired healing, and could be developed as a pharmacological agent in such clinical settings.

  11. Diabetes exacerbates amyloid and neurovascular pathology in aging-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Prior, Marguerite; Lo, David; Jolivalt, Corinne; Schubert, David; Maher, Pamela

    2012-12-01

    Mounting evidence supports a link between diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, and aging. However, the physiological mechanisms by which diabetes impacts brain function and cognition are not fully understood. To determine how diabetes contributes to cognitive dysfunction and age-associated pathology, we used streptozotocin to induce type 1 diabetes (T1D) in senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Contextual fear conditioning demonstrated that T1D resulted in the development of cognitive deficits in SAMR1 mice similar to those seen in age-matched, nondiabetic SAMP8 mice. No further cognitive deficits were observed when the SAMP8 mice were made diabetic. T1D dramatically increased Aβ and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice and to a lesser extent in age-matched SAMR1 mice. Further analysis revealed aggregated Aβ within astrocyte processes surrounding vessels. Western blot analyses from T1D SAMP8 mice showed elevated amyloid precursor protein processing and protein glycation along with increased inflammation. T1D elevated tau phosphorylation in the SAMR1 mice but did not further increase it in the SAMP8 mice where it was already significantly higher. These data suggest that aberrant glucose metabolism potentiates the aging phenotype in old mice and contributes to early stage central nervous system pathology in younger animals.

  12. Anti-Diabetic and Hepato-Renal Protective Effects of Ziyuglycoside II Methyl Ester in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Hwang, Seock Yeon; Kim, Myung-Hyun; Park, Un Kyu; Kim, Byoung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder caused by abnormal carbohydrate metabolism, and closely associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and hepato-renal dysfunction. This study investigated the anti-diabetic and hepato-renal protective properties of ziyuglycoside I (ZG01) derivative on type 2 diabetes. ZG01 was isolated from roots of Sanguisorba officinalis and chemically modified by deglycosylation and esterification to obtained ziyuglycoside II methyl ester (ZG02-ME). Here, we showed that ZG02-ME has stronger anti-diabetic activity than the original compound (ZG01) through decreasing blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and insulin levels in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes (db/db mice). We further found that ZG02-ME treatment effectively ameliorated serum insulin, leptin and C-peptide levels, which are key metabolic hormones, in db/db mice. In addition, we showed that elevated basal blood lipid levels were decreased by ZG02-ME treatment in db/db mice. Furthermore, treatment of ZG02-ME significantly decreased serum AST, ALT, BUN, creatinine, and liver lipid peroxidation in db/db mice. These results demonstrated that compared to ZG01, chemically modified ZG02-ME possess improved anti-diabetic properties, and has hepato-renal protective activities in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26198246

  13. The IL-1β Receptor Antagonist SER140 Postpones the Onset of Diabetes in Female Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cucak, Helena; Hansen, Gitte; Vrang, Niels; Skarsfeldt, Torben; Steiness, Eva; Jelsing, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is known to stimulate proinflammatory immune responses and impair β-cell function and viability, all critical events in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here we evaluate the effect of SER140, a small peptide IL-1β receptor antagonist, on diabetes progression and cellular pancreatic changes in female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Eight weeks of treatment with SER140 reduced the incidence of diabetes by more than 50% compared with vehicle, decreased blood glucose, and increased plasma insulin. Additionally, SER140 changed the endocrine and immune cells dynamics in the NOD mouse pancreas. Together, the data suggest that SER140 treatment postpones the onset of diabetes in female NOD mice by interfering with IL-1β activated pathways. PMID:26953152

  14. Reversal of new-onset type 1 diabetes in mice by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanting; Ouyang, Jian; Yang, Rong; Chen, Junhao; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojun; Burt, Richard K

    2008-09-19

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has recently been performed as a novel strategy to treat patients with new-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the mechanism of autologous HSCT-induced remission of diabetes remains unknown. In order to help clarify the mechanism of remission-induction following autologous HSCT in patients with T1D, mice treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin to induce diabetes were used as both donors (n=20) and recipients (n=20). Compared to streptozocin-treated mice not receiving transplantation, syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (syn-BMT) from a streptozocin-treated diabetic donor, if applied during new-onset T1D (day 10 after diabetes onset), can reverse hyperglycemia without relapse (P<0.001), maintain normal blood insulin levels (P<0.001), and preserve islet cell mass. Compared to diabetic mice not undergoing HSCT, syn-BMT, results in restoration of Tregs in spleens (P<0.01), increased Foxp3 mRNA expression (P<0.01) and increased Foxp3 protein expression (P<0.05). This diabetic-remission-inducing effect occurred in mice receiving bone marrow from either streptozocin-treated diabetic or non-diabetic normal donors. We conclude that autologous HSCT remission of diabetes is more than transient immune suppression, and is capable of prolonged remission-induction via regeneration of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs.

  15. Estrogen treatment predisposes to severe and persistent vaginal candidiasis in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased levels of estrogen and diabetes mellitus separately predispose to vaginal candidiasis (VC). However, the compounding effect of estrogen on the severity and persistence of VC in diabetic females is not clear. Methods To address this issue, a diabetic mouse model with estrogen-maintained VC was developed and evaluated for vaginal fungal burden (VFB) and immune competence at different time points throughout the study period. Results Blood glucose levels in estrogen-treated diabetic mice were consistently lower than that in untreated counterparts. Estrogen-treated C. albicans-infected non-diabetic mice experienced persistent episodes of VC as compared with naïve controls (P < 0.01). However, severity and persistence of VC in estrogen-treated C. albicans-infected diabetic mice was significantly greater than that in non-diabetic counterparts (P < 0.05). Mortality rates among estrogen-treated C. albicans-infected diabetic mice were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in non-diabetic counterparts. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) and persistent suppression of the delayed hypersensitivity response (DTH) was evident in estrogen-treated C. albicans-infected diabetic and non-diabetic mice as compared with controls. Levels of expression of the inhibitory molecule CD152 on vaginal and splenic T cells isolated from estrogen-treated C. albicans infected mice was significantly higher than that in naive untreated controls (P < 0.01). Conclusions These findings suggest that estrogen treatment in diabetic females may protect against the progression of DM on the one hand and predispose to severe and persistent VC on the other. The later outcome could be related to the immunosuppressed status of the host. PMID:24401317

  16. Tadalafil Promotes the Recovery of Peripheral Neuropathy in Type II Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Szalad, Alexandra; Lu, XueRong; Jia, LongFei; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Rui Lan; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with the short (4 hours) half-life phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, sildenafil, improved functional outcome in diabetic db/db mice. To further examine the effect of PDE5 inhibition on diabetic peripheral neuropathy, we investigated the effect of another potent PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tadalafil is pharmacokinetically distinct from sildenafil and has a longer half-life (17+hours) than sildenafil. Diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J, db/db) at age 20 weeks were treated with tadalafil every 48 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. Compared with diabetic mice treated with saline, tadalafil treatment significantly improved motor and sensory conduction velocities in the sciatic nerve and peripheral thermal sensitivity. Tadalafil treatment also markedly increased local blood flow and the density of FITC-dextran perfused vessels in the sciatic nerve concomitantly with increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Moreover, tadalafil reversed the diabetes-induced reductions of axon diameter and myelin thickness and reversed the diabetes-induced increased g-ratio in the sciatic nerve. Furthermore, tadalafil enhanced diabetes-reduced nerve growth factor (NGF) and platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) protein levels in diabetic sciatic nerve tissue. The present study demonstrates that tadalafil increases regional blood flow in the sciatic nerve tissue, which may contribute to the improvement of peripheral nerve function and the amelioration of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27438594

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Novel Nafimidone Derivatives on Thermal Hypoalgesia in Mice with Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kamışlı, Suat; Karakurt, Arzu; Uyumlu, Ayşe B.; Satılmış, Basri; Alagöz, Abdullah; Genç, Metin F.; Batcıoğlu, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a common complication in Diabetes Mellitus. The streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodent is the most commonly used animal model of diabetes and increased sodium channel expression and activity were revealed in this model. At this study, we evaluated the effect of three different nafimidone derivatives which have possible anticonvulsant activity on disorders of thermal pain sensation in diabetic mice. Study Design: Randomized animal experiment. Material and Methods: Mice were divided randomly into five groups (5 mice per group): Control, Diabetes, Dibetes+C1, Diabetes+C2, Diabetes+C3. We used hot and cold plate, and tail-immersion tests for assessment of thermal nociceptive responses. Results: Compared with the control group, the hot-plate response time and the number of paw liftings on cold plate as important indicators of loss of sensation increased, but no significant difference (p>0.05) was found in tail-immersion response time test in diabetes group. C3 compound moved it back to control group levels in the all of three tests. C1 and C2 compounds were effective only in cold-plate test. Conclusion: Nafimidone derivatives may be effective in the cases where epilepsy and diabetes occur together since it has shown efficacy against “loss of sensation” which evolves in diabetic neuropathy over time as well as its antiepileptic effect. PMID:25207077

  18. T cell-mediated inhibition of the transfer of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has recently been introduced as a model for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The role of regulatory T cells in the development of antipancreatic autoimmunity in this model remains unclear. To evaluate the presence of suppressive phenomena, we used disease transfer by spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice into preirradiated adult recipients as a model for accelerated disease. Suppressor phenomena were detected by testing the protection afforded by lymphoid cells from nondiabetic NOD mice against diabetes transfer in irradiated recipients. Transfer of diabetes was delayed by reconstituting recipients with spleen cells from nondiabetic NOD donors. The greatest protection against diabetes transfer was conferred by spleen cells from 8-wk-old nondiabetic female NOD mice. Depletion experiments showed that the protection was dependent on CD4+ cells. Protection was also detected within thymic cells from nondiabetic NOD mice and protection conferred by spleen cells was abrogated by thymectomy of nondiabetic female, but not male, NOD donors at 3 wk of age. These findings indicate that suppressive CD4+ T cells that are dependent on the presence of the thymus may delay the onset of diabetes in female diabetes-prone NOD mice. PMID:2523954

  19. Increased Retinal Oxygen Metabolism Precedes Microvascular Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Wang, Shoujian; Soetikno, Brian; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Siyu; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate inner retinal oxygen metabolic rate (IRMRO2) during early stages of type 1 diabetes in a transgenic mouse model. Methods In current study, we involved seven diabetic mice (Akita/+, TSP1−/−) and seven control mice (TSP1−/−), and applied visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) to image functional parameters including retinal blood flow rate, oxygen saturation (sO2) and the IRMRO2 value longitudinally from 5 weeks of age to 13 weeks of age. After imaging at 13 weeks of age, we analyzed the imaging results, and examined histology of mouse retina. Results Between diabetic mice and the control group, we observed significant differences in venous sO2 from 9 weeks of age (P = 0.006), and significant increment in IRMRO2 from 11 weeks of age (P = 0.001) in diabetic mice compared with control group. We did not find significant differences in retinal blood flow rate as well as arterial sO2 during imaging between diabetic and control mice. Histologic examination of diabetic and control mice at 13 weeks of age also revealed no anatomical retinal alternations. Conclusions In diabetic retinopathy, complications in retinal oxygen metabolism may occur before changes of retinal anatomical structure.

  20. Comparison of Experimental Diabetic Periodontitis Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Aprecio, Ray; Zhang, Dongjiao; Li, Hao; Ji, Ning; Mohamed, Omaima; Zhang, Wu; Li, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the severe complications in diabetic patients and gingival epithelium plays an initial role on the onset and progression of this disease. However the potential mechanism is yet sufficiently understood. Meanwhile, the research on the correlational experimental animal models was also insufficient. Here, we established periodontitis with type 2 diabetes in db/db and Tallyho/JngJ (TH) mice and periodontitis with type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin induced diabetes C57BL/6J (STZ-C57) mice by oral infection of periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis W50. We demonstrated that periodontal infected mice with high blood glucose levels showed dramatically more alveolar bone loss than their counterparts, in which infected db/db mice exhibited the most bone defects. No contrary impact could be observed between this periodontal infection and onset and severity of diabetes. The expressions of PTPN2 were inhibited whereas the expression of JAK1, STAT1, and STAT3 increased dramatically in gingival epithelia and the serum TNF-α also significantly increased in the mice with diabetic periodontitis. Our results indicated that the variations of inflammation-related protein expressions in gingival epithelia might lead to the phenotype differences in the mice with diabetic periodontitis. PMID:27995146

  1. O-GlcNAcase overexpression reverses coronary endothelial cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Ayako; Dai, Anzhi; Han, Ying; Youssef, Katia D; Wang, Weihua; Donthamsetty, Reshma; Scott, Brian T; Wang, Hong; Dillmann, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes, and endothelial dysfunction is commonly seen in these patients. Increased O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) protein modification is one of the central pathogenic features of diabetes. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) is regulated by two key enzymes: β-N-acetylglucosaminidase [O-GlcNAcase (OGA)], which catalyzes the reduction of protein O-GlcNAcylation, and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which induces O-GlcNAcylation. However, it is not known whether reducing O-GlcNAcylation can improve endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. To examine the effect of endothelium-specific OGA overexpression on protein O-GlcNAcylation and coronary endothelial function in diabetic mice, we generated tetracycline-inducible, endothelium-specific OGA transgenic mice, and induced OGA by doxycycline administration in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. OGA protein expression was significantly decreased in mouse coronary endothelial cells (MCECs) isolated from diabetic mice compared with control MCECs, whereas OGT protein level was markedly increased. The level of protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in diabetic compared with control mice, and OGA overexpression significantly decreased the level of protein O-GlcNAcylation in MCECs from diabetic mice. Capillary density in the left ventricle and endothelium-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries were significantly decreased in diabetes, while OGA overexpression increased capillary density to the control level and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation without changing endothelium-independent relaxation. We found that connexin 40 could be the potential target of O-GlcNAcylation that regulates the endothelial functions in diabetes. These data suggest that OGA overexpression in endothelial cells improves endothelial function and may have a beneficial effect on coronary vascular complications in diabetes.

  2. Optical cryo-imaging of kidney mitochondrial redox state in diabetic mice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, S.; Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Sheibani, N.; Sorenson, C. M.; Ranji, M.

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), which increases during diabetes, exacerbates the development and progression of diabetes complications including renal vascular and proximal tubule cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the changes in the metabolic state of the tissue in diabetic mice kidneys using fluorescence imaging. Mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide), and FADH-2 (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) are autofluorescent and can be monitored without exogenous labels by optical techniques. The ratio of the fluorescence intensity of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), called the NADH redox ratio (RR), is a marker of metabolic state of a tissue. We examined mitochondrial redox states of kidneys from diabetic mice, Akita/+ and its control wild type (WT) for a group of 8- and 12-week-old mice. Average intensity and histogram of maximum projected images of FAD, NADH, and NADH RR were calculated for each kidney. Our results indicated a 17% decrease in the mean NADH RR of the kidney from 8-week-old mice compared with WT mice and, a 30% decrease in the mean NADH RR of kidney from12-week-old mice compared with WT mice. These results indicated an increase in OS in diabetic animals and its progression over time. Thus, NADH RR can be used as a hallmark of OS in diabetic kidney allowing temporal identification of oxidative state.

  3. Deletion of Aldose Reductase from Mice Inhibits Diabetes-Induced Retinal Capillary Degeneration and Superoxide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Petrash, J. Mark; Sheibani, Nader; Kern, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pharmacologic inhibition of aldose reductase (AR) previously has been studied with respect to diabetic retinopathy with mixed results. Since drugs can have off-target effects, we studied the effects of AR deletion on the development and molecular abnormalities that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Since recent data suggests an important role for leukocytes in the development of the retinopathy, we determined also if AR in leukocytes contributes to leukocyte-mediated death of retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Methods Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) and AR deficient (AR−/−) mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin. Mice were sacrificed at 2 and 10 months of diabetes to evaluate retinal vascular histopathology, to quantify retinal superoxide production and biochemical and physiological abnormalities in the retina, and to assess the number of retinal endothelial cells killed by blood leukocytes in a co-culture system. Results Diabetes in WT mice developed the expected degeneration of retinal capillaries, and increased generation of superoxide by the retina. Leukocytes from diabetic WT mice also killed more retinal endothelial cells than did leukocytes from nondiabetic animals (p<0.0001). Deletion of AR largely (P<0.05) inhibited the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries, as well as the increase in superoxide production by retina. AR-deficiency significantly inhibited the diabetes-induced increase in expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in retina, but had no significant effect on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), phosphorylated p38 MAPK, or killing of retinal endothelial cells by leukocytes. Conclusions AR contributes to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetic mice. Deletion of the enzyme inhibits the diabetes-induced increase in expression of iNOS and of superoxide production, but does not correct a variety of other pro-inflammatory abnormalities associated with the development of

  4. PKCβ Promotes Vascular inflammation and Acceleration of Atherosclerosis in Diabetic ApoE Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Linghua; Shen, Xiaoping; Lin, Lili; Leitges, Michael; Rosario, Rosa; Zou, Yu Shan; Yan, Shi Fang

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetic subjects are at high risk for developing atherosclerosis through a variety of mechanisms. As the metabolism of glucose results in production of activators of protein kinase C (PKC)β, it was logical to investigate the role of PKCβ in modulation of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Approach and Results ApoE−/− and PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin. Quantification of atherosclerosis, gene expression profiling or analysis of signaling molecules was performed on aortic sinus or aortas from diabetic mice. Diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis increased the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and JNK mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases and augmented vascular expression of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased monocyte/macrophage infiltration and CD11c+ cells accumulation in diabetic ApoE−/− mice; processes which were diminished in diabetic PKCβ −/−/ApoE−/− mice. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in diabetic ApoE−/− mice. In vitro, the inhibitors of PKCβ and ERK1/2, as well as small interfering RNA (siRNA) to Egr-1 significantly decreased high glucose-induced expression of CD11c (Itgax), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and interleukin (IL)-1β in U937 macrophages. Conclusions These data link enhanced activation of PKCβ to accelerated diabetic atherosclerosis via a mechanism that includes modulation of gene transcription and signal transduction in the vascular wall; processes that contribute to acceleration of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis in diabetes. Our results uncover a novel role for PKCβ in modulating CD11c expression and inflammatory response of macrophages in the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. These findings support PKCβ activation as a potential therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:23766264

  5. Double transgenic mice with type 1 diabetes mellitus develop somatic, metabolic and vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Radu, D L; Georgescu, Adriana; Stavaru, Crina; Carale, Alina; Popov, Doina

    2004-01-01

    The double transgenic mice (dTg) were obtained by mating: (i) transgenic mice expressing the hemagglutinin of influenza virus under the insulin promoter with (ii) transgenic mice expressing specific T lymphocytes with receptor for the immunodominant epitope of the same virus. In this study we show that dTg mice developed type 1 diabetes mellitus associated with hyperglycemia, low level of plasma insulin, glucosuria, weight loss and approximately 90% mortality (at 3 months biological age). The membrane of red blood cells was more sensitive to osmotic shock in diabetic mice, compared to non-diabetic mice, assessing systemic oxidative stress. Both vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of the renal arteries decreased significantly in diabetic mice (compared to the control group of non-diabetic mice) related to the phenotypic change of endothelium and smooth muscle cells within the artery wall. This animal model, may be used in developing various strategies to study pancreatic beta-cell function, as well as for a better metabolic control conducting to a reduced risk of vascular complications.

  6. Arsenic induces diabetic effects through beta-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Guo, Xuechao; Wu, Bing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Mei

    2014-11-04

    Arsenic as a potential risk factor for type 2 diabetes has been received attention recently. However, the roles of arsenic on development of diabetes are unclear. In this study, we compared the influences of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on normal and diabetic mice by systems toxicology approaches. Although iAs exposure did not change glucose tolerance in normal mice, it caused the pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis and oxidative damages in liver. However, iAs exposure worsened the glucose tolerance in diabetic mice, which might be due to increased gluconeogenesis and impairment of pancreatic β-cell function. It is interesting that iAs exposure could improve the insulin sensitivity based on the insulin tolerance testing by the activation of glucose uptake-related genes and enzymes in normal and diabetic individuals. Our data suggested that iAs exposure could cause pre-diabetic effects by altering the lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis and insulin secretion in normal individual, and worsen diabetic effects in diabetes individual by these processes. Insulin resistance might be not the reason of diabetic effects caused by iAs, indicating that mechanism of the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure is different from the mechanism associated with traditional risk factors (such as obesity)-reduced type 2 diabetes.

  7. Arsenic induces diabetic effects through beta-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Su; Guo, Xuechao; Wu, Bing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Mei

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic as a potential risk factor for type 2 diabetes has been received attention recently. However, the roles of arsenic on development of diabetes are unclear. In this study, we compared the influences of inorganic arsenic (iAs) on normal and diabetic mice by systems toxicology approaches. Although iAs exposure did not change glucose tolerance in normal mice, it caused the pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and increased gluconeogenesis and oxidative damages in liver. However, iAs exposure worsened the glucose tolerance in diabetic mice, which might be due to increased gluconeogenesis and impairment of pancreatic β-cell function. It is interesting that iAs exposure could improve the insulin sensitivity based on the insulin tolerance testing by the activation of glucose uptake-related genes and enzymes in normal and diabetic individuals. Our data suggested that iAs exposure could cause pre-diabetic effects by altering the lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis and insulin secretion in normal individual, and worsen diabetic effects in diabetes individual by these processes. Insulin resistance might be not the reason of diabetic effects caused by iAs, indicating that mechanism of the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure is different from the mechanism associated with traditional risk factors (such as obesity)-reduced type 2 diabetes.

  8. In vivo targeted molecular magnetic resonance imaging of free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy within mice.

    PubMed

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Carrizales, J; Lupu, F; Silasi-Mansat, R; Ehrenshaft, M; Mason, R P

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We present a method for in vivo observation of free radical events within murine diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study reports on in vivo imaging of protein/lipid radicals using molecular MRI (mMRI) and immuno-spin trapping (IST) in diabetic cardiac muscle. To detect free radicals in diabetic cardiomyopathy, streptozotocin (STZ)-exposed mice were given 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and administered an anti-DMPO probe (biotin-anti-DMPO antibody-albumin-Gd-DTPA). For controls, non-diabetic mice were given DMPO (non-disease control), and administered an anti-DMPO probe; or diabetic mice were given DMPO but administered a non-specific IgG contrast agent instead of the anti-DMPO probe. DMPO administration started at 7 weeks following STZ treatment for 5 days, and the anti-DMPO probe was administered at 8 weeks for MRI detection. MRI was used to detect a significant increase (p < 0.001) in MRI signal intensity (SI) from anti-DMPO nitrone adducts in diabetic murine left-ventricular (LV) cardiac tissue, compared to controls. Regional increases in MR SI in the LV were found in the apical and upper-left areas (p < 0.01 for both), compared to controls. The biotin moiety of the anti-DMPO probe was targeted with fluorescently-labeled streptavidin to locate the anti-DMPO probe in excised cardiac tissues, which indicated elevated fluorescence only in cardiac muscle of mice administered the anti-DMPO probe. Oxidized lipids and proteins were also found to be significantly elevated (p < 0.05 for both) in diabetic cardiac muscle compared to controls. It can be concluded that diabetic mice have more heterogeneously distributed radicals in cardiac tissue than non-diabetic mice.

  9. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes.

  10. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  11. Protective Effects of Red Guava on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Cheng-Chin; Yin, Mei-Chin; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Tang, Feng-Yao; Chao, Che-Yi

    2015-12-12

    Diabetes is an important chronic disease and the 4th leading cause of death in Taiwan. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative and inflammatory damage are the main causes of chronic complications in diabetic patients. The red guava (red-fleshed guava cultivar of Psidium guajava L.) is a tropical fruit belonging to the Myrtaceae family and an important commercial crop in Taiwan. In this study, the protective effects of a diet containing red guava on inflammation and oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were examined. The experimental group was divided into seven subgroups: normal (N), diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetes + red guava 1% (L), 2% (M), and 5% (H), diabetes + 5% red guava + anti-diabetic rosiglitazone (HR), and diabetes + anti-diabetic rosiglitazone (R). The mice were fed for 8 weeks and sacrificed by decapitation. Compared with the DM group, the experimental groups with diets containing red guava as well as rosiglitazone all showed significant improvements in blood glucose control, insulin resistance, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids, cholesterol, c-reactive protein, TNF-α, and IL-10. Furthermore, the expression of inflammatory proteins, such as iNOS and NF-κB, was suppressed via activated PPARγ, and the expression levels of GPx3 and ACO increased. In summary, red guava can significantly suppress inflammatory and oxidative damage caused by diabetes and alleviate diabetic symptoms; thus, it exerts protective effects and has potential applications for the development of a dietary supplement.

  12. Protective Effects of MDG-1, a Polysaccharide from Ophiopogon japonicus on Diabetic Nephropathy in Diabetic KKAy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Shi, Lin-Lin; Wang, Ling-Yi; Xu, Jin-Wen; Feng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Ophiopogon japonicus is a traditional Chinese medicine that might be effective for treating type 2 diabetes. Recent research confirmed that MDG-1, a polysaccharide from O. japonicas, activates the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and improves insulin sensitivity in a diabetic KKAy mouse model, but little is known about its effects on diabetic nephropathy. In this study, KKAy mice were orally administered distilled water (control group), MDG-1, or rosiglitazone for 12 weeks. Blood glucose levels were tested every two weeks for the fed mice. At 6 and 12 weeks, blood samples were collected for biochemical examination. At the end of the experiment, all kidney tissues were collected for histological examination and western blot analysis. Results show that MDG-1 (300 mg/kg) significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, blood urine nitrogen and albumin, and significantly inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and connective tissue growth factor. Moreover, MDG-1 could alleviate glomerular mesangial expansion and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the diabetic mice, as confirmed by histopathological examination. These data indicated that MDG-1 ameliorates renal disease in diabetic mice by reducing hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperlipidemia, and by inhibiting intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:26393572

  13. Long-lasting anti-diabetic efficacy of PEGylated FGF-21 and liraglutide in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xianlong; Qi, Jianying; Ren, Guiping; Xu, Pengfei; Wu, Yunzhou; Zhu, Shenglong; Yu, Dan; Li, Shujie; Wu, Qiang; Muhi, Rasool Lubna; Li, Deshan

    2015-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) is a new member of the FGF family and potential drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, FGF-21 protein has short half-life in vivo, which severely affects its clinical application. In the present study, PEGylated FGF-21 was prepared by modifying the N-terminus of hFGF-21 with 20 kDa mPEG-ALD. The long-acting hypoglycemic effect of PEGylated FGF-21 and liraglutide was compared on type 2 diabetic db/db mice. The pharmacological efficacy of the compounds was evaluated by blood glucose levels, body weight, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, insulin levels, oral glucose tolerance test, lipid levels, and liver function parameters. We noticed that both PEGylated FGF-21 and liraglutide could significantly decrease plasma glucose in db/db mice. However, comparing to liraglutide treatments, PEGylated FGF-21 therapy resulted in more significant effect in lowering blood glucose levels and glycosylated hemoglobin levels, alleviating insulin resistance, improving lipid profile, liver function, and glucose control of the experimental mice. Our results suggest that PEGylated FGF-21 appears more beneficial anti-diabetic effect in type 2 diabetic mice than liraglutide, which holds significant promise as an ideal candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients.

  14. Acute Versus Progressive Onset of Diabetes in NOD Mice: Potential Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Clayton E; Xue, Song; Posgai, Amanda; Lightfoot, Yaima L; Li, Xia; Lin, Andrea; Wasserfall, Clive; Haller, Michael J; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    Most natural history models for type 1 diabetes (T1D) propose that overt hyperglycemia results after a progressive loss of insulin-secreting β-cell mass and/or function. To experimentally address this concept, we prospectively determined morning blood glucose measurements every other day in multiple cohorts (total n = 660) of female NOD/ShiLtJ mice starting at 8 weeks of age until diabetes onset or 26 weeks of age. Consistent with this notion, a majority of mice that developed diabetes (354 of 489 [72%]) displayed a progressive increase in blood glucose with transient excursions >200 mg/dL, followed by acute and persistent hyperglycemia at diabetes onset. However, 135 of the 489 (28%) diabetic animals demonstrated normal glucose values followed by acute (i.e., sudden) hyperglycemia. Interestingly, diabetes onset occurred earlier in mice with acute versus progressive disease onset (15.37 ± 0.3207 vs. 17.44 ± 0.2073 weeks of age, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the pattern of onset (i.e., progressive vs. acute) dramatically influenced the ability to achieve reversal of T1D by immunotherapeutic intervention, with increased effectiveness observed in situations of a progressive deterioration in euglycemia. These studies highlight a novel natural history aspect in this animal model, one that may provide important guidance for the selection of subjects participating in human trials seeking disease reversal.

  15. Cilostazol improves the response to ischemia in diabetic mice by a mechanism dependent on PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, Federico; Pecorini, Giovanni; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Angelini, Flavia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Flex, Andrea

    2013-12-05

    Cilostazol is effective for the treatment of peripheral ischemia. This compound has several beneficial effects on platelet aggregation, serum lipids and endothelial cells, and we recently found that it enhances collateral blood flow in the ischemic hind limbs of mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, a receptor for thiazolidinediones, plays a role in angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms and effects of cilostazol in a model of peripheral ischemia in diabetic mice. We induced diabetes in mice by streptozotocin (STZ) administration and studied ischemia-induced angiogenesis in the ischemic hind limbs of cilostazol-treated and untreated control mice. We found that perfusion recovery was significantly improved in treated compared with control diabetic mice. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PPARγ is reduced in ischemic tissues of diabetic mice. Furthermore, we discovered that local inhibition of the activity of this nuclear receptor decreased the angiogenic response to cilostazol treatment. Finally, we noted that this phenomenon is dependent on VEGF and modulated by PPARγ. Cilostazol administration enhances collateral blood flow in the ischemic hind limbs of STZ-induced diabetic mice through a PPARγ-dependent mechanism.

  16. VEGF-B promotes recovery of corneal innervations and trophic functions in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guohu; Zhao, Xiaowen; Qi, Xia; Zhang, Songmei; Feng, Lu; Shi, Weiyun; Zhou, Qingjun

    2017-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B possesses the capacity of promoting injured peripheral nerve regeneration and restore their sensory and trophic functions. However, the contribution and mechanism of VEGF-B in diabetic peripheral neuropathy remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expression and role of VEGF-B in diabetic corneal neuropathy by using type 1 diabetic mice and cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. Hyperglycemia attenuated the endogenous expression of VEGF-B in regenerated diabetic corneal epithelium, but not that of VEGF receptors in diabetic TG neurons and axons. Exogenous VEGF-B promoted diabetic corneal nerve fiber regeneration through the reactivation of PI-3K/Akt-GSK3β-mTOR signaling and the attenuation of neuronal mitochondria dysfunction via the VEGF receptor-1 and neuropilin-1. Moreover, VEGF-B improved corneal sensation and epithelial regeneration in both normal and diabetic mice, accompanied with the elevated corneal content of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF). PEDF blockade partially abolished trophic function of VEGF-B in diabetic corneal re-innervation. In conclusion, hyperglycemia suppressed endogenous VEGF-B expression in regenerated corneal epithelium of diabetic mice, while exogenous VEGF-B promoted recovery of corneal innervations and trophic functions through reactivating PI-3K/Akt-GSK-3β-mTOR signaling, attenuating neuronal oxidative stress and elevating PEDF expression. PMID:28091556

  17. (-)-Epicatechin-3-O-β-D-allopyranoside from Davallia formosana prevents diabetes and dyslipidemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin; Jian, Jia-Ying; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects and molecular mechanism of (-)-epicatechin-3-O-β-D-allopyranoside from Davallia formosana (BB) (also known as Gu-Sui-Bu) on type 1 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. This plant was demonstrated to display antioxidant activities and possess polyphenol contents. Diabetic mice were randomly divided into six groups and were given daily oral gavage doses of either BB (at three dosage levels), metformin (Metf) (at 0.3 g/kg body weight), fenofibrate (Feno) (at 0.25 g/kg body weight) or vehicle (distilled water) and a group of control (CON) mice were gavaged with vehicle over a period of 4 weeks. Treatment with BB led to reduced levels of blood glucose, HbA1C, triglycerides and leptin and to increased levels of insulin and adiponectin compared with the vehicle-treated STZ group. The diabetic islets showed retraction from their classic round-shaped as compared with the control islets. The BB-treated groups (at middle and high dosages) showed improvement in islets size and number of Langerhans islet cells. The membrane levels of skeletal muscular glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were significantly higher in BB-treated mice. This resulted in a net glucose lowering effect among BB-treated mice. Moreover, BB enhanced the expression of skeletal muscle phospho-AMPK in treated mice. BB-treated mice increased expression of fatty acid oxidation enzymes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase Ia (CPT1a). These mice also expressed lower levels of lipogenic genes such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), as well as lower mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and liver adipocyte fatty acid binding protein 2 (aP2). This resulted in a reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. BB-treated mice also expressed lower levels of PPARγ and FAS protein. This led to reduced adipogenesis, fatty acid

  18. Influence of Two Different Fluences on Laser Photobiomodulation of Wound Healing in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplow, Philip V.; Chung, Tzu-Yun; Baxter, G. David

    2011-08-01

    Background: Laser irradiation of wounds in mice and rats was shown in previous studies to stimulate healing but in almost all the studies the wounds were not covered. Purpose: To compare the healing of covered wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice and the effect of laser irradiation 660 nm at two different fluences (energy densities). Method: A single wound 5-mm diameter was made on the left flank of forty-seven diabetic and twenty nondiabetic mice and covered with Tegaderm HP dressing (day 1). Wounds were irradiated 660 nm 20 s using a low power (18 mW) or high power (80 mW) laser starting immediately post-wounding for 7 consecutive days, with non-irradiated wounds as controls. Mice were euthanized on day 8, 10 or 14. Wound specimens were cut and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and examined by light microscopy. Results: Wound healing was impaired in diabetic mice. Tegaderm HP dressing had retarded contraction in a large proportion of diabetic mice (splinted the wounds) and to a lesser extent in nondiabetic mice. Healing of splinted wounds was delayed compared to unsplinted wounds, but laser irradiation at high power stimulated healing by re-epithelization and granulation tissue formation. The fluence of low power laser was estimated to be about 1 J/cm2, while that of the high power laser was 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2. Conclusion: Laser irradiation of wounds 660 nm with 1 J/cm2 had little effect on healing of wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice, whereas irradiation with 3.7 to 5.0 J/cm2 stimulated healing of wounds in diabetic mice most of which were splinted by the dressing.

  19. Antidiabetic efficacy of bradykinin antagonist R-954 on glucose tolerance test in diabetic type 1 mice.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Orlando L; Dziubecki, Damian; Obregon, Pablo; Rodriguez, Ricardo R; Sirois, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease associated with many complications including nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy and hyperalgesia. Experimental evidence has shown that the bradykinin B1 receptor (BKB1-R) is involved in the development of type 1 diabetes and found to be upregulated alongside the disease. In the present study the effects of the selective BKB1-R antagonist the R-954 (Ac-Orn-[Oic(2), alpha-MePhe(5), D-beta Nal(7), Ile(8) ]des-Arg(9)-BK and the BKB1-R agonist des Arg(9)-BK (DBK) were studied on diabetic hyperglycemia. Diabetic type 1 was induced in C57 BL/KsJ mdb male mice by five consecutives doses of STZ (45mg/kg i.p.). A glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed by an intraperitoneal administration of glucose, 8, 12 and 18days after the diabetes induction. The induction of type 1 diabetes provoked a significant hyperglycemia levels in diabetic mice at 12 and 18days after STZ. The administration of R-954 (400microg/kg i.p.) at 12 and 18days after STZ returned the glycemia levels of this animals to normal values. In addition the administration of DKB (300microg/kg i.p.) significantly potentiated the diabetes-induced hyperglycemia; this effect that was totally reversed by R-954. These results provide further evidence for the implication of BKB1-R in the type 1 diabetes mellitus (insulitis).

  20. Hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in streptozotocin diabetic mice: inhibition of gluconeogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D.L.; Griffith, O.W.

    1986-05-01

    DL-Aminocarnitine and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine are potent, non-covalent inhibitors of carnitine palmitoyl transferase. In both diabetic and non-diabetic fasted mice, DL-aminocarnitine (0.3 mmol/kg) and palmitoyl-DL-aminocarnitine (0.1 mmol/kg) decrease the blood concentration of ketone bodies to levels observed in fed control mice. Both carnitine palmitoyltransferase inhibitors also normalize plasma glucose levels in diabetic mice. The hypoglycemic effect is maximal at 8 hours, the continues for at least 12 hours. In the present studies the authors have used (/sup 14/C)alanine, a pyruvate precursor, to prove the effect of aminocarnitine on gluconeogenesis. Diabetic mice given L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanine (1 mmol/kg) by intraperitoneal injection convert 10-15% of the administered dose to (/sup 14/C)glucose after 10 min; less than 0.1% of the radioactivity is recovered in glycogen. If 0.3 mmol/kg aminocarnitine is given subcutaneously 1 hr prior to giving (/sup 14/C)analine, the radioactivity recovered in plasma glucose is reduced by approximately 40%. The authors conclude that the hypoglycemic effect of DL-aminocarnitine in diabetic mice is due, at least in part, to inhibition of gluconeogenesis. The possibility that aminocarnitine also stimulates glucose utilization in diabetic animals is not excluded.

  1. Promotion of wound collagen formation in normal and diabetic mice by quadrol.

    PubMed

    Bhide, M V; Dunphy, M J; Mirkopulos, N; Smith, D J

    1988-01-01

    The rate of collagen deposition in implanted polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubing in non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic mice was measured during 14 days post-wounding. At the time of implantation, test groups received injections of either Quadrol [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine], glucan, or buffer in an area adjacent to the wound site. The accumulation of collagen in the implants of Quadrol-treated non-diabetic animals was more than 200% above control on days 8 to 11 and was 50% above control on day 14. In Quadrol-treated STZ-diabetic mice, the collagen accumulation gradually increased from 50% above control on day 8 to 200% above control on day 14. Treatment with glucan increased the collagen accumulation in normal mice 200 to 300% above control from days 8 to 11 respectively and then 30% above control on day 14. Collagen accumulation in the implants of the glucan-treated STZ-diabetic mice was similar to the control group. These results indicate that Quadrol promotes in vivo collagen synthesis and that Quadrol may be effective as a stimulator of wound healing in diabetic and non-diabetic animals.

  2. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Reza B.; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T.; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L.; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory / regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26765526

  3. Fibroblast Cell-Based Therapy for Experimental Autoimmune Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Reza B; Zhang, Yun; Hosseini-Tabatabaei, Azadeh; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Khosravi Maharlooei, Mohsen; Li, Yunyuan; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Warnock, Garth L; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from autoimmune destruction of insulin producing β cells of the pancreatic islets. Curbing autoimmunity at the initiation of T1D can result in recovery of residual β cells and consequently remission of diabetes. Here we report a cell-based therapy for autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using dermal fibroblasts. This was achieved by a single injection of fibroblasts, expressing the immunoregulatory molecule indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), into peritoneal cavity of NOD mice shortly after the onset of overt hyperglycemia. Mice were then monitored for reversal of hyperglycemia and changes in inflammatory/regulatory T cell profiles. Blood glucose levels dropped into the normal range in 82% of NOD mice after receiving IDO-expressing fibroblasts while all control mice remained diabetic. We found significantly reduced islet inflammation, increased regulatory T cells, and decreased T helper 17 cells and β cell specific autoreactive CD8+ T cells following IDO cell therapy. We further showed that some of intraperitoneal injected fibroblasts migrated to local lymph nodes and expressed co-inhibitory molecules. These findings suggest that IDO fibroblasts therapy can reinstate self-tolerance and alleviate β cell autoreactivity in NOD mice, resulting in remission of autoimmune diabetes.

  4. Antihyperglycemic Effect of Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fenglin; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Zhijian

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the glucose-lowering effect of ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The diabetic mice were randomly divided into four groups (8 mice per group): diabetic control group, low-dose Gl-PS treated group (50 mg/kg, Gl-PS), high-dose Gl-PS treated group (150 mg/kg, Gl-PS) and positive drug control treated group (glibenclamide, 4 mg/kg), with normal mice used as the control group. Body weights, fasting blood glucose (FBG), serum insulin and blood lipid levels of mice were measured. After 28 days of treatment with Gl-PS, body weights and serum insulin levels of the Gl-PS treated groups was significantly higher than that of the diabetic control group, whereas FBG levels was significantly lower. Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of the Gl-PS treated groups had dropped, whereas the high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels had increased. In addition, according to acute toxicity studies, Gl-PS did not cause behavioral changes and any death of mice. These data suggest that Gl-PS has an antihyperglycemic effect. Furthermore, considering the Gl-PS effects on lipid profile, it may be a potential hypolipidaemic agent, which will be a great advantage in treating diabetic conditions associated with atherosclerosis or hyperlipidemia. PMID:22016649

  5. Tubular overexpression of Gremlin in transgenic mice aggravates renal damage in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Vanessa; Droguett, Alejandra; Valderrama, Graciela; Burgos, M Eugenia; Carpio, Daniel; Kerr, Bredford; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesús; Mezzano, Sergio

    2015-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is currently a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Gremlin was identified as a gene differentially expressed in mesangial cells exposed to high glucose and in experimental diabetic kidneys. We have described that Gremlin is highly expressed in biopsies from patients with diabetic nephropathy, predominantly in areas of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetes, Gremlin deletion using Grem1 heterozygous knockout mice or by gene silencing, ameliorates renal damage. To study the in vivo role of Gremlin in renal damage, we developed a diabetic model induced by STZ in transgenic (TG) mice expressing human Gremlin in proximal tubular epithelial cells. The albuminuria/creatinuria ratio, determined at week 20 after treatment, was significantly increased in diabetic mice but with no significant differences between transgenic (TG/STZ) and wild-type mice (WT/STZ). To assess the level of renal damage, kidney tissue was analyzed by light microscopy (periodic acid-Schiff and Masson staining), electron microscopy, and quantitative PCR. TG/STZ mice had significantly greater thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, increased mesangial matrix, and podocytopenia vs. WT/STZ. At the tubulointerstitial level, TG/STZ showed increased cell infiltration and mild interstitial fibrosis. In addition, we observed a decreased expression of podocin and overexpression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and fibrotic-related markers, including transforming growth factor-β1, Col1a1, and α-smooth muscle actin. Together, these results show that TG mice overexpressing Gremlin in renal tubules develop greater glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in response to diabetic-mediated damage and support the involvement of Gremlin in diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Chromium, selenium, and zinc multimineral enriched yeast supplementation ameliorates diabetes symptom in streptozocin-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Bao, Wei; Jiang, Man; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiping; Liu, Liegang

    2012-05-01

    Chromium, selenium, and zinc malnutrition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic mellitus. This study aims to investigate the effects of novel multiminerals-enriched yeast (MMEY) which are minerals supplementation containing elevated levels of chromium, selenium, and zinc simultaneously in a diabetic animal model. Streptozocin-induced diabetic male Balb/c mice (n = 80) were randomly divided into diabetes control group and three treatment groups. They were administrated oral gavages with low, medium, or high doses of MMEY, respectively. Meanwhile, healthy male Balb/c mice (n = 40) of the same body weight were randomly assigned into normal control group and high dose of MMEY control group. After 8 weeks duration of treatment, the animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Serum glucose concentrations, lipid profiles, oxidative/antioxidant, and immunity status were determined. No significant adverse effects were observed in the high-dose MMEY control group. Treatment of the diabetic mice with medium- or high-dose MMEY significantly decreased serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and malondialdehyde and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glutathione, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, MMEY ameliorated the pathological damage of the pancreatic islets, elevated the thymus or spleen coefficient, and increased the expressions of interleukin-2 and -4 in spleen lymphocytes compared with unsupplemented diabetic mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that supplemental MMEY inhibits hyperglycemia, abates oxidative stress, modulates disorders of lipid metabolism, and reduces the impairment of immune function in diabetic mice; especially notable are the protective effects of medium doses of MMEY on the islet cells of diabetic mice.

  7. Inner Retinal Oxygen Delivery, Metabolism, and Extraction Fraction in Ins2Akita Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Norman P.; Wanek, Justin; Felder, Anthony E.; Brewer, Katherine C.; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal nonperfusion and hypoxia are important factors in human diabetic retinopathy, and these presumably inhibit energy production and lead to cell death. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of diabetes on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in a mouse model of diabetes. Methods Phosphorescence lifetime and blood flow imaging were performed in spontaneously diabetic Ins2Akita (n = 22) and nondiabetic (n = 22) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age to measure retinal arterial (O2A) and venous (O2V) oxygen contents and total retinal blood flow (F). Inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and metabolism (MO2) were calculated as F ∗ O2A and F ∗ (O2A − O2V), respectively. Oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which equals MO2/DO2, was calculated. Results DO2 at 12 weeks were 112 ± 40 and 97 ± 29 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively (NS), and 148 ± 31 and 85 ± 37 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (P < 0.001). MO2 were 65 ± 31 and 66 ± 27 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice at 12 weeks, respectively, and 79 ± 14 and 54 ± 28 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (main effects = NS). At 12 weeks OEF were 0.57 ± 0.17 and 0.67 ± 0.09 in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively, and 0.54 ± 0.07 and 0.63 ± 0.08 at 24 weeks, respectively (main effect of diabetes: P < 0.01). Conclusions Inner retinal MO2 was maintained in diabetic Akita mice indicating that elevation of the OEF adequately compensated for reduced DO2 and prevented oxidative metabolism from being limited by hypoxia. PMID:27802520

  8. T helper 2 (Th2) T cells induce acute pancreatitis and diabetes in immune-compromised nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice.

    PubMed

    Pakala, S V; Kurrer, M O; Katz, J D

    1997-07-21

    Autoimmune diabetes is caused by the CD4(+), T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated apoptosis of insulin-producing beta cells. We have previously shown that Th2 T cells bearing the same T cell receptor (TCR) as the diabetogenic Th1 T cells invade islets in neonatal nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice but fail to cause disease. Moreover, when mixed in excess and cotransferred with Th1 T cells, Th2 T cells could not protect NOD neonates from Th1-mediated diabetes. We have now found, to our great surprise, the same Th2 T cells that produced a harmless insulitis in neonatal NOD mice produced intense and generalized pancreatitis and insulitis associated with islet cell necrosis, abscess formation, and subsequent diabetes when transferred into immunocompromised NOD.scid mice. These lesions resembled allergic inflamation and contained a large eosinophilic infiltrate. Moreover, the Th2-mediated destruction of islet cells was mediated by local interleukin-10 (IL-10) production but not by IL-4. These findings indicate that under certain conditions Th2 T cells may not produce a benign or protective insulitis but rather acute pathology and disease. Additionally, these results lead us to question the feasibility of Th2-based therapy in type I diabetes, especially in immunosuppressed recipients of islet cell transplants.

  9. Carnosine Attenuates the Development of both Type 2 Diabetes and Diabetic Nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Thomas; Schilperoort, Maaike; Zhang, Shiqi; Braun, Jana D.; Qiu, Jiedong; Rodriguez, Angelica; Pastene, Diego O.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Köppel, Hannes; Baelde, Hans; de Heer, Emile; Anna Altomare, Alessandra; Regazzoni, Luca; Denisi, Alessandra; Aldini, Giancarlo; van den Born, Jacob; Yard, Benito A.; Hauske, Sibylle J.

    2017-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that polymorphisms in the carnosinase-1 gene (CNDP1) determine the risk of nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Carnosine, the substrate of the enzyme encoded by this gene, is considered renoprotective and could possibly be used to treat diabetic nephropathy (DN). In this study, we examined the effect of carnosine treatment in vivo in BTBR (Black and Tan, BRachyuric) ob/ob mice, a type 2 diabetes model which develops a phenotype that closely resembles advanced human DN. Treatment of BTBR ob/ob mice with 4 mM carnosine for 18 weeks reduced plasma glucose and HbA1c, concomitant with elevated insulin and C-peptide levels. Also, albuminuria and kidney weights were reduced in carnosine-treated mice, which showed less glomerular hypertrophy due to a decrease in the surface area of Bowman’s capsule and space. Carnosine treatment restored the glomerular ultrastructure without affecting podocyte number, resulted in a modified molecular composition of the expanded mesangial matrix and led to the formation of carnosine-acrolein adducts. Our results demonstrate that treatment with carnosine improves glucose metabolism, albuminuria and pathology in BTBR ob/ob mice. Hence, carnosine could be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat patients with DN and/or be used to prevent DN in patients with diabetes. PMID:28281693

  10. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract on glucose-regulating mechanism in type 2 diabetic mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study is to determine the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against type 2 diabetes induced by a high fat diet administered to mice. Dietary administration of 0.5% or 1% RHSE for 7 weeks results in significantly reduced blood glucose and triglyceride and to...

  11. Metabolic profile changes in the testes of mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mallidis, C; Green, B D; Rogers, D; Agbaje, I M; Hollis, J; Migaud, M; Amigues, E; McClure, N; Browne, R A

    2009-04-01

    Contrary to the traditional view, recent studies suggest that diabetes mellitus has an adverse influence on male reproductive function. Our aim was to determine the effect of diabetes on the testicular environment by identifying and then assessing perturbations in small molecule metabolites. Testes were obtained from control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice, 2, 4 and 8 weeks post-treatment. Diabetic status was confirmed by glycated haemoglobin, non-fasting blood glucose, physiological condition and body weight. A novel extraction procedure was utilized to obtain protein free, low-molecular weight, water soluble extracts which were then assessed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Principal component analysis of the derived profiles was used to classify any variations, and specific metabolites were identified based on their spectral pattern. Characteristic metabolite profiles were identified for control and type 1 diabetic animals with the most distinctive being from mice with the largest physical deterioration and loss of body weight. Eight streptozotocin-treated animals did not develop diabetes and displayed profiles similar to controls. Diabetic mice had decreases in creatine, choline and carnitine and increases in lactate, alanine and myo-inositol. Betaine levels were found to be increased in the majority of diabetic mice but decreased in a few animals with severe loss of body weight and physical condition. The association between perturbations in a number of small molecule metabolites known to be influential in sperm function, with diabetic status and physiological condition, adds further impetus to the proposal that diabetes influences important spermatogenic pathways and mechanisms in a subtle and previously unrecognized manner.

  12. Anti-diabetic activity of cassava cross-linked octenyl succinic maltodextrin in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Maoqiang; Wang, Yingyao; Zhang, Ying; Qian, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Xiguang

    2014-03-01

    The effect of cassava cross-linked octenyl succinic maltodextrin (CCOMD) on diabetic mice was investigated in this study. For CCOMD-L (low dose) and CCOMD-H (high dose) groups, the body weights were recovered by 14.9% and 18.5%, respectively, which were significantly higher than that of model control group. It was also found that the blood glucose and insulin levels were ameliorated in the diabetic mice by the CCOMD diet. Moreover, the CCOMD diet decreased the plasma total cholesterol level (8.1-9.1%) and LDL cholesterol level (28.9-39.4%), and improved the plasma HDL cholesterol level (13.8-15.3%) and intestine short chain fatty acid content. The results indicated that CCOMD administration may be helpful for treating and preventing hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in diabetes.

  13. Alpha1-antitrypsin gene therapy modulates cellular immunity and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Tang, Mei; Wasserfall, Clive; Kou, Zhongchen; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Gardemann, Thomas; Crawford, James; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2006-06-01

    An imbalance of the immune-regulatory pathways plays an important role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Therefore, immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory strategies hold great potential for the prevention of this autoimmune disease. Studies have demonstrated that two serine proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and elafin, act as potent antiinflammatory agents. In the present study, we sought to develop an efficient gene therapy approach to prevent type 1 diabetes. Cohorts of 4-week-old female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were injected intramuscularly with rAAV1-CB-hAAT, rAAV1-CB-hElafin, or saline. AAV1 vector mediated sustained high levels of transgene expression, sufficient to overcome a humoral immune response against hAAT. AAT gene therapy, contrary to elafin and saline, was remarkably effective in preventing type 1 diabetes. T cell receptor spectratyping indicated that AAT gene therapy altered T cell repertoire diversity in splenocytes from NOD mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that AAT gene therapy attenuated cellular immunity associated with beta cell destruction. This study demonstrates that AAT gene therapy attenuates cell-mediated autoimmunity, alters the T cell receptor repertoire, and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that rAAV1-mediated AAT gene therapy may be useful as a novel approach to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  14. Urtica dioica modulates hippocampal insulin signaling and recognition memory deficit in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Gupta, Sahil; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been associated with functional abnormalities in the hippocampus and performance of cognitive function. Urtica dioica (UD) has been used in the treatment of diabetes. In our previous report we observed that UD extract attenuate diabetes mediated associative and spatial memory dysfunction. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of UD extract on mouse model of diabetes-induced recognition memory deficit and explore the possible mechanism behind it. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p. consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (ROSI) (5 mg/kg, oral) administration for 8 weeks. STZ induced diabetic mice showed significant decrease in hippocampal insulin signaling and translocation of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) to neuronal membrane resulting in cognitive dysfunction and hypolocomotion. UD treatment effectively improved hippocampal insulin signaling, glucose tolerance and recognition memory performance in diabetic mice, which was comparable to ROSI. Further, diabetes mediated oxidative stress and inflammation was reversed by chronic UD or ROSI administration. UD leaves extract acts via insulin signaling pathway and might prove to be effective for the diabetes mediated central nervous system complications.

  15. Endothelial-myofibroblast transition contributes to the early development of diabetic renal interstitial fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Qu, Xinli; Bertram, John F

    2009-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic renal failure. Myofibroblasts play a major role in the synthesis and secretion of extracellular matrix in diabetic renal fibrosis. Increasing evidence suggests that endothelial cells may undergo endothelial-myofibroblast transition under physiological and pathophysiological circumstances. Therefore, this study investigates whether endothelial-myofibroblast transition occurs and contributes to the development of diabetic renal interstitial fibrosis. Diabetes was induced by administration of streptozotocin to Tie2-Cre;LoxP-EGFP mice, an endothelial lineage-traceable mouse line generated by crossbreeding B6.Cg-Tg(Tek-cre)12F1v/J mice with B6.Cg-Tg(ACTB-Bgeo/GFP)21Lbe/J mice. The endothelial-myofibroblast transition was also studied in MMECs (a mouse pancreatic microvascular endothelial cell line) and primary cultures of CD31+/EYFP- (enhanced yellow fluorescent protein) endothelial cells isolated from adult normal alpha-smooth muscle actin promoter-driven-EYFP (alpha-SMA/EYFP) mouse kidneys. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that 10.4 +/- 4.2 and 23.5 +/- 7.4% of renal interstitial myofibroblasts (alpha-SMA+) in 1- and 6-month streptozotocin-induced diabetic kidneys were of endothelial origin (EGFP+/alpha-SMA+ cells), compared with just 0.2 +/- 0.1% of myofibroblasts in vehicle-treated Tie2-Cre;LoxP-EGFP mice (P < 0.01). Confocal microscopy and real-time PCR showed that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 induced de novo expression of alpha-SMA and loss of expression of VE-cadherin and CD31 in MMECs and primary cultures of renal endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. These findings demonstrate that the endothelial-myofibroblast transition occurs and contributes to the early development and progression of diabetic renal interstitial fibrosis and suggest that the endothelial-myofibroblast transition may be a therapeutic target.

  16. Toward Testing the Hypothesis that Group B Coxsackieviruses (CVB) Trigger Insulin-Dependent Diabetes: Inoculating Nonobese Diabetic Mice with CVB Markedly Lowers Diabetes Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, S.; Drescher, K. M.; Chapman, N. M.; Kim, K.-S.; Carson, S. D.; Pirruccello, S.; Lane, P. H.; Romero, J. R.; Leser, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus (T1D) onset is mediated by individual human genetics as well as undefined environmental influences such as viral infections. The group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) are commonly named as putative T1D-inducing agents. We studied CVB replication in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice to assess how infection by diverse CVB strains affected T1D incidence in a model of human T1D. Inoculation of 4- or 8-week-old NOD mice with any of nine different CVB strains significantly reduced the incidence of T1D by 2- to 10-fold over a 10-month period relative to T1D incidences in mock-infected control mice. Greater protection was conferred by more-pathogenic CVB strains relative to less-virulent or avirulent strains. Two CVB3 strains were employed to further explore the relationship of CVB virulence phenotypes to T1D onset and incidence: a pathogenic strain (CVB3/M) and a nonvirulent strain (CVB3/GA). CVB3/M replicated to four- to fivefold-higher titers than CVB3/GA in the pancreas and induced widespread pancreatitis, whereas CVB3/GA induced no pancreatitis. Apoptotic nuclei were detected by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) assay in CVB3/M-infected pancreata but not in CVB3/GA-infected pancreata. In situ hybridization detected CVB3 RNA in acinar tissue but not in pancreatic islets. Although islets demonstrated inflammatory infiltrates in CVB3-protected mice, insulin remained detectable by immunohistochemistry in these islets but not in those from diabetic mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based examination of murine sera for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2a immunoreactivity against diabetic autoantigens insulin and HSP60 revealed no statistically significant relationship between CVB3-protected mice or diabetic mice and specific autoimmunity. However, when pooled sera from CVB3/M-protected mice were used to probe a Western blot of pancreatic proteins, numerous proteins were detected, whereas

  17. Berberine ameliorates hyperglycemia in alloxan-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice through activation of Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Li, Wenyuan; Lan, Tian; Liu, Weihua; Peng, Jing; Huang, Kaipeng; Huang, Juan; Shen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it is implicated that the abnormality of Akt signaling pathway is involved in the diabetic pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that berberine could decrease blood glucose by elevating liver glycogen synthesis. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of berberine on fasting blood glucose, liver glycogen, Akt, Glycogen synthase kinase-3, glucokinase and insulin receptor substrate (IRS) in alloxan-induced diabetic mice, exploring its possible hypoglycemic mechanism. We found that in alloxan-induced diabetic mice, the high blood glucose was significantly lowered by berberine treatment. Liver glycogen content, the expression and activity of glucokinase and the phosphorylated Akt and IRS were all significantly reduced in diabetic mice whereas berberine blocked these changes. Berberine also depressed the increasing of phosphorylated GSK-3β in diabetic mice. Collectively, Berberine upregulates the activity of Akt possibly via insulin signaling pathway, eventually lowering high blood glucose in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  18. Gemigliptin improves renal function and attenuates podocyte injury in mice with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsoo; Kim, Junghyun; Ho Kim, Sung; Kim, Sanghwa; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-08-15

    Podocytes participate in the formation and regulation of the glomerular filtration barrier. Loss of podocytes occurs during the early stages of diabetic nephropathy and impairs glomerular filtration. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are widely used as anti-diabetic agents in clinical practice. In this study, we showed that gemigliptin, a novel DPP-4 inhibitor, reduced podocyte apoptosis in type 2 diabetic db/db mice without reducing hyperglycemia. Gemigliptin (100mg/kg/day) was administered orally for 12 weeks in db/db mice. Blood glucose levels and albuminuria were measured. The renal cortex was collected for histological examination, and molecular assays were used to detect 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Type 2 diabetic db/db mice exhibited albuminuria, renal histopathological changes, and podocyte loss. Administration of gemigliptin to db/db mice suppressed albuminuria, enzyme activity and expression of DPP-4, and podocyte apoptosis. The effect of gemigliptin on diabetes-induced podocyte loss was associated with the suppression of oxidative damage, AOPP accumulation, RAGE expression, and ILK expression. These results indicate the possible benefits of using gemigliptin in diabetes patients to treat renal impairment without affecting glycemic control.

  19. Autoimmunity and the highway to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Price, P

    1997-02-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an immunopathological condition involving loss of beta cell function, but views of how this arises are confusing and contradictory. For example, studies with non-obese diabetic mice implicate abnormal cytokine production in disease pathogenesis, but give little insight into how this arises. Many genetic and environmental risk factors have been described, but no single factor predicts the development of disease. Moreover, the prevalence of auto-antibodies suggests an autoimmune aetiology, but no antigen is recognized by all individuals. As an aid to understanding how IDDM develops, this review considers the risk factors as distinct starting points on a journey, and reviews current literature in search of the point where the roads from each origin merge into a highway to diabetes.

  20. Pregnancy Represses Induction of Efflux Transporters in Livers of Type I Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Xu, Jialin; Lin, Eugenia; Wen, Xia; Goedken, Michael J.; Slitt, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether down-regulation of transcription factor signaling during pregnancy disrupts the induction of efflux transporters in type I diabetic mice. Methods Type I diabetes was induced in female C57BL/6 mice with multiple low dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at least 2 weeks prior to mating with normoglycemic male mice. On gestation day 14, livers were collected from vehicle- and STZ-treated non-pregnant and pregnant mice for quantification of efflux transporter and transcription factor signaling. Results STZ treatment up-regulated expression of Mrp1–5, Mdr1, Abcg5, Abcg8, Bcrp, and Bsep mRNA and/or protein in the livers of non-pregnant mice. Interestingly, little to no change in transporter expression was observed in STZ-treated mice that became pregnant. Enhanced PPARγ, Nrf2, and FXR transcription factor signaling, as quantified by nuclear binding and target gene regulation, was also observed in non-pregnant mice treated with STZ. Similar to efflux transporter expression, activation of these transcriptional pathways was diminished by pregnancy in STZ-treated mice. Conclusions This study demonstrates the opposing regulation of hepatobiliary efflux transporters in response to diabetes and pregnancy and points to PPARγ, Nrf2, and FXR as candidate pathways underlying the differential expression of transporters. PMID:23319174

  1. Experimental transmission of systemic AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Mayuko; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a protein misfolding disease characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils. AA amyloidosis has been identified in food animals, and it has been postulated that AA amyloidosis may be transmissible to different animal species. Since the precursor protein of AA fibrils is serum amyloid A (SAA), which is an inflammatory acute phase protein, AA amyloidosis is considered to be associated with inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Chronic diseases such as autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus could be potential factors for AA amyloidosis. In this study, to examine the relationship between the induction of AA amyloidosis and chromic abnormalities such as autoimmune disease or type 2 diabetes mellitus, amyloid fibrils from mice, cattle, or chickens were experimentally injected into disease model mice. Wild-type mice were used as controls. The concentrations of SAA, IL-6, and IL-10 in autoimmune disease model mice were higher than those of control mice. However, induction of AA amyloidosis in autoimmune disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus model mice was lower than that in control mice, and the amount of amyloid deposits in the spleens of both mouse models was lower than that of control mice according to Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that factors other than SAA levels, such as an inflammatory or anti-inflammatory environment in the immune response, may be involved in amyloid deposition. PMID:27321428

  2. Calpain 1 cleaves and inactivates prostacyclin synthase in mesenteric arteries from diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Kyselova, Anastasia; Elgheznawy, Amro; Zukunft, Sven; Wittig, Ilka; Fleming, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a number of co-morbidities including an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The activation of Ca(2+)-activated proteases of the calpain family has been implicated in platelet activation associated with diabetes and this study aimed to determine the role of calpain activation in the development of endothelial dysfunction. Diabetes induction in mice attenuated acetylcholine-induced relaxation of mesenteric artery rings, an effect prevented in mice receiving a calpain inhibitor. A nitric oxide-independent but diclofenac-sensitive component of the relaxation-response was altered and correlated with a loss of prostacyclin (PGI2) generation and reduced vascular levels of PGI2 synthase. Calpain inhibition was also able to restore PGI2 synthase levels and PGI2 generation in arteries from diabetic animals. The effects of diabetes were reproduced in vitro by a combination of high glucose and palmitate, which elicited calpain activation, PGI2 synthase cleavage and inactivation as well as endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice. PGI2 cleavage was not observed in arteries from calpain 1(-/-) mice or mice overexpressing the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin. Finally, proteomic analyses revealed that calpain 1 cleaved the C-terminal domain of PGI2 synthase close to the catalytic site of the enzyme. These data demonstrate that diabetes leads to the activation of calpain 1 in mesenteric arteries and can initiate endothelial dysfunction by cleaving and inactivating the PGI2 synthase. Given that calpain inhibition prevented diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric arteries, calpains represent an interesting therapeutic target for the prevention of cardiovascular complication of diabetes.

  3. Intranasal delivery of nanomicelle curcumin promotes corneal epithelial wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuanlong; Li, Mengshuang; Qi, Xia; Lin, Guiming; Cui, Fenghua; Li, Fengjie; Wu, Xianggen

    2016-07-11

    Corneal nerves are mainly derived from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal ganglion (TG). Corneal neuropathy contributes to epithelial degenerative changes in diabetic keratopathy. Efficient drug delivery to TG may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetic keratopathy. This article described intranasal delivery of nanomicelle curcumin to correct pathophysiological conditions in TG to promote corneal epithelial/nerve wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A diabetic mice model with corneal epithelium abrasion was established. Ocular topical and/or intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatments were performed, and treatment efficacy and mechanisms of action were explored. Results showed that intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatment promoted corneal epithelial wound healing and recovery of corneal sensation. Enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species, reduced free radical scavengers, increased mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased mRNA expressions of neurotrophic factors in the cornea and TG neuron were observed in diabetic mice with corneal epithelium abrasions. Intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatment effectively recovered these pathophysiological conditions, especially that of the TG neuron, and a strengthened recovery was observed with ocular topical combined with intranasal treatment. These findings indicated that intranasal curcumin treatment effectively helped promote diabetic corneal epithelial/nerve wound healing. This novel treatment might be a promising strengthened therapy for diabetic keratopathy.

  4. Saturated fatty acids activate ERK signaling to downregulate hepatic sortilin 1 in obese and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lipeng; Chiang, John Y L; Ding, Wen-Xing; Dunn, Winston; Roberts, Benjamin; Li, Tiangang

    2013-10-01

    Hepatic VLDL overproduction is a characteristic feature of diabetes and an important contributor to diabetic dyslipidemia. Hepatic sortilin 1 (Sort1), a cellular trafficking receptor, is a novel regulator of plasma lipid metabolism and reduces plasma cholesterol and triglycerides by inhibiting hepatic apolipoprotein B production. Elevated circulating free fatty acids play key roles in hepatic VLDL overproduction and the development of dyslipidemia. This study investigated the regulation of hepatic Sort1 in obesity and diabetes and the potential implications in diabetic dyslipidemia. Results showed that hepatic Sort1 protein was markedly decreased in mouse models of type I and type II diabetes and in human individuals with obesity and liver steatosis, whereas increasing hepatic Sort1 expression reduced plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the saturated fatty acid palmitate activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and inhibited Sort1 protein by mechanisms involving Sort1 protein ubiquitination and degradation. Consistently, hepatic ERK signaling was activated in diabetic mice, whereas blocking ERK signaling by an ERK inhibitor increased hepatic Sort1 protein in mice. These results suggest that increased saturated fatty acids downregulate liver Sort1 protein, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia in obesity and diabetes.

  5. Intranasal delivery of nanomicelle curcumin promotes corneal epithelial wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuanlong; Li, Mengshuang; Qi, Xia; Lin, Guiming; Cui, Fenghua; Li, Fengjie; Wu, Xianggen

    2016-01-01

    Corneal nerves are mainly derived from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal ganglion (TG). Corneal neuropathy contributes to epithelial degenerative changes in diabetic keratopathy. Efficient drug delivery to TG may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetic keratopathy. This article described intranasal delivery of nanomicelle curcumin to correct pathophysiological conditions in TG to promote corneal epithelial/nerve wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A diabetic mice model with corneal epithelium abrasion was established. Ocular topical and/or intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatments were performed, and treatment efficacy and mechanisms of action were explored. Results showed that intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatment promoted corneal epithelial wound healing and recovery of corneal sensation. Enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen species, reduced free radical scavengers, increased mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased mRNA expressions of neurotrophic factors in the cornea and TG neuron were observed in diabetic mice with corneal epithelium abrasions. Intranasal nanomicelle curcumin treatment effectively recovered these pathophysiological conditions, especially that of the TG neuron, and a strengthened recovery was observed with ocular topical combined with intranasal treatment. These findings indicated that intranasal curcumin treatment effectively helped promote diabetic corneal epithelial/nerve wound healing. This novel treatment might be a promising strengthened therapy for diabetic keratopathy. PMID:27405815

  6. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Is Involved in Impaired Bone Repair Associated with Diabetes in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li; Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Yano, Masato; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that fracture healing is impaired in diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the impaired bone repair process by using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic female wild-type (PAI-1+/+) and PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1−/−) mice. Bone repair and the number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive cells at the site of a femoral bone damage were comparable in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1−/− mice without STZ treatment. Although the bone repair process was delayed by STZ treatment in PAI-1+/+ mice, this delayed bone repair was blunted in PAI-1−/− mice. The reduction in the number of ALP-positive cells at the site of bone damage induced by STZ treatment was attenuated in PAI-1−/− mice compared to PAI-1+/+ mice. On the other hand, PAI-1 deficiency increased the levels of ALP and type I collagen mRNA in female mice with or without STZ treatment, and the levels of Osterix and osteocalcin mRNA, suppressed by diabetic state in PAI-1+/+ mice, were partially protected in PAI-1−/− mice. PAI-1 deficiency did not affect formation of the cartilage matrix and the levels of types II and X collagen and aggrecan mRNA suppressed by STZ treatment, although PAI-1 deficiency increased the expression of chondrogenic markers in mice without STZ treatment. The present study indicates that PAI-1 is involved in the impaired bone repair process induced by the diabetic state in part through a decrease in the number of ALP-positive cells. PMID:24651693

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is involved in impaired bone repair associated with diabetes in female mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Kawao, Naoyuki; Tamura, Yukinori; Okumoto, Katsumi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Yano, Masato; Matsuo, Osamu; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that fracture healing is impaired in diabetes; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the impaired bone repair process by using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic female wild-type (PAI-1+/+) and PAI-1-deficient (PAI-1-/-) mice. Bone repair and the number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive cells at the site of a femoral bone damage were comparable in PAI-1+/+ and PAI-1-/- mice without STZ treatment. Although the bone repair process was delayed by STZ treatment in PAI-1+/+ mice, this delayed bone repair was blunted in PAI-1-/- mice. The reduction in the number of ALP-positive cells at the site of bone damage induced by STZ treatment was attenuated in PAI-1-/- mice compared to PAI-1+/+ mice. On the other hand, PAI-1 deficiency increased the levels of ALP and type I collagen mRNA in female mice with or without STZ treatment, and the levels of Osterix and osteocalcin mRNA, suppressed by diabetic state in PAI-1+/+ mice, were partially protected in PAI-1-/- mice. PAI-1 deficiency did not affect formation of the cartilage matrix and the levels of types II and X collagen and aggrecan mRNA suppressed by STZ treatment, although PAI-1 deficiency increased the expression of chondrogenic markers in mice without STZ treatment. The present study indicates that PAI-1 is involved in the impaired bone repair process induced by the diabetic state in part through a decrease in the number of ALP-positive cells.

  8. Diabetes attenuates the inhibitory effects of endomorphin-2, but not endomorphin-1 on gastrointestinal transit in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-lin; Diao, Yu-xiang; Xiang, Qiong; Ren, Yu-kun; Gu, Ning

    2014-09-05

    Diabetes affects the entire gastrointestinal tract from the esophagus to the anus. In the present study, the charcoal meal test was undertaken to evaluate and compare the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of endomorphins (EMs) on gastrointestinal transit in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit was found in both 4 and 8 weeks alloxan-induced diabetes compared to non-diabetes. Moreover, i.c.v. EM-1 and EM-2 dose-dependently delayed gastrointestinal transit in non-diabetes and diabetes. The EM-1-induced inhibitory effects of gastrointestinal transit in 4 weeks diabetes were qualitatively similar to those of non-diabetes. However, at higher doses, the EM-1-induced effects in 8 weeks diabetes were largely enhanced. Different to EM-1, the EM-2-induced inhibition of gastrointestinal transit in diabetic mice was significantly attenuated compared to non-diabetic mice. Moreover, these effects were further decreased in 8 weeks diabetes. The delayed gastrointestinal transit effects caused by EM-1 may be primarily mediated by μ2-opioid receptor in both non-diabetes and 4 weeks diabetes. Interestingly, in 8 weeks diabetes, these effects were mediated by μ2- and δ-receptors. However, the inhibitory effects of EM-2 were mediated by μ1-opioid receptor, which exerted a reduced function in diabetes. Also, poor blood glucose control might result in the attenuated effects of EM-2. Our present results demonstrated that diabetes attenuates the inhibitory effects of EM-2, but not EM-1 on gastrointestinal transit in mice. The different effects of EM-1 and EM-2 on gastrointestinal transit in diabetes may be due to changes of opioid receptor subtypes and their functional responses.

  9. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Alexis M; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G; Mattson, Mark P

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake.

  10. Voluntary exercise and caloric restriction enhance hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF levels in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Lee, Kim; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Golden, Erin; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes may adversely affect cognitive function, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. To investigate whether manipulations that enhance neurotrophin levels will also restore neuronal structure and function in diabetes, we examined the effects of wheel running and dietary energy restriction on hippocampal neuron morphology and BDNF levels in db/db mice, a model of insulin resistant diabetes. Running wheel activity, caloric restriction, or the combination of the two treatments increased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Enhancement of hippocampal BDNF was accompanied by increases in dendritic spine density on the secondary and tertiary dendrites of dentate granule neurons. These studies suggest that diabetes exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal structure, and that this state can be attenuated by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing energy intake. PMID:19280661

  11. Gender-specific differences in diabetic neuropathy in BTBR ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Phillipe D.; Hur, Junguk; Robell, Nicholas J.; Hayes, John M.; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To identify a female mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), we characterized DPN in female BTBR ob/ob mice and compared their phenotype to non-diabetic and gender-matched controls. We also identified dysregulated genes and pathways in sciatic nerve (SCN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of female BTBR ob/ob mice to determine potential DPN mechanisms. Methods Terminal neuropathy phenotyping consisted of examining latency to heat stimuli, sciatic motor and sural sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCV), and intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density. For gene expression profiling, DRG and SCN were dissected, RNA was isolated and processed using microarray technology and differentially expressed genes were identified. Results Similar motor and sensory NCV deficits were observed in male and female BTBR ob/ob mice at study termination; however, IENF density was greater in female ob/ob mice than their male counterparts. Male and female ob/ob mice exhibited similar weight gain, hyperglycemia, and hyperinsulinemia compared to non-diabetic controls, although triglycerides were elevated more so in males than in females. Transcriptional profiling of nerve tissue from female mice identified dysregulation of pathways related to inflammation. Conclusions Similar to males, female BTBR ob/ob mice display robust DPN, and pathways related to inflammation are dysregulated in peripheral nerve. PMID:26525588

  12. Antidiabetic effect of glycyrrhizin in genetically diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Takii, H; Kometani, T; Nishimura, T; Nakae, T; Okada, S; Fushiki, T

    2001-05-01

    We, previously demonstrated that one shot administration of glycyrrhizin (Grz) reduced the postprandial blood glucose rise, using Std ddY mice. Subsequently, we evaluated the effects of long-term Grz treatment (2.7, 4.1 g/kg diet) on diabetic symptoms using genetically non-insulin dependent diabetic model mice (KK-Ay). Male KK-Ay mice were divided into 3 groups: the control group, 0.27% Grz diet (2.7 g of Grz/kg diet) group and 0.41% Grz diet (4.1 g of Grz/kg diet) group. The elevation of blood glucose concentration was almost entirely suppressed in mice fed the 0.41% Grz diet 7 weeks after the beginning of test feeding, although it was not suppressed in mice fed the control diet or the 0.27% Grz diet. Water intake in the control and 0.27% Grz diet groups increased gradually, whereas, this was not true in the 0.41% Grz diet group. Grz treatment significantly lowered blood insulin level. Throughout the experiment, Grz did not affect the food intake or body weight among the three groups. The mice fed the 0.41% Grz diet also improved their tolerance to oral glucose loading 9 weeks after the beginning of test feeding. This study shows that Grz has an antidiabetic effect in noninsulin-dependent diabetes model mice.

  13. Cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and by stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hafizur, Rahman M; Hameed, Abdul; Shukrana, Mishkat; Raza, Sayed Ali; Chishti, Sidra; Kabir, Nurul; Siddiqui, Rehan A

    2015-02-15

    Although the anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid, a pure compound from cinnamon, has been reported but its mechanism(s) is not yet clear. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism(s) of anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid in in vitro and in vivo non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. Non-obese type 2 diabetes was developed by injecting 90 mg/kg streptozotocin in 2-day-old Wistar pups. Cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde were administered orally to diabetic rats for assessing acute blood glucose lowering effect and improvement of glucose tolerance. Additionally, insulin secretory activity of cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde was evaluated in isolated mice islets. Cinnamic acid, but not cinnamaldehyde, decreased blood glucose levels in diabetic rats in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Oral administration of cinnamic acid with 5 and 10 mg/kg doses to diabetic rats improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. The improvement by 10 mg/kg cinnamic acid was comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). Further in vitro studies showed that cinnamaldehyde has little or no effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion; however, cinnamic acid significantly enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets. In conclusion, it can be said that cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

  14. A Point Mutation in Sec61α1 Leads to Diabetes and Hepatosteatosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, David J.; Wheeler, Matthew C.; Gekakis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. To better understand the genetic factors we used forward genetics to discover genes that have not previously been implicated in the development of hyperglycemia or diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Offspring of ethylnitrosurea-mutagenized C57BL/6 mice were bred to homozygosity, maintained on high-fat diet, and screened for hyperglycemia. The phenotype in one diabetic family of mice was mapped among hybrid F2s with single nucleotide polymorphic markers, followed by candidate gene sequencing to identify the gene harboring the causative mutation. Subsequent analysis was done on wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mutant mice on a pure C57BL/6 background. RESULTS Diabetes mapped to a point mutation in the Sec61a1 gene that encodes a His to Tyr substitution at amino acid 344 (Y344H). Metabolic profiling, histological examination, and electron microscopy revealed that hyperglycemia was a result of insulin insufficiency due to β-cell apoptosis brought on by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Transgenic β-cell–specific expression of Sec61a1 in mutant mice rescued diabetes, β-cell apoptosis, and ER stress. In vitro experiments showed that Sec61α1 plays a critical role in the β-cell response to glucose. CONCLUSIONS Here we phenotypically characterize diabetes in mice with a novel point mutation in a basic component of the cell's ER protein translocation machinery, Sec61α1. Translocation by the mutant protein does not appear to be affected. Rather, ER homeostasis is perturbed leading to β-cell death and diabetes. PMID:19934005

  15. Defects in dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells result in delayed wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Xu, Yingbin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liang, Guangping; Chen, Lei; Xie, Julin; Tang, Jinming; Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Qi, Shaohai; Chen, Jian; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; He, Weifeng; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a physical and chemical barrier to provide an initial line of defense against environmental threats; however, this function is impaired in diabetes. Vγ4 γ δ T cells in the dermis are an important part of the resident cutaneous immunosurveillance program, but these cells have yet to be explored in the context of diabetes. In this study, we observed that the impaired maintenance of dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells is caused by reduced production of IL-7 in the skin of diabetic mice, which was closely associated with weakened activation of the mTOR pathway in the epidermis of diabetic mice. Weakened CCL20/CCR6 chemokine signaling resulted in the impaired recruitment of dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells following wounding in diabetic mice. Meanwhile, reduced levels of IL-23 and IL-1β in the dermis around the wounds of diabetic mice resulted in the impaired production of IL-17 by dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells. Therefore, diminished dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells and impaired IL-17 production by these cells were important factors in the markedly reduced IL-17 levels in the skin around the wounds of diabetic mice. Because reduced IL-17 levels at the wound edge have been closely associated with delayed wound closure in diabetic mice, defects in dermal Vγ4 γ δ T cells may be an important mechanism underlying delayed wound healing in diabetic mice. PMID:27398150

  16. Attenuation of hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in diabetes STZ-induced type 1 by biotin in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Aldahmash, Badr Abdullah; El-Nagar, Doaa Mohamed; Ibrahim, Khalid Elfakki

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the major health problems. This study was designed to investigate the effect of biotin to regulate blood glucose level, reduced toxicity and oxidative stress in liver of diabetic mice STZ-induced type 1. Male mice were divided into three groups, the first one served as the control group, the second and the third groups received single ip dose of 150 mg/kg of STZ, the second group served as the untreated diabetic group, the third group received daily oral dose of 15 mg/kg of biotin, livers and liver index showed insignificant difference among groups. Blood glucose level showed a significant decrease in treated diabetic mice compared to untreated diabetic mice. Biochemical analysis showed a significant decrease in liver enzymes AST and ALT compared to the control group. Histopathological examination showed severe changes in untreated diabetic liver tissue manifested by dilated portal vein, leukocytic infiltration, fatty degeneration and moderate to severe histopathological score, whereas, treated diabetic mice with biotin showed reduction in hepatotoxicity represented by appearance of relative healthy hepatocytes and normal histopathological score. Immunohistochemistry of acrolein showed intense immunoreactions in liver section of untreated diabetic mice and faint immunoreactions in treated diabetic mice with biotin as evidence to oxidative stress reduction. PMID:26981014

  17. The protective effects of oral low-dose quercetin on diabetic nephropathy in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabele B. S.; Porto, Marcella L.; Santos, Maria C. L. F. S.; Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Gava, Agata L.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Pereira, Thiago M. C.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important causes of chronic renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report (Gomes et al., 2014) indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg) demonstrated anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and renoprotective effects in the C57BL/6J model of DN, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE−/−). Methods: Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes (100 mg/kg/day, 3 days) in male apoE−/− mice (8 week-old). After 6 weeks, the mice were randomly separated into DQ: diabetic apoE−/− mice treated with quercetin (10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, n = 8), DV: diabetic ApoE−/− mice treated with vehicle (n = 8) and ND: non-treated non-diabetic mice (n = 8). Results: Quercetin treatment diminished polyuria (~30%; p < 0.05), glycemia (~25%, p < 0.05), normalized the hypertriglyceridemia. Moreover, this bioflavonoid diminished creatininemia (~30%, p < 0.01) and reduced proteinuria but not to normal levels. We also observed protective effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight/body weight. Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical changes (decrease in glucose and triglycerides serum levels) and reduction of glomerulosclerosis. Thus, this study highlights the relevance of quercetin as an alternative therapeutic option for DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:26388784

  18. Systemic Retinaldehyde Treatment Corrects Retinal Oxidative Stress, Rod Dysfunction, and Impaired Visual Performance in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Kern, Timothy S.; Bissig, David; Patel, Priya; Bhatia, Ankit; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Roberts, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes appears to induce a visual cycle defect because rod dysfunction is correctable with systemic treatment of the visual cycle chromophore 11-cis-retinaldehyde. However, later studies have found no evidence for visual cycle impairment. Here, we further examined whether photoreceptor dysfunction is corrected with 11-cis-retinaldehyde. Because antioxidants correct photoreceptor dysfunction in diabetes, the hypothesis that exogenous visual chromophores have antioxidant activity in the retina of diabetic mice in vivo was tested. Methods Rod function in 2-month-old diabetic mice was evaluated using transretinal electrophysiology in excised retinas and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) MRI to measure light-evoked expansion of subretinal space (SRS) in vivo. Optokinetic tracking was used to evaluate cone-based visual performance. Retinal production of superoxide free radicals, generated mostly in rod cells, was biochemically measured with lucigenin. Diabetic mice were systemically treated with a single injection of either 11-cis-retinaldehyde, 9-cis-retinaldehyde (a chromophore surrogate), or all-trans-retinaldehyde (the photoisomerization product of 11-cis-retinaldehyde). Results Consistent with previous reports, diabetes significantly reduced (1) dark-adapted rod photo responses (transretinal recording) by ∼18%, (2) rod-dominated light-stimulated SRS expansion (ADC MRI) by ∼21%, and (3) cone-dominated contrast sensitivity (using optokinetic tracking [OKT]) by ∼30%. Both 11-cis-retinaldehyde and 9-cis-retinaldehyde largely corrected these metrics of photoreceptor dysfunction. Higher-than-normal retinal superoxide production in diabetes by ∼55% was also significantly corrected following treatment with 11-cis-retinaldehyde, 9-cis-retinaldehyde, or all-trans-retinaldehyde. Conclusions Collectively, data suggest that retinaldehydes improve photoreceptor dysfunction in diabetic mice, independent of the visual cycle, via an antioxidant mechanism. PMID

  19. Low TGFβ1 expression prevents and high expression exacerbates diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Gasim, Adil M. H.; Grant, Ruriko; Chang, Albert S.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Jennette, J. Charles; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Nephropathy develops in many but not all patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Substantial efforts to identify genotypic differences explaining this differential susceptibility have been made, with limited success. Here, we show that the expression of the transforming growth factor β1 gene (Tgfb1) affects the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice. To do this we genetically varied Tgfb1 expression in five steps, 10%, 60%, 100%, 150%, and 300% of normal, in mice with type 1 diabetes caused by the Akita mutation in the insulin gene (Ins2Akita). Although plasma glucose levels were not affected by Tgfb1 genotype, many features of diabetic nephropathy (mesangial expansion, elevated plasma creatinine and urea, decreased creatinine clearance and albuminuria) were progressively ameliorated as Tgfb1 expression decreased and were progressively exacerbated when expression was increased. The diabetic 10% hypomorphs had comparable creatinine clearance and albumin excretion to wild-type mice and no harmful changes in renal morphology. The diabetic 300% hypermorphs had ∼1/3 the creatinine clearance of wild-type mice, >20× their albumin excretion, ∼3× thicker glomerular basement membranes and severe podocyte effacement, matching human diabetic nephropathy. Switching Tgfb1 expression from low to high in the tubules of the hypomorphs increased their albumin excretion more than 10-fold but creatinine clearance remained high. Switching Tgfb1 expression from low to high in the podocytes markedly decreased creatinine clearance, but minimally increased albumin excretion. Decreasing expression of Tgfb1 could be a promising option for preventing loss of renal function in diabetes. PMID:25902541

  20. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice. PMID:27846299

  1. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice.

  2. Emetine Di-HCl Attenuates Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, LaQueta K; Dancho, Meghan E; Li, Jianhua; Bruchfeld, Johanna B; Ragab, Ahmed A; He, Mingzhu M; Bragg, Meaghan; Lenaghan, Delaney; Quinn, Michael D; Fritz, Jason R; Tanzi, Matthew V; Silverman, Harold A; Hanes, William M; Levine, Yaakov A; Pavlov, Valentin A; Olofsson, Peder S; Roth, Jesse; Al-Abed, Yousef; Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J; Chavan, Sangeeta S

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by β cell destruction, insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. Activated macrophages and autoimmune T cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in NOD murine diabetes models, but the molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation are unknown. We recently identified pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as an adipocyte-derived factor that activates macrophages and mediates insulin resistance. Reasoning that PEDF might participate as a proinflammatory mediator in murine diabetes, we measured PEDF levels in NOD mice. PEDF levels are significantly elevated in pancreas, in parallel with pancreatic TNF levels in NOD mice. To identify experimental therapeutics, we screened 2,327 compounds in two chemical libraries (the NIH Clinical Collection and Pharmakon-1600) for leads that inhibit PEDF mediated TNF release in macrophage cultures. The lead molecule selected, “emetine” is a widely used emetic. It inhibited PEDF-mediated macrophage activation with an EC50 or 146 nmol/L. Administration of emetine to NOD mice and to C57Bl6 mice subjected to streptozotocin significantly attenuated hyperglycemia, reduced TNF levels in pancreas and attenuated insulitis. Together, these results suggest that targeting PEDF with emetine may attenuate TNF release and hyperglycemia in murine diabetes models. This suggests that further investigation of PEDF and emetine in the pathogenesis of human diabetes is warranted. PMID:27341452

  3. Bezafibrate Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Metabolic Flexibility in STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Franko, Andras; Huypens, Peter; Neschen, Susanne; Irmler, Martin; Rozman, Jan; Rathkolb, Birgit; Neff, Frauke; Prehn, Cornelia; Dubois, Guillaume; Baumann, Martina; Massinger, Rebecca; Gradinger, Daniel; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Repp, Birgit; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Schommers, Philipp; Stöhr, Oliver; Sanchez-Lasheras, Carmen; Adamski, Jerzy; Peter, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Beckers, Johannes; Walch, Axel K; Fuchs, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard; Schubert, Markus; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Bezafibrate (BEZ), a pan activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), has been generally used to treat hyperlipidemia for decades. Clinical trials with type 2 diabetes patients indicated that BEZ also has beneficial effects on glucose metabolism, although the underlying mechanisms of these effects remain elusive. Even less is known about a potential role for BEZ in treating type 1 diabetes. Here we show that BEZ markedly improves hyperglycemia and glucose and insulin tolerance in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, an insulin-deficient mouse model of type 1 diabetes. BEZ treatment of STZ mice significantly suppressed the hepatic expression of genes that are annotated in inflammatory processes, whereas the expression of PPAR and insulin target gene transcripts was increased. Furthermore, BEZ-treated mice also exhibited improved metabolic flexibility as well as an enhanced mitochondrial mass and function in the liver. Finally, we show that the number of pancreatic islets and the area of insulin-positive cells tended to be higher in BEZ-treated mice. Our data suggest that BEZ may improve impaired glucose metabolism by augmenting hepatic mitochondrial performance, suppressing hepatic inflammatory pathways, and improving insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility. Thus, BEZ treatment might also be useful for patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes.

  4. Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2013-05-06

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice.

  5. Gene expression profiling in hearts of diabetic mice uncovers a potential role of estrogen-related receptor γ in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lasheras, Jaime; Vilà, Maria; Zamora, Mònica; Riu, Efrén; Pardo, Rosario; Poncelas, Marcos; Cases, Ildefonso; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Hernández, Cristina; Feliu, Juan E; Simó, Rafael; García-Dorado, David; Villena, Josep A

    2016-07-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by an abnormal oxidative metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be defined. To uncover potential mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, we performed a gene expression profiling study in hearts of diabetic db/db mice. Diabetic hearts showed a gene expression pattern characterized by the up-regulation of genes involved in lipid oxidation, together with an abnormal expression of genes related to the cardiac contractile function. A screening for potential regulators of the genes differentially expressed in diabetic mice found that estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) was increased in heart of db/db mice. Overexpression of ERRγ in cultured cardiomyocytes was sufficient to promote the expression of genes involved in lipid oxidation, increase palmitate oxidation and induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings strongly support a role for ERRγ in the metabolic alterations that underlie the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Fibronectin potentiates topical erythropoietin-induced wound repair in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Saher; Ullmann, Yehuda; Egozi, Dana; Daod, Essam; Hellou, Elias; Ashkar, Manal; Gilhar, Amos; Teot, Luc

    2011-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus disrupts all phases of the wound repair cascade and leads to development of chronic wounds. We previously showed that topical erythropoietin (EPO) can promote wound repair in diabetic rats. Fibronectin (FN) has a critical role throughout the process of wound healing, yet it is deficient in wound tissues of diabetic patients. Therefore, we investigated the effect of topical treatment of both EPO and FN (EPO/FN) on wound repair in diabetic mice. Full-thickness excisional skin wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic mice were treated with a cream containing vehicle, EPO, FN, or EPO/FN. We assessed the rate of wound closure, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and expression of inflammatory cytokines, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and β1-integrin, in the wound tissues. We also investigated the effect of EPO, FN, and EPO/FN on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts cultured on fibrin-coated plates, or in high glucose concentrations. EPO/FN treatment significantly increased the rate of wound closure and this effect was associated with increased angiogenesis, increased eNOS and β1-integrin expression, and reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. Our findings show that EPO and FN have an additive effect on wound repair in diabetic mice.

  7. Therapeutic miR-21 Silencing Ameliorates Diabetic Kidney Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kölling, Malte; Kaucsar, Tamas; Schauerte, Celina; Hübner, Anika; Dettling, Angela; Park, Joon-Keun; Busch, Martin; Wulff, Xaver; Meier, Matthias; Scherf, Kristian; Bukosza, Nóra; Szénási, Gábor; Godó, Mária; Sharma, Amit; Heuser, Michael; Hamar, Peter; Bang, Claudia; Haller, Hermann; Thum, Thomas; Lorenzen, Johan M

    2017-01-04

    Diabetic nephropathy is the main cause of end-stage renal disease. MicroRNAs are powerful regulators of the genome, and global expression profiling revealed miR-21 to be among the most highly regulated microRNAs in kidneys of mice with diabetic nephropathy. In kidney biopsies of diabetic patients, miR-21 correlated with tubulointerstitial injury. In situ PCR analysis showed a specific enrichment of miR-21 in glomerular cells. We identified cell division cycle 25a (Cdc25a) and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (Cdk6) as novel miR-21 targets in mesangial cells. miR-21-mediated repression of Cdc25a and Cdk6 resulted in impaired cell cycle progression and subsequent mesangial cell hypertrophy. miR-21 increased podocyte motility by regulating phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten). miR-21 antagonism in vitro and in vivo in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mesangial expansion, interstitial fibrosis, macrophage infiltration, podocyte loss, albuminuria, and fibrotic- and inflammatory gene expression. In conclusion, miR-21 antagonism rescued various functional and structural parameters in mice with diabetic nephropathy and, thus, might be a viable option in the treatment of patients with diabetic kidney disease.

  8. Reduction of blood glucose level by orexins in fasting normal and streptozotocin-diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Yoshitaka; Honda, Ritsu; Wada, Tsutomu; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Kimura, Ikuko

    2002-07-19

    Orexin-A and orexin-B are neuropeptides implicated in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. In the present study, we examined the effects of orexins on blood glucose levels in response to fasting in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. After the injection of orexin-A and orexin-B (0.01-1 nmol/kg, i.v.), the blood glucose levels in both normal mice and diabetic mice in the fasting state decreased. In contrast, neither orexin-A nor orexin-B affected the glucose levels in the animals allowed free access to food. Intracerebroventricular administration of orexin-A and orexin-B was associated with glucose-lowering effects in fasting diabetic mice. The serum insulin level did not significantly change following the administration of orexin-A or orexin-B, in either the normal or the diabetic mice in the fasting state. These results demonstrate that orexins lower the blood glucose levels exclusively in the fasting state. The orexins may stimulate some neural and hormonal network and thereby promote blood glucose utilization.

  9. The inhibiting effect of the Coptis chinensis polysaccharide on the type II diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lijuan; Liu, Min; Chang, XiangYun; Sun, Kan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of Coptis chinensis polysaccharide (CCP) on hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. CCP was prepared by extraction from Coptis chinensis and oral given to the mice. C57BL/6J mice in each of the 5 groups (eight mice per group) were given either the normal diet (ND) (D12450B, 10% kcal% fat; Research diet, New Brunswick, NJ, USA), HFD (D12451, 45% kcal% fat; Research diet, New Brunswick, NJ, USA), or HFD with CCP of differing hardness (500, 1000, and 2000ppm) for 20 weeks. Mice given an HFD with CCP showed lowered fasting plasma glucose levels compared to HFD-fed mice. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that CCP improves impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Histopathological evaluation of the pancreas showed that CCP recovers the size of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and increases the secretion of insulin and glucagon in HFD-fed mice. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of hepatic genes involved in glucogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation were suppressed, while those in glucose uptake, β-oxidation, and glucose oxidation in muscle were increased in mice fed HFD with CCP. CCP increased AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 pre- and mature adipocytes and improved impaired AMPK phosphorylation in the muscles and livers of HFD-induced diabetic mice. CCP stimulated phosphoinositol-3-kinase and AMPK pathway-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that CCP has potential as an anti-diabetic agent, given its ability to suppress hyperglycemia and improve glucose intolerance by increasing glucose uptake.

  10. MicroRNA-29b inhibits diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Yong; Zhong, Xiang; Huang, Xiao R; Meng, Xiao-Ming; You, Yongke; Chung, Arthur Ck; Lan, Hui Y

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation and its consequent fibrosis are two main features of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but target therapy on these processes for DN remains yet ineffective. We report here that miR-29b is a novel therapeutic agent capable of inhibiting progressive renal inflammation and fibrosis in type 2 diabetes in db/db mice. Under diabetic conditions, miR-29b was largely downregulated in response to advanced glycation end (AGE) product, which was associated with upregulation of collagen matrix in mesangial cells via the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad3-dependent mechanism. These pathological changes were reversed by overexpressing miR-29b, but enhanced by knocking-down miR-29b. Similarly, loss of renal miR-29b was associated with progressive diabetic kidney injury, including microalbuminuria, renal fibrosis, and inflammation. Restored renal miR-29b by the ultrasound-based gene therapy was capable of attenuating diabetic kidney disease. Further studies revealed that inhibition of Sp1 expression, TGF-β/Smad3-dependent renal fibrosis, NF-κB-driven renal inflammation, and T-bet/Th1-mediated immune response may be mechanisms associated with miR-29b treatment in db/db mice. In conclusion, miR-29b may play a protective role in diabetic kidney disease and may have therapeutic potential for diabetic kidney complication.

  11. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy.

  12. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  13. Antidiabetic activity of Mung bean extracts in diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yang; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu; Wang, Jiashi; Ren, Guixing

    2008-10-08

    The antidiabetic effects of Mung bean sprout (MBS) extracts and Mung bean seed coat (MBSC) extracts were investigated in type 2 diabetic mice. Male KK-A (y) mice and C57BL/6 mice were used in this study. In KK-A (y) mice, the blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, glucagon, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were significantly higher than those in the C57BL/6 mice ( P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01). In addition, KK-A (y) mice showed an obvious decrease in insulin immunoreactivity in pancreas as well. MBS and MBSC were orally administrated to KK-A (y) mice for 5 weeks. It was found that MBS (2 g/kg) and MBSC (3 g/kg) lowered blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, glucagon, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and BUN levels and at the same time markedly improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin immunoreactive levels. These results suggest that MBS and MBSC exert an antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic mice.

  14. Adverse Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on the Skeleton of Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Ardura, Juan Antonio; Lozano, Daniel; Bolívar, Oskarina Hernández; López-Herradón, Ana; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Irene; Proctor, Alexander; van der Eerden, Bram; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Alcaraz, María José; Mulero, Francisca; de la Fuente, Mónica; Esbrit, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the possibility that a diabetic (DM) status might worsen age-related bone deterioration was explored in mice. Male CD-1 mice aged 2 (young control group) or 16 months, nondiabetic or made diabetic by streptozotocin injections, were used. DM induced a decrease in bone volume, trabecular number, and eroded surface, and in mineral apposition and bone formation rates, but an increased trabecular separation, in L1-L3 vertebrae of aged mice. Three-point bending and reference point indentation tests showed slight changes pointing to increased frailty and brittleness in the mouse tibia of diabetic old mice. DM was related to a decreased expression of both vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor 2, which paralleled that of femoral vasculature, and increased expression of the pro-adipogenic gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and adipocyte number, without affecting β-catenin pathway in old mouse bone. Concomitant DM in old mice failed to affect total glutathione levels or activity of main anti-oxidative stress enzymes, although xanthine oxidase was slightly increased, in the bone marrow, but increased the senescence marker caveolin-1 gene. In conclusion, DM worsens bone alterations of aged mice, related to decreased bone turnover and bone vasculature and increased senescence, independently of the anti-oxidative stress machinery.

  15. Interleukin-1 promotes hyperglycemia and insulitis in mice normally resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Zunino, S. J.; Simons, L. F.; Sambrook, J. F.; Gething, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    By administering physiological doses of interleukin-1 (IL-1) concurrently with multiple low doses of the beta cell toxin streptozotocin (MSZ), we observed an augmentation of diabetes by IL-1 in four different strains of mice. Augmentation of hyperglycemia by IL-1 was most prominent in the two MSZ-resistant mouse strains Balb/cJ and A/J. Furthermore, concurrent treatment with IL-1 and MSZ rendered these MSZ-resistant mice susceptible to the development of significant insulitis when compared to mice treated with MSZ alone. Development of insulitis was dependent upon the dose of IL-1; it was only observed at an IL-1 dose of 250 ng/kg body weight. Analysis of the leukocytic infiltrate in the islets of mice after treatment with 250 ng/kg IL-1 plus MSZ revealed the presence of L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T lymphocytes. Administration of MSZ alone or IL-1 alone did not produce diabetes in the MSZ-resistant mice, indicating that neither of these agents was toxic to the beta cells by itself. We conclude that IL-1 synergizes with MSZ to augment diabetes in mice that are normally resistant to the diabetogenic effects of MSZ. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8080048

  16. Oral Corticosterone Administration Reduces Insulitis but Promotes Insulin Resistance and Hyperglycemia in Male Nonobese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Batdorf, Heidi M; Eder, Adrianna E; Karlstad, Michael D; Burk, David H; Noland, Robert C; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Collier, J Jason

    2017-03-01

    Steroid-induced diabetes is the most common form of drug-induced hyperglycemia. Therefore, metabolic and immunological alterations associated with chronic oral corticosterone were investigated using male nonobese diabetic mice. Three weeks after corticosterone delivery, there was reduced sensitivity to insulin action measured by insulin tolerance test. Body composition measurements revealed increased fat mass and decreased lean mass. Overt hyperglycemia (>250 mg/dL) manifested 6 weeks after the start of glucocorticoid administration, whereas 100% of the mice receiving the vehicle control remained normoglycemic. This phenotype was fully reversed during the washout phase and readily reproducible across institutions. Relative to the vehicle control group, mice receiving corticosterone had a significant enhancement in pancreatic insulin-positive area, but a marked decrease in CD3(+) cell infiltration. In addition, there were striking increases in both citrate synthase gene expression and enzymatic activity in skeletal muscle of mice in the corticosterone group relative to vehicle control. Moreover, glycogen synthase expression was greatly enhanced, consistent with elevations in muscle glycogen storage in mice receiving corticosterone. Corticosterone-induced hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and changes in muscle gene expression were all reversed by the end of the washout phase, indicating that the metabolic alterations were not permanent. Thus, male nonobese diabetic mice allow for translational studies on the metabolic and immunological consequences of glucocorticoid-associated interventions in a mouse model with genetic susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

  17. Inhibition of SGLT2 alleviates diabetic nephropathy by suppressing high glucose-induced oxidative stress in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takashi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Tachibana, Hiromi; Eguchi, Jun; Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takei, Kohji; Makino, Hirofumi; Wada, Jun

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear whether the improvement in diabetic nephropathy by sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors is caused by a direct effect on SGLT2 or by the improvement in hyperglycemia. Here, we investigated the effect of dapagliflozin on early-stage diabetic nephropathy using a mouse model of type 1 diabetes and murine proximal tubular epithelial cells. Eight-week-old Akita mice were treated with dapagliflozin or insulin for 12 weeks. Body weight, urinary albumin excretion, blood pressure, as well as levels of blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c were measured. Expansion of the mesangial matrix, interstitial fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration in kidneys were evaluated by histology. Oxidative stress and apoptosis were evaluated in kidneys and cultured proximal tubular epithelial cells. Compared with nontreated mice, dapagliflozin and insulin decreased blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels equally. Urine volume and water intake increased significantly in the dapagliflozin-treated group compared with those in the insulin-treated group, but there were no differences in body weight or blood pressure between the two groups. Macrophage infiltration and fibrosis in renal interstitium improved significantly in the dapagliflozin group compared with the insulin group. Oxidative stress was attenuated by dapagliflozin, and suppression occurred in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi knockdown of SGLT2 resulted in reduced oxidative stress. Dapagliflozin ameliorates diabetic nephropathy by suppressing hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in a manner independent of hyperglycemia improvement in Akita mice. Our findings suggest that dapagliflozin may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Insulin treatment attenuates renal ADAM17 and ACE2 shedding in diabetic Akita mice.

    PubMed

    Salem, Esam S B; Grobe, Nadja; Elased, Khalid M

    2014-03-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is located in several tissues and is highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it degrades the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG II) to ANG-(1-7). Accumulating evidence supports protective roles of ACE2 in several disease states, including diabetic nephropathy. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 17 is involved in the shedding of several transmembrane proteins, including ACE2. Our previous studies showed increased renal ACE2, ADAM17 expression, and urinary ACE2 in type 2 diabetic mice (Chodavarapu H, Grobe N, Somineni HK, Salem ES, Madhu M, Elased KM. PLoS One 8: e62833, 2013). The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of insulin on ACE2 shedding and ADAM17 in type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Results demonstrate increased renal ACE2 and ADAM17 expression and increased urinary ACE2 fragments (≈70 kDa) and albumin excretion in diabetic Akita mice. Immunostaining revealed colocalization of ACE2 with ADAM17 in renal tubules. Renal proximal tubular cells treated with ADAM17 inhibitor showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media, confirming ADAM17-mediated shedding of ACE2. Treatment of Akita mice with insulin implants for 20 wk normalized hyperglycemia and decreased urinary ACE2 and albumin excretion. Insulin also normalized renal ACE2 and ADAM17 but had no effect on tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) protein expression. There was a positive linear correlation between urinary ACE2 and albuminuria, blood glucose, plasma creatinine, glucagon, and triglycerides. This is the first report showing an association between hyperglycemia, cardiovascular risk factors, and increased shedding of urinary ACE2 in diabetic Akita mice. Urinary ACE2 could be used as a biomarker for diabetic nephropathy and as an index of intrarenal ACE2 status.

  19. In vivo characterization of intestinal effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Ying; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Rui

    2013-01-05

    Previously, we have demonstrated that type 1 diabetes significantly attenuated the effects of endomorphins on mouse colonic contractions in vitro. In the present study, to further assess whether diabetes affects the in vivo effects of endomorphins on the mouse intestinal motility, we investigated the effects of endomorphins on colonic propulsion and large intestinal transit in diabetic mice. Both colonic bead expulsion and large intestinal transit were significantly delayed in 4 and 8 weeks diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. Moreover, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of EM-1 and EM-2 (0.5, 1.5 and 5 nmol/mouse) significantly increased bead expulsion latency in a dose-dependent manner both in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Similar results were found in large intestinal transit. However, the inhibitory effects of colonic propulsion induced by endomorphins were significantly attenuated in diabetes compared to non-diabetes. It is noteworthy that the inhibition of distal colonic propulsion induced by EM-1 in 8-week diabetes was lower than that of in 4 weeks diabetes. Nevertheless, there was no significant influence on endomorphins-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit caused by diabetes. Co-administration of naloxone (10 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of endomorphins (5 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) on colonic bead expulsion and large intestinal transit in 4 weeks diabetes, indicating that opioid receptor involved in these effects. Our results indicated that type 1 diabetes attenuated the inhibition of distal colonic propulsion induced by endomorphins in mice, but not the large intestine. The central opioid mechanism was involved in the endomorphins-induced intestinal effects in diabetes.

  20. The modulative effects of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation on diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chun-Feng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Lin, Che-Li

    2017-02-28

    Diabetes (one of non-communicable diseases) is serious due to its complications, such like, cardiovascular ailments, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, wound gangrene and sexual impotence. Diabetes and associated chronic conditions are rapidly emerging as major health problems. In clinical, there were different drugs for diabetes treatment on different mechanisms. However, there were limited studies on the efficacy of electric stimulations on diabetes therapeutic application. In current study, we try to evaluate the effect of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulator (MENS) on diabetes modulation as an alternative medicine. A total of 36 male ICR mice of 6 weeks old were randomly divided into 4 groups [1] Control, [2] MENS only, [3] DM, [4] DM with MENS. During 8 weeks treatments, the diabetes-associated assessments included body weight, diet utilization, blood glucose measurement, other biochemistries and histopathological observations. The diabetes animal model induced by STZ had 180 mg/dl fasting blood glucose (GLU-AC) before MENS intervention. After 3 and 6 weeks administration, the GLU-AC of DM+MENS group significantly decreased 31.97% and 50.82% (P < 0.0001), respectively, as compared to DM group and the OGTT also demonstrated the similar significant results. The diabetic syndromes of polydipsia and polyphagia were also significantly ameliorated by MENS intervention. In other biochemical indexes, the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hyperinsulinemia, liver functions (AST & ALT) and kidneys function (BUN & Creatinine) were also significantly mitigated by MENS under diabetes model. The histological observation also showed the MENS administration improved the diabetes-related pathological characteristics in liver, kidney and pancreas tissues. Our results suggest that administration of MENS could significantly improve diabetes animal model on blood sugar homeostasis, diabetic polydipsia, biochemistries, and tissue damage. In the health conditions, the MENS didn

  1. Insulin-independent reversal of type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice with brown adipose tissue transplant.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Piston, David W

    2015-06-15

    Traditional therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or islet/pancreas transplantation and have numerous limitations. Our previous work demonstrated the ability of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) transplants to establish normoglycemia without insulin in chemically induced models of insulin-deficient diabetes. The current study sought to extend the technique to an autoimmune-mediated T1D model and document the underlying mechanisms. In nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, BAT transplants result in complete reversal of T1D associated with rapid and long-lasting euglycemia. In addition, BAT transplants placed prior to the onset of diabetes on NOD mice can prevent or significantly delay the onset of diabetes. As with streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic models, euglycemia is independent of insulin and strongly correlates with decrease of inflammation and increase of adipokines. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is the first hormone to increase following BAT transplants. Adipose tissue of transplant recipients consistently express IGF-I compared with little or no expression in controls, and plasma IGF-I levels show a direct negative correlation with glucose, glucagon, and inflammatory cytokines. Adipogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of IGF-I may stimulate regeneration of new healthy white adipose tissue, which in turn secretes hypoglycemic adipokines that substitute for insulin. IGF-I can also directly decrease blood glucose through activating insulin receptor. These data demonstrate the potential for insulin-independent reversal of autoimmune-induced T1D with BAT transplants and implicate IGF-I as a likely mediator in the resulting equilibrium.

  2. Pancreatic β-Cells Limit Autoimmune Diabetes via an Immunoregulatory Antimicrobial Peptide Expressed under the Influence of the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Furio, Laetitia; Mecheri, Ramine; van der Does, Anne M; Lundeberg, Erik; Saveanu, Loredana; Chen, Yongquan; van Endert, Peter; Agerberth, Birgitta; Diana, Julien

    2015-08-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed by epithelial and immune cells are largely described for the defense against invading microorganisms. Recently, their immunomodulatory functions have been highlighted in various contexts. However how AMPs expressed by non-immune cells might influence autoimmune responses in peripheral tissues, such as the pancreas, is unknown. Here, we found that insulin-secreting β-cells produced the cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) and that this production was defective in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. CRAMP administrated to prediabetic NOD mice induced regulatory immune cells in the pancreatic islets, dampening the incidence of autoimmune diabetes. Additional investigation revealed that the production of CRAMP by β-cells was controlled by short-chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota. Accordingly, gut microbiota manipulations in NOD mice modulated CRAMP production and inflammation in the pancreatic islets, revealing that the gut microbiota directly shape the pancreatic immune environment and autoimmune diabetes development.

  3. Activating Fc gamma receptors participate in the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Kaifu, Tomonori; Sugahara-Tobinai, Akiko; Nakamura, Akira; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) in humans is an organ-specific autoimmune disease in which pancreatic islet beta cells are ruptured by autoreactive T cells. NOD mice, the most commonly used animal model of T1D, show early infiltration of leukocytes in the islets (insulitis), resulting in islet destruction and diabetes later. NOD mice produce various islet beta cell-specific autoantibodies, although it remains a subject of debate regarding whether these autoantibodies contribute to the development of T1D. Fc gammaRs are multipotent molecules that play important roles in Ab-mediated regulatory as well as effector functions in autoimmune diseases. To investigate the possible role of Fc gammaRs in NOD mice, we generated several Fc gammaR-less NOD lines, namely FcR common gamma-chain (Fc Rgamma)-deficient (NOD.gamma(-/-)), Fc gammaRIII-deficient (NOD.III(-/-)), Fc gammaRIIB-deficient (NOD.IIB(-/-)), and both Fc Rgamma and Fc gammaRIIB-deficient NOD (NOD.null) mice. In this study, we show significant protection from diabetes in NOD.gamma(-/-), NOD.III(-/-), and NOD.null, but not in NOD.IIB(-/-) mice even with grossly comparable production of autoantibodies among them. Insulitis in NOD.gamma(-/-) mice was also alleviated. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells or NK cells from NOD mice rendered NOD.gamma(-/-) animals more susceptible to diabetes, suggesting a possible scenario in which activating Fc gammaRs on dendritic cells enhance autoantigen presentation leading to the activation of autoreactive T cells, and Fc gammaRIII on NK cells trigger Ab-dependent effector functions and inflammation. These findings highlight the critical roles of activating Fc gammaRs in the development of T1D, and indicate that Fc gammaRs are novel targets for therapies for T1D.

  4. Gene expression microarray analysis of the sciatic nerve of mice with diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEI; QU, SHEN; LIANG, AIBIN; JIANG, HONG; WANG, HAO

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore novel target genes that regulate the development of diabetic neuropathy (DN) by analyzing gene expression profiles in the sciatic nerve of infected mice. The GSE11343 microarray dataset, which was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, included data on 4 control samples and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), 5 samples from normal mice treated with rosiglitazone (Rosi) and 5 samples from mice with diabetes induced by STZ and treated with Rosi. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the different groups were identified using the substitution augmentation modification redefinition (SAMR) model. The Gene Ontology (GO) term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks were searched using BioCarta and STRING, respectively. The protein structures of potential regulatory genes were predicted using the SYBYL program. Compared with the controls, 1,384 DEGs were identified in the mice with STZ-induced diabetes and 7 DEGs were identified in the mice treated with Rosi. There were 518 DEGs identified between the mice in the STZ + Rosi and STZ groups. We identified 45 GO items, and the calmodulin nerve phosphatase and chemokine signaling pathways were identified as the main pathways. Three genes [myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (Marcks), GLI pathogenesis-related 2 (Glipr2) and centrosomal protein 170 kDa (Cep170)] were found to be co-regulated by both STZ and Rosi, the protein structure of which was predicted and certain binding activity to Rosi was docked. Our study demonstrates that the Marcks, Glipr2 and Cep170 genes may be underlying drug targets in the treatment of DN. PMID:25435094

  5. Effect of Potentilla fulgens on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in alloxan-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Valrielyn; Syiem, Donkupar; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Potentilla fulgens (Rosaceae) root traditionally used as a folk remedy by local health practitioners of Khasi Hills, Meghalaya was investigated for its effects on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Significant increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and decrease in activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were observed under diabetic condition. Intraperitoneal administration of methanol extract of P. fulgens roots at a dose of 250 mg/kg body weight to male swiss albino diabetic mice for 14 days caused significant reduction in the elevated TBARS level, while increasing the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in diabetic mice. Maximum reduction in TBARS level was observed in liver tissue (75%, p<0.001). Kidney exhibited the highest elevation in the activity for catalase (68%, p<0.001) and superoxide dismutase (29%, p<0.001) while maximum increase in glutathione peroxidase activity was seen in brain (50%, p<0.001). The effects of P. fulgens was compared against known antioxidant, vitamin C. Results indicate that Potentilla fulgens methanolic root extract can reduce free radical mediated oxidative stress in experimental diabetes mellitus. PMID:24826032

  6. Hypoglycemic effect of methanolic extract of Musa paradisiaca (Musaceae) green fruits in normal and diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A O; Adewunmi, C O

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a debilitating hormonal disorder in which strict glycemic control and prevention of associated complications are of crucial importance. This study was designed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of methanolic extract of mature, green fruits of Musa paradisiaca (MEMP) in normal (normoglycemic) and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated, diabetic (hyperglycemic) mice, using chlorpropamide as the reference antidiabetic agent. MEMP (100-800 mg/kg p.o.) induced significant, dose-related (p < 0.05-0.001) reductions in the blood glucose concentrations of both normal and diabetic mice. Chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg p.o.) also produced significant (p < 0.01-0.001) reductions in the blood glucose concentrations of normal and diabetic mice. The results of this experimental study indicate that, in the mammalian model used, MEMP possesses hypoglycemic activity. Although the precise mechanism of the hypoglycemic action of MEMP is still unclear and will have to await further studies, it could be due, at least in part, to stimulation of insulin production and subsequent glucose utilization. Nevertheless, the findings of this experimental animal study indicate that MEMP possesses hypoglycemic activity, and thus lends credence to the suggested folkloric use of the plant in the management and/or control of adult-onset, type-2 diabetic mellitus among the Yoruba-speaking people of South-Western Nigeria.

  7. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin suppresses mouse colon tumorigenesis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Naoki; Inoue, Takuya; Iguchi, Munetaka; Fujiwara, Kaori; Kakimoto, Kazuki; Nouda, Sadaharu; Okada, Toshihiko; Kawakami, Ken; Abe, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-02-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to have an increased risk of colorectal neoplasia. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been used as a new therapeutic tool for type 2 diabetes. Since the substrates for DPP-4 include intestinotrophic hormones and chemokines such as GLP-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which are associated with tumor progression, DPP-4 inhibitors may increase the risk of colorectal tumors. However, the influence of DPP-4 inhibitors on colorectal neoplasia in patients with type 2 diabetes remains unknown. In the present study, we show that long-term administration of a DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin (STG), suppressed colon carcinogenesis in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) C57BL/6J mice. Colonic mucosal concentrations of glucagon‑like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-2 were significantly elevated in the ob/ob mice. However, mucosal GLP concentrations and the plasma level of SDF-1 were not affected by the administration of STG. Real‑time PCR analysis revealed that colonic mucosal IL-6 mRNA expression, which was significantly upregulated in the ob/ob mice, was significantly suppressed by the long-term administration of STG. These results suggest that a DPP-4 inhibitor may suppress colon carcinogenesis in mice with type 2 diabetes in a GLP-independent manner. Since DPP-4 has multiple biological functions, further studies analyzing other factors related to colon carcinogenesis are needed.

  8. Hypoglycemic Effect of Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) Extract on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Joo; Han, Ji-Sook

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the inhibitory effect of jicama extract on α-glucosidase activity, α-amylase activity, and postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Jicama extract showed prominent inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. The IC50 values of jicama extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.083±0.004 and 0.091±0.017 mg/mL, respectively. The increase in postprandial blood glucose levels was more significantly suppressed in the jicama extract-administered group than in the control group of both STZ-induced diabetic and normal mice. Blood glucose levels of the control group increased to 383.75±11.54 and 402.50±15.32 mg/dL at 30 and 60 min after a meal and decreased to 349.67±11.62 mg/dL at 120 min. However, postprandial blood glucose levels were significantly decreased, when diabetic mice were fed with jicama extract (342.00±15.73, 367.00±13.00, and 329.67±12.43 mg/dL at 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively). Furthermore, the area under the curve was significantly decreased with jicama extract administration in diabetic mice (P<0.05). Therefore, these results indicate that jicama extract may help decrease postprandial blood glucose level by inhibiting α-glucosidase.

  9. Capparis spinosa L. aqueous extract evokes antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Eddouks, Mohamed; Lemhadri, Ahmed; Hebi, Morad; EL Hidani, Ahmed; Zeggwagh, Naoufel Ali; EL Bouhali, Bachir; Hajji, Lhoussaine; Burcelin, Remy

    2017-01-01

    Objective: As the aqueous extract of Capparis spinosa (CS) possess antidiabetic effect, he present study aims to reveal the possible mechanism of action of CS in diabetic mice. Materials and Methods: Both single and repeated oral administrations of aqueous extract of CS were performed in multi-low dose streptozotocin-induced (MLDS) diabetic mice. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used in association with the endogenous glucose production (perfusion rate of 3-3H glucose) to evaluate the effect of CS aqueous extract on insulin sensitivity. Results: Our study showed that aqueous extract of CS possess a potent hypoglycaemic activity in MLDS diabetic mice. Furthermore, the analysis perfusion of 3-3H glucose demonstrated the parallel decrease of basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) with the hypoglycaemic activity. EGP was lower in CS-Treated group when compared to the control group (p<0.001). The euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique demonstrated that CS treatment improves insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. Conclusion: We conclude that the antihyperglycemic effet CS is probably due to the inhibition of basal endogenous glucose production and the improvement of insulin sensitivity in MLDS diabetic mice. PMID:28348974

  10. A bioengineered drug-Eluting scaffold accelerated cutaneous wound healing In diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Ding, Guoshan; Shi, Xiaoming; Guo, Wenyuan; Ni, Zhijia; Fu, Hong; Fu, Zhiren

    2016-09-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetic patients can greatly hinder the wound healing process. In this study we investigated if the engagement of F4/80(+) murine macrophages could accelerate the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice. To facilitate the engagement of macrophages, we engineered a drug-eluting electrospun scaffold with a payload of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). MCP-1 could be readily released from the scaffold within 3 days. The electrospun scaffold showed no cytotoxic effects on human keratinocytes in vitro. Full-thickness excisional cutaneous wound was created in diabetic mice. The wound fully recovered within 10 days in mice treated with the drug-eluting scaffold. In contrast, the wound took 14 days to fully recover in control groups. The use of drug-eluting scaffold also improved the re-epithelialization. Furthermore, we observed a larger population of F4/80(+) macrophages in the wound bed of mice treated with drug-eluting scaffolds on day 3. This marked increase of macrophages in the wound bed could have contributed to the accelerated wound healing. Our study shed new light on an immuno-engineering solution for wound healing management in diabetic patients.

  11. Sustained inflammasome activity in macrophages impairs wound healing in type 2 diabetic humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rita E; Fang, Milie M; Weinheimer-Haus, Eileen M; Ennis, William J; Koh, Timothy J

    2014-03-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that sustained activity of the Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome in wounds of diabetic humans and mice contributes to the persistent inflammatory response and impaired healing characteristic of these wounds. Macrophages (Mp) isolated from wounds on diabetic humans and db/db mice exhibited sustained inflammasome activity associated with low level of expression of endogenous inflammasome inhibitors. Soluble factors in the biochemical milieu of these wounds are sufficient to activate the inflammasome, as wound-conditioned medium activates caspase-1 and induces release of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 in cultured Mp via a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. Importantly, inhibiting inflammasome activity in wounds of db/db mice using topical application of pharmacological inhibitors improved healing of these wounds, induced a switch from proinflammatory to healing-associated Mp phenotypes, and increased levels of prohealing growth factors. Furthermore, data generated from bone marrow-transfer experiments from NLRP-3 or caspase-1 knockout to db/db mice indicated that blocking inflammasome activity in bone marrow cells is sufficient to improve healing. Our findings indicate that sustained inflammasome activity in wound Mp contributes to impaired early healing responses of diabetic wounds and that the inflammasome may represent a new therapeutic target for improving healing in diabetic individuals.

  12. Effect of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rodney K; Liu, Perry H; Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Ibrahim, Shahrul I; Hechtman, Herbert B; Orgill, Dennis P

    2006-01-01

    Burns, especially those involving large surface areas, represent a complex wound healing problem. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is released by activated platelets to recruit inflammatory cells toward the wound bed. It has effects on promoting angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation. However, the effectiveness of topical PDGF on wound closure is variable, ranging from little improvement observed in pig models to dramatic improvement reported in a diabetic mouse model. Here, we sought to determine the effectiveness of commercially sold PDGF-BB (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice. C57BL/KsJ db+/db+ mice and its host strain bearing dorsal 1.5-cm wounds were divided into groups (n = 8 in each group) receiving topical application of either Regranex (10 microg/wound) or vehicle for 5 consecutive days after wounding. The rate of wound closure was analyzed using computerized planimetry. The amount of granulation tissue was determined histologically. Our data indicate that diabetic mice exhibit a significant delay in wound closure when compared with their host strain. Topical application of Regranex did not improve the time to wound closure but did significantly increase the amount of granulation tissue. Our current study using commercially available Regranex failed to reproduce the previously reported finding that PDGF improved wound closure in healing impaired genetically diabetic mice.

  13. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSITION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES AND OBESITY ON THE DISPOSTION AND ELIMINATION OF TCDD IN MICE. MJ DeVito', JJ Diliberto', DG Ross', C Emond2, VM Richardson', and LS Birnbaum', 'ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, USA, 2National Research Council.
    One possible explanation fo...

  14. Depression can be prevented by astaxanthin through inhibition of hippocampal inflammation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Xiao-Tong; Chen, Jing; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang; Song, Yuan-Jian

    2017-02-15

    The critical factor considered in a depression induced by diabetes is the inflammation eliciting hippocampal, amygdala and thalamic neuronal injury. Therefore, inhibiting inflammatory reactions in the brain and reducing neuronal injury can alleviate depression in rodents suffering from diabetes mellitus. The oral administration of astaxanthin has been employed in emotional disorders and diabetic complications due to its anti-depressant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic functions. However, it has not been reported whether astaxanthin can improve diabetes-related depression-like behavior, and its potential mechanisms have not been elucidated. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the effect of astaxanthin on depression in diabetic mice and to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, experimental diabetic mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 150mg/kg, dissolved in citrate buffer) after fasting for 12h. The diabetic model was assessed 72h after STZ injection, and mice with a fasting blood glucose level more than or equal to 16.7mmol/L were used in this study, and oral astaxanthin (25mg/kg) was provided uninterrupted for ten weeks. Depression-like behavior was evaluated by the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST). The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and cleaved caspase-3-positive cells were measured by immunohistochemistry, and the western blotting was used to test the protein levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and cyclooxygenase (COX-2). The results showed that astaxanthin had an anti-depressant effect on diabetic mice. Furthermore, we observed that astaxanthin significantly reduced the number of GFAP-positive cells in the hippocampus and hypothalamus, and also the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in the hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus was decreased as well. Moreover, astaxanthin could down-regulate the expression of IL-6, IL-1β and COX

  15. Urinary peptidomics provides a noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; Ericsson, Anette; Huang, Yufeng; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Mischak, Harald; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-11-01

    Nephropathy is among the most frequent complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Despite the success of novel drugs in animal models, the majority of the subsequent clinical trials employing those drugs targeting diabetic nephropathy failed. This lack of translational value may in part be due to an inadequate comparability of human disease and animal models that often capture only a few aspects of disease. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a multimolecular noninvasive humanized readout of diabetic nephropathy based on urinary peptidomics. The disease-modified urinary peptides of 2 type 2 diabetic nephropathy mouse models were identified and compared with previously validated urinary peptide markers of diabetic nephropathy in humans to generate a classifier composed of 21 ortholog peptides. This classifier predicted the response to disease and treatment with inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system in mice. The humanized classifier was significantly correlated with glomerular lesions. Using a human type 2 diabetic validation cohort of 207 patients, the classifier also distinguished between patients with and without diabetic nephropathy, and their response to renin-angiotensin system inhibition. Thus, a combination of multiple molecular features common to both human and murine disease could provide a significant change in translational drug discovery research in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Proteome wide reduction in AGE modification in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice by hydralazine mediated transglycation

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Suresh K.; Bhat, Shweta; Golegaonkar, Sandeep B.; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G.; Deshmukh, Arati B.; Patil, Harshal S.; Bhosale, Santosh D.; Shaikh, Mahemud L.; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.; Boppana, Ramanamurthy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.

    2013-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between glucose and protein can be chemically reversed by transglycation. Here we report the transglycation activity of hydralazine using a newly developed MALDI-TOF-MS based assay. Hydralazine mediated transglycation of HbA1c, plasma proteins and kidney proteins was demonstrated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice, as evidenced by decrease in protein glycation, as well as presence of hydralazine-glucose conjugate in urine of diabetic mice treated with hydralazine. Hydralazine down regulated the expression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE), NADPH oxidase (NOX), and super oxide dismutase (SOD). These findings will provide a new dimension for developing intervention strategies for the treatment of glycation associated diseases such as diabetes complications, atherosclerosis, and aging. PMID:24126953

  17. High Fructose Diet inducing diabetes rapidly impacts olfactory epithelium and behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Sébastien; Soubeyre, Vanessa; Jarriault, David; Molinas, Adrien; Léger-Charnay, Elise; Desmoulins, Lucie; Grebert, Denise; Meunier, Nicolas; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), a major public health issue reaching worldwide epidemic, has been correlated with lower olfactory abilities in humans. As olfaction represents a major component of feeding behavior, its alteration may have drastic consequences on feeding behaviors that may in turn aggravates T2D. In order to decipher the impact of T2D on the olfactory epithelium, we fed mice with a high fructose diet (HFruD) inducing early diabetic state in 4 to 8 weeks. After only 4 weeks of this diet, mice exhibited a dramatic decrease in olfactory behavioral capacities. Consistently, this decline in olfactory behavior was correlated to decreased electrophysiological responses of olfactory neurons recorded as a population and individually. Our results demonstrate that, in rodents, olfaction is modified by HFruD-induced diabetes. Functional, anatomical and behavioral changes occurred in the olfactory system at a very early stage of the disease. PMID:27659313

  18. Shengmai San Ameliorates Myocardial Dysfunction and Fibrosis in Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tong-Tong; Tian, Jing; Chen, Hui-hua; Lu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we mainly investigated the effects of Shengmai San (SMS) on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) in db/db mice. The db/db mice were randomly divided into model group and SMS group, while C57BLKS/J inbred mice were used as controls. After 24-week treatment, blood glucose, body weight, and heart weight were determined. Hemodynamic changes in the left ventricle were measured using catheterization. The myocardial structure and subcellular structural changes were observed by HE staining and electron microscopy; the myocardium collagen content was quantified by Masson staining. To further explore the protective mechanism of SMS, we analyzed the expression profiles of fibrotic related proteins. Compared to nondiabetic mice, db/db mice exhibited enhanced diastolic myocardial dysfunction and adverse structural remodeling. Higher expression of profibrotic proteins and lower levels of extracellular matrix degradation were also observed. After SMS oral administration for 24 weeks, cardiac dysfunction, hypertrophy, and fibrosis in diabetic mice were greatly improved. Moreover, increased profibrotic protein expression was strongly reversed by SMS treatment in db/db mice. The results demonstrate that SMS exerts a cardioprotective effect against DCM by attenuating myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis via a TGF-β dependent pathway. PMID:27200101

  19. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Attenuates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Retinal Pericyte Loss in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeong A.; Koh, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Loss of pericytes, an early hallmark of diabetic retinopathy (DR), results in breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may be involved in this process. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a known ameliorator of ER stress, on pericyte loss in DR of streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic mice. To assess the extent of DR, the integrity of retinal vessels and density of retinal capillaries in STZ-induced diabetic mice were evaluated. Additionally, induction of ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) were assessed in diabetic mice and human retinal pericytes exposed to advanced glycation end products (AGE) or modified low-density lipoprotein (mLDL). Fluorescein dye leakage during angiography and retinal capillary density were improved in UDCA-treated diabetic mice, compared to the nontreated diabetic group. Among the UPR markers, those involved in the protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) pathway were increased, while UDCA attenuated UPR in STZ-induced diabetic mice as well as AGE- or mLDL-exposed retinal pericytes in culture. Consequently, vascular integrity was improved and pericyte loss reduced in the retina of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Our findings suggest that UDCA might be effective in protecting against DR. PMID:28127564

  20. Impaired cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration and bacterial clearance in response to urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Bicer, Fuat; Izgi, Kenan; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic patients have increased susceptibility to infections, and urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common type in women with diabetes mellitus. Knowledge of bacterial clearance effectiveness following UTI in diabetics is sparse. In this study, the effects of diabetes on bacterial clearance efficiency and components of the innate immune system in response to UTI in a murine model were investigated. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control female C57BL/6J mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and bacterial load, expression of chemokines, and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder over time were investigated. Expression levels of histone deacetylases were also measured to address a potential mechanism underlying the phenotype. Bacterial clearance during UTI was significantly prolonged in diabetic mice relative to controls. Neutrophil infiltration in bladder tissue and urine, and both mRNA and protein expression of chemokines MIP-2, KC, MCP-1 and IL-6 in bladder tissue were diminished at early time points after infection in diabetic mice relative to controls. In addition, mRNA levels of histone deacetylases 1-5 were increased in diabetic mice. This is the first study to show an association of impaired bacterial clearance in diabetic mice with suppression of UTI-induced chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder.

  1. Activation of the nuclear receptor FXR improves hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in diabetic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanqiao; Lee, Florence Ying; Barrera, Gabriel; Lee, Hans; Vales, Charisse; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Willson, Timothy M.; Edwards, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in maintaining bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that FXR also regulates glucose metabolism. Activation of FXR by the synthetic agonist GW4064 or hepatic overexpression of constitutively active FXR by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer significantly lowered blood glucose levels in both diabetic db/db and wild-type mice. Consistent with these data, FXR null mice exhibited glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity. We further demonstrate that activation of FXR in db/db mice repressed hepatic gluconeogenic genes and increased hepatic glycogen synthesis and glycogen content by a mechanism that involves enhanced insulin sensitivity. In view of its central roles in coordinating regulation of both glucose and lipid metabolism, we propose that FXR agonists are promising therapeutic agents for treatment of diabetes mellitus. glucose | GW4064 | farnesoid X receptor-VP16 | triglyceride | cholesterol

  2. Radioiodinated Naphthylalanine Derivatives Targeting Pancreatic Beta Cells in Normal and Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amartey, John K.; Shi, Yufei; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Esguerra, Celestina; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Mohanna, Futwan

    2008-01-01

    An imaging method capable of using a signal from pancreatic beta cells to determine their mass would be of immense value in monitoring the progression of diabetes as well as response to treatment. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are expressed on beta cells and are a potential target for imaging. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether pancreatic beta cells are a target for radiolabeled naphthylalanine derivatives. The molecules were subjected to in vitro and ex vivo evaluations. Pancreatic uptake of radioactivity was lower in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice than normal mice at all time points investigated (P < .05) and correlated with the number of islets in tissue sections of both control and NOD mice. Immunohistochemical and confocal fluorescent microscopic studies showed colocalization of insulin and the conjugate radioligand in the pancreas. The results demonstrated that pancreatic uptake is receptor-mediated, and that beta cells are the primary target. PMID:18483609

  3. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ), we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c), the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and μ-opioid receptors (MOR), were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP). The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of CoPP alone or

  4. Exacerbation of dietary steatohepatitis and fibrosis in obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Kyoko; Ikejima, Kenichi; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Abe, Wataru; Yamashina, Shunhei; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Nobuhiro

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated a dietary model of steatohepatitis caused by methionine- and choline-deficiency (MCD) in obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Male KK-A(y) mice and C57Bl/6 mice were fed an MCD diet for up to 8 weeks, and liver pathology was evaluated. Hepatic steatosis and inflammatory infiltration were more prominent in KK-A(y) mice than in C57Bl/6 mice 4 weeks after feeding with MCD diet. MCD diet-induced increases in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA levels, as well as lipid peroxidation, in the liver were also potentiated significantly in KK-A(y) mice. Extended degree of hepatic fibrosis was observed in KK-A(y) mice as compared to C57Bl/6 mice 8 weeks after feeding with MCD diet. Indeed, alpha1(I)procollagen and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA levels were significantly higher in KK-A(y) mice following dietary treatment. Serum adiponectin levels were elevated nearly two-fold when C57Bl/6 mice were given MCD diet for 4 weeks; however, serum adiponectin levels in KK-A(y) mice fed both the control- and MCD diet were the same, reaching the values almost 1/2 of those in C57Bl/6 mice. In conclusion, KK-A(y) mice exhibit increased susceptibility to MCD diet-induced steatohepatitis, where hypoadiponectinemia most likely plays a key role in exacerbation of both inflammatory and profibrogenic responses.

  5. The SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin ameliorates early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob type 2 diabetic mice with and without hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gembardt, Florian; Bartaun, Christoph; Jarzebska, Natalia; Mayoux, Eric; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in humans in the Western world. The recent development of Na+-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offers a new antidiabetic therapy via enhanced glucose excretion. Whether this strategy exerts beneficial effects on the development of type 2 diabetic nephropathy is still largely unclear. We investigated the effects of the specific SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin in BTBR.Cg-Lep/WiscJ (BTBR ob/ob) mice, which spontaneously develop type 2 diabetic nephropathy. In the first experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received either a diet containing 300 ppm empagliflozin or equicaloric placebo chow for 12 wk. In the second experiment, BTBR ob/ob mice received 1 μg·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) ANG II to induce arterial hypertension and were separated into the same two diet groups for 6 wk. In both experiments, empagliflozin treatment enhanced glucosuria, thereby lowering blood glucose. Independently of hypertension, empagliflozin reduced albuminuria in diabetic mice. However, empagliflozin treatment affected diabetes-related glomerular hypertrophy, markers of renal inflammation, and mesangial matrix expansion only in BTBR ob/ob mice without hypertension. In summary, empagliflozin demonstrated significant antihyperglycemic effects, differentially ameliorating early features of diabetic nephropathy in BTBR ob/ob mice with and without hypertension.

  6. TLR4 Antagonist Attenuates Atherogenesis in LDL Receptor-Deficient Mice with Diet-Induced Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongyang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Yanchun; Lopes-Virella, Maria F.; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Although a large number of studies have well documented a key role of toll-like receptor (TLR)4 in atherosclerosis, it remains undetermined if TLR4 antagonist attenuates atherogenesis in mouse model for type 2 diabetes. In this study, we induced type 2 diabetes in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR−/−) mice by high-fat diet (HFD). At 8 weeks old, 20 mice were fed HFD and 20 mice fed regular chow (RC) for 24 weeks. In the last 10 weeks, half HFD-fed mice and half RC-fed mice were treated with Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipopolysaccharide (Rs-LPS), an established TLR4 antagonist. After the treatment, atherosclerotic lesions in aortas were analyzed. Results showed that the HFD significantly increased bodyweight, glucose, lipids including total cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids, and insulin resistance, indicating that the HFD induced type 2 diabetes in LDLR−/− mice. Results also showed that Rs-LPS had no effect on HFD-increased metabolic parameters in both nondiabetic and diabetic mice. Lipid staining of aortas and histological analysis of cross-sections of aortic roots showed that diabetes increased atherosclerotic lesions, but Rs-LPS attenuated atherogenesis in diabetic mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies showed that Rs-LPS reduced infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in atherosclerotic lesions of diabetic mice. Finally, the antagonistic effect of Rs-LPS on TLR4 was demonstrated by our in vitro studies showing that Rs-LPS inhibited IL-6 secretion from macrophages and endothelial cells stimulated by LPS or LPS plus saturated fatty acid palmitate. Taken together, our study demonstrated that TLR4 antagonist was capable of attenuating vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in mice with HFD-induced type 2 diabetes. PMID:26162692

  7. Increased methylmercury toxicity related to obesity in diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Megumi; Yanagisawa, Rie; Motomura, Eriko; Nakamura, Masaaki; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Takeya, Motohiro; Eto, Komyo

    2014-08-01

    We examined the toxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg) in KK-Ay type 2 diabetic mice to clarify how metabolic changes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus affect MeHg toxicity. MeHg (5 mg Hg kg (-1) day(-1) p.o.) was given to 4-week-old male KK-Ay and C57BL/6J (BL/6) mice three times per week for 6 weeks. Average body weights (BW) of vehicle-treated BL/6 and KK-Ay mice were 16.3 and 16.4 g respectively on the first day, and 24.8 and 42.3 g respectively on the last day of the experiment. MeHg-treated KK-Ay mice began to lose weight about 5 weeks after MeHg administration. Six of seven MeHg-treated KK-Ay mice showed hind-limb clasping in the final stage of the experiment. The mean blood mercury level of MeHg-treated KK-Ay mice reached a maximum of 9.8 µg ml(-1) , whereas that of the MeHg-treated BL/6 mice was 2.8 µg ml(-1) after 10 days of treatment. The average total mercury concentrations in the cerebrum and epididymal fat pad were 7.4 and 0.57 µg g(-1) , respectively, for BL/6 mice and 27 and 1.6 µg g(-1) , respectively, for KK-Ay mice. In MeHg-treated KK-Ay mice with neurological symptoms, CD204-positive macrophages were observed in the brain, kidney and spleen, indicating CD204 could be a marker for injured tissues. BW loss and significant pathological changes were not observed in other groups of mice. These results indicate that body fat gain in type 2 diabetes mellitus and low mercury accumulation in adipose tissue increased MeHg concentrations in organs and enhanced toxicity in KK-Ay mice at the same dose of MeHg per BW.

  8. Endovenous administration of bone-marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells prevents renal failure in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Simon, Valeska; Pardo, Fabian; Yañez, Alejandro; Carpio, Daniel; Conget, Paulette

    2009-11-01

    Twenty-five to 40% of diabetic patients develop diabetic nephropathy, a clinical syndrome that comprises renal failure and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It represents the major cause of chronic kidney disease and is associated with premature morbimortality of diabetic patients. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) contribute to the regeneration of several organs, including acutely injured kidney. We sought to evaluate if MSC protect kidney function and structure when endovenously administered to mice with severe diabetes. A month after nonimmunologic diabetes induction by streptozotocin injection, C57BL/6 mice presented hyperglycemia, glycosuria, hypoinsulinemia, massive beta-pancreatic islet destruction, low albuminuria, but not renal histopathologic changes (DM mice). At this stage, one group of animals received the vehicle (untreated) and other group received 2 doses of 0.5 x 10(6) MSC/each (MSC-treated). Untreated DM mice gradually increased urinary albumin excretion and 4 months after diabetes onset, they reached values 15 times higher than normal animals. In contrast, MSC-treated DM mice maintained basal levels of albuminuria. Untreated DM mice had marked glomerular and tubular histopathologic changes (sclerosis, mesangial expansion, tubular dilatation, proteins cylinders, podocytes lost). However, MSC-treated mice showed only slight tubular dilatation. Observed renoprotection was not associated with an improvement in endocrine pancreas function in this animal model, because MSC-treated DM mice remained hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic, and maintained few remnant beta-pancreatic islets throughout the study period. To study MSC biodistribution, cells were isolated from isogenic mice that constitutively express GFP (MSC(GFP)) and endovenously administered to DM mice. Although at very low levels, donor cells were found in kidney of DM mice 3 month after transplantation. Presented preclinical results support MSC administration as a cell

  9. Intermittent injections of osteocalcin improve glucose metabolism and prevent type 2 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Mathieu; McKee, Marc D; Levine, Robert L; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gérard

    2012-02-01

    The uncarboxylated form of the osteoblast-specific secreted molecule osteocalcin is a hormone favoring glucose handling and increasing energy expenditure. As a result, the absence of osteocalcin leads to glucose intolerance in mice, while genetically modified mice with an increase in uncarboxylated osteocalcin are protected from type 2 diabetes and obesity. Here, we tested in the mouse the therapeutic potential of intermittent administration of osteocalcin. We found that daily injections of osteocalcin at either 3 or 30 ng/g/day significantly improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mice fed a normal diet. This was attributable, in part, to an increase in both β-cell mass and insulin secretion. When mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), daily injections of osteocalcin partially restored insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Moreover, mice treated with intermittent osteocalcin injections displayed additional mitochondria in their skeletal muscle, had increased energy expenditure and were protected from diet-induced obesity. Finally, the hepatic steatosis induced by the HFD was completely rescued in mice receiving osteocalcin daily. Overall, these results provide evidence that daily injections of osteocalcin can improve glucose handling and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Metabolic stress–induced activation of FoxO1 triggers diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Hojayev, Berdymammet; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zhao V.; Luo, Xiang; Iglewski, Myriam; Shelton, John M.; Gerard, Robert D.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is cardiovascular disease; diabetic cardiomyopathy is typified by alterations in cardiac morphology and function, independent of hypertension or coronary disease. However, the molecular mechanism that links diabetes to cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood. Insulin resistance is a hallmark feature of diabetes, and the FoxO family of transcription factors, which regulate cell size, viability, and metabolism, are established targets of insulin and growth factor signaling. Here, we set out to evaluate a possible role of FoxO proteins in diabetic cardiomyopathy. We found that FoxO proteins were persistently activated in cardiac tissue in mice with diabetes induced either genetically or by high-fat diet (HFD). FoxO activity was critically linked with development of cardiomyopathy: cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of FoxO1 rescued HFD-induced declines in cardiac function and preserved cardiomyocyte insulin responsiveness. FoxO1-depleted cells displayed a shift in their metabolic substrate usage, from free fatty acids to glucose, associated with decreased accumulation of lipids in the heart. Furthermore, we found that FoxO1-dependent downregulation of IRS1 resulted in blunted Akt signaling and insulin resistance. Together, these data suggest that activation of FoxO1 is an important mediator of diabetic cardiomyopathy and is a promising therapeutic target for the disease. PMID:22326951

  11. Different immunological responses to early-life antibiotic exposure affecting autoimmune diabetes development in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youjia; Jin, Ping; Peng, Jian; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2016-08-01

    Environmental factors clearly influence the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease. We have studied gut microbiota as important environmental agents that could affect the initiation or progression of type 1 diabetes especially in the prenatal period. We used neomycin, targeting mainly Gram negative or vancomycin, targeting mainly Gram positive bacteria, to treat pregnant NOD mothers and to study autoimmune diabetes development in their offspring. Neomycin-treated offspring were protected from diabetes, while vancomycin-treated offspring had accelerated diabetes development, and both antibiotics caused distinctly different shifts in gut microbiota composition compared with the offspring from untreated control mice. Our study demonstrated that neomycin treatment of pregnant mothers leads to generation of immune-tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the offspring and these APCs had reduced specific autoantigen-presenting function both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the protection from diabetes mediated by tolerogenic APCs was vertically transmissible to the second generation. In contrast, more diabetogenic inflammatory T cells were found in the lymphoid organs of the offspring from the vancomycin-treated pregnant mothers. This change however was not transmitted to the second generation. Our results suggested that prenatal exposure to antibiotic influenced gut bacterial composition at the earliest time point in life and is critical for consequent education of the immune system. As different bacteria can induce different immune responses, understanding these differences and how to generate self-tolerogenic APCs could be important for developing new therapy for type 1 diabetes.

  12. ER stress and autophagy dysfunction contribute to fatty liver in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Li, Yan; Liang, Tingting; Lu, Xuemian; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xingkai; Jiang, Xin; Martin, Robert C; Cheng, Mingliang; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are often identified in patients simultaneously. Recent evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy dysfunction play an important role in hepatocytes injury and hepatic lipid metabolism, however the mechanistic interaction between diabetes and NAFLD is largely unknown. In this study, we used a diabetic mouse model to study the interplay between ER stress and autophagy during the pathogenic transformation of NAFLD. The coexist of inflammatory hepatic injury and hepatic accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) stored in lipid droplets indicated development of steatohepatitis in the diabetic mice. The alterations of components for ER stress signaling including ATF6, GRP78, CHOP and caspase12 indicated increased ER stress in liver tissues in early stage but blunted in the later stage during the development of diabetes. Likewise, autophagy functioned well in the early stage but suppressed in the later stage. The inactivation of unfolded protein response and suppression of autophagy were positively related to the development of steatohepatitis, which linked to metabolic abnormalities in the compromised hepatic tissues in diabetic condition. We conclude that the adaption of ER stress and impairment of autophagy play an important role to exacerbate lipid metabolic disorder contributing to steatohepatitis in diabetes.

  13. Glycine prevents metabolic steatohepatitis in diabetic KK-Ay mice through modulation of hepatic innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shiori; Ikejima, Kenichi; Arai, Kumiko; Yokokawa, Junko; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-12-01

    Strategies for prevention and treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remain to be established. We evaluated the effect of glycine on metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Male KK-A(y) mice were fed a diet containing 5% glycine for 4 wk, and liver pathology was evaluated. Hepatic mRNA levels for lipid-regulating molecules, cytokines/chemokines, and macrophage M1/M2 markers were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Hepatic expression of natural killer (NK) T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Body weight gain was significantly blunted and development of hepatic steatosis and inflammatory infiltration were remarkably prevented in mice fed the glycine-containing diet compared with controls. Indeed, hepatic induction levels of molecules related to lipogenesis were largely blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Elevations of hepatic mRNA levels for TNFα and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 were also remarkably blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Furthermore, suppression of hepatic NK T cells was reversed in glycine diet-fed KK-A(y) mice, and basal hepatic expression levels of NK T cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, were increased. Moreover, hepatic mRNA levels of arginase-1, a marker of macrophage M2 transformation, were significantly increased in glycine diet-fed mice. In addition, dietary glycine improved glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia in KK-A(y) mice. These observations clearly indicate that glycine prevents maturity-onset obesity and metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically diabetic KK-A(y) mice. The underlying mechanisms most likely include normalization of hepatic innate immune responses involving NK T cells and M2 transformation of Kupffer cells. It is proposed that glycine is a promising immunonutrient for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome-related nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  14. Curative and beta cell regenerative effects of alpha1-antitrypsin treatment in autoimmune diabetic NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Hoffman, Lauren; Fan, Zhigang; Qipo, Andi; Shi, Hang; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Putheti, Prabhakar; Degauque, Nicolas; Libermann, Towia A; Auchincloss, Hugh; Flier, Jeffrey S; Strom, Terry B

    2008-10-21

    Invasive insulitis is a destructive T cell-dependent autoimmune process directed against insulin-producing beta cells that is central to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in humans and the clinically relevant nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. Few therapies have succeeded in restoring long-term, drug-free euglycemia and immune tolerance to beta cells in overtly diabetic NOD mice, and none have demonstrably enabled enlargement of the functional beta cell mass. Recent studies have emphasized the impact of inflammatory cytokines on the commitment of antigen-activated T cells to various effector or regulatory T cell phenotypes and insulin resistance and defective insulin signaling. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that inflammatory mechanisms trigger insulitis, insulin resistance, faulty insulin signaling, and the loss of immune tolerance to islets. We demonstrate that treatment with alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT), an agent that dampens inflammation, does not directly inhibit T cell activation, ablates invasive insulitis, and restores euglycemia, immune tolerance to beta cells, normal insulin signaling, and insulin responsiveness in NOD mice with recent-onset T1DM through favorable changes in the inflammation milieu. Indeed, the functional mass of beta cells expands in AAT-treated diabetic NOD mice.

  15. Fermented garlic protects diabetic, obese mice when fed a high-fat diet by antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Mi; Lee, Seon-Ha; Lee, Dong-Sub; You, Myung-Jin; Chung, In Kwon; Cheon, Woo Hyun; Kwon, Young-Sam; Lee, Young-Joon; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the bioactivity of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)-fermented aged black garlic (FBG) on obese mice supplied a high-fat diet (HFD) and its in vitro antioxidant activity. Aged black garlic (BG) exhibits potent antioxidative effects and has been subjected to extensive research. In addition, the bioactivity of some natural products is increased by fermentation. In a preliminary test, this study found that the antioxidant activity of FBG is stronger than that of BG. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the bioactivity of BG would be increased by yeast fermentation and would be a good candidate as a nutraceutical product for improving the oxidative defense systems in older patients or patients affected by various oxidative stresses, for example, diabetes and diabetic complications. To test this hypothesis, the bioactivities of FBG in diabetic and obese mice as well as the antioxidant activity in vitro were examined. After 91 days of continuous HFD supply, the mice showed marked obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, and liver and kidney damages. Black garlic and all 3 different doses of FBG showed favorable hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, hypolipidemic, and antiobesity effects compared with the HFD control, but no hypoglycemic effects. In particular, more favorable bioactivity against all 4 HFD-induced diabetic complications was detected in the FBG-treated groups compared with the group given equivalent doses of BG. These findings suggest that the bioactivities of BG can be improved by yeast fermentation.

  16. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  17. Hypoglycemic action of chicken meat extract in type-2 diabetic KKAy mice and GK rats.

    PubMed

    Sim, Meng-Kwoon; Wong, Yong-Chiat; Xu, Xiao-Guang; Sim, Sai-Zhen; Tsi, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study researched the effects of chicken meat extract on blood glucose and insulin level, membrane glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4), and tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice and GK rats. Eight-week-old KKAy mice and GK rats and euglycemic control animals, C57BL/6J mice and Wistar rats, were orally administered a liquid commercial chicken meat extract, BRAND'S Essence of Chicken (BEC), for up to 8 weeks. BEC (1.5 ml/kg) had no effect on blood insulin levels, but significantly lessened the hyperglycemia in the diabetic animals. In the BEC-treated diabetic animals, insulin induced a significant increase in plasma membrane GLUT4 and cytosolic tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS-1, indicating that it attenuates insulin resistance. The present findings are the first demonstration of the hypoglycemic action of a dietary protein, and they lend credence to the reported benefits of using chicken meat as a source of protein in the dietary management of diabetic individuals.

  18. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Protein Promotes Angiogenesis After Peripheral Ischemia in Diabetic Mice Through a VEGF-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Biscetti, Federico; Straface, Giuseppe; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Lancellotti, Stefano; Rizzo, Paola; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Pecorini, Giovanni; Egashira, Kensuke; De Angelis, Giulia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Flex, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is a nuclear DNA-binding protein released from necrotic cells, inducing inflammatory responses and promoting tissue repair and angiogenesis. Diabetic human and mouse tissues contain lower levels of HMGB1 than their normoglycemic counterparts. Deficient angiogenesis after ischemia contributes to worse outcomes of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes. To test the hypothesis that HMGB1 enhances ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetes, we administered HMGB1 protein in a mouse hind limb ischemia model using diabetic mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After the induction of diabetes by streptozotocin, we studied ischemia-induced neovascularization in the ischemic hind limb of normoglycemic, diabetic, and HMGB1-treated diabetic mice. RESULTS We found that the perfusion recovery was significantly attenuated in diabetic mice compared with normoglycemic control mice. Interestingly, HMGB1 protein expression was lower in the ischemic tissue of diabetic mice than in normoglycemic mice. Furthermore, we observed that HMGB1 administration restored the blood flow recovery and capillary density in the ischemic muscle of diabetic mice, that this process was associated with the increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that HMGB1-induced angiogenesis was significantly reduced by inhibiting VEGF activity. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study show that endogenous HMGB1 is crucial for ischemia-induced angiogenesis in diabetic mice and that HMGB1 protein administration enhances collateral blood flow in the ischemic hind limbs of diabetic mice through a VEGF-dependent mechanism. PMID:20200317

  19. Hypoglycemic activities of lyophilized powder of Gynura divaricata by improving antioxidant potential and insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing-Qing; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a serious disease affecting about 5% of people worldwide. Although several studies have indicated hypoglycemic activities of Gynura divaricata (GD), the mechanisms by which GD improves the symptoms of diabetes remain unclear. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the potential hypoglycemic effects of GD. Design The leaves and stems of GD were prepared and lyophilized into a powder, which was added to the diet of mice with type 2 diabetes induced by a high-fat diet in combination with streptozotocin for 4 weeks. During this period, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and body weight of mice were measured. In addition, at the end of the experiment, a series of assays was performed. Results GD administration effectively alleviates insulin resistance and induces a decrease in FBG by 59.54% in 1.2% (L) GD-treated diabetic group and 56.13% in 4.8% (H) GD-treated diabetic group after 4 weeks, respectively, relative to diabetic model mice. The antioxidant capacity was improved by increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) by 64.87% and 53.42% in treatment group H, compared to diabetic model mice, while GD treatment induced a significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) level by 50% in treatment group L, compared to the level in diabetic model mice. Furthermore, glucose metabolism was ameliorated by the increased glycogen synthesis in the livers of diabetic mice. In addition, we also demonstrated that the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of AKT, PI3K and PDK-1, which are involved in insulin signaling, were significantly increased. Conclusions Oral administration of the GD-lyophilized powder has been effectively hypoglycemic, which is done by activating insulin signaling and improving antioxidant capacity in mice with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26715102

  20. Short term supplementation of dietary antioxidants selectively regulates the inflammatory responses during early cutaneous wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcers are serious complications for diabetic patients, yet the precise mechanism that underlines the treatment of these diabetic complications remains unclear. We hypothesized that dietary antioxidant supplementation with vitamin C, combined either with vitamin E or with vitamin E and NAC, improves delayed wound healing through modulation of blood glucose levels, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. Methods Diabetes was induced by administration of alloxan monohydrate. Mice were divided into 4 groups; CON (non-diabetic control mice fed AIN 93 G purified rodent diet), DM (diabetic mice fed AIN 93 G purified rodent diet), VCE (diabetic mice fed 0.5% vitamin C and 0.5% vitamin E supplemented diet), and Comb (diabetic mice fed 0.5% vitamin C, 0.5% vitamin E, and 2.5% NAC supplemented diet). After 10 days of dietary antioxidant supplementation, cutaneous full-thickness excisional wounds were performed, and the rate of wound closure was examined. TBARS as lipid peroxidation products and vitamin E levels were measured in the liver. Expression levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory response related proteins were measured in the cutaneous wound site. Results Dietary antioxidant supplementation improved blood glucose levels and wound closure rate and increased liver vitamin E, but not liver TBARS levels in the diabetic mice as compared to those of the CON. In addition, dietary antioxidant supplementation modulated the expression levels of pIκBα, HO-1, CuZnSOD, iNOS and COX-2 proteins in the diabetic mice. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that delayed wound healing is associated with an inflammatory response induced by hyperglycaemia, and suggests that dietary antioxidant supplementation may have beneficial effects on wound healing through selective modulation of blood glucose levels, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. PMID:22088091

  1. Age-Dependent Loss of Tolerance to an Immunodominant Epitope of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Diabetic prone RIP-B7/DR4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gebe, John A.; Unrath, Kellee A; Falk, Ben A.; Ito, Kouichi; Wen, Li; Daniels, Terri L.; Lernmark, Åke; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2007-01-01

    We have identified for the first time an age-dependent spontaneous loss of tolerance to two self-antigenic epitopes derived from putative diabetes associated antigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in RIP-B7/DRB1*0404 HLA transgenic mice. Diabetic and older non-diabetic mice exhibited a proliferative response to an immunodominant epitope from GAD65 (555-567) and also from GFAP (240-252) but not from an immunogenic epitope from diabetes associated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein. The response to both of these self-antigens is not observed in young mice but is observed in older non-diabetic mice, and is accompanied by histological evidence of insulitis in the absence of overt diabetes. Islet infiltrates in older non-diabetic mice and diabetic mice contain CD4+/FoxP3+ cells and suggest the presence of a regulatory mechanism prior and during diabetic disease. Diabetes penetrance in RIP-B7/DR0404 mice is 23% with a mean onset age of 40 weeks and is similar to that reported for RIP-B7/DR0401 mice. A gender preference is observed in that 38% of female mice become diabetic compared to 8% of male mice. PMID:16979383

  2. Age-dependent loss of tolerance to an immunodominant epitope of glutamic acid decarboxylase in diabetic-prone RIP-B7/DR4 mice.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Unrath, Kellee A; Falk, Ben A; Ito, Kouichi; Wen, Li; Daniels, Terri L; Lernmark, Ake; Nepom, Gerald T

    2006-12-01

    We have identified for the first time an age-dependent spontaneous loss of tolerance to two self-antigenic epitopes derived from putative diabetes-associated antigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in RIP-B7/DRB1*0404 HLA transgenic mice. Diabetic and older non-diabetic mice exhibited a proliferative response to an immunodominant epitope from GAD65 (555-567) and also from GFAP (240-252) but not from an immunogenic epitope from diabetes-associated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein. The response to both of these self-antigens is not observed in young mice but is observed in older non-diabetic mice and is accompanied by histological evidence of insulitis in the absence of overt diabetes. Islet infiltrates in older non-diabetic mice and diabetic mice contain CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) cells and suggest the presence of a regulatory mechanism prior and during diabetic disease. Diabetes penetrance in RIP-B7/DR0404 mice is 23% with a mean onset age of 40 weeks and is similar to that reported for RIP-B7/DR0401 mice. A gender preference is observed in that 38% of female mice become diabetic compared to 8% of male mice.

  3. Phycocyanin ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in mice: Involved in insulin signaling pathway and GK expression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yu; Ren, Zhiheng; Wang, Jianhui; Yang, Xuegan

    2016-03-05

    The therapeutic potential and molecular mechanism of phycocyanin from Spirulina on alloxan-induced diabetes mice was investigated. In the experiment, 4-week treatment of phycocyanin at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight in alloxan-induced diabetes mice resulted in improved metrics in comparison with alloxan-induced diabetes group. These metrics include blood glucose levels, glycosylated serum protein (GSP), glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) and fasting serum insulin (FINS) levels. As its molecular mode of action, phycocyanin leads to the increase of IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the decrease of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, also accompany with increased level of Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 in the liver and pancreas in diabetic mice. In addition, phycocyanin treatment enhanced the glucokinase (GK) level in the liver and pancreas, and the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) level in the liver in diabetic mice. The results suggest that phycocyanin ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in mice by activating insulin signaling pathway and GK expression in pancreas and liver in diabetic mice.

  4. The Leaf of Diospyros kaki Thumb Ameliorates Renal Oxidative Damage in Mice with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Jeong, Mi Ji; Park, Yong Bok; Kim, Sang Ryong; Jung, Un Ju

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is the most common and severe chronic complication of diabetes. The leaf of Diospyros kaki Thumb (persimmon) has been commonly used for herbal tea and medicinal purposes to treat a variety of conditions, including hypertension and atherosclerosis. However, the effect of persimmon leaf on kidney failure has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the role of persimmon leaf in protecting the diabetes-associated kidney damage in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. Mice were fed either a normal chow diet with or without powered persimmon leaf (5%, w/w) for 5 weeks. In addition to kidney morphology and blood markers of kidney function, we assessed levels of oxidative stress markers as well as antioxidant enzymes activities and mRNA expression in the kidney. Supplementation of the diet with powered persimmon leaf not only decreased the concentration of blood urea nitrogen in the plasma but also improved glomerular hypertrophy. Furthermore, the persimmon leaf significantly decreased the levels of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxide in the kidney. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and the mRNA expression of their respective genes were also increased in the kidney of persimmon leaf-supplemented db/db mice. Taken together, these results suggest that supplementation with the persimmon leaf may have protective effects against type 2 diabetes-induced kidney dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:28078262

  5. Methadone ameliorates multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Amirshahrokhi, K.; Dehpour, A.R.; Hadjati, J.; Sotoudeh, M.; Ghazi-Khansari, M.

    2008-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of {beta} cells by the immune system. Opioids have been shown to modulate a number of immune functions, including T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines. The immunosuppressive effect of long-term administration of opioids has been demonstrated both in animal models and humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of methadone, a {mu}-opioid receptor agonist, on type 1 diabetes. Administration of multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) (MLDS) (40mg/kg intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days) to mice resulted in autoimmune diabetes. Mice were treated with methadone (10mg/kg/day subcutaneously) for 24days. Blood glucose, insulin and pancreatic cytokine levels were measured. Chronic methadone treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia and incidence of diabetes, and restored pancreatic insulin secretion in the MLDS model. The protective effect of methadone can be overcome by pretreatment with naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Also, methadone treatment decreased the proinflammatory Th1 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interferon-{gamma}] and increased anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Histopathological observations indicated that STZ-mediated destruction of {beta} cells was attenuated by methadone treatment. It seems that methadone as an opioid agonist may have a protective effect against destruction of {beta} cells and insulitis in the MLDS model of type 1 diabetes.

  6. Transcriptional Profile of Kidney from Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Zhiguo; Yan, Meihua; Zhao, Hailing; Zhu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a common diabetic microvascular complication, is characterized by progressive glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in DN remain to be elucidated. We explored changes in the transcriptional profile in spontaneous type 2 diabetic db/db mice by using the cDNA microarray. Compared with control db/m mice, the db/db mice exhibited marked increases in body weight, kidney weight, and urinary albumin excretion. Renal histological analysis revealed mesangial expansion and thickness of the basement membrane in the kidney of the db/db mice. A total of 355 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by microarray analysis. Pathway enrichment analysis suggested that biological oxidation, bile acid metabolism, and steroid hormone synthesis were the 3 major significant pathways. The top 10 hub genes were selected from the constructed PPI network of DEGs, including Ccnb2 and Nr1i2, which remained largely unclear in DN. We believe that our study can help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DN. PMID:28232950

  7. PPARδ Is Required for Exercise to Attenuate Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Cheang, Wai San; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jian; Wang, Li; Lau, Chi Wai; Chen, Zhen Yu; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Nanping; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity has profound benefits on health, especially on cardiometabolic wellness. Experiments in rodents with trained exercise have shown that exercise improves vascular function and reduces vascular inflammation by modulating the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress. However, the upstream regulator of exercise-induced vascular benefits is unclear. We aimed to investigate the involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) in exercise-induced vascular functional improvement. We show that PPARδ is a crucial mediator for exercise to exert a beneficial effect on the vascular endothelium in diabetic mice. In db/db mice and high-fat diet-induced obese mice, 4 weeks of treadmill exercise restored endothelium-dependent vasodilation of aortas and flow-mediated vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries, whereas genetic ablation of Ppard abolished such improvements. Exercise induces AMPK activation and subsequent PPARδ activation, which help to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, thus increasing NO bioavailability in endothelial cells and vascular tissues. Chemical chaperones 4-phenylbutyric acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid decrease ER stress and protect against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic mice. The results demonstrate that PPARδ-mediated inhibition of ER stress contributes to the vascular benefits of exercise and provides potentially effective targets for treating diabetic vasculopathy.

  8. Exenatide suppresses 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in diabetic mice: Effect on tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mona K; Mohamed, Magda I

    2016-08-01

    Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, which results from interactions of different factors. It is frequently a pathological consequence of persistent inflammation. Diabetes affects several cancers and is positively correlated with the incidence of colon cancer. This study aimed to study the effect of exenatide in ameliorating inflammation, angiogenesis and cell proliferation in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) induced colorectal carcinoma in diabetic mice. Mice were randomly allocated into six groups, 8 mice each. Group 1: vehicle control group. Group 2: diabetic control group. Group 3: DMH control group: diabetic mice treated with DMH (20mg/kg/week,s.c.) for 15 week. Group 4: DMH-cisplatin group: mice received cisplatin (4mg/kg/week, i.p.). Groups 5 & 6: DMH-exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) group: mice received exenatide (10 or 20μg/kg/day,s.c.), respectively. The present results highlighted an increase in angiogenic markers and cell proliferation in the DMH-diabetic group in comparison with the control group with greater expression of endothelial marker (CD34) and Ki-67 in colon tissue. Monotherapy with cisplatin or exenatide (10 and 20μg/kg) downregulated these markers to different extents. The current results provided evidence that exenatide represents a promising chemopreventive effect against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in diabetic mice, at least in part, attributed to its anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative mechanisms.

  9. Linagliptin alleviates fatty liver disease in diabetic db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Michurina, Svetlana V; Ishenko, Irina Ju; Klimontov, Vadim V; Archipov, Sergey A; Myakina, Natalia E; Cherepanova, Marina A; Zavjalov, Eugenii L; Koncevaya, Galina V; Konenkov, Vladimir I

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the effects of linagliptin on the structural signs of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in db/db mice. METHODS Male diabetic db/db mice (BKS.Cg-Dock7m+/+Leprdb/J) aged 10 wk received the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor linagliptin (10 mg/kg) or saline as a placebo once per day by gavage for 8 wk. Intact db/db mice served as controls. Structural changes in the liver were analyzed from light and electron microscopic images of sections from intact, placebo-treated and linagliptin-treated animals. We estimated the changes in hepatocytes, sinusoidal cells, liver microvasculature and lymphatic roots. Hepatic staining for lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS In 18-wk-old diabetic mice, liver steatosis (predominantly microvesicular and mediovesicular steatosis) was accompanied by dilation of the roots of the lymphatic system, interlobular blood vessels and bile canaliculi. Compared to saline-treated mice, linagliptin-treated mice exhibited a reduction in the mean numeral densities of hepatocytes with lipid droplets (92.4% ± 1.7% vs 64.9% ± 5.8% per field of view, P = 0.0002) and a lower proportion of hepatocytes with a high density of lipid droplets (20.7% ± 3.6% vs 50.4% ± 3.1%, P = 0.0007). We observed heterogeneous hepatocytes and relatively preserved cell structures in the linagliptin group. Dilation of blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as ultrastructural changes in the hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, were alleviated by linagliptin treatment. In intact and placebo-treated mice, immunohistochemical staining for LYVE-1 was observed in the endothelial cells of interlobular lymphatic vessels and on the membranes of some endothelial sinusoidal cells. We observed an enlarged LYVE-1 reaction area in linagliptin-treated mice compared to intact and placebo-treated mice. The improvement in the structural parameters of the liver in linagliptin-treated mice

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 amplification limited to the circulation does not protect mice from development of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jan; Ye, Minghao; Khattab, Ahmed M; Fogo, Agnes; Martin, Aline; David, Nicolae Valentin; Kanwar, Yashpal; Osborn, Mark; Batlle, Daniel

    2016-12-04

    Blockers of the renin-angiotensin system are effective in the treatment of experimental and clinical diabetic nephropathy. An approach different from blocking the formation or action of angiotensin II (1-8) that could also be effective involves fostering its degradation. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that cleaves angiotensin II (1-8) to form angiotensin (1-7). Therefore, we examined the renal effects of murine recombinant ACE2 in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy as well as that of amplification of circulating ACE2 using minicircle DNA delivery prior to induction of experimental diabetes. This delivery resulted in a long-term sustained and profound increase in serum ACE2 activity and enhanced ability to metabolize an acute angiotensin II (1-8) load. In mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes pretreated with minicircle ACE2, ACE2 protein in plasma increased markedly and this was associated with a more than 100-fold increase in serum ACE2 activity. However, minicircle ACE2 did not result in changes in urinary ACE2 activity as compared to untreated diabetic mice. In both diabetic groups, glomerular filtration rate increased significantly and to the same extent as compared to non-diabetic controls. Albuminuria, glomerular mesangial expansion, glomerular cellularity, and glomerular size were all increased to a similar extent in minicircle ACE2-treated and untreated diabetic mice, as compared to non-diabetic controls. Recombinant mouse ACE2 given for 4 weeks by intraperitoneal daily injections in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy also failed to improve albuminuria or kidney pathology. Thus, a profound augmentation of ACE2 confined to the circulation failed to ameliorate the glomerular lesions and hyperfiltration characteristic of early diabetic nephropathy. These findings emphasize the importance of targeting the kidney rather than the circulatory renin angiotensin system to combat diabetic

  11. Male gonadal environment paradoxically promotes dacryoadenitis in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hunger, R E; Carnaud, C; Vogt, I; Mueller, C

    1998-01-01

    Similar to pancreatic islets, submandibular glands are more rapidly infiltrated in female NOD mice than in males. The present comparative analysis of cellular infiltrations in lacrimal glands, however, revealed the opposite finding. At 12 wk of age, approximately 25% of male lacrimal tissue area is infiltrated, whereas age-matched female NOD mice still lack major signs of inflammation. T cells predominate in early stages of invasion, but B cells accumulate promptly in more advanced stages, and ultimately dominate over T cells. Dacryoadenitis is promoted by sex hormones, as suggested by the reduced infiltrations seen in orchidectomized NOD males (P < 0.01). It is also controlled by the local environment provided by the lacrimal tissue. Splenocytes from 4- and 20-wk-old female NOD mice cause massive lesions upon adoptive transfer into NOD male recipients while, conversely, female recipients develop barely any histological sign of infiltration, even after transfer of splenocytes from 20-wk-old donor males. These observations provide strong evidence for a dacryoadenitis-promoting role of male gonadal hormones in NOD mice, a finding that contrasts the known androgen-mediated protective effects on insulitis and submandibulitis in the same strain and on dacryoadenitis in other animal models of Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:9502771

  12. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Metabolically Healthy versus Unhealthy Obese and Non-Obese Individuals – The Maastricht Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Berg, Julianne D.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Schram, Miranda T.; Savelberg, Hans H. C. M.; Schaper, Nicolaas C.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Henry, Ronald M. A.; Kroon, Abraham A.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Koster, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Background Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Although both frequently occur together in the same individual, obesity and the metabolic syndrome can also develop independently from each other. The (patho)physiology of “metabolically healthy obese” (i.e. obese without metabolic syndrome) and “metabolically unhealthy non-obese” phenotypes (i.e. non-obese with metabolic syndrome) is not fully understood, but physical activity and sedentary behavior may play a role. Objective To examine objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior across four groups: I) “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO); II) “metabolically unhealthy obese” (MUO); III)”metabolically healthy non-obese” (MHNO); and IV) “metabolically unhealthy non-obese” (MUNO). Methods Data were available from 2,449 men and women aged 40–75 years who participated in The Maastricht Study from 2010 to 2013. Participants were classified into the four groups according to obesity (BMI≥30kg/m2) and metabolic syndrome (ATPIII definition). Daily activity was measured for 7 days with the activPAL physical activity monitor and classified as time spent sitting, standing, and stepping. Results In our study population, 562 individuals were obese. 19.4% of the obese individuals and 72.7% of the non-obese individuals was metabolically healthy. After adjustments for age, sex, educational level, smoking, alcohol use, waking time, T2DM, history of CVD and mobility limitation, MHO (n = 107) spent, per day, more time stepping (118.2 versus 105.2 min; p<0.01) and less time sedentary (563.5 versus 593.0 min., p = 0.02) than MUO (n = 440). In parallel, MHNO (n = 1384) spent more time stepping (125.0 versus 115.4 min; p<0.01) and less time sedentary (553.3 versus 576.6 min., p<0.01) than MUNO (n = 518). Conclusion Overall, the metabolically healthy groups were less sedentary and more physically active than the

  13. Roles for Catharsis S, L, and B in Insulitis and Diabetes in the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Lianne C.; Kirk, Elizabeth A.; McMillen, Timothy S.; Hsiao, Shuo-Hung; Caldwell, Mark; Houston, Barbara; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; LeBoeuf, Renee C.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a panel of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice deficient in major lysosomal cysteine proteases (cathepsins S, L and B) to identify protease enzymes essential for autoimmune diabetes. Null alleles for cathepsins (Cts) S, L or B were introgressed onto the NOD genetic background with 19 Idd markers at homozygosity. Diabetes onset was determined among females aged up to 6 months. We evaluated insulitis and sialadenitis in tissues using histology and computer assisted morphology. NOD mice deficient in Ctss or Ctsb were partially protected from diabetes with incidence at 33% and 28%, respectively, versus wild-type NOD (69%; p<0.00001). NODs lacking cathepsin L (Ctsl−/−) are completely protected from IDDM, as originally shown by others. Ctsl, Ctss, or Ctsb heterozygous mice were able to develop IDDM, although incidence levels were significantly lower for Ctsb+/− (50%) and Ctsl+/− (55%) as compared to NODs (69%; p<0.03). Ctsl−/− mice contain functional, diabetogenic T-cells and an enriched Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell population, and diabetes resistance was due to the presence of an expanded population of regulatory T-cells. These data provide additional information about the potency of the diabetogenic T-cell population in Ctsl−/− mice which were comparable in potency to wild-type NOD mice. These data illustrate the critical contribution of each of these proteases in determining IDDM in the NOD mouse and provide a useful set of models for further studies. PMID:19664906

  14. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro . E-mail: kodera_y@wakunaga.co.jp; Katoh, Akira . E-mail: katoh@st.seikei.ac.jp; Takada, Jitsuya . E-mail: takada@hl.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Hiromu . E-mail: sakurai@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx){sub 2}) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx){sub 2} was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx){sub 2} was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice. Treatment of VO(alx){sub 2} for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA{sup y} mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx){sub 2} also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA{sup y} mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx){sub 2} is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal.

  15. Proregenerative Microenvironment Triggered by Donor Mesenchymal Stem Cells Preserves Renal Function and Structure in Mice with Severe Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando; Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Carpio, Daniel; Cabezas, Fabián; Conget, Paulette; Ezquer, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our work was to evaluate, in an animal model of severe diabetes mellitus, the effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) administration on diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression. After diabetes induction, one group of mice received the vehicle (DM) and other group received a single dose of MSCs (DM + MSCs). DM + MSCs mice showed a significant improvement in functional parameters of the kidney compared with untreated mice. While DM mice presented marked histopathological changes characteristics of advanced stages of DN (fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular basement membrane thickening, capillary occlusion, decreased podocyte density, and effacement of foot processes), DM + MSCs mice showed only slight tubular dilatation. The renoprotection was not associated with an improvement in diabetic condition and very low number of donor cells was found in the kidney of DM + MSCs mice, suggesting that renoprotection could be mediated by paracrine effects. Indeed, DM + MSC mice presented increased renal proliferation index, decreased renal apoptotic index and the restoration of proregenerative factors, and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress damage were also reduced in DM + MSCs mice. Our data demonstrate that MSC administration triggers a proregenerative microenvironment in DN kidney, which allows the preservation of the renal function even if diabetes was uncorrected.

  16. Proregenerative Microenvironment Triggered by Donor Mesenchymal Stem Cells Preserves Renal Function and Structure in Mice with Severe Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ezquer, Fernando; Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Carpio, Daniel; Cabezas, Fabián; Conget, Paulette; Ezquer, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our work was to evaluate, in an animal model of severe diabetes mellitus, the effect of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) administration on diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression. After diabetes induction, one group of mice received the vehicle (DM) and other group received a single dose of MSCs (DM + MSCs). DM + MSCs mice showed a significant improvement in functional parameters of the kidney compared with untreated mice. While DM mice presented marked histopathological changes characteristics of advanced stages of DN (fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular basement membrane thickening, capillary occlusion, decreased podocyte density, and effacement of foot processes), DM + MSCs mice showed only slight tubular dilatation. The renoprotection was not associated with an improvement in diabetic condition and very low number of donor cells was found in the kidney of DM + MSCs mice, suggesting that renoprotection could be mediated by paracrine effects. Indeed, DM + MSC mice presented increased renal proliferation index, decreased renal apoptotic index and the restoration of proregenerative factors, and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and oxidative stress damage were also reduced in DM + MSCs mice. Our data demonstrate that MSC administration triggers a proregenerative microenvironment in DN kidney, which allows the preservation of the renal function even if diabetes was uncorrected. PMID:26167475

  17. Neurotensin-loaded collagen dressings reduce inflammation and improve wound healing in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Moura, Liane I F; Dias, Ana M A; Suesca, Edward; Casadiegos, Sergio; Leal, Ermelindo C; Fontanilla, Marta R; Carvalho, Lina; de Sousa, Hermínio C; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is an important clinical problem in diabetes mellitus and results in failure to completely heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which may lead to lower extremity amputations. In the present study, collagen based dressings were prepared to be applied as support for the delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. The performance of NT alone and NT-loaded collagen matrices to treat wounds in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic induced mice was evaluated. Results showed that the prepared dressings were not-cytotoxic up to 72h after contact with macrophages (Raw 264.7) and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell lines. Moreover, those cells were shown to adhere to the collagen matrices without noticeable change in their morphology. NT-loaded collagen dressings induced faster healing (17% wound area reduction) in the early phases of wound healing in diabetic wounded mice. In addition, they also significantly reduced inflammatory cytokine expression namely, TNF-α (p<0.01) and IL-1β (p<0.01) and decreased the inflammatory infiltrate at day 3 post-wounding (inflammatory phase). After complete healing, metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is reduced in diabetic skin (p<0.05) which significantly increased fibroblast migration and collagen (collagen type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2) and collagen type III, alpha 1 (COL3A1)) expression and deposition. These results suggest that collagen-based dressings can be an effective support for NT release into diabetic wound enhancing the healing process. Nevertheless, a more prominent scar is observed in diabetic wounds treated with collagen when compared to the treatment with NT alone.

  18. Changes in Synaptic Plasticity and Glutamate Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic KK-Ay Mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huajing; Wang, Weiping; Yu, Wenwen; Li, Jiang; Feng, Nan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2017-03-18

    In the present study, the progressive alteration of cognition and the mechanisms of reduction in long-term potentiation (LTP) in spontaneous obese KK-Ay type 2 diabetic mice were investigated. In the study, 3-, 5-, and 7-month-old KK-Ay mice were used. The results indicated that KK-Ay mice showed cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test beginning at the age of 3 months. LTP was significantly impaired in KK-Ay mice during whole study period (3 to 7 months). The above deficits were reversible at an early stage (3 to 5 months old) by diet intervention. Moreover, we found the underlying mechanisms of LTP impairment in KK-Ay mice might be attributed to abnormal phosphorylation or expression of postsynaptic glutamate receptor subunits instead of alteration of basal synaptic transmission. The expression levels of NR1, NR2A, and NR2B subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors were unchanged while the Tyr-dependent phosphorylation of both NR2A and NR2B subunits were significantly reduced in KK-Ay mice. The level of p-Src expression mediating this process was decreased, and the level of αCaMKII autophosphorylation was also reduced. Meanwhile, the GluR1 of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) was decreased, and GluR2 was significantly increased. These data suggest that deficits in synaptic plasticity in KK-Ay mice may arise from the abnormal phosphorylation of the NR2 subunits and the alteration of subunit composition of AMPARs. Diet intervention at an early stage of diabetes might alleviate the cognitive deficits and LTP reduction in KK-Ay mice.

  19. Association of Bactericidal Dysfunction of Paneth Cells in Streptozocin-Induced Diabetic Mice with Insulin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Hong-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Ji; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Ouyang, Hui; Shan, Ti-Dong; Huang, Can-Ze; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2016-08-30

    BACKGROUND Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with increased risks of enteric infection. Paneth cells constitute the first line of the gut defense. Little is known about the impact of T1DM on the bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS A T1DM mouse model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. The analysis of intestinal microbiota and the mucosal bactericidal assay were conducted to evaluate intestinal innate defense. Numbers of Paneth cells and their expression of related antimicrobial peptides were analyzed. Expression of total insulin receptor (IR) mRNA and relative levels of IR-A/IR-B were analyzed. The primary mouse small intestinal crypt culture was used to analyze the effect of insulin and glucose on the expression of related antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells. RESULTS In T1DM mice, bacterial loads were increased and there was an alteration in the composition of the intestinal microflora. Exogenous bacteria had better survival in the small bowel of the T1DM mice. The expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides was significantly decreased in the T1DM mice, although the number of Paneth cells was increased. Relative levels of IR-A/IR-B in Paneth cells of diabetic mice were elevated, but the total IR mRNA did not change. Insulin treatment restored the expression of antimicrobial peptides and normalized the microbiota in the gut of T1DM mice. Subsequently, in vitro culture assay demonstrated that insulin rather than glucose was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides. CONCLUSIONS The bactericidal function of intestinal Paneth cells was impaired in STZ-induced diabetic mice, resulting in the altered intestinal flora, and insulin was essential for the optimal expression of Paneth cell-derived antimicrobial peptides.

  20. Antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from Catathelasma ventricosum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuntao; Sun, Jun; Rao, Shengqi; Su, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2013-07-01

    It is the first time to extract polysaccharides (CVPs) from Catathelasma ventricosum. The antihyperglycemic and antioxidant activity of CVPs in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were examined. Compared with untreated diabetic mice, the administration of CVPs for 30 days caused a significant decrease in the concentrations of blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and maleic dialdehyde (MDA), and a significant increase in the concentrations of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Specially, when normal mice were treated with CVPs, all detection indexes and pathologic morphologies of liver, kidney and pancreas are similar to untreated normal mice, which indicated CVPs are safe for normal mice. In addition, the average molecular weight of CVPs was estimated to be from 3.7 × 10(3) to 1.7 × 10(7)Da and they were mainly composed of glucose (93.5%) with the conformation of α-d-Glucopyranose.

  1. Accumulation of pathogenic DeltamtDNA induced deafness but not diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Sone, Hideyuki; Kasahara, Atsuko; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kagawa, Yasuo; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2004-10-08

    Mito-mice carrying various proportions of deletion mutant mtDNA (DeltamtDNA) were generated by introduction of the DeltamtDNA from cultured cells into fertilized eggs of C57BL/6J (B6) strain mice. Great advantages of mito-mice are that they share exactly the same nuclear-genome background, and that their genetic variations are restricted to proportions of pathogenic DeltamtDNA. Since accumulation of DeltamtDNA to more than 75% induced respiration defects, the disease phenotypes observed exclusively in mito-mice carrying more than 75% DeltamtDNA should be due to accumulated DeltamtDNA. In this study, we focused on the expressions of hearing loss and diabetic phenotypes, since these common age-associated abnormalities have sometimes been reported to be inherited maternally and to be associated with pathogenic mutant mtDNAs. The results showed that accumulation of exogenously introduced DeltamtDNA was responsible for hearing loss, but not for expression of diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice.

  2. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, on bone of mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Teng-Yue; Pan, Hai; Gu, Sa-Sa; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Fang-Yi; Wong, Man-Sau; Zhang, Yan

    2014-05-01

    There are contradictory results about the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on bone. This study was performed to address the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and the effects of the ACEI, captopril, on the bone of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Histochemical assessment on bone paraffin sections was conducted by Safranin O staining and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Micro-computed tomography was performed to analyze bone biological parameters. Gene and protein expression were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting, respectively. Type 1 diabetic mice displayed osteopenia phenotype and captopril treatment showed no osteoprotective effects in diabetic mice as shown by the reduction of bone mineral density, trabecular thickness and bone volume/total volume. The mRNA expression of ACE and renin receptor, and the protein expression of renin and angiotensin II were markedly up-regulated in the bone of vehicle-treated diabetic mice compared to those of non-diabetic mice, and these molecular changes of skeletal RAS components were effectively inhibited by treatment with captopril. However, treatment with captopril significantly elevated serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels, reduced the ratio of osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand expression, increased carbonic anhydrase II mRNA expression and the number of matured osteoclasts and decreased transforming growth factor-β and osteocalcin mRNA expression in the tibia compared to those of diabetic mice. The present study demonstrated that the use of the ACEI, captopril, has no beneficial effect on the skeletal biological properties of diabetic mice. However, this could be attributed, at least partially, to its suppression of osteogenesis and stimulation of osteoclastogenesis, even though it could effectively inhibit high activity of local RAS in the bone of diabetic mice.

  3. Activation of EphA1-Epha receptor axis attenuates diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihui; Yan, Hongdan; Wang, Feng; Huang, Shanying; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Zhihao; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-06

    The Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases serves as key modulators of various cellular functions, including inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Recent analyses have revealed that a member of the Eph family, EphA1, plays a pivotal role in regulating insulin metabolism and kidney injury. However, the importance of EphA1 in diabetic nephropathy has not been recognized. We established a diabetic nephropathy mouse model using a high-fat diet and streptozotocin (STZ) injection. Then, the recombinant adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) overexpressing EphA1 or a negative control was injected locally into the kidney. Metabolite testing and histopathological analyses of kidney fibrosis, pancreatic islet function and signaling pathways were evaluated. Our study showed that hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and renal fibrosis accompanied the deterioration of kidney function in diabetic mice. The overexpression of EphA1 in the kidney attenuated renal fibrosis and improved kidney function but did not affect systemic glucose metabolism and pancreatic islet function. Furthermore, the overexpression of EphA1 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and MYPT1 (a substrate of Rho kinase). The overexpression of EphA1 can be therapeutically targeted to inhibit diabetic renal fibrosis, which suggests that the EphA1-Epha receptor axis may be a novel therapy target for diabetic nephropathy. Mechanistically, the overexpression of EphA1 could inhibit MAPK and the Rho pathway in diabetic kidneys.

  4. 5-HT7 receptor activation attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in streptozocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ulugol, Ahmet; Oltulu, Cagatay; Gunduz, Ozgur; Citak, Cihad; Carrara, Roberto; Shaqaqi, Mohammad Reza; Sanchez, Alicia Mansilla; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2012-08-01

    The role of 5-HT7 receptors in the nociceptive processing received most attention during the last few years. The involvement of 5-HT₇ receptors in nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain states have been reported only recently; however, there are no reports on its contribution in diabetic neuropathic pain. We therefore planned to investigate the effect of 5-HT₇ receptor activation on the changes of nociceptive threshold in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin (150 mg/kg, i.p.). The nociceptive responses in normal and diabetic animals were tested in the hot-plate and tail-flick assays. Both hot-plate and tail-flick latencies significantly shortened at 1-3/4 weeks (thermal hyperalgesia) and prolonged at 6-7 weeks (thermal hypoalgesia) after streptozocin administration. At the dose of 10 mg/kg, systemic injections of AS-19, a selective 5-HT₇ receptor agonist, reduced thermal hyperalgesia at early stage of diabetes, but did not influence thermal hypoalgesia at late stage. Co-administration of SB-258719, a selective 5-HT₇ receptor antagonist, at a dose that had no effect on its own (10 mg/kg), reversed the anti-hyperalgesic effect of AS-19. Our results indicate that systemic administration of 5-HT₇ receptor agonists may have clinical utility in treating diabetic neuropathic pain.

  5. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  6. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Oscar; Benito, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte--specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Differential anti-diabetic effects and mechanism of action of charantin-rich extract of Taiwanese Momordica charantia between type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsien-Yi; Kan, Wei-Chih; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Yu, Sung-Hsun; Chang, Liang-Hao; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye

    2014-07-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae), also called bitter melon, has traditionally been used as a natural anti-diabetic agent for anti-hyperglycemic activity in several animal models and clinical trials. We investigated the differences in the anti-diabetic properties and mechanism of action of Taiwanese M. charantia (MC) between type 1 diabetic (T1D) and type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice. To clarify the beneficial effects of MC, we measured non-fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance, and plasma insulin levels in KK/HIJ mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes (200 mg/kg/day of charantin-rich extract of MC [CEMC]) and in ICR mice with STZ-induced diabetes. After 8 weeks, all the mice were exsanguinated, and the expression of the insulin-signaling-associated proteins in their tissue was evaluated, in coordination with the protective effects of CEMC against pancreatic β-cell toxicity (in vitro). Eight weeks of data indicated that CEMC caused a significant decline in non-fasting blood glucose, plasma glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in the KK/HIJ mice, but not in the ICR mice. Furthermore, CEMC decreased plasma insulin and promoted the sensitivity of insulin by increasing the expression of GLUT4 in the skeletal muscle and of IRS-1 in the liver of KK/HIJ mice; however, CEMC extract had no effect on the insulin sensitivity of ICR mice. In vitro study showed that CEMC prevented pancreatic β cells from high-glucose-induced cytotoxicity after 24 h of incubation, but the protective effect was not detectable after 72 h. Collectively, the hypoglycemic effects of CEMC suggest that it has potential for increasing insulin sensitivity in patients with T2D rather than for protecting patients with T1D against β-cell dysfunction.

  8. Reversal of new-onset diabetes through modulating inflammation and stimulating beta-cell replication in nonobese diabetic mice by a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Gao, Jie; Hao, Jianqiang; Zhang, Yu; Yi, Huimin; O'Brien, Timothy D; Sorenson, Robert; Luo, Jian; Guo, Zhiguang

    2010-07-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) activity by NVP-DPP728, a DPP-IV inhibitor, improves the therapeutic efficacy of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). CD26 is a membrane-associated glycoprotein with DPP-IV activity and is expressed on lymphocytes. We investigated the effect of NVP-DPP728 on reversing new-onset diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and modulating the inflammatory response and stimulating beta-cell regeneration. New-onset diabetic NOD mice were treated with NVP-DPP728 for 2, 4, and 6 wk. Blood glucose level was monitored. Regulatory T cells in thymus and secondary lymph nodes, TGF-beta1 and GLP-1 in plasma, and the insulin content in the pancreas were measured. Immunostaining for insulin and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) were performed. The correlation of beta-cell replication with inflammation was determined. In NVP-DPP728-treated NOD mice, diabetes could be reversed in 57, 74, and 73% of mice after 2, 4, and 6 wk treatment, respectively. Insulitis was reduced and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells was increased in treated NOD mice with remission. Plasma TGF-beta1 and GLP-1, the insulin content, and both insulin(+) and BrdU(+) beta-cells in pancreas were also significantly increased. No significant correlations were found between numbers of both insulin(+) and BrdU(+) beta-cells in islets and beta-cell area or islets with different insulitis score in NOD mice with remission of diabetes. In conclusion, NVP-DPP728 treatment can reverse new-onset diabetes in NOD mice by reducing insulitis, increasing CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and stimulating beta-cell replication. beta-Cell replication is not associated with the degree of inflammation in NVP-DPP728-treated NOD mice.

  9. Evaluation of the Hypoglycemic Effect of Composite Rice Flour in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhigang; Gao, Hongmei; Du, Chuanlai; Zheng, Yimei; Guo, Yuanxin; Pan, Dongmei

    2016-03-01

    To study the hypoglycemic effect of composite rice flour, the diabetic mouse model was established through the intraperitoneal injection of alloxan saline (twice, 200 mg/kg bw). The mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: negative control, positive control, metformin medication group, and composite rice flour feed group. After 21 days, the fasting blood glucose levels were determined by glucose oxidase method and followed with a glucose tolerance test. The results show that the body weight growth rate of mice in the rice flour group was significantly higher than that of the medication group (P < 0.01). Comparing with the positive control group, the fasting blood glucose levels of medication group and rice flour group were significantly lower, and the glucose tolerance was significantly increased in rice flour group (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the composite rice flour has obvious hypoglycemic and protective effect for diabetic mouse model.

  10. Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM) on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Jin; Choi, Jina; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2014-01-01

    HemoHIM (a new herbal preparation of three edible herbs: Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe) was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation. This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice. Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100 mg/kg) once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg, i.p.). In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic β-cells. HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4+ T and CD8+ T), which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-γ production in response to Con A stimulation. These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic β-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice. PMID:25045390

  11. Effects of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on the thermal nociceptive threshold in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Ohsawa, Masahiro; Miyata, Shigeo; Endo, Kazuki; Hayakawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-19

    Neuropathy accompanied by abnormal sensory perception is the most common complication in insulin-dependent and -independent diabetes mellitus. Since there are very few effective therapeutic regimens for sensory abnormalities in diabetes, we examined the effect of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP)-choline on the thermal nociceptive threshold in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice using the tail-flick test. Diabetic mice showed a shorter tail-flick latency at 1-4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment and a longer tail-flick latency after 8-12 weeks. This hyper- and hypoalgesia in diabetic mice was almost completely inhibited by daily treatment with CDP-choline (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) beginning on the day of streptozotocin treatment. Daily treatment with CDP-choline beginning 5 weeks after streptozotocin treatment attenuated the development of hypoalgesia. Diabetic mice showed a significant increase in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity at 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment, whereas Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was decreased at 12 weeks after treatment. These alterations were normalized by daily treatment with CDP-choline (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) beginning the day of streptozotocin treatment. These results provide evidence to support the therapeutic potency of CDP-choline on the development of thermal hyper- and hypoalgesia and the progression of thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic mice. Moreover, these effects of CDP-choline may result from the normalization of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity.

  12. Possible involvement of stress hormones and hyperglycaemia in chronic mild stress-induced impairment of immune functions in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M R; Cremaschi, G A; Oliveri, L M; Gerez, E N; Wald, M R; Genaro, A M

    2010-09-01

    Stress, an important aspect of modern life, has long been associated with an altered homeostatic state. Little is known about the effect of the life stress on the outcome of diabetes mellitus, especially related to the higher risk of infections. Here, we evaluate the effects of chronic mild stress (CMS) exposure on the evolution of type I diabetes induced by streptozotocin administration in BALB/c mice. Exposure of diabetic mice to CMS resulted in a significant reduction of survival and a sustained increase in blood glucose values. Concerning the immune response, chronic stress had a differential effect in mice with diabetes with respect to controls, showing a marked decrease in both T- and B-cell proliferation. No correlation was found between splenic catecholamine or circulating corticosterone levels and the proliferative response. However, a significant negative correlation was found between glucose levels and concanavalin A- and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated proliferative responses of T and B cells. A positive correlation between blood glucose and splenic catecholamine concentrations was found in diabetic mice but not in controls subjected to CMS. Hence, the present report shows that diabetic mice show a worse performance in immune function after stress exposure, pointing to the importance of considering life stress as a risk factor for patients with diabetes.

  13. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  14. NFAT2 inhibitor ameliorates diabetic nephropathy and podocyte injury in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ruizhao; Shi, Wei; Liang, Xinling; Liu, Shuangxin; Ye, Zhiming; Yu, Chunping; Chen, Yuanhan; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wenjian; Lai, Yuxiong; Ma, Jianchao; Li, Zhuo; Tan, Xiaofan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Podocyte injury plays a key role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). We have recently shown that 11R-VIVIT, an inhibitor of cell-permeable nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), attenuates podocyte apoptosis induced by high glucose in vitro. However, it is not known whether 11R-VIVIT has a protective effect on DN, especially podocyte injury, under in vivo diabetic conditions. Hence, we examined the renoprotective effects of 11R-VIVIT in diabetic db/db mice and the possible mechanisms underlying its protective effects on podocyte injury in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Type 2 diabetic db/db mice received i.p. injections of 11R-VIVIT (1 mg·kg−1) three times a week and were killed after 8 weeks. Immortalized mouse podocytes were cultured under different experimental conditions. KEY RESULTS 11R-VIVIT treatment markedly attenuated the albuminuria in diabetic db/db mice and also alleviated mesangial matrix expansion and podocyte injury. However, body weight, food and water intake, and glucose levels were unaffected. It also attenuated the increased NFAT2 activation and enhanced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPA receptor) expression in glomerulor podocytes. In cultured podocytes, the increased nuclear accumulation of NFAT2 and uPA receptor expression induced by high glucose treatment was prevented by 11R-VIVIT or NFAT2-knockdown; this was accompanied by improvements in the filtration barrier function of the podocyte monolayer. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The NFAT inhibitor 11R-VIVIT might be a useful therapeutic strategy for protecting podocytes and treating DN. The calcinerin/NFAT2/uPA receptor signalling pathway should be exploited as a therapeutic target for protecting podocytes from injury in DN. PMID:23826864

  15. Sex differences in the development of diabetes in mice with deleted wolframin (Wfs1) gene.

    PubMed

    Noormets, K; Kõks, S; Muldmaa, M; Mauring, L; Vasar, E; Tillmann, V

    2011-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in the wolframin (Wfs1) gene, is characterised by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, progressive optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. Diabetes tend to start earlier in boys. This study investigated sex differences in longitudinal changes in blood glucose concentration (BGC) in wolframin-deficient mice (Wfs1KO) and compared their plasma proinsulin and insulin levels with those of wild-type (wt) mice. Non-fasting BGC was measured weekly in 42 (21 males) mice from both groups at nine weeks of age. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted at the 30 (th) week and plasma insulin, c-peptide and proinsulin levels were measured at the 32 (nd) week. At the 32 (nd) week, Wfs1KO males had increased BGC compared to wt males (9.40±0.60 mmol/l vs. 7.91±0.20 mmol/l; p<0.05). The opposite tendency was seen in females. Both male and female Wfs1KO mice had impaired glucose tolerance on IPGTT. Wfs1KO males had significantly lower mean plasma insulin levels than wt males (57.78±1.80 ng/ml vs. 69.42±3.06 ng/ml; p<0.01) and Wfs1KO females (70.30±4.42 ng/ml; p<0.05). Wfs1KO males had a higher proinsulin/insulin ratio than wt males (0.09±0.02 vs. 0.05±0.01; p=0.05) and Wfs1KO females (0.04±0.01; p<0.05). Plasma c-peptide levels in males were lower in Wfs1KO males (mean 55.3±14.0 pg/ml vs. 112.7±21.9 pg/ml; p<0.05). Male Wfs1KO mice had a greater risk of developing diabetes than female Wfs1KO mice. Low plasma insulin concentration with an increased proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KO males indicates possible disturbances in converting proinsulin to insulin which in long-term may lead to insulin deficiency. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism for the sex differences in the development of diabetes in Wolfram syndrome.

  16. Hypoglycemic Effect of Jicama (Pachyrhizus erosus) Extract on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Joo; Han, Ji-Sook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the inhibitory effect of jicama extract on α-glucosidase activity, α-amylase activity, and postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Jicama extract showed prominent inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase and α-amylase. The IC50 values of jicama extract against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.083±0.004 and 0.091±0.017 mg/mL, respectively. The increase in postprandial blood glucose levels was more significantly suppressed in the jicama extract-administered group than in the control group of both STZ-induced diabetic and normal mice. Blood glucose levels of the control group increased to 383.75±11.54 and 402.50±15.32 mg/dL at 30 and 60 min after a meal and decreased to 349.67±11.62 mg/dL at 120 min. However, postprandial blood glucose levels were significantly decreased, when diabetic mice were fed with jicama extract (342.00±15.73, 367.00±13.00, and 329.67±12.43 mg/dL at 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively). Furthermore, the area under the curve was significantly decreased with jicama extract administration in diabetic mice (P<0.05). Therefore, these results indicate that jicama extract may help decrease postprandial blood glucose level by inhibiting α-glucosidase. PMID:26175995

  17. Diabetic KK-A(y) mice are highly susceptible to oxidative hepatocellular damage induced by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Okumura, Kyoko; Arai, Kumiko; Aoyama, Tomonori; Watanabe, Sumio

    2010-08-01

    Despite pathophysiological similarities to alcoholic liver disease, susceptibility to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in metabolic syndrome-related nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been well elucidated. In this study, therefore, we investigated acetaminophen-induced liver injury in KK-A(y) mice, an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Twelve-week-old male KK-A(y) and C57Bl/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with 300 or 600 mg/kg acetaminophen, and euthanized 6 h later. Liver histology was assessed, and hepatic expression of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal was detected by immunohistochemistry. Levels of reduced glutathione were determined spectrophotometrically. Phosphorylation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) was analyzed by Western blotting. Hepatocytes were isolated from both strains by collagenase perfusion, and cell death and oxidative stress were measured fluorometrically by use of propidium iodide and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2'7'-dichloro-dihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester, respectively. Acetaminophen induced more severe necrosis and apoptosis of hepatocytes in KK-A(y) mice than in C57Bl/6 mice and significantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels in KK-A(y) mice. Acetaminophen-induction of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in the liver was potentiated, whereas the levels of reduced glutathione in liver were lower in KK-A(y) mice. Acetaminophen-induced phosphorylation of JNK in the liver was also enhanced in KK-A(y) mice. Exposure to 20 microM tert-butyl hydroperoxide did not kill hepatocytes isolated from C57Bl/6 mice but induced cell death and higher oxidative stress in hepatocytes from KK-A(y) mice. These results demonstrated that acetaminophen toxicity is increased in diabetic KK-A(y) mice mainly due to enhanced oxidative stress in hepatocytes, suggesting that metabolic syndrome-related steatohepatitis is an exacerbating factor for acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  18. [Antidepressant action of emoxipin and mexidol in mice with alloxan diabetes].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Rassokhina, L M; Miroshnichenko, I Iu

    2009-01-01

    The development of alloxan diabetes in mice is accompanied by prolonged desperate behavior (analogous to human depression) and decreased activity of animals in the open field test. Course administration of emoxypin and mexidol in doses corresponding to the human therapeutic range renders the antidepressant action manifested by reduced desperate behavior and increased activity in the open field. The antidepressant effect of emoxypin and mexidol is accompanied by a decrease in the blood glucose level after 14 days of administration. Emoxypin, in contrast to mexidol, provokes transient deterioration of diabetic hyperglycemia after 7 days of administration. Mexidol is characterized by an optimal combination of antidepressant action and favorable impact on carbohydrate metabolism that makes this 3-oxypyridine derivative a promising substance for the treatment of depression in diabetic patients.

  19. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Canet, Mark J.; Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Lin; Xiong, Yi; Yin, Lei; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic inflammation is believed to promote insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes progression in obesity. TRAF3, a cytoplasmic signaling protein, has been known to mediate/modulate cytokine signaling in immune cells. The goal is to define the metabolic function of hepatic TRAF3 in the setting of obesity. Methods Hepatocyte-specific TRAF3 knockout mice were generated using the loxp/albumin-cre system. Liver TRAF3 was deleted in adult obese mice via Cre adenoviral infection. Both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity were examined. TRAF3 levels and insulin signaling were measured by immunoblotting. Insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and glucose metabolism were examined by glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests. Hepatic steatosis was examined by Oil red O staining of liver sections and measuring liver triacylglycerol levels. Results Liver TRAF3 levels were lower in the fasted states in normal mice, and were aberrantly higher in obese mice and in mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Glucose directly increased TRAF3 levels in primary hepatocytes. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of TRAF3 decreased hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis in mice with either high fat diet-induced obesity or genetic obesity (ob/ob); conversely, in lean mice, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of TRAF3 in the liver induced hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Deletion of TRAF3 enhanced the ability of insulin to stimulate phosphorylation of Akt in hepatocytes, whereas overexpression of TRAF3 suppressed insulin signaling. Conclusions Glucose increases the levels of hepatic TRAF3. TRAF3 in turn promotes hyperglycemia through increasing hepatic glucose production, thus forming a glucose-TRAF3 reinforcement loop in the liver. This positive feedback loop may drive the progression of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity. PMID:26909311

  20. Linagliptin enhances neural stem cell proliferation after stroke in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Darsalia, Vladimer; Olverling, Anna; Larsson, Martin; Mansouri, Shiva; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Klein, Thomas; Sjöholm, Åke; Patrone, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are current drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) based on their main property to enhance endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels, thus increasing insulin secretion. However, the mechanism of action of DPP-4 inhibition in extra pancreatic tissues has been poorly investigated and it might occur differently from that induced by GLP-1R agonists. Increased adult neurogenesis by GLP-1R agonists has been suggested to play a role in functional recovery in animal models of brain disorders. We recently showed that the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin reduces brain damage after stroke in normal and type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether linagliptin impacts stroke-induced neurogenesis. T2D was induced by 25 weeks of high-fat diet. Linagliptin treatment was carried out for 7 weeks. Standard diet fed-mice were used as controls. Stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion 4 weeks into the linagliptin treatment. Neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation/neuroblast formation and striatal neurogenesis/gliogenesis were assessed 3 weeks after stroke. The effect of linagliptin on NSC viability was also determined in vitro. The results show that linagliptin enhances NSC proliferation in T2D mice but not in normal mice. Linagliptin did not increase NSC number in vitro indicating that the effect of linagliptin on NSC proliferation in T2D is indirect. Neurogenesis and gliogenesis were not affected. In conclusion, we found no correlation between acute neuroprotection (occurring in both T2D and normal mice) and increased NSC proliferation (occurring only in T2D mice). However, our results show that linagliptin evokes a differential response on NSC proliferation after stroke in normal and T2D mice suggesting that DPP-4 inhibition effect in the CNS might go beyond the well known increase of GLP-1.

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 agonist exacerbates renal injury in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fanglin; Zhang, Ningyu; Li, Zhiming; Deng, Lihua; Zhang, Jianjie; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is a ligand-activated membrane-bound receptor, which induces an inflammatory response, thus serving a crucial role in the pathogenesis of DN. The present study aimed to determine whether a TLR2 agonist, Pam3CysSK4, modulates the development of DN. A mouse model of DN was induced using streptozotocin (STZ) and, following the confirmation of hyperglycemia, mice were treated with or without Pam3CysSK4. Pathological and functional markers, including the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, expression of TLR2, inflammatory infiltration, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were assessed. STZ-treated mice exhibited elevated blood glucose levels and increased serum creatinine levels, which increased further following Pam3CysSK4 treatment. In addition, Pam3CysSK4 treatment was observed to increase podocyte foot process formation. Furthermore, STZ-induced renal glomerular sclerosis was significantly exacerbated in Pam3CysSK4-treated mice. Pam3CysSK4-treated mice also exhibited increased levels of collagen IV following renal immunostaining, associated with increased macrophage infiltration. Renal expression of TLR2 was markedly elevated in STZ-induced mice; this was further increased in Pam3CysSK4-treated mice, accompanied by upregulation of proinflammatory genes and activation of NF-κB. This indicates that enhanced renal expression of TLR2 is associated with inflammatory infiltration in DN and demonstrates that renal injury was exacerbated by the TLR2 agonist in diabetic mice.

  2. Evaluation of Chios mastic gum on lipid and glucose metabolism in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Ioannis; Karatzas, Theodore; Korou, Laskarina-Maria; Agrogiannis, George; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Pantopoulou, Alkisti; Tzanetakou, Irene P; Katsilambros, Nikolaos; Perrea, Despina N

    2014-03-01

    Chios mastic gum (MG), a resin produced from Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia, is reported to possess beneficial cardiovascular and hepatoprotective properties. This study investigated the effect of crude Chios MG on metabolic parameters in diabetic mice. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic 12-week-old male C57bl/6 mice were assigned to three groups: NC (n=9) control; LdM (n=9) animals receiving low dose mastic for 8 weeks (20 mg/kg body weight [BW]); and HdM (n=9) animals receiving high dose mastic (500 mg/kg BW) for the same period. Serum lipid and glucose levels were determined at baseline, at 4 and 8 weeks. Serum total protein, adiponectin, and resistin levels were also measured at the end of the experiment. Histopathological examination for liver, kidney, aorta, and heart lesions was performed. After 4 weeks, MG administration resulted in decreased serum glucose and triglyceride levels in both LdM and HdM, whereas BW levels were reduced in LdM group compared with controls. At the end of the experiment, LdM presented significantly lower serum glucose, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels and improved high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared with control group. HdM group had ameliorated serum triglyceride levels. Hepatic steatosis observed in control group was partially reversed in LdM and HdM groups. MG administered in low dosages improves glucose and lipid disturbances in diabetic mice while alleviating hepatic damage.

  3. Effects of Bauhinia forficata Tea on Oxidative Stress and Liver Damage in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salgueiro, Andréia Caroline Fernandes; da Silva, Marianne Pires; Mendez, Andreas Sebastian Loureiro; Zemolin, Ana Paula Pegoraro; Posser, Thaís; Puntel, Robson Luiz; Puntel, Gustavo Orione

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Bauhinia forficata Link subsp. pruinosa (BF) tea on oxidative stress and liver damage in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic male mice have remained 30 days without any treatment. BF treatment started on day 31 and continued for 21 days as a drinking-water substitute. We evaluated (1) BF chemical composition; (2) glucose levels; (3) liver/body weight ratio and liver transaminases; (4) reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonylation in liver; (5) superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in liver; (6) δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) and nonprotein thiols (NPSH) in liver; (7) Nrf2, NQO-1, and HSP70 levels in liver and pancreas. Phytochemical analyses identified four phenols compounds. Diabetic mice present high levels of NQO-1 in pancreas, increased levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation in liver, and decrease in CAT activity. BF treatment normalized all these parameters. BF did not normalize hyperglycemia, liver/body weight ratio, aspartate aminotransferase, protein carbonyl, NPSH levels, and δ-ALA-D activity. The raised oxidative stress seems to be a potential mechanism involved in liver damage in hyperglycemic conditions. Our results indicated that BF protective effect could be attributed to its antioxidant capacity, more than a hypoglycemic potential. PMID:26839634

  4. Nearby Construction Impedes the Progression to Overt Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hillhouse, Erin E.; Chabot-Roy, Geneviève; Guyon, Marie-Josée; Tessier, Nathalie; Boulay, Maryse; Liscourt, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Construction nearby animal houses has sporadically been reported to affect various aspects of animal health. Most of the reports have focussed on the impact on stress hormone levels and the hypersensitivity of animals relative to humans. There has also been an anecdotal report on the impact of construction on autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. Here, we describe that nearby construction significantly impedes the progression to overt diabetes in female NOD mice offspring. We demonstrate that this was not due to a genetic drift or to particularities associated with our specific mouse colony. Interestingly, although the glycemia levels remained low in mice born from mothers subject to construction stress during gestation, we detected an active autoimmune reaction towards pancreatic islet cells, as measured by both the degree of insulitis and the presence of insulin autoantibody levels in the serum. These results suggest that the external stress imposed during embryonic development does not prevent but significantly delays the autoimmune process. Together, our findings emphasize the impact of surrounding factors during in vivo studies and are in agreement with the hypothesis that both environmental and genetic cues contribute to autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:23691516

  5. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α modulates systemic ketone body homeostasis and ameliorates diabetic hyperketonemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Kristoffer; Albert, Verena; Cardel, Bettina; Salatino, Silvia; Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies are crucial energy substrates during states of low carbohydrate availability. However, an aberrant regulation of ketone body homeostasis can lead to complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Exercise and diabetes affect systemic ketone body homeostasis, but the regulation of ketone body metabolism is still enigmatic. Using mice with either a knockout or overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle, we show that PGC-1α regulates ketolytic gene transcription in muscle. Furthermore, ketone body homeostasis of these mice was investigated during fasting, exercise, ketogenic diet feeding and after streptozotocin injection. In response to these ketogenic stimuli, we show that modulation of PGC-1α levels in muscle affects systemic ketone body homeostasis. Moreover, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle PGC-1α is necessary for the enhanced ketolytic capacity in response to exercise training and overexpression of PGC-1α in muscle enhances systemic ketolytic capacity and is sufficient to ameliorate diabetic hyperketonemia in mice. Using cultured myotubes, we also show that the transcription factor estrogen related receptor α (ERRα) is a partner of PGC-1α in the regulation of ketolytic gene transcription. Collectively, these results demonstrate a central role of skeletal muscle PGC-1α in the transcriptional regulation of systemic ketolytic capacity. PMID:26849960

  6. Polyopes lancifolia Extract, a Potent α-Glucosidase Inhibitor, Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Min, Seong Won; Han, Ji Sook

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the inhibitory effects of Polyopes lancifolia extract (PLE) on α-glucosidase activity, α-amylase activitiy, and postprandial hyperglycemia in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results of this study revealed a marked inhibitory effect of PLE on α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities. The IC50s of PLE against α-glucosidase and α-amylase were 0.20 mg/mL and 0.35 mg/mL, respectively. PLE was a more effective inhibitor of α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities than acarbose, the positive control. The postprandial blood glucose levels of STZ-induced diabetic mice were significantly lower in the PLE treated group than in the control group. Moreover, PLE administration was associated with a decreased area under the curve for the glucose response in diabetic mice. These results indicate that PLE may be a potent inhibitor of α-glucosidase and α-amylase activities and may suppress postprandial hyperglycemia.

  7. Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice by brown adipose tissue transplant.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C; Piston, David W

    2012-03-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue, both of which suffer from numerous limitations and complications. Here, we show that subcutaneous transplants of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) can correct T1D in streptozotocin-treated mice (both immune competent and immune deficient) with severely impaired glucose tolerance and significant loss of adipose tissue. BAT transplants result in euglycemia, normalized glucose tolerance, reduced tissue inflammation, and reversal of clinical diabetes markers such as polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. These effects are independent of insulin but correlate with recovery of the animals' white adipose tissue. BAT transplants lead to significant increases in adiponectin and leptin, but with levels that are static and not responsive to glucose. Pharmacological blockade of the insulin receptor in BAT transplant mice leads to impaired glucose tolerance, similar to what is seen in nondiabetic animals, indicating that insulin receptor activity plays a role in the reversal of diabetes. One possible candidate for activating the insulin receptor is IGF-1, whose levels are also significantly elevated in BAT transplant mice. Thus, we propose that the combined action of multiple adipokines establishes a new equilibrium in the animal that allows for chronic glycemic control without insulin.

  8. Impaired Albumin Uptake and Processing Promote Albuminuria in OVE26 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Y. S.; Zheng, S.; Kralik, P. M.; Benz, F. W.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of proximal tubules dysfunction to diabetic albuminuria is uncertain. OVE26 mice have the most severe albuminuria of all diabetic mouse models but it is not known if impaired tubule uptake and processing are contributing factors. In the current study fluorescent albumin was used to follow the fate of albumin in OVE26 and normal mice. Compared to normal urine, OVE26 urine contained at least 23 times more intact fluorescent albumin but only 3-fold more 70 kD fluorescent dextran. This indicated that a function other than size selective glomerular sieving contributed to OVE26 albuminuria. Imaging of albumin was similar in normal and diabetic tubules for 3 hrs after injection. However 3 days after injection a subset of OVE26 tubules retained strong albumin fluorescence, which was never observed in normal mice. OVE26 tubules with prolonged retention of injected albumin lost the capacity to take up albumin and there was a significant correlation between tubules unable to eliminate fluorescent albumin and total albuminuria. TUNEL staining revealed a 76-fold increase in cell death in OVE26 tubules that retained fluorescent albumin. These results indicate that failure to process and dispose of internalized albumin leads to impaired albumin uptake, increased albuminuria, and tubule cell apoptosis. PMID:27822483

  9. Effect of Resveratrol on Behavioral Performance of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Mice inAnxiety Tests

    PubMed Central

    Damián, Juan P.; Acosta, Victoria; Da Cuña, Maira; Ramírez, Isara; Oddone, Natalia; Zambrana, Ana; Bervejillo, Verónica; Benech, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with anxiety tests the effect of resveratrol (RSV) on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mouse behavioral performance at the second and fourth week of treatment. Confirmed diabetic mice (>250 mg/dl of glucose in blood after STZ injection) were treated with RSV (RDM, n=12) or control treated (DM, n=12) for 4 weeks. DM and RDM were tested in the Open Field Test (OFT) and Elevated Plus Maze (EPM). In the second week of RSV treatment, a higher grooming frequency (P<0.05) and a lower defecation and rearing frequency (P<0.05) were detected in the OFT in the RDM group compared with the DM. There was a higher grooming frequency (P<0.05) and higher percentage of entries in open arms (P<0.05) in the RDM group than in the DM group in the EPM. However, in the fourth week of RSV treatment, the only effect observed was a higher grooming frequency in the RDM group than in the DM group (P<0.05) in the EPM. In conclusion, RSV treatment in diabetic mice provoked anxiolytic-like effects in both tests (OFT and EPM), and these effects were observed in a short time window (2 weeks). It is suggested that RSV may help diabetic animals to adapt to new stressing and anxiety situations and thus to improve their welfare. PMID:25077757

  10. Human islet oxygen consumption rate and DNA measurements predict diabetes reversal in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Papas, K K; Colton, C K; Nelson, R A; Rozak, P R; Avgoustiniatos, E S; Scott, W E; Wildey, G M; Pisania, A; Weir, G C; Hering, B J

    2007-03-01

    There is a need for simple, quantitative and prospective assays for islet quality assessment that are predictive of islet transplantation outcome. The current state-of-the-art athymic nude mouse bioassay is costly, technically challenging and retrospective. In this study, we report on the ability of 2 parameters characterizing human islet quality: (1) oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a measure of viable volume; and (2) OCR/DNA, a measure of fractional viability, to predict diabetes reversal in nude mice. Results demonstrate that the probability for diabetes reversal increases as the graft's OCR/DNA and total OCR increase. For a given transplanted OCR dose, diabetes reversal is strongly dependent on OCR/DNA. The OCR and OCR/DNA (the 'OCR test') data exhibit 89% sensitivity and 77% specificity in predicting diabetes reversal in nude mice (n = 86). We conclude that the prospective OCR test can effectively replace the retrospective athymic nude mouse bioassay in assessing human islet quality prior to islet transplantation.

  11. Berberine enhances antidiabetic effects and attenuates untoward effects of canagliflozin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cai-Ming; Jiang, Xin; Ouyang, Xiao-Xi; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Xie, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed at determining whether berberine can enhance the antidiabetic effects and alleviate the adverse effects of canagliflozin in diabetes mellitus. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were introduced, and the combined effects of berberine and canagliflozin on glucose metabolism and kidney functions were investigated. Our results showed that berberine combined with canagliflozin (BC) increased reduction of fasting and postprandial blood glucose, diet, and water intake compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. Interestingly, BC showed greater decrease in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and lower total urine glucose excretion than canagliflozin alone. In addition, BC showed increased phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) expression and decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels in kidneys, compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. These results indicated that BC was a stronger antidiabetic than berberine or canagliflozin alone with less negative side effects on the kidneys in the diabetic mice. The antidiabetic effect was likely to be mediated by synergically promoting the expression of pAMPK and reducing the expression of TNFα in kidneys. The present study represented the first report that canagliflozin combined with berberine was a promising treatment for diabetes mellitus. The exact underlying mechanisms of action should be investigated in future studies.

  12. Study of the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes mellitus through animal models.

    PubMed

    Brito-Casillas, Yeray; Melián, Carlos; Wägner, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Most research in diabetes mellitus (DM) has been conducted in animals, and their replacement is currently a chimera. As compared to when they started to be used by modern science in the 17th century, a very high number of animal models of diabetes is now available, and they provide new insights into almost every aspect of diabetes. Approaches combining human, in vitro, and animal studies are probably the best strategy to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of diabetes, and the choice of the best model to achieve such objective is crucial. Traditionally classified based on pathogenesis as spontaneous or induced models, each has its own advantages and disadvantages. The most common animal models of diabetes are described, and in addition to non-obese diabetic mice, biobreeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rats, streptozotocin-induced models, or high-fat diet-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice, new valuable models, such as dogs and cats with spontaneous diabetes, are described.

  13. Dapagliflozin‐lowered blood glucose reduces respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Annika; Wingren, Cecilia; Benjamin, Audra; Tregoning, John S; Garnett, James P; Groves, Helen; Gill, Simren; Orogo‐Wenn, Maria; Lundqvist, Anders J; Walters, Dafydd; Smith, David M; Taylor, John D; Baker, Emma H

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperglycaemia increases glucose concentrations in airway surface liquid and increases the risk of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We determined whether reduction of blood and airway glucose concentrations by the anti‐diabetic drug dapagliflozin could reduce P. aeruginosa growth/survival in the lungs of diabetic mice. Experimental Approach The effect of dapagliflozin on blood and airway glucose concentration, the inflammatory response and infection were investigated in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT) or leptin receptor‐deficient (db/db) mice, treated orally with dapagliflozin prior to intranasal dosing with LPS or inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Pulmonary glucose transport and fluid absorption were investigated in Wistar rats using the perfused fluid‐filled lung technique. Key Results Fasting blood, airway glucose and lactate concentrations were elevated in the db/db mouse lung. LPS challenge increased inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from WT and db/db mice with and without dapagliflozin treatment. P. aeruginosa colony‐forming units (CFU) were increased in db/db lungs. Pretreatment with dapagliflozin reduced blood and bronchoalveolar lavage glucose concentrations and P. aeruginosa CFU in db/db mice towards those seen in WT. Dapagliflozin had no adverse effects on the inflammatory response in the mouse or pulmonary glucose transport or fluid absorption in the rat lung. Conclusion and Implications Pharmacological lowering of blood glucose with dapagliflozin effectively reduced P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of diabetic mice and had no adverse pulmonary effects in the rat. Dapagliflozin has potential to reduce the use, or augment the effect, of antimicrobials in the prevention or treatment of pulmonary infection. PMID:28192604

  14. Suppression of islet homeostasis protein thwarts diabetes mellitus progression.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seh-Hoon; Jorgensen, Marda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Gjymishka, Altin; Petersen, Bryon E

    2017-02-20

    During progression to type 1 diabetes, insulin-producing β-cells are lost through an autoimmune attack resulting in unrestrained glucagon expression and secretion, activation of glycogenolysis, and escalating hyperglycemia. We recently identified a protein, designated islet homeostasis protein (IHoP), which specifically co-localizes within glucagon-positive α-cells and is overexpressed in the islets of both post-onset non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and type 1 diabetes patients. Here we report that in the αTC1.9 mouse α-cell line, IHoP was released in response to high-glucose challenge and was found to regulate secretion of glucagon. We also show that in NOD mice with diabetes, major histocompatibility complex class II was upregulated in islets. In addition hyperglycemia was modulated in NOD mice via suppression of IHoP utilizing small interfering RNA (IHoP-siRNA) constructs/approaches. Suppression of IHoP in the pre-diabetes setting maintained normoglycemia, glyconeolysis, and fostered β-cell restoration in NOD mice 35 weeks post treatment. Furthermore, we performed adoptive transfer experiments using splenocytes from IHoP-siRNA-treated NOD/ShiLtJ mice, which thwarted the development of hyperglycemia and the extent of insulitis seen in recipient mice. Last, IHoP can be detected in the serum of human type 1 diabetes patients and could potentially serve as an early novel biomarker for type 1 diabetes in patients.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 20 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.15.

  15. Role of metformin in suppressing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in diabetic and non-diabetic mice: effect on tumor angiogenesis and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zaafar, Dalia K; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    Several studies indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance are associated with increased colon cancer risk. Recently, studies suggest that metformin can reduce cancer risk in diabetic or non-diabetic patients with unclear mechanisms. This work aimed to determine the effect of metformin on chemically-induced colon cancer in mice. Colon cancer was induced using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH, 20 mg/kg/week, s.c.) for fifteen weeks. Experiment I: healthy mice were fed with basal diet for four weeks and then allocated into seven groups, (i) saline, (ii) DMH, (iii) oxaliplatin, (iv-v): metformin (100 or 200 mg/kg) and (vi-vii): oxaliplatin+metformin (100 or 200 mg/kg), respectively. Experiment II: type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced by injection of STZ (30 mg/kg) after four weeks of high-fat feeding and then mice were allocated into seven groups similar to those reported in experiment I. Examination of the colonic tissue at the end of the experiment highlighted an increase in angiogenic markers and cell proliferation and showed a greater immunostaining for insulin growth factor I receptors and CD34 in the colon of diabetic mice compared to non-diabetics. In general, metformin downregulated tumor angiogenesis and augmented the antitumor effect of oxaliplatin. Overall, the current results showed that metformin protected against DMH-induced colon cancer in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. This therapeutic effect was, at least in part, attributed to its anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative mechanisms.

  16. Syngeneic transfer of autoimmune diabetes from diabetic NOD mice to healthy neonates. Requirement for both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have developed a model of syngeneic adoptive transfer for type I diabetes mellitus of NOD mice. This model consists in injecting spleen cells from diabetic adult mice into newborn NOD recipients. 50% of recipients inoculated with 20 X 10(6) cells develop diabetes within the first 10 wk of life, at a time when none of the control littermates have yet become diabetic. The earliest successful transfers are observed at 3 wk of age, at a time when controls do not even exhibit histological changes in their pancreas. In addition we have shown that: (a) both males and females can be adoptively transferred, despite the fact that males rarely develop spontaneous diabetes in our colony; (b) diabetes transfer is a dose-dependent phenomenon that provides an in vivo assay for comparing the autoimmune potential of spleen cells from mice at various stages of their natural history; (c) the susceptibility of the recipients to the transfer is limited in time and declines after 3 wk; and (d) both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cell subsets are necessary for the successful transfer. The neonatal syngeneic transfer provides an effective model for studies of the cellular events involved at regulatory and effector stages of autoimmune type I diabetes. PMID:3309126

  17. Exercise-Mediated Improvements in Painful Neuropathy Associated with Pre-Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Groover, Anna L.; Ryals, Janelle M.; Guilford, Brianne L.; Wilson, Natalie M.; Christianson, Julie A.; Wright, Doug E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that exercise can be effective in reducing pain in animals and humans with neuropathic pain. To investigate mechanisms in which exercise may improve hyperalgesia associated with prediabetes, C57Bl/6 mice were fed either standard chow or a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and were provided access to running wheels (exercised) or without access (sedentary). The high-fat diet induced a number of prediabetic symptoms, including increased weight, blood glucose, and insulin levels. Exercise reduced but did not restore these metabolic abnormalities to normal levels. In addition, mice fed a high-fat diet developed significant cutaneous and visceral hyperalgesia, similar to mice that develop neuropathy associated with diabetes. Finally, a high-fat diet significantly modulated neurotrophin protein expression in peripheral tissues and altered the composition of epidermal innervation. Over time, mice that exercised normalized with regards to their behavioral hypersensitivity, neurotrophin levels, and epidermal innervation. These results confirm that elevated hypersensitivity and associated neuropathic changes can be induced by a high-fat diet and exercise may alleviate these neuropathic symptoms. These findings suggest that exercise intervention could significantly improve aspects of neuropathy and pain associated with obesity and diabetes. Additionally, this work could potentially help clinicians determine those patients which will develop painful versus insensate neuropathy using intraepidermal nerve fiber quantification. PMID:23932909

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Attenuates Renal Damage by Suppressing Oxidative Stress in Diabetic db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiu Hong; Pan, Yu; Zhan, Xiao Li; Zhang, Bao Long

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), extracted from green tea, has been shown to have antioxidative activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of EGCG on the kidney function in db/db mice and also tried to investigate the underlying mechanism of the renoprotective effects of EGCG in both animals and cells. EGCG treatment could decrease the level of urinary protein, 8-iso-PGF2a, and Ang II. Moreover, EGCG could also change the level of several parameters associated with oxidative stress. In addition, the protein expression levels of AT-1R, p22-phox, p47-phox, p-ERK1/2, p-p38 MAPK, TGF-β1, and α-SMA in diabetic db/db mice were upregulated, and all of these symptoms were downregulated with the treatment of EGCG at 50 and 100 mg/kg/d. Furthermore, the pathological changes were ameliorated in db/db mice after EGCG treatment. HK-2 cell-based experiments indicated that EGCG could inhibit the expression of MAPK pathways, which is the downstream effector of Ang II mediated oxidative stress. All these results indicated that EGCG treatment could ameliorate changes of renal pathology and delay the progression of DKD by suppressing hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in diabetic db/db mice. PMID:27698952

  19. Irisin Increased the Number and Improved the Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetes Mellitus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Song, Mingbao; Zhou, Fang; Fu, Dagan; Ruan, Guangping; Zhu, Xiangqing; Bai, Yinyin; Huang, Lan; Pang, Rongqing; Kang, Huali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was found to be associated with vascular complications in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Previous studies found that regular exercise could improve the function of EPCs in DM patients, but the underling mechanism was unclear. Irisin, a newly identified myokine, was induced by exercise and has been demonstrated to mediate some of the positive effects of exercise. In this study, we hypothesize that irisin may have direct effects on EPC function in DM mice. These data showed for the first time that irisin increased the number of EPCs in peripheral blood of DM mice and improved the function of EPCs derived from DM mice bone marrow. The mechanism for the effect of irisin is related to the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. Furthermore, irisin was demonstrated to improve endothelial repair in DM mice that received EPC transplants after carotid artery injury. The results of this study indicate a novel effect of irisin in regulating the number and function of EPCs via the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway, suggesting a potential for the administration of exogenous irisin as a succedaneum to improve EPC function in diabetic patients who fail to achieve such improvements through regular exercise. PMID:27002278

  20. Mesenteric Resistance Arteries in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice Undergo Outward Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Katz, Paige S.; Trask, Aaron J.; Stewart, James A.; Lord, Kevin C.; Varner, Kurt J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resistance vessel remodeling is controlled by myriad of hemodynamic and neurohormonal factors. This study characterized structural and molecular remodeling in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRAs) in diabetic (db/db) and control (Db/db) mice. Methods Structural properties were assessed in isolated MRAs from 12 and 16 wk-old db/db and Db/db mice by pressure myography. Matrix regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot analysis. Mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric blood flow were measured in 12 wk-old mice by telemetry and a Doppler flow nanoprobe, respectively. Results Blood pressure was similar between groups. Lumen diameter and medial cross-sectional area were significantly increased in 16 wk-old db/db MRA compared to control, indicating outward hypertrophic remodeling. Moreover, wall stress and cross-sectional compliance were significantly larger in diabetic arteries. These remodeling indices were associated with increased expression of matrix regulatory proteins matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in db/db arteries. Finally, superior mesenteric artery blood flow was increased by 46% in 12 wk-old db/db mice, a finding that preceded mesenteric resistance artery remodeling. Conclusions These data suggest that flow-induced hemodynamic changes may supersede the local neurohormonal and metabolic milieu to culminate in hypertrophic outward remodeling of type 2 DM mesenteric resistance arteries. PMID:21829729

  1. [Effect and mechanism of polydatin on diabetic myocardial hypertrophy in mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Xue, Lai; Wu, Yang; Jiang, Qing-song

    2015-11-01

    To observe the preventive effect of polydatin on diabetic myocardial hypertrophy in mice and discuss its and mechanism. The diabetic model was induced with low dose STZ (40 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) x 5 d, ip) for five days in mice. The myocardial hypertrophy was determined by hypertrophy indexes (LVHI, left ventricular/right ventricle and septum), left ventricular/body weight (LV/BW), the histological examination and the mRNA expression of atrial natriuretic factor(ANF). The fast blood glucose(FBG), serum insulin and plasma hemoglobin A1c ( HbA1c) levels were detected, and then HOMA insulin resistance index ( HOMA. IR) was calculated. The mRNA and protein expressions were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. According to the results, the FBG of the model group exceeded 11.1 mmol x L(-1), with notable decrease in BW and significant increase in insulin, HbA1c and HOME. IR, suggesting the successful establishment and stability of the diabetic model. The increases in LVHI, LV/BW, cell surface and ANF mRNA indicated a myocardial hypertrophy in diabetic mice. Meanwhile, the model group showed decrease in mRNA and protein expressions of PPARβ and significant increase in NF-κB p65, COX-2 and iNOS expressions. After the preventation with PD (50, 100 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)), diabetic mice showed increase in BW, reduction in the levels of FBG, insulin and HbA1 c, relief in insulin resistance and significant recovery in hypertrophy indexes, indicating PD has the protective effect in diabetic myocardial hypertrophy. Meanwhile, PD up-regulated the expression of PPARβ, inhibited the expressions of NF-κB p65, COX-2 and iNOS, demonstrating that PD's protective effect may be related to the activation of PPARβ and the inhibition of NF-κB, COX-2 and iNOS signaling pathways.

  2. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  3. Acute and Chronic Kudzu Improves Plasma Glucose Tolerance in Non-Diabetic CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Peng, Ning; Dai, Yanying; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that kudzu root extract and its major isoflavone (puerarin) improve glucose metabolism in animal models of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, these beneficial effects have not been investigated in normal glycemic mice. The present study investigates the effect of acute and chronic kudzu root extract supplementation on glucose tolerance in normoglycemic CD-1 mice. Male, adult CD-1 mice were fed a phytoestrogen-free diet containing 0.2% or 0.0% kudzu root extract for 6 weeks. Thereafter, they were acutely administered kudzu root extract (75 mg/kg BW; oral) or vehicle followed by a glucose challenge (2 g/kg BW; oral). In control fed mice, the acute glucose challenge increased blood glucose ~300% after 30 minutes, and acute kudzu root extract administration significantly blunted this response by ~50%. In mice chronically fed a kudzu-supplemented diet, glucose tolerance was improved, and acute treatment caused no additional improvement. Irrespective of treatment, all mice were normoglycemic at the start of each glucose challenge. Administration of insulin resulted in a larger decrease in blood glucose in chronic kudzu-supplemented compared to control mice. Co-administration of phloridzin (a specific inhibitor of SGLT-mediated glucose uptake), improved glucose tolerance in acutely kudzu-treated mice but had no significant effect on glucose tolerance in chronically treated mice. These results indicate that both acute and chronic administration of kudzu root extract improves glucose tolerance in a normal glycemic mouse strain and that the effects of chronic kudzu feeding may be mediated, in part, by enhanced insulin sensitivity (chronic) and inhibition of sodium dependent glucose transport.

  4. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Agostinho, Paula M; Carvalho, Rui A; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l) was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25), mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters), and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity) compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A) receptors and down-regulated A(1) receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Helminth protection against autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice is independent of a type 2 immune shift and requires TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Marc P; Shi, Yinghui; Torrero, Marina N; Mueller, Ellen; Larson, David; Soloviova, Kateryna; Gondorf, Fabian; Hoerauf, Achim; Killoran, Kristin E.; Stocker, J Thomas; Davies, Stephen J; Tarbell, Kristin V; Mitre, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Leading hypotheses to explain helminth-mediated protection against autoimmunity postulate that type 2 or regulatory immune responses induced by helminth infections in the host limit pathogenic Th1-driven autoimmune responses. We tested these hypotheses by investigating whether infection with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis prevents diabetes onset in IL-4-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and whether depletion or absence of regulatory T cells, IL-10, or TGFβ alters helminth-mediated protection. In contrast to IL-4-competent NOD mice, IL-4-deficient NOD mice failed to develop a type 2 shift in either cytokine or antibody production during L. sigmodontis infection. Despite the absence of a type 2 immune shift, infection of IL-4-deficient NOD mice with L. sigmodontis prevented diabetes onset in all mice studied. Infections in immunocompetent and IL-4-deficient NOD mice were accompanied by increases in CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell frequencies and numbers, respectively, and helminth infection increased proliferation of CD4+FoxP3+ cells. However, depletion of CD25+ cells in NOD mice or FoxP3+ T cells from splenocytes transferred into NOD.scid mice did not decrease helminth-mediated protection against diabetes onset. Continuous depletion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGFβ, but not blockade of IL-10 signaling, prevented the beneficial effect of helminth infection on diabetes. Changes in Th17 responses did not seem to play an important role in helminth-mediated protection against autoimmunity as helminth infection was not associated with a decreased Th17 immune response. This study demonstrates that L. sigmodontis-mediated protection against diabetes in NOD mice is not dependent on the induction of a type 2 immune shift but does require TGFβ. PMID:22174447

  6. Antidiabetic activity of Lyophyllum decastes in genetically type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshihiro; Kubo, Mizue; Itoh, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Kato, Motoshi; Park, Sang Rae; Ukawa, Yuuichi; Kita, Yukio; Suzuki, Ikukatsu

    2002-09-01

    The antidiabetic activity of Lyophyllum decastes (Tricholomataceae) was investigated in KK-Ay mice, an animal model of genetically type 2 diabetes with hyperinsulinemia. The water extract of Lyophyllum decastes (LD) (500 mg/kg body weight) reduced the blood glucose of KK-Ay mice 7 h after a single oral administration (p<0.05) when compared with control. LD reduced the blood glucose of KK-Ay mice 3 weeks after repeated administration (p<0.05), and also significantly lowered the serum insulin of KK-Ay mice under similar conditions (p<0.01). However, LD did not affect the blood glucose in normal mice. LD tended to decrease of the blood glucose in an insulin tolerance test. In addition, the muscle content of facilitative glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) protein content in the plasma membrane fraction from muscle significantly increased in the orally LD-treated KK-Ay mice when compared to that of the controls (p<0.01). These results suggest that the antidiabetic activity of LD is derived, at least in part, from a decrease in insulin resistance, due to the increase of GLUT4 protein content in the plasma membrane of the muscle.

  7. Myricitrin Alleviates Oxidative Stress-induced Inflammation and Apoptosis and Protects Mice against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Qiang; Chen, Yaping; Pan, Ruile; Kuang, Shihuan; Liu, Guiyan; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) has been increasingly considered as a main cause of heart failure and death in diabetic patients. At present, no effective treatment exists to prevent its development. In the present study, we describe the potential protective effects and mechanisms of myricitrin (Myr) on the cardiac function of streptozotosin-induced diabetic mice and on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced H9c2 cardiomyocytes. In vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with Myr significantly decreased AGEs-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, limited an increase in ROS levels, and reduced cell apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. These effects are correlated with Nrf2 activation and NF-κB inhibition. In vivo investigation demonstrated that oral administration of Myr at 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks remarkably decreased the expression of enzymes associated with cardiomyopathy, as well as the expression of inflammatory cytokines and apoptotic proteins. Finally, Myr improved diastolic dysfunction and attenuated histological abnormalities. Mechanistically, Myr attenuated diabetes-induced Nrf2 inhibition via the regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation in the diabetic heart. Collectively, these results strongly indicate that Myr exerts cardioprotective effects against DCM through the blockage of inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. This suggests that Myr might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of DCM. PMID:28287141

  8. Short-term subcutaneous insulin treatment delays but does not prevent diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brezar, Vedran; Culina, Slobodan; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Mallone, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Despite encouraging results in the NOD mouse, type 1 diabetes prevention trials using subcutaneous insulin have been unsuccessful. To explain these discrepancies, 3-week-old NOD mice were treated for 7 weeks with subcutaneous insulin at two different doses: a high dose (0.5 U/mouse) used in previous mouse studies; and a low dose (0.005 U/mouse) equivalent to that used in human trials. Effects on insulitis and diabetes were monitored along with immune and metabolic modifications. Low-dose insulin did not have any effect on disease incidence. High-dose treatment delayed but did not prevent diabetes, with reduced insulitis reappearing once insulin discontinued. This effect was not associated with significant immune changes in islet infiltrates, either in terms of cell composition or frequency and IFN-γ secretion of islet-reactive CD8(+) T cells recognizing the immunodominant epitopes insulin B(15-23) and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)(206-214). Delayed diabetes and insulitis were associated with lower blood glucose and endogenous C-peptide levels, which rapidly returned to normal upon treatment discontinuation. In conclusion, high- but not low-dose prophylactic insulin treatment delays diabetes onset and is associated with metabolic changes suggestive of β-cell "rest" which do not persist beyond treatment. These findings have important implications for designing insulin-based prevention trials.

  9. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Adolf; Walker, Audrey; Nissen, Erwin

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers.

  10. Myricitrin Alleviates Oxidative Stress-induced Inflammation and Apoptosis and Protects Mice against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Qiang; Chen, Yaping; Pan, Ruile; Kuang, Shihuan; Liu, Guiyan; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2017-03-13

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) has been increasingly considered as a main cause of heart failure and death in diabetic patients. At present, no effective treatment exists to prevent its development. In the present study, we describe the potential protective effects and mechanisms of myricitrin (Myr) on the cardiac function of streptozotosin-induced diabetic mice and on advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced H9c2 cardiomyocytes. In vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with Myr significantly decreased AGEs-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, limited an increase in ROS levels, and reduced cell apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. These effects are correlated with Nrf2 activation and NF-κB inhibition. In vivo investigation demonstrated that oral administration of Myr at 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks remarkably decreased the expression of enzymes associated with cardiomyopathy, as well as the expression of inflammatory cytokines and apoptotic proteins. Finally, Myr improved diastolic dysfunction and attenuated histological abnormalities. Mechanistically, Myr attenuated diabetes-induced Nrf2 inhibition via the regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation in the diabetic heart. Collectively, these results strongly indicate that Myr exerts cardioprotective effects against DCM through the blockage of inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. This suggests that Myr might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of DCM.

  11. Nephro-toxic effects of intraperitoneally injected EGCG in diabetic mice: involvement of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Nora O. Abdel; Ahmed, Lamiaa A.; Abdallah, Dalaal M.; El-Sayeh, Bahia M.

    2017-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has been studied for its beneficial effects. However, some case reports have associated EGCG supplementation with hepato-toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the possible nephro-toxic effects of EGCG in diabetic mice. Streptozotocin (150 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected in mice for diabetes induction. EGCG (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was then given for 4 days. The administration of EGCG to diabetic mice caused 60% mortality with no death recorded in other groups. Blood samples were collected for estimation of serum cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and blood urea nitrogen. Animals were then sacrificed and kidneys were rapidly excised for estimation of oxidative stress markers (NADPH oxidase, reduced glutathione, total antioxidant capacity, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heat shock protein 90, hemeoxygenase-1), as well as inflammatory markers (nuclear factor kappa-B and tumor necrosis factor-α). Administration of EGCG to diabetic mice showed significant elevation in serum cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, marked increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory states in addition to marked over expression of active caspase-3. Histopathological examination confirmed EGCG induced renal damage in diabetic mice. In conclusion, despite of its well known favorable effects, EGCG could paradoxically exhibit nephro-toxic effect in the presence of diabetes. PMID:28098182

  12. Immunotherapeutic effects of pentoxifylline in type 1 diabetic mice and its role in the response of T-helper lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Malekifard, Farin; Delirezh, Nowruz; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Malekinejad, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Pentoxifylline is an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent and is used in vascular disorders. It has been shown that pentoxifylline inhibits proinflammatory cytokines production. The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of pentoxifylline on the treatment of autoimmune diabetes in mice. Materials and Methods: Diabetes was induced by multiple low dose of streptozotocin (MLDS) injection (40 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days) in male C57BL/6 mice. After induction of diabetes, mice were treated with pentoxifylline (100 mg/kg/day IP) for 21 days. Blood glucose levels and plasma levels of insulin were measured. Splenocytes were tested for proliferation by MTT test and cytokine production by ELISA. Results: Pentoxifylline treatment prevented hyperglycemia and increased plasma insulin levels in the diabetic mice. Aside from reducing lymphocyte proliferation, pentoxifylline significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory interleukin 17 (IL-17) as well as interferon gamma (IFN-γ), while increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 as compared with those in MLDS group (diabetic control group). Conclusion: These findings indicate that pentoxifylline may have therapeutic effect against the autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta-cells during the development of MLDS-induced type 1 diabetes in mice. PMID:25945237

  13. Experimental induction of type 2 diabetes in aging-accelerated mice triggered Alzheimer-like pathology and memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jogender; Chauhan, Balwantsinh C; Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease constituting ~95% of late-onset non-familial/sporadic AD, and only ~5% accounting for early-onset familial AD. Availability of a pertinent model representing sporadic AD is essential for testing candidate therapies. Emerging evidence indicates a causal link between diabetes and AD. People with diabetes are >1.5-fold more likely to develop AD. Senescence-accelerated mouse model (SAMP8) of accelerated aging displays many features occurring early in AD. Given the role played by diabetes in the pre-disposition of AD, and the utility of SAMP8 non-transgenic mouse model of accelerated aging, we examined if high fat diet-induced experimental type 2 diabetes in SAMP8 mice will trigger pathological aging of the brain. Results showed that compared to non-diabetic SAMP8 mice, diabetic SAMP8 mice exhibited increased cerebral amyloid-β, dysregulated tau-phosphorylating glycogen synthase kinase 3β, reduced synaptophysin immunoreactivity, and displayed memory deficits, indicating Alzheimer-like changes. High fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic SAMP8 mice may represent the metabolic model of AD.

  14. α-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of protein-rich extracts from extruded adzuki bean in diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yang; Cheng, Xuzhen; Ren, Guixing

    2014-05-01

    An extrusion process has been widely used for the development of many functional foods. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the extrusion process on the α-glucosidase inhibitory properties of adzuki bean protein in type 2 diabetes model KK-A(y) mice. The extruded adzuki bean protein (EA) was prepared by adding 1% and 2% into the diet for 42 days. It was found that the fasting blood glucose concentration was significantly decreased with the EA-2 group compared with the control diabetic mice group. In addition, there was a significant decrease in serum triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen levels and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Meanwhile, hepatic lipids were improved and the content of α-dicarbonyl compounds in the kidney were reduced in mice fed with EA. These results suggest that the intake of EA could moderate type 2 diabetes and diabetic complications.

  15. Senescence-associated phenotypes in Akita diabetic mice are enhanced by absence of bradykinin B2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kakoki, Masao; Kizer, Catherine M.; Yi, Xianwen; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Bagnell, C. Robert; Edgell, Cora-Jean S.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Jennette, J. Charles; Smithies, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that genetically increased angiotensin-converting enzyme levels, or absence of the bradykinin B2 receptor, increase kidney damage in diabetic mice. We demonstrate here that this is part of a more general phenomenon — diabetes and, to a lesser degree, absence of the B2 receptor, independently but also largely additively when combined, enhance senescence-associated phenotypes in multiple tissues. Thus, at 12 months of age, indicators of senescence (alopecia, skin atrophy, kyphosis, osteoporosis, testicular atrophy, lipofuscin accumulation in renal proximal tubule and testicular Leydig cells, and apoptosis in the testis and intestine) are virtually absent in WT mice, detectable in B2 receptor–null mice, clearly apparent in mice diabetic because of a dominant mutation (Akita) in the Ins2 gene, and most obvious in Akita diabetic plus B2 receptor–null mice. Renal expression of several genes that encode proteins associated with senescence and/or apoptosis (TGF-β1, connective tissue growth factor, p53, α-synuclein, and forkhead box O1) increases in the same progression. Concomitant increases occur in 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, point mutations and deletions in kidney mitochondrial DNA, and thiobarbituric acid–reactive substances in plasma, together with decreases in the reduced form of glutathione in erythrocytes. Thus, absence of the bradykinin B2 receptor increases the oxidative stress, mitochondrial DNA damage, and many senescence-associated phenotypes already present in untreated Akita diabetic mice. PMID:16604193

  16. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; MacDougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita −/− mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita −/− and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita −/− mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita −/− teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  17. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; Macdougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita ⁻/⁻ mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita ⁻/⁻ and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita ⁻/⁻ mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita ⁻/⁻ teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  18. Phosphodiesterase-5 is a therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathy in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chopp, M; Szalad, A; Liu, Z; Bolz, M; Alvarez, F M; Lu, M; Zhang, L; Cui, Y; Zhang, R L; Zhang, Z G

    2011-10-13

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and major complication of diabetes, the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully understood. Using a mouse model of type II diabetes, the present study investigated the role of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) in peripheral neuropathy. BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J (db/db) mice were treated with sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of PDE5, at doses of 2 and 10 mg/kg or saline. Levels of PDE5 and morphometric parameters in sciatic nerve tissue as well as the motor and sensory function were measured in these mice. In diabetic mice, PDE5 expression in sciatic nerve tissue was significantly upregulated, whereas the myelin sheath thickness, myelin basic protein (MBP), and subcutaneous nerve fibers were significantly reduced. Treatment with sildenafil significantly improved neurological function, assayed by motor and sensory conducting velocities and thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli, concomitantly with increases in myelin sheath thickness, MBP levels, and subcutaneous nerve fibers. In vitro, hyperglycemia upregulated PDE5 in Schwann cells and reduced Schwann cell proliferation, migration, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Blockage of PDE5 with sildenafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and completely abolished the effect of hyperglycemia on Schwann cells. Sildenafil upregulated cGMP-dependent protein kinase G I (PKGI), whereas inhibition of PKGI with a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suppressed the inhibitory effect of sildenafil on Schwann cells. These data indicate that hyperglycemia substantially upregulates PDE5 expression and that the cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by sildenafil mediates the beneficial effects of sildenafil on diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model

    PubMed Central

    Canelles, Sandra; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2−/−) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2−/− mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  20. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Eva; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; González-Rodríguez, Agueda; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente; Valverde, Angela M; Frago, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus.

  1. Anti-diabetic effect of balanced deep-sea water and its mode of action in high-fat diet induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Shin, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Eun; Shon, Yun Hee

    2013-10-29

    In this study, we investigated the effects of balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) on hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. BDSW was prepared by mixing deep-sea water (DSW) mineral extracts and desalinated water to give a final hardness of 500-2000. Mice given an HFD with BDSW showed lowered fasting plasma glucose levels compared to HFD-fed mice. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that BDSW improves impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Histopathological evaluation of the pancreas showed that BDSW recovers the size of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and increases the secretion of insulin and glucagon in HFD-fed mice. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of hepatic genes involved in glucogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation were suppressed, while those in glucose uptake, β-oxidation, and glucose oxidation in muscle were increased in mice fed HFD with BDSW. BDSW increased AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 pre- and mature adipocytes and improved impaired AMPK phosphorylation in the muscles and livers of HFD-induced diabetic mice. BDSW stimulated phosphoinositol-3-kinase and AMPK pathway-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that BDSW has potential as an anti-diabetic agent, given its ability to suppress hyperglycemia and improve glucose intolerance by increasing glucose uptake.

  2. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Balanced Deep-Sea Water and Its Mode of Action in High-Fat Diet Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Geun; Shin, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Eun; Shon, Yun Hee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) on hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. BDSW was prepared by mixing deep-sea water (DSW) mineral extracts and desalinated water to give a final hardness of 500–2000. Mice given an HFD with BDSW showed lowered fasting plasma glucose levels compared to HFD-fed mice. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that BDSW improves impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Histopathological evaluation of the pancreas showed that BDSW recovers the size of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and increases the secretion of insulin and glucagon in HFD-fed mice. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of hepatic genes involved in glucogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation were suppressed, while those in glucose uptake, β-oxidation, and glucose oxidation in muscle were increased in mice fed HFD with BDSW. BDSW increased AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 pre- and mature adipocytes and improved impaired AMPK phosphorylation in the muscles and livers of HFD-induced diabetic mice. BDSW stimulated phosphoinositol-3-kinase and AMPK pathway-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that BDSW has potential as an anti-diabetic agent, given its ability to suppress hyperglycemia and improve glucose intolerance by increasing glucose uptake. PMID:24172214

  3. Impaired Oral Tolerance Induction in Diabetes Prone but not in Diabetes Resistant Mice Revealed by Cholera Toxin Subunit B-Peptide Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Presa, Maximiliano; Ortiz, Angela Zarama; Garabatos, Nahir; Izquierdo, Cristina; Rivas, Elisa I.; Teyton, Luc; Mora, Conchi; Serreze, David; Stratmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB) has been used as adjuvant to improve oral vaccine delivery in type 1 diabetes. The effect of CTB/peptide formulations on antigen-specific CD4 T cells has remained largely unexplored. We investigated by tetramer analysis how oral delivery of CTB fused to 2 CD4 T cell epitopes, the BDC-2.5 T cell 2.5mi mimotope and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 286–300, affected diabetogenic CD4 T cells in NOD mice. CTB-2.5mi activated 2.5mi+ T cells when administered intraperitoneally and generated Ag-specific Foxp3+ Treg and Th2 cells following intragastric delivery. While 2.5mi+ and GAD-specific T cells were tolerized in diabetes resistant NODxB6.Foxp3EGFP F1 and NOR mice, this did not occur in NOD mice. This indicated NOD mice had a recessive genetic resistance to induce oral tolerance to both CTB-fused epitopes. Contrarily to NODxB6.Foxp3EGFP F1 mice, oral treatment in NOD mice lead to strong 2.5mi+ T cell activation and the sequestration of these cells to the effector-memory pool. Oral treatment of NOD mice with CTB-2.5mi failed to prevent diabetes. These findings underline the importance of investigating the effect of oral vaccine formulations on diabetogenic T cells as in selected cases they may have counterproductive consequences in human patients. PMID:23925934

  4. Transplantation of insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human adipose tissue-derived stem cells into type 2 diabetes mice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji Sun; Kang, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seah; Kim, Haekwon; Ahn, Chul Woo; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2014-01-10

    Currently, there are limited ways to preserve or recover insulin secretory capacity in human pancreas. We evaluated the efficacy of cell therapy using insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human eyelid adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hEAs) into type 2 diabetes mice. After differentiating hEAs into insulin-secreting cells (hEA-ISCs) in vitro, cells were transplanted into a type 2 diabetes mouse model. Serum levels of glucose, insulin and c-peptide were measured, and changes of metabolism and inflammation were assessed in mice that received undifferentiated hEAs (UDC group), differentiated hEA-ISCs (DC group), or sham operation (sham group). Human gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis were done. DC group mice showed improved glucose level, and survival up to 60 days compared to those of UDC and sham group. Significantly increased levels of human insulin and c-peptide were detected in sera of DC mice. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed human gene expression and the presence of human cells in kidneys of DC mice. When compared to sham mice, DC mice exhibited lower levels of IL-6, triglyceride and free fatty acids as the control mice. Transplantation of hEA-ISCs lowered blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mice by increasing circulating insulin level, and ameliorating metabolic parameters including IL-6.

  5. High-molecular weight hyaluronan reduced renal PKC activation in genetically diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; Micali, Antonio; Nastasi, Giancarlo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Rinaldi, Maria Grazia; Calatroni, Alberto; D'Ascola, Angela; Campo, Salvatore

    2010-11-01

    The cluster determinant (CD44) seems to play a key role in tissues injured by diabetes type 2. CD44 stimulation activates the protein kinase C (PKC) family which in turn activates the transcriptional nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) responsible for the expression of the inflammation mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-18 (IL-18), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Regulation of CD44 interaction with its ligands depends greatly upon PKC. We investigated the effect of the treatment with high-molecular weight hyaluronan (HA) on diabetic nephropathy in genetically diabetic mice. BKS.Cg-m+/+Lepr(db) mice had elevated plasma insulin from 15 days of age and high blood sugar levels at 4 weeks. The severe nephropathy that developed was characterized by a marked increased in CD44 receptors, protein kinase C betaI, betaII, and epsilon (PKC(βI), PKC(βII), and PKCε) mRNA expression and the related protein products in kidney tissue. High levels of mRNA and related protein levels were also detected in the damaged kidney for NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-18, MMP-7, and iNOS. Chronic daily administration of high-molecular mass HA for 2 weeks significantly reduced CD44, PKC(βI), PKC(βII), and PKCα gene expression and the related protein production in kidney tissue and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-18, MMP-7, and iNOS expression and levels also decreased. Histological analysis confirmed the biochemical data. However, blood parameters of diabetes were unchanged. These results suggest that the CD44 and PKC play an important role in diabetes and interaction of high-molecular weight HA with these proteins may reduce inflammation and secondary pathologies due to this disease.

  6. Local expression of transgene encoded TNF alpha in islets prevents autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by preventing the development of auto-reactive islet-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Grewal, I S; Grewal, K D; Wong, F S; Picarella, D E; Janeway, C A; Flavell, R A

    1996-11-01

    Lately, TNF alpha has been the focus of studies of autoimmunity; its role in the progression of autoimmune diabetes is, however, still unclear. To analyze the effects of TNF alpha in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), we have generated nonobese diabetic (NOD) transgenic mice expressing TNF alpha under the control of the rat insulin II promoter (RIP). In transgenic mice, TNF alpha expression on the islets resulted in massive insulitis, composed of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells. Despite infiltration of considerable number of lymphoid cells in islets, expression of TNF alpha protected NOD mice from IDDM. To determine the mechanism of TNF alpha action, splenic cells from control NOD and RIP-TNF alpha mice were adoptively transferred to NOD-SCID recipients. In contrast to the induction of diabetes by splenic cells from control NOD mice, splenic cells from RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice did not induce diabetes in NOD-SCID recipients. Diabetes was induced however, in the RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice when CD8+ diabetogenic cloned T cells or splenic cells from diabetic NOD mice were adoptively transferred to these mice. Furthermore, expression of TNF alpha in islets also downregulated splenic cell responses to autoantigens. These data establish a mechanism of TNF alpha action and provide evidence that local expression of TNF alpha protects NOD mice from autoimmune diabetes by preventing the development of autoreactive islet-specific T cells.

  7. Zinc Prevents the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shudong; Wang, Bowei; Wang, Yuehui; Tong, Qian; Liu, Quan; Sun, Jian; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Zinc is an important essential trace metal, whose deficiency is associated with various chronic ailments, including vascular diseases. We assessed T2DM B6.BKS(D)-Leprdb/J (db/db) mice fed for six months on a normal diet containing three zinc levels (deficient, adequate, and supplemented), to explore the role of zinc in DCM development and progression. Cardiac function, reflected by ejection fraction, was significantly decreased, along with increased left ventricle mass and heart weight to tibial length ratio, in db/db mice. As a molecular cardiac hypertrophy marker, atrial natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly increased. Cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy were accompanied by significantly increased fibrotic (elevated collagen accumulation as well as transforming growth factor β and connective tissue growth factor levels) and inflammatory (enhanced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, caspase recruitment domain family member 9, and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) responses in the heart. All these diabetic effects were exacerbated by zinc deficiency, and not affected by zinc supplementation, respectively. Mechanistically, oxidative stress and damage, mirrored by the accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, was significantly increased along with significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidants (NQO-1 and catalase). This was also exacerbated by zinc deficiency in the db/db mouse heart. These results suggested that zinc deficiency promotes the development and progression of DCM in T2DM db/db mice. The exacerbated effects by zinc deficiency on the heart of db/db mice may be related to further suppression of Nrf2 expression and function. PMID:28272348

  8. Chlorogenic Acid Improves Late Diabetes through Adiponectin Receptor Signaling Pathways in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shasha; Chang, Cuiqing; Zhang, Lantao; Liu, Yang; Huang, Xianren; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on glucose and lipid metabolism in late diabetic db/db mice, as well as on adiponectin receptors and their signaling molecules, to provide evidence for CGA in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. We randomly divided 16 female db/db mice into db/db-CGA and db/db-control (CON) groups equally; db/m mice were used as control mice. The mice in both the db/db-CGA and db/m-CGA groups were administered 80 mg/kg/d CGA by lavage for 12 weeks, whereas the mice in both CON groups were given equal volumes of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) by lavage. At the end of the intervention, we assessed body fat and the parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism in the plasma, liver and skeletal muscle tissues as well as the levels of aldose reductase (AR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the kidneys and measured adiponectin receptors and the protein expression of their signaling molecules in liver and muscle tissues. After 12 weeks of intervention, compared with the db/db-CON group, the percentage of body fat, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the db/db-CGA group were all significantly decreased; TGF-β1 protein expression and AR activity in the kidney were both decreased; and the adiponectin level in visceral adipose was increased. The protein expression of adiponectin receptors (ADPNRs), the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the liver and muscle, and the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) in the liver were all significantly greater. CGA could lower the levels of fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c during late diabetes and improve kidney fibrosis to some extent through the modulation of adiponectin receptor signaling pathways in db/db mice. PMID:25849026

  9. Early Family Environments of Obese and Non-Obese College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailey, B. Jo; Sison, Gustave F. P., Jr.

    Although case studies and anecdotal information have suggested that differences exist between the early family environments of obese and non-obese individuals, no experimental research exists. Undergraduates completed the Family Environment Scale (FES) and a questionnaire concerning past and present weight information. Subjects were classified as…

  10. Response to Vitamin D3 Supplementation in Obese and Non-obese Caucasian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, Roxana Aguirre; Nader, Nicole; Weaver, Amy; Singh, Ravinder; Kumar, Seema

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in obese children. Obese children tend to respond poorly to vitamin D supplementation. The objective of the study was to compare the response to vitamin D3 supplementation (2000 IU once daily for 12 weeks) between obese and non- obese Caucasian adolescents. Methods The study design was open label non-randomized. It was carried out at a single center. Eighteen obese adolescents (age 12-18 years) and the same number of age, gender and season matched non-obese adolescents received Vitamin D3 (2000 IU/day) orally for 12 weeks. Total serum 25(OH) D, PTH, calcium and phosphorus were measured at baseline and at the end of the 12 week period. Results The mean baseline 25 (OH)D level was higher in the non-obese subjects compared to the obese subjects (mean, 28.9 vs. 25.2 ng/mL, p=0.029). The increment in 25(OH) D levels following vitamin D supplementation was significantly lower in the obese adolescents (mean change, 5.8 vs. 9.8 ng/mL, p=0.019). Conclusions Higher doses of vitamin D are required to treat vitamin D deficiency in obese adolescents than in their non-obese peers. PMID:23128469

  11. Peer Victimization as a Predictor of Depression and Body Mass Index in Obese and Non-Obese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ryan E.; Bukowski, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The current study examined the pathway from peer victimization to depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) as mediated by self-concept for physical appearance in both obese and non-obese adolescents. It was thought that this pathway would be particularly important for obese adolescents because, compared to non-obese adolescents,…

  12. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Overproduction of Reactive Oxygen Species Impairs Postischemic Neovascularization in Mice with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P.; Levy, Bernard I.; Shah, Ajay M.; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91phox-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 μg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91phox deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 μmol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 μmol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91phox-deficient diabetic mice increased neovascularization by ∼1.5-fold greater than untreated diabetic BM-MNCs (P < 0.05). Thus, inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction improves the angiogenic and vasculogenic processes and restores postischemic neovascularization in type 1 diabetic mice. PMID:16877369

  13. NADPH oxidase-derived overproduction of reactive oxygen species impairs postischemic neovascularization in mice with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P; Levy, Bernard I; Shah, Ajay M; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-08-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91(phox)-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 microg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91(phox) deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 micromol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 micromol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91(phox)-deficient diabetic mice increased neovascularization by approximately 1.5-fold greater than untreated diabetic BM-MNCs (P < 0.05). Thus, inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction improves the angiogenic and vasculogenic processes and restores postischemic neovascularization in type 1 diabetic mice.

  14. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species.

  15. Anti-CD3 mAb treatment cures PDL1-/-.NOD mice of diabetes but precipitates fatal myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Mfarrej, Bechara; Keir, Mary; Dada, Shirine; Trikudanathan, Subbulaxmi; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Sharpe, Arlene H; Guleria, Indira

    2011-07-01

    Anti-CD3 mAb is an effective therapy that can reverse diabetes in NOD mice and has therapeutic potential in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We administered anti-CD3 to PDL1-/-.NOD mice in order to determine whether this treatment would reverse the development of diabetes in these mice. Mice injected with anti-CD3 mAb neonatally were protected from T1D. However, all of these anti-CD3 mAb treated PDL1-/-.NOD mice developed a wasting disease between 12 and 20 weeks of age with sudden deterioration and weight loss, leading to death within 3-5 days of development of illness. Histology revealed severe inflammation in the heart and skeletal muscles. These results suggest that deficiency of PDL1 in NOD background has the potential to lead to immune-mediated tissue damage in organs other than the pancreas, but this cannot be appreciated in PDL1-/-.NOD mice as the mice develop T1D at an early age and die from diabetes prior to manifesting other autoimmune diseases.

  16. Renoprotection From Diabetic Complications in OVE Transgenic Mice by Endothelial Cell Specific Overexpression of Metallothionein: A TEM Stereological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chhoun, Jennifer M.; Grove, Bryon D.; Laturnus, Donna I.; Zheng, Shirong; Epstein, Paul N.; Tan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated that OVE transgenic diabetic mice are susceptible to chronic complications of diabetic nephropathy (DN) including substantial oxidative damage to the renal glomerular filtration barrier (GFB). Importantly, the damage was mitigated significantly by overexpression of the powerful antioxidant, metallothionein (MT) in podocytes. To test our hypothesis that GFB damage in OVE mice is the result of endothelial oxidative insult, a new JTMT transgenic mouse was designed in which MT overexpression was targeted specifically to endothelial cells. At 60 days of age, JTMT mice were crossed with age‐matched OVE diabetic mice to produce bi‐transgenic OVE‐JTMT diabetic progeny that carried the endothelial targeted JTMT transgene. Renal tissues from the OVE‐JTMT progeny were examined by unbiased TEM stereometry for possible GFB damage and other alterations from chronic complications of DN. In 150 day‐old OVE‐JTMT mice, blood glucose and HbA1c were indistinguishable from age‐matched OVE mice. However, endothelial‐specific MT overexpression in OVE‐JTMT mice mitigated several DN complications including significantly increased non‐fenestrated glomerular endothelial area, and elimination of glomerular basement membrane thickening. Significant renoprotection was also observed outside of endothelial cells, including reduced podocyte effacement, and increased podocyte and total glomerular cell densities. Moreover, when compared to OVE diabetic animals, OVE‐JTMT mice showed significant mitigation of nephromegaly, glomerular hypertrophy, increased mesangial cell numbers and increased total glomerular cell numbers. These results confirm the importance of oxidative stress to glomerular damage in DN, and show the central role of endothelial cell injury to the pathogenesis of chronic complications of diabetes. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:560–576, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published

  17. Anti-diabetic properties of a non-conventional radical scavenger, as compared to pioglitazone and exendin-4, in streptozotocin-nicotinamide diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Michela; Canistro, Donatella; Martano, Manuela; Funel, Niccola; Sapone, Andrea; Melega, Simone; Masini, Matilde; De Tata, Vincenzo; Pippa, Anna; Vecoli, Cecilia; Campani, Daniela; De Siena, Rocco; Soleti, Antonio; Paolini, Moreno; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-04-15

    We previously showed that the innovative radical scavenger bis(1-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl)-decandioate (IAC) improves metabolic dysfunctions in a diabetic mouse model. Here, we compared the in vivo effects of IAC with those of the anti-diabetic drugs pioglitazone (PIO) and exendin-4 (EX-4). Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6J mice by streptozotocin and nicotinamide administration. Paralleled by healthy controls, diabetic animals (D) were randomly assigned to four groups and treated daily for 7 consecutive weeks: D+saline, ip; D+IAC 30mg/kgb.w., ip; D+PIO 10mg/kgb.w. per os; and D+EX-4, 50μg/kgb.w., ip. Our results show that IAC reduced basal hyperglycemia and improved glucose tolerance better than PIO or EX-4. Interestingly, in the heart of diabetic mice, IAC treatment normalized the increased levels of GSSG/GSH ratio and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, indexes of oxidative stress and damage, while PIO and EX-4 were less effective. As supported by immunohistochemical data, IAC markedly prevented diabetic islet β-cell reduced density, differently from PIO and EX-4 that had only a moderate effect. Interestingly, in diabetic animals, IAC treatment enhanced the activity of pancreatic-duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1), an oxidative stress-sensitive transcription factor essential for maintenance of β-cell function, as evaluated by quantification of its nuclear immunostaining, whereas PIO or EX-4 treatments did not. Altogether, these observations support the improvement of the general redox balance and β-cell function induced by IAC treatment in streptozotocin-nicotinamide diabetic mice. Furthermore, in this model, the correction of diabetic alterations was better obtained by treatment with the radical scavenger IAC than with pioglitazone or exendin-4.

  18. Berberine nanosuspension enhances hypoglycemic efficacy on streptozotocin induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Wu, Junbiao; Zhou, Qun; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid and active ingredient of Coptis, has been demonstrated to possess antidiabetic activities. However its low oral bioavailability restricts its clinical application. In this report, Ber nanosuspension (Ber-NS) composed of Ber and D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was prepared by high pressure homogenization technique. Antidiabetic effects of Ber-NS relative to efficacy of bulk Ber were evaluated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The particle size and zeta potential of Ber-NS were 73.1 ± 3.7 nm and 6.99 ± 0.17 mV, respectively. Ber-NS (50 mg/kg) treatment via oral gavage for 8 weeks resulted in a superior hypoglycemic and total cholesterol (TC) and body weight reduction effects compared to an equivalent dose of bulk Ber and metformin (Met, 300 mg/kg). These data indicate that a low dosage Ber-NS decreases blood glucose and improves lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 mice. These results suggest that the delivery of Ber as a nanosuspension is a promising approach for treating type 2 diabetes.

  19. P2X7 receptor knockout prevents streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Flávia Sarmento; Nanini, Hayandra Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-01-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of islet of Langerhans β-cells. P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) modulate proinflammatory immune responses by binding extracellular ATP, a classic 'danger signal'. Here, we evaluated whether the P2X7R has a role in T1D development. P2X7(-/-) mice are resistant to TD1 induction by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, with no increase in blood glucose, decrease in insulin-positive cells, and pancreatic islet reduction, compared to WT (C57BL/6) mice. Also, the levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IFN-γ and NO) did not increase after STZ treatment in P2X7(-/-) animals, with reduced infiltration of CD4(+), CD8(+), B220(+), CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Treatment with a P2X7 antagonist mimicked the effect of P2X7 knockout, preventing STZ-induced diabetes. Our results show that the absence of the P2X7R provides resistance in the induction of diabetes in this model, and suggest that therapy targeting the P2X7R may be useful against clinical T1D.

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote the repair of islets from diabetic mice through paracrine actions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodong; Song, Lujun; Shen, Kuntang; Wang, Hongshan; Qian, Mengjia; Niu, Weixin; Qin, Xinyu

    2014-05-05

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to effectively lower blood glucose levels in diabetic individuals, but the mechanism has not been adequately explained. We hypothesized that MSCs exert beneficial paracrine actions on the injured islets by releasing biologically active factors. To prove our hypothesis, we tested the cytoprotective effect of conditioned medium from cultured MSCs on isolated islets exposed to STZ in vitro and on mice islets after t