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Sample records for non-orthogonal fixed beam

  1. Non-Orthogonal Iris Segmentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-09

    pixels ( eyelashes , eyelids, etc.). For example, if all three quality bounds are close in proximity, the iris pattern that was segmented...iris pattern that was segmented by the algorithm contains eyelashes and additional extraneous information. If all automatically generated “test” mask...orthogonal iris images (see Figs. 25-28). This is primarily explained by the increased presence of eyelashes in the non-orthogonal iris masks. As the angle

  2. Non-orthogonal subband/transform coder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a simplified digital subband coder/decoder. In the present invention a signal is fed into a coder. The coder uses a non-orthogonal algorithm that is simply implemented in the coder hardware. The simple non-orthogonal design is then used in the implementation of the decoder to decode the signal.

  3. Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Pitthan, Rainer

    2001-01-17

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Moeller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  4. Test beams and polarized fixed target beams at the NLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomensky, Yury

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics running. A list of physics topics is given; one topic (Mo/ller Scattering) is treated in more depth.

  5. Experimental Study on Nonlinear Vibrations of Fixed-Fixed Curved Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Patel, B. P.

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear dynamic behavior of fixed-fixed shallow and deep curved beams is studied experimentally using non-contact type of electromagnetic shaker and acceleration measurements. The frequency response obtained from acceleration measurements is found to be in fairly good agreement with the computational response. The travellingwave phenomenon along with participation of higher harmonics and softening nonlinearity are observed. The experimental results on the internal resonance of curved beams due to direct excitation of anti-symmetric mode are reported for the first time. The deep curved beam depicts chaotic response at higher excitation amplitude.

  6. Using Non-Orthogonal Iris Images for Iris Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-05

    Figure 4. Rectangular-to-polar coordinate transformation. glare and eyelashes are then accounted for by determining if any...Coordinate Transformation Boundary of pupil/iris Lower eyelid & eyelashes Center of pupil Upper eyelid & eyelashes glare Image in polar coordinates 130...are not hidden by glare, eyelids, and eyelashes . In the case of non-orthogonal iris images, the pupillary and limbic boundaries are now elliptical

  7. 42. Fixed Span; General View of the Floor Beam, Stringer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Fixed Span; General View of the Floor Beam, Stringer, & Lateral Bracing System; looking S. (from near to far: 6L & R, 5L & R, 4 L & R). - Pacific Shortline Bridge, U.S. Route 20,spanning Missouri River, Sioux City, Woodbury County, IA

  8. Velocity field calculation for non-orthogonal numerical grids

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G. P.

    2015-03-01

    Computational grids containing cell faces that do not align with an orthogonal (e.g. Cartesian, cylindrical) coordinate system are routinely encountered in porous-medium numerical simulations. Such grids are referred to in this study as non-orthogonal grids because some cell faces are not orthogonal to a coordinate system plane (e.g. xy, yz or xz plane in Cartesian coordinates). Non-orthogonal grids are routinely encountered at the Savannah River Site in porous-medium flow simulations for Performance Assessments and groundwater flow modeling. Examples include grid lines that conform to the sloping roof of a waste tank or disposal unit in a 2D Performance Assessment simulation, and grid surfaces that conform to undulating stratigraphic surfaces in a 3D groundwater flow model. Particle tracking is routinely performed after a porous-medium numerical flow simulation to better understand the dynamics of the flow field and/or as an approximate indication of the trajectory and timing of advective solute transport. Particle tracks are computed by integrating the velocity field from cell to cell starting from designated seed (starting) positions. An accurate velocity field is required to attain accurate particle tracks. However, many numerical simulation codes report only the volumetric flowrate (e.g. PORFLOW) and/or flux (flowrate divided by area) crossing cell faces. For an orthogonal grid, the normal flux at a cell face is a component of the Darcy velocity vector in the coordinate system, and the pore velocity for particle tracking is attained by dividing by water content. For a non-orthogonal grid, the flux normal to a cell face that lies outside a coordinate plane is not a true component of velocity with respect to the coordinate system. Nonetheless, normal fluxes are often taken as Darcy velocity components, either naively or with accepted approximation. To enable accurate particle tracking or otherwise present an accurate depiction of the velocity field for a non-orthogonal

  9. A novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bin E-mail: xueting@tju.edu.cn; Yang, Fengting; Ding, Wen; Xue, Ting E-mail: xueting@tju.edu.cn

    2016-03-15

    Non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite (N-theodolite) is a new kind of large-scale metrological instrument made up by two rotary tables and one collimated laser. There are three axes for an N-theodolite. According to naming conventions in traditional theodolite, rotary axes of two rotary tables are called as horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively, and the collimated laser beam is named as sight axis. And the difference between N-theodolite and traditional theodolite is obvious, since the former one with no orthogonal and intersecting accuracy requirements. So the calibration method for traditional theodolite is no longer suitable for N-theodolite, while the calibration method applied currently is really complicated. Thus this paper introduces a novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system to simplify the procedure and to improve the calibration accuracy. A simple two-step process, calibration for intrinsic parameters and for extrinsic parameters, is proposed by the novel method. And experiments have shown its efficiency and accuracy.

  10. A novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Yang, Fengting; Ding, Wen; Xue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite (N-theodolite) is a new kind of large-scale metrological instrument made up by two rotary tables and one collimated laser. There are three axes for an N-theodolite. According to naming conventions in traditional theodolite, rotary axes of two rotary tables are called as horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively, and the collimated laser beam is named as sight axis. And the difference between N-theodolite and traditional theodolite is obvious, since the former one with no orthogonal and intersecting accuracy requirements. So the calibration method for traditional theodolite is no longer suitable for N-theodolite, while the calibration method applied currently is really complicated. Thus this paper introduces a novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system to simplify the procedure and to improve the calibration accuracy. A simple two-step process, calibration for intrinsic parameters and for extrinsic parameters, is proposed by the novel method. And experiments have shown its efficiency and accuracy.

  11. A novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Yang, Fengting; Ding, Wen; Xue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite (N-theodolite) is a new kind of large-scale metrological instrument made up by two rotary tables and one collimated laser. There are three axes for an N-theodolite. According to naming conventions in traditional theodolite, rotary axes of two rotary tables are called as horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively, and the collimated laser beam is named as sight axis. And the difference between N-theodolite and traditional theodolite is obvious, since the former one with no orthogonal and intersecting accuracy requirements. So the calibration method for traditional theodolite is no longer suitable for N-theodolite, while the calibration method applied currently is really complicated. Thus this paper introduces a novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system to simplify the procedure and to improve the calibration accuracy. A simple two-step process, calibration for intrinsic parameters and for extrinsic parameters, is proposed by the novel method. And experiments have shown its efficiency and accuracy.

  12. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  13. Laser Welding of Alumina Ceramic Substrates with Two Fixed Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedore, Blake William Clark

    Laser welding was investigated as a potential joining technology for alumina ceramic substrates. The objective of this study was to develop a method to preheat the ceramic using a single defocused laser beam prior to welding. Engineering ceramics are employed in a variety of systems and environments due to their unique properties. Joining technologies must be developed to facilitate the manufacture of complex or large ceramic components. Laser welding is advantageous as it forms joints rapidly, and does not introduce intermediate materials to form the bond, which can have deleterious effects. The Laser Machining System (LMS) at Queen's University was adapted for this study. A defocused far-infrared (FIR) laser beam was positioned to overlay a focused near-infrared (NIR) laser beam; the defocused FIR beam preheated the ceramic substrate and the focused NIR beam formed the weld. A finite element model was developed in COMSOL MultiPhysics to simulate the preheating processes and to develop a preheating protocol. The protocol was implemented using the FIR beam and adjusted to achieve preheating temperatures of 1450, 1525, and 1600°C. Welds were performed on 1 mm thick alumina plates using the preheating protocols and NIR beam powers of 25, 50, and 75 W. Weld speed was held constant throughout the study at 0.5 mm/s. The preheating protocols were successful at achieving near-constant preheating temperatures, with standard deviations below 32 degrees. Partially penetrating welds were formed with the NIR beam at 25 W, and fully penetrating welds at 50 and 75 W. Large pores were present in the 25 W and 50 W welds. Minimal porosity was observed in the welds formed at 75 W. All of the welded plates experienced a transverse fracture that extended perpendicular to weld, and a longitudinal fracture extending parallel to the weld. This study shows that a fixed defocused laser beam can successfully preheat alumina substrates to the high temperatures required for welding; however

  14. Test track evaluation of headlight glare associated with adaptive curve HID, fixed HID, and fixed halogen low beam headlights.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; Frischmann, Tim; Brumbelow, Matthew L

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive curve headlights swivel with steering input and are linked to reduced insurance claims and improved visual performance. This study assessed glare experienced from adaptive curve high-intensity discharge (HID), fixed (non-swiveling) HID and fixed halogen headlights - all tested in low beam mode. Twenty participants rated glare from vehicles' headlights using the DeBoer visual discomfort scale as a test driver drove towards them from five approaches on a test track. Participants rated the fixed halogen condition as less glaring than the adaptive curve and fixed HID conditions. There was no significant difference in ratings between the HID low-beam conditions. Collapsing across roadway approaches, the mean subjective ratings for the fixed halogen, adaptive curve HID and fixed HID low-beam conditions indicated 'satisfactory' levels of glare. Differences between subjective ratings were supported by illuminance data. Differences among the three low-beam systems appear minor, relative to their differences from a benchmark high-beam condition. Practitioner Summary: Insurance data indicates reduced claims associated with adaptive curve lighting. The current effort was to study how such lighting affects discomfort glare of oncoming drivers relative to conventional headlights. Participants rated halogen headlights as less glaring than fixed and adaptive curve HID low beams. Differences among systems were small and associated with acceptable levels of discomfort glare.

  15. Exact exchange with non-orthogonal generalized Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Mountjoy, Jeff; Todd, Michelle; Mosey, Nicholas J

    2017-03-14

    The evaluation of exact exchange (EXX) is an important component of quantum chemical calculations performed with ab initio and hybrid density functional methods. While evaluating exact exchange is routine in molecular quantum chemical calculations performed with localized basis sets, the non-local nature of the exchange operator presents a major impediment to the efficient use of exact exchange in calculations that employ planewave basis sets. Non-orthogonal generalized Wannier functions (NGWFs) corresponding to planewave expansions of localized basis functions are an alternative form of basis set that can be used in quantum chemical calculations. The periodic nature of these functions renders them suitable for calculations of periodic systems, while the contraction of sets of planewaves into individual basis functions reduces the number of variational parameters, permitting the construction and direct diagonalization of the Fock matrix. The present study examines how NGWFs corresponding to Fourier series representations of conventional atom-centered basis sets can be used to evaluate exact exchange in periodic systems. Specifically, an approach for constructing the exchange operator with NGWFs is presented and used to perform Hartree-Fock calculations with a series of molecules in periodically repeated simulation cells. The results demonstrate that the NGWF approach is significantly faster than the EXX method, which is a standard approach for evaluating exact exchange in periodic systems.

  16. Exact exchange with non-orthogonal generalized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Jeff; Todd, Michelle; Mosey, Nicholas J.

    2017-03-01

    The evaluation of exact exchange (EXX) is an important component of quantum chemical calculations performed with ab initio and hybrid density functional methods. While evaluating exact exchange is routine in molecular quantum chemical calculations performed with localized basis sets, the non-local nature of the exchange operator presents a major impediment to the efficient use of exact exchange in calculations that employ planewave basis sets. Non-orthogonal generalized Wannier functions (NGWFs) corresponding to planewave expansions of localized basis functions are an alternative form of basis set that can be used in quantum chemical calculations. The periodic nature of these functions renders them suitable for calculations of periodic systems, while the contraction of sets of planewaves into individual basis functions reduces the number of variational parameters, permitting the construction and direct diagonalization of the Fock matrix. The present study examines how NGWFs corresponding to Fourier series representations of conventional atom-centered basis sets can be used to evaluate exact exchange in periodic systems. Specifically, an approach for constructing the exchange operator with NGWFs is presented and used to perform Hartree-Fock calculations with a series of molecules in periodically repeated simulation cells. The results demonstrate that the NGWF approach is significantly faster than the EXX method, which is a standard approach for evaluating exact exchange in periodic systems.

  17. Behavior simulation for electrically actuated bow-tie shaped fixed-fixed beams based on nodal analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Huang, Qing-an; Li, Wei-hua

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports a nodal model for the trapeziform beam element with gradual change cross-sections. Using this model, electromechanical behavior of the electrically actuated bow-tie shaped fixed-fixed beams can be simulated in a system level. The model is developed by treating the governing equations of the trapeziform beam based on the Galerkin residual method and decomposing the 4th-order partial differential equation into discrete modal ordinary differential equations. After that, the equivalent circuits and corresponding nodal model are established. In the model, the nonlinearities including mid-plane stretching and electrostatic forcing are considered. The accuracy of the developed model is verified by extensively comparing the static and dynamic analysis results with those obtained from FEA and available experiment data. The developed model is also applicable to beam-like structures with uniform cross-sections.

  18. Which are more accurate, orthogonal or non-orthogonal sonic anemometers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, W. J.; Frank, J. M.; Swiatek, E.; Zimmerman, H.; Ewers, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Sonic anemometry is fundamental to all eddy-covariance studies of surface energy, ecosystem carbon, and water balance. Recent studies have shown the potential underestimation of the vertical wind fluctuations among the most commonly encountered anemometer models, but thus far testing has been focused on non-orthogonal sonic anemometer designs. We hypothesize that these underestimates are systematic to the non-orthogonal design and not attributable to a single manufacturer. If so, orthogonal measurements of vertical wind should be more accurate. We tested this by conducting an experiment to measure the relative consistency between vertical and horizontal wind measurements for three sonic anemometer designs: orthogonal, non-orthogonal, and quasi-orthogonal. Both the orthogonal and non-orthogonal models were from a single manufacturer (K-probe and A-probe, Applied Technologies, Inc.) while the quasi-orthogonal design featured non-orthogonal u- and v-axes but with an orthogonal w-axis (CSAT3V, Campbell Scientific, Inc.). We conducted a 12-week experiment, testing four sonic anemometers relative to a control (CSAT3, Campbell Scientific, Inc.), each week randomly selecting at least one of each model from a pool of twelve instruments (three of each model) and randomly locating the test anemometers around the control. Half-way through the week the test anemometers were re-mounted in a horizontal position. Work was done at the GLEES AmeriFlux site (southeastern Wyoming, USA) which experiences large, uni-directional wind and turbulence. Results are discussed.

  19. Preparation of a primary argon beam for the CERN fixed target physics.

    PubMed

    Küchler, D; O'Neil, M; Scrivens, R; Thomae, R

    2014-02-01

    The fixed target experiment NA61 in the North Area of the Super Proton Synchrotron is studying phase transitions in strongly interacting matter. Up to now they used the primary beams available from the CERN accelerator complex (protons and lead ions) or fragmented beams created from the primary lead ion beam. To explore a wider range of energies and densities a request was made to provide primary argon and xenon beams. This paper describes the results of the setting up and 10 week test run of the Ar(11+) beam from the 14.5 GHz ECR ion source and the linear accelerator (Linac3) at CERN.

  20. Orthogonal and Non-Orthogonal Tight Binding Parameters for III-V Semiconductors Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, A. S.; Fellows, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    A simulated annealing (SA) approach is employed in the determination of different tight binding (TB) sets of parameters for the nitride semiconductors AlN, GaN and InN, as well their limitations and potentialities are also discussed. Two kinds of atomic basis set are considered: (i) the orthogonal sp 3 s∗ with interaction up to second neighbors and (ii) a spd non-orthogonal set, with the Hamiltonian matrix elements calculated within the Extended Hückel Theory (EHT) prescriptions. For the non-orthogonal method, TB parameters are given for both zincblend and wurtzite crystalline structures.

  1. Deterministic Quantum Key Distribution Using Two Non-orthogonal Entangled States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Zeng, Gui-Hua

    2007-03-01

    A deterministic quantum key distribution scheme using two non-orthogonal entangled states is proposed. In the proposed scheme, communicators share key information by exchanging one travelling photon with two random and secret polarization angles. The security of the distributed key is guaranteed by three checking phases in three-way channel and the communicators' secret polarization angles.

  2. Teleportation of a qubit using entangled non-orthogonal states: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisodia, Mitali; Verma, Vikram; Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban

    2017-03-01

    The effect of non-orthogonality of an entangled non-orthogonal state-based quantum channel is investigated in detail in the context of the teleportation of a qubit. Specifically, average fidelity, minimum fidelity and minimum assured fidelity (MASFI) are obtained for teleportation of a single-qubit state using all the Bell-type entangled non-orthogonal states known as quasi-Bell states. Using Horodecki criterion, it is shown that the teleportation scheme obtained by replacing the quantum channel (Bell state) of the usual teleportation scheme by a quasi-Bell state is optimal. Further, the performance of various quasi-Bell states as teleportation channel is compared in an ideal situation (i.e., in the absence of noise) and under different noise models (e.g., amplitude and phase damping channels). It is observed that the best choice of the quasi-Bell state depends on the amount non-orthogonality, both in noisy and noiseless case. A specific quasi-Bell state, which was found to be maximally entangled in the ideal conditions, is shown to be less efficient as a teleportation channel compared to other quasi-Bell states in particular cases when subjected to noisy channels. It has also been observed that usually the value of average fidelity falls with an increase in the number of qubits exposed to noisy channels (viz., Alice's, Bob's and to be teleported qubits), but the converse may be observed in some particular cases.

  3. Fixed target project AFTER at the LHC beams for heavy ion and hadron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurepin, A. B.; Topilskaya, N. S.

    2017-09-01

    High intensity proton and lead ion beams at the LHC collider allow one to use the beam halo by placing a fixed target or a bent crystal for beam extraction. The particle energy in this case is just half that at the RHIC collider, but the luminosity exceeds the collider luminosity many times. It is also possible to install a polarized target in the extracted beam. The project AFTER is aimed at investigation of rare processes, polarization phenomena, determination of the parameters required for analysis of cosmic rays and neutrino astrophysics, detailed investigation of quarkonia production and suppression depending on the phase transition of matter to the quark-gluon phase.

  4. Heavy-ion collisions in a fixed target mode at the LHC beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurepin, Alexey; Topilskaya, Nataliya

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of high-energy LHC beams with fixed target, including polarized nuclei targets, can expand the range of fundamental physical investigations accessible at CERN. High-intensity beam of protons and lead ions accumulated in the LHC collider allows to apply the gas-target system like the LHCb SMOG or HERMES systems. It is also possible to use the beam halo by placing in the halo the fixed target in the form of thin ribbon or use a bend crystal to extract the beam. In the extracted beam it is possible to install a polarized target. Using the proton and ion beams of the LHC with fixed targets, the data in the energy interval between maximum energy of the SPS and the nominal RHIC energy in p-A and A-A collisions could be obtained. The fixed target mode allows the intensive study of rare processes, the study of polarization phenomena, the measurements of the parameters needed to analyze the data of cosmic rays and neutrino astrophysics, detailed study of the processes of quarkonia production and suppression. The high statistics data on quarkonium production at these energies will give the possibility to clarify the mechanism of production, to investigate the importance of recombination process and the energy dependence on the phase transition of nuclear matter to the quark-gluon phase. Also the physical program includes the study of the Drell-Yan process, D-meson production, flow and spin physics.

  5. Underestimates of sensible heat flux due to vertical velocity measurement errors in non-orthogonal sonic anemometers

    Treesearch

    John M. Frank; William J. Massman; Brent E. Ewers

    2013-01-01

    Sonic thermometry and anemometry are fundamental to all eddy-covariance studies of surface energy balance. Recent studies have suggested that sonic anemometers with non-orthogonal transducers can underestimate vertical wind velocity (w) and sensible heat flux (H) when compared to orthogonal designs. In this study we tested whether a non-orthogonal sonic anemometer (...

  6. Non-Orthogonality of Seafloor Spreading: A New Look at Fast Spreading Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Most of Earth's surface is created by seafloor spreading. While most seafloor spreading is orthogonal, that is, the strike of mid-ocean ridge segments is perpendicular to nearby transform faults, examples of significant non-orthogonality have been noted since the 1970s, in particular in regions of slow seafloor spreading such as the western Gulf of Aden with non-orthogonality up to 45°. In contrast, here we focus on fast and ultra-fast seafloor spreading along the East Pacific Rise. To estimate non-orthogonality, we compare ridge-segment strikes with the direction of plate motion determined from the angular velocity that best fits all the data along the boundary of a single plate pair [DeMets et al., 2010]. The advantages of this approach include greater accuracy and the ability to estimate non-orthogonality where there are no nearby transform faults. Estimating the strikes of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge segments present several challenges as non-transform offsets on various scales affect the estimate of the strike. While spreading is orthogonal or nearly orthogonal along much of the East Pacific Rise, some ridge segments along the Pacific-Nazca boundary near 30°S and near 16°S-22°S deviate from orthogonality by as much as 6°-12° even when we exclude the portions of mid-ocean ridge segments involved in overlapping spreading centers. Thus modest but significant non-orthogonality occurs where seafloor spreading is the fastest on the planet. If a plume lies near the ridge segment, we assume it contributes to magma overpressure along the ridge segment [Abelson & Agnon, 1997]. We further assume that the contribution to magma overpressure is proportional to the buoyancy flux of the plume [Sleep, 1990] and inversely proportional to the distance between the mid-ocean ridge segment and a given plume. We find that the non-orthogonal angle tends to decrease with increasing spreading rate and with increasing distance between ridge segment and plume.

  7. A calibration method of non-orthogonal redundant ring laser gyro inertial navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunfeng; Wang, Qi; Wei, Guo; Ying, Zhihui; Long, Xingwu

    2017-05-01

    As a highly reliable positioning and orientation equipment, the redundant inertial navigation system (INS) is widely used in aerospace and other fields. For INS, high-precision calibration is the basis of high-precision navigation. Different from the calibration error modeling method of traditional orthogonal system, the nonorthogonal redundant ring laser gyro INS is installed with multi-device obliquely, and with the complexity of the configuration, the difficulty of separating the calibration parameters is also increased. Therefore, it is very significant to find a high precision calibration scheme for the non-orthogonal redundant INS. In this paper, the high precision calibration of non-orthogonal redundant INS in laboratory is studied, and a new calibration model of redundant system is summarized. A regular tetrahedral configuration prototype consisting of four Ring Laser Gyro and four Quartz Accelerometer is designed, and the calibration error modeling method and calibration accuracy are verified.

  8. Non-orthogonal optical multicarrier access based on filter bank and SCMA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun

    2015-10-19

    This paper proposes a novel non-orthogonal optical multicarrier access system based on filter bank and sparse code multiple access (SCMA). It offers released frequency offset and better spectral efficiency for multicarrier access. An experiment of 73.68 Gb/s filter bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) SCMA system with 60 km single mode fiber link is performed to demonstrate the feasibility. The comparison between fast Fourier transform (FFT) based multicarrier and the proposed scheme is also investigated in the experiment.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Functionally Graded Timoshenko Beam fixed to a Rotating Hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahi, B.; Pohit, G.

    2016-08-01

    The present work accounts centrifugal stiffening effect on the nonlinear vibration response of an FGM Timoshenko beam. Analysis is carried out for a cantilever beam fixed with a rotating hub. Material is assumed to have a gradation relation along the depth of the beam. Centrifugal force and axial displacement raised due to the rotating hub is incorporated in the strain energy equations. Subsequent to this, an iterative technique is employed to obtain amplitude dependent vibration response of a rotating Timoshenko beam while material follows a gradation relation along the beam depth. Main objective of the work is to obtain the effects of rotational speeds, hub radius, and different gradation relations on the linear as well as nonlinear frequencies and mode shapes.

  10. Development of a robotic patient positioning system with a wide beam-angle range for fixed-beam particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hongseok; Park, Jong-Oh; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Sukho; Cho, Sungho; Jung, Won-Gyun; Park, Yong Kyun; Kang, Jung Suk

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes a robotic patient positioning system (PPS) for a fixed-beam heavy-ion therapy system. In order to extend the limited irradiation angle range of the fixed beam, we developed a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) serial-link robotic arm and used it as the robotic PPS for the fixed-beam heavy-ion therapy system. This research aims to develop a robotic PPS for use in the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) system, which is under development at the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). In particular, we select constraints and criteria that will be used for designing and evaluating the robotic PPS through full consultation with KIRAMS. In accordance with the constraints and criteria, we develop a 6-DOF serial-link robotic arm that consists of six revolute joints for the robotic PPS, where the robotic arm covers the upper body of a patient as a treatment area and achieves a 15 ° roll and pitch angle in the treatment area without any collision. Various preliminary experiments confirm that the robotic PPS can meet all criteria for extension of the limited irradiation angle range in the treatment area and has a positioning repeatability of 0.275 mm.

  11. An equation-based nonlinear model for non-flat MEMS fixed-fixed beams with non-vertical anchoring supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Juan; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Bajaj, Anil K.; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    Anchor supports in MEMS beams are often far from the ideally assumed built-in or step-up conditions. Practical fabrication processes often result in non-vertical anchoring supports (referred to as inclined supports in the following text) which significantly influence the post-release performance of the beam. This paper brings attention to the presence of the inclined supports in surface micromachined fixed-fixed beams and models the mechanical and electromechanical effects of inclined supports for the first time. Specifically, we calculate and validate the effects of residual stress and loading on the post-release beam behavior including their nonlinear large-displacement characteristics. In addition the model accounts for non-flat beam profiles caused by residual stress and/or a non-flat sacrificial layer profile. Inclined supports are modeled as cantilever beams connected to a horizontal beam. The Euler-Bernoulli equations for all beams are simultaneously solved to calculate the axial stress of the horizontal beam and the axial, translational, and rotational compliance of the supports. Nonlinear effects due to stretching and residual stress are also included. The calculated beam displacements agree with FEM models to within 1.1% in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, experimentally-obtained displacements of six fabricated beams with inclined supports agree to within 5.2% with the presented model.

  12. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Eric J. Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-03-21

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing 〈S{sup 2}〉 for the ground and excited states.

  13. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundstrom, Eric J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-03-01

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing ⟨S2⟩ for the ground and excited states.

  14. Fairness for Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access in 5G Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timotheou, Stelios; Krikidis, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    In non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) downlink, multiple data flows are superimposed in the power domain and user decoding is based on successive interference cancellation. NOMA's performance highly depends on the power split among the data flows and the associated power allocation (PA) problem. In this letter, we study NOMA from a fairness standpoint and we investigate PA techniques that ensure fairness for the downlink users under i) instantaneous channel state information (CSI) at the transmitter, and ii) average CSI. Although the formulated problems are non-convex, we have developed low-complexity polynomial algorithms that yield the optimal solution in both cases considered.

  15. Oscillator strengths of allowed and intercombination lines in Si II using non-orthogonal wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2007-07-01

    The importance of valence-shell, core-valence and core-core correlation and interactions between the members of 3s2nd 2D Rydberg series and between the Rydberg series and 3s3p22D perturber state in singly ionized silicon has been examined using term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach. Large sets of spectroscopic and correlation non-orthogonal functions have been chosen to adequately describe the term dependence of wavefunctions, various correlation corrections and strong interactions in Rydberg series. The relativistic corrections are included through the one-body mass correction, Darwin and spin-orbit operators and two-body spin-other-orbit operator in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Extensive configuration-interaction wavefunctions have been used in the representation of Si II levels to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities. The accuracy of present oscillator strengths is evaluated by the agreement between the length and velocity formulations combined with the agreement between the calculated and measured transition energies. The present results have been compared with previous calculations, experimental measurements and astronomical observations.

  16. Low crosstalk optical hierarchical authentication with a fixed random phase lock based on two beams interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dajiang; He, Wenqi; Peng, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel method to achieve the purpose of hierarchical authentication based on two beams interference. In this method, different target images indicating different authentication levels are analytically encoded into corresponding phase-only masks (phase keys) and amplitude-only masks (amplitude keys) with the help of a random phase mask, which is created in advance and acts as the fixed lock of this authentication system. For the authentication process, a legal user can obtain a specified target image at the output plane if his/her phase key, and amplitude key, which should be settled close against the fixed internal phase lock, are respectively illuminated by two coherent beams. By comparing the target image with all the standard certification images in the database, the system can thus verify the user's identity. In simple terms, this system can not only confirm the legality of a user but also distinguish his/her identity level. Moreover, in despite of the internal phase lock of this system being fixed, the crosstalk between different pairs of keys hold by different users is low. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are both provided to demonstrate the validity of this method.

  17. Simultaneous Source Localization and Polarization Estimation via Non-Orthogonal Joint Diagonalization with Vector-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Ke; Lin, Qiu-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Wen; Xu, You-Gen

    2012-01-01

    Joint estimation of direction-of-arrival (DOA) and polarization with electromagnetic vector-sensors (EMVS) is considered in the framework of complex-valued non-orthogonal joint diagonalization (CNJD). Two new CNJD algorithms are presented, which propose to tackle the high dimensional optimization problem in CNJD via a sequence of simple sub-optimization problems, by using LU or LQ decompositions of the target matrices as well as the Jacobi-type scheme. Furthermore, based on the above CNJD algorithms we present a novel strategy to exploit the multi-dimensional structure present in the second-order statistics of EMVS outputs for simultaneous DOA and polarization estimation. Simulations are provided to compare the proposed strategy with existing tensorial or joint diagonalization based methods. PMID:22737015

  18. Reformulating time-dependent density functional theory with non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Weihai; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has broad application in the study of electronic response, excitation and transport. To extend such application to large and complex systems, we develop a reformulation of TDDFT equations in terms of non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals (NOLMOs). NOLMO is the most localized representation of electronic degrees of freedom and has been used in ground state calculations. In atomic orbital (AO) representation, the sparsity of NOLMO is transferred to the coefficient matrix of molecular orbitals (MOs). Its novel use in TDDFT here leads to a very simple form of time propagation equations which can be solved with linear-scaling effort. We have tested the method for several long-chain saturated and conjugated molecular systems within the self-consistent charge density-functional tight-binding method (SCC-DFTB) and demonstrated its accuracy. This opens up pathways for TDDFT applications to large bio- and nano-systems.

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Zheng, Xiao; Chen, Guan Hua

    2013-12-14

    Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

  20. Non-orthogonal multiple access with phase pre-distortion in visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xun; Yang, Qing; Hong, Yang; Chan, Calvin Chun-Kit

    2016-10-31

    Non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) offers a good balance between throughput and fairness for visible light communication (VLC). This work presents a phase pre-distortion method to improve the symbol error rate performance of NOMA uplink with successive interference cancellation (SIC) decoding in VLC. Both theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation have shown that the proposed phase pre-distortion method improves the bit-error-rate (BER) performance for NOMA under both low and high relative power ratios. Specifically, at low relative power ratios, the proposed method can eliminate the possible BER floors and alleviate the power ratio requirement by 2 dB at the BER of 3.8 × 10-3.

  1. Evolution of relativistic electron current beam in a cold plasma with fixed background of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajawat, Roopendra Singh; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman K.

    2016-10-01

    A numerical study of evolution of relativistic electron current beam in a cold homogeneous plasma with immobile ions has been carried out using one dimensional electrostatic relativistic particle-in-cell code. It is found that the beam current when longitudinally perturbed by imposing a relativistically intense wave, diminishes with time due to phase mixing effects, arising because of spatial variation of relativistic mass. Studies have been conducted for various flow velocities (v0 / c) and relativistic intensities (eE0/mωpe c ) of the perturbed wave. Rate of decay of current decreases with increasing flow velocity for a fixed (eE0/mωpe c ); and for a given initial current the final magnitude of current decreases with increasing relativistic intensity of the perturbed wave.

  2. Cone Beam Computed Tomography- An Effective Tool in Detecting Caries Under Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Gondivkar, Shailesh Madhukar; Bhoosreddy, Ajay Ramesh; Shah, Karan Rajendra; Verma, Gaurav Ravishankar; Mehrotra, Gayatri Praveen; Nerkar, Ashwini Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caries under restorations is the most common reason for re-treatment and replacement in restorative failures. To avoid failures of fixed dental prostheses, it is important to diagnose caries under it earlier. Without image degradation and metal artifacts, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be the solution to detect caries without removing fixed dental prostheses. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of CBCT in detecting caries under fixed dental prostheses. Materials and Methods Each specimen was scanned with CBCT for evaluation of secondary caries under fixed prostheses. Exposure parameters were 60 kVp and 3mA. Field of View (FOV) used was 8cm X 8cm. According to International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) criteria, six Grade 6 carious extracted teeth were selected. All teeth were prepared with four different specimens - full metal, metal-ceramic, full ceramic and metal-acrylic crowns for each tooth. Each specimen was scanned by CBCT. T-test was performed for mean gray value differences between caries and noncaries regions of each material. Gray values were recorded and evaluated for different parameters using two-way analysis of variance. Results Significant differences were found with respect to material (full metal, metal-ceramic, full ceramic and metal-acrylic) and situation (caries/noncaries) (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with respect to location (anterior or posterior). Mean gray values of caries and noncaries regions were found to be different for each material. Conclusion CBCT can be used as a post-treatment diagnostic technique for detecting caries under fixed prostheses without removing it. PMID:27656548

  3. Arrow diagram theory for non-orthogonal electronic groups: the continued fractions method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Kantorovich, Lev

    2009-11-25

    The group function theory by Tolpygo and McWeeny is a useful tool in treating quantum systems that can be represented as a set of localized electronic groups (e.g. atoms, molecules or bonds). It provides a general means of taking into account intra-correlation effects inside the groups without assuming that the interaction between the groups is weak. For non-orthogonal group functions the arrow diagram (AD) technique provides a convenient procedure for calculating matrix elements [Formula: see text] of arbitrary symmetrical operators [Formula: see text] which are needed, for example, for calculating the total energy of the system or its electron density. The total wavefunction of the system [Formula: see text] is represented as an antisymmetrized product of non-orthogonal electron group functions Φ(I) of each group I in the system. However, application of the AD theory to extended (e.g. infinite) systems (such as biological molecules or crystals) is not straightforward, since the calculation of the mean value of an operator requires that each term of the diagram expansion be divided by the normalization integral S = ⟨Ψ|Ψ⟩ which is given by an AD expansion as well. In our previous work, we cast the mean value [Formula: see text] of a symmetrical operator [Formula: see text] in the form of an AD expansion which is a linear combination of linked (connected) ADs multiplied by numerical pre-factors. To obtain the pre-factors, a method based on power series expansion with respect to overlap was developed and tested for a simple 1D Hartree-Fock (HF) ring model. In the present paper this method is first tested on a 2D HF model, and we find that the power series expansion for the pre-factors converges extremely slowly to the exact solution. Instead, we suggest another, more powerful, method based on a continued fraction expansion of the pre-factors that approaches the exact solution much faster. The method is illustrated on the calculation of the electron density

  4. Optimized Non-Orthogonal Localized Orbitals for Linear Scaling Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Reboredo, Fernando; Galli, Giulia

    2004-03-01

    It has been shown [1] that Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of total energies of interacting systems can be made to scale nearly linearly with the number of electrons (N), by using localized single particle orbitals to construct Slater determinants. Here we propose a new way of defining the localized orbitals required for O(N)-QMC calculation, by minimizing an appropriate cost function yielding a set of N non-orthogonal (NO) localized orbitals considerably smoother in real space than Maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWF). These NO orbitals have better localization properties than MLWFs. We show that for semiconducting systems NO orbitals can be localized in a much smaller region of space than orthogonal orbitals (typically, one eighth of the volume) and give total energies with the same accuracy, thus yielding a linear scaling QMC algorithm which is 5 times faster than the one originally proposed [1]. We also discuss the extension of O(N)-QMC with NO orbitals to the calculations of total energies of metallic systems. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. [1] A. J. Williamson, R.Q. Hood and J.C. Grossman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246406 (2001)

  5. A Novel Attitude Estimation Algorithm Based on the Non-Orthogonal Magnetic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianliang; Wu, Panlong; Bo, Yuming

    2016-05-19

    Because the existing extremum ratio method for projectile attitude measurement is vulnerable to random disturbance, a novel integral ratio method is proposed to calculate the projectile attitude. First, the non-orthogonal measurement theory of the magnetic sensors is analyzed. It is found that the projectile rotating velocity is constant in one spinning circle and the attitude error is actually the pitch error. Next, by investigating the model of the extremum ratio method, an integral ratio mathematical model is established to improve the anti-disturbance performance. Finally, by combining the preprocessed magnetic sensor data based on the least-square method and the rotating extremum features in one cycle, the analytical expression of the proposed integral ratio algorithm is derived with respect to the pitch angle. The simulation results show that the proposed integral ratio method gives more accurate attitude calculations than does the extremum ratio method, and that the attitude error variance can decrease by more than 90%. Compared to the extremum ratio method (which collects only a single data point in one rotation cycle), the proposed integral ratio method can utilize all of the data collected in the high spin environment, which is a clearly superior calculation approach, and can be applied to the actual projectile environment disturbance.

  6. A Novel Attitude Estimation Algorithm Based on the Non-Orthogonal Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianliang; Wu, Panlong; Bo, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    Because the existing extremum ratio method for projectile attitude measurement is vulnerable to random disturbance, a novel integral ratio method is proposed to calculate the projectile attitude. First, the non-orthogonal measurement theory of the magnetic sensors is analyzed. It is found that the projectile rotating velocity is constant in one spinning circle and the attitude error is actually the pitch error. Next, by investigating the model of the extremum ratio method, an integral ratio mathematical model is established to improve the anti-disturbance performance. Finally, by combining the preprocessed magnetic sensor data based on the least-square method and the rotating extremum features in one cycle, the analytical expression of the proposed integral ratio algorithm is derived with respect to the pitch angle. The simulation results show that the proposed integral ratio method gives more accurate attitude calculations than does the extremum ratio method, and that the attitude error variance can decrease by more than 90%. Compared to the extremum ratio method (which collects only a single data point in one rotation cycle), the proposed integral ratio method can utilize all of the data collected in the high spin environment, which is a clearly superior calculation approach, and can be applied to the actual projectile environment disturbance. PMID:27213389

  7. Multicolour nanoscopy of fixed and living cells with a single STED beam and hyperspectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Franziska R.; Loidolt, Maria; Westphal, Volker; Butkevich, Alexey N.; Gregor, Carola; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2017-04-01

    The extension of fluorescence nanoscopy to larger numbers of molecular species concurrently visualized by distinct markers is of great importance for advanced biological applications. To date, up to four markers had been distinguished in STED experiments featuring comparatively elaborate imaging schemes and optical setups, and exploiting various properties of the fluorophores. Here we present a simple yet versatile STED design for multicolour imaging below the diffraction limit. A hyperspectral detection arrangement (hyperSTED) collects the fluorescence in four spectral channels, allowing the separation of four markers with only one excitation wavelength and a single STED beam. Unmixing of the different marker signals based on the simultaneous readout of all channels is performed with a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. We illustrate the approach showing four-colour nanoscopy of fixed and living cellular samples.

  8. Multicolour nanoscopy of fixed and living cells with a single STED beam and hyperspectral detection.

    PubMed

    Winter, Franziska R; Loidolt, Maria; Westphal, Volker; Butkevich, Alexey N; Gregor, Carola; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W

    2017-04-18

    The extension of fluorescence nanoscopy to larger numbers of molecular species concurrently visualized by distinct markers is of great importance for advanced biological applications. To date, up to four markers had been distinguished in STED experiments featuring comparatively elaborate imaging schemes and optical setups, and exploiting various properties of the fluorophores. Here we present a simple yet versatile STED design for multicolour imaging below the diffraction limit. A hyperspectral detection arrangement (hyperSTED) collects the fluorescence in four spectral channels, allowing the separation of four markers with only one excitation wavelength and a single STED beam. Unmixing of the different marker signals based on the simultaneous readout of all channels is performed with a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. We illustrate the approach showing four-colour nanoscopy of fixed and living cellular samples.

  9. Axisymmetric scattering of an acoustical Bessel beam by a rigid fixed spheroid.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Farid G

    2015-10-01

    Based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates, a formal analytical solution for the acoustic scattering of a zeroth-order Bessel acoustic beam centered on a rigid fixed (oblate or prolate) spheroid is provided. The unknown scattering coefficients of the spheroid are determined by solving a system of linear equations derived for the Neumann boundary condition. Numerical results for the modulus of the backscattered pressure (θ = π) in the near field and the backscattering form function in the far field for both prolate and oblate spheroids are presented and discussed, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle of the Bessel beam, and the dimensionless frequency. The plots display periodic oscillations (versus the dimensionless frequency) because of the interference of specularly reflected waves in the backscattering direction with circumferential Franz' waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3-D directivity patterns illustrate the near- and far-field axisymmetric scattering. Investigations in underwater acoustics, particle levitation, scattering, and the detection of submerged elongated objects and other related applications utilizing Bessel waves would benefit from the results of the present study.

  10. Transverse beam dynamics in non-linear Fixed Field Alternating Gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Haj, Tahar M.; Meot, F.

    2016-03-02

    In this paper, we present some aspects of the transverse beam dynamics in Fixed Field Ring Accelerators (FFRA): we start from the basic principles in order to derive the linearized transverse particle equations of motion for FFRA, essentially FFAGs and cyclotrons are considered here. This is a simple extension of a previous work valid for linear lattices that we generalized by including the bending terms to ensure its correctness for FFAG lattice. The space charge term (contribution of the internal coulombian forces of the beam) is contained as well, although it is not discussed here. The emphasis is on the scaling FFAG type: a collaboration work is undertaken in view of better understanding the properties of the 150 MeV scaling FFAG at KURRI in Japan, and progress towards high intensity operation. Some results of the benchmarking work between different codes are presented. Analysis of certain type of field imperfections revealed some interesting features about this machine that explain some of the experimental results and generalize the concept of a scaling FFAG to a non-scaling one for which the tune variations obey a well-defined law.

  11. Physics Opportunities of a Fixed-Target Experiment using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-03-16

    We outline the many physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton and lead-ion beams of the LHC extracted by a bent crystal. In a proton run with the LHC 7-TeV beam, one can analyze pp, pd and pA collisions at center-of-mass energy {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and even higher using the Fermi motion of the nucleons in a nuclear target. In a lead run with a 2.76 TeV-per-nucleon beam, {radical}s{sub NN} is as high as 72 GeV. Bent crystals can be used to extract about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons/sec; the integrated luminosity over a year reaches 0.5 fb{sup -1} on a typical 1 cm-long target without nuclear species limitation. We emphasize that such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, gluon and heavy-quark distributions of the proton and the neutron can be accessed at large x and even at x larger than unity in the nuclear case. Single diffractive physics and, for the first time, the large negative-xF domain can be accessed. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter versus the features of the hot and dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions, including the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, which can be studied in PbA collisions over the full range of target-rapidity domain with a large variety of nuclei. The polarization of hydrogen and nuclear targets allows an ambitious spin program, including measurements of the QCD lensing effects which underlie the Sivers single-spin asymmetry, the study of transversity distributions and possibly of polarized parton distributions. We also emphasize the potential offered by pA ultra-peripheral collisions where the nucleus target A is used as a coherent photon source, mimicking photoproduction processes in ep collisions. Finally, we note that W and Z bosons can be produced and detected in a fixed-target experiment and in their

  12. Non-orthogonal tool/flange and robot/world calibration.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Floris; Richter, Lars; Matthäus, Lars; Martens, Volker; Bruder, Ralf; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2012-12-01

    For many robot-assisted medical applications, it is necessary to accurately compute the relation between the robot's coordinate system and the coordinate system of a localisation or tracking device. Today, this is typically carried out using hand-eye calibration methods like those proposed by Tsai/Lenz or Daniilidis. We present a new method for simultaneous tool/flange and robot/world calibration by estimating a solution to the matrix equation AX = YB. It is computed using a least-squares approach. Because real robots and localisation are all afflicted by errors, our approach allows for non-orthogonal matrices, partially compensating for imperfect calibration of the robot or localisation device. We also introduce a new method where full robot/world and partial tool/flange calibration is possible by using localisation devices providing less than six degrees of freedom (DOFs). The methods are evaluated on simulation data and on real-world measurements from optical and magnetical tracking devices, volumetric ultrasound providing 3-DOF data, and a surface laser scanning device. We compare our methods with two classical approaches: the method by Tsai/Lenz and the method by Daniilidis. In all experiments, the new algorithms outperform the classical methods in terms of translational accuracy by up to 80% and perform similarly in terms of rotational accuracy. Additionally, the methods are shown to be stable: the number of calibration stations used has far less influence on calibration quality than for the classical methods. Our work shows that the new method can be used for estimating the relationship between the robot's and the localisation device's coordinate systems. The new method can also be used for deficient systems providing only 3-DOF data, and it can be employed in real-time scenarios because of its speed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Non-orthogonal spin-adaptation of coupled cluster methods: A new implementation of methods including quadruple excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Devin A.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-02-14

    The theory of non-orthogonal spin-adaptation for closed-shell molecular systems is applied to coupled cluster methods with quadruple excitations (CCSDTQ). Calculations at this level of detail are of critical importance in describing the properties of molecular systems to an accuracy which can meet or exceed modern experimental techniques. Such calculations are of significant (and growing) importance in such fields as thermodynamics, kinetics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopies. With respect to the implementation of CCSDTQ and related methods, we show that there are significant advantages to non-orthogonal spin-adaption with respect to simplification and factorization of the working equations and to creating an efficient implementation. The resulting algorithm is implemented in the CFOUR program suite for CCSDT, CCSDTQ, and various approximate methods (CCSD(T), CC3, CCSDT-n, and CCSDT(Q))

  14. Non-orthogonal spin-adaptation of coupled cluster methods: A new implementation of methods including quadruple excitations.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Devin A; Stanton, John F

    2015-02-14

    The theory of non-orthogonal spin-adaptation for closed-shell molecular systems is applied to coupled cluster methods with quadruple excitations (CCSDTQ). Calculations at this level of detail are of critical importance in describing the properties of molecular systems to an accuracy which can meet or exceed modern experimental techniques. Such calculations are of significant (and growing) importance in such fields as thermodynamics, kinetics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopies. With respect to the implementation of CCSDTQ and related methods, we show that there are significant advantages to non-orthogonal spin-adaption with respect to simplification and factorization of the working equations and to creating an efficient implementation. The resulting algorithm is implemented in the CFOUR program suite for CCSDT, CCSDTQ, and various approximate methods (CCSD(T), CC3, CCSDT-n, and CCSDT(Q)).

  15. Non-orthogonal spin-adaptation of coupled cluster methods: A new implementation of methods including quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Devin A.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-02-01

    The theory of non-orthogonal spin-adaptation for closed-shell molecular systems is applied to coupled cluster methods with quadruple excitations (CCSDTQ). Calculations at this level of detail are of critical importance in describing the properties of molecular systems to an accuracy which can meet or exceed modern experimental techniques. Such calculations are of significant (and growing) importance in such fields as thermodynamics, kinetics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopies. With respect to the implementation of CCSDTQ and related methods, we show that there are significant advantages to non-orthogonal spin-adaption with respect to simplification and factorization of the working equations and to creating an efficient implementation. The resulting algorithm is implemented in the CFOUR program suite for CCSDT, CCSDTQ, and various approximate methods (CCSD(T), CC3, CCSDT-n, and CCSDT(Q)).

  16. Multireference M[oslash]ller Plesset perturbation theory with non-canonical and non-orthogonal orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, James P.; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2000-09-01

    Using non-orthogonal secondary orbitals and non-canonical (localized) inactive and active orbitals, a second-order multireference perturbation theory is formulated, based on a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wavefunction. The equations of interest are derived from the first-order Bloch equation by using an approach based on a bi-orthogonal basis and operators expressed in second-quantization.

  17. Design verification for sub-70-nm DRAM nodes via metal fix using E-beam direct write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, K.; Jaschinsky, P.; Hohle, C.; Choi, K.-H.; Schneider, R.; Tesauro, M.; Thrum, F.; Zimmermann, R.; Kretz, J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of mask cost reduction, electron beam direct write (EBDW) is implemented for special applications such as rapid prototyping or small volume production in semiconductor industry. One of the most promising applications for EBDW is design verification by means of metal fix. Due to write time constrains, Mix & Match solutions have to be developed at smaller nodes. This study reports on several Mix and Match processes for the integration of E-Beam lithography into the optical litho process flow of Qimonda's 70 nm and 58 nm DRAM nodes. Different metal layers have been patterned in part with DUV litho followed by E-Beam litho using a 50 kV Vistec SB3050 shaped electron beam direct writer. All hardmask patterns were then simultaneously transferred into the DRAM stack. After full chip processing a yield study comprising electrical device characterization and defect investigation was performed. We show detailed results including CD and OVL as well as improvements of the alignment mark recognition. The yield of the E-Beam processed chips was found to be within the range of wafer-to-wafer fluctuation of the POR hardware. We also report on metal fix by electrical cutting of selected diodes in large chip scales which usually cannot be accessed with FIB methods. In summary, we show the capability of EBDW for quick and flexible design verification.

  18. Renovation of the fixing and loading factors of the beam by the spectral data of free flexural vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhymbek, Meiram Erkanatuly; Yessirkegenov, Nurgissa Amankeldiuly; Sadybekov, Makhmud Abdysametovich

    2015-09-18

    In the current paper, the problem of bending vibrations of a beam in which the binding on the right end is unknown and not available for visual inspection is studied. The main objective is to study an inverse problem: find additional unknown boundary conditions by additional spectral data, i.e., the conditions of fixing the right end of the rod. In this work, unlike many other works, as such additional conditions we choose the first natural frequencies (eigenvalues) of two new problems corresponding to the problem of bending vibrations of a beam with loads of different weights at the central point.

  19. Quarkonium Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lansberg, J.P.; Brodsky, S.J.; Fleuret, F.; Hadjidakis, C.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-04-09

    We outline the many quarkonium-physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the p and Pb LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. This provides an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb{sup -1} per year on a typical 1cm-long target. Such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. With such a high luminosity, one can analyse quarkonium production in great details in pp, pd and pA collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 72 GeV in PbA collisions. In a typical pp (pA) run, the obtained quarkonium yields per unit of rapidity are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those expected at RHIC and about respectively 10 (70) times larger than for ALICE. In PbA, they are comparable. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, the large negative-x{sub F} domain can be accessed for the first time, greatly extending previous measurements by Hera-B and E866. Such analyses should help resolving the quarkonium-production controversies and clear the way for gluon PDF extraction via quarkonium studies. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter and the features of the hot and dense matter formed in PbA collisions. A polarised proton target allows the study of transverse-spin asymmetries in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production, providing access to the gluon and charm Sivers functions.

  20. On the Performance of Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access in 5G Systems with Randomly Deployed Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiguo; Yang, Zheng; Fan, Pingzhi; Poor, H. Vincent

    2014-12-01

    In this letter, the performance of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) is investigated in a cellular downlink scenario with randomly deployed users. The developed analytical results show that NOMA can achieve superior performance in terms of ergodic sum rates; however, the outage performance of NOMA depends critically on the choices of the users' targeted data rates and allocated power. In particular, a wrong choice of the targeted data rates and allocated power can lead to a situation in which the user's outage probability is always one, i.e. the user's targeted quality of service will never be met.

  1. Human performance capabilities in a simulated space station-like environment. 1: Fixed beam luminance and location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Bartz, A. E.; Zahn, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of a fixed, intense, one-foot diameter beam of simulated sunlight imaged within the field of view, upon responses to a battery of visual, body balance and stability, eye-hand coordination, and mental tests were studied. Each subject's electrocardiogram and electro-oculograms (vertical and horizontal) were recorded throughout each two-hour testing period within the space-station-like environment. It is possible to say that both subjects adapted to the brightly illuminated white panels in approximately 30 seconds after their first exposure each day and thereafter did not experience ocular fatigue, eye strain, or other kinds of disturbances as a result of these viewing conditions.

  2. The U-Beam bridge: an advancement in the fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Rada, Robert; Cruz Gonzalez, Wanda I

    2009-01-01

    Conservative, esthetic restorative dentistry has become an essential component in modern clinical dental practice. This article reviews the literature regarding the fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. A clinical case illustrates the technique. The main supportive framework is a U-beam and reinforcing rod composed of unidirectional, pretensed quartz fibers bound in an epoxy resin matrix. This composite resin restoration is ideal as an interim solution when an implant is being considered for placement in the undetermined future or as a medium to long-term restoration in certain clinical cases where occlusal forces are controlled and the abutment teeth in good health.

  3. Acoustic scattering of a Bessel vortex beam by a rigid fixed spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Partial-wave series representation of the acoustic scattering field of high-order Bessel vortex beams by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids using the modal matching method is developed. The method, which is applicable to slightly elongated objects at low-to-moderate frequencies, requires solving a system of linear equations which depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs), and satisfying the Neumann boundary condition for a rigid immovable surface in the least-squares sense. This original semi-analytical approach developed for Bessel vortex beams is demonstrated for finite oblate and prolate spheroids, where the mathematical functions describing the spheroidal geometry are written in a form involving single angular (polar) integrals that are numerically computed. The transverse (θ = π / 2) and 3D scattering directivity patterns are evaluated in the far-field for both prolate and oblate spheroids, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid) not exceeding 3:1, the half-cone angle β and order m of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kr0. Periodic oscillations in the magnitude plots of the far-field scattering form function are observed, which result from the interference of the reflected waves with the circumferential (Franz') waves circumnavigating the surface of the spheroid in the surrounding fluid. Moreover, the 3D directivity patterns illustrate the far-field scattering from the spheroid, that vanishes in the forward (θ = 0) and backward (θ = π) directions. Particular applications in underwater acoustics and scattering, acoustic levitation and the detection of submerged elongated objects using Bessel vortex waves to name a few, would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  4. Three Dimensional Wind Speed and Flux Measurement over a Rain-fed Soybean Field Using Orthogonal and Non-orthogonal Sonic Anemometer Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T.; Suyker, A.; Burba, G. G.; Billesbach, D.

    2014-12-01

    The eddy covariance method for estimating fluxes of trace gases, energy and momentum in the constant flux layer above a plant canopy fundamentally relies on accurate measurements of the vertical wind speed. This wind speed is typically measured using a three dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. These anemometers incorporate designs with transducer sets that are aligned either orthogonally or non-orthogonally. Previous studies comparing the two designs suggest differences in measured 3D wind speed components, in particular vertical wind speed, from the non-orthogonal transducer relative to the orthogonal design. These differences, attributed to additional flow distortion caused by the non-orthogonal transducer arrangement, directly affect fluxes of trace gases, energy and momentum. A field experiment is being conducted over a rain-fed soybean field at the AmeriFlux site (US-Ne3) near Mead, Nebraska. In this study, ultrasonic anemometers featuring orthogonal transducer sets (ATI Vx Probe) and non-orthogonal transducer sets (Gill R3-100) collect high frequency wind vector and sonic temperature data. Sensible heat and momentum fluxes and other key sonic performance data are evaluated based on environmental parameters including wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and angle of attack. Preliminary field experiment results are presented.

  5. Reliable Attention Network Scores and Mutually Inhibited Inter-network Relationships Revealed by Mixed Design and Non-orthogonal Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Feng; Li, Mei-Ling; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-05-21

    The attention system can be divided into alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. The efficiency and independence of attention networks have been widely tested with the attention network test (ANT) and its revised versions. However, many studies have failed to find effects of attention network scores (ANSs) and inter-network relationships (INRs). Moreover, the low reliability of ANSs can not meet the demands of theoretical and empirical investigations. Two methodological factors (the inter-trial influence in the event-related design and the inter-network interference in orthogonal contrast) may be responsible for the unreliability of ANT. In this study, we combined the mixed design and non-orthogonal method to explore ANSs and directional INRs. With a small number of trials, we obtained reliable and independent ANSs (split-half reliability of alerting: 0.684; orienting: 0.588; and executive control: 0.616), suggesting an individual and specific attention system. Furthermore, mutual inhibition was observed when two networks were operated simultaneously, indicating a differentiated but integrated attention system. Overall, the reliable and individual specific ANSs and mutually inhibited INRs provide novel insight into the understanding of the developmental, physiological and pathological mechanisms of attention networks, and can benefit future experimental and clinical investigations of attention using ANT.

  6. Modified Reinshaw and Pollard Criteria for a Non-Orthogonal Cohesive Natural Interface Intersected by an Induced Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmadivaleh, M.; Rasouli, V.

    2014-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a widely used stimulation method to enhance the productivity of unconventional resources. The hydraulic fracturing operation in naturally fractured reservoirs or when it is expected to intersect a natural interface, such as an interbed is subjected to complexity. The induced fracture may cross, get arrested by or open the fracture plane upon its arrival at the natural interface. Besides other parameters, this depends on the natural interface mechanical properties, including the cohesion and friction angle of the interface. Several analytical criteria have been developed to predict the interaction mechanism of induced and natural fracture. While these analytical solutions have been developed based on some simplified assumptions, they can provide a good understanding of the effect of different parameters. The first part of this paper summarizes the available criteria for interaction of hydraulic and natural fractures. Important factors will be mentioned and illustrations will be given to present the limitations of each criterion. The second part discusses the development and validation of an extension to Renshaw and Pollard criterion in the form a single analytical formula for non-orthogonal cohesive fracture. This includes the contribution of the strength of the in-fill material to the bonding of the two sides of a fracture, hence its effect on the interaction mechanism. The proposed criterion was validated using published laboratory data. Finally, a methodology is proposed to help the design of interaction experiments in the laboratory, which can also be used for prediction of interaction mode in numerical simulations.

  7. Linear-scaling calculation of Hartree-Fock exchange energy with non-orthogonal generalised Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, J; Hill, Q; Skylaris, C-K

    2013-12-07

    We present a method for the calculation of four-centre two-electron repulsion integrals in terms of localised non-orthogonal generalised Wannier functions (NGWFs). Our method has been implemented in the ONETEP program and is used to compute the Hartree-Fock exchange energy component of Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. As the NGWFs are optimised in situ in terms of a systematically improvable basis set which is equivalent to plane waves, it is possible to achieve large basis set accuracy in routine calculations. The spatial localisation of the NGWFs allows us to exploit the exponential decay of the density matrix in systems with a band gap in order to compute the exchange energy with a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of atoms. We describe the implementation of this approach in the ONETEP program for linear-scaling first principles quantum mechanical calculations. We present extensive numerical validation of all the steps in our method. Furthermore, we find excellent agreement in energies and structures for a wide variety of molecules when comparing with other codes. We use our method to perform calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for models of myoglobin systems bound with O2 and CO ligands and confirm that the same qualitative behaviour is obtained as when the same myoglobin models are studied with the DFT+U approach which is also available in ONETEP. Finally, we confirm the linear-scaling capability of our method by performing calculations on polyethylene and polyacetylene chains of increasing length.

  8. Linear-scaling calculation of Hartree-Fock exchange energy with non-orthogonal generalised Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziedzic, J.; Hill, Q.; Skylaris, C.-K.

    2013-12-01

    We present a method for the calculation of four-centre two-electron repulsion integrals in terms of localised non-orthogonal generalised Wannier functions (NGWFs). Our method has been implemented in the ONETEP program and is used to compute the Hartree-Fock exchange energy component of Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. As the NGWFs are optimised in situ in terms of a systematically improvable basis set which is equivalent to plane waves, it is possible to achieve large basis set accuracy in routine calculations. The spatial localisation of the NGWFs allows us to exploit the exponential decay of the density matrix in systems with a band gap in order to compute the exchange energy with a computational effort that increases linearly with the number of atoms. We describe the implementation of this approach in the ONETEP program for linear-scaling first principles quantum mechanical calculations. We present extensive numerical validation of all the steps in our method. Furthermore, we find excellent agreement in energies and structures for a wide variety of molecules when comparing with other codes. We use our method to perform calculations with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for models of myoglobin systems bound with O2 and CO ligands and confirm that the same qualitative behaviour is obtained as when the same myoglobin models are studied with the DFT+U approach which is also available in ONETEP. Finally, we confirm the linear-scaling capability of our method by performing calculations on polyethylene and polyacetylene chains of increasing length.

  9. Correction of a Non-orthogonal, Three-Component Sonic Anemometer for Flow Distortion by Transducer Shadowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, T. W.; Semmer, S. R.; Maclean, G.

    2015-06-01

    We propose that flow distortion within a non-orthogonal CSAT3 sonic anemometer is primarily due to transducer shadowing, which is caused by wakes in the lee of the acoustic transducers impinging on their measurement paths. The dependence of transducer shadowing on sonic path geometry, wind direction and atmospheric stability is investigated with simulations that use surface-layer data from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program and canopy roughness-sublayer data from the CHATS (Canopy HATS) field program. We demonstrate the efficacy of correcting the CSAT3 for transducer shadowing with measurements of its flow distortion in the NCAR wind tunnel, combined with 6 months of data collected in the atmospheric surface layer with adjacent CSAT3 and orthogonal ATI-K sonic anemometers at the NCAR Marshall field site. CSAT3 and ATI-K measurements of the variance of vertical velocity and the vertical flux of sonic temperature agree within 1 % after correction of both sonics for transducer shadowing. Both the simulations of transducer shadowing and the comparison of CSAT3 and ATI-K field data suggest a simple, approximate correction of CSAT3 surface-layer scalar fluxes with an increase on the order of 4-5 %, independent of wind direction and atmospheric stability. We also find that (where is the friction velocity) and (the correlation coefficient) calculated with corrected CSAT3 data are insensitive to wind direction and agree closely with known values of these dimensionless variables for neutral stratification, which is evidence for the efficacy of the correction of the horizontal wind components for transducer shadowing as well.

  10. Technical Note: The design and function of a horizontal patient rotation system for the purposes of fixed-beam cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Feain, Ilana; Coleman, Lloyd; Wallis, Hue; Sokolov, Richard; O'Brien, Ricky; Keall, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Cancer radiation therapy treatment is performed by delivering a 3D dose distribution to the tumor via the relative rotation between beam and patient. While most modern machines rotate the radiation beam around a still patient, the treatment can also be delivered by rotating the patient relative to a fixed beam. Fixed-beam, patient rotation radiotherapy machines show promise for reducing the size, surface area footprint, and shielding requirements compared with rotating gantry machines. In this Technical Note, we describe the development of a bespoke horizontal patient rotation system for the purposes of a fixed-beam cancer radiotherapy architecture. A horizontal Patient Rotation System was designed in accordance with the appropriate standards pertaining to performance and safety of medical electrical equipment and medical linear accelerators (ISO 9001, IEC 60601-1, IEC 60601-2-1, ISO 14971, ISO 13485, 21CFR820, IEC 62304, Machinery Directive 98/37/EC). The principal criteria for the design were safety, patient comfort, real-time control and the ability to be integrated with other radiation therapy componentry (including a linear accelerator and kV imaging systems). A first of its kind device for securing, immobilizing, translating, and rotating patients has been designed and built and tested against 161 different design, safety, and usability specifications. The device has real-time control for all critical applications. We designed and built a bespoke device which can translate and rotate patients 360° around a horizontal axis. The device meets all design and safety criteria with early usability tests indicating a high degree of comfort and utility. The system has been installed in a clinical bunker, integrated with a fixed-beam linear accelerator and is currently being commissioned for the purposes of cancer radiotherapy treatment. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Novel methods for configuration interaction and orbital optimization for wave functions containing non-orthogonal orbitals with applications to the chromium dimer and trimer.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeppe

    2015-09-21

    A novel algorithm for performing configuration interaction (CI) calculations using non-orthogonal orbitals is introduced. In the new algorithm, the explicit calculation of the Hamiltonian matrix is replaced by the direct evaluation of the Hamiltonian matrix times a vector, which allows expressing the CI-vector in a bi-orthonormal basis, thereby drastically reducing the computational complexity. A new non-orthogonal orbital optimization method that employs exponential mappings is also described. To allow non-orthogonal transformations of the orbitals, the standard exponential mapping using anti-symmetric operators is supplemented with an exponential mapping based on a symmetric operator in the active orbital space. Expressions are obtained for the orbital gradient and Hessian, which involve the calculation of at most two-body density matrices, thereby avoiding the time-consuming calculation of the three- and four-body density matrices of the previous approaches. An approach that completely avoids the calculation of any four-body terms with limited degradation of convergence is also devised. The novel methods for non-orthogonal configuration interaction and orbital optimization are applied to the chromium dimer and trimer. For internuclear distances that are typical for chromium clusters, it is shown that a reference configuration consisting of optimized singly occupied active orbitals is sufficient to give a potential curve that is in qualitative agreement with complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations containing more than 500 × 10(6) determinants. To obtain a potential curve that deviates from the CASSCF curve by less than 1 mHartree, it is sufficient to add single and double excitations out from the reference configuration.

  12. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of delivering intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric comparison among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralateral lung V5Gy(p≤0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p<0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p=0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p=0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p=0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans compared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p<0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p=0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an increase in dose to the

  13. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p < 0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p < 0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p = 0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an

  14. SU-E-T-462: Fixed-Jaw Optimization for Critical Structure Sparing in IMRT Treatment Planning: Beam Modeling Cautions for Non-Routine Use

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Veltchev, I; Cherian, G; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Multiple publications exist concerning fixed-jaw utilization to avoid linac carriage shifts and reduce intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment times. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate delivery QA discrepancies and illustrate the need for improved treatment planning system (TPS) commissioning for non-routine use. Methods: A 6cm diameter spherical target was delineated on a virtual phantom containing the Iba Matrixx linear array within the Varian Eclipse TPS. Optimization was performed for target coverage for the following 3 scenarios: a single open, zero degree field where the X and Y jaws completely cover the target; the same field using an asymmetric, fixed-jaw technique where the upper Y jaw does not cover the superior 2cm of the target; and both of the aforementioned directed at the target at 315 and 45 degree gantry angles, respectively. This final orientation was also irradiated on a linac for delivery analysis. A sarcoma patient case was also analyzed where the fixed jaw technique was utilized for kidney sparing. Results: The open beam results were as predicted but the fixed-jaw results demonstrate a pronounced fluence increase along the asymmetric, upper jaw. Analysis of the delivery of the combined beam plan Resultin 83% of pixels evaluated passing gamma criteria of 3%, 3mm DTA. Analysis for the sarcoma patient, in the plane of the shielded kidney, indicated 93% passing although the maximum dose discrepancies in this region were approximately 23%. Conclusion: Optimization within the target is routinely performed using MLC leaf-end characteristics. The fixed-jaw technique forces optimization of target coverage to utilize the penumbra profiles of the associated beamdefining jaw. If the profiles were collected using a common 0.125cc ionization chamber, the resolution may be insufficient resulting in a planvs.-delivery mismatch. It is recommended that high-resolution beam characteristics be considered when non-routine planning

  15. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) using fixed beams or an ion gantry for the treatment of patients with skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the potential improvement in treatment planning for patients with skull base meningioma using IMRT compared to carbon ion or proton beams with and without a gantry. Methods Five patients originally treated with photon IMRT were selected for the study. Ion beams were chosen using a horizontal beam or an ion gantry. Intensity controlled raster scanning and the intensity modulated particle therapy mode were used for plan optimization. The evaluation included analysis of dose-volume histograms of the target volumes and organs at risk. Results In comparison with carbon and proton beams only with horizontal beams, carbon ion treatment plans could spare the OARs more and concentrated on the target volumes more than proton and photon IMRT treatment plans. Using only a horizontal fixed beam, satisfactory plans could be achieved for skull base tumors. Conclusion The results of the case studies showed that using IMPT has the potential to overcome the lack of a gantry for skull base tumors. Carbon ion plans offered slightly better dose distributions than proton plans, but the differences were not clinically significant with established dose prescription concepts. PMID:22439607

  16. Reducing the probability of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity by changing the treatment modality from helical tomotherapy to fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin Ho; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Jang, Hong Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and compare the risk of radiation-induced hepatic toxicity (RIHT) in helical tomotherapy and fixed-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Twenty patients with unresectable HCC treated with tomotherapy were selected. We performed tomotherapy re-planning to reduce the non-target normal liver volume receiving a dose of more than 15 Gy (NTNL-V15Gy), and we created a fixed-beam IMRT plan (FB-P). We compared the dosimetric results as well as the estimated probability of RIHT among the tomotherapy initial plan (T-IP), the tomotherapy re-plan (T-RP), and the FB-P. Results Comparing the T-RP and FB-P, the homogeneity index was 0.11 better with the T-RP. However, the mean NTNL-V15Gy was 6.3% lower with the FB-P. These differences result in a decline in the probability of RIHT from 0.216 in the T-RP to 0.115 in the FB-P. In patients whose NTNL-V15Gy was higher than 43.2% with the T-RP, the probability of RIHT markedly reduced from 0.533 to 0.274. Conclusions By changing the treatment modality from tomotherapy to fixed-beam IMRT, we could reduce the liver dose and the probability of RIHT without scarifying the target coverage, especially in patients whose liver dose is high. PMID:26376679

  17. SU-E-T-273: Radiation Shielding for a Fixed Horizontal-Beam Linac in a Shipping Container and a Conventional Treatment Vault

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Balter, P; Beadle, B; Chi, P; Stingo, F; Court, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A fixed horizontal-beam linac, where the patient is treated in a seated position, could lower the overall costs of the treatment unit and room shielding substantially. This design also allows the treatment room and control area to be contained within a reduced space, such as a shipping container. The main application is the introduction of low-cost, high-quality radiation therapy to low- and middle-income regions. Here we consider shielding for upright treatments with a fixed-6MV-beam linac in a shipping container and a conventional treatment vault. Methods: Shielding calculations were done for two treatment room layouts using calculation methods in NCRP Report 151: (1) a shipping container (6m × 2.4m with the remaining space occupied by the console area), and (2) the treatment vault in NCRP 151 (7.8m by 5.4m by 3.4m). The shipping container has a fixed gantry that points in one direction at all times. For the treatment vault, various beam directions were evaluated. Results: The shipping container requires a primary barrier of 168cm concrete (4.5 TVL), surrounded by a secondary barrier of 3.6 TVL. The other walls require between 2.8–3.3 TVL. Multiple shielding calculations were done along the side wall. The results show that patient scatter increases in the forward direction and decreases dramatically in the backward direction. Leakage scatter also varies along the wall, depending largely on the distance between the gantry and the wall. For the treatment room, fixed-beam requires a slightly thicker primary barrier than the conventional linac (0.6 TVL), although this barrier is only needed in the center of one wall. The secondary barrier is different only by 0–0.2 TVL. Conclusion: This work shows that (1) the shipping container option is achievable, using indigenous materials for shielding and (2) upright treatments can be performed in a conventional treatment room with minimal additional shielding. Varian Medical Systems.

  18. A program for calculating photonic band structures, Green's functions and transmission/reflection coefficients using a non-orthogonal FDTD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. J.; Pendry, J. B.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper we present an updated version of our ONYX program for calculating photonic band structures using a non-orthogonal finite difference time domain method. This new version employs the same transparent formalism as the first version with the same capabilities for calculating photonic band structures or causal Green's functions but also includes extra subroutines for the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients. Both the electric and magnetic fields are placed onto a discrete lattice by approximating the spacial and temporal derivatives with finite differences. This results in discrete versions of Maxwell's equations which can be used to integrate the fields forwards in time. The time required for a calculation using this method scales linearly with the number of real space points used in the discretization so the technique is ideally suited to handling systems with large and complicated unit cells.

  19. Volumetric changes in pharyngeal airway in Class II division 1 patients treated with Forsus-fixed functional appliance: A three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Temani, Parul; Jain, Pradeep; Rathee, Pooja; Temani, Ruchira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest to determine a quantifiable relationship between mandibular advancement performed with an orthodontic appliance and the resulting airway volume. The study was conducted to evaluate the volumetric changes in pharyngeal airway space using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in Class II division 1 patients with retrognathic mandible treated by Forsus-fixed functional appliance and to compare them with their pretreatment findings. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion of age group 10–17 years were selected randomly and evaluated for changes in pharyngeal airway volume with and without Forsus-fixed functional appliance. Patients in each group underwent CBCT scan of head and neck region at pretreatment stage and 6 months after the initial scan. Institutional approval for the project was obtained from the Ethical Committee. Volumetric changes of upper (oropharynx) and lower (hypopharynx) pharyngeal airways were measured on scanogram using computer software and intragroup comparisons were done. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the volume of both hypopharynx and oropharynx and also total airway volume in patients treated with Forsus-fixed functional appliance. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the airway also demonstrates a considerable increase in pharyngeal airway space. Conclusion: Forsus-fixed functional appliance can be a promising appliance for improving pharyngeal airway volume in Class II division 1 patients with retrognathic mandible thus preventing obstructive sleep apnea and other respiratory problems in future. However, the long-term implications of this treatment modality need further consideration and a longer period of follow-up. PMID:27041897

  20. Volumetric changes in pharyngeal airway in Class II division 1 patients treated with Forsus-fixed functional appliance: A three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Temani, Parul; Jain, Pradeep; Rathee, Pooja; Temani, Ruchira

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a renewed interest to determine a quantifiable relationship between mandibular advancement performed with an orthodontic appliance and the resulting airway volume. The study was conducted to evaluate the volumetric changes in pharyngeal airway space using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in Class II division 1 patients with retrognathic mandible treated by Forsus-fixed functional appliance and to compare them with their pretreatment findings. Thirty patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion of age group 10-17 years were selected randomly and evaluated for changes in pharyngeal airway volume with and without Forsus-fixed functional appliance. Patients in each group underwent CBCT scan of head and neck region at pretreatment stage and 6 months after the initial scan. Institutional approval for the project was obtained from the Ethical Committee. Volumetric changes of upper (oropharynx) and lower (hypopharynx) pharyngeal airways were measured on scanogram using computer software and intragroup comparisons were done. There was a statistically significant increase in the volume of both hypopharynx and oropharynx and also total airway volume in patients treated with Forsus-fixed functional appliance. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the airway also demonstrates a considerable increase in pharyngeal airway space. Forsus-fixed functional appliance can be a promising appliance for improving pharyngeal airway volume in Class II division 1 patients with retrognathic mandible thus preventing obstructive sleep apnea and other respiratory problems in future. However, the long-term implications of this treatment modality need further consideration and a longer period of follow-up.

  1. Vibrations of pinned-fixed heterogeneous circular beams pre-loaded by a vertical force at the crown point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, László Péter; Szeidl, György

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the vibrations of isotropic, linearly elastic and heterogeneous circular beams given that a vertical force acts at the crown point. The effect of the loading is taken into account via the axial strain it causes. The material parameters, like Young's modulus, can vary arbitrarily over the symmetric, uniform cross-section. Thus, it is possible to simply model composites (not only multi-layered but also functionally graded material distributions). The main objectives are as follows: (1) to derive the equations of motion, (2) to determine the Green function matrix in closed-form both for a tensile force and for a compressive one; (3) to clarify how the load affects the natural frequencies and (4) to develop a numerical model so that we can obtain how the eigenfrequencies are related to the load. The computational results are presented in graphical format.

  2. Size consistent formulations of the perturb-then-diagonalize Møller-Plesset perturbation theory correction to non-orthogonal configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Shane R.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we introduce two size consistent forms of the non-orthogonal configuration interaction with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory method, NOCI-MP2. We show that the original NOCI-MP2 formulation [S. R. Yost, T. Kowalczyk, and T. VanVoorh, J. Chem. Phys. 193, 174104 (2013)], which is a perturb-then-diagonalize multi-reference method, is not size consistent. We also show that this causes significant errors in large systems like the linear acenes. By contrast, the size consistent versions of the method give satisfactory results for singlet and triplet excited states when compared to other multi-reference methods that include dynamic correlation. For NOCI-MP2 however, the number of required determinants to yield similar levels of accuracy is significantly smaller. These results show the promise of the NOCI-MP2 method, though work still needs to be done in creating a more consistent black-box approach to computing the determinants that comprise the many-electron NOCI basis.

  3. Size consistent formulations of the perturb-then-diagonalize Møller-Plesset perturbation theory correction to non-orthogonal configuration interaction.

    PubMed

    Yost, Shane R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-07

    In this paper we introduce two size consistent forms of the non-orthogonal configuration interaction with second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory method, NOCI-MP2. We show that the original NOCI-MP2 formulation [S. R. Yost, T. Kowalczyk, and T. VanVoorh, J. Chem. Phys. 193, 174104 (2013)], which is a perturb-then-diagonalize multi-reference method, is not size consistent. We also show that this causes significant errors in large systems like the linear acenes. By contrast, the size consistent versions of the method give satisfactory results for singlet and triplet excited states when compared to other multi-reference methods that include dynamic correlation. For NOCI-MP2 however, the number of required determinants to yield similar levels of accuracy is significantly smaller. These results show the promise of the NOCI-MP2 method, though work still needs to be done in creating a more consistent black-box approach to computing the determinants that comprise the many-electron NOCI basis.

  4. The Unevenness and Non-orthogonal State of Distribution of Corneal Thickness and the Influence on Correction of Myopic Astigmatism by LASEK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shulin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Mingna; Wang, Haiying; Li, Jing; Shi, Weiyun

    2015-09-01

    To observe and calculate the unevenness and the non-orthogonal state of distribution of corneal thickness and the relationship between them using Pentacam and to investigate the influence of unevenness and the non-orthogonal state on correction of myopic astigmatism by laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK). 230 eyes with myopic astigmatism treated with LASEK were divided into two groups: 114 eyes as the low astigmatism group (-0.25 to -0.75 DC) and 116 eyes as the midrange-high astigmatism group (-1.00 to -4.50 DC). With the help of the diagram of keratoconus evaluation program of the Pentacam, the D 3.0 and D 6.5 were calculated for the index of distribution of unevenness of the corneal thickness, and the absolute value of the angle between the maximum and minimum progression-index orientation (M 90) for the index of non-orthogonal states. The correction of myopic astigmatism by LASEK was based on standard vector analysis and power vector analysis. The follow-up period was for 3 months. The preoperative M 90 was 22.14° ± 20.87°, D 6.5 was 58.66 ± 21.32 μm, and D 3.0 was 16.11 ± 4.28 μm for the 230 eyes that were tested. The D 6.5 of low astigmatism group (55.62 ± 20.81) μm was significantly lower than that of midrange-high astigmatism group (61.65 ± 21.48) μm (P < 0.05). Of the 230 eyes, the M 90 was positively correlated with D 6.5 (r = 0.37, P < 0.001), and D 6.5 was positively correlated with D 3.0 (r = 0.56, P < 0.001). 3 months postoperatively, the absolute error vector (|EV|) of low astigmatism group (0.46 ± 0.34) was significantly lower than that of midrange-high astigmatism group (0.53 ± 0.29) (P < 0.01). The error of magnitude of low astigmatism group (-0.10 ± 0.31) was significantly lower than that of midrange-high astigmatism group (0.08 ± 0.41) (P < 0.001). The absolute error of angle (|EA|) of low astigmatism group (26.10 ± 27.24) was significantly higher than that of midrange

  5. SU-F-BRD-05: Dosimetric Comparison of Protocol-Based SBRT Lung Treatment Modalities: Statistically Significant VMAT Advantages Over Fixed- Beam IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R; Harrell, A; Geesey, C; Libby, B; Wijesooriya, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to inter-compare and find statistically significant differences between flattened field fixed-beam (FB) IMRT with flattening-filter free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for stereotactic body radiation therapy SBRT. Methods: SBRT plans using FB IMRT and FFF VMAT were generated for fifteen SBRT lung patients using 6 MV beams. For each patient, both IMRT and VMAT plans were created for comparison. Plans were generated utilizing RTOG 0915 (peripheral, 10 patients) and RTOG 0813 (medial, 5 patients) lung protocols. Target dose, critical structure dose, and treatment time were compared and tested for statistical significance. Parameters of interest included prescription isodose surface coverage, target dose heterogeneity, high dose spillage (location and volume), low dose spillage (location and volume), lung dose spillage, and critical structure maximum- and volumetric-dose limits. Results: For all criteria, we found equivalent or higher conformality with VMAT plans as well as reduced critical structure doses. Several differences passed a Student's t-test of significance: VMAT reduced the high dose spillage, evaluated with conformality index (CI), by an average of 9.4%±15.1% (p=0.030) compared to IMRT. VMAT plans reduced the lung volume receiving 20 Gy by 16.2%±15.0% (p=0.016) compared with IMRT. For the RTOG 0915 peripheral lesions, the volumes of lung receiving 12.4 Gy and 11.6 Gy were reduced by 27.0%±13.8% and 27.5%±12.6% (for both, p<0.001) in VMAT plans. Of the 26 protocol pass/fail criteria, VMAT plans were able to achieve an average of 0.2±0.7 (p=0.026) more constraints than the IMRT plans. Conclusions: FFF VMAT has dosimetric advantages over fixed beam IMRT for lung SBRT. Significant advantages included increased dose conformity, and reduced organs-at-risk doses. The overall improvements in terms of protocol pass/fail criteria were more modest and will require more patient data to establish difference

  6. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. Results IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. Conclusion RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT. PMID:21078145

  7. Whole abdomen radiation therapy in ovarian cancers: a comparison between fixed beam and volumetric arc based intensity modulation.

    PubMed

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Jamema, Swamidas; Engineer, Reena; Deshpande, Deepak; Sarin, Rajiv; Fogliata, Antonella; Nicolini, Giorgia; Clivio, Alessandro; Vanetti, Eugenio; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore; Cozzi, Luca

    2010-11-15

    A study was performed to assess dosimetric characteristics of volumetric modulated arcs (RapidArc, RA) and fixed field intensity modulated therapy (IMRT) for Whole Abdomen Radiotherapy (WAR) after ovarian cancer. Plans for IMRT and RA were optimised for 5 patients prescribing 25 Gy to the whole abdomen (PTV_WAR) and 45 Gy to the pelvis and pelvic nodes (PTV_Pelvis) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. Plans were investigated for 6 MV (RA6, IMRT6) and 15 MV (RA15, IMRT15) photons. Objectives were: for both PTVs V90% > 95%, for PTV_Pelvis: Dmax < 105%; for organs at risk, maximal sparing was required. The MU and delivery time measured treatment efficiency. Pre-treatment Quality assurance was scored with Gamma Agreement Index (GAI) with 3% and 3 mm thresholds. IMRT and RapidArc resulted comparable for target coverage. For PTV_WAR, V90% was 99.8 ± 0.2% and 93.4 ± 7.3% for IMRT6 and IMRT15, and 98.4 ± 1.7 and 98.6 ± 0.9% for RA6 and RA15. Target coverage resulted improved for PTV_Pelvis. Dose homogeneity resulted slightly improved by RA (Uniformity was defined as U5-95% = D5%-D95%/Dmean). U5-95% for PTV_WAR was 0.34 ± 0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.06 (IMRT6 and IMRT15), 0.30 ± 0.03 and 0.26 ± 0.04 (RA6 and RA15); for PTV_Pelvis, it resulted equal to 0.1 for all techniques. For organs at risk, small differences were observed between the techniques. MU resulted 3130 ± 221 (IMRT6), 2841 ± 318 (IMRT15), 538 ± 29 (RA6), 635 ± 139 (RA15); the average measured treatment time was 18.0 ± 0.8 and 17.4 ± 2.2 minutes (IMRT6 and IMRT15) and 4.8 ± 0.2 (RA6 and RA15). GAIIMRT6 = 97.3 ± 2.6%, GAIIMRT15 = 94.4 ± 2.1%, GAIRA6 = 98.7 ± 1.0% and GAIRA15 = 95.7 ± 3.7%. RapidArc showed to be a solution to WAR treatments offering good dosimetric features with significant logistic improvements compared to IMRT.

  8. SU-E-T-59: A Novel Multi-Beam Dynamic IMRT with Fixed-Jaw Technique for Left Breast Cancer Patients with Regional Lymph Nodes Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate the dosimetric benefit of a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for irradiating the left breast and regional lymph node (RLN). Methods: The breast and RLN (internal mammary node and periclavicular node) and normal tissue were contoured for 16 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with RT after lumpectomy. Nine equi-spaced fields IMRT (9 -field IMRT), tangential multi-beam IMRT (tangential-IMRT) and IMRT with fixed-jaw technique (FJT-IMRT) were developed and compared with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were used to evaluate plans. Results: All IMRTs achieved similar target coverage and substantially reduced heart V30 and V20 compared to the 3DCRT. The average heart mean dose had different changes, which were 9.0Gy for 9-field IMRT, 5.7Gy for tangential-IMRT and 4.2Gy for FJT-IMRT. For the contralateral lung and breast, the 9-field IMRT has the highest mean dose; and the FJT-IMRT and tangential-IMRT had similar lower value. For the thyroid, both 9-field IMRT and FJT-IMRT had similar V30 (20% and 22%) and were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT (34%) and tangential-IMRT (46%). Moreover, the thyroid mean dose of FJT-IMRT is the lowest. For cervical esophagus and humeral head, the FJT-IMRT also had the best sparing. Conclusion: All 9-field IMRT, tangential-IMRT and FJT-IMRT had superiority for targets coverage and substantially reduced the heart volume of high dose irradiation. The FJT-IMRT showed advantages of avoiding the contralateral breast and lung irradiation and decreasing the thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophagus radiation dose at the expense of a slight monitor units (MUs) increasing.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Electrical Breakdown in DC for Dielectric-Loaded Systems with Non-Orthogonal Boundaries Including the Effects of Space-Charge and Gaseous Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldan, Manuel Thomas Pangelinan, III

    Improved modeling of angled-dielectric insulation in high-voltage systems is described for use in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Treatment of non-orthogonal boundaries is a significant challenge in modeling angled-dielectric flashover, and conditions on boundaries are developed to maintain uniform truncation error in discretized space across the dielectric angles studied. Extensive effort was expended in isolating particular operating regimes to illustrate fundamental phenomenological surface effects that drive the discharges studied herein; consequently, this document focuses on the phenomenology of two specific dielectric angles at 6.12° for multiplicative breakdown (the so-called single-surface multipactor) and 22.9° for a non-multiplicative discharge that evolves into a dark current at steady state. Phenomenological results for simulations in vacuum through "ultra-low pressures" on the order of a few hundred mTorr are presented. A multipactor front forms via net emission of electrons from impact on the dielectric surface, where emission leads to saturated field conditions in the wake of the front, producing a well-defined forward-peaked wave. A treatment of the gain and saturation characteristics is presented, isolating the surface electric fields as the driving contributor to both metrics. Physical models include oftenneglected effects such as space-charge, dielectric-surface charging, and particle distributions in energy and space. For the discharges treated in this study, breakdown voltages of the typical Paschen form are not applicable, since multiplicative conditions are driven primarily by surface effects. Phenomenological results are also presented for simulations at low pressure (~ 1Torr), which is shown to be a transitional limit where volume effects become appreciable compared to surface effects. A coupling between space charge and surface charge is shown to lead to oscillatory effects in otherwise DC discharges. Surface multipactor leads to

  10. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  11. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  12. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer: a treatment planning comparison with fixed Beam IMRT.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Mok, E; Wang, L; Chen, C; Le, Q-T

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the dose distribution, monitor units (MUs) and radiation delivery time between volumetric-modulated arc (VMAT) and fix-beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (FB-IMRT) in skull-base and non-skull-base head and neck cancer (HNC). CT datasets of 8 skull-base and 7 non-skull-base HNC were identified. IMRT and VMAT plans were generated. The prescription dose ranged 45-70 Gy (1.8-2.2 Gy/fraction). The VMAT delivery time was measured when these plans were delivered to the patients. The FB-IMRT delivery time was generated on a phantom. Comparison of dose-volume histogram data, MUs, and delivery times was performed using T-test. Our results show that both plans yield similar target volume coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. In skull-base cases, compared to FB-IMRT, VMAT generated significantly smaller hot-spot inside PTV (2.0% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.031), lower maximum chiasm dose (32 ± 11 Gy vs. 41 ± 15 Gy, p = 0.026), lower ipsilateral temporal-mandibular joint dose (D33: 41.4 Gy vs. 46.1 Gy, p = 0.016), lower mean ipsilateral middle ear dose (43 ± 9 Gy vs. 38 ± 10 Gy, p = 0.020) and a trend for lower optic nerve, temporal lobe, parotid, and oral cavity dose. In non-skull-base cases, doses to normal tissues were similar between the two plans. There was a reduction of 70% in MUs (486 ± 95 vs. 1614 ± 493, p < 0.001) and 73% in delivery times (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 11.0 ± 3.3 min, p < 0.001) favoring VMAT. We conclude that VMAT appears to spare more normal tissues from high radiation dose for the tested skull-base tumors. Dosimetrically, both approaches were equivalent for non-skull-base tumor with VMAT using fewer MUs and shorter delivery time.

  13. Antenna Beam Coverage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, Polly; Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The strawman Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) design calls for the use of a CONUS beam for transmission between the supplier and the satellite and for fixed beams for transmission between the basic personal terminal and the satellite. The satellite uses a 3 m main reflector for transmission at 20 GHz and a 2 m main reflector for reception at 30 GHz. There are several types of spot beams under consideration for the PASS system besides fixed beams. The beam pattern of a CONUS coverage switched beam is shown along with that of a scanning beam. A switched beam refers to one in which the signal from the satellite is connected alternatively to various feed horns. Scanning beams are taken to mean beams whose footprints are moved between contiguous regions in the beam's coverage area. The advantages and disadvantages of switched and/or scanning beams relative to fixed beams. The consequences of using switched/scanning in lieu of fixed beams in the PASS design and attempts are made to evaluate the listed advantages and disadvantages. Two uses of switched/scanning beams are examined. To illustrate the implications of switched beams use on PASS system design, operation at two beam scan rates is explored.

  14. LASER MODES AND BEAMS: Tunable astigmatic π/2 converter of laser modes with a fixed distance between input and output planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutin, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    The scheme of a tunable astigmatic π/2 mode converter is proposed in which the distance between input and output planes is fixed. The converter is tuned only by rotating the cylindrical components of optical quadrupoles used in the converter around its optical axis. The Gouy phase difference in the orthogonal planes of the astigmatic π/2 converter required for mode conversion was achieved for the first time by using the scaled fractional Fourier transforms of the appropriate orders.

  15. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  16. Heavy-Ion Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Proton and Lead Beams (AFTER@LHC): Feasibility Studies for Quarkonium and Drell-Yan Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, B.; Da Silva, C.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Hadjidakis, C.; Kikola, D.; Lansberg, J. P.; Massacrier, L.; Seixas, J.; Uras, A.; Yang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    We outline the case for heavy-ion-physics studies using the multi-TeV lead LHC beams in the fixed-target mode. After a brief contextual reminder, we detail the possible contributions of AFTER@LHC to heavy-ion physics with a specific emphasis on quarkonia. We then present performance simulations for a selection of observables. These show that Υ (nS), J/ψ and ψ (2S) production in heavy-ion collisions can be studied in new energy and rapidity domains with the LHCb and ALICE detectors. We also discuss the relevance to analyse the Drell-Yan pair production in asymmetric nucleus-nucleus collisions to study the factorisation of the nuclear modification of partonic densities and of further quarkonium states to restore their status of golden probes of the quark-gluon plasma formation.

  17. Feasibility Studies for Single Transverse-Spin Asymmetry Measurements at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Proton and Lead Beams (AFTER@LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikoła, Daniel; Echevarria, Miguel García; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; Lansberg, Jean-Philippe; Lorcé, Cédric; Massacrier, Laure; Quintans, Catarina; Signori, Andrea; Trzeciak, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    The measurement of Single Transverse-Spin Asymmetries, A_N, for various quarkonium states and Drell-Yan lepton pairs can shed light on the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, a fundamental ingredient of the proton-spin puzzle. The AFTER@LHC proposal combines a unique kinematic coverage and large luminosities thanks to the Large Hadron Collider beams to deliver precise measurements, complementary to the knowledge provided by collider experiments such as at RHIC. In this paper, we report on sensitivity studies for J/ψ , Υ and Drell-Yan A_N done using the performance of LHCb-like or ALICE-like detectors, combined with polarised gaseous hydrogen and helium-3 targets. In particular, such analyses will provide us with new insights and knowledge about transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions for quarks and gluons and on twist-3 collinear matrix elements in the proton and the neutron.

  18. Feasibility Studies for Single Transverse-Spin Asymmetry Measurements at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Proton and Lead Beams (AFTER@LHC)

    DOE PAGES

    Kikoła, Daniel; Echevarria, Miguel García; Hadjidakis, Cynthia; ...

    2017-05-17

    Measurement of Single Transverse-Spin Asymmetrymore » $$A_N$$ for various quarkonia states and Drell-Yan lepton pairs can shed light on the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, a fundamental ingredient of the spin puzzle of the proton. The AFTER@LHC experiment combines a unique kinematic coverage and large luminosities of the Large Hadron Collider beams to deliver precise measurements, complementary to the knowledge provided by collider experiments such as RHIC. Here, we report on sensitivity studies for $$J/\\Psi$$, $$\\Upsilon$$ and Drell-Yan $$A_N$$ done using the performance of a LHCb-like and ALICE-like detectors, combined with a polarised hydrogen and $^3$He target. Particularly, such research will provide new insights and knowledge about transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions for quarks and gluons and on twist-3 collinear matrix elements in a proton and a neutron.« less

  19. Nanomachining of non-orthogonal mask patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tod; Yi, Daniel; White, Roy; Bozak, Ron; Archuletta, Mike; Lee, David

    2010-05-01

    Patterns which are not aligned to standard orthogonal (x and y ordinate) directions have recently been developed for advanced lithography nodes. Efforts have been successful in developing single pass nanomachining repair processes to meet the printability requirements for these patterns. This development makes use of the latest improvements made to the COBRA repair process (the Enhanced COBRA process typically completed in less than 2 minutes of repair time) with symmetric NanoBits to repair opposing critical edges of bridging defects. It also required fundamental changes in the software tools to allow automated detection of the angle of the edges and the application of pre-programmed repair edge biases normal (90°) to the detected angled edges. Additionally, some other new improvements (hardware, software, and process) are reviewed in light of more traditional nanomachining repairs.

  20. Fixed Target Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Kathryn C.

    2016-12-01

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Previous results have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies of 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb potential analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions are presented and are found to be consistent with results from previous experiments. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared to published results from the AGS.

  1. Bolt beam propagation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokair, I. R.

    BOLT (Beam on Laser Technology) is a rocket experiment to demonstrate electron beam propagation on a laser ionized plasma channel across the geomagnetic field in the ion focused regime (IFR). The beam parameters for BOLT are: beam current I(sub b) = 100 Amps, beam energy of 1--1.5 MeV (gamma =3-4), and a Gaussian beam and channel of radii r(sub b) = r(sub c) = 1.5 cm. The N+1 ionization scheme is used to ionize atomic oxygen in the upper atmosphere. This scheme utilizes 130 nm light plus three IR lasers to excite and then ionize atomic oxygen. The limiting factor for the channel strength is the energy of the 130 nm laser, which is assumed to be 1.6 mJ for BOLT. At a fixed laser energy and altitude (fixing the density of atomic oxygen), the range can be varied by adjusting the laser tuning, resulting in a neutralization fraction axial profile of the form: f(z) = f(sub 0) e(exp minus z)/R, where R is the range. In this paper we consider the propagation of the BOLT beam and calculate the range of the electron beam taking into account the fact that the erosion rates (magnetic and inductive) vary with beam length as the beam and channel dynamically respond to sausage and hose instabilities.

  2. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  3. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  4. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  5. Spectroscopic investigations of beam-plasma interactions in an ion plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruyten, W. M.; Friedly, V. J.; Peng, X.; Celenza, J. A.; Keefer, D.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of spectroscopic investigations of beam-plasma interactions in the plume from a 3 cm ion source operated on argon. Ion-electron, ion-neutral, and electron-neutral scattering are identified by studying the dependence of neutral and ion emission intensities on chamber pressure and mass flow rate, and by analyzing the emission lineshapes at a non-orthogonal angle to the plume axis. Through the Doppler shift, we are able to separate contributions from fast beam ions and fast charge-exchange neutrals on the one hand, and of slow neutrals and slow ions on the other. We discuss the application of this new technique to the characterization of beam plasma interactions in the downstream region of ion thruster engines, and its potential for identifying the processes which lead to grid erosion.

  6. Magnetic beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenkov, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Many nondestructive beam position monitors are known. However, these devices can not be used for DC particle beam diagnostics. We investigated a method of beam diagnostics applicable for the operative control of DC high power e-beam inside closed waveguide. A design of the detector for determination of{open_quote} center of mass {close_quote} position of DC particle beam was developed. It was shown that the monitor can be used as a nondestructive method for the beam position control in resonators. Magnetic field of the particle beam outside a resonator is used. The detector consists of the steel yokes and magnetic field sensors. The sensors measure magnetic fluxes in the steel yokes fixed outside the resonator. When the particle beam changes its position, these magnetic fluxes also change. Beam displacement sensitivity of the monitor depends on the steel yoke dimensions. The detector sensitivity is equal to 1 Gauss/mm for the conditions adequate to the FOM-FEM project.

  7. Beam-beam simulations for separated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.

    2000-04-10

    We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong-strong gaussian code for separated beams for the LHC and RHIC. The frequency spectrum produced by the beam-beam collisions is readily obtained and offers a good opportunity for experimental comparisons. Although our results for the emittance blowup are preliminary, we conclude that, for nominal parameter values, there is no significant difference between separated beams and center-on-center collisions.

  8. Is there a role for fixed target heavy ion physics beyond RHIC startup?

    SciTech Connect

    Sandweiss, J.

    1995-07-15

    The interesting and important physics opportunities provided by AGS and CERN fixed target facilities will be far from exhausted by the time of RHIC turn on. Given the need for the AGS to provide heavy ion beams for injection into RHIC, the cost effectiveness of fixed target experimentation with AGS beams will be high. Examples of the physics are given.

  9. Finite Element Solution: Nonlinear Flapping Beams for Use with Micro Air Vehicle Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    used to approximate the nonlinearity in a beam is the SDOF Duffing Oscillator ӱ + C ẏ + ω0 2 y + βy3 = P sin(ωt...Hilbert Transform.......................................................................................................19 Duffing Equation...Amplitude vs Nonlinear Frequency: Fixed-Fixed Steel................................. 36 Figure 26. Duffing Equation Plot: Fixed-Fixed Steel Beam

  10. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.; Morfin, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures.

  11. Fixed-target hadron production experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    Results from fixed-target hadroproduction experiments (HARP, MIPP, NA49 and NA61/SHINE) as well as their implications for cosmic ray and neutrino physics are reviewed. HARP measurements have been used for predictions of neutrino beams in K2K and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE experiments and are also being used to improve predictions of the muon yields in EAS and of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes as well as to help in the optimization of neutrino factory and super-beam designs. Recent measurements released by the NA61/SHINE experiment are of significant importance for a precise prediction of the J-PARC neutrino beam used for the T2K experiment and for interpretation of EAS data. These hadroproduction experiments provide also a large amount of input for validation and tuning of hadron production models in Monte-Carlo generators.

  12. Cartesian beams.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Miguel A; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2007-12-01

    A new and very general beam solution of the paraxial wave equation in Cartesian coordinates is presented. We call such a field a Cartesian beam. The complex amplitude of the Cartesian beams is described by either the parabolic cylinder functions or the confluent hypergeometric functions, and the beams are characterized by three parameters that are complex in the most general situation. The propagation through complex ABCD optical systems and the conditions for square integration are studied in detail. Applying the general expression of the Cartesian beams, we also derive two new and meaningful beam structures that, to our knowledge, have not yet been reported in the literature. Special cases of the Cartesian beams are the standard, elegant, and generalized Hermite-Gauss beams, the cosine-Gauss beams, the Lorentz beams, and the fractional order beams.

  13. Beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik E. Gottschalk

    2003-12-10

    Fixed-target experiments continue to provide insights into the physics of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments are performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Studies of beauty and charm production are of particular interest, since experimental results can be compared to perturbative QCD calculations. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty and charm production will be reviewed.

  14. Fixing Dataset Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  15. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  16. Matching optics for Gaussian beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, William D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A system of matching optics for Gaussian beams is described. The matching optics system is positioned between a light beam emitter (such as a laser) and the input optics of a second optics system whereby the output from the light beam emitter is converted into an optimum input for the succeeding parts of the second optical system. The matching optics arrangement includes the combination of a light beam emitter, such as a laser with a movable afocal lens pair (telescope) and a single movable lens placed in the laser's output beam. The single movable lens serves as an input to the telescope. If desired, a second lens, which may be fixed, is positioned in the beam before the adjustable lens to serve as an input processor to the movable lens. The system provides the ability to choose waist diameter and position independently and achieve the desired values with two simple adjustments not requiring iteration.

  17. A beam source model for scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-07

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  18. A beam source model for scanned proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimstrand, Peter; Traneus, Erik; Ahnesjö, Anders; Grusell, Erik; Glimelius, Bengt; Tilly, Nina

    2007-06-01

    A beam source model, i.e. a model for the initial phase space of the beam, for scanned proton beams has been developed. The beam source model is based on parameterized particle sources with characteristics found by fitting towards measured data per individual beam line. A specific aim for this beam source model is to make it applicable to the majority of the various proton beam systems currently available or under development, with the overall purpose to drive dose calculations in proton beam treatment planning. The proton beam phase space is characterized by an energy spectrum, radial and angular distributions and deflections for the non-modulated elementary pencil beam. The beam propagation through the scanning magnets is modelled by applying experimentally determined focal points for each scanning dimension. The radial and angular distribution parameters are deduced from measured two-dimensional fluence distributions of the elementary beam in air. The energy spectrum is extracted from a depth dose distribution for a fixed broad beam scan pattern measured in water. The impact of a multi-slab range shifter for energy modulation is calculated with an own Monte Carlo code taking multiple scattering, energy loss and straggling, non-elastic and elastic nuclear interactions in the slab assembly into account. Measurements for characterization and verification have been performed with the scanning proton beam system at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Both in-air fluence patterns and dose points located in a water phantom were used. For verification, dose-in-water was calculated with the Monte Carlo code GEANT 3.21 instead of using a clinical dose engine with approximations of its own. For a set of four individual pencil beams, both with the full energy and range shifted, 96.5% (99.8%) of the tested dose points satisfied the 1%/1 mm (2%/2 mm) gamma criterion.

  19. A Non-Orthogonal Fourier Expansion for Conic Decomposition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    permitted for any purpose of the United States Government. CENTER FOR CYBERNETIC STUDIES A. Charnes, Director Business - Economics Building, 203E The...where initially, (k=l) = 0 (2.1) Y= b x i = 0 VieN. 1 Then one computes vectors dk, zk +1• Yk+l• and scalars ck’ xk+l as follows ’ ’* .’ 4...34 " 7 for k odd (2.2) dk = a(k+) (2.3) dk = max { d -X k+l 2 xk+ l k k+1 (2.4) j C xk+l x k c k+lI i k Y) - - (2.5) zk +l = b -z k + l d for k even

  20. Non-Orthogonal Channel and Reservoir Routing in GSSHA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    GSSHA has the following structure types and related features. ERDC TN-SWWRP-08-05 July 2008 8 • Broad crested weirs o Horizontal o Parabolic... discharge coefficients depending upon the flow direction, which accounts for asymmetry of the structure. Weir sub- mergence is accounted for if the...each stream reach (link in GSSHA) is subdivided into cells (nodes) for computational purposes. Channel properties, cross section, roughness coefficient

  1. Fixed solar collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, H.R.

    1984-07-31

    A fixed solar energy collector system has facing panels of different size forming a Vee-shaped trough open at its base and supporting a plurality of highly reflective convex reflectors strategically disposed upon said panels in reflective relationship to a plurality of Fresnel lenses positioned at the base of the trough. A suitable reflector, disposed beneath the Fresnel lenses, directs the reflected energy to a heat-needy target.

  2. Fixed pitch wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, D. B.; Viterna, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Wind turbines designed for fixed pitch operation offer potential reductions in the cost of the machine by eliminating many costly components. It was shown that a rotor can be designed which produces the same energy annually as Mod-0 but which regulates its power automatically by progressively stalling the blades as wind speed increases. Effects of blade twist, taper, root cutout, and airfoil shape on performance are discussed as well as various starting technqiues.

  3. Neutrophilic Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Leah; Reddy, Swathi B; Kassim, Andrea; Dettloff, Jennifer; Reddy, Vijaya B

    2015-07-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous reaction to a medication that recurs in the same fairly localized site with each exposure to the offending drug. The classical histopathologic findings in FDE consist of an interface dermatitis with predominantly lymphocytic inflammatory cell infiltrate. An unusual case of FDE in a 27-year-old pregnant woman who presented with widespread lesions and a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate on histopathologic examination is reported.

  4. Fixed target electroweak and hard scattering physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, R. ); Brown, C.N.; Montgomery, H.E. ); Corcoran, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The possibilities for future physics and experiments involving weak and electromagnetic interactions, neutrino oscillations, general hard scattering and experiments involving nuclear targets were explored. The studies were limited to the physics accessible using fixed target experimentation. While some of the avenues explored turn out to be relatively unrewarding in the light of competition elsewhere in the world, there are a number of positive conclusions reached about experimentation in the energy range available to the Main Injector and Tevatron. Some of the experiments would benefit from the increased intensity available from the Tevatron utilizing the Main Injector, while some require this increase. Finally, some of the experiments would use the Main Injector low energy, high intensity extracted beams directly. A program of electroweak and hard scattering experiments at fixed target energies retains the potential for important contributions to physics. The key to major parts of this program would appear to be the existence of the Main Injector. 115 refs, 17 figs.

  5. Argon indirect ophthalmoscopic photocoagulation: reduced potential phototoxicity with a fixed safety filter.

    PubMed Central

    Whitacre, M M; Manoukian, N; Mainster, M A

    1990-01-01

    A new argon indirect ophthalmoscopic photocoagulator is presented which uses a red helium-neon laser aiming beam. An interference filter protects the operator from green or blue-green treatment beam reflections without impairing visualisation of the aiming beam or significant retinal anatomy. The protective filter is fixed in place, eliminating the weight, noise, and potential failure of mechanically switched filters. The red aiming beam has a negligible potential for producing photochemical retinal damage in the patient or operator. PMID:2337549

  6. Argon indirect ophthalmoscopic photocoagulation: reduced potential phototoxicity with a fixed safety filter.

    PubMed

    Whitacre, M M; Manoukian, N; Mainster, M A

    1990-04-01

    A new argon indirect ophthalmoscopic photocoagulator is presented which uses a red helium-neon laser aiming beam. An interference filter protects the operator from green or blue-green treatment beam reflections without impairing visualisation of the aiming beam or significant retinal anatomy. The protective filter is fixed in place, eliminating the weight, noise, and potential failure of mechanically switched filters. The red aiming beam has a negligible potential for producing photochemical retinal damage in the patient or operator.

  7. Monolithical aspherical beam expanding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, U.

    2014-02-01

    In complex laser systems, such as those for material processing, and in basically all laboratory applications passive optical components are indispensable. Matching beam diameters is a common task, where Galileo type telescopes are preferred for beam expansion. Nevertheless researches and customers have found various limitations when using these systems. Some of them are the complicated adjustment, very small diameter for the incoming beam (1/e2), fixed and non-modifiable magnifications. Above that, diffraction-limitation is only assured within the optical design and not for the real world setup of the beam expanding system. Therefore, we will discuss limitations of currently used beam expanding systems to some extent. We will then present a new monolithical solution, which is based on the usage of only one aspherical component. It will be shown theoretically how the beam quality can be significantly improved by using aspherical lenses. As it is in the nature of things aspheres are working diffraction limited in the design, it will be shown how to combine up to five monolithical beam expanding systems and to keep the beam quality at diffraction limitation. Data of the culminated wavefront error will be presented. Last but not least insights will be given how beam expanding systems based on aspheres will help to use larger incoming beams and to reduce the overall length of such a system.

  8. Beam Energy Calibration with Meson Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razen, B.; Betigeri, M. G.; Bojowald, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Drochner, M.; Ernst, J.; Foertsch, S.; Freindl, L.; Frekers, D.; Garske, W.; Grewer, K.; Hamacher, A.; Hawash, M.; Igel, S.; Ilieva, I.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Kemmerling, G.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Klimala, W.; Kolev, D.; Kutsarova, T.; Lieb, B. J.; Lippert, G.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Nann, H.; Plendl, H. S.; Protic, D.; Razen, B.; von Rossen, P.; Roy, B.; Siudak, R.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Tsenov, R.; Zolnierczuk, P. A.

    1998-11-01

    The magnetic spectrometer BIG KARL is used to get energy calibration fix-points for the external beam of COSY-Juelich. These fixpoints were obtained by measuring the meson-production reaction pp → dπ+ close to threshold and at the beam momentum, where the forward pions and the backward deuterons have the same momentum.

  9. Fixed solar energy concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, A.J.; Knasel, T.M.

    1981-01-20

    An apparatus for the concentration of solar energy upon a fixed array of solar cells is disclosed. A transparent material is overlayed upon the cell array, and a diffuse reflective coating is applied to the surface area of the transparent medium in between cells. Radiant light, which reflects through the transparent layer and does not fall directly incident to a cell surface is reflected by the coating layer in an approximate cosine pattern. Thereafter, such light undergoes internal reflection and rediffusion until subsequently it either strikes a solar cell surface or is lost through the upper surface of the transparent material.

  10. Fixed Sagittal Plane Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction. PMID:25396111

  11. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  12. Apparatus for fixing latency

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R [Provo, UT; Bartholomew, David B [Springville, UT; Moon, Justin [Bountiful, UT; Koehler, Roger O [Provo, UT

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus for fixing computational latency within a deterministic region on a network comprises a network interface modem, a high priority module and at least one deterministic peripheral device. The network interface modem is in communication with the network. The high priority module is in communication with the network interface modem. The at least one deterministic peripheral device is connected to the high priority module. The high priority module comprises a packet assembler/disassembler, and hardware for performing at least one operation. Also disclosed is an apparatus for executing at least one instruction on a downhole device within a deterministic region, the apparatus comprising a control device, a downhole network, and a downhole device. The control device is near the surface of a downhole tool string. The downhole network is integrated into the tool string. The downhole device is in communication with the downhole network.

  13. Beam splitter and method for generating equal optical path length beams

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Shinan; Takacs, Peter

    2003-08-26

    The present invention is a beam splitter for splitting an incident beam into first and second beams so that the first and second beams have a fixed separation and are parallel upon exiting. The beam splitter includes a first prism, a second prism, and a film located between the prisms. The first prism is defined by a first thickness and a first perimeter which has a first major base. The second prism is defined by a second thickness and a second perimeter which has a second major base. The film is located between the first major base and the second major base for splitting the incident beam into the first and second beams. The first and second perimeters are right angle trapezoidal shaped. The beam splitter is configured for generating equal optical path length beams.

  14. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  15. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    DOE PAGES

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-03-22

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 fTmore » $$/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$$ for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. As a result, we anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.« less

  16. Spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer with nearly parallel pump and probe beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaulanov, Todor; Savukov, Igor; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-03-22

    We constructed a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer with a small angle between the pump and probe beams facilitating a multi-channel design with a flat pancake cell. This configuration provides almost complete overlap of the beams in the cell, and prevents the pump beam from entering the probe detection channel. By coupling the lasers in multi-mode fibers, without an optical isolator or field modulation, we demonstrate a sensitivity of 10 fT$/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ for frequencies between 10 Hz and 100 Hz. In addition to the experimental study of sensitivity, we present a theoretical analysis of SERF magnetometer response to magnetic fields for small-angle and parallel-beam configurations, and show that at optimal DC offset fields the magnetometer response is comparable to that in the orthogonal-beam configuration. Based on the analysis, we also derive fundamental and probe-limited sensitivities for the arbitrary non-orthogonal geometry. The expected practical and fundamental sensitivities are of the same order as those in the orthogonal geometry. As a result, we anticipate that our design will be useful for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) applications.

  17. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  18. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  19. Fast wire scanner for intense electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Agladze, N. I.; Bazarov, I. V.; Bartnik, A.; Dobbins, J.; Dunham, B.; Full, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Savino, J.; Smolenski, K.

    2014-02-01

    We have developed a cost-effective, fast rotating wire scanner for use in accelerators where high beam currents would otherwise melt even carbon wires. This new design uses a simple planetary gear setup to rotate a carbon wire, fixed at one end, through the beam at speeds in excess of 20 m/s. We present results from bench tests, as well as transverse beam profile measurements taken at Cornell's high-brightness energy recovery linac photoinjector, for beam currents up to 35 mA.

  20. Beauty, charm and hyperon production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Gottschalk

    2002-12-11

    Over the years fixed-target experiments have performed numerous studies of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments have been performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Since the physics of particle production is still not understood, ongoing research of phenomena that we observe as beauty, charm and strange-particle production is crucial if we are to gain an understanding of these fundamental processes. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty, charm, and hyperon production will be reviewed.

  1. Beam-energy inequality in the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Siemann, R. )

    1990-03-01

    Conditions for energy transparency,'' unequal-energy beams having the same beam-beam behavior, are derived for round beams from a Hamiltonian model of the beam-beam interaction. These conditions are equal fractional betatron tunes, equal synchrotron tunes, equal beam-beam strength parameters, equal nominal sizes, equal {beta}{sup *}'s and equal bunch lengths. With these conditions the only way to compensate for unequal energies is with the number of particles per bunch.

  2. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  3. Spacecraft Multi-Beam and Contoured-Beam Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Shaped Reflector Antenna Design ". Letchworth, Hertfordshire, England: Research Studies Press Ltd. [si] N Adatia and S Tun (1986), " Shaped dual offset...flexible BFNs. If the antenna system only is required to generate a single fixed contoured beam, a shaped reflector illuminated by a single feed is an...and - frequency band must be specified. Hext, the antenna designer may identify the range of a number of antenna parameters «uch as -

  4. Beam tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Zinkann, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    A program for configuring the linac, based on previously run configurations for any desired beam was used during the past year. This program uses only a small number of empirical tunes to scale resonator fields to properly accelerate a beam with a different charge-to-mass (q/A) ratio from the original tune configuration. The program worked very well for the PII linac section where we can easily match a new beam`s arrival phase and velocity to the tuned value. It was also fairly successful for the Booster and ATLAS sections of the linac, but not as successful as for the PII linac. Most of the problems are associated with setting the beam arrival time correctly for each major linac section. This problem is being addressed with the development of the capacitive pickup beam phase monitor discussed above. During the next year we expect to improve our ability to quickly configure the linac for new beams and reduce the time required for linac tuning. Already the time required for linac tuning as a percentage of research hours has decreased from 22% in FY 1993 to 15% in the first quarter of FY 1995.

  5. Fixed drug eruption to sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is a common adverse effect seen with various drugs notably antibiotics, antiepileptics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we report a case of Sitagliptin induced fixed drug eruption in a 46 year old female who developed circumscribed, erythematous macules all over the body within one week of initiation of Sitagliptin. The lesions resolved with residual hyperpigmentation on cessation of the drug. The diagnosis was confirmed by an oral provocation test which led to a reactivation of the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fixed drug eruption to Sitagliptin reported in the literature.

  6. Fixed drug eruption to propofol.

    PubMed

    Allchurch, L G V; Crilly, H

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of fixed drug eruption to propofol following a series of sedations of a patient for a number of day case procedures. The patient experienced oedema and blistering of his penis, increasing in severity and duration following each subsequent exposure. The diagnosis was confirmed by punch biopsy following an intravenous challenge test with propofol. Whilst reports of fixed drug eruptions to anaesthetic induction agents are uncommon, a number of drugs used commonly by anaesthetists are known triggers. We discuss fixed drug eruptions in relation to anaesthetic practice, aiming to raise awareness of this adverse drug reaction.

  7. Foldable beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Coyner, J. V.; Crawford, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A foldable beam possessing superior qualities of light weight, compactness for transportation, quick deployment with minimum use of force, and high strength is described. These qualities are achieved through the use of a series of longitudinally rigid segments, hinged along one side and threaded by one or two cables along the opposite side. Tightening the cables holds the beam extended. Loosening the cables permits the segments to fold away from the threaded side. In one embodiment the segments are connected by canted hinges with the result that the beam may be folded in a helix-like configuration around a cylinder. In another embodiment the segments themselves may be hinged to fold flat laterally as the beam is folded, resulting in a configuration that may be helixed around a shorter cylinder.

  8. Beam-beam deflection and signature curves for elliptic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, V.

    1990-10-22

    In this note we will present closed expressions for the beam-beam deflection angle for arbitrary elliptic beams including tilt. From these expressions signature curves, i.e., systematic deviations from the round beam deflection curve due to ellipticity or tilt are derived. In the course of the presentation we will prove that it is generally impossible to infer individual beam sizes from beam-beam deflection scans. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Testing light dark matter coannihilation with fixed-target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Moschella, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a novel program of fixed-target searches for thermal-origin dark matter (DM), which couples inelastically to the Standard Model. Since the DM only interacts by transitioning to a heavier state, freeze-out proceeds via coannihilation and the unstable heavier state is depleted at later times. For sufficiently large mass splittings, direct detection is kinematically forbidden and indirect detection is impossible, so this scenario can only be tested with accelerators. Here we propose new searches at proton- and electron-beam fixed-target experiments to probe sub-GeV coannihilation, exploiting the distinctive signals of up- and downscattering as well as decay of the excited state inside the detector volume. We focus on a representative model in which DM is a pseudo-Dirac fermion coupled to a hidden gauge field (dark photon), which kinetically mixes with the visible photon. We define theoretical targets in this framework and determine the existing bounds by reanalyzing results from previous experiments. We find that LSND, E137, and BABAR data already place strong constraints on the parameter space consistent with a thermal freeze-out origin, and that future searches at Belle II and MiniBooNE, as well as recently proposed fixed-target experiments such as LDMX and BDX, can cover nearly all remaining gaps. We also briefly comment on the discovery potential for proposed beam dump and neutrino experiments which operate at much higher beam energies.

  10. A review of the Fermilab fixed-target program

    SciTech Connect

    Rameika, R.

    1994-12-01

    All eyes are now on the Fermilab collider program as the intense search for the top quark continues. Nevertheless, Fermilab`s long tradition of operating a strong, diverse physics program depends not only on collider physics but also on effective use of the facilities the Laboratory was founded on, the fixed-target beamlines. In this talk the author presents highlights of the Fermilab fixed-target program from its (not too distant) past, (soon to be) present, and (hopefully, not too distant) future program. The author concentrates on those experiments which are unique to the fixed-target program, in particular hadron structure measurements which use the varied beams and targets available in this mode and the physics results from kaon, hyperon and high statistics charm experiments which are not easily accessible in high p{sub T} hadron collider detectors.

  11. Fixed exanthema from systemic tobramycin.

    PubMed

    García-Rubio, I; Martínez-Cócera, C; Robledo Echarren, T; Vázquez Cortés, S

    2006-01-01

    Eye drops contain several ophthalmic medications which can produce allergic reactions. We report the case of a patient with contact dermatitis from neomycin and a probable fixed exanthema after parenteral administration of tobramycin who tolerated topical tobramycin and other aminoglycosides.

  12. Fixed field circular accelerator designs

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Wan, W.; Garren, A.

    2000-01-06

    The rapid rate and cycle time required to efficiently accelerate muons precludes conventional circular accelerators. Recirculating linacs provide one option, but the separate return arcs per acceleration pass may prove costly. Recent work on muon acceleration schemes has concentrated on designing fixed-field circular accelerators whose strong superconducting fields can sustain a factor of 4 increase in energy from injection to extraction. A 4 to 16 GeV fixed-field circular accelerator has been designed which allows large orbit excursions and the tune to vary as a function of momentum. Acceleration is .6 GeV per turn so the entire cycle consists of only 20 turns. In addition, a 16 to 64 GeV fixed-field circular accelerator has been designed which is more in keeping with the traditional Fixed Field Alternating Gradient machines. In this work the two machine designs are described.

  13. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  14. Observations and open questions in beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The first of the hadron colliders, ISR, started operation in 1970. In the following years, the hadron colliders to follow were the SPS (started 1980), the Tevatron (started 1987 first as a fixed target machine), RHIC (started 2000) and most recently the LHC, which started in 2008. HERA was a hybrid that collided electrons and protons. All of these accelerators had or have their performance limited by the effects of the beam-beam interactions. That has also been true for the electron-positron colliders such as LEP, CESR, KEKB and PEPII. In this article I will discuss how the beam-beam limitations arose in some of these machines. The discussion will be focused on common themes that span the different colliders. I will mostly discuss the hadron colliders but sometimes discuss the lepton colliders where relevant. Only a handful of common accelerator physics topics are chosen here, the list is not meant to be exhaustive. A comparative review of beam-beam performance in the ISR, SPS and Tevatron (ca 1989) can be found in reference. Table 1 shows the relevant parameters of colliders (excluding the LHC), which have accelerated protons.

  15. Experimental observations and theoretical models for beam-beam phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1981-03-01

    The beam-beam interaction in storage rings exhibits all the characteristics of nonintegrable dynamical systems. Here one finds all kinds of resonances, closed orbits, stable and unstable fixed points, stochastic layers, chaotic behavior, diffusion, etc. The storage ring itself being an expensive device nevertheless while constructed and put into operation presents a good opportunity of experimentally studying the long-time behavior of both conservative (proton machines) and nonconservative (electron machines) dynamical systems - the number of bunch-bunch interactions routinely reaches values of 10/sup 10/-10/sup 11/ and could be increased by decreasing the beam current. At the same time the beam-beam interaction puts practical limits for the yield of the storage ring. This phenomenon not only determines the design value of main storage ring parameters (luminosity, space charge parameters, beam current), but also in fact prevents many of the existing storage rings from achieving design parameters. Hence, the problem has great practical importance along with its enormous theoretical interest. A brief overview of the problem is presented.

  16. Fixed prosthodontics: avoiding pulp death.

    PubMed

    1995-11-01

    Fixed prostheses & crowns have become a major part of dental services due to aging population & increase in retention of natural teeth. In some practices, alarming numbers of endodontic procedures are necessary because of pulp damage after prosthesis cementation. Third party payment companies show many teeth receiving crowns require endodontic therapy within 5 years. Following report describes: (1) 14 potential causes of endodontic need related to fixed prosthodontics; & (2) state-of-art concepts to prevent pulp damage.

  17. Differential regulation of fixN-reiterated genes in Rhizobium etli by a novel fixL-fixK cascade.

    PubMed

    Girard, L; Brom, S; Dávalos, A; López, O; Soberón, M; Romero, D

    2000-12-01

    Among the complexities in the regulation of nitrogen fixation in the Rhizobiaceae are reiteration of regulatory components as well as variant roles for each component between species. For Rhizobium etli CFN42, we reported that the symbiotic plasmid (pCFN42d) contains a key regulatory gene (fixKd) and genes for a symbiotic cytochrome oxidase (fixNOQPd). Here we discuss the occurrence of reiteration of these genes (fixKf and fixNOQPf) and the finding of an unusual fixL homolog on a plasmid previously considered cryptic (pCFN42f). The structure of the deduced FixL polypeptide is suggestive of a fusion of the receiver and transmitter modules of a two-component regulatory system as described in R. leguminosarum bv. viciae VF39. Gene fusion analysis, coupled with mutation of each regulatory element, revealed that free-living expression of FixKf was dependent fully on FixL. In contrast, synthesis of FixKd was not detected under the conditions tested. The FixKf protein is needed for microaerobic expression of both fixN reiterations, whereas the FixKd protein appears to be dispensable. Interestingly, expression of the fixN reiterations exhibits a differential dependence for FixL, where transcription of fixNf was suppressed in the absence of FixL but expression of fixNd still showed significant levels. This suggests the existence of a FixL-independent mechanism for expression of the fixNd reiteration. Surprisingly, mutations in fixL, fixKd, or fixKf (either singly or in combination) did not alter symbiotic effectiveness. A mutation in fixNd (but not in fixNf) was, however, severely affected, indicating a differential role for these reiterations in nitrogen fixation.

  18. A multiple-beam CLEAN for imaging intra-day variable radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, I. M.; Fenech, D. M.; Muxlow, T. W. B.

    2011-11-01

    The CLEAN algorithm, widely used in radio interferometry for the deconvolution of radio images, performs well only if the raw radio image (dirty image) is, to good approximation, a simple convolution between the instrumental point-spread function (dirty beam) and the true distribution of emission across the sky. An important case in which this approximation breaks down is during frequency synthesis if the observing bandwidth is wide enough for variations in the spectrum of the sky to become significant. The convolution assumption also breaks down, in any situation but snapshot observations, if sources in the field vary significantly in flux density over the duration of the observation. Such time-variation can even be instrumental in nature, for example due to jitter or rotation of the primary beam pattern on the sky during an observation. An algorithm already exists for dealing with the spectral variation encountered in wide-band frequency synthesis interferometry. This algorithm is an extension of CLEAN in which, at each iteration, a set of N "dirty beams" are fitted and subtracted in parallel, instead of just a single dirty beam as in standard CLEAN. In the wide-band algorithm the beams are obtained by expanding a nominal source spectrum in a Taylor series, each term of the series generating one of the beams. In the present paper this algorithm is extended to images which contain sources which vary over both frequency and time. Different expansion schemes (or bases) on the time and frequency axes are compared, and issues such as Gibbs ringing and non-orthogonality are discussed. It is shown that practical considerations make it often desirable to orthogonalize the set of beams before commencing the cleaning. This is easily accomplished via a Gram-Schmidt technique.

  19. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e[plus]e[minus] collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  20. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e{plus}e{minus} collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  1. Coherent beam-beam interaction with four colliding beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, B.; Siemann, R. H.

    1995-09-01

    The coherent beam-beam interaction in the absence of Landau damping is studied with a computer simulation of four space-charge-compensated colliding beams. Results are presented for the modes, phase space structures, widths, and growth rates of coherent beam-beam resonances. These results are compared with solutions of the Vlasov equation, and with measurements made at the Dispositif de Collisions dans l'Igloo (DCI) storage ring in Orsay, France, which operated with space-charge-compensated colliding beams.

  2. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  3. Evidence of the big fix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-06-01

    We give an evidence of the Big Fix. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value vh. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self-coupling are fixed when we vary vh. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental law in our case.

  4. Mobile versus fixed site lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C.; Burgess, N. A.; Feneley, R. C.; Matthews, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    The efficacy of a mobile Dornier HM4 lithotriptor, was compared with that of a fixed site Siemens Lithostar. A total of 115 calculi in 98 patients were treated, 55 on the mobile Dornier and 60 on the Lithostar. The groups were similar except for stone size, the mean of the Lithostar group being 11 mm compared with 7.7 mm in the Dornier group. Fragmentation rates were not significantly different, 88% and 75% on the mobile and fixed site machines, respectively and, at 3 months follow-up 66% and 46% were stone free or with fragments of less than 2 mm. There were no serious complications, and the incidence of mild complications was similar in the two groups. We conclude that the mobile Dornier HM4 is an effective lithotriptor and can offer several advantages over fixed site machines. PMID:1929134

  5. Slenderness effects in the free vibration of laminated magnetoelectroelastic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Heyliger, Paul R.

    2017-08-01

    A semi-analytical discrete-layer approach is used to evaluate slenderness effects in the free vibration of laminated magnetoelectroelastic beams under various boundary conditions. Piecewise continuous approximations are used through the thickness direction of the beam and either continuous polynomial or trigonometric functions are used in the axial direction. Conventional beam models, including those of Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko, can be recovered to predict frequency estimates and are compared with results of the present model. Numerical examples are used to show the effects of beam slenderness on frequency and modal order for beams under simply-supported, fixed-fixed, and cantilever conditions. The results of these analyses clearly illustrate the thickness effects for axial, torsional, and bending modes and also provide some results useful for comparison for theses laminated beams.

  6. Reconstruction of lattice parameters and beam momentum distribution from turn-by-turn beam position monitor readings in circular accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, C. S.; Gratus, J.; Hock, K. M.; Machida, S.; Muratori, B. D.; Torromé, R. G.; Wolski, A.

    2014-05-01

    In high chromaticity circular accelerators, rapid decoherence of the betatron motion of a particle beam can make the measurement of lattice and bunch values, such as Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron amplitude, difficult. A method for reconstructing the momentum distribution of a beam from beam position measurements is presented. Further analysis of the same beam position monitor data allows estimates to be made of the Courant-Snyder parameters and the amplitude of coherent betatron oscillation of the beam. The methods are tested through application to data taken on the linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator, EMMA.

  7. Improving Plating by Use of Intense Acoustic Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Denofrio, Charles

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of selective plating of metals and possibly other materials involves the use of directed high-intensity acoustic beams. The beams, typically in the ultrasonic frequency range, can be generated by fixed-focus transducers (see figure) or by phased arrays of transducers excited, variously, by continuous waves, tone bursts, or single pulses. The nonlinear effects produced by these beams are used to alter plating processes in ways that are advantageous.

  8. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  9. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  10. Fixed drug eruption to tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Orchard, D C; Varigos, G A

    1997-11-01

    An 11-year-old girl with a recurrent fixed drug eruption to tartrazine on the dorsum of the left hand is presented. Oral provocation tests to both the suspected food, an artificially coloured cheese crisp, and to tartrazine were positive. This case highlights fire need to consider artificial flavours, colours and preservatives as potential culprits in classic drug eruptions.

  11. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    PubMed

    Millett, D T; Glenny, A M; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Mandall, N A

    2007-04-18

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. Electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (29th January 2007), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to 29th January 2007) and EMBASE (1980 to 29th January 2007). A search of the internet was also undertaken. There was no restriction with regard to publication status or language of publication. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors were involved in study selection, validity assessment and data extraction without blinding to the authors, adhesives used or results

  12. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    PubMed

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  13. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by...

  14. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983 shall...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fixed stairways. 1917.120 Section 1917.120 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.120 Fixed stairways. (a) Definition. “Fixed stairway... intergral part of machinery. (b) New installations. (1) Fixed stairs installed after October 3, 1983 shall...

  17. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed ballast. 170.235 Section 170.235 Shipping COAST... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used, must... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by...

  18. Coherent beam-beam effects, theory & observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri I Alexahin

    2003-07-16

    Current theoretical understanding of the coherent beam-beam effect as well as its experimental observations are discussed: conditions under which the coherent beambeam modes may appear, possibility of their resonant interaction (coherent resonances), stability of beam-beam oscillations in the presence of external impedances. A special attention is given to the coherent beam-beam modes of finite length bunches: the synchro-betatron coupling is shown to provide reduction in the coherent tuneshift and--at the synchrotron tune values smaller than the beam-beam parameter--Landau damping by overlapping synchrotron satellites.

  19. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOEpatents

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  20. Fixed-film biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, J.

    1982-07-01

    During the 1970's, interest in fixed-film biological (FFB) processes for wastewater treatment has increased markedly. One reason for this is that these systems have a potential for considerable energy savings, as compared to conventional suspended-growth or activated-sludge systems, and certain FFB processes may eventually become energy producers. In this article, FFB processes are reviewed. Aerobic and anaerobic FFB systems are discussed and compared, along with a discussion of the toxic substances produced by FFB processes.

  1. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only.

  2. Zirconia in fixed implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra Christine; Att, Wael; Strub, Joerg Rudolf

    2012-10-01

    CAD/CAM technology in combination with zirconia ceramic has increasingly gained popularity in implant dentistry. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized as framework material for implant-borne restorations and implant abutments, laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends for implant dentistry are addressed. A review of available literature from 1990 through 2010 was conducted with search terms zirconia,"implants,"abutment,"crown," and "fixed dental prosthesis" using electronic databases (PubMed) and manual searching. Latest applications of zirconia in implant dentistry include implant abutments, multiple unit and full-arch frameworks as well as custom-made bars to support fixed and removable prostheses. High biocompatibility, low bacterial surface adhesion as well as favorable chemical properties of zirconia ceramics are reported. Zirconia stabilized with yttrium oxide exhibits high flexural strength and fracture toughness due to a transformation toughening mechanism. Preliminary clinical data confirmed the high stability of zirconia for abutments and as a framework material for implant borne crowns and fixed dental prostheses. Zirconia abutment or framework damage has rarely been encountered. However, veneering porcelain fractures are the most common technical complication in implant-supported zirconia restorations. These porcelain veneer failures have led to concerns regarding differences in coefficient of thermal expansions between core and veneering porcelain and their respective processing techniques. As presently evidence of clinical long-term data is missing, caution with regard to especially extensive implant-borne zirconia frameworks is recommended. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reduction of beam hardening artifacts in cone-beam CT imaging via SMART-RECON algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    When an automatic exposure control is introduced in C-arm cone beam CT data acquisition, the spectral inconsistencies between acquired projection data are exacerbated. As a result, conventional water/bone correction schemes are not as effective as in conventional diagnostic x-ray CT acquisitions with a fixed tube potential. In this paper, a new method was proposed to reconstruct several images with different degrees of spectral consistency and thus different levels of beam hardening artifacts. The new method relies neither on prior knowledge of the x-ray beam spectrum nor on prior compositional information of the imaging object. Numerical simulations were used to validate the algorithm.

  4. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  6. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations. [Laser beaming to airplanes; microwave beaming to ground

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.; Hertzberg, A.

    1981-01-01

    Power beaming from space-based reactor systems is examined using an advanced compact, lightweight Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR). Closed Brayton power conversion efficiencies in the range of 30 to 40% can be achieved with turbines, with reactor exit temperatures on the order of 2000/sup 0/K and a liquid drop radiator to reject heat at temperatures of approx. 500/sup 0/K. Higher RBR coolant temperatures (up to approx. 3000/sup 0/K) are possible, but gains in power conversion efficiency are minimal, due to lower expander efficiency (e.g., a MHD generator). Two power beaming applications are examined - laser beaming to airplanes and microwave beaming to fixed ground receivers. Use of the RBR greatly reduces system weight and cost, as compared to solar power sources. Payback times are a few years at present prices for power and airplane fuel.

  7. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  8. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  9. Linear fixed-field multipass arcs for recirculating linear accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Morozov, V. S.; Bogacz, S. A.; Roblin, Y. R.; ...

    2012-06-14

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA's) provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting themore » dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dog-bone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of two. Finally, we present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dog-bone RLA.« less

  10. The fixed target experiment for studies of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron (BM@N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapishin, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) is the first experiment to be realized at the accelerator complex of NICA-Nuclotron. The aim of the BM@N experiment is to study interactions of relativistic heavy-ion beams with fixed targets. The BM@N setup, results of Monte Carlo simulations and the BM@N experimental program are presented.

  11. Imaging characterization of the rapid adiabatic passage in a source-rotatable, crossed-beam scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huilin; Mondal, Sohidul; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Kopin

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve a more efficient preparation of a specific ro-vibrationally excited reactant state for reactive scattering experiments, we implemented the rapid adiabatic passage (RAP) scheme to our pulsed crossed-beam machine, using a single-mode, continuous-wave mid-infrared laser. The challenge for this source-rotatable apparatus lies in the non-orthogonal geometry between the molecular beam and the laser propagation directions. As such, the velocity spread of the supersonic beam results in a significantly broader Doppler distribution that needs to be activated for RAP to occur than the conventional orthogonal configuration. In this report, we detail our approach to shifting, locking, and stabilizing the absolute mid-infrared frequency. We exploited the imaging detection technique to characterize the RAP process and to quantify the excitation efficiency. We showed that with appropriate focusing of the IR laser, a nearly complete population transfer can still be achieved in favorable cases. Compared to our previous setup—a pulsed optical parametric oscillator/amplifier in combination with a multipass ring reflector for saturated absorption, the present RAP scheme with a single-pass, continuous-wave laser yields noticeably higher population-transfer efficiency.

  12. SPS Beam Steering for LHC Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana; Bartosik, Hannes; Cornelis, Karel; Norderhaug Drøsdal, Lene; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wenninger, Jorg

    2014-07-01

    The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron accelerates beams for the Large Hadron Collider to 450 GeV. In addition it produces beams for fixed target facilities which adds complexity to the SPS operation. During the run 2012-2013 drifts of the extracted beam trajectories have been observed and lengthy optimizations in the transfer lines were performed to reduce particle losses in the LHC. The observed trajectory drifts are consistent with the measured SPS orbit drifts at extraction. While extensive studies are going on to understand, and possibly suppress, the source of such SPS orbit drifts the feasibility of an automatic beam steering towards a “golden” orbit at the extraction septa, by means of the interlocked correctors, is also being investigated. The challenges and constraints related to the implementation of such a correction in the SPS are described. Simulation results are presented and a possible operational steering strategy is proposed.

  13. Laser beam centering and pointing system

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael Charles

    2015-01-13

    An optical instrument aligns an optical beam without the need for physical intervention of the instrument within the apparatus or platforms from which the trajectory of the beam to be ascertained. The alignment apparatus and method enable the desired function to be realized without the placement of physical apertures or sensors directly in the path of the beam through the system whose spatial position and slope is to be sought. An image plane provides the observer with a pair of well-defined images that are indicative of the beam centering and pointing alignment parameters. The optical alignment can be realized without the need for referencing to an external or fixed set of coordinates or fiducials. The instrument can therefore service situations where adverse environments would otherwise prohibit the use of such instruments, including regions of high radiation, high temperature, vacuum and/or cryogenic atmospheres.

  14. Compact high precision adjustable beam defining aperture

    DOEpatents

    Morton, Simon A; Dickert, Jeffrey

    2013-07-02

    The present invention provides an adjustable aperture for limiting the dimension of a beam of energy. In an exemplary embodiment, the aperture includes (1) at least one piezoelectric bender, where a fixed end of the bender is attached to a common support structure via a first attachment and where a movable end of the bender is movable in response to an actuating voltage applied to the bender and (2) at least one blade attached to the movable end of the bender via a second attachment such that the blade is capable of impinging upon the beam. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is electromagnetic radiation. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is X-rays.

  15. Beam splitter phase shifts: Wave optics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Antonio; Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the phase relationships between transmitted and reflected waves in a lossless beam splitter having a multilayer structure, using the matrix approach as outlined in classical optics books. Contrarily to the case of the quantum optics formalism generally employed to describe beam splitters, these matrices are not unitary. In this note we point out the existence of general relations among the elements of the transfer matrix that describes the multilayer beam splitter. Such relations, which are independent of the detailed structure of the beam splitter, fix the phase shifts between reflected and transmitted waves. It is instructive to see how the results obtained by Zeilinger by using spinor algebra and Pauli matrices can be easily derived from our general relations.

  16. Widespread bullous fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Patell, Rushad D; Dosi, Rupal V; Shah, Purav C; Joshi, Harshal S

    2014-02-07

    A 53-year-old man developed a widespread erythematous eruption which rapidly evolved into fluid-filled bulla mostly involving the distal areas of all four limbs and erosions on the oral as well as anogenital mucosa. Based on clinical presentation, chronology of drug exposure, past events and histopathology as diagnosis of widespread bullous fixed drug eruption was made over Steven Johnson-toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome. Steroids were deferred and the lesions healed with minimal pigmentation within a week. Differentiating between the two entities has been historically difficult, and yet can have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  17. Simple electron beam guiding system including automatic capture circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, W.; Schulenburg, M.; Freund, F.

    1980-08-01

    The spatial stability of the point of impact of an electron beam is a stringent requirement in some experiments such as soft x-ray spectroscopy using a focussing curved crystal spectrometer. The occasinally poor design of moderately priced electron guns, thermal instabilities, electromagnetic stray fields and so on, make spot stabilization an arduous task. The problem can be solved to some extent by a simple electron beam guiding system: a small fraction of the electron beam is captured by a metal wire mounted in the vicinity of the target. The beam position is fixed, if this fraction is controlled by a feedback loop via the deflection plates of the gun.

  18. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  19. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center. However, ballast may be temporarily moved for vessel examination... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used,...

  20. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center or the ABS. However, ballast may be temporarily moved for vessel... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used,...

  1. Fixed point theorems and dissipative processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, J. K.; Lopes, O.

    1973-01-01

    Operators of the type considered by Hale et al. (1972) are used to show that under certain conditions there is a fixed point in a dissipative map within a Banach space. The conditions required for the existence of this fixed point are discussed in detail. Several fixed point theorems are formulated and proved.

  2. Beam divergence changing mechanism for short-range inter-unmanned aerial vehicle optical communications.

    PubMed

    Heng, Kiang Huat; Zhong, Wen-De; Cheng, Tee Hiang; Liu, Ning; He, Yingjie

    2009-03-10

    The problems associated with using a single fixed beam divergence for short-range inter-unmanned aerial vehicle free-space optical communications are discussed. To overcome the problems, a beam divergence changing mechanism is proposed. Four different methods are then proposed to implement the beam divergence changing mechanism. The performance of these methods is evaluated in terms of transmission distance under adverse weather conditions. The results show that the performance is greatly improved when the beam divergence changing mechanism is used.

  3. Timing shifts due to NIF beam repointing

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J

    2007-08-15

    Repointing a NIF beam to hit a target position off target chamber center (TCC) will introduce a timing shift due to changes in the light pathlength. This shift could be important for target experiment requirements even for targets placed at TCC, since beam timing test shots will place beams up to 15 mm off TCC in order to spatially separate them on foil targets. In particular, timing errors due to beam repointing need to be considered against the 30 ps RMS timing requirement. Since the repointing process will keep the beam passing through a fixed point in the final optics assembly (the conversion crystal) by tip/tilt adjustments of two turning mirrors (LM5 and LM7), the problem naturally divides into two parts: Timing offsets past the conversion crystal due to target positioning changes, and timing offsets behind the fixed point on the conversion crystal due to turning mirror adjustments. Timing offsets past the conversion crystal can be significant, but are trivial to calculate exactly; however, an exact calculation of timing offsets behind the fixed point on the conversion crystal would require a three-dimensional optomechanical raytrace model to be developed for every beamline, and this would be difficult and expensive. In this memo, I estimate the magnitude of timing offsets due to pathlength changes behind the conversion crystal by analysis of a worst-case model. I conclude that these timing offsets are insignificant compared with the current allocation in the 30 ps RMS timing requirement, and that more detailed raytrace modeling of individual beams is not necessary.

  4. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  5. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  6. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  8. Tunable beam displacer

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar-Serrano, Luis José; Valencia, Alejandra; Torres, Juan P.

    2015-03-15

    We report the implementation of a tunable beam displacer, composed of a polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and two mirrors, that divides an initially polarized beam into two parallel beams whose separation can be continuously tuned. The two output beams are linearly polarized with either vertical or horizontal polarization and no optical path difference is introduced between them. The wavelength dependence of the device as well as the maximum separation between the beams achievable is limited mainly by the PBS characteristics.

  9. The analysis of aluminum alloy structure beams under static load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Minghsiung; Wang, Pinning; Yeh, Jungpeng

    2017-04-01

    The Aluminum alloy had been applications in many areas. In this study, the models with four type's cross-section were designed and analyzed. Analyses of the use of aluminum alloy materials are 5086-H32, 6061-T6, 7005-T6 and 7075-T6. The materials selected are based on the recommendations of the casting plant. The boundary conditions are set according to the actual conditions of use. Force and torsion are used to apple on models under different conditions. The results of stress and deformation are discussed. The stress results were shown that 40x80 model with hollow cross-section under two end fixed middle beam load had the highest stresses of 41.177 MPa nearby fixed end position. The beam model of 40x80 hollow cross-section under boundary condition of one end fixed and one end force load like a cantilever beam has the maximum deformation 1.587 mm.

  10. Fixed drug eruption from piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Cuerda Galindo, E; Goday Buján, J J; García Silva, J M; Martínez, W; Verea Hernando, M; Fonseca, E

    2004-09-01

    The pathogenetic mechanism of fixed drug eruption (FDE) is still unknown. One of the most common causes of FDE is the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Oxicams are in the NSAID group and piroxicam is one of the most used of these drugs. FDE caused by piroxicam is rare but a few cases have been reported. Patch tests are useful for diagnosing some cases of FDE; they give variable results on previously affected skin while no reaction appears on unaffected skin. Some cases of cross-sensitivity among piroxicam and other substances have been reported. We report two new cases of FDE due to piroxicam with negative patch test on normal skin and positive results on affected skin. Copyright 2004 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

  11. Narrow Spin Resonance Width and Spin Flip with an rf-Bunched Deuteron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V. S.; Chao, A. W.; Krisch, A. D.; Leonova, M. A.; Raymond, R. S.; Sivers, D. W.; Wong, V. K.; Kondratenko, A. M.

    2009-10-02

    We used an rf solenoid to study the widths of rf spin resonances with both bunched and unbunched beams of 1.85 GeV/c polarized deuterons stored in the COSY synchrotron. With the unbunched beam at different fixed rf-solenoid frequencies, we observed only partial depolarization near the resonance. However, the bunched beam's polarization was almost fully flipped; moreover, its resonance was much narrower. We then used Chao's recent equations to explain this behavior and to calculate the polarization's dependence on various rf-solenoid and beam parameters. Our data and calculations indicate that a bunched deuteron beam's polarization can behave as if the beam has zero momentum spread.

  12. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  13. Position measurement of non-integer OAM beams with structurally invariant propagation.

    PubMed

    Nugrowati, A M; Stam, W G; Woerdman, J P

    2012-12-03

    We present a design to generate structurally propagation invariant light beams carrying non-integer orbital angular momentum (OAM) using Hermite-Laguerre-Gaussian (HLG) modes. Different from previous techniques, the symmetry axes of our beams are fixed when varying the OAM; this simplifies the calibration technique for beam positional measurement using a quadrant detector. We have also demonstrated analytically and experimentally that both the OAM value and the HLG mode orientation play an important role in the quadrant detector response. The assumption that a quadrant detector is most sensitive at the beam center does not always hold for anisotropic beam profiles, such as HLG beams.

  14. Propagation-invariant beams with quantum pendulum spectra: from Bessel beams to Gaussian beam-beams.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mark R; Ring, James D

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new class of propagation-invariant light beams with Fourier transform given by an eigenfunction of the quantum mechanical pendulum. These beams, whose spectra (restricted to a circle) are doubly periodic Mathieu functions in azimuth, depend on a field strength parameter. When the parameter is zero, pendulum beams are Bessel beams, and as the parameter approaches infinity, they resemble transversely propagating one-dimensional Gaussian wave packets (Gaussian beam-beams). Pendulum beams are the eigenfunctions of an operator that interpolates between the squared angular momentum operator and the linear momentum operator. The analysis reveals connections with Mathieu beams, and insight into the paraxial approximation.

  15. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR HIGH POWER HADRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will describe developments in the beam diagnostics which support the understanding and operation of high power hadron accelerators. These include the measurement of large dynamic range transverse and longitudinal beam profiles, beam loss detection, and non-interceptive diagnostics.

  16. Beam Stop for Electron Accelerator Beam Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Greg; Sharp, Vic; Tickner, James; Uher, Josef

    2009-08-01

    Electron linear accelerator applications involving the generation of hard X-rays frequently require accurate knowledge of the electron beam parameters. We developed a beam stop device which houses a tungsten Bremsstrahlung target and enables the electron beam current, energy and position to be monitored. The beam stop consisted of four plates. The first was a removable aluminium (Al) transmission plate. Then followed the tungsten target. Behind the target there were four Al quadrant plates for beam position measurement. The last plate was a thick Al back-stop block. Currents from the four quadrants and the back-stop were measured and the beam lateral position, energy and current were calculated. The beam stop device was optimised using Monte-Carlo simulation, manufactured (including custom-made electronics and software) in our laboratory and tested at the ARPANSA (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency) linear accelerator in Melbourne. The electron beam energy was determined with a precision of 60 keV at beam energies between 11 and 21 MeV and the lateral beam position was controlled with a precision of 200 mum. The relative changes of the beam current were monitored as well.

  17. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Beam Techniques - Beam Control and Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, Michiko G

    2003-04-24

    We describe commonly used strategies for the control of charged particle beams and the manipulation of their properties. Emphasis is placed on relativistic beams in linear accelerators and storage rings. After a brief review of linear optics, we discuss basic and advanced beam control techniques, such as transverse and longitudinal lattice diagnostics, matching, orbit correction and steering, beam-based alignment, and linac emittance preservation. A variety of methods for the manipulation of particle beam properties are also presented, for instance, bunch length and energy compression, bunch rotation, changes to the damping partition number, and beam collimation. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from various accelerators. Special topics include injection and extraction methods, beam cooling, spin transport and polarization.

  19. Electron beam control for barely separated beams

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method for achieving independent control of multiple beams in close proximity to one another, such as in a multi-pass accelerator where coaxial beams are at different energies, but moving on a common axis, and need to be split into spatially separated beams for efficient recirculation transport. The method for independent control includes placing a magnet arrangement in the path of the barely separated beams with the magnet arrangement including at least two multipole magnets spaced closely together and having a multipole distribution including at least one odd multipole and one even multipole. The magnetic fields are then tuned to cancel out for a first of the barely separated beams to allow independent control of the second beam with common magnets. The magnetic fields may be tuned to cancel out either the dipole component or tuned to cancel out the quadrupole component in order to independently control the separate beams.

  20. Phase saddles in light beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    In a section through a monochromatic light beam the contour map of phase contains saddle points. It has already been shown that a two-dimensional model of two superposed coaxial Gaussian beams, in antiphase and having different waist sizes, contains two saddles that perform an elaborate dance as the ratio of the amplitudes of the beams is altered. The present paper explains why this choreography is qualitatively identical to that found in a symmetrical version of an earlier and simpler two-dimensional model, where a plane wave is modulated by a quadratic polynomial. If wavefronts are defined as lines of equal phase, successive wavefronts pinch together in these models, and change their connectedness as they pass through two fixed saddle points on the axis. Although the idea of a phase saddle is not generally applicable in three dimensions, it can be extended to three dimensions in axially symmetric models, for example, two superposed coaxial Gaussian beams. The saddles are features of the set of azimuthal planes, and can either form rings around the axis or be on the axis itself. The action here as a parameter changes takes a more dramatic form, because it involves both a vortex ring and two saddle points on the axis, which collide and explode into a concentric saddle ring. The physical significance of saddles is that they change the topology of the wavefronts. In two dimensions a moving wavefront line passing through a fixed saddle point on the axis undergoes reconnection. As it meets an off-axis saddle the same process occurs but in a different orientation. In three dimensions as a wavefront passes through a saddle point on the axis, its local form changes from a hyperboloid of two sheets to a hyperboloid of one sheet, or vice versa, via a cone of angle 2\\tan^{-1}\\sqrt 2=109^{\\circ } . As it passes through a saddle ring a similar transition occurs simultaneously at all points of the ring. The changes in the topology of a wavefront as it encounters a monkey

  1. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  2. Analysis of orthotropic beams

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; S. Cheng

    1979-01-01

    A plane-stress analysis of orthotropic or isotropic beams is presented. The loading conditions considered are: (1) a concentrated normal load arbitrarily located on the beam, and (2) a distributed normal load covering an arbitrary length of the beam. exhibit close agreement with existing experimental data from Sitka spruce beams. Other loading conditions can similarly...

  3. Biological fixed-film systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.M.; Lim, B.S.; Al-Ghusain, I.A.; Hao, O.J.; Lin, C.F.; Davis, A.P.; Kim, M.H.; Huang, J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper includes reports on several biological fixed film systems in wastewater and hazardous waste treatment. Biological treatment of a refinery wastewater was studied in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) unit coupled with polyurethane foam (PUF) as a porous biomass support attached on both sides of the biodisks. The RBC-PUF bioreactor exhibited better performance than conventional RBCs for the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH{sub 3}-N, phenol, hydrocarbons, and suspended solids because of higher concentrations of active biomass. Successful performance of an anaerobic-aerobic treatment process using a combination of RCBs with activated sludge was achieved for treating a dye wastewater. Two high-rate trickling filters, cross-flow (CF) and vertical flow, were examined over a two year period for biological treatment of seafood processing wastewater. Results suggested superior performance of CF plastic media with substrate removal following a pseudo half-order kinetic reaction. Submerged structured packings in biofilm reactors were tested and characterized for a wide range of applications. Their efficiency was discussed in terms of contaminant removals and SS retention.

  4. Updraft Fixed Bed Gasification Aspen Plus Model

    SciTech Connect

    2007-09-27

    The updraft fixed bed gasification model provides predictive modeling capabilities for updraft fixed bed gasifiers, when devolatilization data is available. The fixed bed model is constructed using Aspen Plus, process modeling software, coupled with a FORTRAN user kinetic subroutine. Current updraft gasification models created in Aspen Plus have limited predictive capabilities and must be "tuned" to reflect a generalized gas composition as specified in literature or by the gasifier manufacturer. This limits the applicability of the process model.

  5. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1996-06-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the Beam Current Limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beam line below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  6. Classification system adopted for fixed cutter bits

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.J.; Doiron, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The drilling industry has begun adopting the 1987 International Association of Drilling Contractors' (IADC) method for classifying fixed cutter drill bits. By studying the classification codes on bit records and properly applying the new IADC fixed cutter dull grading system to recently run bits, the end-user should be able to improve the selection and usage of fixed cutter bits. Several users are developing databases for fixed cutter bits in an effort to relate field performance to some of the more prominent bit design characteristics.

  7. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniel; Cohen, Philip R

    2017-07-01

    Dapsone is a sulfone drug used to treat infectious conditions and also numerous dermatologic diseases. Fixed drug eruption is a distinctive adverse cutaneous reaction associated with the initial administration and subsequent delivery of a specific agent. Areas covered: The authors preformed a literature search using the following keywords: dapsone, fixed drug eruption, and adverse cutaneous drug reaction. Bibliographies were also reviewed for pertinent articles. The results were combed for relevant papers and reviewed. Articles pertaining to dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption were included. Expert commentary: The majority of cases of dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption in the literature come from Africa or India where there is a high prevalence of patients treated for leprosy. Characteristics of these cases are similar to fixed drug eruption described in the western literature, with differences in frequency of multiple versus solitary lesions. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption should be considered when reviewing the drug history of a patient with fixed drug eruption. In the case of darker pigmented individuals, multiple fixed drug eruption lesions may be more common. Multiple lesions may mimic Kaposi's sarcoma in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. Dapsone-associated fixed drug eruption should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple hyperpigmented lesions.

  8. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  9. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  10. Automated beam builder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muench, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for the space fabrication of large space structures are considered with emphasis on the design, development, manufacture, and testing of a machine which automatically produces a basic building block aluminum beam. Particular problems discussed include those associated with beam cap forming; brace storage, dispensing, and transporting; beam component fastening; and beam cut-off. Various critical process tests conducted to develop technology for a machine to produce composite beams are also discussed.

  11. Ways to Make Polarized Antiproton Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, K.; Grzonka, D.; Möhl, D.; Oelert, W.

    For making polarized antiproton beams the so called filter method is normally discussed. It is based on the depletion of one spin component due to the spin dependent interaction if a stored beam passes a polarized target. The method has been proven by the FILTEX collaboration and detailed studies are presently performed by the PAX collaboration. Another source for polarized antiprotons is the antilambda decay as it was used in the only experiment with polarized antiprotons so far at FERMILAB. Furthermore the antiproton production process itself if showing polarisation, would be by far the best way to get polarized bar p. It can be assumed to result from a quasi-free proton-nucleon collison. Up to now it has never been investigated in detail. In such a hadronic interaction the antiprotons may have substantial polarisation which would simplify the preparation of a polarized antiproton beam drastically. It is proposed to measure the polarisation of antiprotons produced in a fixed target experiment.

  12. Simplifying fixed implant dental prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Through following the FPPD protocol for multiple adjacent implants, and delivering final abutments, picking up the metal framework, and delivering provisionals, many benefits are gained. The benefits of following the FPPD protocol are as follows: The restorative dentist is trying-in and delivering the final abutments in one visit as opposed to removing them and placing them multiple times. This requires less chair time and time for the patient. It also reduces the mechanical stress on the abutment screw and implant body due to the elimination of multiple try-in appointments. When the metal framework is tried-in and verified for fit, the restorative dentist has the opportunity check the retention, check the margins, and make any corrections that might be needed. The abutments will be staying in the mouth when the framework is picked up. This metal try-in allows for a verification of the bite to be given to the dental lab. The delivery of provisionals manufactured by the dental laboratory offers many advantages in the FPPD technique. The patient has a form of tooth much earlier in the traditional appointment sequence. The patient can now offer feedback to the doctor and laboratory for fabrication of the permanent prosthesis with regards to shape and color. The laboratory-fabricated provisionals offer progressive loading to the implants through having a reduced occlusion yet allowing food to stimulate the implants. Overall, the FPPD technique offers shorter appointment times, more rapid delivery of fixed supported teeth, improved doctor-technician communication, and less mechanical wear on the implant parts.

  13. NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD GRADIENT ACCELERATOR (FFAG) DESIGN FOR THE PROTON AND CARBON THERAPY.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.

    2005-06-05

    The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG-from now on) accelerator provides few advantages with respect to the other fixed field accelerators like CYCLOTRONS or scaling-FFAG's. One of the advantages is smaller required aperture due to small orbit offsets during acceleration. The large and heavy magnets are avoided. The beam is very well controlled in a strong focusing regime. This concept has been extensively investigated during the last eight FFAG workshops in Japan, USA, Canada, and CERN in Europe.

  14. New fixed-target experiments to search for dark gauge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, James D.; Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    Fixed-target experiments are ideally suited for discovering new MeV-GeV mass U(1) gauge bosons through their kinetic mixing with the photon. In this paper, we identify the production and decay properties of new light gauge bosons that dictate fixed-target search strategies. We summarize existing limits and suggest five new experimental approaches that we anticipate can cover most of the natural parameter space, using currently operating GeV-energy beams and well-established detection methods. Such experiments are particularly timely in light of recent terrestrial and astrophysical anomalies (PAMELA, Fermi, DAMA/LIBRA, etc.) consistent with dark matter charged under a new gauge force.

  15. New Fixed-Target Experiments to Search for Dark Gauge Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, James D.; Essig, Rouven; Schuster, Philip; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2010-06-11

    Fixed-target experiments are ideally suited for discovering new MeV-GeV mass U(1) gauge bosons through their kinetic mixing with the photon. In this paper, we identify the production and decay properties of new light gauge bosons that dictate fixed-target search strategies. We summarize existing limits and suggest five new experimental approaches that we anticipate can cover most of the natural parameter space, using currently operating GeV-energy beams and well-established detection methods. Such experiments are particularly timely in light of recent terrestrial and astrophysical anomalies (PAMELA, FERMI, DAMA/LIBRA, etc.) consistent with dark matter charged under a new gauge force.

  16. A fixed-target programme at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Barbara; AFTER@LHC study group

    2017-01-01

    We report on the perspectives for hadron, heavy-ion and spin physics with a multi-purpose fixed-target programme using the LHC multi-TeV proton and heavy-ion beams (AFTER@LHC). This would be the most energetic fixed-target experiment opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing current and future collider programmes. Thanks to the large boost, one can fully access –with conventional detectors– the backward hemisphere in the center-of-mass system which allows for studies of the largely uncharted high-x region (xF → -1).

  17. Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Tiunov, M.; Bishofberger, K.; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

  18. Properties of Fixed-Fixed Models and Alternatives in Presence-Absence Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Aleksi

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the significance of patterns in presence-absence data is an important question in ecological data analysis, e.g., when studying nestedness. Significance testing can be performed with the commonly used fixed-fixed models, which preserve the row and column sums while permuting the data. The manuscript considers the properties of fixed-fixed models and points out how their strict constraints can lead to limited randomizability. The manuscript considers the question of relaxing row and column sun constraints of the fixed-fixed models. The Rasch models are presented as an alternative with relaxed constraints and sound statistical properties. Models are compared on presence-absence data and surprisingly the fixed-fixed models are observed to produce unreasonably optimistic measures of statistical significance, giving interesting insight into practical effects of limited randomizability. PMID:27812126

  19. Properties of Fixed-Fixed Models and Alternatives in Presence-Absence Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Aleksi

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the significance of patterns in presence-absence data is an important question in ecological data analysis, e.g., when studying nestedness. Significance testing can be performed with the commonly used fixed-fixed models, which preserve the row and column sums while permuting the data. The manuscript considers the properties of fixed-fixed models and points out how their strict constraints can lead to limited randomizability. The manuscript considers the question of relaxing row and column sun constraints of the fixed-fixed models. The Rasch models are presented as an alternative with relaxed constraints and sound statistical properties. Models are compared on presence-absence data and surprisingly the fixed-fixed models are observed to produce unreasonably optimistic measures of statistical significance, giving interesting insight into practical effects of limited randomizability.

  20. Negotiating a Fixed-Unit Price Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasquale, Mathew; Morrison, Wade

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the concept of "fixed-unit price contracting," an arrangement that is becoming popular with private industry councils (PICs). Guidelines include (1) find out as much as you can about the PIC's requirements; (2) figure out whether you can meet the PIC's requirements; and (3) keep in mind that most elements of a fixed-unit price…

  1. Fixed point theorems and dissipative processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, J. K.; Lopes, O.

    1972-01-01

    The deficiencies of the theories that characterize the maximal compact invariant set of T as asymptotically stable, and that some iterate of T has a fixed point are discussed. It is shown that this fixed point condition is always satisfied for condensing and local dissipative T. Applications are given to a class of neutral functional differential equations.

  2. Stabilising springs for fixed lingual retainer.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, M K; Ramachandraprabhakar; Saravanan, R; Rajvikram, N; Kuppuchamy

    2013-11-01

    Most treated malocclusion needs fixed lingual retention. To stabilise fixed lingual retainer in the exact location needs proper stabilisation. Proper stabilization requires a holding spring. This Stabilising Spring should be easy to fabricate and help the clinician to stabilise the retainer quickly and save the chair side time. More over it should not irritate the mucosa and should be easy to insert and remove.

  3. Statistical analysis of fixed income market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Grilli, Luca; Vergni, Davide

    2002-05-01

    We present cross and time series analysis of price fluctuations in the US Treasury fixed income market. Bonds have been classified according to a suitable metric based on the correlation among them. The classification shows how the correlation among fixed income securities depends strongly on their maturity. We study also the structure of price fluctuations for single time series.

  4. Fixed-Response Questions with a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Alex H.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah

    2002-01-01

    Offers three types of fixed-response questions that are designed to overcome drawbacks appearing in the conventional forms of fixed-response questions such as not allowing the examiner to investigate reasoning, background, or prevent guessing. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  5. Fixed-Response Questions with a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Alex H.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah

    2002-01-01

    Offers three types of fixed-response questions that are designed to overcome drawbacks appearing in the conventional forms of fixed-response questions such as not allowing the examiner to investigate reasoning, background, or prevent guessing. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. SU-E-T-514: Investigating the Dose Distributions of Equiangular Spaced Noncoplanar Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T; Maxim, P; Hadsell, M; Loo, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that the use of noncoplanar beams in radiation therapy may Result in dose distributions that are comparable or better than standard coplanar beams [Pugachev, 2001]. A radiation therapy system designed with a noncoplanar beam geometry could allow for a full ring diagnostic quality imaging system to be placed around the patient. Additionally, if the noncoplanar beams were fixed in number and in their angle with respect to the patient’s axial plane, then both treatment and imaging could be achieved concurrently without the need for moving parts, which could greatly reduce treatment times. For such a system to be designed, it is necessary to determine the appropriate number of beams and the beam angles to achieve optimal dose distributions. For simplicity, the beam angles are assumed to be equiangular in the patient’s axial plane, and only the beam angle with respect to the axial plane are varied. This study aims to investigate the dose distributions produced by equiangular noncoplanar beams for multiple beam numbers and beam angles, and to compare these dose distributions with distributions achieved in coplanar volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Dose distributions produced by noncoplanar beams were calculated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system by varying the gantry, collimator, and couch angles to simulate the noncoplanar delivery method. Noncoplanar intensity-modulated (NC-IMRT) beams using 8, 12, and 16 beams with angles varying from 45 degrees to 54 with respect to the patient’s axial plane were studied. Results The NC-IMRT beams produced dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans for a number of treatment sites, and were capable of meeting similar dose-volume histogram constraints. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that a noncoplanar beam delivery method with fixed beam numbers and beam angles is capable of delivering dose distributions comparable to VMAT plans currently in use.

  7. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV N20e7+ beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0°, top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6° in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h =1 and h =2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h =1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h =2.

  8. Useful technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the azimuthally varying field cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Yuyama, Takahiro; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We have developed a new technique for analysis and control of the acceleration beam phase in the cyclotron. In this technique, the beam current pattern at a fixed radius r is measured by slightly scanning the acceleration frequency in the cyclotron. The acceleration beam phase is obtained by analyzing symmetry of the current pattern. Simple procedure to control the acceleration beam phase by changing coil currents of a few trim coils was established. The beam phase width is also obtained by analyzing gradient of the decreasing part of the current pattern. We verified reliability of this technique with 260 MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 7+} beams which were accelerated on different tuning condition of the cyclotron. When the acceleration beam phase was around 0 deg., top of the energy gain of cosine wave, and the beam phase width was about 6 deg. in full width at half maximum, a clear turn pattern of the beam was observed with a differential beam probe in the extraction region. Beam phase widths of ion beams at acceleration harmonics of h=1 and h=2 were estimated without beam cutting by phase-defining slits. We also calculated the beam phase widths roughly from the beam current ratio between the injected beam and the accelerated beam in the cyclotron without operating the beam buncher. Both beam phase widths were almost the same for h=1, while phase compressions by a factor of about 3 were confirmed for h=2.

  9. Renovation of unknown coefficients of fixing and loading by the spectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhymbek, Meiram; Yessirkegenov, Nurgisa

    2016-12-01

    In the current paper there is studied a problem of bending vibrations of a beam in which the binding on the right-hand end is unknown and not available for visual inspection. The main objective is to study an inverse problem: find additional unknown boundary conditions by additional spectral data, i.e. the conditions of fixing the right-hand end of the rod. In this work, unlike many other works, as such additional conditions we choose the first natural frequencies (eigenvalues) of two new problems corresponding to the problem of bending vibrations of a beam with loads of different weights at the central point.

  10. Drivers' detection of roadside targets when driving vehicles with three headlight systems during high beam activation.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; Brumbelow, Matthew L

    2017-02-01

    A previous open-road experiment indicated that curve-adaptive HID headlights driven with low beams improved drivers' detection of low conspicuity targets compared with fixed halogen and fixed HID low beam systems. The current study used the same test environment and targets to assess whether drivers' detection of targets was affected by the same three headlight systems when using high beams. Twenty drivers search and responded for 60 8×12inch targets of high or low reflectance that were distributed evenly across straight and curved road sections as they drove at 30 mph on an unlit two-lane rural road. The results indicate that target detection performance was generally similar across the three systems. However, one interaction indicated that drivers saw low reflectance targets on straight road sections from further away when driving with the fixed halogen high beam condition compared with curve-adaptive HID high beam headlights and also indicated a possible benefit for the curve-adaptive HID high beams for high reflectance targets placed on the inside of curves. The results of this study conflict with the previous study of low beams, which showed a consistent benefit for the curve-adaptive HID low beams for targets placed on curves compared with fixed HID and fixed halogen low beam conditions. However, a comparison of mean detection distances from the two studies indicated uniformly longer mean target detection distances for participants driving with high beams and implicates the potential visibility benefits for systems that optimize proper high beam use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power, or fixed palenstrophy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.

    2012-11-01

    We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with fixed power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.

  12. Radiation from Pulsed Electron Beams in Space Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    Techtnicatz and engneeig auppo4tt withi.n ata. o6 competence i,6 p’LoviLded .to ESV PLd-g~ram 0-6-ic. (P,6 ) car- d o- Chet - ESV eZeehts .to pe4%6otm... D -R174 722 RADIATION FROM PULSED ELECTRON BEAMS IN SPACE PLASM s 1/i (U) STANFORD UNIV CA SPACE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND RADIOSCIENCE LAB K J HARKER ET...beams. The study assumes an electron beam which has a well organized spatial structure determined by a fixed trajectory in a magnetic field and on/off

  13. LANSCE beam current limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, Floyd R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  14. Beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  15. Beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2000-09-21

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  16. LANSCE beam current limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. Active instrumentation, such as the beam current limiter, is a component of the RSS. The current limiter is designed to limit the average current in a beamline below a specific level, thus minimizing the maximum current available for a beam spill accident. The beam current limiter is a self-contained, electrically isolated toroidal beam transformer which continuously monitors beam current. It is designed as fail-safe instrumentation. The design philosophy, hardware design, operation, and limitations of the device are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Pyramid beam splitter

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.; Fairer, George

    1992-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention provides means for obtaining accurate, dependable, measurement of bearings and directions for geologic mapping in subterranean shafts, such as, for example, nuclear waste storage investigations. In operation, a laser beam is projected along a reference bearing. A pyramid is mounted such that the laser beam is parallel to the pyramid axis and can impinge on the apex of the pyramid thus splitting the beam several ways into several beams at right angles to each other and at right angles to the reference beam. The pyramid is also translatable and rotatable in a plane perpendicular to the reference beam.

  18. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Shahnazi, K.; Koss, P.; Sanders, E.

    2007-06-15

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of {+-}0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of {+-}0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  19. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  20. Beam-Beam Experience at DAPHINE

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, Pantaleo

    2002-08-21

    This paper summarizes the results of experimental observations and measurements of beam-beam interactions in DAPHINE, the Frascati Phi-factory. The achieved results are reported with analysis of present limitations in both single and multibunch operation modes and compared with numerical simulations.

  1. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  2. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  3. Computed tomographic beam-hardening artefacts: mathematical characterization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-06-13

    This paper presents a mathematical characterization and analysis of beam-hardening artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT). In the field of dental and medical radiography, metal artefact reduction in CT is becoming increasingly important as artificial prostheses and metallic implants become more widespread in ageing populations. Metal artefacts are mainly caused by the beam-hardening of polychromatic X-ray photon beams, which causes mismatch between the actual sinogram data and the data model being the Radon transform of the unknown attenuation distribution in the CT reconstruction algorithm. We investigate the beam-hardening factor through a mathematical analysis of the discrepancy between the data and the Radon transform of the attenuation distribution at a fixed energy level. Separation of cupping artefacts from beam-hardening artefacts allows causes and effects of streaking artefacts to be analysed. Various computer simulations and experiments are performed to support our mathematical analysis.

  4. Computed tomographic beam-hardening artefacts: mathematical characterization and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical characterization and analysis of beam-hardening artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT). In the field of dental and medical radiography, metal artefact reduction in CT is becoming increasingly important as artificial prostheses and metallic implants become more widespread in ageing populations. Metal artefacts are mainly caused by the beam-hardening of polychromatic X-ray photon beams, which causes mismatch between the actual sinogram data and the data model being the Radon transform of the unknown attenuation distribution in the CT reconstruction algorithm. We investigate the beam-hardening factor through a mathematical analysis of the discrepancy between the data and the Radon transform of the attenuation distribution at a fixed energy level. Separation of cupping artefacts from beam-hardening artefacts allows causes and effects of streaking artefacts to be analysed. Various computer simulations and experiments are performed to support our mathematical analysis. PMID:25939628

  5. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  6. Interplanetary particle beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews observations of interplanetary particle beams of the kind that frequently accompany a solar flare. It is shown that the most frequently observed beams are beams of electrons which are associated with radio bursts of type III, but occasionally with flares and X-ray bursts. Although the main features of these beams and their associated plasma waves and radio bursts are known, uncertainties remain in terms of the correlation between electron beams and filamentary structures, the relative importance of the quasi-linear and the nonlinear wave emissions as the dominant process, and the mechanism of conversion of some of the Langmuir wave energy into radio emissions. Other particle beams discussed are those composed of protons, neutrons, He ions, or heavy ions. While most of these beams originate from sun flares, the source of some of particle beams may be the earth, Jupiter, or other planets as well as comets.

  7. High energy beam lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  8. Fixed-point adiabatic quantum search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Alexander M.; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2017-01-01

    Fixed-point quantum search algorithms succeed at finding one of M target items among N total items even when the run time of the algorithm is longer than necessary. While the famous Grover's algorithm can search quadratically faster than a classical computer, it lacks the fixed-point property—the fraction of target items must be known precisely to know when to terminate the algorithm. Recently, Yoder, Low, and Chuang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 210501 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.210501] gave an optimal gate-model search algorithm with the fixed-point property. Previously, it had been discovered by Roland and Cerf [Phys. Rev. A 65, 042308 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.042308] that an adiabatic quantum algorithm, operating by continuously varying a Hamiltonian, can reproduce the quadratic speedup of gate-model Grover search. We ask, can an adiabatic algorithm also reproduce the fixed-point property? We show that the answer depends on what interpolation schedule is used, so as in the gate model, there are both fixed-point and non-fixed-point versions of adiabatic search, only some of which attain the quadratic quantum speedup. Guided by geometric intuition on the Bloch sphere, we rigorously justify our claims with an explicit upper bound on the error in the adiabatic approximation. We also show that the fixed-point adiabatic search algorithm can be simulated in the gate model with neither loss of the quadratic Grover speedup nor of the fixed-point property. Finally, we discuss natural uses of fixed-point algorithms such as preparation of a relatively prime state and oblivious amplitude amplification.

  9. Review of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, P. C.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of solution of the inverse scattering problem at fixed energy in quantum mechanics are presented. Scattering experiments of a beam of particles at a nonrelativisitic energy by a target made up of particles are analyzed. The Schroedinger equation is used to develop the quantum mechanical description of the system and one of several functions depending on the relative distance of the particles. The inverse problem is the construction of the potentials from experimental measurements.

  10. Efficient reorientation of a deformable body in space: A free-free beam example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the planar reorientation of a free-free beam in zero gravity space can be accomplished by periodically changing the shape of the beam using internal actuators. A control scheme is proposed in which electromechanical actuators excite the flexible motion of the beam so that it rotates in the desired manner with respect to a fixed inertial reference. The results can be viewed as an extension of previous work to a distributed parameter case.

  11. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2014-10-14

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  12. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  13. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  14. The 1994 Fermilab Fixed Target Program

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, J. |

    1994-11-01

    This paper highlights the results of the Fermilab Fixed Target Program that were announced between October, 1993 and October, 1994. These results are drawn from 18 experiments that took data in the 1985, 1987 and 1990/91 fixed target running periods. For this discussion, the Fermilab Fixed Target Program is divided into 5 major topics: hadron structure, precision electroweak measurements, heavy quark production, polarization and magnetic moments, and searches for new phenomena. However, it should be noted that most experiments span several subtopics. Also, measurements within each subtopic often affect the results in other subtopics. For example, parton distributions from hadron structure measurements are used in the studies of heavy quark production.

  15. Beam spreading of vortex beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lukin, Vladimir P; Konyaev, Peter A; Sennikov, Victor A

    2012-04-01

    We present some results obtained by numerical modeling of the propagation of vortex beams LG(0l) through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The vortex beams are the lower order Laguerre-Gaussian modes. Such beams, if propagated under conditions of weak turbulence, also experience distortions, like a Gaussian beam. However, the statistically averaged vortex beams (LG(0l)) conserve the central intensity dip with a nonzero intensity on the beam axis. The beam broadening of vortex beams is analyzed. The average vortex beams are found to be broadened less than the Gaussian beam while propagated through a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The higher the topological charge l is, the smaller the beam broadening is.

  16. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  17. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  18. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  19. Electromagnetic nonuniformly correlated beams.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-10-01

    A class of electromagnetic sources with nonuniformly distributed field correlations is introduced. The conditions on source parameters guaranteeing that the source generates a physical beam are derived. It is shown that the new sources are capable of producing beams with polarization properties that evolve on propagation in a manner much more complex compared to the well-known electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

  20. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  1. Dual beam optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A dual beam interferometer device is disclosed that enables moving an optics module in a direction, which changes the path lengths of two beams of light. The two beams reflect off a surface of an object and generate different speckle patterns detected by an element, such as a camera. The camera detects a characteristic of the surface.

  2. ATA beam director experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Younger, F.C.; Cruz, G.E.; Nolting, E.

    1986-06-23

    This report describes beam director elements for an experiment at the Advanced Test Accelerator. The elements described include a vernier magnet for beam aiming, an achromat magnet, and an isolation system for the beam interface. These components are built at small scale for concept testing. (JDH)

  3. Interferometric Measurement for Improved Understanding of Boundary Effects in Micromachined Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bitsie, Fernando; Jensen, Brian D.; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-15

    Micromachined beams are commonly used to measure material properties in MEMS. Such measurements are complicated by the fact that boundary effects at the ends of the beams have a significant effect on the properties being measured. In an effort to improve the accuracy and resolution of such measurements, we are conducting a study of support post compliance in cantilever and fixed-fixed beams. Three different support post designs have been analyzed by finite element modeling. The results are then compared to measurements made on actual devices using interferometry. Using this technique, the accuracy of measurements of Young's modulus has been improved. Continuing work will also improve the measurement of residual stress.

  4. Compact Fixed-exit UHV DCM for XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickers, K.; Brüggmann, U.; Drube, W.; Herrmann, M.; Heuer, J.; Welter, E.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Schulz-Ritter, H.

    2007-01-01

    A double-crystal, UHV-compatible monochromator for XAFS applications at bending magnet beamlines has been designed. It uses two crystal sets, Si(111) and (311), on a common central rotation axis driven by an ex-vacuo goniometer. All mechanical and electrical components are mounted on a 400 mm UHV flange which is attached to a compact vacuum chamber. The first crystals are water cooled using connector- and bellowless tubing through the fluidic sealed feedthrough of the central rotation. The first crystal set is mounted off-axis and can be translated vertically to keep the fixed exit condition. The second crystal set uses small crystals of the same size as the first. In order to accept the reflected beam of the first crystal at small Bragg angles, it is tangentially translated along the beam. The angle can be varied from 5° to 55.5° resulting in a total energy range 2.4 - 43.4 keV for Si(111)/(311). Crystal sets are interchangeable by translating the vacuum chamber. Angle encoding is achieved by a Renishaw incremental optical encoder in vacuo.

  5. Beam-beam interaction working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    The limit in hadron colliders is understood phenomenologically. The beam-beam interaction produces nonlinear resonances and makes the transverse tunes amplitude dependent. Tune spreads result from the latter, and as long as these tune spreads do not overlap low order resonances, the lifetime and performance is acceptable. Experience is that tenth and sometimes twelfth order resonances must be avoided, and the hadron collider limit corresponds roughly to the space available between resonances of that and lower order when operating near the coupling resonance. The beam-beam interaction in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders is not understood well. This affects the performance of existing colliders and could lead to surprises in new ones. For example. a substantial amount of operator tuning is usually required to reach the performance limit given above, and this tuning has to be repeated after each major shutdown. The usual interpretation is that colliding beam performance is sensitive to small lattice errors, and these are being reduced during tuning. It is natural to ask what these errors are, how can a lattice be characterized to minimize tuning time, and what aspects of a lattice should receive particular attention when a new collider is being designed. The answers to this type of question are not known, and developing ideas for calculations, simulations and experiments that could illuminate the details of the beam-beam interaction was the primary working group activity.

  6. Powder diffraction by fixed incident angle reflection using a curved position-sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, Ryan P.; Sarin, Pankaj; Bérar, Jean-Francois; Apostolov, Zlatomir D.; Kriven, Waltraud M.

    2010-05-25

    As curved position-sensitive detectors improve in angular resolution, the effects that fixed incident angle reflection have on X-ray diffraction peaks become more apparent. In this study the effects of sample transparency, incident beam height, detector resolution and sample displacement on the intensity, location, width and shape of powder diffraction peaks were examined. The functions describing each of these phenomena are presented and were successfully used to quantitatively model the diffraction peaks collected in this geometry. Three distinct regimes of diffraction peak resolution were identified from the phenomena that limit the peak variance. Pertinent criteria based on experimental parameters have been outlined to classify fixed incident angle reflection experiments into each regime. Guidelines for improvement of experimental resolution and for conducting analysis of data acquired using fixed incident angle reflection geometry and curved position-sensitive detectors are also provided.

  7. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  8. Fluconazole-induced Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Gaiser, Cory Allen; Sabatino, Dominick

    2013-03-01

    Triazole antifungals are commonly used in the treatment of oral, esophageal, and vaginal candidiasis. Fluconazole is frequently prescribed as the therapy modality for vaginal fungal infections. On rare occasions, fluconazole has been shown to cause fixed drug eruptions. Lesions of fixed drug eruptions vary in size and number, but have the same general appearance and symptoms. The authors report a case of fluconazole-induced fixed drug eruption in a 24-year-old woman with recurrent vaginal candidiasis. The lesion was initially diagnosed as a spider bite. Topical and oral provocation tests with fluconazole were performed. Topical provocation with petroleum/fluconazole and dimethyl sulfoxide/fluonazole were both negative. Oral provocation was positive, thus confirming the diagnosis of fluconazole-induced fixed drug eruption.

  9. Anderson Acceleration for Fixed-Point Iterations

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Homer F.

    2015-08-31

    The purpose of this grant was to support research on acceleration methods for fixed-point iterations, with applications to computational frameworks and simulation problems that are of interest to DOE.

  10. Global Wilson-Fisher fixed points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüttner, Andreas; Litim, Daniel F.; Marchais, Edouard

    2017-08-01

    The Wilson-Fisher fixed point with O (N) universality in three dimensions is studied using the renormalisation group. It is shown how a combination of analytical and numerical techniques determine global fixed points to leading order in the derivative expansion for real or purely imaginary fields with moderate numerical effort. Universal and non-universal quantities such as scaling exponents and mass ratios are computed, for all N, together with local fixed point coordinates, radii of convergence, and parameters which control the asymptotic behaviour of the effective action. We also explain when and why finite-N results do not converge pointwise towards the exact infinite-N limit. In the regime of purely imaginary fields, a new link between singularities of fixed point effective actions and singularities of their counterparts by Polchinski are established. Implications for other theories are indicated.

  11. Do we really want a quick fix?

    PubMed

    Chate, R A

    2000-02-26

    Dental practitioners have been encouraged recently to take a more structured long term view of their continuing professional development, in particular being wary of any 'weekend' courses apparently offering 'quick fix' solutions to their clinical problems.

  12. 78 FR 20705 - Fixed Income Roundtable

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Fixed Income Roundtable AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Notice of roundtable discussion; request for comment. SUMMARY: The Securities and Exchange Commission will host a one...

  13. Gravitational fixed points from perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niedermaier, Max R

    2009-09-04

    The fixed point structure of the renormalization flow in higher derivative gravity is investigated in terms of the background covariant effective action using an operator cutoff that keeps track of powerlike divergences. Spectral positivity of the gauge fixed Hessian can be satisfied upon expansion in the asymptotically free higher derivative coupling. At one-loop order in this coupling strictly positive fixed points are found for the dimensionless Newton constant g(N) and the cosmological constant lambda, which are determined solely by the coefficients of the powerlike divergences. The renormalization flow is asymptotically safe with respect to this fixed point and settles on a lambda(g(N)) trajectory after O(10) units of the renormalization mass scale to accuracy 10(-7).

  14. On Fixed Points of Strictly Causal Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-08

    Systems (CHESS) at UC Berkeley, which receives support from the National Science Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0931843 (CPS: Large...National Science Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0931843 (CPS: Large: ActionWebs), and #1035672 (CPS: Medium: Ptides)), the Naval Research...For despite the abundance of fixed-point problems in the field , it is almost invariably the fixed-point theory of ordered sets or that of metric

  15. Fixed-target physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver is now successfully commissioned and fixed-target experimentation at high energy (800 GeV) has begun. In addition, a number of new experiments designed to exploit the unique features of the Tevatron are yet to come on-line. In this talk, we will review recent accomplishments in the fixed-target program and describe experiments in progress and others yet to come.

  16. Stabilising Springs for Fixed Lingual Retainer

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M.K.; Ramachandraprabhakar; Saravanan, R.; Rajvikram, N.; Kuppuchamy

    2013-01-01

    Most treated malocclusion needs fixed lingual retention. To stabilise fixed lingual retainer in the exact location needs proper stabilisation. Proper stabilization requires a holding spring. This Stabilising Spring should be easy to fabricate and help the clinician to stabilise the retainer quickly and save the chair side time. More over it should not irritate the mucosa and should be easy to insert and remove. PMID:24392431

  17. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  18. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  19. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  20. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-06-10

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate.

  1. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  2. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  3. The Cylindrical GEM Inner Tracker of the BESIII experiment: prototype test beam results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavezzi, L.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Calcaterra, A.; Canale, N.; Capodiferro, M.; Carassiti, V.; Cerioni, S.; Chai, J. Y.; Chiozzi, S.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Dong, J.; Evangelisti, F.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Felici, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Gatta, M.; Greco, M.; Leng, C. Y.; Li, H.; Maggiora, M.; Malaguti, R.; Marcello, S.; Melchiorri, M.; Mezzadri, G.; Mignone, M.; Morello, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pellegrino, J.; Pelosi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Savrié, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Soldani, E.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Tskhadadze, E.; Verma, S.; Wheadon, R.; Yan, L.

    2017-07-01

    A cylindrical GEM detector is under development, to serve as an upgraded inner tracker at the BESIII spectrometer. It will consist of three layers of cylindrically-shaped triple GEMs surrounding the interaction point. The experiment is taking data at the e+e- collider BEPCII in Beijing (China) and the GEM tracker will be installed in 2018. Tests on the performances of triple GEMs in strong magnetic field have been run by means of the muon beam available in the H4 line of SPS (CERN) with both planar chambers and the first cylindrical prototype. Efficiencies and resolutions have been evaluated using different gains, gas mixtures, with and without magnetic field. The obtained efficiency is 97-98% on single coordinate view, in many operational arrangements. The spatial resolution for planar GEMs has been evaluated with two different algorithms for the position determination: the charge centroid and the micro time projection chamber (μ-TPC) methods. The two modes are complementary and are able to cope with the asymmetry of the electron avalanche when running in magnetic field, and with non-orthogonal incident tracks. With the charge centroid, a resolution lower than 100 μm has been reached without magnetic field and lower than 200 μm with a magnetic field up to 1 T. The μ-TPC mode showed to be able to improve those results. In the first beam test with the cylindrical prototype, the detector had a very good stability under different voltage configurations and particle intensities. The resolution evaluation is in progress.

  4. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit and...

  5. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit and...

  6. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit and...

  7. 48 CFR 16.204 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Fixed-Price Contracts 16.204 Fixed-price incentive contracts. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for adjusting profit and...

  8. Beam envelope matching for beam guidance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.

    1980-08-01

    Ray optics and phase ellipse optics are developed as tools for designing charged particle beam guidance systems. Specific examples of basic optical systems and of phase ellipse matching are presented as illustrations of these mathematical techniques.

  9. Beam-beam experience in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Heimerle, M.

    2010-07-29

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC consists of two superconducting storage rings that intersect at six locations around the ring circumference. Two of these interaction regions are currently equipped with experiment detectors, namely STAR at the “6 o’clock” interaction point (IP), and PHENIX at “8 o’clock”. The two beams collide only at these two interaction regions, while they are vertically separated by typically 6-10mm at the other IPs. Together with the separator dipoles located at roughly 10m from the IP, and a distance between bunches of 30m, this avoids any parasitic beam-beam collisions. RHIC is capable of colliding any ion species at magnetic rigidities up to B × r = 830T × m , corresponding to 250 GeV for proton beams, or 100 GeV/n for fully stripped gold ions.

  10. Refractive beam shapers for focused laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-09-01

    Focusing of laser radiation is most often used approach in various industrial micromachining applications like scribing, PCB drilling, and is important in scientific researches like laser heating in geophysics experiments with diamond anvil cells (DAC). Control of intensity distribution in focal spot is important task since optimum intensity profiles are rather flat-top, doughnut or "inverse-Gauss" than typical for lasers Gaussian profile. Because of high intensity of modern CW and pulsed lasers it is advisable to use refractive beam shaping optics with smooth optical surfaces providing high radiation resistance. Workable optical solutions can be built on the base of diffraction theory conclusion that flat-top intensity profile in focal plane of a lens is created when input beam has Airy-disk intensity distribution. It is suggested to apply refractive beam shapers converting, with minimum wavefront deformation, Gaussian profile of TEM00 beam to a beam with Airy disk intensity distribution, thereby optimizing conditions of interference near the focal plane of a lens after the beam shaper and providing flat-top, doughnut, "inverse-Gauss" profiles. This approach allows operation with CW and ultra-short pulse lasers, using F-theta lenses and objectives, mirror scanners, provides extended depth of field similar to Rayleigh length of comparable TEM00 beam, easy integration in industrial equipment, simple adjustment procedure and switching between profiles, telescope and collimator implementations. There will be considered design basics of beam shapers, analysis of profile behaviour near focal plane, examples of implementations in micromachining systems and experimental DAC setups, results of profile measurements and material processing.

  11. Continuous, fixed-ratio, and fixed-interval reinforcement in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Klaus E.

    1973-01-01

    Bees learned to enter a Plexiglas tube and to suck small portions of sugar solution; every entry or every fifth entry was reinforced. During an extinction phase, the bees on the fixed-ratio schedule emitted twice as many responses as did those given continuous reinforcement. Bees on a fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement emitted lower response rates than did those given fixed-ratio reinforcement. By extending the conditioning procedure for several days, it was possible to maintain responding with fixed-ratio schedules requiring 30 responses per reinforcement and with fixed-interval values up to 90 sec. Under fixed-interval schedules, response rates did not increase toward the end of the reinforcement intervals. PMID:16811686

  12. It is not a fixed drug eruption, it is a fixed "sunlight" eruption.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Rommel; Cañarte, Cecilia

    2010-12-01

    Hyperpigmented fixed eruption is a phenomenon usually related with drug antigens, and known as fixed drug eruption. A woman had a skin condition with clinical and histopathologic indications of fixed drug eruption. The disease first appeared when she went to a swimming pool and left with hyperpigmented macules. Previously affected skin reactivated on three other occasions when she again visited swimming pools. Sunlight involvement (UVA-UVB) was demonstrated through phototests. Sunlight should be considered as a cause of fixed drug-like eruption and a possible cause of some cases of FDE without any apparent etiological factor.

  13. Colliding crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The understanding of crystalline beams has advanced to the point where one can now, with reasonable confidence, undertake an analysis of the luminosity of colliding crystalline beams. Such a study is reported here. It is necessary to observe the criteria, previously stated, for the creation and stability of crystalline beams. This requires, firstly, the proper design of a lattice. Secondly, a crystal must be formed, and this can usually be done at various densities. Thirdly, the crystals in a colliding-beam machine are brought into collision. The authors study all of these processes using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The work parallels what was done previously, but the new part is to study the crystal-crystal interaction in collision. They initially study the zero-temperature situation. If the beam-beam force (or equivalent tune shift) is too large then overlapping crystals can not be created (rather two spatially separated crystals are formed). However, if the beam-beam force is less than but comparable to that of the space-charge forces between the particles, they find that overlapping crystals can be formed and the beam-beam tune shift can be of the order of unity. Operating at low but non-zero temperature can increase the luminosity by several orders of magnitude over that of a usual collider. The construction of an appropriate lattice, and the development of adequately strong cooling, although theoretically achievable, is a challenge in practice.

  14. Non-Orthogonal Random Access in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks: Beamforming, Power Allocation, and Opportunistic Transmission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huifa; Shin, Won-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We study secondary random access in multi-input multi-output cognitive radio networks, where a slotted ALOHA-type protocol and successive interference cancellation are used. We first introduce three types of transmit beamforming performed by secondary users, where multiple antennas are used to suppress the interference at the primary base station and/or to increase the received signal power at the secondary base station. Then, we show a simple decentralized power allocation along with the equivalent single-antenna conversion. To exploit the multiuser diversity gain, an opportunistic transmission protocol is proposed, where the secondary users generating less interference are opportunistically selected, resulting in a further reduction of the interference temperature. The proposed methods are validated via computer simulations. Numerical results show that increasing the number of transmit antennas can greatly reduce the interference temperature, while increasing the number of receive antennas leads to a reduction of the total transmit power. Optimal parameter values of the opportunistic transmission protocol are examined according to three types of beamforming and different antenna configurations, in terms of maximizing the cognitive transmission capacity. All the beamforming, decentralized power allocation, and opportunistic transmission protocol are performed by the secondary users in a decentralized manner, thus resulting in an easy implementation in practice.

  15. Stability of a non-orthogonal stagnation flow to three dimensional disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    A similarity solution for a low Mach number nonorthogonal flow impinging on a hot or cold plate is presented. For the constant density case, it is known that the stagnation point shifts in the direction of the incoming flow and that this shift increases as the angle of attack decreases. When the effects of density variations are included, a critical plate temperature exists; above this temperature the stagnation point shifts away from the incoming stream as the angle is decreased. This flow field is believed to have application to the reattachment zone of certain separated flows or to a lifting body at a high angle of attack. Finally, the stability of this nonorthogonal flow to self similar, 3-D disturbances is examined. Stability properties of the flow are given as a function of the parameters of this study; ratio of the plate temperature to that of the outer potential flow and angle of attack. In particular, it is shown that the angle of attack can be scaled out by a suitable definition of an equivalent wavenumber and temporal growth rate, and the stability problem for the nonorthogonal case is identical to the stability problem for the orthogonal case.

  16. Functional Implications of Ubiquitous Semicircular Canal Non-Orthogonality in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jeri C.; Kirk, E. Christopher; Rowe, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘canonical model’ of semicircular canal orientation in mammals assumes that 1) the three ipsilateral canals of an inner ear exist in orthogonal planes (i.e., orthogonality), 2) corresponding left and right canal pairs have equivalent angles (i.e., angle symmetry), and 3) contralateral synergistic canals occupy parallel planes (i.e., coplanarity). However, descriptions of vestibular anatomy that quantify semicircular canal orientation in single species often diverge substantially from this model. Data for primates further suggest that semicircular canal orthogonality varies predictably with the angular head velocities encountered in locomotion. These observations raise the possibility that orthogonality, symmetry, and coplanarity are misleading descriptors of semicircular canal orientation in mammals, and that deviations from these norms could have significant functional consequences. Here we critically assess the canonical model of semicircular canal orientation using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography scans of 39 mammal species. We find that substantial deviations from orthogonality, angle symmetry, and coplanarity are the rule for the mammals in our comparative sample. Furthermore, the degree to which the semicircular canals of a given species deviate from orthogonality is negatively correlated with estimated vestibular sensitivity. We conclude that the available comparative morphometric data do not support the canonical model and that its overemphasis as a heuristic generalization obscures a large amount of functionally relevant variation in semicircular canal orientation between species. PMID:24260256

  17. Non-Orthogonal Random Access in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks: Beamforming, Power Allocation, and Opportunistic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huifa; Shin, Won-Yong

    2017-01-01

    We study secondary random access in multi-input multi-output cognitive radio networks, where a slotted ALOHA-type protocol and successive interference cancellation are used. We first introduce three types of transmit beamforming performed by secondary users, where multiple antennas are used to suppress the interference at the primary base station and/or to increase the received signal power at the secondary base station. Then, we show a simple decentralized power allocation along with the equivalent single-antenna conversion. To exploit the multiuser diversity gain, an opportunistic transmission protocol is proposed, where the secondary users generating less interference are opportunistically selected, resulting in a further reduction of the interference temperature. The proposed methods are validated via computer simulations. Numerical results show that increasing the number of transmit antennas can greatly reduce the interference temperature, while increasing the number of receive antennas leads to a reduction of the total transmit power. Optimal parameter values of the opportunistic transmission protocol are examined according to three types of beamforming and different antenna configurations, in terms of maximizing the cognitive transmission capacity. All the beamforming, decentralized power allocation, and opportunistic transmission protocol are performed by the secondary users in a decentralized manner, thus resulting in an easy implementation in practice. PMID:28076402

  18. A non-orthogonal SVD-based decomposition for phase invariant error-related potential estimation.

    PubMed

    Phlypo, Ronald; Jrad, Nisrine; Rousseau, Sandra; Congedo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of the Error Related Potential from a set of trials is a challenging problem. Indeed, the Error Related Potential is of low amplitude compared to the ongoing electroencephalographic activity. In addition, simple summing over the different trials is prone to errors, since the waveform does not appear at an exact latency with respect to the trigger. In this work, we propose a method to cope with the discrepancy of these latencies of the Error Related Potential waveform and offer a framework in which the estimation of the Error Related Potential waveform reduces to a simple Singular Value Decomposition of an analytic waveform representation of the observed signal. The followed approach is promising, since we are able to explain a higher portion of the variance of the observed signal with fewer components in the expansion.

  19. Divergence preserving discrete surface integral methods for Maxwell's curl equations using non-orthogonal unstructured grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Niel K.

    1992-01-01

    Several new discrete surface integral (DSI) methods for solving Maxwell's equations in the time-domain are presented. These methods, which allow the use of general nonorthogonal mixed-polyhedral unstructured grids, are direct generalizations of the canonical staggered-grid finite difference method. These methods are conservative in that they locally preserve divergence or charge. Employing mixed polyhedral cells, (hexahedral, tetrahedral, etc.) these methods allow more accurate modeling of non-rectangular structures and objects because the traditional stair-stepped boundary approximations associated with the orthogonal grid based finite difference methods can be avoided. Numerical results demonstrating the accuracy of these new methods are presented.

  20. The radar cross section of non-orthogonal corner reflectors, symmetrically illuminated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. M.

    The monostatic radar cross section of a nonorthogonal corner reflector, for symmetrical illumination, is shown to be a function of a single dimensionless group at high frequency. The function is calculated for the triangular and square trihedrals and the dihedral.

  1. Non-orthogonal depth from focus for on-the-fly, three-dimensional inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribnick, Evan

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a new technique that was developed for performing three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction on-the-fly for inspection applications. It is based on the same principles as the traditional depth from focus approach but is able to estimate the three-dimensional structure of a surface as it is undergoing a continuous linear lateral translation, similar to the situation on many types of modern production lines. This has important applications in the area of automated inspection and quality control, since the ability to inspect materials in real-time as they are being manufactured in a continuous process is valuable in a broad range of circumstances. We assume that the relative motion of the surface is known, which is realistic in these types of environments. We demonstrate the technical feasibility of our approach, including its ability to acquire 3-D shape on several different types of structured surfaces.

  2. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-07-28

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  3. Inadvertent tooth movement with fixed lingual retainers.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Timothy G; Proffit, William R; Samara, Said A

    2016-02-01

    Fixed retainers are effective in maintaining the alignment of the anterior teeth more than 90% of the time, but they can produce inadvertent tooth movement that in the most severe instances requires orthodontic retreatment managed with a periodontist. This is different from relapse into crowding when a fixed retainer is lost. These problems arise when the retainer breaks but remains bonded to some or all teeth, or when an intact retainer is distorted by function or was not passive when bonded. In both instances, torque of the affected teeth is the predominant outcome. A fixed retainer made with dead soft wire is the least likely to create torque problems but is the most likely to break. Highly flexible twist wires bonded to all the teeth appear to be the most likely to produce inadvertent tooth movement, but this also can occur with stiffer wires bonded only to the canines. Orthodontists, general dentists, and patients should be aware of possible problems with fixed retainers, especially those with all teeth bonded, because the patient might not notice partial debonding. Regular observations of patients wearing fixed retainers by orthodontists in the short term and family dentists in the long term are needed.

  4. Au Fixed Point Development at NRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedyulin, S. N.; Gotoh, M.; Todd, A. D. W.

    2017-04-01

    Two Au fixed points filled using metal of different nominal purities in carbon crucibles have been developed at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). The primary motivation behind this project was to provide the means for direct thermocouple calibrations at the Au freezing point (1064.18°C). Using a Au fixed point filled with the metal of maximum available purity [99.9997 % pure according to glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS)], multiple freezing plateaus were measured in a commercial high-temperature furnace. Four Pt/Pd thermocouples constructed and calibrated in-house were used to measure the freezing plateaus. From the calibration at Sn, Zn, Al and Ag fixed points, the linear deviation function from the NIST-IMGC reference function (IEC 62460:2008 Standard) was determined and extrapolated to the freezing temperature of Au. For all the Pt/Pd thermocouples used in this study, the measured EMF values agree with the extrapolated values within expanded uncertainty, thus substantiating the use of 99.9997 % pure Au fixed point cell for thermocouple calibrations at NRC. Using the Au fixed point filled with metal of lower purity (99.99 % pure according to GDMS), the effect of impurities on the Au freezing temperature measured with Pt/Pd thermocouple was further investigated.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Eder, David; Fisher, Aaron; Masters, Nathan

    2016-03-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as well as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    DOE PAGES

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; ...

    2016-04-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as wellmore » as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.« less

  7. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Eder, David; Fisher, Aaron; Masters, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as well as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.

  8. Advanced 30/20 GHz multiple-beam antennas for communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Design concepts under development utilize two separate spacecraft antenna systems, one uplink at 30 GHz and the other a downlink at 20 GHz, where each antenna provides multiple fixed and scanning beams. Two contractors completed configuration trade-off studies and breadboarding of critical technology components, and are fabricating and testing proof-of-concept (POC) models to demonstrate the technology feasibility. Technology developments required for the proposed systems are presented, along with each contractor's progress to date. The technology development areas discussed include: (1) offset Cassegrain and shaped reflector systems for narrow beams with low sidelobes and wideangle off-axis scan; (2) diplexed beam-forming networks for dual polarization, low sidelobes, and fixed and scan-beam operation; (3) fast switching networks for scanning beams; and (4) fabrication of precision feed components and large offset reflectors.

  9. Controlling reaching movements during self-motion: body-fixed versus Earth-fixed targets.

    PubMed

    Guillaud, Etienne; Simoneau, Martin; Gauthier, Gabriel; Blouin, Jean

    2006-10-01

    The control of goal-directed arm movements performed during whole-body displacements is far from being understood. Recent studies suggested that the compensatory arm movements that allow individuals to preserve hand-in-space trajectory during unexpected body motion are controlled by sensorimotor, automatic- like processes. We tested this hypothesis comparing both the accuracy of movements directed towards body-fixed or Earth-fixed target during body rotations and the amount of interference of the reaching tasks on a concurrent cognitive task. Participants reached for a memorized 55 cm distant straight-ahead target in darkness which was about 20 cm lower than the initial finger position. The target was either body-fixed or Earth-fixed. At reaching onset, participants could be rotated in yaw. The concurrent task consisted of a verbal reaction time (RT) to an auditory stimulus. RTs increased when participants reached for the target while they were rotated. However, this increase was not significantly different for body-fixed and Earth-fixed targets. Reaching accuracy was greater for body-fixed than for Earth-fixed targets. A control experiment suggested that the errors in the Earth-fixed target condition arose from a difficulty in the organization of movements which necessitate both the production of active forces at the shoulder joint (to compensate for body rotation) and a concomitant decrease of muscular activation to lower the arm during reaching movements. These findings suggest that reaching for Earth-fixed or body-fixed targets during body rotation cannot be considered as being purely automatic tasks.

  10. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  11. Craft Stick Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karplus, Alan K.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this exercise is to provide a phenomenological 'hands-on' experience that shows how geometry can affect the load carrying capacity of a material used in construction, how different materials have different failure characteristics, and how construction affects the performance of a composite material. This will be accomplished by building beams of a single material and composite beams of a mixture of materials (popsicle sticks, fiberboard sheets, and tongue depressors); testing these layered beams to determine how and where they fail; and based on the failure analysis, designing a layered beam that will fail in a predicted manner. The students will learn the effects of lamination, adhesion, and geometry in layered beam construction on beam strength and failure location.

  12. Focused Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P V

    2000-04-30

    The diffraction broadening of a focused beam with a Bessel amplitude distribution is examined. Calculations are reported not only of the traditional differential characteristics (radial distributions of the electric-energy densities and of the axial total electromagnetic energy flux in the beam), but also of integral quantities characterising the degree of transverse localisation of the radiation in a tube of specified radius within the beam. It is shown that in a large-aperture Bessel beam only a very small fraction of the total beam power is concentrated in its central core and that a focal point is also observed on intense focusing of the Bessel beam. This spot is not in the geometric-optical focal plane but is displaced from the latter by a certain distance. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Primer on Beam Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-27

    emphasis on neutral particle beam (NPB) optical devices. It explains how the motion of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields is...Inc. San Diego, California Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Organization of Primer 1 1.2 Introduction to Neutral Particle Beam...102 Figures Figure Pag© 1. Generic Neutral Particle Beam Device 4 2. An orthogonal three dimensional coordinate system 11 3. Trajectory of a

  14. Mechanical beam isolator

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam.

  15. Bigelow BEAM Contract

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-16

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and President and founder of Bigelow Aerospace Robert T. Bigelow talk while standing next to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) during a media briefing where it is was announced that the BEAM expandable space habitat technology will be tested on the International Space Station, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 in Las Vegas. BEAM is scheduled to arrive at the space station in 2015 for a two-year technology demonstration. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Bigelow BEAM Contract

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-16

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and President and founder of Bigelow Aerospace Robert T. Bigelow talk while standing next to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) during a media briefing where is was announced that the BEAM expandable space habitat technology will be tested on the International Space Station, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 in Las Vegas. BEAM is scheduled to arrive at the space station in 2015 for a two-year technology demonstration. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Fixed-ratio escape reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Azrin, N. H.; Holz, W. C.; Hake, D. F.; Ayllon, T.

    1963-01-01

    Escape responses of squirrel monkeys were reinforced according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The reinforcement was a period of safety from a stimulus that signalled the delivery of intermittent pain-shocks. When the frequency of shock was gradually reduced, the performance remained at a high level until the shocks were quite infrequent. Similarly, the duration of the period of safety could be reduced to a few seconds with little loss of behavior. Thus, the responses appeared to be reinforced by even a brief period of safety, the actual degree of shock reduction being fairly slight. The changes in responding during this fixed-ratio escape procedure were comparable to the response changes typically obtained during fixed-ratio food procedures. PMID:13965780

  18. Computational challenges for beam-beam simulation for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-10-01

    In this article we will review the computational challenges in the beam-beam simulation for the polarized proton run of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The difficulties in our multi-particle and million turn tracking to calculate the proton beam lifetime and proton beam emittance growth due to head-on beam-beam interaction and head-on beam-beam compensation are presented and discussed. Solutions to obtain meaningful physics results from these trackings are proposed and tested. In the end we will present the progress in the benchmarking of the RHIC operational proton beam lifetime.

  19. Development of laser beam injection system for the Edge Thomson Scattering (ETS) in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuka, E.; Hatae, T.; Suitoh, S.; Ohara, M.; Hagita, K.; Inoue, K.; Bassan, M.; Walsh, M.; Itami, K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design and development of the laser injection system for the ITER Edge Thomson Scattering system (ETS). The ITER ETS achieves a temporal resolution of 100 Hz by firing two 50 Hz laser beams alternatively. The use of dual lasers enables us to perform the Thomson scattering measurements at a temporal resolution of 50 Hz in case that one of the laser systems stops functioning. A new type of beam combiner was developed to obtain a single beam that is collinear and fixed linearly polarized from two laser beams using a motor-driven rotating half-wave plate. The rotating half-wave plate method does not induce misalignment even if the rotating mechanism malfunctions. The combined beam is relayed from the diagnostic hall to the plasma using mirror optics and is absorbed at the beam dump integrated on the inner blanket. The beam alignment system was designed to direct the laser beam onto the center of the beam dump head. The beam position at the beam dump is monitored by four alignment laser beams which propagate parallel to the diagnostic Nd:YAG laser beam and imaging systems installed outside the diagnostic port.

  20. Power beaming options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, John D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Some large scale power beaming applications are proposed for the purpose of stimulating research. The first proposal is for a combination of large phased arrays on the ground near power stations and passive reflectors in geostationary orbit. The systems would beam excess electrical power in microwave form to areas in need of electrical power. Another proposal is to build solar arrays in deserts and beam the energy around the world. Another proposal is to use lasers to beam energy from earth to orbiting spacecraft.

  1. Plasma Beam Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    GUN PLASMA BEAM / ,I 21 cm diameter = 0 GLASS DRIFT TUBE 50 cm diameter MCP CAMERA CLASS CROSSES (a) Gun muzzle /"- PLASA BEAM / TAROT z = 10 m MCP...discusses some of the hydrodynamic issues related to the calcula- tions. The reader may well wonder why hydrodynamics should be an issue in a 116 WL-TR-90...answer is yes for the slow beam cases and no for the fast beam cases. This is explained further. 118 WL-TR-90-83 The reader will recall the

  2. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  3. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  4. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  5. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Foosland, D. W.; Smith, C. W.; Lee, M. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic instabilities driven by an energetic ion beam streaming parallel to a magnetic field in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation are presented. At propagation parallel to the magnetic field, there are four distinct instabilities. A sufficiently energetic beam gives rise to two unstable modes with right-hand polarization, one resonant with the beam, the other nonresonant. A beam with sufficiently large T (perpendicular to B)/T (parallel to B) gives rise to the left-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability at relatively small beam velocities, and a sufficiently hot beam drives unstable a left-hand beam resonant mode. The parametric dependences of the growth rates for the three high beam velocity instabilities are presented here. In addition, some properties at oblique propagation are examined. It is demonstrated that, as the beam drift velocity is increased, relative maxima in growth rates can arise at harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance for both right and left elliptically polarized modes.

  6. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  7. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  8. Dynamic bowtie for fan-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang; Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2013-01-01

    A bowtie is a filter used to shape an x-ray beam and equalize its flux reaching different detector channels. For development of spectral CT with energy discriminating photon-counting (EDPC) detectors, here we propose and evaluate a dynamic bowtie for performance optimization based on a patient model or a scout scan. With a mechanical rotation of a dynamic bowtie and an adaptive adjustment of an x-ray source flux, an x-ray beam intensity profile can be modulated. First, a mathematical model for dynamic bowtie filtering is established for an elliptical section in fan-beam geometry, and the contour of the optimal bowtie is derived. Then, numerical simulation is performed to compare the performance of the dynamic bowtie in the cases of an ideal phantom and a realistic cross-section relative to the counterparts without any bowtie and with a fixed bowtie respectively. Our dynamic bowtie can equalize the expected numbers of photons in the case of an ideal phantom. In practical cases, our dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the field of view. Although our design is optimized for an elliptical phantom, the resultant dynamic bowtie can be applied to a real fan-beam scan if the underlying cross-section can be approximated as an ellipse. Furthermore, our design methodology can be applied to specify an optimized dynamic bowtie for any cross-section of a patient, preferably using rapid prototyping technology.

  9. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary. PMID:26288438

  10. Beauty physics at Fermilab fixed target energies

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1988-04-01

    The very high luminosities (>>10/sup 32/cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/) available in the Fermilab fixed target experimental areas offer immediate opportunities for producing large samples (>10/sup 8/ of B hadrons in individual experiments. The possibilities of accumulating large samples of B decays are limited by experimental techniques and trigger strategies and not by available luminosity. At the present time one experiment, E771, is approved to begin B physics experimentation and several other experimental possibilities are being discussed. Some of the problems and the potential of B experiments at fixed target energies as B factories are discussed.

  11. Cross Service Fixed-Wing Cost Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    making up the majority of fixed-wing costs , with occasional spikes in some of the other fields like 5.0 Continuing System Improvements. Category 6.0... Costs , a field that can differentiate widely between services and is not a key cost driver when evaluated with the Air Force Systems. The main cost ...TRAC-M-TR-16-021 May 2016 Cross Service Fixed-Wing Cost Estimation TRADOC Analysis Center 700 Dyer Road Monterey, California 93943-0692 This study

  12. Tranexamic Acid-Induced Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Natsuko; Hanami, Yuka; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male showed multiple pigmented patches on his trunk and extremities after he took tranexamic acid for common cold. He stated that similar eruptions appeared when he was treated with tranexamic acid for influenza 10 months before. Patch test showed positive results at 48 h and 72 h by 1% and 10% tranexamic acid at the lesional skin only. To our knowledge, nine cases of fixed drug eruption induced by tranexamic acid have been reported in Japan. Tranexamic acid is a safe drug and frequently used because of its anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory effects, but caution of inducing fixed drug eruption should be necessary.

  13. Fixed Wordsize Implementation of Lifting Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Tanja

    2006-12-01

    We present a reversible nonlinear discrete wavelet transform with predefined fixed wordsize based on lifting schemes. Restricting the dynamic range of the wavelet domain coefficients due to a fixed wordsize may result in overflow. We show how this overflow has to be handled in order to maintain reversibility of the transform. We also perform an analysis on how large a wordsize of the wavelet coefficients is needed to perform optimal lossless and lossy compressions of images. The scheme is advantageous to well-known integer-to-integer transforms since the wordsize of adders and multipliers can be predefined and does not increase steadily. This also results in significant gains in hardware implementations.

  14. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist adjustment.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Ming-Wei; Kam, Pooi-Yuen

    2016-05-30

    In this paper, we propose the idea of dynamic beam waist adjustment for laser inter-satellite communications, and study the performance of this dynamic-beam scheme. The beam waist adjustment is based on continuous detection of the instantaneous pointing error angle, which is performed at the transmitter side. Using a square to approximate the circular detector region, we obtain a closed-form expression for calculating the proportion of power that can be collected by the receiver aperture, and derive a simple algebraic solution for the optimum dynamic beam waist. Due to its simple form, the dynamic beam waist value can be computed in real time at the transmitter, and therefore, the adjustment is practically implementable. It is shown that the performance of laser inter-satellite links with dynamic beam waist is better than that with fixed beam waist.

  16. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana, Charles

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  17. A scanning spot-beam satellite communication system via transponder with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, K.; Teshirogi, T.

    1981-07-01

    A TDMA satellite communication system with a spot beam scanned rapidly over the entire service area is discussed, and a configuration of a satellite transponder is proposed, which has an up-link and a down-link beam simultaneously controlled in the same sequence. A comparison is made with Reudink's (1977) system, and it is shown that the switching rate of the down-link beam for the present system can handle high power and thus be reduced to a fraction of Reudink's system. The configuration of the present antenna system would also be simpler in the case of coexistence of a fixed multibeam and scanning spot-beam system.

  18. Generating optical superimposed vortex beam with tunable orbital angular momentum using integrated devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xiangdong; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-07-20

    An integrated device, which consists of a variable amplitude splitter and an orbital angular momentum (OAM) emitter, is proposed for the superposition of optical vortex beams. With fixed wavelength and power of incident beam, the OAM of the radiated optical superimposed vortex beam can be dynamically tuned. To verify the operating principle, the proposed device has been fabricated on the SOI substrate and experimentally measured. The experimental results confirm the tunability of superimposed vortex beams. Moreover, the ability of independently varying the OAM flux and the geometric distribution of intensity is illustrated and discussed with numerical simulation. We believe that this work would be promising in various applications.

  19. On the use of consistent approximations for the optimal design of beams

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, E.; Neto, C.K.

    1994-12-31

    Most optimal design problems can only be solved through discretization. One solution strategy is to expand the original problem into an infinite sequence of finite dimensional, approximating nonlinear programming problems, which can be solved using standard algorithms. In this paper, an expansion strategy based on the concept of consistent approximations is proposed for certain optimal beam design problems, where the beam is modelled using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. It is shown that any accumulation point of the sequence of the stationary points of the family of approximating problems is a stationary point of the original, infinite-dimensional problem. Numerical results are presented for problems of optimal design of fixed beams.

  20. Generating optical superimposed vortex beam with tunable orbital angular momentum using integrated devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Dengke; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xiangdong; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Huang, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    An integrated device, which consists of a variable amplitude splitter and an orbital angular momentum (OAM) emitter, is proposed for the superposition of optical vortex beams. With fixed wavelength and power of incident beam, the OAM of the radiated optical superimposed vortex beam can be dynamically tuned. To verify the operating principle, the proposed device has been fabricated on the SOI substrate and experimentally measured. The experimental results confirm the tunability of superimposed vortex beams. Moreover, the ability of independently varying the OAM flux and the geometric distribution of intensity is illustrated and discussed with numerical simulation. We believe that this work would be promising in various applications. PMID:26190669

  1. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  2. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    DOEpatents

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  3. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G. Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-04-15

    coverage and organ at risk sparing and were superior over plans produced with fixed sets of common beam angles. The great majority of the automatic plans (93%) were approved as clinically acceptable by three radiation therapy specialists. Conclusions: The results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing a learning-based approach for automatic selection of beam angles in thoracic IMRT planning. The proposed method may assist in reducing the manual planning workload, while sustaining plan quality.

  4. Route Optimization for Offloading Congested Meter Fixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Zelinski, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    The Optimized Route Capability (ORC) concept proposed by the FAA facilitates traffic managers to identify and resolve arrival flight delays caused by bottlenecks formed at arrival meter fixes when there exists imbalance between arrival fixes and runways. ORC makes use of the prediction capability of existing automation tools, monitors the traffic delays based on these predictions, and searches the best reroutes upstream of the meter fixes based on the predictions and estimated arrival schedules when delays are over a predefined threshold. Initial implementation and evaluation of the ORC concept considered only reroutes available at the time arrival congestion was first predicted. This work extends previous work by introducing an additional dimension in reroute options such that ORC can find the best time to reroute and overcome the 'firstcome- first-reroute' phenomenon. To deal with the enlarged reroute solution space, a genetic algorithm was developed to solve this problem. Experiments were conducted using the same traffic scenario used in previous work, when an arrival rush was created for one of the four arrival meter fixes at George Bush Intercontinental Houston Airport. Results showed the new approach further improved delay savings. The suggested route changes from the new approach were on average 30 minutes later than those using other approaches, and fewer numbers of reroutes were required. Fewer numbers of reroutes reduce operational complexity and later reroutes help decision makers deal with uncertain situations.

  5. From Fixed to Flexible: Making the Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Joyce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses changing from fixed to flexible scheduling for school libraries and describes the process of change at two elementary school libraries. Highlights include the difference between information and learning; information literacy; problem-solving models; curriculum integration; collaboration between teachers and librarians; student needs; and…

  6. The microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, G. David; Weiss, Bernard; Laties, Victor G.

    1983-01-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation in shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. PMID:16812324

  7. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics.

  8. Fixed drug eruption due to ornidazole.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ramji

    2014-11-01

    A 56-year-old male developed an ulcer on his glans penis and mucosae of upper and lower lips 3 days after taking ofloxacin, cephalexin, and ornidazole. Clinically, a provisional diagnosis of fixed drug eruption was made. The causative drug was confirmed by an oral provocation test which triggered a reactivation of all lesions only with ornidazole.

  9. Fixed drug eruption related to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lai, Olivia; Hsu, Sylvia

    2016-04-18

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of cutaneous drug reaction that occurs at the same sites upon re-exposure to specific medications. Herein we discuss the case of a 23-year-old man with a FDE to fluconazole.

  10. The Perennial Reform: Fixing School Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Presidential commissions, parents, academics, and employers have proposed the same solutions, again and again, for fixing the time students spend in school: (1) Add more days to the annual school calendar; (2) Change to year-round schools; (3) Add instructional time to the daily schedule; and (4) Extend the school day. Three reasons--cost,…

  11. Stress tolerant crops from nitrogen fixing trees

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R.; Saunders, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Notes are given on the nutritional quality and uses of: pods of Geoffroea decorticans, a species tolerant of saline and limed soils and saline water; seeds of Olneya tesota which nodulates readily and fixes nitrogen and photosynthesizes at low water potential; and pods of Prosopis chilensis and P. tamarugo which tolerate long periods without rain. 3 references.

  12. Why to Treat Subjects as Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Estes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R2 targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an…

  13. "If the Water Is Nasty, Fix It."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston, Bruce O.

    1999-01-01

    After taking an environmental inventory of their community, seventh-graders in a Denver-area middle school decided to tackle the drinking water problem and fix it. The school is one of seven participating in Earth Force, an environmental and community-service-learning program based in Alexandria, Virginia. The program's progress and six-step…

  14. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Steel Rails and Round Steel Rungs (c) Clearance—(1) Climbing side. On fixed ladders, the perpendicular... back of ladder. The distance from the centerline of rungs, cleats, or steps to the nearest permanent object in back of the ladder shall be not less than 7 inches, except that when unavoidable...

  15. Microanalysis of fixed-interval responding

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Weiss, B.; Laties, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    The fixed-interval schedule of reinforcement is one of the more widely studied schedules in the experimental analysis of behavior and is also a common baseline for behavior pharmacology. Despite many intensive studies, the controlling variables and the pattern of behavior engendered are not well understood. The present study examined the microstructure and superstructure of the behavior engendered by a fixed-interval 5- and a fixed-interval 15-minute schedule of food reinforcement in the pigeon. Analysis of performance typical of fixed-interval responding indicated that the scalloped pattern does not result from smooth acceleration in responding, but, rather, from renewed pausing early in the interval. Individual interresponse-time (IRT) analyses provided no evidence of acceleration. There was a strong indication of alternation is shorter-longer IRTs, but these shorter-longer IRTs did not occur at random, reflecting instead a sequential dependency in successive IRTs. Furthermore, early in the interval there was a high relative frequency of short IRTs. Such a pattern of early pauses and short IRTs does not suggest behavior typical of reinforced responding as exemplified by the pattern found near the end of the interval. Thus, behavior from clearly scalloped performance can be classified into three states: postreinforcement pause, interim behavior, and terminal behavior. 31 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  16. 29 CFR 1910.27 - Fixed ladders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Walking-Working Surfaces § 1910.27 Fixed ladders. (a) Design... details shall be such as to prevent or minimize the accumulation of water on wood parts. (iii) When.... Ladder safety devices may be used on tower, water tank, and chimney ladders over 20 feet in...

  17. Long-term fixed income market structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Luca

    2004-02-01

    Long-term fixed income market securities present a strong positive correlation in daily returns. By using a metrical approach and considering “modified” time series, I show how it is possible to show a more complex structure which depends strictly on the maturity date.

  18. 29 CFR 1917.120 - Fixed stairways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (4) Railing height from tread surface at the riser face shall be 33±3 inches (83.82 cm ±7.62 cm). (5... the tread surface at the riser face. (6) Maintenance. Fixed stairways shall be maintained in...

  19. ASIC For Complex Fixed-Point Arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petilli, Stephen G.; Grimm, Michael J.; Olson, Erlend M.

    1995-01-01

    Application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performs 24-bit, fixed-point arithmetic operations on arrays of complex-valued input data. High-performance, wide-band arithmetic logic unit (ALU) designed for use in computing fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and for performing ditigal filtering functions. Other applications include general computations involved in analysis of spectra and digital signal processing.

  20. Why to Treat Subjects as Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, James S.; Estes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R2 targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an…

  1. Fixing the Shadows While Moving the Gnomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    It is a common practice to fix a vertical gnomon and study the moving shadow cast by it. This shows our local solar time and gives us a hint regarding the season in which we perform the observation. The moving shadow can also tell us our latitude with high precision. In this paper we propose to exchange the roles and while keeping the shadows…

  2. Fixing the Shadows While Moving the Gnomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    It is a common practice to fix a vertical gnomon and study the moving shadow cast by it. This shows our local solar time and gives us a hint regarding the season in which we perform the observation. The moving shadow can also tell us our latitude with high precision. In this paper we propose to exchange the roles and while keeping the shadows…

  3. Raman imaging using fixed bandpass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landström, L.; Kullander, F.; Lundén, H.; Wästerby, P.

    2017-05-01

    By using fixed narrow band pass optical filtering and scanning the laser excitation wavelength, hyperspectral Raman imaging could be achieved. Experimental, proof-of-principle results from the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) tabun (GA) as well as the common CWA simulant tributyl phosphate (TBP) on different surfaces/substrates are presented and discussed.

  4. Deep Learning Experiences within a Fixed Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Julie; Olmstead, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Two and a half years ago, elementary school librarians in the Birmingham Public School district (Troy, Michigan) had to change to a fixed schedule for half the day with kindergarten through second grade students. This change was due to cutbacks and the need for common planning time among classroom teachers. School librarians found themselves…

  5. Deep Learning Experiences within a Fixed Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Julie; Olmstead, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Two and a half years ago, elementary school librarians in the Birmingham Public School district (Troy, Michigan) had to change to a fixed schedule for half the day with kindergarten through second grade students. This change was due to cutbacks and the need for common planning time among classroom teachers. School librarians found themselves…

  6. Ion Beam Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Ion Beam Propulsion Study was a joint high-level study between the Applied Physics Laboratory operated by NASA and ASRC Aerospace at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and Berkeley Scientific, Berkeley, California. The results were promising and suggested that work should continue if future funding becomes available. The application of ion thrusters for spacecraft propulsion is limited to quite modest ion sources with similarly modest ion beam parameters because of the mass penalty associated with the ion source and its power supply system. Also, the ion source technology has not been able to provide very high-power ion beams. Small ion beam propulsion systems were used with considerable success. Ion propulsion systems brought into practice use an onboard ion source to form an energetic ion beam, typically Xe+ ions, as the propellant. Such systems were used for steering and correction of telecommunication satellites and as the main thruster for the Deep Space 1 demonstration mission. In recent years, "giant" ion sources were developed for the controlled-fusion research effort worldwide, with beam parameters many orders of magnitude greater than the tiny ones of conventional space thruster application. The advent of such huge ion beam sources and the need for advanced propulsion systems for exploration of the solar system suggest a fresh look at ion beam propulsion, now with the giant fusion sources in mind.

  7. Experiments with isomeric beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfützner, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Rykaczewski, K.

    1997-02-01

    The results of the search for μs-isomers performed with 112Sn and 86Kr beams at 60 MeV/nucleon with the LISE3 spectrometer at GANIL are summarized. Planned extension of these studies to high energy fragmentation reactions with the FRS separator at GSI is described. Some perspectives for experiments with isomeric beams at GSI are mentioned.

  8. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  9. Picosecond beam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Schutt, D.W.; Beck, G.O.

    1974-01-01

    The current in the beam of a particle accelerator is monitored with picosecond resolution by causing the beam to impinge upon the center conductor of a coaxial line, generating a pulse of electromagnetic energy in response thereto. This pulse is detected by means such as a sampling oscilloscope. (Official Gazette)

  10. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  11. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  12. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  13. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  14. Durnin-Whitney beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Cabrera-Rosas, Omar; Espíndola-Ramos, Ernesto; Alejandro Juárez-Reyes, Salvador; Julián-Macías, Israel; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Sosa-Sánchez, Citlalli Teresa

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to define a Durnin-Whitney beam as a nondiffracting beam such that its associated caustic locally only has singularities of the fold and cusp types. Since the caustic is structurally stable then the intensity pattern of this beam is also stable and this property is what makes its definition and its theoretical and experimental study worthwhile. These properties are important in applications such as uniform optical drilling in waveguides and communications through weak turbulent atmosphere. We find that in accordance with Whitney's theorem on the stability of maps from a two-dimensional manifold to a two-dimensional manifold the phase g({{Φ }}), of the complex function A({{Φ }}) characterizing the beam, locally is given by g({{Φ }})=a{{Φ }} for a fold and g({{Φ }})=b{{{Φ }}}2 for a cusp. This result implies that the Bessel beam of order zero is not stable and that any other Bessel beam is stable because locally it has a caustic of fold type. Finally, we present an example of a Durnin-Whitney beam given by g({{Φ }})=m{{Φ }}+b{{{Φ }}}2, which is a natural generalization of the Bessel beam of order m with a singularity of cusp ridge type.

  15. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  16. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  17. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient recirculator for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.; Neil, V.K.

    1991-03-01

    A heavy ion fusion driver is considered in which a beam is passed repeatedly through a LIA (linear induction accelerator) by recirculating with two spiral sector FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) 180 degree bends. The driver consists of three such rings: a 10--100 MeV low energy ring (LER), a 100--1000 MeV medium energy ring (MER), and a 1--10 GeV high energy ring (HER). Using a scaling field of 14 kG and taking the length of the straight sections to equal the path length in the bends, the circumference of the three rings would be 187, 590, and 1890 meters. Four matching sections in each of the three rings provide the interface between the two straight sections accommodating the LIA and the FFAG bends. These matching sections consist of dipoles which provide a dispersion free match between the linear induction accelerator and the energy dependent equilibrium orbits of the FFAG ring. The advantage in the use of the spiral sector FFAG over other recirculator concepts is that the fields are time invariant. This removes the problems associated with time dependent field penetration into the vacuum chamber and the large amount of energy which must be expended to change the magnetic field on the small time scale associated with the required pulse repetition frequency. The disadvantage, as we show in this work is the relatively weak alternating gradient focusing. The FFAG will not accommodate the level of beam current possible in a separate function lattice of bending magnets and quadrupoles.

  18. Beam-centric algorithm for pretreatment patient position correction in external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Maltz, Jonathan

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: In current image guided pretreatment patient position adjustment methods, image registration is used to determine alignment parameters. Since most positioning hardware lacks the full six degrees of freedom (DOF), accuracy is compromised. The authors show that such compromises are often unnecessary when one models the planned treatment beams as part of the adjustment calculation process. The authors present a flexible algorithm for determining optimal realizable adjustments for both step-and-shoot and arc delivery methods. Methods: The beam shape model is based on the polygonal intersection of each beam segment with the plane in pretreatment image volume that passes through machine isocenter perpendicular to the central axis of the beam. Under a virtual six-DOF correction, ideal positions of these polygon vertices are computed. The proposed method determines the couch, gantry, and collimator adjustments that minimize the total mismatch of all vertices over all segments with respect to their ideal positions. Using this geometric error metric as a function of the number of available DOF, the user may select the most desirable correction regime. Results: For a simulated treatment plan consisting of three equally weighted coplanar fixed beams, the authors achieve a 7% residual geometric error (with respect to the ideal correction, considered 0% error) by applying gantry rotation as well as translation and isocentric rotation of the couch. For a clinical head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy plan with seven beams and five segments per beam, the corresponding error is 6%. Correction involving only couch translation (typical clinical practice) leads to a much larger 18% mismatch. Clinically significant consequences of more accurate adjustment are apparent in the dose volume histograms of target and critical structures. Conclusions: The algorithm achieves improvements in delivery accuracy using standard delivery hardware without significantly increasing

  19. Oxygen-dependent hologram writing and fixing in conjugated polymer storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Ofer; Agranat, Aharon J.; Perepelitsa, Galina; Shalom, Shoshy; Neumann, Ronny; Avny, Yair; Davidov, Dan

    1999-11-01

    Hologram writing and fixing mechanisms are examined in disordered conjugated polymer/glass composites. The conjugated polymers used were alkoxy substituted poly(phenylenevinylne) analogs and the glass matrices were zirconia-organosilica xerogels. Hologram formation mechanism is shown to be a photochromic process consisting of light induced photo- oxidation (bleaching) of the embedded conjugated polymer resulting in the formation of an absorption grating and a phase grating. IR and Raman spectroscopy show that the chemical transformations upon photo-bleaching involve chain scission and oxidation of the polymer at the vinylic position of the conjugated polymer. Oxygen removal increases hologram formation time by more than an order of magnitude and halves the total hologram efficiency. The oxygen dependence was also highly correlated with photo-bleaching of the samples and beam interaction of the writing beams. Light sensitivity was compared for several polymer/glass composites showing that the new composites and film preparation techniques are promising for blue and ultraviolet sensitive holographic materials. A hologram fixing method based on a PMMA coating, applied on the film after hologram formation is demonstrated and shown to increase hologram erasure times by four. These important findings show that conjugated polymer/glass composites based storage media can be manufactured and fixed efficiently for a long term based on this method.

  20. Performance of the SLC polarized electron source and injector with the SLAC 3 km linac configured for fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    The SLC polarized electron source (PES) can be modified to produce {mu}sec-long pulses for injection into the un-SLEDed SLAC 3 km linac, with a duty factor considerably higher than for SLC. Such beams are desirable for fixed target experiments at SLAC requiring polarized electron beams of up to 50 mA within an energy spread of 0.5%, at energies of up to 26 GeV. During the fall of 1992, the SLAC linac was operated continuously for two months unSLEDed with the PES dye laser (715 nm) modified to produce a 1{mu}ec pulse at 120Hz. An AlGaAs photocathode was installed in the electron gun to achieve 40% polarization, and a prebuncher was added to the SLC injector to improve capture for long pulse beams. We discuss the performance eo the polarized electron beam for long pulse operation.

  1. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  2. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  3. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  4. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  5. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  6. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking. 660... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked at the surface and at...

  7. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  8. 2 CFR 200.45 - Fixed amount awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fixed amount awards. 200.45 Section 200.45... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Acronyms and Definitions Acronyms § 200.45 Fixed amount awards. Fixed amount... primarily on performance and results. See §§ 200.201 Use of grant agreements (including fixed amount awards...

  9. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked at...

  10. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause) ...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause) ...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage...

  13. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in support...

  14. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked at...

  15. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed Fee—Construction...

  16. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause) ...

  17. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage...

  18. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage...

  19. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for...

  20. 12 CFR 701.36 - FCU ownership of fixed assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FCU ownership of fixed assets. 701.36 Section... ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.36 FCU ownership of fixed assets. (a) Investment in Fixed Assets. (1) No Federal credit union with $1,000,000 or more in assets may invest in any fixed...

  1. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to the...

  2. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed Fee—Construction...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause) ...

  4. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed Fee—Construction...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.216-78 - Firm fixed price.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Firm fixed price. 1852.216... 1852.216-78 Firm fixed price. As prescribed in 1816.202-70, insert the following clause: Firm Fixed Price (DEC 1988) The total firm fixed price of this contract is $ . (End of clause) ...

  6. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for...

  7. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage...

  8. 48 CFR 52.216-9 - Fixed Fee-Construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed Fee-Construction. 52....216-9 Fixed Fee—Construction. As prescribed in 16.307(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when a cost-plus-fixed-fee construction contract is contemplated: Fixed Fee—Construction...

  9. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to the...

  10. 10 CFR 600.29 - Fixed obligation awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fixed obligation awards. 600.29 Section 600.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE RULES General § 600.29 Fixed... assistance instruments on a fixed amount basis. Under a fixed obligation award, funds are issued in support...

  11. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to the...

  12. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for...

  13. 48 CFR 16.403 - Fixed-price incentive contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed-price incentive... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Incentive Contracts 16.403 Fixed-price incentive contracts. (a) Description. A fixed-price incentive contract is a fixed-price contract that provides for...

  14. 47 CFR 90.235 - Secondary fixed signaling operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Secondary fixed signaling operations. 90.235... fixed signaling operations. Fixed operations may, subject to the following conditions, be authorized on... function is repeated consecutively more than five times. (h) Fixed stations authorized pursuant to the...

  15. 47 CFR 90.637 - Restrictions on operational fixed stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restrictions on operational fixed stations. 90... operational fixed stations. (a) Except for control stations, operational fixed operations will not be... secondary fixed tone signaling and alarm operations authorized in § 90.235 or in paragraph (c) of this...

  16. 48 CFR 1852.216-75 - Payment of fixed fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of fixed fee. 1852... 1852.216-75 Payment of fixed fee. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(c), insert the following clause: Payment of Fixed Fee (DEC 1988) The fixed fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage...

  17. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for the...

  18. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for the...

  19. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for the...

  20. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to the...

  1. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to the...

  2. 46 CFR 184.410 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 184.410 Section 184... Electronic position fixing devices. A vessel on an oceans route must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device, capable of providing accurate fixes for the area in which the vessel operates, to the...

  3. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for the...

  4. 46 CFR 28.260 - Electronic position fixing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic position fixing devices. 28.260 Section 28... Trade § 28.260 Electronic position fixing devices. Each vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be equipped with an electronic position fixing device capable of providing accurate fixes for the...

  5. Multisegment coherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Tucker, Steve D.; Morgan, R.; Smith, Tony G.; Warren, Mial E.; Gruetzner, James K.; Rosenthal, R. R.; Bentley, A. E.

    1995-08-01

    Scaling laser systems to large sizes for power beaming and other applications can sometimes be simplified by combining a number of smaller lasers. However, to fully utilize this scaling, coherent beam combination is necessary. This requires measuring and controlling each beam's pointing and phase relative to adjacent beams using an adaptive optical system. We have built a sub-scale brass-board to evaluate various methods for beam-combining. It includes a segmented adaptive optic and several different specialized wavefront sensors that are fabricated using diffractive optics methods. We have evaluated a number of different phasing algorithms, including hierarchical and matrix methods, and have demonstrated phasing of several elements. The system is currently extended to a large number of segments to evaluate various scaling methodologies.

  6. Laser beam alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Kasner, William H.; Racki, Daniel J.; Swenson, Clark E.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

  7. Entangled vector vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  8. Ion Beam Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, Taneli

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ion beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.

  9. Beam director design report

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  10. Accelerator Science: Collider vs. Fixed Target

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-21

    Particle physics experiments employ high energy particle accelerators to make their measurements. However there are many kinds of particle accelerators with many interesting techniques. One important dichotomy is whether one takes a particle beam and have it hit a stationary target of atoms, or whether one takes two counter rotating beams of particles and smashes them together head on. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of these two powerful methods of exploring the rules of the universe.

  11. Accelerator Science: Collider vs. Fixed Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-07

    Particle physics experiments employ high energy particle accelerators to make their measurements. However there are many kinds of particle accelerators with many interesting techniques. One important dichotomy is whether one takes a particle beam and have it hit a stationary target of atoms, or whether one takes two counter rotating beams of particles and smashes them together head on. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of these two powerful methods of exploring the rules of the universe.

  12. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  13. Theoretical study of longitudinal beam splitting and related phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.; Shih, H.J.; Kummer, M.

    1993-10-01

    A recent experiment at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) with electron cooling showed that rf phase modulation near 1:1 resonance leads to longitudinal beam splitting. Here we explain this by applying the method of averaging, a powerful tool from the study of dynamical systems, to the underlying equation of motion -- a pendulum equation with small damping and periodic forcing. The beam splitting is explained by showing that the associated Poincare map has two attracting fixed points, each with a well-defined basin of attraction. Our approach can be immediately applied to other accelerator physics problems governed by a similar equation.

  14. Theoretical study of longitudinal beam splitting and related phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.A.; Shih, H. ); Kummer, M. )

    1994-03-01

    A recent experiment at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility with electron cooling showed that rf phase modulation near the 1:1 resonance leads to longitudinal beam splitting. Here we explain this by applying the method of averaging, a powerful tool from the study of dynamical systems, to the underlying equation of motion---a pendulum equation with small damping and periodic forcing. The beam splitting is explained by showing that the associated Poincare map has two attracting fixed points, each with a well-defined basin of attraction. Our approach can be immediately applied to other accelerator-physics problems governed by a similar equation.

  15. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  16. Complexation precedes phosphorylation for two-component regulatory system FixL/FixJ of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Tuckerman, J R; Gonzalez, G; Gilles-Gonzalez, M A

    2001-05-04

    The FixL/FixJ two-component regulatory system of Sinorhizobium meliloti controls the expression of nitrogen fixation genes in response to O2. When phosphorylated, the transcription factor FixJ binds to the nifA and fixK promoters in S. meliloti and induces expression of the corresponding genes, both of which encode key transcription activators. Phosphorylation of FixJ has been proposed to occur via the following cascade. The sensor kinase FixL reacts with ATP independently of FixJ, transferring a phosphoryl group to one of its own histidine residues. Dissociation of O2 from a heme-binding PAS domain in FixL greatly accelerates the rate of this autophosphorylation. The phosphoryl group is rapidly transferred from phospho-FixL to an aspartate residue on FixJ. The resulting phospho-FixJ is short-lived, due to a FixL-catalyzed hydrolysis of the aspartyl phosphate. Here, we show that phosphorylation of FixLJ, i.e. the complex of FixL with FixJ, is at least tenfold faster than the phosphorylation of FixL without FixJ. We further show that a phospho-FixJ phosphatase, thought to reside in FixL, is absent from this complex. These results indicate that FixLJ reacts with ATP as a unit and much more efficiently than FixL alone, and that autophosphorylation and phosphoryl transfer do not occur independently, in sequence, but rather in a closely coupled processive reaction. These findings highlight the possible influence of synergistic interactions of the regulatory components in two-component-system signal transduction.

  17. A study into lowering beam trajectories in P01

    SciTech Connect

    Sondgeroth, A.

    1995-09-01

    This document describes what changes would be needed to lower the primary beams coming from switchyard into enclosure P01 without changing trajectories in the downstream enclosures. There is a 680 foot pipe buried in the ground between Enclosure E and P01 which allows primary beam to travel from the switchyard area to the research division area. This pipe is approximately 25 years old and has started to leak. The effects of the leaky pipe can be catastrophic to the transportation of the proton area beams. The vacuum group has devised an ingenious way of repairing a leak from the inside using remotely controlled grinders, patchers, welders and cameras mounted on carts that can be pulled into the pipe. A typical patch adds approximately one half of an inch of material which, in turn, restricts the aperture of the pipe. This pipe has three separate beams running through it split in the vertical plane. Pwest is the highest beam in the pipe and, in at least one location, the center of the beam clears the top of the pipe by one and one half inches. If a leak were to develop at a low spot in the pipe the patch to fix the leak might create an obstruction for the beam. Hence, the request from the Research Division Head.

  18. Progress of Multi-Beam Long Trace-Profiler Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kester, Thomas; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2012-01-01

    The multi-beam long trace profiler (LTP) under development at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center[1] is designed to increase the efficiency of metrology of replicated X-ray optics. The traditional LTP operates on a single laser beam that scans along the test surface to detect the slope errors. While capable of exceptional surface slope accuracy, the LTP single beam scanning has slow measuring speed. As metrology constitutes a significant fraction of the time spent in optics production, an increase in the efficiency of metrology helps in decreasing the cost of fabrication of the x-ray optics and in improving their quality. Metrology efficiency can be increased by replacing the single laser beam with multiple beams that can scan a section of the test surface at a single instance. The increase in speed with such a system would be almost proportional to the number of laser beams. A collaborative feasibility study has been made and specifications were fixed for a multi-beam long trace profiler. The progress made in the development of this metrology system is presented.

  19. Laser-based profile and energy monitor for H beams

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly,R.; Alessi, J.; Bellavia, S.; Dawson, C.; Degen, C.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Russo, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-09-29

    A beam profile and energy monitor for H{sup -} beams based on laser photoneutralization was built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)* for use on the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HMS) at Fermilab. An H{sup -} ion has a first ionization potential of 0.75eV and can be neutralized by light from a Nd:YAG laser ({lambda}=1064nm). To measure beam profiles, a narrow laser beam is stepped across the ion beam, removing electrons from the portion of the H{sup -} beam intercepted by the laser. These electrons are channeled into a Faraday cup by a curved axial magnetic field. To measure the energy distribution of the electrons, the laser position is fixed and the voltage on a screen in front of the Faraday cup is raised in small steps. We present a model which reproduces the measured energy spectrum from calculated beam energy and space-charge fields. Measurements are reported from experiments in the BNL linac MEBT at 750keV.

  20. CRYSTALLINE BEAMS AT HIGH ENERGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.; OKAMOTO, H.; YURI, Y.; SESSLER, A.; MACHIDA, S.

    2006-06-23

    Previously it was shown that by crystallizing each of the two counter-circulating beams, a much larger beam-beam tune shift can be tolerated during the beam-beam collisions; thus a higher luminosity can be reached for colliding beams [1]. On the other hand, crystalline beams can only be formed at energies below the transition energy ({gamma}{sub T}) of the accelerators [2]. In this paper, we investigate the formation of crystals in a high-{gamma}{sub T} lattice that also satisfies the maintenance condition for a crystalline beam [3].

  1. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  2. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  3. Investigation of ion-beam machining methods for replicated x-ray optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drueding, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    The final figuring step in the fabrication of an optical component involves imparting a specified contour onto the surface. This can be expensive and time consuming step. The recent development of ion beam figuring provides a method for performing the figuring process with advantages over standard mechanical methods. Ion figuring has proven effective in figuring large optical components. The process of ion beam figuring removes material by transferring kinetic energy from impinging neutral particles. The process utilizes a Kaufman type ion source, where a plasma is generated in a discharge chamber by controlled electric potentials. Charged grids extract and accelerate ions from the chamber. The accelerated ions form a directional beam. A neutralizer outside the accelerator grids supplies electrons to the positive ion beam. It is necessary to neutralize the beam to prevent charging workpieces and to avoid bending the beam with extraneous electro-magnetic fields. When the directed beam strikes the workpiece, material sputters in a predicable manner. The amount and distribution of material sputtered is a function of the energy of the beam, material of the component, distance from the workpiece, and angle of incidence of the beam. The figuring method described here assumes a constant beam removal, so that the process can be represented by a convolution operation. A fixed beam energy maintains a constant sputtering rate. This temporally and spatially stable beam is held perpendicular to the workpiece at a fixed distance. For non-constant removal, corrections would be required to model the process as a convolution operation. Specific figures (contours) are achieved by rastering the beam over the workpiece at varying velocities. A unique deconvolution is performed, using series-derivative solution developed for the system, to determine these velocities.

  4. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.

    1995-05-05

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms=root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in {ital z} or a closed to double-horned energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, F.-J.

    1995-05-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms=root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-horned energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree'' and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  6. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, F. J.

    1994-09-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms = root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parameters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-homed energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a 'Christmas tree' and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  7. Beam distributions beyond RMS

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    The beam is often represented only by its position (mean) and the width (rms = root mean squared) of its distribution. To achieve these beam parameters in a noisy condition with high backgrounds, a Gaussian distribution with offset (4 parmeters) is fitted to the measured beam distribution. This gives a very robust answer and is not very sensitive to background subtraction techniques. To get higher moments of the distribution, like skew or kurtosis, a fitting function with one or two more parameters is desired which would model the higher moments. In this paper we will concentrate on an Asymmetric Gaussian and a Super Gaussian function that will give something like the skew and the kurtosis of the distribution. This information is used to quantify special beam distribution. Some are unwanted like beam tails (skew) from transverse wakefields, higher order dispersive aberrations or potential well distortion in a damping ring. A negative kurtosis of a beam distribution describes a more rectangular, compact shape like with an over-compressed beam in z or a closed to double-homed energy distribution, while a positive kurtosis looks more like a ``Christmas tree`` and can quantify a beam mismatch after filamentation. Besides the advantages of the quantification, there are some distributions which need a further investigation like long flat tails which create background particles in a detector. In particle simulations on the other hand a simple rms number might grossly overestimate the effective size (e.g. for producing luminosity) due to a few particles which are far away from the core. This can reduce the practical gain of a big theoretical improvement in the beam size.

  8. Non uniform shrinkages of double-walled carbon nanotube as induced by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xianfang Li, Lunxiong; Gong, Huimin; Yang, Lan; Sun, Chenghua

    2014-09-01

    Electron beam-induced nanoinstabilities of pristine double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) of two different configurations, one fixed at both ends and another fixed at only one end, were in-situ investigated in transmission electron microscope at room temperature. It was observed that the DWCNT fixed at both ends shrank in its diameter uniformly. Meanwhile, the DWCNT fixed at only one end intriguingly shrank preferentially from its free cap end along its axial direction whereas its diameter shrinkage was offset. A mechanism of “diffusion” along with “evaporation” at room temperature which is driven by the nanocurvature of the DWCNTs, and the athermal activation induced by the electron beam was proposed to elucidate the observed phenomena. The effect of the interlayer interaction of the DWCNTs was also discussed.

  9. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  10. In celebration of the fixed target program with the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel et al.

    2001-12-28

    The Tevatron is the world's first large superconducting accelerator. With its construction, we gained the dual opportunities to advance the state of the art in accelerator technology with the machine itself and in particle physics with the experiments that became possible in a higher energy regime. There have been 43 experiments in the Tevatron fixed target program. Many of these are better described as experimental programs, each with a broad range of physics goals and results, and more than 100 collaborating physicists and engineers. The results of this program are three-fold: (1) new technologies in accelerators, beams and detectors which advanced the state of the art; (2) new experimental results published in the refereed physics journals; and (3) newly trained scientists who are both the next generation of particle physicists and an important part of the scientific, technical and educational backbone of the country as a whole. In this book they compile these results. There are sections from each experiment including what their physics goals and results were, what papers were published, and which students have received degrees. Summaries of these results from the program as a whole are quite interesting, but the physics results from this program are too broad to summarize globally. The most important of the results appear in later sections of this booklet.

  11. Beam Purification by Photodetachment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Andersson, P.; Lindahl, A. O.; Hanstorp, D.; Forstner, Dr. Oliver; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

  12. Agile beam laser

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, G. C.

    1985-01-08

    A laser system for providing a rapidly steerable laser output beam. The laser system includes a phase conjugate reflector, laser gain medium and its associated pump source, an output coupling device, and an optical element which selectably controls the transverse lasing mode of the laser system. The components are arranged to form a laser oscillator between the phase conjugate reflector and the optical device, and is operated in such a manner that each selected transverse mode of laser operation generates an output beam from the system which has a different wavefront tilt. Accordingly, the output beam is steerable and is dependent upon the selected transverse mode which is currently lasing in the oscillator.

  13. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  14. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  15. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  16. Beam scanning binary logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Mukai, Seiji; Watanabe, Masanobu; Mori, Masahiko; Yajima, Hiroyoshi

    1990-07-01

    A beam-scanning laser diode (BSLD) is presently applied to a novel optoelectronic logic operation, designated 'beam-scanning binary logic' (BSBL), that covers the implementation of both the basic logic gates and a spatial code encoder for photodetection, while allowing a greater reduction of the number of active devices than ordinary binary logic operations. BSBL executes multifunctional logic operations simultaneously. The data connections between logic gates in BSLD are flexible, due to the ability to electrically control both output power and laser-beam direction.

  17. Fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Zhang; Bing, Yuan; Zengji, Liu

    2006-10-01

    A new fixed-rate layered multicast congestion control algorithm called FLMCC is proposed. The sender of a multicast session transmits data packets at a fixed rate on each layer, while receivers each obtain different throughput by cumulatively subscribing to deferent number of layers based on their expected rates. In order to provide TCP-friendliness and estimate the expected rate accurately, a window-based mechanism implemented at receivers is presented. To achieve this, each receiver maintains a congestion window, adjusts it based on the GAIMD algorithm, and from the congestion window an expected rate is calculated. To measure RTT, a new method is presented which combines an accurate measurement with a rough estimation. A feedback suppression based on a random timer mechanism is given to avoid feedback implosion in the accurate measurement. The protocol is simple in its implementation. Simulations indicate that FLMCC shows good TCP-friendliness, responsiveness as well as intra-protocol fairness, and provides high link utilization.

  18. Fixed drug eruptions: presentation, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Hal; Brodell, Robert; Brents, Melissa; Wyatt, Julie Porter

    2014-11-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a well-defined, circular, hyperpigmenting plaque that recurs as one or a few lesions always in fixed locations upon ingestion of a drug. FDE commonly occurs on the genitals, lips, trunk, and hands. Although the lesions are distinctive, the diagnosis of FDE often is missed because it shares none of the characteristics of more common morbilliform drug rashes. The diagnosis can be confirmed by histopathologic examination of a small punch biopsy specimen. Drug avoidance is the mainstay of treatment, and antihistamines can reduce associated pruritus. Raising awareness of this condition will increase the likelihood of prompt diagnosis leading to resolution within days to weeks after the offending drug is discontinued.

  19. Selective fixed drug eruption to amoxycillin.

    PubMed

    Arias, J; Férnandez-Rivas, M; Panadero, P

    1995-07-01

    A selective fixed drug eruption to amoxycillin but not other betalactam drugs is reported. Penicillins are the drugs most frequently implicated in immunological adverse reactions. The most important of these are allergic reactions where an IgE-mediated mechanism is well established. Other immunological mechanisms have been described in reactions, such as haemolytic anaemia, serum sickness, drug-induced nephritis, drug fever and contact dermatitis. Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a type of drug-induced dermatosis, the immunopathogenesis of which remains unknown. FDE is an uncommon reaction to penicillin derivatives, and very few cases have been reported. We present a case of a selective FDE to amoxycillin (AX), with no reaction to other betalactam drugs. Although one similar case has been reported, the reactivity to other penicillin derivatives was not assessed.

  20. Caution -- Beam Crossing Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, Kenneth L.

    2008-04-02

    There are times when a laser beam needs to cross between tables or even go from one room to another. This presents an interesting traffic-flow and safety challenge to both the laser safety officer and laser user. Fortunately it is a challenge that has several solutions But the simplest solution may not be the best one. For example, the simplest way to get a beam from one optical table to another is just to put a sturdy tube around it. That's a permanent solution, and it completely contains the laser beam. While this is laser safe, there can be egress issues if it blocks a walkway. One comment this author often hears is, 'We can just duck under the tube.' The fire marshal, as well as the laser safety officer, might have issues with this. Especially in the case of a darkened lab, a blocked walkway can present a hazard of its own. One good solution is to transport the beam from Point A to Point B through a fiberoptic cable, when that is possible. One should easily be able to run the fiber up and over any walkway or down through a conduit on the floor. An important concern often overlooked with fibers is a label at the termination end indicating disconnection may expose one to laser radiation. Suppose there's an experiment that is usually confined to a single optical table, but sometimes needs to expand to a second table. It's inconvenient to install a permanent tube between the tables, so some sort of temporary arrangement is desirable. I have often seen people casually lay a beam tube across support arms, and remove it when it's not needed. The problem with this approach is that there's no mechanism to prevent the beam from crossing if somebody's forgotten the tube, or if the tube gets knocked out of place. A better solution is a mechanism that only allows the beam to cross when the beam protection is in place. A swing shutter, or a guillotine and swing arm, are examples (Figures 1 and 2). Another alternative is a sensor, maybe a little microswitch, that activates a

  1. Fixed Wages, Layoffs, Unemployment Compensation, and Welfare.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    feasibility and optimality of alternative employment contracts. For the case where layoffs are prohibited, they demonstrate that both the fixed wage--constant...society’s point of view. In the case with layoffs , they show that the competitive mechanism leads to a less than optimal number of layoffs , and...demonstrate that unemployment insurance with less than complete experience rating lowers the cost of layoffs to the firm and encourages labor mobility. In the

  2. Azithromycin induced bullous fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a common type of drug eruption seen in skin clinics. It is characterized by solitary or multiple, round to oval erythematous patches with dusky red centers, some of which may progress to bulla formation. Bullous FDE may be caused by a number of drugs. We hereby describe a case of azithromycin-induced bullous FDE; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case being reported.

  3. Acemetacin-induced fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, Filiz; Yaşar, Şirin; Aytekin, Sema; Güneş, Pembegül

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an adverse effect observed with various drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and various antibiotics. Acemetacin, a prodrug of indomethacin, is an NSAID licensed for use in rheumatic disease and other musculoskeletal disorders. We present a case of acemetacin-induced FDE in a 49-year-old woman. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case report detailing clinical and histopathological findings of a patient with FDE caused by acemetacin.

  4. Carbon monoxide fixed point continuous monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    This instrument is to monitor carbon monoxide concentration in underground mines. A carbon monoxide fixed-point continuous monitor consists of two modules. A line-powered control module is designed to power a remote transducer module; provide continuous readouts, visual and audible alarms, operational checks; and activate fans and equipment shutdown circuits if present CO concentration levels are exceeded. Details are given for the workings of each module. (DP)

  5. Fixed drug eruptions with intraoral presentation

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Bihari, Manorama; Bhuvan, Jyoti; Saad, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Fixed-drug eruption (FDE) is an unusual and rare adverse drug reaction. This type of reaction is actually a delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction that occurs as lesions recurring at the same skin site due to repeated intake of an offending drug. Here is a case report of a 58-year-old male patient who developed intraoral FDEs after ingestion of the first dose of ornidazole. PMID:26097341

  6. Azithromycin induced bullous fixed drug eruption

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Sancheti, Karan; Podder, Indrashis; Das, Nilay Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a common type of drug eruption seen in skin clinics. It is characterized by solitary or multiple, round to oval erythematous patches with dusky red centers, some of which may progress to bulla formation. Bullous FDE may be caused by a number of drugs. We hereby describe a case of azithromycin-induced bullous FDE; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case being reported. PMID:26997729

  7. Ergostatting and thermostatting at a fixed point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüffel, Helmuth; Ilijić, Saša

    2016-11-01

    We propose an innovative type of ergostats and thermostats for molecular dynamics simulations. A general class of active particle swarm models is considered, where any specific total energy (alternatively any specific temperature) can be provided at a fixed point of the evolution of the swarm. We identify the extended system feedback force of the Nosé-Hoover thermostat with the "internal energy" variable of active Brownian motion.

  8. Intermediate fixed point in a Luttinger liquid with elastic and dissipative backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altland, Alexander; Gefen, Yuval; Rosenow, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In a recent work [A. Altland, Y. Gefen, and B. Rosenow, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 136401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.136401], we have addressed the problem of a Luttinger liquid with a scatterer that allows for both coherent and incoherent scattering channels. We have found that the physics associated with this model is qualitatively different from the elastic impurity setup analyzed by Kane and Fisher, and from the inelastic scattering scenario studied by Furusaki and Matveev, thus proposing a paradigmatic picture of Luttinger liquid with an impurity. Here we present an extensive study of the renormalization group flows for this problem, the fixed point landscape, and scaling near those fixed points. Our analysis is nonperturbative in the elastic tunneling amplitudes, employing an instanton calculation in one or two of the available elastic tunneling channels. Our analysis accounts for nontrivial Klein factors, which represent anyonic or fermionic statistics. These Klein factors need to be taken into account due to the fact that higher-order tunneling processes take place. In particular, we find a stable fixed point, where an incoming current is split 1/2 -1/2 between a forward and a backward scattered beams. This intermediate fixed point, between complete backscattering and full forward scattering, is stable for the Luttinger parameter g <1 .

  9. RSRM nozzle fixed housing cooldown test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolieau, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight 5 aft segments with nozzles were exposed to -17 F temperatures while awaiting shipment to KSC in February, 1989. No records were found which show that any previous nozzles were exposed to air temperatures as low as those seen by the Flight 5 nozzles. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of the fixed housing, and forward and aft exit cone components dropped as low as -10 F. Structural analysis of the nozzles at these low temperatures show the forward and aft exit cone adhesive bonds to have a positive margin of safety, based on a 2.0 safety factor. These analyses show the normal and shear stresses in the fixed housing bond as low values. However, the hoop and meridinal stresses were predicted to be in the 4000 psi range; the failure stress allowable of EA913NA adhesive at -7 F. If the bonds did break in directions perpendicular to the surfaces, called bond crazing, no normal bond strength would be lost. Testing was conducted in two phases, showing that no degradation to the adhesive bonds occurred while the Flight 5 nozzles were subjected to subzero temperatures. The results of these tests are documented. Phase 1 testing cooled a full-scale RSRM insulated fixed housing to -13 F, with extensive bondline inspections. Phase 2 testing cooled the witness panel adhesive tensile buttions to -13 F, with failure strengths recorded before, during, and after the cooldown.

  10. Fixed behaviours and migration in parasitic flatworms.

    PubMed

    Sukhdeo, M V K; Sukhdeo, S C

    2002-03-01

    This paper considers how fixed behaviours may play a role in post-larval migrations of Entobdella soleae. A general argument is that a shift away from the paradigm of orientation is required to elucidate the mechanisms that parasites use to navigate on the surface of their hosts. Some migrations may rely on fixed behaviours (genetically programmed stereotyped behaviours) that often evolve under predictable environmental conditions with reliable signals. In turbulent and stochastic free-living environments, homeostatic hosts present very predictable topological substrates and physico-chemical characteristics to their parasites. Over the course of evolution on these predictable host substrates, adaptive behaviours in the parasites can become fixed. Examples of endoparasite migration behaviour, particularly that of the common liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, will be used to develop an approach based on the perceptual worlds of migrating parasites. An important conclusion is that multi-disciplinary approaches, firmly rooted in an understanding of each parasite's natural history, are requisite to successful interpretation of migration behaviours on the host.

  11. Zirconia in fixed prosthesis. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Román-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Ferreiroa, Alberto; Solá-Ruíz, María F.; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Statement of problem: Evidence is limited on the efficacy of zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses. Objective: To carry out a literature review of the behavior of zirconium oxide dental restorations. Material and Methods: This literature review searched the Pubmed, Scopus, Medline and Cochrane Library databases using key search words “zirconium oxide,” “zirconia,” “non-metal restorations,” “ceramic oxides,” “veneering ceramic,” “zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses”. Both in vivo and in vitro studies into zirconia-based prosthodontic restoration behavior were included. Results: Clinical studies have revealed a high rate of fracture for porcelain-veneered zirconia-based restorations that varies between 6% and 15% over a 3- to 5-year period, while for ceramo-metallic restorations the fracture rate ranges between 4 and 10% over ten years. These results provoke uncertainty as to the long-term prognosis for this material in the oral medium. The cause of veneering porcelain fractures is unknown but hypothetically they could be associated with bond failure between the veneer material and the zirconia sub-structure. Key words:Veneering ceramic, zirconia-based ceramic restoration, crown, zirconia, tooth-supported fixed prosthesis. PMID:24596638

  12. Why to treat subjects as fixed effects.

    PubMed

    Adelman, James S; Estes, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    Adelman, Marquis, Sabatos-DeVito, and Estes (2013) collected word naming latencies from 4 participants who read 2,820 words 50 times each. Their recommendation and practice was that R² targets set for models should take into account subject idiosyncrasies as replicable patterns, equivalent to a subjects-as-fixed-effects assumption. In light of an interaction involving subjects, they broke down the interaction into individual subject data. Courrieu and Rey's (2015) commentary argues that (a) single-subject data need not be more reliable than subject-average data, and (b) anyway, treating groups of subjects as random samples leads to valid conclusions about general mechanisms of reading. Point (a) was not part of Adelman et al.'s claim. In this reply, we examine the consequences of using the fixed-effect assumption. It (a) produces the correct target to check if by-items regression models contain all necessary variables, (b) more accurately constrains cognitive models, (c) more accurately reveals general mechanisms, and (d) can offer more powerful tests of effects. Even when individual differences are not the primary focus of a study, the fixed-effect analysis is often preferable to the random-effects analysis.

  13. Fixed points and FLRW cosmologies: Flat case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Adel

    2013-05-01

    We use a phase space approach to study possible consequences of fixed points in a single fluid flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) models with pressure p(H), where H is the Hubble parameter. One of these consequences is that a fluid with a differentiable pressure, i.e., a finite adiabatic speed of sound, reaches a fixed point in an infinite time and has no finite-time singularities of types I, II, and III described by Nojiri, Odintsov, and Tsujikawa [Phys. Rev. D 71, 063004 (2005)]. It is impossible for such a fluid to cross the phantom divide in a finite time. We show that a divergent dp/dH, or the speed of sound, is a necessary but not sufficient condition for phantom crossing. We use pressure properties, such as asymptotic behavior and fixed points, to qualitatively describe the entire behavior of a solution in flat FLRW models. We discuss FLRW models with bulk viscosity η˜ρr, in particular, solutions for r=1 and r=1/4 cases, which can be expressed in terms of the Lambert-W function. The last solution behaves as either a nonsingular phantom fluid or a unified dark fluid. Using causality and stability constraints, we show that the universe must end as a de Sitter space. Relaxing the stability constraint leads to a de Sitter universe, an empty universe, or a turnaround solution that reaches a maximum size and then recollapses.

  14. Thermo-mechanical optimization of Fixed Mask 2 for APS front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Sheng, I.C.A.

    1992-07-27

    Fixed mask 2 (FM2) is one of the critical elements on the front end of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The FM2 uses an enhanced heat transfer tube developed at ANL. Due to large thermal loads on these components, inclined geometry is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. Even then, thermal loads are very critical. To address the thermal and thermo-mechanical issues, analytical studies have been applied to a simplified model of the FM2 tube. The maximum temperature and maximum effective stress have been parametrically studied. Results for maximum temperatures and stresses are obtained and compared with the available strength/fatigue data for the materials proposed for the fixed mask design.

  15. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  16. LEDA beam diagnostics instrumentation: Beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, D.; Day, L.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Kasemir, K.-U.; Martinez, D.; Power, J. F.; Shurter, R.; Stettler, M.

    2000-11-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7 MeV and current of 100 mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS320C40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  17. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    D. BARR; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system.

  18. Propagation of Polarization Modulated Beams Through a Turbulent Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-24

    EM energy absorption in dense concentrations of particles ( clouds , fog). Propagation through turbulent atmospheres with minimum jitter/absorption...and beam redirection. The media substituting for the atmosphere and ionosphere were: a water vapor chamber , heated air, and static and rotated...atomic resonance. A simple representation of an ion is as an electron cloud attached to a fixed ion. If the attachments are represented in the x, y and

  19. Tangent map analysis of the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Tepikian, S.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the tangent map of the beam-beam interaction and found no evidence of beam-beam instability for /epsilon/ = 0.04. Tracking study with tune modulation shows however large emittance growth due to the sum resonances. The emittance growth is due to the multiple crossing of the sum resonances. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Beam-beam tuneshift during the TEVATRON squeeze

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.

    1988-11-01

    We calculate the beam-beam tuneshift during the squeeze of the beam in the Tevatron from injection to mini-beta. We find that for the beam emittances typically used, there is little variation of the tuneshift, in either plane, during the squeeze. 7 figs., 2 tabs.