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Sample records for non-planar magnetohydrodynamic simulation

  1. Dynamical Evolution of a Coronal Streamer-Flux Rope System: 2. A Self-Consistent Non-Planar Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Guo, W. P.; Dryer, Murray

    1996-01-01

    The dynamical response of a helmet streamer to a flux rope escape from the sub-photosphere is examined in a physically self-consistent manner within the approximation of axisymmetric three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (i.e., so-called '2 1/2 D'). In contrast to the previous planar analyses of Paper 1 (Wu, Guo, and Wang), the present study shows, with the inclusion of out-of-plane components of magnetic and velocity fields, that the magnetic configuration represents a helical flux rope instead of a planar bubble as shown in Paper 1. Because of this more physically-realistic configuration, we are able to examine the dynamical evolution of the helical flux rope's interaction with the helmet streamer. This process leads to the formation of two parts of the solar mass ejection: (i) the expulsion of the helmet dome due to eruption of this flux rope, and (ii) the flux rope's eruption itself. When this two-part feature propagates out to the interplanetary space, it exhibits all the physical characteristics of observed interplanetary magnetic clouds. These numerical simulations also show that the dynamical behavior of the streamer-flux rope system has three distinct states: (i) quasi-equilibrium, (ii) non-equilibrium, and (iii) eruptive state depending on the energy level of the flux rope.

  2. Rupture Dynamics Simulation for Non-Planar fault by a Curved Grid Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, G.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We first implement the non-staggered finite difference method to solve the dynamic rupture problem, with split-node, for non-planar fault. Split-node method for dynamic simulation has been used widely, because of that it's more precise to represent the fault plane than other methods, for example, thick fault, stress glut and so on. The finite difference method is also a popular numeric method to solve kinematic and dynamic problem in seismology. However, previous works focus most of theirs eyes on the staggered-grid method, because of its simplicity and computational efficiency. However this method has its own disadvantage comparing to non-staggered finite difference method at some fact for example describing the boundary condition, especially the irregular boundary, or non-planar fault. Zhang and Chen (2006) proposed the MacCormack high order non-staggered finite difference method based on curved grids to precisely solve irregular boundary problem. Based upon on this non-staggered grid method, we make success of simulating the spontaneous rupture problem. The fault plane is a kind of boundary condition, which could be irregular of course. So it's convinced that we could simulate rupture process in the case of any kind of bending fault plane. We will prove this method is valid in the case of Cartesian coordinate first. In the case of bending fault, the curvilinear grids will be used.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  4. Lagrangian simulation of explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Seo, Min Su; Kim, Inho

    2003-06-01

    A series of time-dependent one-dimensional simulations has been carried out on the hydrodynamic behavior of argon and air plasmas in an explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic power generator. The thermodynamic properties of plasma gases are computed using equation-of-state data obtained from a detailed theoretical model. The plasma conductivities are given by a mixture rule, which comprises the fully and weakly ionized plasma approximations. The effects of the initial pressure and the magnetic field strength on the plasma behavior in the flow channel are examined over a moderate range of operating conditions, and then the computed results are compared with the experimental measurements, showing good agreement for the case of low magnetic Reynolds number.

  5. RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-06-20

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfvenic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the 'diamond-chain' structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  6. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfv enic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the "diamond-chain" structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  7. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-06-01

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfvénic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the "diamond-chain" structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  8. NIMROD resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of spheromak physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. B.; Cohen, B. I.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    The physics of spheromak plasmas is addressed by time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. Included in some detail are the formation of a spheromak driven electrostatically by a coaxial plasma gun with a flux-conserver geometry and power systems that accurately model the sustained spheromak physics experiment [R. D. Wood et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, 1582 (2005)]. The controlled decay of the spheromak plasma over several milliseconds is also modeled as the programmable current and voltage relax, resulting in simulations of entire experimental pulses. Reconnection phenomena and the effects of current profile evolution on the growth of symmetry-breaking toroidal modes are diagnosed; these in turn affect the quality of magnetic surfaces and the energy confinement. The sensitivity of the simulation results addresses variations in both physical and numerical parameters, including spatial resolution. There are significant points of agreement between the simulations and the observed experimental behavior, e.g., in the evolution of the magnetics and the sensitivity of the energy confinement to the presence of symmetry-breaking magnetic fluctuations.

  9. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Ogino, T.

    1989-04-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and a planetary magnetosphere enable us to calculate self-consistently the time-dependent three-dimensional configuration of the magnetosphere. To demonstrate the application of a global MHD model to the magnetosphere, the authors have calculated the dependence of the magnetospheric configuration and polar-cap structure on the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). First, they modeled the magnetosphere in the absence of an IMF and found a slowly evolving system in which steady convection leads to slow reconnection in the plasma sheet. When a uniform northward IMF was initially imposed throughout the system the plasma sheet thickened in a small region near the noon-midnight meridian and extended into the tail lobes. When viewed from the polar cap, this appears as a narrow finger of closed field lines extending into the polar cap. The plasma sheet thickening is caused by reconnection on the nightside magnetopause. This plasma sheet extension becomes less pronounced when the northward IMF enters the simulation box with the solar wind. For both cases the convection near midnight is toward the sun, and region-1-type field-aligned currents appear on both sides of the plasma sheet extension. For northward IMF the resulting magnetospheric configuration approached a quasi-steady state in which stable magnetospheric convection was maintained. The simulation results indicate that the presence of a northward B in the plasma sheet stabilizes the tail.

  10. Non-planar chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Sokolowski, Sara S.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2006-10-10

    A non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a high-surface area, low mass, three-dimensional, flow-through sorption support structure that can be coated or packed with a sorptive material. The sorptive material can collect and concentrate a chemical analyte from a fluid stream and rapidly release it as a very narrow temporal plug for improved separations in a microanalytical system. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator retains most of the thermal and fabrication benefits of a planar preconcentrator, but has improved ruggedness and uptake, while reducing sorptive coating concerns and extending the range of collectible analytes.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Martinez, Daniel; Matthaeus, William

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method, based on a discrete Boltzmann equation, is presented for solving the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The algorithm provides advantages similar to the cellular automaton method in that it is local and easily adapted to parallel computing environments. Because of much lower noise levels and less stringent requirements on lattice size, the method appears to be more competitive with traditional solution methods. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces both linear and nonlinear MHD phenomena.

  12. Principles of magnetohydrodynamic simulation in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, T.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the philosophical as well as physical principles that are essential to the establishment of MHD simulation studies for solar plasma research, assuming the capabilities of state-of-the-art computers and emphasizing the importance of 'local' MHD simulation. Solar-terrestrial plasma space is divided into several elementary regions where a macroscopic elementary energy conversion process could conceivably occur; the local MHD simulation is defined as self-contained in each of the regions. The importance of, and the difficulties associated with, the boundary condition are discussed in detail. The roles of diagnostics and of the finite difference method are noted.

  13. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EFFECTS AND EARLY FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2015-03-10

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  14. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1989-04-01

    The use of a global MHD simulation to study the magnetospheric configuration is demonstrated by reviewing some of the results obtained with the model of Ogino (1986). The steady-state configuration of the magnetosphere in the absence of an IMF is considered, and it is demonstrated that this configuration is changed when a northward or southward IMF is introduced. It is noted that the magnetosphere is very dynamic, and that, since global MHD simulations are intrinsically time-dependent, they offer the possibility of modeling the time sequence of events in the magnetosphere. Results are presented from a calculation in which a magnetospheric substrom is modeled.

  15. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1989-01-01

    The use of a global MHD simulation to study the magnetospheric configuration is demonstrated by reviewing some of the results obtained with the model of Ogino (1986). The steady-state configuration of the magnetosphere in the absence of an IMF is considered, and it is demonstrated that this configuration is changed when a northward or southward IMF is introduced. It is noted that the magnetosphere is very dynamic, and that, since global MHD simulations are intrinsically time-dependent, they offer the possibility of modeling the time sequence of events in the magnetosphere. Results are presented from a calculation in which a magnetospheric substrom is modeled.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hot jupiter upper atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Trammell, George B.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Arras, Phil E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2014-06-20

    Two-dimensional simulations of hot Jupiter upper atmospheres including the planet's magnetic field are presented. The goal is to explore magnetic effects on the layer of the atmosphere that is ionized and heated by stellar EUV radiation, and the imprint of these effects on the Lyα transmission spectrum. The simulations are axisymmetric, isothermal, and include both rotation and azimuth-averaged stellar tides. Mass density is converted to atomic hydrogen density through the assumption of ionization equilibrium. The three-zone structure—polar dead zone (DZ), mid-latitude wind zone (WZ), and equatorial DZ—found in previous analytic calculations is confirmed. For a magnetic field comparable to that of Jupiter, the equatorial DZ, which is confined by the magnetic field and corotates with the planet, contributes at least half of the transit signal. For even stronger fields, the gas escaping in the mid-latitude WZ is found to have a smaller contribution to the transit depth than the equatorial DZ. Transmission spectra computed from the simulations are compared to Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and Advanced Camera for Surveys data for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, and the range of model parameters consistent with the data is found. The central result of this paper is that the transit depth increases strongly with magnetic field strength when the hydrogen ionization layer is magnetically dominated, for dipole magnetic field B {sub 0} ≳ 10 G. Hence transit depth is sensitive to magnetic field strength, in addition to standard quantities such as the ratio of thermal to gravitational binding energies. Another effect of the magnetic field is that the planet loses angular momentum orders of magnitude faster than in the non-magnetic case, because the magnetic field greatly increases the lever arm for wind braking of the planet's rotation. Spin-down timescales for magnetized models of HD 209458b that agree with the observed transit depth can be as

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SIGMOID ERUPTION OF ACTIVE REGION 11283

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2013-07-10

    Current magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the initiation of solar eruptions are still commonly carried out with idealized magnetic field models, whereas the realistic coronal field prior to eruptions can possibly be reconstructed from the observable photospheric field. Using a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation prior to a sigmoid eruption in AR 11283 as the initial condition in an MHD model, we successfully simulate the realistic initiation process of the eruption event, as is confirmed by a remarkable resemblance to the SDO/AIA observations. Analysis of the pre-eruption field reveals that the envelope flux of the sigmoidal core contains a coronal null and furthermore the flux rope is prone to a torus instability. Observations suggest that reconnection at the null cuts overlying tethers and likely triggers the torus instability of the flux rope, which results in the eruption. This kind of simulation demonstrates the capability of modeling the realistic solar eruptions to provide the initiation process.

  18. Efficient magnetohydrodynamic simulations on graphics processing units with CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Hon-Cheng; Wong, Un-Hong; Feng, Xueshang; Tang, Zesheng

    2011-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on the ideal MHD equations have become a powerful tool for modeling phenomena in a wide range of applications including laboratory, astrophysical, and space plasmas. In general, high-resolution methods for solving the ideal MHD equations are computationally expensive and Beowulf clusters or even supercomputers are often used to run the codes that implemented these methods. With the advent of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide an alternative approach to parallel computing for scientific simulations. In this paper we present, to the best of the author's knowledge, the first implementation of MHD simulations entirely on GPUs with CUDA, named GPU-MHD, to accelerate the simulation process. GPU-MHD supports both single and double precision computations. A series of numerical tests have been performed to validate the correctness of our code. Accuracy evaluation by comparing single and double precision computation results is also given. Performance measurements of both single and double precision are conducted on both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295 (GT200 architecture) and GTX 480 (Fermi architecture) graphics cards. These measurements show that our GPU-based implementation achieves between one and two orders of magnitude of improvement depending on the graphics card used, the problem size, and the precision when comparing to the original serial CPU MHD implementation. In addition, we extend GPU-MHD to support the visualization of the simulation results and thus the whole MHD simulation and visualization process can be performed entirely on GPUs.

  19. COMPARISONS OF COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER SIMULATIONS TO RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Govoni, Federica; Murgia, Matteo; Norman, Michael L.; Cen Renyue; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: matteo@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: lferetti@ira.inaf.it

    2012-11-01

    Radio observations of galaxy clusters show that there are {mu}G magnetic fields permeating the intracluster medium (ICM), but it is hard to accurately constrain the strength and structure of the magnetic fields without the help of advanced computer simulations. We present qualitative comparisons of synthetic Very Large Array observations of simulated galaxy clusters to radio observations of Faraday rotation measure (RM) and radio halos. The cluster formation is modeled using adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the assumption that the initial magnetic fields are injected into the ICM by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at high redshift. In addition to simulated clusters in Xu et al., we present a new simulation with magnetic field injections from multiple AGNs. We find that the cluster with multiple injection sources is magnetized to a similar level as in previous simulations with a single AGN. The RM profiles from simulated clusters, both |RM| and the dispersion of RM ({sigma}{sub RM}), are consistent at a first order with the radial distribution from observations. The correlations between the {sigma}{sub RM} and X-ray surface brightness from simulations are in a broad agreement with the observations, although there is an indication that the simulated clusters could be slightly overdense and less magnetized with respect to those in the observed sample. In addition, the simulated radio halos agree with the observed correlations between the radio power versus the cluster X-ray luminosity and between the radio power versus the radio halo size. These studies show that the cluster-wide magnetic fields that originate from AGNs and are then amplified by the ICM turbulence match observations of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters.

  20. Simulations and Transport Models for Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chung-Sang; Dennis, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a series of three-dimensional simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence based on reduced MHD equations. Alfven waves are launched from both ends of a long tube along the background uniform magnetic field so that turbulence develops due to collision between counter propagating Alfven waves in the interior region. Waves are launched randomly with specified correlation time Tc such that the length of the tube, L, is greater than (but of the same order of) VA *Tc such that turbulence can fill most of the tube. While waves at both ends are launched with equal power, turbulence generated is imbalanced in general, with normalized cross-helicity gets close to -1 at one end and 1 at the other end. This simulation setup allows easier comparison of turbulence properties with one-dimensional turbulence transport models, which have been applied rather successfully in modeling solar wind turbulence. However, direct comparison of such models with full simulations of solar wind turbulence is difficult due to much higher level of complexity involved. We will present our latest simulations at different resolutions with decreasing dissipation (resistivity and viscosity) levels and compare with model outputs from turbulence transport models. This work is supported by a NASA Grant NNX15AU61G.

  1. Observations and Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    2006-12-01

    Alfvénic fluctuations are a ubiquitous component of the solar wind. Evidence from many spacecraft indicates that the fluctuations are convected out of the solar corona with relatively flat power spectra and constitute a source of free energy for a turbulent cascade of magnetic and kinetic energy to high wave numbers. Observations and simulations support the conclusion that the cascade evolves most rapidly in the vicinity of velocity shears and current sheets. Numerical solutions of the magnetohydrodynamic equations have elucidated the role of expansion on the evolution of the turbulence. Such studies are clarifying not only how a turbulent cascade develops, but also the nature of the symmetries of the turbulence. Of particular interest is the origin of the two-component correlation function of magnetic fluctuations that was deduced from ISEE-3 data. A central issue to be resolved is whether the correlation function indicates the existence of a quasi-two- dimensional component of the turbulence, or reflects another origin, such as pressure-balanced structures or small velocity shears. In our efforts to simulate solar wind turbulence we have included a tilted rotating current heliospheric sheet as well as variety of waves (e.g., Alfvénic, quasi-two-dimensional, pressure balance structures) and microstreams. These simulations have replicated many of the observations, but challenges remain.

  2. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Jet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation ofjet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity approx.0.3c) is created, as shown by previous two-dimensional axi- symmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The three-dimensional simulation ran over 100 light crossing time units (T(sub s) = r(sub s)/c, where r(sub s = 2GM/c(sup 2), which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted owing in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting of the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3r(sub s). At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface ofthe thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outward with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward-moving torsional Alfven waves. This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk because of the iack of streaming materiai from an accompanying star.

  3. Theory and Simulation of Real and Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2004-01-01

    Incompressible, homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence consists of fluctuating vorticity and magnetic fields, which are represented in terms of their Fourier coefficients. Here, a set of five Fourier spectral transform method numerical simulations of two-dimensional (2-D) MHD turbulence on a 512(sup 2) grid is described. Each simulation is a numerically realized dynamical system consisting of Fourier modes associated with wave vectors k, with integer components, such that k = |k| less than or equal to k(sub max). The simulation set consists of one ideal (non-dissipative) case and four real (dissipative) cases. All five runs had equivalent initial conditions. The dimensions of the dynamical systems associated with these cases are the numbers of independent real and imaginary parts of the Fourier modes. The ideal simulation has a dimension of 366104, while each real simulation has a dimension of 411712. The real runs vary in magnetic Prandtl number P(sub M), with P(sub M) is a member of {0.1, 0.25, 1, 4}. In the results presented here, all runs have been taken to a simulation time of t = 25. Although ideal and real Fourier spectra are quite different at high k, they are similar at low values of k. Their low k behavior indicates the existence of broken symmetry and coherent structure in real MHD turbulence, similar to what exists in ideal MHD turbulence. The value of PM strongly affects the ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy and energy dissipation (which is mostly ohmic). The relevance of these results to 3-D Navier-Stokes and MHD turbulence is discussed.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of global accretion disks with vertical magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-04-01

    We report results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of global accretion disks threaded with weak vertical magnetic fields. We perform the simulations in the spherical coordinates with different temperature profiles and accordingly different rotation profiles. In the cases with a spatially constant temperature, because the rotation frequency is vertically constant in the equilibrium condition, general properties of the turbulence excited by magnetorotational instability are quantitatively similar to those obtained in local shearing box simulations. On the other hand, in the cases with a radially variable temperature profile, the vertical differential rotation, which is inevitable in the equilibrium condition, winds up the magnetic field lines in addition to the usual radial differential rotation. As a result, the coherent wound magnetic fields contribute to the Maxwell stress in the surface regions. We obtain nondimensional density and velocity fluctuations ∼0.1-0.2 at the midplane. The azimuthal power spectra of the magnetic fields show shallower slopes, ∼m {sup 0} – m {sup –1}, than those of velocity and density. The Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence drives intermittent and structured disk winds as well as sound-like waves toward the midplane. The mass accretion mainly occurs near the surfaces, and the gas near the midplane slowly moves outward in the time domain of the present simulations. The vertical magnetic fields are also dragged inward in the surface regions, while they stochastically move outward and inward around the midplane. We also discuss an observational implication of induced spiral structure in the simulated turbulent disks.

  5. SOLAR WIND COLLISIONAL AGE FROM A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chhiber, R; Usmanov, AV; Matthaeus, WH; Goldstein, ML

    2016-04-10

    Simple estimates of the number of Coulomb collisions experienced by the interplanetary plasma to the point of observation, i.e., the “collisional age”, can be usefully employed in the study of non-thermal features of the solar wind. Usually these estimates are based on local plasma properties at the point of observation. Here we improve the method of estimation of the collisional age by employing solutions obtained from global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. This enables evaluation of the complete analytical expression for the collisional age without using approximations. The improved estimation of the collisional timescale is compared with turbulence and expansion timescales to assess the relative importance of collisions. The collisional age computed using the approximate formula employed in previous work is compared with the improved simulation-based calculations to examine the validity of the simplified formula. We also develop an analytical expression for the evaluation of the collisional age and we find good agreement between the numerical and analytical results. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications for an improved estimation of collisionality along spacecraft trajectories, including Solar Probe Plus.

  6. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Showman, A. P. E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-02-10

    We present the first three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the atmosphere of HD 209458b which self-consistently include reduction of winds due to the Lorentz force and Ohmic heating. We find overall wind structures similar to that seen in previous models of hot Jupiter atmospheres, with strong equatorial jets and meridional flows poleward near the day side and equatorward near the night side. Inclusion of magnetic fields slows those winds and leads to Ohmic dissipation. We find wind slowing ranging from 10%-40% for reasonable field strengths. We find Ohmic dissipation rates ∼10{sup 17} W at 100 bar, orders of magnitude too small to explain the inflated radius of this planet. Faster wind speeds, not achievable in these anelastic calculations, may be able to increase this value somewhat, but likely will not be able to close the gap necessary to explain the inflated radius. We demonstrate that the discrepancy between the simulations presented here and previous models is due to inadequate treatment of magnetic field geometry and evolution. Induced poloidal fields become much larger than those imposed, highlighting the need for a self-consistent MHD treatment of these hot atmospheres.

  7. A new framework for magnetohydrodynamic simulations with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro; Amano, Takanobu

    2016-12-01

    We describe a new theoretical and numerical framework for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with an incorporated anisotropic pressure tensor, which can play an important role in collisionless plasmas. The classical approach to handle the anisotropy is based on application of the double adiabatic approximation, assuming that the pressure tensor is well described only by those components that are oriented parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This gyrotropic assumption, however, fails around magnetically neutral regions, where the cyclotron period may become comparable to or even longer than the system's dynamical time, which causes a singularity in the mathematical expression. In this paper, we demonstrate that this singularity can be completely removed by direct use of the 2nd-moment of the Vlasov equation, combined with an ingenious gyrotropization model. Numerical tests are used to verify that our model properly reduces to the standard MHD results or the double adiabatic formulation in an asymptotic manner under the limit of fast isotropization and fast gyrotropization, respectively.

  8. TWO-FLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the large-scale evolution of a relativistic magnetic reconnection in an electron-positron pair plasma by a relativistic two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We introduce an interspecies friction force as an effective resistivity to dissipate magnetic fields. We demonstrate that magnetic reconnection successfully occurs in our two-fluid system, and that it involves Petschek-type bifurcated current layers in a later stage. We further observe a quasi-steady evolution thanks to an open boundary condition, and find that the Petschek-type structure is stable over the long time period. Simulation results and theoretical analyses exhibit that the Petschek outflow channel becomes narrower when the reconnection inflow contains more magnetic energy, as previously claimed. Meanwhile, we find that the reconnection rate goes up to {approx}1 in extreme cases, which is faster than previously thought. The role of the resistivity, implications for reconnection models in the magnetically dominated limit, and relevance to kinetic reconnection works are discussed.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Solid-Deuterium - Z-Pinch Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehey, Peter Trogdon

    Solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments are numerically simulated using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, which includes many important experimental details, such as "cold-start" initial conditions, thermal conduction, radiative energy loss, actual discharge current vs. time, and grids of sufficient size and resolution to allow realistic development of the plasma. The alternating -direction-implicit numerical technique used meets the substantial demands presented by such a computational task. Simulations of fiber-initiated experiments show that when the fiber becomes fully ionized (at a time depending on current ramp and fiber thickness), rapidly developing m = 0 instabilities, which originated in the coronal plasma generated from the ablating fiber, drive intense non-uniform heating and rapid expansion of the plasma column. The possibility that inclusion of additional physical effects would improve stability is explored. Finite-Larmor-radius-ordered Hall and diamagnetic pressure terms in the magnetic field evolution equation, corresponding energy equation terms, and separate ion and electron energy equations are included; these do not change the basic results. Model diagnostics, such as shadowgrams and interferograms, generated from simulation results, are in good agreement with experiment. Two alternative experimental approaches are explored: high-current magnetic implosion of hollow cylindrical deuterium shells, and "plasma -on wire" (POW) implosion of low-density plasma onto a central deuterium fiber. By minimizing instability problems, these techniques may allow attainment of higher temperatures and densities than possible with bare fiber-initiated Z -pinches. Conditions for significant D-D or D-T fusion neutron production may be realizable with these implosion -based approaches.

  10. Time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkin, V. G.; Lyon, J. G.; Lario, D.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study exploring heliospheric consequences of time-dependent changes at the Sun. We selected a 2 month period in the beginning of year 2008 that was characterized by very low solar activity. The heliosphere in the equatorial region was dominated by two coronal holes whose changing structure created temporal variations distorting the classical steady state picture of the heliosphere. We used the Air Force Data Assimilate Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) model to obtain daily updated photospheric magnetograms and drive the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model of the corona. This leads to a formulation of a time-dependent boundary condition for our three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, LFM-helio, which is the heliospheric adaptation of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry MHD simulation code. The time-dependent coronal conditions were propagated throughout the inner heliosphere, and the simulation results were compared with the spacecraft located near 1 astronomical unit (AU) heliocentric distance: Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A and STEREO-B), and the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft that was in cruise phase measuring the heliospheric magnetic field between 0.35 and 0.6 AU. In addition, during the selected interval MESSENGER and ACE aligned radially allowing minimization of the effects of temporal variation at the Sun versus radial evolution of structures. Our simulations show that time-dependent simulationsreproduce the gross-scale structure of the heliosphere with higher fidelity, while on smaller spatial and faster time scales (e.g., 1 day) they provide important insights for interpretation of the data. The simulations suggest that moving boundaries of slow-fast wind transitions at 0.1 AU may result in the formation of inverted magnetic fields near pseudostreamers which is an intrinsically time-dependent process

  11. Radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the photoionization of magnetized globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henney, William J.; Arthur, S. Jane; de Colle, Fabio; Mellema, Garrelt

    2009-09-01

    We present the first three-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the photoionization of a dense, magnetized molecular globule by an external source of ultraviolet radiation. We find that, for the case of a strong ionizing field, significant deviations from the non-magnetic evolution are seen when the initial magnetic field threading the globule has an associated magnetic pressure that is greater than 100 times the gas pressure. In such a strong-field case, the photoevaporating globule will adopt a flattened or `curled up' shape, depending on the initial field orientation, and magnetic confinement of the ionized photoevaporation flow can lead to recombination and subsequent fragmentation during advanced stages of the globule evolution. We find suggestive evidence that such magnetic effects may be important in the formation of bright, bar-like emission features in HII regions. We include simple but realistic fits to heating and cooling rates in the neutral and molecular gas in the vicinity of a high-mass star cluster, and show that the frequently used isothermal approximation can lead to an overestimate of the importance of gravitational instability in the radiatively imploded globule. For globules within 2 pc of a high-mass star cluster, we find that heating by stellar X-rays prevents the molecular gas from cooling below 50 K. Based in part on numerical simulations carried out using the Kan Balam supercomputer, operated by the Departamento de Supercómputo, Dirección General de Servicios de Cómputo Académico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. E-mail: w.henney@astrosmo.unam.mx

  12. Spin Vortex Resonance in Non-planar Ferromagnetic Dots

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junjia; Lapa, Pavel; Jain, Shikha; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Posada, Christian M.; Yefremenko, Volodymyr G.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Novosad, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    In planar structures, the vortex resonance frequency changes little as a function of an in-plane magnetic field as long as the vortex state persists. Altering the topography of the element leads to a vastly different dynamic response that arises due to the local vortex core confinement effect. In this work, we studied the magnetic excitations in non-planar ferromagnetic dots using a broadband microwave spectroscopy technique. Two distinct regimes of vortex gyration were detected depending on the vortex core position. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:27143405

  13. Dynamics of rotationally fissioned asteroids: non-planar case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrin, L. A. G.; Scheeres, D. J.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-10-01

    The rotational fission of asteroids has been studied previously with simplified models restricted to planar motion. However, the observed physical configuration of contact binaries leads one to conclude that most of them are not in a planar configuration and hence would not be restricted to planar motion once they undergo rotational fission. This motivated a study of the evolution of initially non-planar binaries created by fission. Using a two-ellipsoid model, we performed simulations taking only gravitational interactions between components into account. We simulate 91 different initial inclinations of the equator of the secondary body for 19 different mass ratios. After disruption, the binary system dynamics are chaotic, as predicted from theory. Starting the system in a non-planar configuration leads to a larger energy and enhanced coupling between the rotation state of the smaller fissioned body and the evolving orbital system, and enables re-impact to occur. This leads to differences with previous planar studies, with collisions and secondary spin fission occurring for all mass ratios with inclinations θ0 ≥ 40o, and mimics a Lidov-Kozai mechanism. Out of 1729 studied cases, we found that ˜14 per cent result in secondary fission, ˜25 per cent result in collisions and ˜6 per cent have lifetimes longer than 200 yr. In Jacobson & Scheeres stable binaries only formed in cases with mass ratios q < 0.20. Our results indicate that it should be possible to obtain a stable binary with the same mechanisms for cases with mass ratios larger than this limit, but that the system should start in a non-planar configuration.

  14. Two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Stone, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x 1-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an "L" shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x 1-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

  15. Non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Patrick R.; Wheeler, David R.

    2007-09-25

    A non-planar microfabricated gas chromatography column comprises a planar substrate having a plurality of through holes, a top lid and a bottom lid bonded to opposite surfaces of the planar substrate, and inlet and outlet ports for injection of a sample gas and elution of separated analytes. A plurality of such planar substrates can be aligned and stacked to provide a longer column length having a small footprint. Furthermore, two or more separate channels can enable multi-channel or multi-dimensional gas chromatography. The through holes preferably have a circular cross section and can be coated with a stationary phase material or packed with a porous packing material. Importantly, uniform stationary phase coatings can be obtained and band broadening can be minimized with the circular channels. A heating or cooling element can be disposed on at least one of the lids to enable temperature programming of the column.

  16. Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves Driven by Photospheric Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumford, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    This thesis investigates the properties of various modelled photospheric motions as generation mechanisms for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the low solar atmosphere. The solar atmosphere is heated to million-degree temperatures, yet there is no fully understood heating mechanism which can provide the ≈ 300 W/m^2) required to keep the quiet corona at its observed temperatures. MHD waves are one mechanism by which this energy could be provided to the upper solar atmosphere, however, these waves need to be excited. The excitation of these waves, in or below the photosphere is a complex interaction between the plasma and the magnetic field embedded within it. This thesis studies a model of a small-scale magnetic flux tube based upon a magnetic bright point (MBP). These features are very common in the photosphere and have been observed to be affected by the plasma motions. The modelled flux tube has a foot point magnetic field strength of 120 mT and a FWHM of 90 km, and is embedded in a realistic, stratified solar atmosphere based upon the VALIIIc model. To better understand the excitation of MHD waves in this type of magnetic structures, a selection of velocity profiles are implemented to excite waves. Initially a study of five different driving profiles was performed. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers which mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere, along with vertical and horizontal drivers to mimic different motions caused by convection in the photosphere. The results are then analysed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated, to enable

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection in Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Syuniti

    2000-03-01

    In this thesis, we perform two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the magnetic reconnection in interstellar medium. Part I is introduction. The motivation of the study is to investigate the origin of hot gas in interstellar medium. A scenario for generating X-ray gas in Galaxy is proposed, and examined by performing 2D MHD simulations with simple assumptions (Part II). The magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova (Part III) and Parker instability (Part IV) are studied in detail, by performing 2D MHD simulations. Furthermore, the magnetic reconnection is also studied by performing three-dimensional (3D) MHD numerical simulation in (Part V). % Finally, we discuss and summarize the thesis (Parts VI and VII). Part I First, we review observation of Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) and its problems. Second, we describe observation of interstellar magnetic field briefly. Third, we review magnetic reconnection, theoretical models, numerical simulations, observations and experiments, and tearing instability. Forth, Parker instability (undular mode of magnetobuoyancy instability) is mentioned. Finally, we show the purpose of this thesis. Part II We present a scenario for the origin of the hot plasma in Galaxy as a model of strong X-ray emission [sim 3-10 keV; LX(2-10 keV) sim 1038 erg s-1], called GRXE, which has been observed near to the galactic plane. GRXE is thermal emission from a hot component (sim 7 keV) and a cool component (sim 0.8 keV). Observations suggest that the hot component is diffuse, and that it is not escaping away freely. Both what heats the hot component and what confines it in Galactic ridge still remain puzzling, while the cool component is believed to be created by supernovae. We propose a new scenario: the hot component is heated by magnetic reconnection, and confined by a helical magnetic field produced by magnetic reconnection. We solved 2D MHD equations numerically to study how magnetic

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Power Generation in the Laboratory Simulated Martian Entry Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Popovic, S.; Drake, J.; Moses, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) conversion of the energy released during the planetary entry phase of an interplanetary vehicle trajectory. The effect of MHD conversion is multi-fold. It reduces and redirects heat transferred to the vehicle, and regenerates the dissipated energy in reusable and transportable form. A vehicle on an interplanetary mission carries about 10,000 kWh of kinetic energy per ton of its mass. This energy is dissipated into heat during the planetary atmospheric entry phase. For instance, the kinetic energy of Mars Pathfinder was about 4220 kWh. Based on the loss in velocity, Mars Pathfinder lost about 92.5% of that energy during the plasma-sustaining entry phase that is approximately 3900 kWh. An ideal MHD generator, distributed over the probe surface of Mars Pathfinder could convert more than 2000 kWh of this energy loss into electrical energy, which correspond to more than 50% of the kinetic energy loss. That means that the heat transferred to the probe surface can be reduced by at least 50% if the converted energy is adequately stored, or re-radiated, or directly used. Therefore, MHD conversion could act not only as the power generating, but also as the cooling process. In this paper we describe results of preliminary experiments with light and microwave emitters powered by model magnetohydrodynamic generators and discuss method for direct use of converted energy.

  19. Fracturing from highly deviated and horizontal wells: Numerical analysis of non-planar fracture propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Fracturing from horizontal and highly deviated wells can often result in complex, non-planar fracture geometry. A two-dimensional model was developed to analyze the effects of non-planar fracture propagation for different in situ boundary conditions and hydraulic fracturing parameters. Numerical simulations show that curving fracture geometry reduces created fracture length compared to a planar fracture and causes a fracture width restriction at the wellbore. Reduction in fracture length can reduce expected well stimulation effects and jeopardize well economics. Near-wellbore width restrictions increase fracture treating pressure and may cause wellbore screen-out during the proppant stages of a fracturing treatment. The negative impact of non-planar geometry can be mitigated with short perforated intervals, high viscosity fracturing fluids, proper wellbore alignment and pre-pad proppant slugs for near-wellbore erosion.

  20. Cell projection of meshes with non-planar faces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N; Williams, P; Silva, C

    2000-11-27

    Volume rendering converts a scalar function on a 3D volume into varying colors and opacities, and creates an image by integrating the color and opacity effects along viewing rays through each pixel [1]. For data specified on a regular grid, the ray tracing is straightforward [2,3,4,5], and similar effects can be obtained with 3D textures [6]. For curvilinear or irregular grids, these methods are only applicable after the data has been resampled. An alternative, which works directly on these more general grids, is cell projection [7,8,9]. The cells composited onto the image in back to front sorted order. The projections of the edges of a single cell divide the image plane into polygons, which can be scan converted and composited by standard graphics hardware. In references [9,10,11], we assumed that the cells were polyhedra with planar faces. A curvilinear grid maps a rectangular grid onto a curved volume, for example to fit next to an airplane wing or ship hull, and quadrilateral faces may map to non-planar surfaces. Irregular grids are fitted to complex geometries, for example mechanical parts, and even initially flat faces may become non-planar as the grid elements deform, for example, in a car crash simulation. Non-planar faces cause problems in the sorting and compositing when a viewing ray crosses the same face twice. We call such a face a ''problem face''. For example, the ray may leave cell A through face F, enter cell B , and then enter cell A again through the same face F. If a viewing ray intersects a cell like A in two disjoint segments, we call the cell a ''problem cell''. This makes it impossible to sort cells A and B in back-to-front compositing order. Our solution is to divide problem cells into tetrahedra, which have planar faces. A single hexahedron can be projected and composited more quickly than the five or six tetrahedra into which it is subdivided, so we subdivide only the problem cells. In the example above, cell B might not turn out to be a

  1. SPECTRAL SCALING LAWS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS AND IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Carlos Perez, Jean; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Podesta, John J.

    2011-11-15

    The question is addressed as to what extent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics can describe random magnetic and velocity fluctuations measured in the solar wind. It is demonstrated that distributions of spectral indices for the velocity, magnetic field, and total energy obtained from high-resolution numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to solar wind observations at 1 AU. Both simulations and observations show that in the inertial range the magnetic field spectrum E{sub b} is steeper than the velocity spectrum E{sub v} with E{sub b} {approx}> E{sub v} and that the magnitude of the residual energy E{sub R} = E{sub v} - E{sub b} decreases nearly following a k{sup -2}{sub perpendicular} scaling.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the ejection of a magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CME's) are one of the most violent phenomena found on the Sun. One model to explain their occurrence is the flux rope ejection model. In this model, magnetic flux ropes form slowly over time periods of days to weeks. They then lose equilibrium and are ejected from the solar corona over a few hours. The contrasting time scales of formation and ejection pose a serious problem for numerical simulations. Aims: We simulate the whole life span of a flux rope from slow formation to rapid ejection and investigate whether magnetic flux ropes formed from a continuous magnetic field distribution, during a quasi-static evolution, can erupt to produce a CME. Methods: To model the full life span of magnetic flux ropes we couple two models. The global non-linear force-free field (GNLFFF) evolution model is used to follow the quasi-static formation of a flux rope. The MHD code ARMVAC is used to simulate the production of a CME through the loss of equilibrium and ejection of this flux rope. Results: We show that the two distinct models may be successfully coupled and that the flux rope is ejected out of our simulation box, where the outer boundary is placed at 2.5 R⊙. The plasma expelled during the flux rope ejection travels outward at a speed of 100 km s-1, which is consistent with the observed speed of CMEs in the low corona. Conclusions: Our work shows that flux ropes formed in the GNLFFF can lead to the ejection of a mass loaded magnetic flux rope in full MHD simulations. Coupling the two distinct models opens up a new avenue of research to investigate phenomena where different phases of their evolution occur on drastically different time scales. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Slapper Initiation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J S; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    Although useful information can be gleaned from 2D and even 1D simulations of slapper type initiation systems, these systems are inherently three-dimensional and therefore require full 3D representation to model all relevant details. Further, such representation provides additional insight into optimizing the design of such devices from a first-principles perspective and can thereby reduce experimental costs. We discuss in this paper several ongoing efforts in modeling these systems, our pursuit of validation, and extension of these methods to other systems. Our results show the substantial dependence upon highly accurate global equations of state and resistivity models in these analyses.

  4. Large Scale Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kai; Staff, J. E.; Niebergal, B. P.; Pudritz, R. E.; Ouyed, R.

    2007-05-01

    High resolution spectra of protostellar jets obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the past few years, especially those near the jet base, have made it possible for a direct comparison with jet simulation results. Using Zeus-MP code, we extend our three-dimensional time-dependent calculations of such jets launched from the surface of Keplerian accretion disks to physical scales that are probed by the HST observations. We produce velocity channel maps and other diagnostics of our jet simulations that can be directly compared with the observations. In particular, the observations of jet rotation and velocity structure on these larger scales (50 AU) can be used to constrain the physics of the disk wind at its source, including information about the magnetic field configuration on the disk as well as the mass loading of the jet by the underlying accretion disk. Our approach will ultimately allow the observations to put strong constraints on the nature of the central engine. This work is supported by a grant from NSERC. K.C. acknowledges support from a CITA National Fellowship.

  5. THE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE OF LIQUID OXYGEN: EXPERIMENTATION AND SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, J. C.; Ban, H.; Wassom, S.; Jensen, S.

    2010-04-09

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been conducted to establish the basic understanding and predictive capability for the dynamics of a liquid oxygen (LOX) slug subjected to magnetic fields within a solenoid. The electrically-pulsed solenoids around a 1.9 mm ID quartz tube were capable of producing up to 1.1 T when immersed in liquid nitrogen. The slug dynamics were measured by pressure changes in a closed volume on both sides of the slug. A theoretical model was developed which balances the magnetic, viscous, and pressure forces into a single equation of motion. The model was applied to a one-dimensional discretized algorithm that solved the coupled multiphysics problem of the Navier-Stokes and Maxwell's equations. The simulation and experimental results established LOX as a good candidate in a magnetic fluid system without moving parts for cryogenic applications.

  6. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the jet in M 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościbrodzka, Monika; Falcke, Heino; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2016-02-01

    Context. The connection between black hole, accretion disk, and radio jet can be constrained best by fitting models to observations of nearby low-luminosity galactic nuclei, in particular the well-studied sources Sgr A* and M 87. There has been considerable progress in modeling the central engine of active galactic nuclei by an accreting supermassive black hole coupled to a relativistic plasma jet. However, can a single model be applied to a range of black hole masses and accretion rates? Aims: Here we want to compare the latest three-dimensional numerical model, originally developed for Sgr A* in the center of the Milky Way, to radio observations of the much more powerful and more massive black hole in M 87. Methods: We postprocess three-dimensional GRMHD models of a jet-producing radiatively inefficient accretion flow around a spinning black hole using relativistic radiative transfer and ray-tracing to produce model spectra and images. As a key new ingredient in these models, we allow the proton-electron coupling in these simulations depend on the magnetic properties of the plasma. Results: We find that the radio emission in M 87 is described well by a combination of a two-temperature accretion flow and a hot single-temperature jet. Most of the radio emission in our simulations comes from the jet sheath. The model fits the basic observed characteristics of the M 87 radio core: it is "edge-brightened", starts subluminally, has a flat spectrum, and increases in size with wavelength. The best fit model has a mass-accretion rate of Ṁ ~ 9 × 10-3M⊙ yr-1 and a total jet power of Pj ~ 1043 erg s-1. Emission at λ = 1.3 mm is produced by the counter-jet close to the event horizon. Its characteristic crescent shape surrounding the black hole shadow could be resolved by future millimeter-wave VLBI experiments. Conclusions: The model was successfully derived from one for the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way by appropriately scaling mass and

  7. Tokamak magneto-hydrodynamics and reference magnetic coordinates for simulations of plasma disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Li, Xujing

    2015-06-15

    This paper formulates the Tokamak Magneto-Hydrodynamics (TMHD), initially outlined by X. Li and L. E. Zakharov [Plasma Science and Technology 17(2), 97–104 (2015)] for proper simulations of macroscopic plasma dynamics. The simplest set of magneto-hydrodynamics equations, sufficient for disruption modeling and extendable to more refined physics, is explained in detail. First, the TMHD introduces to 3-D simulations the Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC), which are aligned with the magnetic field in the best possible way. The numerical implementation of RMC is adaptive grids. Being consistent with the high anisotropy of the tokamak plasma, RMC allow simulations at realistic, very high plasma electric conductivity. Second, the TMHD splits the equation of motion into an equilibrium equation and the plasma advancing equation. This resolves the 4 decade old problem of Courant limitations of the time step in existing, plasma inertia driven numerical codes. The splitting allows disruption simulations on a relatively slow time scale in comparison with the fast time of ideal MHD instabilities. A new, efficient numerical scheme is proposed for TMHD.

  8. Hall effects and sub-grid-scale modeling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hideaki; Araki, Keisuke; Hamba, Fujihiro

    2016-07-01

    Effects of the Hall term on short-wave components of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and sub-grid-scale modeling of the effects are studied. Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with and without the Hall term are carried out. The Hall term excites short-wave components in the magnetic field, demanding a high numerical resolution to resolve the scales smaller than the ion skin depth. A k 7 / 3-like scaling-law in the magnetic energy spectrum associated with the excitation of the short-wave components is clearly shown by the use of both an isotropic spectrum and a one-dimensional spectrum. It is also shown that the introduction of the Hall term can cause a structural transition in the vorticity field from tubes to sheets. In order to overcome a strong demand on high-resolution in space and time and to enable quicker computations, large eddy simulations with a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model are carried out. It is shown that our large eddy simulations successfully reproduce not only the energy spectrum but also tubular vortex structures, reducing the computational cost considerably.

  9. Constrained Quantum Mechanics: Chaos in Non-Planar Billiards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salazar, R.; Tellez, G.

    2012-01-01

    We illustrate some of the techniques to identify chaos signatures at the quantum level using as guiding examples some systems where a particle is constrained to move on a radial symmetric, but non-planar, surface. In particular, two systems are studied: the case of a cone with an arbitrary contour or "dunce hat billiard" and the rectangular…

  10. Constrained quantum mechanics: chaos in non-planar billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, R.; Téllez, G.

    2012-07-01

    We illustrate some of the techniques to identify chaos signatures at the quantum level using as guiding examples some systems where a particle is constrained to move on a radial symmetric, but non-planar, surface. In particular, two systems are studied: the case of a cone with an arbitrary contour or dunce hat billiard and the rectangular billiard with an inner Gaussian surface.

  11. Spectral-element adaptive refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the island coalescence instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2006-10-01

    A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate the problem of island coalescence instability (ICI) in 2D. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsasser formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described in [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys., 215, 59-80 (2006)], allowing both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. ICI is a MHD process that can produce strong current sheets and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [cf., Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Thus, it is desirable to use adaptive refinement grids to increase resolution, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. Results are compared with simulations using finite difference method with the same refinement grid, as well as pesudo-spectral simulations using uniform grid.

  12. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-01

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  13. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-15

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the collapsar model for early and late evolution of gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Proga, Daniel

    2007-05-15

    I present results from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of a gaseous envelope collapsing onto a black hole (BH). These results support the notion that the collapsar model is one of the most promising scenarios to explain the huge release of energy in a matter of seconds associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Additionally, the MHD simulations show that at late times, when the mass supply rate is expected to decrease, the region in the vicinity of the BH can play an important role in determining the rate of accretion, its time behaviour and ultimately the energy output. In particular, the magnetic flux accumulated around the BH can repeatedly stop and then restart the energy release. As proposed by Proga & Zhang, the episode or episodes of reoccurrence of accretion processes can correspond to X-ray flares discovered recently in a number of GRBs.

  15. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetosheath and magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond I.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1992-01-01

    We have used a new high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model to investigate the configuration of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. For northward IMF the magnetospheric configuration is dominated by magnetic reconnection at the tail lobe magnetopause tailward of the polar cusp. This results in a local thickening of the plasma sheet equatorward of the region of reconnection and the establishment of a convection system with two cells in each lobe. In the magnetosheath the plasma density and pressure decrease near the subsolar magnetopause, forming a depletion region. Along the flanks of the magnetosphere the magnetosheath flow is accelerated to values larger than the solar wind velocity. The magnetopause shape from the simulations is consistent with the empirically determined shape.

  16. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Tilted Black Hole Accretion Flows and Their Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J.; Noble, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    We perform global General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) simulations of non-radiative, magnetized disks that are initially tilted with respect to the black hole's spin axis. We run the simulations with different size and tilt angle of the tori for 2 different resolutions. We also perform radiative transfer using Monte Carlo based code that includes synchrotron emission, absorption and Compton scattering to obtain spectral energy distribution and light curves. Similar work was done by Fragile et al. (2007) and Dexter & Fragile (2012) to model the super massive black hole SgrA* with tilted accretion disks. We compare our results of fully conservative hydrodynamic code and spectra that include X-ray, with their results.

  17. Studies of Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei with Monte Carlo and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, Guy Louis

    Results from several studies are presented which detail explorations of the physical and spectral properties of low luminosity active galactic nuclei. An initial Sagittarius A* general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation and Monte Carlo radiation transport model suggests accretion rate changes as the dominant flaring method. A similar study on M87 introduces new methods to the Monte Carlo model for increased consistency in highly energetic sources. Again, accretion rate variation seems most appropriate to explain spectral transients. To more closely resolve the methods of particle energization in active galactic nuclei accretion disks, a series of localized shearing box simulations explores the effect of numerical resolution on the development of current sheets. A particular focus on numerically describing converged current sheet formation will provide new methods for consideration of turbulence in accretion disks.

  18. Depletion of nonlinearity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Insights from analysis and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, J. D.; Gupta, A.; Krstulovic, G.; Pandit, R.; Politano, H.; Ponty, Y.; Pouquet, A.; Sahoo, G.; Stawarz, J.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown how suitably scaled, order-m moments, Dm±, of the Elsässer vorticity fields in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can be used to identify three possible regimes for solutions of the MHD equations with magnetic Prandtl number PM=1 . These vorticity fields are defined by ω±=curlz±=ω ±j , where z± are Elsässer variables, and where ω and j are, respectively, the fluid vorticity and current density. This study follows recent developments in the study of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes fluid turbulence [Gibbon et al., Nonlinearity 27, 2605 (2014), 10.1088/0951-7715/27/10/2605]. Our mathematical results are then compared with those from a variety of direct numerical simulations, which demonstrate that all solutions that have been investigated remain in only one of these regimes which has depleted nonlinearity. The exponents q± that characterize the inertial range power-law dependencies of the z± energy spectra, E±(k ) , are then examined, and bounds are obtained. Comments are also made on (a) the generalization of our results to the case PM≠1 and (b) the relation between Dm± and the order-m moments of gradients of magnetohydrodynamic fields, which are used to characterize intermittency in turbulent flows.

  19. Polarizability matrix retrieval of a non-planar chiral particle through scattering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanos, Theodosios; Kantartzis, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    An efficient technique for the polarizability matrix extraction of non-planar chiral particles is introduced in this paper. Assuming electrically small sizes, the particles are modeled via electric and magnetic dipoles, whose induced moments are derived from the surface S-parameter response of three normal wave incidences. Then, these moments are inserted in the initial convention and polarizabilities are acquired through a linear system formed by the measured or simulated S-parameters. To validate the novel method, the retrieved polarizabilities are involved in RCS calculations for diverse incidences and compared with simulated ones.

  20. Defective non-planar surfaces of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourn, E. A.; Kendrick, J.; Mackrodt, W. C.

    1983-03-01

    Defect lattice and ab initio SCF calculations are reported for defective non-planar surfaces of MgO. It is suggested that the concentration of free vacancies and Ca 2+ will be much lower at non-planar irregularities than at planar surfaces and in the bulk, whereas the level of Li + and trapped holes will be higher. The binding of H atoms and CO to three-coordinated comer sites is found to be appreciably higher than to the five-coordinated {001} surface. Thus it is concluded that calcium doping of MgO will affect neither CO chemisorption nor the dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen whereas lithium doping will influence both.

  1. Application of Random Ferns for non-planar object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastov, Alexey; Konovalenko, Ivan; Grigoryev, Anton

    2015-12-01

    The real time object detection task is considered as a part of a project devoted to development of autonomous ground robot. This problem has been successfully solved with Random Ferns algorithm, which belongs to keypoint-based method and uses fast machine learning algorithms for keypoint matching step. As objects in the real world are not always planar, in this article we describe experiments of applying this algorithm for non-planar objects. Also we introduce a method for fast detection of a special class of non-planar objects | those which can be decomposed into planar parts (e.g. faces of a box). This decomposition needs one detector for each side, which may significantly affect speed of detection. Proposed approach copes with it by omitting repeated steps for each detector and organizing special queue of detectors. It makes the algorithm three times faster than naive one.

  2. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation of Jet Formation with a State Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fushman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed the first fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity sim 0.3c) is created as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The 3-D simulation ran over one hundred light-crossing time units which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted due in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outwards with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward moving shock wave. This evolution of jet-disk coupling suggests that the low/hard state of the jet system may switch to the high/soft state with a wind, as the accretion rate diminishes.

  3. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1989-01-01

    Dayside magnetic reconnection was studied by using a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Two different mechanisms were found for the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the dayside magnetopause, which depend on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dayside magnetic flux tubes occur only when the IMF has a southward component. A strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tube similar to magnetic flux ropes appears at the subsolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large B(y) component. When the B(y) component is small, twin flux tubes appear at the dayside magnetopause. Both types of magnetic flux tube are consistent with several observational features of flux transfer events and are generated by antiparallel magnetic reconnection.

  4. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Tatsuki ); Walker, R.J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha )

    1989-02-01

    The authors have studied dayside magnetic reconnection by using a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. They found two different mechanisms for the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the dayside magnetopause which depend on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dayside magnetic flux tubes occur only when the IMF has a southward component. A strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tube similar to magnetic flux ropes appears at the subsolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large B{sub y} component. When the B{sub y} component is small, twin flux tubes appear at the dayside magnetopause. Both types of magnetic flux tube are consistent with several observational features of flux transfer events and are generated by antiparallel magnetic reconnection.

  5. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of noninductive helicity injection in the reversed-field pinch and tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical computation is used to investigate resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and in tokamak-like configurations driven solely by direct current (DC) helicity injection. A Lundquist number (S) scan of RFP turbulence without plasma pressure produces the weak scaling of S-0.18 for the root-mean-square magnetic fluctuation level for 2.5x103≤S≤4x104. The temporal behavior of fluctuations and the reversal parameter becomes more regular as S is increased, acquiring a "sawtooth" shape at the largest value of S. Simulations with plasma pressure and anisotropic thermal conduction demonstrate energy transport resulting from parallel heat fluctuations. To investigate means of improving RFP energy confinement, three forms of current profile modification are tested. Radio frequency (RF) current drive is modeled with an auxiliary electron force, and linear stability calculations are used.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation-driven Kinematic Mean Field Model of the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Corinne; Charbonneau, Paul; Bouchat, Amélie

    2013-05-01

    We construct a series of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field dynamo models operating in the αΩ, α2Ω and α2 regimes, all using the full α-tensor extracted from a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of solar convection producing large-scale magnetic fields undergoing solar-like cyclic polarity reversals. We also include an internal differential rotation profile produced in a purely hydrodynamical parent simulation of solar convection, and a simple meridional flow profile described by a single cell per meridional quadrant. An α2Ω mean-field model, presumably closest to the mode of dynamo action characterizing the MHD simulation, produces a spatiotemporal evolution of magnetic fields that share some striking similarities with the zonally-averaged toroidal component extracted from the simulation. Comparison with α2 and αΩ mean-field models operating in the same parameter regimes indicates that much of the complexity observed in the spatiotemporal evolution of the large-scale magnetic field in the simulation can be traced to the turbulent electromotive force. Oscillating α2 solutions are readily produced, and show some similarities with the observed solar cycle, including a deep-seated toroidal component concentrated at low latitudes and migrating equatorward in the course of the solar cycle. Various numerical experiments performed using the mean-field models reveal that turbulent pumping plays an important role in setting the global characteristics of the magnetic cycles.

  9. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION-DRIVEN KINEMATIC MEAN FIELD MODEL OF THE SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, Corinne; Charbonneau, Paul; Bouchat, Amelie E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca

    2013-05-01

    We construct a series of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field dynamo models operating in the {alpha}{Omega}, {alpha}{sup 2}{Omega} and {alpha}{sup 2} regimes, all using the full {alpha}-tensor extracted from a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of solar convection producing large-scale magnetic fields undergoing solar-like cyclic polarity reversals. We also include an internal differential rotation profile produced in a purely hydrodynamical parent simulation of solar convection, and a simple meridional flow profile described by a single cell per meridional quadrant. An {alpha}{sup 2}{Omega} mean-field model, presumably closest to the mode of dynamo action characterizing the MHD simulation, produces a spatiotemporal evolution of magnetic fields that share some striking similarities with the zonally-averaged toroidal component extracted from the simulation. Comparison with {alpha}{sup 2} and {alpha}{Omega} mean-field models operating in the same parameter regimes indicates that much of the complexity observed in the spatiotemporal evolution of the large-scale magnetic field in the simulation can be traced to the turbulent electromotive force. Oscillating {alpha}{sup 2} solutions are readily produced, and show some similarities with the observed solar cycle, including a deep-seated toroidal component concentrated at low latitudes and migrating equatorward in the course of the solar cycle. Various numerical experiments performed using the mean-field models reveal that turbulent pumping plays an important role in setting the global characteristics of the magnetic cycles.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of transient transpolar potential responses to solar wind density changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.; Burke, W. J.; Maynard, N. C.; Siebert, K. D.

    2007-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to examine the response of the transpolar potential (ΦTP) to changes in the solar wind density during periods of constant solar wind electric field. For increases (decreases) in the solar wind density ΦTP responds immediately by increasing (decreasing) from the steady state values. In both cases the response of ΦTP is transient, decaying to near initial steady state values even when the density change persists. The magnitude of the ΦTP response is proportional to both the rate of erosion of the dayside magnetopause and the ionospheric Pedersen conductance. In our MHD simulations ΦTP is driven entirely by the dayside merging rate and is insensitive to changes in the nightside reconnection rate. The observed relationship between the modeled dayside merging rate and ΦTP is well characterized by an L-R circuit equation derived from integrating Faraday's Law around the Region 1 current loop. The inductive time constant for variations in the transpolar potential was found to be 6.5 (13) minutes for simulations using ionospheric Pedersen conductances of 6 (12) mhos. This corresponds in both cases to a magnetosphere-ionosphere inductance of 65 Henries. Observations of the transpolar potential derived using the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) model are presented and shown to be consistent with the simulation results.

  11. Towards Observational Astronomy of Jets in Active Galaxies from General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantua, Richard; Roger Blandford, Jonathan McKinney and Alexander Tchekhovskoy

    2016-01-01

    We carry out the process of "observing" simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with relativistic jets (hereafter called jet/accretion disk/black hole (JAB) systems) from ray tracing between image plane and source to convolving the resulting images with a point spread function. Images are generated at arbitrary observer angle relative to the black hole spin axis by implementing spatial and temporal interpolation of conserved magnetohydrodynamic flow quantities from a time series of output datablocks from fully general relativistic 3D simulations. We also describe the evolution of simulations of JAB systems' dynamical and kinematic variables, e.g., velocity shear and momentum density, respectively, and the variation of these variables with respect to observer polar and azimuthal angles. We produce, at frequencies from radio to optical, fixed observer time intensity and polarization maps using various plasma physics motivated prescriptions for the emissivity function of physical quantities from the simulation output, and analyze the corresponding light curves. Our hypothesis is that this approach reproduces observed features of JAB systems such as superluminal bulk flow projections and quasi-periodic oscillations in the light curves more closely than extant stylized analytical models, e.g., cannonball bulk flows. Moreover, our development of user-friendly, versatile C++ routines for processing images of state-of-the-art simulations of JAB systems may afford greater flexibility for observing a wide range of sources from high power BL-Lacs to low power quasars (possibly with the same simulation) without requiring years of observation using multiple telescopes. Advantages of observing simulations instead of observing astrophysical sources directly include: the absence of a diffraction limit, panoramic views of the same object and the ability to freely track features. Light travel time effects become significant for high Lorentz factor and small angles between

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetotail Response to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauer, Paulo Ricardo; Echer, Ezequiel; Alves, Maria Virginia

    In the present work, a study of the dynamical response of the macroscopic parameters, den-sity, pressure, and velocity, of the Earth's magnetotail, was carried out. The goal of this work was to study the variation of such parameters as a response to the different topologies of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) present in some of the geoeffective solar wind magnetic structures. We used Magnetohydrodynamic simulation in order to approach this problem. The bi-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic code was originally developed by Ogino et al. (1986), being restricted to the formation of the terrestrial magnetosphere with a stationary IMF. After we performed the necessary modifications in the original code, the magnetospheric dynamics was observed. Based on that, we investigated the response of the different regions of the magne-tosphere (specially the magnetotail) to different IMF conditions. Four different configurations of the IMF were analyzed when interacting with the Earth's magnetosphere. Among these different topologies, one could find a representative for a positive shock, i.e, a shock with a pos-itive Bz , another for a negative shock, i.e, a shock with a negative Bz , an idealized HILDCAA event with a Bz squared fluctuation similar to an Alfvénic one, and, finally, a structure similar to a Magnetic Cloud. The considered changes in the IMF configuration favored the observation of different physical processes. Among these processes, it was possible to observe the forma-tion of the Near-Earth Neutral Line for the IMF configuration representative of a negative Bz (negative shock). Furthermore, a plasmoid release was observed, which is associated with one of the most dynamics phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere: the substorm.

  13. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk GalaxyFormation: the Magnetization of The Cold and Warm Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-12-18

    Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we study the formation and early evolution of disk galaxies with a magnetized interstellar medium. For a 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} halo with initial NFW dark matter and gas profiles, we impose a uniform 10{sup -9} G magnetic field and follow its collapse, disk formation and evolution up to 1 Gyr. Comparing to a purely hydrodynamic simulation with the same initial condition, we find that a protogalactic field of this strength does not significantly influence the global disk properties. At the same time, the initial magnetic fields are quickly amplified by the differentially rotating turbulent disk. After the initial rapid amplification lasting {approx} 500 Myr, subsequent field amplification appears self-regulated. As a result, highly magnetized material begin to form above and below the disk. Interestingly, the field strengths in the self-regulated regime agrees well with the observed fields in the Milky Way galaxy both in the warm and the cold HI phase and do not change appreciably with time. Most of the cold phase shows a dispersion of order ten in the magnetic field strength. The global azimuthal magnetic fields reverse at different radii and the amplitude declines as a function of radius of the disk. By comparing the estimated star formation rate (SFR) in hydrodynamic and MHD simulations, we find that after the magnetic field strength saturates, magnetic forces provide further support in the cold gas and lead to a decline of the SFR.

  15. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive drive

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, V.A.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-05-15

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive drive (HIT-SI) [P. E. Sieck, W. T. Hamp, V. A. Izzo, T. R. Jarboe, B. A. Nelson, R. G. O'Neill, A. J. Redd, and R. J. Smith, IEEE Conference Record-Abstracts. 31st IEEE International Conference On Plasma Science (IEEE Catalog No. 04CH37537), 2004, p. 160] is a spheromak driven by steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI) and consists of the toroidally symmetric spheromak confinement region and two nonsymmetric helicity injectors. The three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic code NIMROD [A. H. Glasser, C. R. Sovinec, R. A. Nebel, T. A. Gianakon, S. J. Plimpton, M. S. Chu, and D. D. Schnack, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 41, A747 (1999)] is used to simulate HIT-SI operation, but the code's toroidally symmetric boundary requires a creative treatment of the injectors. Sustained HIT-SI operation is simulated with nonaxisymmetric boundary conditions. In driven simulations at low Lundquist number S no n=0 fields are generated as a result of relaxation of the predominantly n=1 injector fields until the injectors are quickly shut off. At S=500, an n=0 component arises due to relaxation during sustainment. As S is increased further, the ratio of n=0 (equilibrium) fields to n=1 (injector) fields increases. The effects of a thin insulating boundary layer on the plasma decay time are also discussed.

  16. Flow simulation of the Component Development Integration Facility magnetohydrodynamic power train system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    This report covers application of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) computer codes to simulation and analysis of components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train system at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF). Major components of the system include a 50-MWt coal-fired, two-stage combustor and an MHD channel. The combustor, designed and built by TRW, includes a deswirl section between the first and the second-stage combustor and a converging nozzle following the second-stage combustor, which connects to the MHD channel. ANL used computer codes to simulate and analyze flow characteristics in various components of the MHD system. The first-stage swirl combustor was deemed a mature technology and, therefore, was not included in the computer simulation. Several versions of the ICOMFLO computer code were used for the deswirl section and second-stage combustor. The MGMHD code, upgraded with a slag current leakage submodel, was used for the MHD channel. Whenever possible data from the test facilities were used to aid in calibrating parameters in the computer code, to validate the computer code, or to set base-case operating conditions for computations with the computer code. Extensive sensitivity and parametric studies were done on cold-flow mixing in the second-stage combustor, reacting flow in the second-stage combustor and converging nozzle, and particle-laden flow in the deswirl zone of the first-stage combustor, the second-stage combustor, and the converging nozzle. These simulations with subsequent analysis were able to show clearly in flow patterns and various computable measures of performance a number of sensitive and problematical areas in the design of the power train. The simulations of upstream components also provided inlet parameter profiles for simulation of the MHD power generating channel. 86 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Reconnection-driven Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in a Simulated Coronal-hole Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Roberts, Merrill A.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2017-03-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet and X-ray jets occur frequently in magnetically open coronal holes on the Sun, especially at high solar latitudes. Some of these jets are observed by white-light coronagraphs as they propagate through the outer corona toward the inner heliosphere, and it has been proposed that they give rise to microstreams and torsional Alfvén waves detected in situ in the solar wind. To predict and understand the signatures of coronal-hole jets, we have performed a detailed statistical analysis of such a jet simulated by an adaptively refined magnetohydrodynamics model. The results confirm the generation and persistence of three-dimensional, reconnection-driven magnetic turbulence in the simulation. We calculate the spatial correlations of magnetic fluctuations within the jet and find that they agree best with the Müller–Biskamp scaling model including intermittent current sheets of various sizes coupled via hydrodynamic turbulent cascade. The anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations and the spatial orientation of the current sheets are consistent with an ensemble of nonlinear Alfvén waves. These properties also reflect the overall collimated jet structure imposed by the geometry of the reconnecting magnetic field. A comparison with Ulysses observations shows that turbulence in the jet wake is in quantitative agreement with that in the fast solar wind.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of thermofluidic transport phenomena in a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Amiroudine, Sakir

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive non-isothermal Lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm is proposed in this article to simulate the thermofluidic transport phenomena encountered in a direct-current (DC) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump. Inside the pump, an electrically conducting fluid is transported through the microchannel by the action of an electromagnetic Lorentz force evolved out as a consequence of the interaction between applied electric and magnetic fields. The fluid flow and thermal characteristics of the MHD micropump depend on several factors such as the channel geometry, electromagnetic field strength and electrical property of the conducting fluid. An involved analysis is carried out following the LB technique to understand the significant influences of the aforementioned controlling parameters on the overall transport phenomena. In the LB framework, the hydrodynamics is simulated by a distribution function, which obeys a single scalar kinetic equation associated with an externally imposed electromagnetic force field. The thermal history is monitored by a separate temperature distribution function through another scalar kinetic equation incorporating the Joule heating effect. Agreement with analytical, experimental and other available numerical results is found to be quantitative.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Hypersonic Flow over a Cylinder Using Axial- and Transverse-Oriented Magnetic Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Guarendi, Andrew N.; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (≪1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  20. Simulation and demonstration of magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion in a high-temperature inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2009-03-15

    The present paper describes high-density magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion in a high-temperature seed-free argon plasma, for which a quasi-three-dimensional numerical simulation and a single-pulse shock-tunnel-based demonstration are conducted. The numerical model simulates the two-dimensional profiles of both the electron and the heavy-particle system of the supersonic argon plasma flow, of which the total inflow temperature is 8000 K. The MHD power-generating experiment clarifies the relationship between the plasma quality and the energy conversion efficiency as functions of the total inflow temperature (7600-9600 K) and the applied magnetic flux density (up to 4.0 T). The increase in the total inflow temperature from 7600 to 9400 K and the application of magnetic flux with density of 0.5-1.2 T change the plasma state; unstable behavior accompanied by an inhomogeneous structure is transformed to a homogeneous and stable state, which results in the significant improvement of the power generation performance. Even in low-density magnetic flux, the attained generator performance is comparable or superior to previous results obtained using a conventional low-temperature seeded gas.

  1. Polarization Signatures of Kink Instabilities in the Blazar Emission Region from Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; Taylor, Greg

    2017-02-01

    Kink instabilities are likely to occur in the current-carrying magnetized plasma jets. Recent observations of the blazar radiation and polarization signatures suggest that the blazar emission region may be considerably magnetized. While the kink instability has been studied with first-principle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the corresponding time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures have not been investigated. In this paper, we perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of the kink instability in the blazar emission region based on relativistic MHD (RMHD) simulations. We find that the kink instability may give rise to strong flares with polarization angle (PA) swings or weak flares with polarization fluctuations, depending on the initial magnetic topology and magnetization. These findings are consistent with observations. Compared with the shock model, the kink model generates polarization signatures that are in better agreement with the general polarization observations. Therefore, we suggest that kink instabilities may widely exist in the jet environment and provide an efficient way to convert the magnetic energy and produce multiwavelength flares and polarization variations.

  2. Theory and Simulation Basis for Magnetohydrodynamic Stability in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Lao, L.L.; Snyder, P.B.

    2005-10-15

    Theory and simulation have provided one of the critical foundations for many of the significant achievements in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability in DIII-D over the past two decades. Early signature achievements included the validation of tokamak MHD stability limits, beta and performance optimization through cross-section shaping and profiles, and the development of new operational regimes. More recent accomplishments encompass the realization and sustainment of wall stabilization using plasma rotation and active feedback, a new understanding of edge stability and its relation to edge-localized modes, and recent successes in predicting resistive tearing and interchange instabilities. The key to success has been the synergistic tie between the theory effort and the experiment made possible by the detailed equilibrium reconstruction data available in DIII-D and the corresponding attention to the measured details in the modeling. This interaction fosters an emphasis on the important phenomena and leads to testable theoretical predictions. Also important is the application of a range of analytic and simulation techniques, coupled with a program of numerical tool development. The result is a comprehensive integrated approach to fusion science and improving the tokamak approach to burning plasmas.

  3. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamics with Embedded Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Gombosi, T. I.; Markidis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is much more dynamic than other planetary magnetospheres because of Mercury's weak intrinsic magnetic field and its proximity to the Sun. Magnetic reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz phenomena occur in Mercury's magnetopause and magnetotail at higher frequencies than in other planetary magnetosphere. For instance, chains of flux transfer events (FTEs) on the magnetopause, have been frequentlyobserved by the the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft (Slavin et al., 2012). Because ion Larmor radius is comparable to typical spatial scales in Mercury's magnetosphere, finite Larmor radius effects need to be accounted for. In addition, it is important to take in account non-ideal dissipation mechanisms to accurately describe magnetic reconnection. A kinetic approach allows us to model these phenomena accurately. However, kinetic global simulations, even for small-size magnetospheres like Mercury's, are currently unfeasible because of the high computational cost. In this work, we carry out global simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with the recently developed MHD-EPIC model, which is a two-way coupling of the extended magnetohydrodynamic (XMHD) code BATS-R-US with the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D. The PIC model can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient. We will present our preliminary results and comparison with MESSENGER observations.

  5. Probabilistic Prognosis of Non-Planar Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Warner, James E.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the uncertainty in model parameters for the purpose of damage prognosis can be accomplished utilizing Bayesian inference and damage diagnosis data from sources such as non-destructive evaluation or structural health monitoring. The number of samples required to solve the Bayesian inverse problem through common sampling techniques (e.g., Markov chain Monte Carlo) renders high-fidelity finite element-based damage growth models unusable due to prohibitive computation times. However, these types of models are often the only option when attempting to model complex damage growth in real-world structures. Here, a recently developed high-fidelity crack growth model is used which, when compared to finite element-based modeling, has demonstrated reductions in computation times of three orders of magnitude through the use of surrogate models and machine learning. The model is flexible in that only the expensive computation of the crack driving forces is replaced by the surrogate models, leaving the remaining parameters accessible for uncertainty quantification. A probabilistic prognosis framework incorporating this model is developed and demonstrated for non-planar crack growth in a modified, edge-notched, aluminum tensile specimen. Predictions of remaining useful life are made over time for five updates of the damage diagnosis data, and prognostic metrics are utilized to evaluate the performance of the prognostic framework. Challenges specific to the probabilistic prognosis of non-planar fatigue crack growth are highlighted and discussed in the context of the experimental results.

  6. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of a Core-Collapse Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Hayato; Sato, Yuji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    2008-08-01

    We show three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a core-collapse supernova in which the progenitor has magnetic fields inclined to the rotation axis. The simulations employed a simple empirical equation of state in which the pressure of degenerate gas is approximated by piecewise polytropes for simplicity. Energy loss due to neutrinos is not taken into account for simplicity as well. The simulations start from the stage of dynamical collapse of an iron core. The dynamical collapse halts at t = 189 ms by the pressure of high-density gas, and a proto-neutron star (PNS) forms. The evolution of the PNS was followed for about 40 ms in typical models. When the initial rotation is mildly fast and the initial magnetic fields are mildly strong, bipolar jets are launched from the upper atmosphere (r ~ 60 km ) of the PNS. The jets are accelerated to ~3 × 104 km s-1, which is comparable to the escape velocity at the footpoint. The jets are parallel to the initial rotation axis. Before the launch of the jets, magnetic fields are twisted by rotation of the PNS. The twisted magnetic fields form torus-shaped multilayers in which the azimuthal component changes alternately. The formation of magnetic multilayers is due to the initial condition in which the magnetic fields are inclined with respect to the rotation axis. The energy of the jet depends only weakly on the initial magnetic field assumed. When the initial magnetic fields are weaker, the time lag is longer between the PNS formation and jet ejection. It is also shown that the time lag is related to the Alfvén transit time. Although the nearly spherical prompt shock propagates outward in our simulations, it is an artifact due to our simplified equation of state and neglect of neutrino loss. The morphology of twisted magnetic field and associate jet ejection are, however, not affected by the simplification.

  7. Self-Consistent, 2D Magneto-Hydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetically Driven Flyer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Raymond W.

    2002-11-01

    The intense magnetic field generated in the 20 MA Z-machine is used to accelerate flyer plates to high velocity for equation of state experiments. A peak magnetic drive pressure on the order of 2 Mbar can be generated, which accelerates an approximately 0.2 g aluminum disc to 21 km/s [1]. We have used 2D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to investigate the physics of accelerating flyer plates using multi-megabar magnetic drive pressures. A typical shock physics load is formed by a rectangular slab cathode enclosed by a hollow rectangular duct (the anode). The anode and cathode are connected (shorted) at one end. The electrodes are highly compressible at multi-megabar pressures. Electrode deformation that occurs during the rise time of the current pulse causes significant inductance increase, which reduces the peak current (drive pressure) relative to a static geometry. This important dynamic effect is modeled self-consistently by driving the MHD simulation with a circuit model of Z. Comparison of simulation results with highly accurate velocity interferometry measurements shows that the drive pressure waveform is affected by current losses and short circuiting in the machine, in conjunction with time varying load inductance. The understanding gained from these comparisons has allowed us to optimize shock physics loads using simulation. In this way a load was designed to produce a flyer velocity of 28 km/s, which was achieved experimentally on Z. We have identified paths to producing a flyer velocity of 40 km/s and peak isentropic pressure of 10 Mbar on the refurbished Z-machine [2]. Details of the modeling, the physics and comparisons with experiment are presented. [1] M. D. Knudson et al., Phys. Rev. Letters 87 (22), 22550-1 (2002). [2] R. W. Lemke et al., to be published in Proc. of the Int. Conf. on High Power Particle Beams and Dense Z-Pinches, Albuquerque, NM, June 23-28, 2002.

  8. A global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of super-eddington accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M.; Davis, Shane W.

    2014-12-01

    We study super-Eddington accretion flows onto black holes using a global three-dimensional radiation magneto-hydrodynamical simulation. We solve the time-dependent radiative transfer equation for the specific intensities to accurately calculate the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. Turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability provides self-consistent angular momentum transfer. The simulation reaches inflow equilibrium with an accretion rate ∼220 L {sub Edd}/c {sup 2} and forms a radiation-driven outflow along the rotation axis. The mechanical energy flux carried by the outflow is ∼20% of the radiative energy flux. The total mass flux lost in the outflow is about 29% of the net accretion rate. The radiative luminosity of this flow is ∼10 L {sub Edd}. This yields a radiative efficiency ∼4.5%, which is comparable to the value in a standard thin disk model. In our simulation, vertical advection of radiation caused by magnetic buoyancy transports energy faster than photon diffusion, allowing a significant fraction of the photons to escape from the surface of the disk before being advected into the black hole. We contrast our results with the lower radiative efficiencies inferred in most models, such as the slim disk model, which neglect vertical advection. Our inferred radiative efficiencies also exceed published results from previous global numerical simulations, which did not attribute a significant role to vertical advection. We briefly discuss the implications for the growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe and describe how these results provided a basis for explaining the spectrum and population statistics of ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  9. Resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of X-line retreat during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, N. A.

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the impact of current sheet motion on the reconnection process, we perform resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of two closely located reconnection sites that move apart from each other as reconnection develops. This simulation develops less quickly than an otherwise equivalent single perturbation simulation but eventually exhibits a higher reconnection rate. The unobstructed outflow jets are faster and longer than the outflow jets directed toward the magnetic island that forms between the two current sheets. The X-line and flow stagnation point are located near the trailing end of each current sheet very close to the obstructed exit. The speed of X-line retreat ranges from {approx}0.02-0.06, while the speed of stagnation point retreat ranges from {approx}0.03-0.07 in units of the initial upstream Alfven velocity. Early in time, the flow stagnation point is located closer to the center of the current sheet than the X-line, but later on the relative positions of these two points switch. Consequently, late in time, there is significant plasma flow across the X-line in the opposite direction of X-line retreat. Throughout the simulation, the velocity at the X-line does not equal the velocity of the X-line. Motivated by these results, an expression for the rate of X-line retreat is derived in terms of local parameters evaluated at the X-line. This expression shows that X-line retreat is due to both advection by the bulk plasma flow and diffusion of the normal component of the magnetic field.

  10. Comparison of magnetic island stabilization strategies from magneto-hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Février, O.; Maget, P.; Lütjens, H.; Beyer, P.

    2017-04-01

    The degradation of plasma confinement in tokamaks caused by magnetic islands motivates to better understand their possible suppression using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and to investigate the various strategies relevant for this purpose. In this work, we evaluate the efficiency of several control methods through nonlinear simulations of this process with the toroidal magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) code XTOR-2F (Lütjens and Luciani 2010 J. Comput. Phys. 229 8130–43), which has been extended to incorporate in Ohm’s law a source term modeling the driven current resulting from the interaction of the EC waves with the plasma. A basic control system has been implemented in the code, allowing testing of advanced strategies that require feedback on island position or phase. We focus in particular on the robustness of the control strategies towards uncertainties that apply to the control and ECCD systems, such as the risk of misalignment of the current deposition or the possible inability to generate narrow current deposition.

  11. Resistivity profile effects in numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sätherblom, H.-E.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1996-12-01

    The influence of the resistivity profile on reversed-field pinch (RFP) dynamics is investigated numerically using a three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic code. This investigation is motivated by experimental observations on the EXTRAP-T1 RFP (Nordlund P et al 1994 Int. Conf. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research IAEA-CN-60/A6/C-P-6). Two cases with profiles mainly differing in the edge region, i.e. in the region outside the reversal surface, are simulated. It is found that increasing the resistivity in this region results in a factor of two increase in magnetic fluctuation energy and an equal amount in the fluctuation-induced electric field. In spite of this, the parallel current decreases in the edge region, resulting in a factor two reduction of the field reversal ratio. The dynamics become more irregular and the characteristic timescale is reduced. The final state is characterized by a higher loop voltage, slightly lower values of the total (fluctuating plus mean part) magnetic energy and the magnetic helicity, but almost unchanged Taylor relaxation ratio. The results indicate that the edge region can be important for RFP confinement since cooling of the plasma in this region can lead to an increased fluctuation level and degraded performance.

  12. Multispectral Emission of the Sun during the First Whole Sun Month: Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the corona can model its global plasma density and temperature structure with sufficient accuracy to reproduce many of the multispectral properties of the corona observed in extreme ultraviolet (EW) and X-ray emission. The key ingredient to this new type of global MHD model is the inclusion of energy transport processes (coronal heating, anisotropic thermal conduction, and radiative losses) in the energy equation. The calculation of these processes has previously been confined to one-dimensional loop models, idealized two-dimensional computations, and three-dimensional active region models. We refer to this as the thermodynamic MHD model, and we apply it to the time period of Carrington rotation 1913 (1996 August 22 to September 18). The form of the coronal heating term strongly affects the plasma density and temperature of the solutions. We perform our calculation for three different empirical heating models: (1) a heating function exponentially decreasing in radius; (2) the model of Schrijver et al.; and (3) a model reproducing the heating properties of the quiet Sun and active regions. We produce synthetic emission images from the density and temperature calculated with these three heating functions and quantitatively compare them with observations from E W Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. Although none of the heating models provide a perfect match, heating models 2 and 3 provide a reasonable match to the observations.

  13. A fully magnetohydrodynamic simulation of three-dimensional non-null reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Pontin, D.I.; Galsgaard, K.; Hornig, G.; Priest, E.R.

    2005-05-15

    A knowledge of the nature of fully three-dimensional magnetic reconnection is crucial in understanding a great many processes in plasmas. It has been previously shown that in the kinematic regime the evolution of magnetic flux in three-dimensional reconnection is very different from two dimensions. In this paper a numerical fully magnetohydrodynamic simulation is described, in which this evolution is investigated. The reconnection takes place in the absence of a magnetic null point, and the nonideal region is localized in the center of the domain. The effect of differently prescribed resistivities is considered. The magnetic field is stressed by shear boundary motions, and a current concentration grows within the volume. A stagnation-point flow develops, with strong outflow jets emanating from the reconnection region. The behavior of the magnetic flux matches closely that discovered in the kinematic regime. In particular, it is found that no unique field line velocity exists, and that as a result field lines change their connections continually and continuously throughout the nonideal region. In order to describe the motion of magnetic flux within the domain, it is therefore necessary to use two different field line velocities. The importance of a component of the electric field parallel to the magnetic field is also demonstrated.

  14. Global General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Black Hole Accretion Flows: A Convergence Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Dolence, Joshua C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Noble, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Global, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of non-radiative, magnetized disks are widely used to model accreting black holes. We have performed a convergence study of GRMHD models computed with HARM3D. The models span a factor of four in linear resolution, from 96 × 96 × 64 to 384 × 384 × 256. We consider three diagnostics of convergence: (1) dimensionless shell-averaged quantities such as plasma β (2) the azimuthal correlation length of fluid variables; and (3) synthetic spectra of the source including synchrotron emission, absorption, and Compton scattering. Shell-averaged temperature is, except for the lowest resolution run, nearly independent of resolution; shell-averaged plasma β decreases steadily with resolution but shows signs of convergence. The azimuthal correlation lengths of density, internal energy, and temperature decrease steadily with resolution but show signs of convergence. In contrast, the azimuthal correlation length of magnetic field decreases nearly linearly with grid size. We argue by analogy with local models, however, that convergence should be achieved with another factor of two in resolution. Synthetic spectra are, except for the lowest resolution run, nearly independent of resolution. The convergence behavior is consistent with that of higher physical resolution local model ("shearing box") calculations and with the recent non-relativistic global convergence studies of Hawley et al.

  15. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O.; Kasper, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  16. Implicit predictor-corrector central finite difference scheme for the equations of magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, T. C.; Yu, H.-S.; Hsieh, M.-S.; Lai, S. H.; Yang, Y.-H.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays most of supercomputers are based on the frame of PC cluster; therefore, the efficiency of parallel computing is of importance especially with the increasing computing scale. This paper proposes a high-order implicit predictor-corrector central finite difference (iPCCFD) scheme and demonstrates its high efficiency in parallel computing. Of special interests are the large scale numerical studies such as the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in the planetary magnetosphere. An iPCCFD scheme is developed based on fifth-order central finite difference method and fourth-order implicit predictor-corrector method in combination with elimination-of-the-round-off-errors (ERE) technique. We examine several numerical studies such as one-dimensional Brio-Wu shock tube problem, two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex system, vortex type K-H instability, kink type K-H instability, field loop advection, and blast wave. All the simulation results are consistent with many literatures. iPCCFD can minimize the numerical instabilities and noises along with the additional diffusion terms. All of our studies present relatively small numerical errors without employing any divergence-free reconstruction. In particular, we obtain fairly stable results in the two-dimensional Brio-Wu shock tube problem which well conserves ∇ ṡ B = 0 throughout the simulation. The ERE technique removes the accumulation of roundoff errors in the uniform or non-disturbed system. We have also shown that iPCCFD is characterized by the high order of accuracy and the low numerical dissipation in the circularly polarized Alfvén wave tests. The proposed iPCCFD scheme is a parallel-efficient and high precision numerical scheme for solving the MHD equations in hyperbolic conservation systems.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, Peter Trogdon

    1994-02-01

    Solid-deuterium-initiated Z-pinch experiments are numerically simulated using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, which includes many important experimental details, such as ``cold-start`` initial conditions, thermal conduction, radiative energy loss, actual discharge current vs. time, and grids of sufficient size and resolution to allow realistic development of the plasma. The alternating-direction-implicit numerical technique used meets the substantial demands presented by such a computational task. Simulations of fiber-initiated experiments show that when the fiber becomes fully ionized rapidly developing m=0 instabilities, which originated in the coronal plasma generated from the ablating fiber, drive intense non-uniform heating and rapid expansion of the plasma column. The possibility that inclusion of additional physical effects would improve stability is explored. Finite-Larmor-radius-ordered Hall and diamagnetic pressure terms in the magnetic field evolution equation, corresponding energy equation terms, and separate ion and electron energy equations are included; these do not change the basic results. Model diagnostics, such as shadowgrams and interferograms, generated from simulation results, are in good agreement with experiment. Two alternative experimental approaches are explored: high-current magnetic implosion of hollow cylindrical deuterium shells, and ``plasma-on-wire`` (POW) implosion of low-density plasma onto a central deuterium fiber. By minimizing instability problems, these techniques may allow attainment of higher temperatures and densities than possible with bare fiber-initiated Z-pinches. Conditions for significant D-D or D-T fusion neutron production may be realizable with these implosion-based approaches.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PLANET MIGRATION IN TURBULENT STRATIFIED DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Flock, M.; Henning, Th.

    2011-08-01

    We performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of planet migration in stratified disks using the Godunov code PLUTO, where the disk is turbulent due to the magnetorotational instability. We study the migration for planets with different planet-star mass ratios q = M{sub p} /M{sub s} . In agreement with previous studies, for the low-mass planet cases (q = 5 x 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -5}), migration is dominated by random fluctuations in the torque. For a Jupiter-mass planet (q = M{sub p} /M{sub s} = 10{sup -3} for M{sub s} = 1M{sub sun}), we find a reduction of the magnetic stress inside the orbit of the planet and around the gap region. After an initial stage where the torque on the planet is positive, it reverses and we recover migration rates similar to those found in disks where the turbulent viscosity is modeled by an {alpha} viscosity. For the intermediate-mass planets (q = 5 x 10{sup -5}, 10{sup -4}, and 2 x 10{sup -4}), we find a new and so far unexpected behavior. In some cases they experience sustained and systematic outward migration for the entire duration of the simulation. For this case, the horseshoe region is resolved and torques coming from the corotation region can remain unsaturated due to the stresses in the disk. These stresses are generated directly by the magnetic field. The magnitude of the horseshoe drag can overcome the negative Lindblad contribution when the local surface density profile is flat or increasing outward, which we see in certain locations in our simulations due to the presence of a zonal flow. The intermediate-mass planet is migrating radially outward in locations where there is a positive gradient of a pressure bump (zonal flow).

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of mechanical stellar feedback in a sheet-like molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2017-03-01

    We have used the adaptive-mesh-refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity of stellar feedback in a sheet-like molecular cloud formed through the action of the thermal instability. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from a 15 star and a 40 M⊙ star into a 100 pc-diameter 17 000 M⊙ cloud with a corrugated sheet morphology that in projection appears filamentary. The stellar winds are introduced using appropriate Geneva stellar evolution models. In the 15 M⊙ star case, the wind forms a narrow bipolar cavity with minimal effect on the parent cloud. In the 40 M⊙ star case, the more powerful stellar wind creates a large cylindrical cavity through the centre of the cloud. After 12.5 and 4.97 Myr, respectively, the massive stars explode as supernovae (SNe). In the 15 M⊙ star case, the SN material and energy is primarily deposited into the molecular cloud surroundings over ∼105 yr before the SN remnant escapes the cloud. In the 40 M⊙ star case, a significant fraction of the SN material and energy rapidly escapes the molecular cloud along the wind cavity in a few tens of kiloyears. Both SN events compress the molecular cloud material around them to higher densities (so may trigger further star formation), and strengthen the magnetic field, typically by factors of 2-3 but up to a factor of 10. Our simulations are relevant to observations of bubbles in flattened ring-like molecular clouds and bipolar H II regions.

  20. Self-consistent hybrid neoclassical-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of axisymmetric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Brendan Carrick

    Neoclassical effects (e.g., conductivity reduction and bootstrap currents) have a profound impact on many magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in toroidally-confined plasmas, including tearing modes, edge-localized modes, and resistive wall modes. High-fidelity simulations of such phenomena require a multiphysics code that self-consistently couples the kinetic and fluid models. We review a hybrid formulation from the recent literatureAB that is appropriate for such studies. In particular, the formulation uses a set of time-dependent drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) to advance the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions (fNM) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. The form of the DKEs used were derived in a Chapman-Enskog-like fashion, ensuring that fNM carries no density, momentum, or temperature. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellian and are evolved by a set of MHD equations which are closed by moments of fNM . We then present two DKE solvers based upon this formulation in axisymmetric toroidal geometries. The Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES) solves the steady-state DKEs in the low-collisionality limit. Convergence and benchmark studies are discussed, providing a proof-of-principle that this new formulation can accurately reproduce results from the literature in the limit considered. We then present the DK4D code which evolves the finite-collisionality DKEs time-dependently. Computational methods used and successful benchmarks to other neoclassical models and codes are discussed. Furthermore, we couple DK4D to a reduced, transport-timescale MHD code. The resulting hybrid code is used to simulate the evolution of the current density in a large-aspect-ratio plasma in the presence of several different time-dependent pressure profiles. These simulations demonstrate the self-consistent, dynamic formation of the ohmic and bootstrap currents. In the slowly-evolving plasmas considered

  1. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; ...

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smallermore » simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.« less

  2. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Makwana, K. D.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.; Cattaneo, F.

    2015-04-10

    We performed simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k-1.5⊥k⊥-1.5 for smaller simulation domain, and k-1.3⊥k⊥-1.3 for larger domain. We then estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. Finally, this work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  4. Multi-phase hybrid simulation of energetic particle driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities driven by energetic particles in tokamak plasmas and the energetic particle distribution formed with the instabilities, neutral beam injection, and collisions are investigated with hybrid simulations for energetic particles and an MHD fluid. The multi-phase simulation, which is a combination of classical simulation and hybrid simulation, is applied to examine the distribution formation process in the collisional slowing-down time scale of energetic ions for various beam deposition power ({P}{NBI}) and slowing-down time ({τ }{{s}}). The physical parameters other than {P}{NBI} and {τ }{{s}} are similar to those of a Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment (Wong et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 1874). For {P}{NBI} = 10 MW and {τ }{{s}} = 100 ms, which is similar to the TFTR experiment, the bursts of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes take place with a time interval 2 ms, which is close to that observed in the experiment. The maximum radial velocity amplitude (v r) of the dominant TAE at the bursts in the simulation is {v}{{r}}/{v}{{A}}∼ 3× {10}-3 where v A is the Alfvén velocity at the plasma center. For {P}{NBI} = 5 MW and {τ }{{s}} = 20 ms, the amplitude of the dominant TAE is kept at a constant level {v}{{r}}/{v}{{A}}∼ 4× {10}-4. The intermittency of TAE rises with increasing {P}{NBI} and increasing {τ }{{s}} (= decreasing collision frequency). With increasing volume-averaged classical energetic ion pressure, which is well proportional to {P}{NBI}{τ }{{s}}, the energetic ion confinement degrades monotonically due to the transport by the instabilities. The volume-averaged energetic ion pressure depends only on the volume-averaged classical energetic ion pressure, not independently on {P}{NBI} or {τ }{{s}}. The energetic ion pressure profile resiliency, where the increase in energetic ion pressure profile is saturated, is found for the cases with the highest {P}{NBI}{τ }{{s}} where the TAE bursts take place.

  5. Magnetospheric Simulations With the Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics With Embedded Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Jia, X.; Chen, Y.; Markidis, S.; Peng, B.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Haiducek, J. D.; Gombosi, T. I.; Glocer, A.; Dorelli, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    We have recently developed a new modeling capability to embed the implicit Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model iPIC3D into the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model. The PIC domain can cover the regions where kinetic effects are most important, such as reconnection sites. The BATS-R-US code, on the other hand, can efficiently handle the rest of the computational domain where the MHD or Hall MHD description is sufficient with its block-adaptive grid. The current implementation of the MHD-EPIC model allows two-way coupled simulations in two and three dimensions with multiple embedded PIC regions. The MHD and PIC grids can have different grid resolutions. The MHD variables and the moments of the PIC distribution functions are interpolated and message passed in an efficient manner through the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Both BATS-R-US and iPIC3D are massively parallel codes fully integrated into, run by and coupled through the SWMF. We have successfully applied the MHD-EPIC code to model Ganymede's magnetosphere. Using four PIC regions we have in effect performed a fully kinetic simulation of the moon's mini-magnetosphere with a grid resolution that is about 5 times finer than the ion inertial length. The Hall MHD model provides proper boundary conditions for the four PIC regions and connects them with each other and with the inner and outer outer boundary conditions of the much larger MHD domain. We compare our results with Galileo magnetic observations and find good overall agreement with both Hall MHD and MHD-EPIC simulations. The power spectrum for the small scale fluctuations, however, agrees with the data much better for the MHD-EPIC simulation than for Hall MHD. In the MHD-EPIC simulation, unlike in the pure Hall MHD results, we also find signatures of flux transfer events (FTEs) that agree very well with the observed FTE signatures both in terms of shape and amplitudes. We will also highlight our ongoing efforts to model the magnetospheres of Mercury and

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Effects of the Solar Wind on the Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    2001-01-01

    We have used a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and a rapidly rotating magnetosphere to study the effects of the solar wind dynamic pressure and the interplanetary magnetic field IMF on the configuration of the Jovian magnetosphere. Both the solar wind dynamic pressure and the IMF can cause substantial changes in the magnetosphere. On the dayside when the pressure increases the bow shock and magnetopause move toward Jupiter and the equatorial magnetic field in the middle magnetosphere becomes more dipole-like. When the pressure decreases the boundaries move farther from Jupiter and the dayside magnetic field becomes stretched out into a more tail-like configuration. For northward IMF the boundaries move toward Jupiter but the field becomes more tail-like. Finally, for southward IMF the boundaries move away and the field becomes more dipole-like. These changes are qualitatively consistent with those observed on spacecraft passing through the dayside magnetosphere. However, we were not always able to get quantitative agreement. In particular the model does not reproduce the extremely tail-like magnetic field observed during the Pioneer 10 and Ulysses inbound passes. The solar wind and IMF also influence the configuration of the middle magnetosphere in the magnetotail. Tailward flows were found in the nightside equatorial plasma sheet for most IMF orientations. Both inertial effects and the IMF influence reconnection in the tail. The only time the tailward flow in the magnetotail stopped was during prolonged intervals with southward IMF. Then reconnection in the polar cusp caused the flow to move out of the equatorial plane.

  7. A multifluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between Jupiter's magnetosphere and its moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; van der Holst, B.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is believed to contain a subsurface water ocean whose finite electrical conductance imposes clear induction signatures on the magnetic field in its surroundings. The evidence rests heavily on measurements performed by the magnetometer on board the Galileo spacecraft during multiple flybys of the moon. Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere has become a major target of research in planetary science, partly because of the potential of a salty ocean to harbor life outside our own planet. Thus it is of considerable interest to develop numerical simulations of the Europa-Jupiter interaction that can be compared with data in order to refine our knowledge of Europa's subsurface structure. In this presentation we show aspects of Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere extracted from a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code BATS-R-US recently developed at the University of Michigan. The model dynamically separates magnetospheric and pick-up ions and is capable of capturing some of the physics previously accessible only to kinetic approaches. The model utilizes an adaptive grid to maintain the high spatial resolution on the surface required to resolve the portion of Europa's neutral atmosphere with a scale height of a few tens of kilometers that is in thermal equilibrium. The model also derives the electron temperature, which is crucial to obtain the local electron impact ionization rates and hence the plasma mass loading in Europa's atmosphere. We compare our results with observations made by the plasma particles and fields instruments on the Galileo spacecraft to validate our model. We will show that multifluid MHD is able to reproduce the basic features of the plasma moments and magnetic field observations obtained during the Galileo E4 and E26 flybys at Europa.

  8. TURBULENCE AND STEADY FLOWS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GLOBAL STRATIFIED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, M.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Klahr, H.; Turner, N. J.; Henning, Th.

    2011-07-10

    We present full 2{pi} global three-dimensional stratified magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of accretion disks. We interpret our results in the context of protoplanetary disks. We investigate the turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using the PLUTO Godunov code in spherical coordinates with the accurate and robust HLLD Riemann solver. We follow the turbulence for more than 1500 orbits at the innermost radius of the domain to measure the overall strength of turbulent motions and the detailed accretion flow pattern. We find that regions within two scale heights of the midplane have a turbulent Mach number of about 0.1 and a magnetic pressure two to three orders of magnitude less than the gas pressure, while in those outside three scale heights the magnetic pressure equals or exceeds the gas pressure and the turbulence is transonic, leading to large density fluctuations. The strongest large-scale density disturbances are spiral density waves, and the strongest of these waves has m = 5. No clear meridional circulation appears in the calculations because fluctuating radial pressure gradients lead to changes in the orbital frequency, comparable in importance to the stress gradients that drive the meridional flows in viscous models. The net mass flow rate is well reproduced by a viscous model using the mean stress distribution taken from the MHD calculation. The strength of the mean turbulent magnetic field is inversely proportional to the radius, so the fields are approximately force-free on the largest scales. Consequently, the accretion stress falls off as the inverse square of the radius.

  9. X-RAY SPECTRA FROM MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETING BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Noble, Scott C. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a new global radiation transport code coupled to a general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an accreting, non-rotating black hole. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way all the components seen in the X-ray spectra of stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak and all the features associated with strong hard X-ray emission: a power law extending to high energies, a Compton reflection hump, and a broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce a wide range of X-ray states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is T{sub e} {approx} 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to T{sub e} {approx}> 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. Even as the disk's reflection edge varies from the horizon out to Almost-Equal-To 6M as the accretion rate decreases, we find that the shape of the Fe K{alpha} line is remarkably constant. This is because photons emitted from the plunging region are strongly beamed into the horizon and never reach the observer. We have also carried out a basic timing analysis of the spectra and find that the fractional variability increases with photon energy and viewer inclination angle, consistent with the coronal hot spot model for X-ray fluctuations.

  10. Novel residual-based large eddy simulation turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David

    The goal of this work was to develop, introduce, and test a promising computational paradigm for the development of turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD governs the behavior of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an external electromagnetic (EM) field. The incompressible MHD model is used in many engineering and scientific disciplines from the development of nuclear fusion as a sustainable energy source to the study of space weather and solar physics. Many interesting MHD systems exhibit the phenomenon of turbulence which remains an elusive problem from all scientific perspectives. This work focuses on the computational perspective and proposes techniques that enable the study of systems involving MHD turbulence. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is not a feasible approach for studying MHD turbulence. In this work, turbulence models for incompressible MHD were developed from the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation wherein the solution fields were decomposed into resolved and unresolved components. The unresolved components were modeled with a term that is proportional to the residual of the resolved scales. Two additional MHD models were developed based off of the VMS formulation: a residual-based eddy viscosity (RBEV) model and a mixed model that partners the VMS formulation with the RBEV model. These models are endowed with several special numerical and physics features. Included in the numerical features is the internal numerical consistency of each of the models. Physically, the new models are able to capture desirable MHD physics such as the inverse cascade of magnetic energy and the subgrid dynamo effect. The models were tested with a Fourier-spectral numerical method and the finite element method (FEM). The primary test problem was the Taylor-Green vortex. Results comparing the performance of the new models to DNS were obtained. The performance of the new models was compared to classic and cutting

  11. A unified radiative magnetohydrodynamics code for lightning-like discharge simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang Chen, Bin Xiong, Run; Cai, Zhaoyang; Chen, P. F.

    2014-03-15

    A two-dimensional Eulerian finite difference code is developed for solving the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the effects of self-consistent magnetic field, thermal conduction, resistivity, gravity, and radiation transfer, which when combined with specified pulse current models and plasma equations of state, can be used as a unified lightning return stroke solver. The differential equations are written in the covariant form in the cylindrical geometry and kept in the conservative form which enables some high-accuracy shock capturing schemes to be equipped in the lightning channel configuration naturally. In this code, the 5-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme combined with Lax-Friedrichs flux splitting method is introduced for computing the convection terms of the MHD equations. The 3-order total variation diminishing Runge-Kutta integral operator is also equipped to keep the time-space accuracy of consistency. The numerical algorithms for non-ideal terms, e.g., artificial viscosity, resistivity, and thermal conduction, are introduced in the code via operator splitting method. This code assumes the radiation is in local thermodynamic equilibrium with plasma components and the flux limited diffusion algorithm with grey opacities is implemented for computing the radiation transfer. The transport coefficients and equation of state in this code are obtained from detailed particle population distribution calculation, which makes the numerical model is self-consistent. This code is systematically validated via the Sedov blast solutions and then used for lightning return stroke simulations with the peak current being 20 kA, 30 kA, and 40 kA, respectively. The results show that this numerical model consistent with observations and previous numerical results. The population distribution evolution and energy conservation problems are also discussed.

  12. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetically Choked Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Blandford, Roger D.

    2012-04-26

    Black hole (BH) accretion flows and jets are qualitatively affected by the presence of ordered magnetic fields. We study fully three-dimensional global general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of radially extended and thick (height H to cylindrical radius R ratio of |H/R| {approx} 0.2-1) accretion flows around BHs with various dimensionless spins (a/M, with BH mass M) and with initially toroidally-dominated ({phi}-directed) and poloidally-dominated (R-z directed) magnetic fields. Firstly, for toroidal field models and BHs with high enough |a/M|, coherent large-scale (i.e. >> H) dipolar poloidal magnetic flux patches emerge, thread the BH, and generate transient relativistic jets. Secondly, for poloidal field models, poloidal magnetic flux readily accretes through the disk from large radii and builds-up to a natural saturation point near the BH. While models with |H/R| {approx} 1 and |a/M| {le} 0.5 do not launch jets due to quenching by mass infall, for sufficiently high |a/M| or low |H/R| the polar magnetic field compresses the inflow into a geometrically thin highly non-axisymmetric 'magnetically choked accretion flow' (MCAF) within which the standard linear magneto-rotational instability is suppressed. The condition of a highly-magnetized state over most of the horizon is optimal for the Blandford-Znajek mechanism that generates persistent relativistic jets with and 100% efficiency for |a/M| {approx}> 0.9. A magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetospheric interface forms between the compressed inflow and bulging jet magnetosphere, which drives a new jet-disk oscillation (JDO) type of quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) mechanism. The high-frequency QPO has spherical harmonic |m| = 1 mode period of {tau} {approx} 70GM/c{sup 3} for a/M {approx} 0.9 with coherence quality factors Q {approx}> 10. Overall, our models are qualitatively distinct from most prior MHD simulations (typically, |H/R| << 1 and poloidal flux is limited by

  13. Impact of velocity space distribution on hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the (1,1) mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charlson C.

    2008-07-15

    Numeric studies of the impact of the velocity space distribution on the stabilization of (1,1) internal kink mode and excitation of the fishbone mode are performed with a hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic model. These simulations demonstrate an extension of the physics capabilities of NIMROD[C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)], a three-dimensional extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, to include the kinetic effects of an energetic minority ion species. Kinetic effects are captured by a modification of the usual MHD momentum equation to include a pressure tensor calculated from the {delta}f particle-in-cell method [S. E. Parker and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids B 5, 77 (1993)]. The particles are advanced in the self-consistent NIMROD fields. We outline the implementation and present simulation results of energetic minority ion stabilization of the (1,1) internal kink mode and excitation of the fishbone mode. A benchmark of the linear growth rate and real frequency is shown to agree well with another code. The impact of the details of the velocity space distribution is examined; particularly extending the velocity space cutoff of the simulation particles. Modestly increasing the cutoff strongly impacts the (1,1) mode. Numeric experiments are performed to study the impact of passing versus trapped particles. Observations of these numeric experiments suggest that assumptions of energetic particle effects should be re-examined.

  14. Defining and identifying three-dimensional magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of Earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Dorelli, John C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2008-05-15

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the primary mode by which the solar wind couples to the terrestrial magnetosphere, driving phenomena such as magnetic storms and aurorae. While the theory of two-dimensional reconnection is well developed and has been applied with great success to axisymmetric and toroidal systems such as laboratory plasma experiments and fusion devices, it is difficult to justify the application of two-dimensional theory to nontoroidal plasma systems such as Earth's magnetosphere. Unfortunately, the theory of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection is much less well developed, and even defining magnetic reconnection has turned out to be controversial. In this paper, recent progress in the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to address the physics of three-dimensional reconnection in Earth's magnetosphere is reviewed. The paper consists of two parts. In the first part, various definitions of three-dimensional reconnection are reviewed, with the goal of mapping these definitions to sets of physical phenomena that have been identified as 'reconnection' in various contexts. In the second part of the paper, MHD simulation results for the magnetosphere are presented, and two qualitatively distinct types of reconnection phenomena are identified: (1) Steady separator reconnection under generic northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, involving plasma flow across magnetic separatrices, and (2) time-dependent reconnection under generic southward IMF conditions, involving a locally detectable change in the magnetic field topology. It is concluded that magnetic reconnection phenomena at Earth's dayside magnetopause are adequately captured by two distinct definitions: The Vasyliunas definition [V. M. Vasyliunas, Rev. Geophys 13, 303 (1975)], which identifies magnetic reconnection with plasma flow across magnetic separatrices, and the Greene definition [J. Greene, Phys. Fluids B 5, 2355 (1993)], which identifies magnetic reconnection with a

  15. Simulation of confined magnetohydrodynamic flows with Dirichlet boundary conditions using a pseudo-spectral method with volume penalization

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A.; Leroy, Matthieu; Bos, Wouter J.T.; Schneider, Kai

    2014-10-01

    A volume penalization approach to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in confined domains is presented. Here the incompressible visco-resistive MHD equations are solved using parallel pseudo-spectral solvers in Cartesian geometries. The volume penalization technique is an immersed boundary method which is characterized by a high flexibility for the geometry of the considered flow. In the present case, it allows to use other than periodic boundary conditions in a Fourier pseudo-spectral approach. The numerical method is validated and its convergence is assessed for two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic (HD) and MHD flows, by comparing the numerical results with results from literature and analytical solutions. The test cases considered are two-dimensional Taylor–Couette flow, the z-pinch configuration, three dimensional Orszag–Tang flow, Ohmic-decay in a periodic cylinder, three-dimensional Taylor–Couette flow with and without axial magnetic field and three-dimensional Hartmann-instabilities in a cylinder with an imposed helical magnetic field. Finally, we present a magnetohydrodynamic flow simulation in toroidal geometry with non-symmetric cross section and imposing a helical magnetic field to illustrate the potential of the method.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field of 5 nT, the plasma sheer thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B/sub z/ Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  17. A data-constrained three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation model for a coronal mass ejection initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zhou, Yufen; Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Wu, Chin-Chun; Hu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model based on an observed eruptive twisted flux rope (sigmoid) deduced from solar vector magnetograms. This model is a combination of our two very well tested MHD models: (i) data-driven 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) active region evolution (MHD-DARE) model for the reconstruction of the observed flux rope and (ii) 3-D MHD global coronal-heliosphere evolution (MHD-GCHE) model to track the propagation of the observed flux rope. The 6 September 2011, AR11283, event is used to test this model. First, the formation of the flux rope (sigmoid) from AR11283 is reproduced by the MHD-DARE model with input from the measured vector magnetograms given by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. Second, these results are used as the initial boundary condition for our MHD-GCHE model for the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) as observed. The model output indicates that the flux rope resulting from MHD-DARE produces the physical properties of a CME, and the morphology resembles the observations made by STEREO/COR-1.

  18. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulation of plasma formed on a surface by a megagauss field.

    PubMed

    Esaulov, A A; Bauer, B S; Makhin, V; Siemon, R E; Lindemuth, I R; Awe, T J; Reinovsky, R E; Struve, K W; Desjarlais, M P; Mehlhorn, T A

    2008-03-01

    Radiation magnetohydrodynamic modeling is used to study the plasma formed on the surface of a cylindrical metallic load, driven by megagauss magnetic field at the 1MA Zebra generator (University of Nevada, Reno). An ionized aluminum plasma is used to represent the "core-corona" behavior in which a heterogeneous Z-pinch consists of a hot low-density corona surrounding a dense low-temperature core. The radiation dynamics model included simultaneously a self-consistent treatment of both the opaque and transparent plasma regions in a corona. For the parameters of this experiment, the boundary of the opaque plasma region emits the major radiation power with Planckian black-body spectrum in the extreme ultraviolet corresponding to an equilibrium temperature of 16 eV. The radiation heat transport significantly exceeds the electron and ion kinetic heat transport in the outer layers of the opaque plasma. Electromagnetic field energy is partly radiated (13%) and partly deposited into inner corona and core regions (87%). Surface temperature estimates are sensitive to the radiation effects, but the surface motion in response to pressure and magnetic forces is not. The general results of the present investigation are applicable to the liner compression experiments at multi-MA long-pulse current accelerators such as Atlas and Shiva Star. Also the radiation magnetohydrodynamic model discussed in the paper may be useful for understanding key effects of wire array implosion dynamics.

  19. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetospheric dynamics when the IMF is southward: Mapping to the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Raeder, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model is used to investigate magnetospheric dynamics during intervals with southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). When the southward IMF reaches the dayside magnetopause reconnection begins and magnetic flux is convected into the tail lobes. After about 35 m, reconnection begins within the plasma sheet near midnight at x = -14 RE. Later the x-line moves towards the magnetopause. The reconnection occurs just tailward of the region where the tail attaches onto the dipole dominated inner magnetosphere. Later when all the plasma sheet field lines have reconnected a plasmoid moves down the tail. The region of the ionosphere where the energy flux from the magnetosphere is greatest is calculated. The energy flux is confined to a region which approximates the auroral oval.

  20. Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-20

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  1. Comparison of Physical Properties of Quiet and Active Regions Through the Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criscuoli, S.

    2013-11-01

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  2. THE ROLE OF A FLUX ROPE EJECTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Keisuke; Shibata, Kazunari; Nishizuka, Naoto

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the dynamic evolution of a three-dimensional (3D) flux rope eruption and magnetic reconnection process in a solar flare by simply extending the two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulation model of solar flares with low β plasma to a 3D model. We succeeded in reproducing a current sheet and bi-directional reconnection outflows just below the flux rope during the eruption in our 3D simulations. We calculated four cases of a strongly twisted flux rope and a weakly twisted flux rope in 2D and 3D simulations. The time evolution of a weakly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation shows behaviors similar to those of the 2D simulation, while a strongly twisted flux rope in the 3D simulation clearly shows a different time evolution from the 2D simulation except for the initial phase evolution. The ejection speeds of both strongly and weakly twisted flux ropes in 3D simulations are larger than in the 2D simulations, and the reconnection rates in 3D cases are also larger than in the 2D cases. This indicates positive feedback between the ejection speed of a flux rope and the reconnection rate even in the 3D simulation, and we conclude that the plasmoid-induced reconnection model can be applied to 3D. We also found that small-scale plasmoids are formed inside a current sheet and make it turbulent. These small-scale plasmoid ejections have a role in locally increasing the reconnection rate intermittently as observed in solar flares, coupled with a global eruption of a flux rope.

  3. Magneto-hydrodynamics simulation study of deflagration mode in co-axial plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies by Poehlmann et al. [Phys. Plasmas 17(12), 123508 (2010)] on a coaxial electrode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma accelerator have revealed two modes of operation. A deflagration or stationary mode is observed for lower power settings, while higher input power leads to a detonation or snowplow mode. A numerical modeling study of a coaxial plasma accelerator using the non-ideal MHD equations is presented. The effect of plasma conductivity on the axial distribution of radial current is studied and found to agree well with experiments. Lower conductivities lead to the formation of a high current density, stationary region close to the inlet/breech, which is a characteristic of the deflagration mode, while a propagating current sheet like feature is observed at higher conductivities, similar to the detonation mode. Results confirm that plasma resistivity, which determines magnetic field diffusion effects, is fundamentally responsible for the two modes.

  4. Magneto-hydrodynamics simulation study of deflagration mode in co-axial plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2014-01-15

    Experimental studies by Poehlmann et al. [Phys. Plasmas 17(12), 123508 (2010)] on a coaxial electrode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma accelerator have revealed two modes of operation. A deflagration or stationary mode is observed for lower power settings, while higher input power leads to a detonation or snowplow mode. A numerical modeling study of a coaxial plasma accelerator using the non-ideal MHD equations is presented. The effect of plasma conductivity on the axial distribution of radial current is studied and found to agree well with experiments. Lower conductivities lead to the formation of a high current density, stationary region close to the inlet/breech, which is a characteristic of the deflagration mode, while a propagating current sheet like feature is observed at higher conductivities, similar to the detonation mode. Results confirm that plasma resistivity, which determines magnetic field diffusion effects, is fundamentally responsible for the two modes.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of interplanetary propagation of multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux rope (SUSANOO-CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, D.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. Here we report a newly developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields. First, the polarity of the spheromak magnetic field is set as determined automatically according to the Hale-Nicholson law and the chirality law of Bothmer and Schwenn. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the southward interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. This profile is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts of magnetic storms. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003, and present the result of a simulation of the solar wind parameters at the Earth during the 2003 Halloween storms. We succeeded in reproducing the arrival at the Earth's position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm. We find that the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth could be reasonably well understood by the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  7. Evidence of the Correspondence of EIT Waves and Coronal Mass Ejections Induced Waves Using a Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Wu, C.-C.; Liou, K.

    2013-04-01

    Before the discovery of EIT waves and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) it was already known that Moreton waves were observed to propagate across the solar disk during some solar flares. This magnetohydrodynamic wave was explained as the intersecting line between the edge of an expanding global coronal wavefront and the chromosphere (Uchida, 1968) where Uchida concluded that the Moreton wave was a fast mode MHD wave. In this presentation, we will show that the EIT wave could be a part of a CME induced wave propagating across the solar disk. To illustrate this scenario, we have employed a global 3D MHD model (Wu et al. 2001) to simulate this phenomenon for the May 12, 1997 event which was an Earth-directed CME observed by SOHO/EIT (Thompson et al. 1998). To carry out this simulation, the measured global magnetic fields obtained from the Stanford University Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) were used as the inputs to the simulation model. We were able to show that the scenario suggested by Uchida (1968), namely, the observed EIT wave propagating across the solar disk could be caused by the intersection line between the edge of an expanding CME induced wave front and the chromosphere. In addition to the flare source scenario, we concluded that an EIT (or EUV) wave can also be a part of a flare induced coronal wave with its foot print on the Sun's surface.

  8. Advancements in the Coupling of State-of-the-Art Energetic Particle and Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in coupling the Earth Moon Mars Radiation Environment Module (EMMREM) and two MHD models, Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS) and ENLIL, have yielded promising results for predicting differential energy flux and radiation doses at 1AU. The EMMREM+MAS coupling focuses on the details of particle acceleration due to CMEs initiated low in the corona (1Rs - 20Rs). The EMMREM+ENLIL coupling gives results for CMEs initiated at ~20Rs and is part of a predictive capability being developed in conjunction with the CCMC. The challenge in forming large solar energetic particle events in both the prompt scenario lower down or for a gradual CME further out is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration regions while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream. We present here details of the MHD parameters and topology of a CME around the acceleration regions in the early evolution (below 2Rs), dose and flux predictions at 1AU, and how compression regions vs. shocks affect the evolution and spectrum of an SEP event.

  9. Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-SI) Spheromak Experiment with the NIMROD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Cihan

    A comparative study of 3-D pressureless resistive (single-fluid) magnetohydrodynamic (rMHD) and 3-D pressureless two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (2fl-MHD) models of the Helicity Injected Torus experiment (HIT-SI) is presented. HIT-SI is a spheromak current-drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate that steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI) is a viable method for driving and sustaining a magnetized plasma for the eventual purpose of electricity production with magnetic fusion power. The experiment has achieved sustainment of nearly 100 kA of plasma current for ˜1~ms. Fusion power plants are expected to sustain a burning plasma for many minutes to hours with more than 10~MA of plasma current. The purpose of project is to determine the validity of the single-fluid and two-fluid MHD models of HIT-SI. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth to the diameter of the injectors and resistive skin depth predicates the importance of two-fluid effects. The simulations are run with NIMROD (non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics code with rotation-open discussion), an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. A constant and uniform plasma density and temperature are assumed. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification and formation time

  10. Simulation of Alfvén eigenmode bursts using a hybrid code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics and energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B. N.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid simulation code for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and energetic-particle dynamics has been extended to simulate recurrent bursts of Alfvén eigenmodes by implementing the energetic-particle source, collisions and losses. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts with synchronization of multiple modes and beam ion losses at each burst are successfully simulated with nonlinear MHD effects for the physics condition similar to a reduced simulation for a TFTR experiment (Wong et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 1874, Todo et al 2003 Phys. Plasmas 10 2888). It is demonstrated with a comparison between nonlinear MHD and linear MHD simulation results that the nonlinear MHD effects significantly reduce both the saturation amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes and the beam ion losses. Two types of time evolution are found depending on the MHD dissipation coefficients, namely viscosity, resistivity and diffusivity. The Alfvén eigenmode bursts take place for higher dissipation coefficients with roughly 10% drop in stored beam energy and the maximum amplitude of the dominant magnetic fluctuation harmonic δBm/n/B ~ 5 × 10-3 at the mode peak location inside the plasma. Quadratic dependence of beam ion loss rate on magnetic fluctuation amplitude is found for the bursting evolution in the nonlinear MHD simulation. For lower dissipation coefficients, the amplitude of the Alfvén eigenmodes is at steady levels δBm/n/B ~ 2 × 10-3 and the beam ion losses take place continuously. The beam ion pressure profiles are similar among the different dissipation coefficients, and the stored beam energy is higher for higher dissipation coefficients.

  11. Comparative statistics of selected subgrid-scale models in large-eddy simulations of decaying, supersonic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grete, Philipp; Vlaykov, Dimitar G.; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2017-03-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) are a powerful tool in understanding processes that are inaccessible by direct simulations due to their complexity, for example, in the highly turbulent regime. However, their accuracy and success depends on a proper subgrid-scale (SGS) model that accounts for the unresolved scales in the simulation. We evaluate the applicability of two traditional SGS models, namely the eddy-viscosity (EV) and the scale-similarity (SS) models, and one recently proposed nonlinear (NL) SGS model in the realm of compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Using 209 simulations of decaying, supersonic (initial sonic Mach number Ms≈3 ) MHD turbulence with a shock-capturing scheme and varying resolution, SGS model, and filter, we analyze the ensemble statistics of kinetic and magnetic energy spectra and structure functions. Furthermore, we compare the temporal evolution of lower- and higher-order statistical moments of the spatial distributions of kinetic and magnetic energy, vorticity, current density, and dilatation magnitudes. We find no statistical influence on the evolution of the flow by any model if grid-scale quantities are used to calculate SGS contributions. In addition, the SS models, which employ an explicit filter, have no impact in general. On the contrary, both the EV and NL models change the statistics if an explicit filter is used. For example, they slightly increase the dissipation on the smallest scales. We demonstrate that the nonlinear model improves higher-order statistics already with a small explicit filter, i.e., a three-point stencil. The results of, e.g., the structure functions or the skewness and kurtosis of the current density distribution are closer to the ones obtained from simulations at higher resolution. In addition, no additional regularization to stabilize the model is required. We conclude that the nonlinear model with a small explicit filter is suitable for application in more complex scenarios when higher

  12. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hoeksema, J T; Liu, Y; Bobra, M G; Sun, X D; Norton, A A

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  13. On the Use of Space-Environmental Satellite Data for Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations. Time-Scale Initialisation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Maibys Sierra; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mecías, Angela León; Menconi, Varlei Everton; Mendes, Odim

    2016-12-01

    A global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model describes the solar-terrestrial system and the physical processes that live in it. Information obtained from satellites provides input to MHD model to compose a more realistic initial state for the equations and, therefore, more accurate simulations. However, the use of high resolution in time data can produce numerical instabilities that quickly interrupt the simulations. Moreover, satellite time series may have gaps which could be a problem in this context. In order to contribute to the overcoming of such challenges, we propose in this work a methodology based on a variant of the continuous wavelet transform to introduce environmental satellite data on the global resistive MHD model originally developed by Prof. Ogino at the University of Nagoya. Our methodology uses a simplified time-scale version of the original data that preserves the most important spectral features of the phenomena of interest. Then, we can do a long-term integration using this MHD model without any computational instability, while preserving the main time-scale features of the original data set and even overcome possible occurrence of gaps on the satellite data. This methodology also contributes to keeping more realistic physical results.

  14. A global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward: The onset of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Raeder, J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1993-10-01

    The authors have used a new high-resolution global magnetohydrodynamic simulation model to investigate the onset of reconnection in the magnetotail during intervals with southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). After the southward IMF reaches the dayside magnetopause, reconnection begins and magnetic flux is convected into the tail lobes. After about 35 min, reconnection begins within the plasma sheet near midnight at x = 14R{sub E}. Later the x line moves toward dawn and dusk. The reconnection occurs just tailward of the region where the tail attaches onto the dipole-dominated inner magnetosphere. The simulation shows that prior to the onset of reconnection, the Poynting flux is concentrated in this region. The time required for the start of reconnection depends on the component of the magnetic field normal to the equator (B{sub z}). Reconnection occurs only after the B{sub z} component has been reduced sufficiently for the tearing mode to grow. Later, when all the plasma sheet field lines have reconnected, a plasmoid moves down the tail. 63 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  16. Realization of autofocusing system for laser direct writing on non-planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianbo; Liang, Yiyong; Yang, Guoguang

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents an autofocusing system for laser direct writing on non-planar surfaces, including focus error signal detection and focusing control. The focus error signal detection is based on modified confocal techniques, which features easy implementation, independence of the tilt angles of non-planar surfaces, and excellent suppression of common-mode noise or variable system factors. We also present a macro/micro dual-drive mechanism and its synchronous operation for focusing control on non-planar surfaces. Finally, a performance evaluation of the autofocusing system is presented. The uniform line width of 2.1 μm for a pattern on a convex spherical substrate with a curvature radius of 100 mm shows the autofocusing system performs well.

  17. Neutrino magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2016-01-15

    A new neutrino magnetohydrodynamics (NMHD) model is formulated, where the effects of the charged weak current on the electron-ion magnetohydrodynamic fluid are taken into account. The model incorporates in a systematic way the role of the Fermi neutrino weak force in magnetized plasmas. A fast neutrino-driven short wavelengths instability associated with the magnetosonic wave is derived. Such an instability should play a central role in strongly magnetized plasma as occurs in supernovae, where dense neutrino beams also exist. In addition, in the case of nonlinear or high frequency waves, the neutrino coupling is shown to be responsible for breaking the frozen-in magnetic field lines condition even in infinite conductivity plasmas. Simplified and ideal NMHD assumptions were adopted and analyzed in detail.

  18. Fabrication of small-scale structures with non-planar features

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David B.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2015-11-19

    The fabrication of small-scale structures is disclosed. A unit-cell of a small-scale structure with non-planar features is fabricated by forming a membrane on a suitable material. A pattern is formed in the membrane and a portion of the substrate underneath the membrane is removed to form a cavity. Resonators are then directionally deposited on the wall or sides of the cavity. The cavity may be rotated during deposition to form closed-loop resonators. The resonators may be non-planar. The unit-cells can be formed in a layer that includes an array of unit-cells.

  19. Fabrication method for small-scale structures with non-planar features

    DOEpatents

    Burckel, David Bruce; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2016-09-20

    The fabrication of small-scale structures is disclosed. A unit-cell of a small-scale structure with non-planar features is fabricated by forming a membrane on a suitable material. A pattern is formed in the membrane and a portion of the substrate underneath the membrane is removed to form a cavity. Resonators are then directionally deposited on the wall or sides of the cavity. The cavity may be rotated during deposition to form closed-loop resonators. The resonators may be non-planar. The unit-cells can be formed in a layer that includes an array of unit-cells.

  20. Local properties of magnetic reconnection in nonlinear resistive- and extended-magnetohydrodynamic toroidal simulations of the sawtooth crash

    DOE PAGES

    Beidler, M. T.; Cassak, P. A.; Jardin, S. C.; ...

    2016-12-15

    We diagnose local properties of magnetic reconnection during a sawtooth crash employing the three-dimensional toroidal, extended-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code M3D-C1. To do so, we sample simulation data in the plane in which reconnection occurs, the plane perpendicular to the helical (m, n) = (1, 1) mode at the q = 1 surface, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers and q is the safety factor. We study the nonlinear evolution of a particular test equilibrium in a non-reduced field representation using both resistive-MHD and extended-MHD models. We find growth rates for the extended-MHD reconnection process exhibit amore » nonlinear acceleration and greatly exceed that of the resistive-MHD model, as is expected from previous experimental, theoretical, and computational work. We compare the properties of reconnection in the two simulations, revealing the reconnecting current sheets are locally different in the two models and we present the first observation of the quadrupole out-of-plane Hall magnetic field that appears during extended-MHD reconnection in a 3D toroidal simulation (but not in resistive-MHD). We also explore the dependence on toroidal angle of the properties of reconnection as viewed in the plane perpendicular to the helical magnetic field, finding qualitative and quantitative effects due to changes in the symmetry of the reconnection process. Furthermore, this study is potentially important for a wide range of magnetically confined fusion applications, from confirming simulations with extended-MHD effects are sufficiently resolved to describe reconnection, to quantifying local reconnection rates for purposes of understanding and predicting transport, not only at the q = 1 rational surface for sawteeth, but also at higher order rational surfaces that play a role in disruptions and edge-confinement degradation.« less

  1. Efficient magnetohydrodynamic simulations on distributed multi-GPU systems using a novel GPU Direct-MPI hybrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Un-Hong; Aoki, Takayuki; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely utilized in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in recent years. Due to the limited memory of a single GPU, distributed multi-GPU systems are needed to be explored for large-scale MHD simulations. However, the data transfer between GPUs bottlenecks the efficiency of the simulations on such systems. In this paper we propose a novel GPU Direct-MPI hybrid approach to address this problem for overall performance enhancement. Our approach consists of two strategies: (1) We exploit GPU Direct 2.0 to speedup the data transfers between multiple GPUs in a single node and reduce the total number of message passing interface (MPI) communications; (2) We design Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) kernels instead of using memory copy to speedup the fragmented data exchange in the three-dimensional (3D) decomposition. 3D decomposition is usually not preferable for distributed multi-GPU systems due to its low efficiency of the fragmented data exchange. Our approach has made a breakthrough to make 3D decomposition available on distributed multi-GPU systems. As a result, it can reduce the memory usage and computation time of each partition of the computational domain. Experiment results show twice the FLOPS comparing to common 2D decomposition MPI-only implementation method. The proposed approach has been developed in an efficient implementation for MHD simulations on distributed multi-GPU systems, called MGPU-MHD code. The code realizes the GPU parallelization of a total variation diminishing (TVD) algorithm for solving the multidimensional ideal MHD equations, extending our work from single GPU computation (Wong et al., 2011) to multiple GPUs. Numerical tests and performance measurements are conducted on the TSUBAME 2.0 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Our code achieves 2 TFLOPS in double precision for the problem with 12003 grid points using 216 GPUs.

  2. Local properties of magnetic reconnection in nonlinear resistive- and extended-magnetohydrodynamic toroidal simulations of the sawtooth crash

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, M. T.; Cassak, P. A.; Jardin, S. C.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2016-12-15

    We diagnose local properties of magnetic reconnection during a sawtooth crash employing the three-dimensional toroidal, extended-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code M3D-C1. To do so, we sample simulation data in the plane in which reconnection occurs, the plane perpendicular to the helical (m, n) = (1, 1) mode at the q = 1 surface, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers and q is the safety factor. We study the nonlinear evolution of a particular test equilibrium in a non-reduced field representation using both resistive-MHD and extended-MHD models. We find growth rates for the extended-MHD reconnection process exhibit a nonlinear acceleration and greatly exceed that of the resistive-MHD model, as is expected from previous experimental, theoretical, and computational work. We compare the properties of reconnection in the two simulations, revealing the reconnecting current sheets are locally different in the two models and we present the first observation of the quadrupole out-of-plane Hall magnetic field that appears during extended-MHD reconnection in a 3D toroidal simulation (but not in resistive-MHD). We also explore the dependence on toroidal angle of the properties of reconnection as viewed in the plane perpendicular to the helical magnetic field, finding qualitative and quantitative effects due to changes in the symmetry of the reconnection process. Furthermore, this study is potentially important for a wide range of magnetically confined fusion applications, from confirming simulations with extended-MHD effects are sufficiently resolved to describe reconnection, to quantifying local reconnection rates for purposes of understanding and predicting transport, not only at the q = 1 rational surface for sawteeth, but also at higher order rational surfaces that play a role in disruptions and edge-confinement degradation.

  3. Local properties of magnetic reconnection in nonlinear resistive- and extended-magnetohydrodynamic toroidal simulations of the sawtooth crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, M. T.; Cassak, P. A.; Jardin, S. C.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2017-02-01

    We diagnose local properties of magnetic reconnection during a sawtooth crash employing the three-dimensional toroidal, extended-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code M3D-C1. To do so, we sample simulation data in the plane in which reconnection occurs, the plane perpendicular to the helical (m,n)=(1,1) mode at the q = 1 surface, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers and q is the safety factor. We study the nonlinear evolution of a particular test equilibrium in a non-reduced field representation using both resistive-MHD and extended-MHD models. We find growth rates for the extended-MHD reconnection process exhibit a nonlinear acceleration and greatly exceed that of the resistive-MHD model, as is expected from previous experimental, theoretical, and computational work. We compare the properties of reconnection in the two simulations, revealing the reconnecting current sheets are locally different in the two models and we present the first observation of the quadrupole out-of-plane Hall magnetic field that appears during extended-MHD reconnection in a 3D toroidal simulation (but not in resistive-MHD). We also explore the dependence on toroidal angle of the properties of reconnection as viewed in the plane perpendicular to the helical magnetic field, finding qualitative and quantitative effects due to changes in the symmetry of the reconnection process. This study is potentially important for a wide range of magnetically confined fusion applications, from confirming simulations with extended-MHD effects are sufficiently resolved to describe reconnection, to quantifying local reconnection rates for purposes of understanding and predicting transport, not only at the q = 1 rational surface for sawteeth, but also at higher order rational surfaces that play a role in disruptions and edge-confinement degradation.

  4. Episodic slow slip events in a non-planar subduction fault model for northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Liu, Y.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shibazaki, B.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slow slip (ETS) events have been detected along the Cascadia margin, as well as many other subduction zones, by increasingly dense seismic and geodetic networks over the past decade. In northern Cascadia, ETS events arise on the thrust fault interface of 30~50 km depth, coincident with metamorphic dehydration of the subducting oceanic slab around temperatures of 350. Previous numerical simulations (e.g., Liu and Rice 2007) suggested that near-lithostatic pore pressure in the rate-state friction stability transition zone could give rise to slow slip events (SSE) down-dip of the seismogenic zone, which provides a plausible physical mechanism for these phenomena. Here we present a 3-D numerical simulation of inter-seismic SSEs based on the rate- and state- friction law, incorporating a non-planar, realistic northern Cascadia slab geometry compiled by McCrory et al. (2012) using triangular dislocation elements. Preliminary results show that the width and pore pressure level of the transition zone can remarkably affect the recurrence of SSEs. With effective normal stress of ~1-2 MPa and characteristic slip distance of ~1.4 mm, inter-seismic SSEs can arise about every year. The duration of each event is about 2~3 weeks, with the propagating speed along strike in the range of km/day. Furthermore, the slab bending beneath southern Vancouver Island and northern Washington State appears to accelerate the along-strike propagation of SSEs. Our next step is to constrain the rate-state frictional properties using geodetic inversion of SSE slip and inter-SSE plate coupling from the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS measurements. Incorporating the realistic fault geometry into a physics model constrained by geodetic data will enable us to transition from a conceptual towards a quantitative and predictive understanding of SSEs mechanism.

  5. Simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with application to plasma-assisted supersonic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kenji

    Plasma assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising alternative to hold or ignite a fuel and air mixture in a supersonic environment. Efficient supersonic combustion is of primary importance for SCRAMJET technology. The advantages of PAC is the addition of large amounts of energy to specific regions of the SCRAMJET flow-field for short periods of time, and as a result accelerate the fuel/air kinetic rates to achieve a self-sustaining condition. Moreover, the promise of enhancement of fuel-air mixing by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow control offers significant improvement of combustion performance. The development of a numerical tool for investigating high-temperature chemistry and plasmadynamic effects of a discharge arc is desired to gain understanding of PAC technology and the potential improvement of the operational efficiency of SCRAMJET engines. The main objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive model with the capability of modeling both high Reynolds number and high magnetic Reynolds number turbulent flow for application to supersonic combustor. The development of this model can be divided into three categories: first, the development of a self-consistent MHD numerical model capable of modeling magnetic turbulence in high magnetic Reynolds number applications. Second, the development of a gas discharge model which models the interaction of externally applied fields in conductive medium. Third, the development of models necessary for studying supersonic combustion applications with plasma-assistance such the extension of chemical kinetics models to extremely high temperature and non-equilibrium phenomenon. Finally, these models are combined and utilized to model plasma assisted combustion in a SCRAMJET. Two types of plasmas are investigated: an equilibrium electrical discharge (arc) and a non-equilibrium plasma jet. It is shown that both plasmas significantly increase the concentration of radicals such as O, OH and H, and both have positive impact

  6. Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, W.; Woodward, P.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) discontinuities are studied through numerical simulations for the set of one-dimensional MHD equations. The interactions include the impact of a shock on a contact discontinuity, the collision of two shocks, and the catchup of a shock over another shock. The shocks involved in the interactions may be very strong. Each shock in an interaction may be either a fast or a slow shock.

  7. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the x2.2 solar flare on 2011 February 15. I. Comparison with the observations

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Hayashi, K.; Park, Y. D.

    2014-06-20

    We performed a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation using a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) in solar active region 11158 to clarify the dynamics of an X2.2-class solar flare. We found that the NLFFF never shows the dramatic dynamics seen in observations, i.e., it is in a stable state against the perturbations. On the other hand, the MHD simulation shows that when the strongly twisted lines are formed at close to the neutral line, which are produced via tether-cutting reconnection in the twisted lines of the NLFFF, they consequently erupt away from the solar surface via the complicated reconnection. This result supports the argument that the strongly twisted lines formed in NLFFF via tether-cutting reconnection are responsible for breaking the force balance condition of the magnetic fields in the lower solar corona. In addition to this, the dynamical evolution of these field lines reveals that at the initial stage the spatial pattern of the footpoints caused by the reconnection of the twisted lines appropriately maps the distribution of the observed two-ribbon flares. Interestingly, after the flare, the reconnected field lines convert into a structure like the post-flare loops, which is analogous to the extreme ultraviolet image taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Eventually, we found that the twisted lines exceed a critical height at which the flux tube becomes unstable to the torus instability. These results illustrate the reliability of our simulation and also provide an important relationship between flare and coronal mass ejection dynamics.

  9. Numerical investigation of blood flow in a deformable coronary bifurcation and non-planar branch

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Esmail; Omidi, Amir Ali; Saghafi Zanjani, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Among cardiovascular diseases, arterials stenosis is recognized more commonly than the others. Hemodynamic characteristics of blood play a key role in the incidence of stenosis. This paper numerically investigates the pulsatile blood flow in a coronary bifurcation with a non-planar branch. To create a more realistic analysis, the wall is assumed to be compliant. Furthermore, the flow is considered to be three-dimensional, incompressible, and laminar. Methods: The effects of non-Newtonian blood, compliant walls and different angles of bifurcation on hemodynamic characteristics of flow were evaluated. Shear thinning of blood was simulated with the Carreau-Yasuda model. The current research was mainly focused on the flow characteristics in bifurcations since atherosclerosis occurs mostly in bifurcations. Moreover, as the areas with low shear stresses are prone to stenosis, these areas were identified. Results: Our findings indicated that the compliant model of the wall, bifurcation’s angle, and other physical properties of flow have an impact on hemodynamics of blood flow. Lower wall shear stress was observed in the compliant wall than that in the rigid wall. The outer wall of bifurcation in all models had lower wall shear stress. In bifurcations with larger angles, wall shear stress was higher in outer walls, and lower in inner walls. Conclusion: The non-Newtonian blood vessels and different angles of bifurcation on hemodynamic characteristics of flow evaluation confirmed a lower wall shear stress in the compliant wall than that in the rigid wall, while the wall shear stress was higher in outer walls but lower in inner walls in the bifurcation regions with larger angles. PMID:25671176

  10. 2D and 3D Non-planar Dynamic Rupture by a Finite Volume Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjemaa, M.; Glinsky-Olivier, N.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Piperno, S.; Lanteri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the physics of the rupture process requires very sophisticated and accurate tools in which both the geometry of the fault surface and realistic frictional behaviours could interact during rupture propagation. New formulations have been recently proposed for modelling the dynamic shear rupture of non-planar faults (Ando et al., 2004; Cruz-Atienza &Virieux, 2004; Huang &Costanzo, 2004) providing highly accurate field estimates nearby the crack edges at the expanse of a simple medium description or high computational cost. We propose a new method based on the finite volume formulation to model the dynamic rupture propagation of non-planar faults. After proper transformations of the velocity-stress elastodynamic system of partial differential equations following an explicit conservative law, we construct an unstructured time-domain numerical formulation of the crack problem. As a result, arbitrary non-planar faults can be explicitly represented without extra computational cost. The analysis of the total discrete energy through the fault surface leads us to the specification of dynamic rupture boundary conditions which insure the correct discrete energy time variation and, therefore, the system stability. These boundary conditions are set on stress fluxes and not on stress values, which makes the fracture to have no thickness. Different shapes of cracks are analysed. We present an example of a bidimensional non-planar spontaneous fault growth in heterogeneous media as well as preliminary results of a highly efficient extension to the three dimensional rupture model based on the standard MPI.

  11. Non-planar Feynman diagrams and Mellin-Barnes representations with AMBRE 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovyk, Ievgen; Gluza, Janusz; Riemann, Tord

    2015-05-01

    We introduce the Mellin-Barnes representation of general Feynman integrals and discuss their evaluation. The Mathematica package AMBRE has been recently extended in order to cover consistently non-planar Feynman integrals with two loops. Prospects for the near future are outlined. This write-up is an introduction to new results which have also been presented elsewhere.

  12. Analysis and design of planar and non-planar wings for induced drag minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortara, K.; Straussfogel, Dennis M.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work was to develop and validate computational tools to be used for the design of planar and non-planar wing geometries for minimum induced drag. Because of the iterative nature of the design problem, it is important that, in addition to being sufficiently accurate for the problem at hand, they are reasonably fast and computationally efficient. Toward this end, a method of predicting induced drag in the presence of a non-rigid wake is coupled with a panel method. The induced drag prediction technique is based on the Kutta-Joukowski law applied at the trailing edge. Until recently, the use of this method has not been fully explored and pressure integration and Trefftz-plane calculations favored. As is shown in this report, however, the Kutta-Joukowski method is able to give better results for a given amount of effort than the more common techniques, particularly when relaxed wakes and non-planar wing geometries are considered. Using these tools, a workable design method is in place which takes into account relaxed wakes and non-planar wing geometries. It is recommended that this method be used to design a wind-tunnel experiment to verify the predicted aerodynamic benefits of non-planar wing geometries.

  13. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  14. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN AND ABOVE POST-FLARE LOOPS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION AND A SIMPLIFIED MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Naoki; Shibata, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Takuma

    2015-06-01

    Solar flares are an explosive phenomenon where super-sonic flows and shocks are expected in and above the post-flare loops. To understand the dynamics of post-flare loops, a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulation of a solar flare has been carried out. We found new shock structures in and above the post-flare loops, which were not resolved in the previous work by Yokoyama and Shibata. To study the dynamics of flows along the reconnected magnetic field, the kinematics and energetics of the plasma are investigated along selected field lines. It is found that shocks are crucial to determine the thermal and flow structures in the post-flare loops. On the basis of the 2D MHD simulation, we developed a new post-flare loop model, which we defined as the pseudo-2D MHD model. The model is based on the one-dimensional (1D) MHD equations, where all variables depend on one space dimension, and all the three components of the magnetic and velocity fields are considered. Our pseudo-2D model includes many features of the multi-dimensional MHD processes related to magnetic reconnection (particularly MHD shocks), which the previous 1D hydrodynamic models are not able to include. We compared the shock formation and energetics of a specific field line in the 2D calculation with those in our pseudo-2D MHD model, and found that they give similar results. This model will allow us to study the evolution of the post-flare loops in a wide parameter space without expensive computational cost or neglecting important physics associated with magnetic reconnection.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  17. Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss modes in (non-) planar four-mirror cavities for future gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Noack, Andreas; Bogan, Christina; Willke, Benno

    2017-02-15

    One of the limiting noise sources in the current generation of gravitational wave detectors, such as the advanced laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (aLIGO), is the thermal noise in the interferometer's test mass coatings. One proposed method to reduce the coupling of this noise source to the gravitational wave readout is using a laser beam in the higher-order spatial LG33 mode within the interferometer. Here we show that the current four-mirror cavities of aLIGO are not compatible with Laguerre-Gauss modes due to astigmatism. A non-degeneracy of modes of the same order could be observed in experiment and simulation. We demonstrate that a non-planar cavity could be used instead as it compensates for the astigmatism and transmits the LG33 mode undisturbed.

  18. A New Physics-Based Modeling of Multiple Non-Planar Hydraulic Fractures Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jing; Huang, Hai; Deo, Milind; Jiang, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the low permeability in shale plays, closely spaced hydraulic fractures and multilateral horizontal wells are generally required to improve production. Therefore, understanding the potential fracture interaction and stress evolution is critical in optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multi-stage horizontal wells. In this paper, a novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple non-planar fractures propagation. The numerical model from Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to simulate the mechanics of fracture propagations and interactions, while a conjugate irregular lattice network is generated to represent fluid flow in both fractures and formation. The fluid flow in the formation is controlled by Darcy’s law, but within fractures it is simulated by using cubic law for laminar flow through parallel plates. Initiation, growth and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. We investigate the fracture propagation path in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs using the simulator developed. Stress shadow caused by the transverse fracture will change the orientation of principal stress in the fracture neighborhood, which may inhibit or alter the growth direction of nearby fracture clusters. However, the initial in-situ stress anisotropy often helps overcome this phenomenon. Under large in-situ stress anisotropy, the hydraulic fractures are more likely to propagate in a direction that is perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress. Under small in-situ stress anisotropy, there is a greater chance for fractures from nearby clusters to merge with each other. Then, we examine the differences in fracture geometry caused by fracturing in cemented or uncemented wellbore. Moreover, the impact of

  19. MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION DYNAMICS FROM 3D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dário; Charbonneau, Paul; Miesch, Mark

    2015-02-10

    The form of solar meridional circulation is a very important ingredient for mean field flux transport dynamo models. However, a shroud of mystery still surrounds this large-scale flow, given that its measurement using current helioseismic techniques is challenging. In this work, we use results from three-dimensional global simulations of solar convection to infer the dynamical behavior of the established meridional circulation. We make a direct comparison between the meridional circulation that arises in these simulations and the latest observations. Based on our results, we argue that there should be an equatorward flow at the base of the convection zone at mid-latitudes, below the current maximum depth helioseismic measures can probe (0.75 R{sub ⊙}). We also provide physical arguments to justify this behavior. The simulations indicate that the meridional circulation undergoes substantial changes in morphology as the magnetic cycle unfolds. We close by discussing the importance of these dynamical changes for current methods of observation which involve long averaging periods of helioseismic data. Also noteworthy is the fact that these topological changes indicate a rich interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows, which challenges the ubiquitous kinematic approach used in the vast majority of mean field dynamo simulations.

  20. Contrasting Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence with alpha-Viscosity in Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragile, P. Christopher Christopher; Etheridge, Sarina Marie; Anninos, Peter; Mishra, Bhupendra

    2017-01-01

    Many analytic, semi-analytic, and even some numerical treatments of black hole accretion parametrize the stresses within the disk as an effective viscosity, even though the true source of stresses is likely to be turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. Despite some attempts to quantify the differences between these treatments, it remains unclear exactly what the consequences of a viscous treatment are, especially in the context of the temporal and spatial variability of global disk parameters. We use the astrophysics code, Cosmos++, to create two accretion disk simulations using alpha-viscosity, one thin and one thick. These simulations are then compared to similar work done using MHD in order to analyze the extent of the validity of the alpha-model. One expected result, which we, nevertheless, demonstrate is the greater spatial and temporal variability of MHD.

  1. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Jet Formation with a Thin Keplerian Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Hardee, Philip; Gerald, J. Fishman

    2006-01-01

    We have performed several simulations of black hole systems (non-rotating, black hole spin parameter a = 0.0 and rapidly rotating, a = 0.95) with a geometrically thin Keplerian disk using the newly developed RAISHIN code. The simulation results show the formation of jets driven by the Lorentz force and the gas pressure gradient. The jets have mildly relativistic speed (greater than or equal to 0.4 c). The matter is continuously supplied from the accretion disk and the jet propagates outward until each applicable terminal simulation time (non-rotating: t/tau S = 275 and rotating: t/tau S = 200, tau s equivalent to r(sub s/c). It appears that a rotating black hole creates an additional, faster, and more collimated inner outflow (greater than or equal to 0.5 c) formed and accelerated by the twisted magnetic field resulting from frame-dragging in the black hole ergosphere. This new result indicates that jet kinematic structure depends on black hole rotation.

  2. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. 1; Instability of a Static Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the non-linear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  3. SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A TWO-COMPONENT OUTFLOW POWERED BY MAGNETIC EXPLOSION ON COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Asano, Eiji; Shibata, Kazunari; Masada, Youhei

    2011-05-20

    The nonlinear dynamics of outflows driven by magnetic explosion on the surface of a compact star is investigated through special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We adopt, as the initial equilibrium state, a spherical stellar object embedded in hydrostatic plasma which has a density {rho}(r) {proportional_to} r{sup -}{alpha} and is threaded by a dipole magnetic field. The injection of magnetic energy at the surface of a compact star breaks the equilibrium and triggers a two-component outflow. At the early evolutionary stage, the magnetic pressure increases rapidly around the stellar surface, initiating a magnetically driven outflow. A strong forward shock driven outflow is then excited. The expansion velocity of the magnetically driven outflow is characterized by the Alfven velocity on the stellar surface and follows a simple scaling relation v{sub mag} {proportional_to} v{sub A}{sup 1/2}. When the initial density profile declines steeply with radius, the strong shock is accelerated self-similarly to relativistic velocity ahead of the magnetically driven component. We find that it evolves according to a self-similar relation {Gamma}{sub sh} {proportional_to} r{sub sh}, where {Gamma}{sub sh} is the Lorentz factor of the plasma measured at the shock surface r{sub sh}. A purely hydrodynamic process would be responsible for the acceleration mechanism of the shock driven outflow. Our two-component outflow model, which is the natural outcome of the magnetic explosion, can provide a better understanding of the magnetic active phenomena on various magnetized compact stars.

  4. STUDY OF THE POYNTING FLUX IN ACTIVE REGION 10930 USING DATA-DRIVEN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y. L.; Wang, H. N.; He, H.; Zhu, X. S.

    2011-08-10

    Powerful solar flares are closely related to the evolution of magnetic field configuration on the photosphere. We choose the Poynting flux as a parameter in the study of magnetic field changes. We use time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations around a flare occurrence to generate the results, with the temporal variation of the bottom boundary conditions being deduced from the projected normal characteristic method. By this method, the photospheric magnetogram could be incorporated self-consistently as the bottom condition of data-driven simulations. The model is first applied to a simulation datum produced by an emerging magnetic flux rope as a test case. Then, the model is used to study NOAA AR 10930, which has an X3.4 flare, the data of which has been obtained by the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope on 2006 December 13. We compute the magnitude of Poynting flux (S{sub total}), radial Poynting flux (S{sub z} ), a proxy for ideal radial Poynting flux (S{sub proxy}), Poynting flux due to plasma surface motion (S{sub sur}), and Poynting flux due to plasma emergence (S{sub emg}) and analyze their extensive properties in four selected areas: the whole sunspot, the positive sunspot, the negative sunspot, and the strong-field polarity inversion line (SPIL) area. It is found that (1) the S{sub total}, S{sub z} , and S{sub proxy} parameters show similar behaviors in the whole sunspot area and in the negative sunspot area. The evolutions of these three parameters in the positive area and the SPIL area are more volatile because of the effect of sunspot rotation and flux emergence. (2) The evolution of S{sub sur} is largely influenced by the process of sunspot rotation, especially in the positive sunspot. The evolution of S{sub emg} is greatly affected by flux emergence, especially in the SPIL area.

  5. TWO-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTIAL IONIZATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2012-07-10

    The bulk of the solar chromosphere is weakly ionized and interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles likely have significant consequences for the thermodynamics of the chromospheric plasma. We investigate the importance of introducing neutral particles into the MHD equations using numerical 2.5D radiative MHD simulations obtained with the Bifrost code. The models span the solar atmosphere from the upper layers of the convection zone to the low corona, and solve the full MHD equations with non-gray and non-LTE radiative transfer, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field. The effects of partial ionization are implemented using the generalized Ohm's law, i.e., we consider the effects of the Hall term and ambipolar diffusion in the induction equation. The approximations required in going from three fluids to the generalized Ohm's law are tested in our simulations. The Ohmic diffusion, Hall term, and ambipolar diffusion show strong variations in the chromosphere. These strong variations of the various magnetic diffusivities are absent or significantly underestimated when, as has been common for these types of studies, using the semi-empirical VAL-C model as a basis for estimates. In addition, we find that differences in estimating the magnitude of ambipolar diffusion arise depending on which method is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision frequency. These differences cause uncertainties in the different magnetic diffusivity terms. In the chromosphere, we find that the ambipolar diffusion is of the same order of magnitude or even larger than the numerical diffusion used to stabilize our code. As a consequence, ambipolar diffusion produces a strong impact on the modeled atmosphere. Perhaps more importantly, it suggests that at least in the chromospheric domain, self-consistent simulations of the solar atmosphere driven by magnetoconvection can accurately describe the impact of the dominant form of resistivity, i.e., ambipolar diffusion. This

  6. Non-planar vibrations of a string in the presence of a boundary obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harkirat; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-02-01

    We analyze planar and non-planar motions of a string vibrating against a unilateral curved obstacle. Our model incorporates the change in tension due to stretching of the string, which introduces nonlinear coupling between motions in mutually perpendicular directions, as well as the wrapping nonlinearity due to the presence of the obstacle. The system of equations has been discretized by assuming functional form of the displacements which satisfies all the geometrical boundary conditions. This discretized system is then used to investigate the various motions possible both in the absence as well as the presence of the obstacle. In the absence of the obstacle, there are infinitely many planar and two non-planar motions viz. a circular trajectory and a precessing elliptical trajectory for a fixed magnitude of the disturbance. In contrast, the string has only one planar motion when the obstacle is present and two non-planar motions, either an oscillating orbit or a whirling orbit depending on the magnitude of the initial disturbance. To obtain the transition from oscillating to whirling orbits, we perform a stability analysis of the planar motion using Floquet theory. This analysis reveals that there exists a critical amplitude below which the planar motion is neutrally stable and the typical trajectories are ellipses with major and minor radii changing both in magnitude and direction. Beyond the critical amplitude, the planar motion is unstable and we get whirling trajectories which are precessing ellipses again with varying major and minor radii. We further study the effect of changing obstacle parameters on the critical amplitude, and obtain the stability boundaries in the space spanned by the obstacle parameters and the amplitude of the planar vibration. We obtain some interesting values of the obstacle parameters for which small and large amplitude planar motions are stable resulting in oscillating ellipses while motions with intermediate amplitudes are unstable

  7. Pseudo-transient Continuation Based Variable Relaxation Solve in Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Chen

    2009-12-07

    Efficient and robust Variable Relaxation Solver, based on pseudo-transient continuation, is developed to solve nonlinear anisotropic thermal conduction arising from fusion plasma simulations. By adding first and/or second order artificial time derivatives to the system, this type of method advances the resulting time-dependent nonlinear PDEs to steady state, which is the solution to be sought. In this process, only the stiffness matrix itself is involved so that the numerical complexity and errors can be greatly reduced. In fact, this work is an extension of integrating efficient linear elliptic solvers for fusion simulation on Cray XIE. Two schemes are derived in this work, first and second order Variable Relaxations. Four factors are observed to be critical for efficiency and preservation of solution's symmetric structure arising from periodic boundary condition: refining meshes in different coordinate directions, initializing nonlinear process, varying time steps in both temporal and spatial directions, and accurately generating nonlinear stiffness matrix. First finer mesh scale should be taken in strong transport direction; Next the system is carefully initialized by the solution with linear conductivity; Third, time step and relaxation factor are vertex-based varied and optimized at each time step; Finally, the nonlinear stiffness matrix is updated by just scaling corresponding linear one with the vector generated from nonlinear thermal conductivity.

  8. Simulation of two-dimensional fully developed laminar flow for a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Jen; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Ming-Lang

    2004-07-30

    MHD micro-pumps circumvent the wear and fatigue caused by high pressure-drop across the check valves of mechanical micro-pumps in micro-fluidic systems. Early analyses of the fluid flow for MHD micro-pumps were mostly made possible by the Poiseuille flow theory; however, this conventional laminar approach cannot illustrate the effects of various channel sizes and shapes. This paper, therefore, presents a simplified MHD flow model based upon steady state, incompressible and fully developed laminar flow theory to investigate the characteristics of a MHD pump. Inside the pump, flowing along the channel is the electrically conducting fluid flowing driven by the Lorentz forces in the direction perpendicular to both dc magnetic field and applied electric currents. The Lorentz forces were converted into a hydrostatic pressure gradient in the momentum equations of the MHD channel flow model. The numerical simulations conducted with the explicit finite difference method show that the channel dimensions and the induced Lorentz forces have significant influences on the flow velocity profile. Furthermore, the simulation results agree well with the experimental results published by other researchers.

  9. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n =0 Bθ can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1978-01-01

    An electrode capable of withstanding high temperatures and suitable for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator consists of a sintered powdered metal base portion, the upper surface of the base being coated with a first layer of nickel aluminide, an intermediate layer of a mixture of nickel aluminide - refractory ceramic on the first layer and a third or outer layer of a refractory ceramic material on the intermediate layer. The sintered powdered metal base resists spalling by the ceramic coatings and permits greater electrode compliance to thermal shock. The density of the powdered metal base can be varied to allow optimization of the thermal conductivity of the electrode and prevent excess heat loss from the channel.

  11. Inversion and rotation processes involving non-planar aromatic compounds catalyzed by extended polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we show that extended planar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can efficiently catalyze a range of chemical processes involving non-planar aromatic systems. These include (i) bowl-to-bowl inversion of curved PAHs (e.g. corannulene and sumanene), (ii) 'flip-flop' inversion of helicenes (e.g. benzo[c]phenanthrene), and (iii) rotation about the Phsbnd Ph bond in biphenyls. Non-covalent π-π interactions between the planar catalyst and the substrate stabilize the planar transition structures to a greater extent than they stabilize the non-planar reactants. These result in surprisingly large catalytic enhancements (namely, the reaction barrier heights are reduced by 21-63% of the uncatalyzed reaction barriers).

  12. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of reconnection in the magnetotail during intervals with southward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Ogino, T.

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported from a simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the earth magnetosphere, using a time-dependent three-dimensional MHD model. The calculation was performed for several orientations of the IMF between dawnward pointing and southward. When the IMF has a dawnward component, the plasma sheet rotates northward on the dawnside of the tail and toward the south on the duskside. As the southward component becomes larger, the plasma sheet becomes thinner and develops a wavy cross section because of patchy or localized tail reconnection. The field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with this localized reconnection have a filamentary layered structure. When projected onto the polar cap the filamentary FACs are located in the same region as the tail region 1 currents. At lower latitudes strong region 2 sense currents that originate in the plasma sheet are found. FACs are found on field lines that map to the polar cap even for southward IMF. These currents have many of the properties of the observed polar-cusp currents. The polar-cusp FACs evolve from the polar-cap NB(z) FACs as the IMF is rotated from northward to southward.

  13. Simulation of flux expulsion and associated dynamics in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Pracht, Julian; Boeck, Thomas; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    We consider a plane channel flow of an electrically conducting fluid which is driven by a mean pressure gradient in the presence of an applied magnetic field that is streamwise periodic with zero mean. Magnetic flux expulsion and the associated bifurcation in such a configuration are explored using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The structure of the flow and magnetic fields in the Hartmann regime (where the dominant balance is through Lorentz forces) and the Poiseuille regime (where viscous effects play a significant role) are studied, and detailed comparisons to the existing one-dimensional model of Kamkar and Moffatt (J Fluid Mech 90:107-122, 1982) are drawn to evaluate the validity of the model. Comparisons show good agreement of the model with DNS in the Hartmann regime, but significant differences arising in the Poiseuille regime when nonlinear effects become important. The effects of various parameters like the magnetic Reynolds number, imposed field wavenumber etc. on the bifurcation of the flow are studied. Magnetic field line reconnections occurring during the dynamic runaway reveal a specific two-step pattern that leads to the gradual expulsion of flux in the core region.

  14. INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2012-10-10

    Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

  15. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A DISK SUBJECTED TO LENSE-THIRRING PRECESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-11-01

    When matter orbits around a central mass obliquely with respect to the mass's spin axis, the Lense-Thirring effect causes it to precess at a rate declining sharply with radius. Ever since the work of Bardeen and Petterson, it has been expected that when a fluid fills an orbiting disk, the orbital angular momentum at small radii should then align with the mass's spin. Nearly all previous work has studied this alignment under the assumption that a phenomenological 'viscosity' isotropically degrades fluid shears in accretion disks, even though it is now understood that internal stress in flat disks is due to anisotropic MHD turbulence. In this paper we report a pair of matched simulations, one in MHD and one in pure (non-viscous) HD in order to clarify the specific mechanisms of alignment. As in the previous work, we find that disk warps induce radial flows that mix angular momentum of different orientation; however, we also show that the speeds of these flows are generically transonic and are only very weakly influenced by internal stresses other than pressure. In particular, MHD turbulence does not act in a manner consistent with an isotropic viscosity. When MHD effects are present, the disk aligns, first at small radii and then at large; alignment is only partial in the HD case. We identify the specific angular momentum transport mechanisms causing alignment and show how MHD effects permit them to operate more efficiently. Last, we relate the speed at which an alignment front propagates outward (in the MHD case) to the rate at which Lense-Thirring torques deliver angular momentum at smaller radii.

  16. 3D Radiation Nonideal Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2017-02-01

    Many planets orbit within 1 au of their stars, raising questions about their origins. Particularly puzzling are the planets found near the silicate sublimation front. We investigate conditions near the front in the protostellar disk around a young intermediate-mass star, using the first global 3D radiation nonideal MHD simulations in this context. We treat the starlight heating; the silicate grains’ sublimation and deposition at the local, time-varying temperature and density; temperature-dependent ohmic dissipation; and various initial magnetic fields. The results show magnetorotational turbulence around the sublimation front at 0.5 au. The disk interior to 0.8 au is turbulent, with velocities exceeding 10% of the sound speed. Beyond 0.8 au is the dead zone, cooler than 1000 K and with turbulence orders of magnitude weaker. A local pressure maximum just inside the dead zone concentrates solid particles, favoring their growth. Over many orbits, a vortex develops at the dead zone’s inner edge, increasing the disk’s thickness locally by around 10%. We synthetically observe the results using Monte Carlo transfer calculations, finding that the sublimation front is near-infrared bright. The models with net vertical magnetic fields develop extended, magnetically supported atmospheres that reprocess extra starlight, raising the near-infrared flux 20%. The vortex throws a nonaxisymmetric shadow on the outer disk. At wavelengths > 2 μ {{m}}, the flux varies several percent on monthly timescales. The variations are more regular when the vortex is present. The vortex is directly visible as an arc at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths, given sub-au spatial resolution.

  17. Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic flows driven by a moving permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, S.; Bandaru, V.; Kolesnikov, Y.; Krasnov, D.; Boeck, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from numerical reconstructions of magnetic obstacle experiments performed in liquid metal flows. The experimental setup consists of an open rectangular container filled with a thin layer of liquid metal (GaInSn). A permanent magnet is installed on a rail beneath the container and is moved with a constant velocity U0, which in turn induces a flow inside the liquid metal due to Lorentz forces. The setup allows experiments in a parameter range that is accessible by direct numerical simulations (DNS). We present results from realizations with four different parameter sets, covering flows with stable stationary vortex structures in the reference system of the moving magnet as well as time-dependent flow regimes. Although the liquid metal layer is very thin, the flow shows a highly three-dimensional character in the near and in the far wake of the magnetic obstacle. We conclude that the streamline visualization in the experiment (using gas bubbles at the surface of the liquid metal layer) is insufficient to picture the flow structure occurring in the liquid metal. To underpin our conclusions, we introduce a modified numerical model which aims to mimic the movement of these gas bubbles. Although this model is a strong simplification of the highly complicated behavior of bubbles at a fluid-fluid interface, it captures the main effects and provides a good reproduction of the experimental results. Furthermore, transient effects are investigated when the flow is initiated, i.e., when the magnet approaches the container and crosses its front wall. We conclude that the process of vortex formation is accompanied by a decrease of the streamwise component of the Lorentz force compared to the time when the fluid is still quiescent. This decrease occurs only for flows with stable vortex structures, which might be of interest for practical applications like Lorentz force velocimetry. The Lorentz forces obtained from our DNS are in good agreement with the values

  18. Manifestations of non-planar adsorption geometries of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Mali, Kunal S; Zöphel, Lukas; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Müllen, Klaus; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we provide evidence for multiple non-planar adsorption geometries of a novel pyrenocyanine derivative at the liquid-solid interface under ambient conditions. When adsorbed at the organic liquid-solid interface, lead pyrenocyanine forms well-ordered monolayers that exhibit peculiar non-periodic contrast variation. The different contrast of the adsorbed molecules is attributed to dissimilar adsorption geometries which arise from the non-planar conformation of the molecules. The non-planarity of the molecular backbone in turn arises due to a combination of the angularly extended pyrene subunits and the presence of the large lead ion, which is too big to fit inside the central cavity and thus is located out of the aromatic plane. The two possible locations of the lead atom, namely below and above the aromatic plane, could be identified as depression and protrusion in the central cavity, respectively. The manifestation of such multiple adsorption geometries on the structure of the resultant monolayer is discussed in detail. The packing density of these 2D arrays of molecules could be tuned by heating of the sample wherein the molecular packing changes from a low-density, pseudo six-fold symmetric to a high-density, two-fold symmetric arrangement. Finally, a well-ordered two-component system could be constructed by incorporating C60 molecules in the adlayer of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

  19. Analysis and design of planar and non-planar wings for induced drag minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortara, Karl W.; Straussfogel, Dennis M.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the work reported herein is to develop and validate computational tools to be used for the design of planar and non-planar wing geometries for minimum induced drag. Because of the iterative nature of the design problem, it is important that, in addition to being sufficiently accurate for the problem at hand, these tools need to be reasonably fast and computationally efficient. Toward this end, a method of predicting induced drag in the presence of a free wake has been coupled with a panel method. The induced drag prediction technique is based on the application of the Kutta-Joukowski law at the trailing edge. Until now, the use of this method has not been fully explored and pressure integration and Trefftz-plane calculations favored. As is shown in this report, however, the Kutta-Joukowski method is able to give better results for a given amount of effort than the more commonly used techniques, particularly when relaxed wakes and non-planar wing geometries are considered. Using these methods, it is demonstrated that a reduction in induced drag can be achieved through non-planar wing geometries. It remains to determine what overall drag reductions are possible when the induced drag reduction is traded-off against increased wetted area. With the design methodology that is described herein, such trade studies can be performed in which the non-linear effects of the free wake are taken into account.

  20. Testing the equation of state and electrical conductivity of copper by the electrical wire explosion in air: Experiment and magnetohydrodynamic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barysevich, A. E.; Cherkas, S. L.

    2011-05-15

    We perform experiments on testing the equations of state and electrical conductivity of copper in three different regimes of copper wire electrical explosion, when the inserted energy (i) is slightly exceeded, (ii) is approximately equal, and (iii) is substantially exceeded the energy needed for the wire complete evaporation. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation is performed. The results predicted by the two different equations of state are compared with the experiment. Empirical expression for the copper electrical conductivity is presented. Parameters in this expression is fit on every of two equations of state. Map of copper conductivity is plotted.

  1. Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies (e.g., Malara et al., Astrophys. J. 533, 523 (2000)) considered small-amplitude Alfven wave (AW) packets in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) magnetic field using WKB approximation. They draw a distinction between 2D AW dissipation via phase mixing and 3D AW dissipation via exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. In the former case, AW dissipation time scales as S{sup 1∕3} and in the latter as log(S), where S is the Lundquist number. In this work, linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in ABC magnetic field via direct 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation is studied for the first time. A Gaussian AW pulse with length-scale much shorter than ABC domain length and a harmonic AW with wavelength equal to ABC domain length are studied for four different resistivities. While it is found that AWs dissipate quickly in the ABC field, contrary to an expectation, it is found the AW perturbation energy increases in time. In the case of the harmonic AW, the perturbation energy growth is transient in time, attaining peaks in both velocity and magnetic perturbation energies within timescales much smaller than the resistive time. In the case of the Gaussian AW pulse, the velocity perturbation energy growth is still transient in time, attaining a peak within few resistive times, while magnetic perturbation energy continues to grow. It is also shown that the total magnetic energy decreases in time and this is governed by the resistive evolution of the background ABC magnetic field rather than AW damping. On contrary, when the background magnetic field is uniform, the total magnetic energy decrease is prescribed by AW damping, because there is no resistive evolution of the background. By considering runs with different amplitudes and by analysing the perturbation spectra, possible dynamo action by AW perturbation-induced peristaltic flow and inverse cascade of magnetic energy have been excluded. Therefore, the perturbation energy growth is

  2. Three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Malara et al., Astrophys. J. 533, 523 (2000)) considered small-amplitude Alfven wave (AW) packets in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) magnetic field using WKB approximation. They draw a distinction between 2D AW dissipation via phase mixing and 3D AW dissipation via exponentially divergent magnetic field lines. In the former case, AW dissipation time scales as S 1/3 and in the latter as log(S) , where S is the Lundquist number. In this work [1], linearly polarised Alfven wave dynamics in ABC magnetic field via direct 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation is studied for the first time. A Gaussian AW pulse with length-scale much shorter than ABC domain length and a harmonic AW with wavelength equal to ABC domain length are studied for four different resistivities. While it is found that AWs dissipate quickly in the ABC field, contrary to an expectation, it is found the AW perturbation energy increases in time. In the case of the harmonic AW, the perturbation energy growth is transient in time, attaining peaks in both velocity and magnetic perturbation energies within timescales much smaller than the resistive time. In the case of the Gaussian AW pulse, the velocity perturbation energy growth is still transient in time, attaining a peak within few resistive times, while magnetic perturbation energy continues to grow. It is also shown that the total magnetic energy decreases in time and this is governed by the resistive evolution of the background ABC magnetic field rather than AW damping. On contrary, when the background magnetic field is uniform, the total magnetic energy decrease is prescribed by AW damping, because there is no resistive evolution of the background. By considering runs with different amplitudes and by analysing the perturbation spectra, possible dynamo action by AW perturbation-induced peristaltic flow and inverse cascade of magnetic energy have been excluded. Therefore, the perturbation energy growth is attributed

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor-unstable accretion to and variability of magnetized stars: Global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkanarni, Akshay Kishor

    We present results of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities at the accretion disk-magnetosphere boundary in accreting magnetized stars. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It manifests itself in the form of tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane, instead of flowing around the magnetosphere as in the canonical accretion picture. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner-disk dynamical timescale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, theta ≲ 30°, between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with relatively high accretion rates. We then calculate the photometric variability due to emission from the hot spots that the accreting matter produces on the stellar surface. For neutron stars, we take relativistic effects into account in calculating the observed energy flux. Our goal is to compare the features of the lightcurve during stable and unstable accretion, and to look for possible quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), which produce broad peaks in the Fourier power spectra of these objects. The lightcurves during stable accretion show periodicity at the star's frequency and sometimes twice that, due to the presence of two funnel streams that produce antipodal hotspots near the magnetic poles. On the other hand, lightcurves during unstable accretion are more chaotic due to the stochastic behaviour of the tongues, and produce noisier power spectra. However, the power spectra do show some signs of quasi-periodic variability. Most importantly, the rotation frequency of the tongues and the resulting hotspots is close to the inner-disk orbital frequency, except in the most

  4. A Compact Non-Planar Coil Design for the SFLM Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagnestål, A.; Ågren, O.; Moiseenko, V. E.

    2012-08-01

    A non-planar single layer semiconductor coil set for a version of the Straight Field Line Mirror Hybrid concept with reduced magnetic field has been computed. The coil set consists of 30 coils that are somewhat similar to baseball coils with skewed sides. The coil set has been modeled with filamentary current distributions and basic scaling assumptions have been made regarding the coil widths. This coil set is expected to be considerably cheaper than a previous computed coil set. The coils can probably be produced with technologies known today.

  5. Final Report for "Tech-X Corporation work for the SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM)"

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-03-25

    Work carried out by Tech-X Corporation for the DoE SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM; U.S. DoE Office of Science Award Number DE-FC02-06ER54899) is summarized and is shown to fulfil the project objectives. The Tech-X portion of the SWIM work focused on the development of analytic and computational approaches to study neoclassical tearing modes and their interaction with injected electron cyclotron current drive. Using formalism developed by Hegna, Callen, and Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009); Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); Phys. Plasmas 18, 102506 (2011)], analytic approximations for the RF interaction were derived and the numerical methods needed to implement these interactions in the NIMROD extended MHD code were developed. Using the SWIM IPS framework, NIMROD has successfully coupled to GENRAY, an RF ray tracing code; additionally, a numerical control system to trigger the RF injection, adjustment, and shutdown in response to tearing mode activity has been developed. We discuss these accomplishments, as well as prospects for ongoing future research that this work has enabled (which continue in a limited fashion under the SciDAC Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) project and under a baseline theory grant). Associated conference presentations, published articles, and publications in progress are also listed.

  6. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the bifurcation of tail lobes during intervals with a northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, T.; Walker, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere during a northward interplanetary magnetic field was studied by using a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic model. For a northward interplanetary magnetic field on 5 nT, the plasma sheet thickens near the noon-midnight meridian plane. When projected onto the polar cap this appears as a narrow channel extending from midnight towards noon. This plasma pattern is associated with three pairs of convection cells. The high latitude sunward convection and northern B(z) Birkeland current are caused by magnetic merging in the polar region.

  7. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  8. Improvement of boundary conditions for non-planar boundaries represented by polygons with an initial particle arrangement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiangang; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Murotani, Kohei; Shibata, Kazuya; Ishii, Eiji; Ishikawa, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    The boundary conditions represented by polygons in moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method (Koshizuka and Oka, Nuclear Science and Engineering, 1996) have been widely used in the industry simulations since it can simply simulate complex geometry with high efficiency. However, the inaccurate particle number density near non-planar wall boundaries dramatically affects the accuracy of simulations. In this paper, we propose an initial boundary particle arrangement technique coupled with the wall weight function method (Zhang et al. Transaction of JSCES, 2015) to improve the particle number density near slopes and curved surfaces with boundary conditions represented by polygons in three dimensions. Two uniform grids are utilized in the proposed technique. The grid points in the first uniform grid are used to construct boundary particles, and the second uniform grid stores the same information as in the work by Zhang et al. The wall weight functions of the grid points in the second uniform grid are calculated by newly constructed boundary particles. The wall weight functions of the fluid particles are interpolated from the values stored on the grid points in the second uniform grid. Because boundary particles are located on the polygons, complex geometries can be accurately represented. The proposed method can dramatically improve the particle number density and maintain the high efficiency. The performance of the previously proposed wall weight function (Zhang et al.) with the boundary particle arrangement technique is verified in comparison with the wall weight function without boundary particle arrangement by investigating two example geometries. The simulations of a water tank with a wedge and a complex geometry show the general applicability of the boundary particle arrangement technique to complex geometries and demonstrate its improvement of the wall weight function near the slopes and curved surfaces.

  9. Highly non-planar dendritic porphyrin for pH sensing: observation of porphyrin monocation.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Sujatha; Leiding, Thom; Arsköld, Sindra Peterson; Cheprakov, Andrei V; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2010-11-01

    Metal-free porphyrin-dendrimers provide a convenient platform for the construction of membrane-impermeable ratiometric probes for pH measurements in compartmentalized biological systems. In all previously reported molecules, electrostatic stabilization (shielding) of the core porphyrin by peripheral negative charges (carboxylates) was required to shift the intrinsically low porphyrin protonation pK(a)'s into the physiological pH range (pH 6-8). However, binding of metal cations (e.g., K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) by the carboxylate groups on the dendrimer could affect the protonation behavior of such probes in biological environments. Here we present a dendritic pH nanoprobe based on a highly non-planar tetraaryltetracyclohexenoporphyrin (Ar(4)TCHP), whose intrinsic protonation pK(a)'s are significantly higher than those of regular tetraarylporphyrins, thereby eliminating the need for electrostatic core shielding. The porphyrin was modified with eight Newkome-type dendrons and PEGylated at the periphery, rendering a neutral water-soluble probe (TCHpH), suitable for measurements in the physiological pH range. The protonation of TCHpH could be followed by absorption (e.g., ε(Soret)(dication)∼270,000 M(-1) cm(-1)) or by fluorescence. Unlike most tetraarylporphyrins, TCHpH is protonated in two distinct steps (pK(a)'s 7.8 and 6.0). In the region between the pK(a)'s, an intermediate species with a well-defined spectroscopic signature, presumably a TCHpH monocation, could be observed in the mixture. The performance of TCHpH was evaluated by pH gradient measurements in large unilamellar vesicles. The probe was retained inside the vesicles and did not pass through and/or interact with vesicle membranes, proving useful for quantification of proton transport across phospholipid bilayers. To interpret the protonation behavior of TCHpH we developed a model relating structural changes on the porphyrin macrocycle upon protonation to its basicity. The model was validated by

  10. A 5 meter range non-planar CMUT array for Automotive Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Aguirre, Jonathan

    A discretized hyperbolic paraboloid geometry capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array has been designed and fabricated for automotive collision avoidance. The array is designed to operate at 40 kHz, beamwidth of 40° with a maximum sidelobe intensity of -10dB. An SOI based fabrication technology has been used for the 5x5 array with 5 sensing surfaces along each x and y axis and 7 elevation levels. An assembly and packaging technique has been developed to realize the non-planar geometry in a PGA-68 package. A highly accurate mathematical method has been presented for analytical characterization of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) built with square diaphragms. The method uses a new two-dimensional polynomial function to more accurately predict the deflection curve of a multilayer square diaphragm subject to both mechanical and electrostatic pressure and a new capacitance model that takes into account the contribution of the fringing field capacitances.

  11. The Bouguer-Lambert-Beer Absorption Law and Non-Planar Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinko, John E.; Oh, Benjamin I.

    2011-11-01

    The familiar Bouguer-Lambert-Beer absorption law, often called Beer's law, is an essential component of many laser ablation propulsion models. However, its treatment in non-planar conditions requires a consideration of irradiation geometry. Forms of the absorption law are derived for cylindrical and spherical normal incidence geometries, and for conical nozzles with flat and cylindrical targets. The results indicate that use of a concentrating nozzle optic with a transparent target could provide increased impulse generation for laser propulsion. This improvement would be accomplished using a combination of chosen optics and a transparent target material to generate highly confined ablation in-volume. The surface fluence and ablation depth on a cylindrical target in a parabolic optical nozzle is also derived, and the results are compared to literature raytracing model results and profilometry data, respectively.

  12. Multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2004-11-01

    This report documents the author's efforts in the deterministic modeling of copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates such as diodes and electrical connectors. A new framework based on Goma was developed for multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates. In this framework, the moving sulfidation front is explicitly tracked by treating the finite-element mesh as a pseudo solid with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and repeatedly performing re-meshing using CUBIT and re-mapping using MAPVAR. Three one-dimensional studies were performed for verifying the framework in asymptotic regimes. Limited model validation was also carried out by comparing computed copper-sulfide thickness with experimental data. The framework was first demonstrated in modeling one-dimensional copper sulfidation with charge separation. It was found that both the thickness of the space-charge layers and the electrical potential at the sulfidation surface decrease rapidly as the Cu{sub 2}S layer thickens initially but eventually reach equilibrium values as Cu{sub 2}S layer becomes sufficiently thick; it was also found that electroneutrality is a reasonable approximation and that the electro-migration flux may be estimated by using the equilibrium potential difference between the sulfidation and annihilation surfaces when the Cu{sub 2}S layer is sufficiently thick. The framework was then employed to model copper sulfidation in the solid-state-diffusion controlled regime (i.e. stage II sulfidation) on a prototypical diode until a continuous Cu{sub 2}S film was formed on the diode surface. The framework was also applied to model copper sulfidation on an intermittent electrical contact between a gold-plated copper pin and gold-plated copper pad; the presence of Cu{sub 2}S was found to raise the effective electrical resistance drastically. Lastly, future research needs in modeling atmospheric copper sulfidation are discussed.

  13. Effect of an applied electric field on a weakly anchored non-planar Nematic Liquid Crystal (NLC) layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, Ensela; Cummings, Linda J.; Kondic, Lou

    We consider a mathematical model that consists of a NLC layer sandwiched between two parallel bounding plates, across which an external field is applied. We investigate its effect on the director orientation by considering the dielectric and flexoelectric contributions and varying parameters that represent the anchoring conditions and the electric field strength. In particular, we investigate possible director configurations that occur in weakly anchored and non-planar systems. We observe that non-planar anchoring angles destroy any hysteresis seen in a planar system by eliminating the fully vertical director configuration and the ''saturation threshold'' seen in weakly anchored planar Freedericksz cells. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-1211713.

  14. The effect of subgrid-scale models on grid-scale/subgrid-scale energy transfers in large-eddy simulation of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessar, M.; Balarac, G.; Plunian, F.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the accuracy of various models used in large-eddy simulations (LES) of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is evaluated. Particular attention is devoted to the capabilities of models to reproduce the transfers between resolved grid- and subgrid-scales. The exact global balance of MHD turbulent flows is first evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) database. This balance is controlled by the transfers between scales and between kinetic and magnetic energies. Two cases of forced homogeneous isotropic MHD turbulent flows are considered, with and without injecting large scale helicity. The strong helical case leads to domination of the magnetic energy due to an inverse cascade [A. Brandenburg, Astrophys. J. 550(2), 824 (2001); N. E. Haugen et al., Phys. Rev. E 70(1), 016308 (2004)]. The energy transfers predicted by various models are then compared with the transfer extracted from DNS results. This allows to discriminate models classically used for LES of MHD turbulence. In the non-helical case, the Smagorinsky-like model [M. L. Theobald et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 3016 (1994)] and a mixed model are able to perform stable LES, but the helical case is a more demanding test and all the models lead to unstable simulations.

  15. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of hypervelocity neutral plasma jets and their interactions with materials generating extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2014-10-01

    The development of a Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high density thermal plasma in a co-axial plasma gun is presented. The MHD governing equations are numerically solved using a matrix free implicit scheme in an unstructured grid finite volume framework. The MHD model is used to characterize the high energy jet which emanates from the accelerator. The solver is then used to predict the conditions created at the surface of a flat plate placed at a fixed distance from the exit of the gun. The model parameters are adjusted so that the energy density of the jet impacting the plate is of the same order of magnitude as that of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruptions in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The idea is to use the pressure and temperature on the plate surface to obtain an estimate of the stress created on the plate due to jet impact. The model is used to quantify damage caused by ELM disruptions on the confining material surface.

  16. Beam position controlling method for 3D optical system and its application in non-planar ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Chen, Meixiong; Long, Xingwu; Tan, Yanyang; Kang, Zhenglong; Li, Yingying

    2012-08-13

    A novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system has been proposed in this paper. Non-planar ring resonator, which is a typical 3D optical system, has been chosen as an example to show its application. To the best of our knowledge, the generalized ray matrices, augmented 5 × 5 ray matrices for paraxial dielectric interface transmission and paraxial optical-wedge transmission, and their detailed deducing process have been proposed in this paper for the first time. By utilizing the novel coordinate system for Gaussian beam reflection and the generalized ray matrix of paraxial optical-wedge transmission, the rules and some novel results of the optical-axis perturbations of non-planar ring resonators have been obtained. Wedge angle-induced mismatching errors of non-planar ring resonators have been found out and two experimental beam position controlling methods to effectively eliminate the wedge angle-induced mismatching errors have been proposed. All those results have been confirmed by related alignment experiments and the experimental results have been described with diagrammatic representation. These findings are important to the beam control, cavity design, and cavity alignment of high precision non-planar ring laser gyroscopes. Those generalized ray matrices and their deducing methods are valuable for ray analysis of various kinds of paraxial optical-elements and resonators. This novel theoretical beam position controlling method for 3D optical system is valuable for the controlling of various kinds of 3D optical systems.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the polarized radio emission of the adiabatic SNRs in ISM with nonuniform distribution of density and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, Oleh; Bandiera, Rino; Beshley, Vasyl; Orlando, Salvatore; Miceli, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Polarized radio emission has been mapped with great details in several Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). The polarization of synchrotron emission contains a wealth of information but has not yet been exploited to the extent it deserves. We have developed a numerical method to model the maps of the Stokes parameters for SNRs during their adiabatic phase of evolution, in either a uniform or a non-uniform environment. The method consists in the following steps. 1. A 3-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical structure of the SNR is simulated, taking into account the interstellar magnetic field, and a possible gradient of the ISM density and/or of the ambient magnetic field. 2. The acceleration of particles at the forward shock and their evolution downstream are modelled. 3. The generation and dissipation of the turbulent component of magnetic field has been calculated everywhere in the SNR, taking into account its interaction with the accelerated particles. 4. Our generalization of the classical synchrotron theory, to include both the ordered and the disordered components of magnetic field, is used to model the emission. 5. The internal Faraday rotation of the polarization plane is considered. 6. Finally, 2-D maps are derived, for different orientations of the SNR with respect to the observer. We present details of the model, as well as some results of the numerical simulations.

  18. Numerical investigation of the non-Newtonian pulsatile blood flow in a bifurcation model with a non-planar branch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2006-01-01

    The pulsatile flow of non-Newtonian fluid in a bifurcation model with a non-planar daughter branch is investigated numerically by using the Carreau-Yasuda model to take into account the shear thinning behavior of the analog blood fluid. The objective of this study is to deal with the influence of the non-Newtonian property of fluid and of out-of-plane curvature in the non-planar daughter vessel on wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and flow phenomena during the pulse cycle. The non-Newtonian property in the daughter vessels induces a flattened axial velocity profile due to its shear thinning behavior. The non-planarity deflects flow from the inner wall of the vessel to the outer wall and changes the distribution of WSS along the vessel, in particular in systole phase. Downstream of the bifurcation, the velocity profiles are shifted toward the flow divider, and low WSS and high shear stress temporal oscillations characterized by OSI occur on the outer wall region of the daughter vessels close to the bifurcation. Secondary motions become stronger with the addition of the out-of-plane curvature induced by the bending of the vessel, and the secondary flow patterns swirl along the non-planar daughter vessel. A significant difference between the non-Newtonian and the Newtonian pulsatile flow is revealed during the pulse cycle; however, reasonable agreement between the non-Newtonian and the rescaled Newtonian flow is found. Calculated results for the pulsatile flow support the view that the non-planarity of blood vessels and the non-Newtonian properties of blood are an important factor in hemodynamics and may play a significant role in vascular biology and pathophysiology.

  19. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in the investigation of the solar corona using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Coronal mass ejections (CME) are believed to be the primary cause of nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms and these have been investigated through the use of three-dimensional computer simulation.

  20. Infrared non-planar plasmonic perfect absorber for enhanced sensitive refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yongzhi; Mao, Xue Song; Wu, Chenjun; Wu, Lin; Gong, RongZhou

    2016-03-01

    We present a non-planar all-metal plasmonic perfect absorber (PA) with response polarization independent in infrared region, which can be served as a sensor for enhanced refractive index sensing. Distinct from previous designs, the proposed PA consisted of all metal structured film constructed with an assembly of four-tined rod resonators (FRRs). The PA with a high quality-factor (Q-factor) of 41.2 and an absorbance of 99.9% at 142.6 THz has been demonstrated numerically. The resonance behavior occurs in the space between the rods of the FRRs, which is remarkable different conventional sandwiched structural PAs. Based on equivalent LC circuit theory, the absorption peak can be finely tuned by varying the geometrical dimensions of the FRRs. Furthermore, the resonance frequency shows highly sensitive response to the change of refractive index in the surrounding medium. A careful design for refractive index sensor can yield a sensitivity of 1445 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) and a figure of merit (FOM) of 28.8. The demonstrated design of the plasmonic PA for sensing provides great potential application in enhancing refractive index sensors and the enhanced infrared spectroscopy.

  1. Asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Cerfon, Antoine; Parra, Felix

    2012-10-01

    We have recently presented a new asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria that generalizes the classic Greene-Johnson expansion [1] to allow for 3D equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis [2]. Our expansion achieves the two goals of reducing the complexity of the three-dimensional MHD equilibrium equations and of describing equilibria in modern stellarator experiments. The end result of our analysis is a set of two coupled partial differential equations for the plasma pressure and the toroidal vector potential which fully determine the stellarator equilibrium. Both equations are advection equations in which the toroidal angle plays the role of time. We show that the method of characteristics, following magnetic field lines, is a convenient way of solving these equations, avoiding the difficulties associated with the periodicity of the solution in the toroidal angle. By combining the method of characteristics with Green's function integrals for the evaluation of the magnetic field due to the plasma current, we obtain an efficient numerical solver for our expansion. Numerical equilibria thus calculated will be given.[4pt] [1] J.M. Greene and J.L. Johnson, Phys. Fluids 4, 875 (1961)[0pt] [2] A.J. Cerfon, J.P. Freidberg, and F.I. Parra, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 16 GP9.00081 (2011)

  2. Asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis: Numerical progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerfon, Antoine; Freidberg, Jeffrey; Parra, Felix

    2012-03-01

    We have recently presented a new asymptotic analysis [1], which reduces the complexity of the MHD equilibrium equations in stellarators and generalizes the asymptotic approach followed by Greene and Johnson in their classic paper [2]. As in [2], our expansion relies on the small ratio of the helical magnetic field to the vacuum toroidal field. However, our ordering relaxes the Greene and Johnson constraint which assumes a strong separation in length scales between the helical period and the major radius. In our expansion these two length scales are of comparable order, which provides a better match with modern stellarator experiments. Toroidal effects enter the analysis in the same order as helical effects, allowing the calculations of equilibria with multiple helicities and a non-planar magnetic axis. The end result of our analysis is a set of two coupled PDEs for the plasma pressure and the magnetic vector potential, which fully determine the stellarator equilibrium. We present simple analytic solutions to these equations, and discuss the numerical methods we are developping to calculate more general stellarator equilibria.[4pt] [1] A.J. Cerfon, J.P. Freidberg, and F.I. Parra, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 16 GP9.00081[0pt] [2] J.M. Greene and J.L. Johnson, Phys. Fluids 4, 875 (1961)

  3. High-Reliability Pump Module for Non-Planar Ring Oscillator Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T.; Qiu, Yueming; Wilson, Daniel W.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Forouhar, Siamak

    2007-01-01

    We propose and have demonstrated a prototype high-reliability pump module for pumping a Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) laser suitable for space missions. The pump module consists of multiple fiber-coupled single-mode laser diodes and a fiber array micro-lens array based fiber combiner. The reported Single-Mode laser diode combiner laser pump module (LPM) provides a higher normalized brightness at the combined beam than multimode laser diode based LPMs. A higher brightness from the pump source is essential for efficient NPRO laser pumping and leads to higher reliability because higher efficiency requires a lower operating power for the laser diodes, which in turn increases the reliability and lifetime of the laser diodes. Single-mode laser diodes with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) stabilized wavelength permit the pump module to be operated without a thermal electric cooler (TEC) and this further improves the overall reliability of the pump module. The single-mode laser diode LPM is scalable in terms of the number of pump diodes and is capable of combining hundreds of fiber-coupled laser diodes. In the proof-of-concept demonstration, an e-beam written diffractive micro lens array, a custom fiber array, commercial 808nm single mode laser diodes, and a custom NPRO laser head are used. The reliability of the proposed LPM is discussed.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Clouds toward the Stellar Cluster Westerlund 2: Interaction of a Jet with a Clumpy Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    The formation mechanism of CO clouds observed with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes toward the stellar cluster Westerlund 2 is studied by 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, taking into account the interstellar cooling. These molecular clouds show a peculiar shape composed of an arc-shaped cloud on one side of the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1023-575 and a linear distribution of clouds (jet clouds) on the other side. We propose that these clouds are formed by the interaction of a jet with clumps of interstellar neutral hydrogen (H i). By studying the dependence of the shape of dense cold clouds formed by shock compression and cooling on the filling factor of H i clumps, we found that the density distribution of H i clumps determines the shape of molecular clouds formed by the jet–cloud interaction: arc clouds are formed when the filling factor is large. On the other hand, when the filling factor is small, molecular clouds align with the jet. The jet propagates faster in models with small filling factors.

  5. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David; Doolen, Gary D.

    1987-01-01

    A generalization of the hexagonal lattice gas model of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau is shown to lead to two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. The method relies on the ideal point-wise conservation law for vector potential.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  8. Gyroscopic analog for magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The gross features of plasma equilibrium and dynamics in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model can be understood in terms of a dynamical system which closely resembles the equations for a deformable gyroscope.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Bachman, Mark G.

    2004-08-24

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system includes a reagent source containing a reagent fluid and a sample source containing a sample fluid that includes a constituent. A reactor is operatively connected to the supply reagent source and the sample source. MHD pumps utilize a magnetohydrodynamic drive to move the reagent fluid and the sample fluid in a flow such that the reagent fluid and the sample fluid form an interface causing the constituent to be separated from the sample fluid.

  10. Introduction to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Preface; Table of physical quantities; Part I. Foundations: 1. Introduction; 2. Magnetohydrodynamics; 3. Conservation laws; Part II. Fundamental Processes: 4. Magnetohydrodynamic waves; 5. Dynamo; 6. Discontinuities and shocks; 7. Magnetic reconnection; Part III. Instabilities and Magnetic Confinement: 8. Static equilibrium; 9. Linear perturbation theory; 10. Study of MHD instabilities; Part IV. Turbulence: 11. Hydrodynamic turbulence; 12. MHD turbulence; 13. Advanced MHD turbulence; Appendix 1. Solutions to the exercises; Appendix 2. Formulary; References; Index.

  11. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected. the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories. but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic mechanism for pedestal formation.

    PubMed

    Guazzotto, L; Betti, R

    2011-09-16

    Time-dependent two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are carried out for tokamak plasmas with edge poloidal flow. Differently from conventional equilibrium theory, a density pedestal all around the edge is obtained when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed. The outboard pedestal is induced by the transonic discontinuity, the inboard one by mass redistribution. The density pedestal follows the formation of a highly sheared flow at the transonic surface. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition and pedestal formation in high performance tokamak plasmas.

  13. Numerical investigation of the non-Newtonian blood flow in a bifurcation model with a non-planar branch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2004-12-01

    The non-Newtonian fluid flow in a bifurcation model with a non-planar daughter branch is investigated by using finite element method to solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a non-Newtonian constitutive model, in which the shear thinning behavior of the blood fluid is incorporated by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the non-Newtonian property of fluid as well as of curvature and out-of-plane geometry in the non-planar daughter vessel on wall shear stress (WSS) and flow phenomena. In the non-planar daughter vessel, the flows are typified by the skewing of the velocity profile towards the outer wall, creating a relatively low WSS at the inner wall. In the downstream of the bifurcation, the velocity profiles are shifted towards the flow divider. The low WSS is found at the inner walls of the curvature and the lateral walls of the bifurcation. Secondary flow patterns that swirl fluid from the inner wall of curvature to the outer wall in the middle of the vessel are also well documented for the curved and bifurcating vessels. The numerical results for the non-Newtonian fluid and the Newtonian fluid with original Reynolds number and the corresponding rescaled Reynolds number are presented. Significant difference between the non-Newtonian flow and the Newtonian flow is revealed; however, reasonable agreement between the non-Newtonian flow and the rescaled Newtonian flow is found. Results of this study support the view that the non-planarity of blood vessels and the non-Newtonian properties of blood are an important factor in hemodynamics and may play a significant role in vascular biology and pathophysiology.

  14. Structural stability, C--N internal rotations and vibrational spectral analysis of non-planar phenylurea and phenylthiourea.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Hassan M

    2009-04-01

    The structural stability and C-N internal rotations of phenylurea and phenylthiourea were investigated by DFT-B3LYP and ab initio MP2 and MP4//MP2 calculations with 6-311G** and/or 6-311+G** basis sets. The complex multirotor internal rotations in phenylurea and phenylthiourea were investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory from which several clear minima were predicted in the calculated potential energy scans of both molecules. For phenylurea two minima that correspond to non-planar- (CNCC dihedral angle of about 45 degrees ) cis (CNCO dihedral angle is near 0 degrees ) and trans (CNCO dihedral angle is near 180 degrees ) structures were predicted to have real frequency. For phenylthiourea only the non-planar-trans structure was predicted to be the low energy minimum for the molecule. The vibrational frequencies of the lowest energy non-planar-trans conformer of each of the two molecules were computed at the B3LYP level and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of normal coordinate analysis and experimental infrared and Raman data.

  15. Structural stability, C-N internal rotations and vibrational spectral analysis of non-planar phenylurea and phenylthiourea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.

    2009-04-01

    The structural stability and C-N internal rotations of phenylurea and phenylthiourea were investigated by DFT-B3LYP and ab initio MP2 and MP4//MP2 calculations with 6-311G** and/or 6-311+G** basis sets. The complex multirotor internal rotations in phenylurea and phenylthiourea were investigated at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory from which several clear minima were predicted in the calculated potential energy scans of both molecules. For phenylurea two minima that correspond to non-planar- (CNCC dihedral angle of about 45°) cis (CNCO dihedral angle is near 0°) and trans (CNCO dihedral angle is near 180°) structures were predicted to have real frequency. For phenylthiourea only the non- planar- trans structure was predicted to be the low energy minimum for the molecule. The vibrational frequencies of the lowest energy non-planar-trans conformer of each of the two molecules were computed at the B3LYP level and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of normal coordinate analysis and experimental infrared and Raman data.

  16. SUB-ALFVENIC NON-IDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS WITH AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSERVATIONS AND TURBULENT ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: cmckee@astro.berkeley.edu

    2012-01-01

    Ambipolar diffusion (AD) is believed to be a crucial process for redistributing magnetic flux in the dense molecular gas that occurs in regions of star formation. We carry out numerical simulations of this process in regions of low ionization using the heavy-ion approximation. The simulations are for regions of strong field (plasma {beta} = 0.1) and mildly supersonic turbulence (M=3, corresponding to an Alfven Mach number of 0.67). The velocity power spectrum of the neutral gas changes from an Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum in the case of ideal MHD to a Burgers spectrum in the case of a shock-dominated hydrodynamic system. The magnetic power spectrum shows a similar behavior. We use a one-dimensional radiative transfer code to post-process our simulation results; the simulated emission from the CS J = 2-1 and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 1-0 lines shows that the effects of AD are observable in principle. Linewidths of ions are observed to be less than those of neutrals, and we confirm previous suggestions that this is due to AD. We show that AD is unlikely to affect the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method for inferring field strengths unless the AD is stronger than generally observed. Finally, we present a study of the enhancement of AD by turbulence, finding that AD is accelerated by factor 2-4.5 for non-self-gravitating systems with the level of turbulence we consider.

  17. Data assimilation for magnetohydrodynamics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, O. Barrero; de Moor, B.; Bernstein, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    Prediction of solar storms has become a very important issue due to the fact that they can affect dramatically the telecommunication and electrical power systems at the earth. As a result, a lot of research is being done in this direction, space weather forecast. Magnetohydrodynamics systems are being studied in order to analyse the space plasma dynamics, and techniques which have been broadly used in the prediction of earth environmental variables like the Kalman filter (KF), the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), the extended Kalman filter (EKF), etc., are being studied and adapted to this new framework. The assimilation of a wide range of space environment data into first-principles-based global numerical models will improve our understanding of the physics of the geospace environment and the forecasting of its behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to study the performance of nonlinear observers in magnetohydrodynamics systems, namely, the EnKF.The EnKF is based on a Monte Carlo simulation approach for propagation of process and measurement errors. In this paper, the EnKF for a nonlinear two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D-MHD) system is considered. For its implementation, two software packages are merged, namely, the Versatile Advection Code (VAC) written in Fortran and Matlab of Mathworks. The 2D-MHD is simulated with the VAC code while the EnKF is computed in Matlab. In order to study the performance of the EnKF in MHD systems, different number of measurement points as well as ensemble members are set.

  18. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the 15 March 2013 coronal mass ejection event—Interpretation of the 30-80 MeV proton flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Dryer, Murray; Wu, S. T.; Mewaldt, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on 15 March 2013 is one of the few solar events in Cycle 24 that produced a large solar energetic particle (SEP) event and severe geomagnetic activity. Observations of SEP from the ACE spacecraft show a complex time-intensity SEP profile that is not easily understood with current empirical SEP models. In this study, we employ a global three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to help interpret the observations. The simulation is based on the H3DMHD code and incorporates extrapolations of photospheric magnetic field as the inner boundary condition at a solar radial distance (r) of 2.5 solar radii. A Gaussian-shaped velocity pulse is imposed at the inner boundary as a proxy for the complex physical conditions that initiated the CME. It is found that the time-intensity profile of the high-energy (>10 MeV) SEPs can be explained by the evolution of the CME-driven shock and its interaction with the heliospheric current sheet and the nonuniform solar wind. We also demonstrate in more detail that the simulated fast-mode shock Mach number at the magnetically connected shock location is well correlated (rcc ≥ 0.7) with the concurrent 30-80 MeV proton flux. A better correlation occurs when the 30-80 MeV proton flux is scaled by r-1.4(rcc = 0.87). When scaled by r-2.8, the correlation for 10-30 MeV proton flux improves significantly from rcc = 0.12 to rcc = 0.73, with 1 h delay. The present study suggests that (1) sector boundary can act as an obstacle to the propagation of SEPs; (2) the background solar wind is an important factor in the variation of IP shock strength and thus plays an important role in manipulation of SEP flux; (3) at least 50% of the variance in SEP flux can be explained by the fast-mode shock Mach number. This study demonstrates that global MHD simulation, despite the limitation implied by its physics-based ideal fluid continuum assumption, can be a viable tool for SEP data analysis.

  19. Finite Element Modeling of Dynamic Shear Rupture Experiments Along Non-Planar Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, E. L.; Baudet, A.; Bhat, H. S.; Rice, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    The study of dynamically propagating shear cracks along weak paths like faults is of great interest for the study of earthquakes. We adapted the ABAQUS/Explicit dynamic finite element program to analyze the nucleation and propagation of shear cracks along a non-planar, kinked, weak path corresponding to the one that was used in recent laboratory fracture studies by Rousseau and Rosakis [JGR, 2003]. Their experiments involved impact loading of thin plates of Homalite-100, a photoelastically sensitive brittle polymer, which had been cut along a kinked path and then weakly glued back together everywhere except along a starter notch near the impact site. Under different conditions, propagation speeds were observed in both the sub-Rayleigh and intersonic (supershear) regimes. Strain gage recordings and high speed photography of isochromatic lines (lines of constant difference between the in-plane principal strains) provided characterization of the transient deformation fields associated with the impact and fracture propagation. For the finite element analyses, we implemented a slip-weakening failure model through an option in the ABAQUS program allowing user defined constitutive relations. The analyses of impact loading and of rupture nucleation and propagation were then carried out in the 2D framework of plane stress. In a first set of studies of nucleation and propagation of rupture along a straight fault, we determined after some trial and error an appropriate CFL number, and examined different element types and layouts, finding that the most acceptable results were obtained for low order elements. We used constant strain triangles, arrayed in groups of four to effectively form four-sided elements with corner nodes and one internal node. The studies also showed that to obtain representations of slip rate and shear stress near the propagating rupture tip that were relatively free from numerical oscillations, it was necessary to have element side lengths of order Ro/50

  20. A STUDY OF THE HELIOCENTRIC DEPENDENCE OF SHOCK STANDOFF DISTANCE AND GEOMETRY USING 2.5D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Savani, N. P.; Shiota, D.; Kusano, K.; Vourlidas, A.; Lugaz, N.

    2012-11-10

    We perform four numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations in 2.5 dimensions (2.5D) of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shock fronts between 10 Rs and 300 Rs. We investigate the relative change in the shock standoff distance, {Delta}, as a fraction of the CME radial half-width, D {sub OB} (i.e., {Delta}/D {sub OB}). Previous hydrodynamic studies have related the shock standoff distance for Earth's magnetosphere to the density compression ratio (DR; {rho} {sub u}/{rho} {sub d}) measured across the bow shock. The DR coefficient, k {sub dr}, which is the proportionality constant between the relative standoff distance ({Delta}/D {sub OB}) and the compression ratio, was semi-empirically estimated as 1.1. For CMEs, we show that this value varies linearly as a function of heliocentric distance and changes significantly for different radii of curvature of the CME's leading edge. We find that a value of 0.8 {+-} 0.1 is more appropriate for small heliocentric distances (<30 Rs) which corresponds to the spherical geometry of a magnetosphere presented by Seiff. As the CME propagates its cross section becomes more oblate and the k {sub dr} value increases linearly with heliocentric distance, such that k {sub dr} = 1.1 is most appropriate at a heliocentric distance of about 80 Rs. For terrestrial distances (215 Rs) we estimate k {sub dr} = 1.8 {+-} 0.3, which also indicates that the CME cross-sectional structure is generally more oblate than that of Earth's magnetosphere. These alterations to the proportionality coefficients may serve to improve investigations into the estimates of the magnetic field in the corona upstream of a CME as well as the aspect ratio of CMEs as measured in situ.

  1. High resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulation of black hole-neutron star merger: Mass ejection and short gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Wada, Tomohide

    2015-09-01

    We report results of a high resolution numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of black hole-magnetized neutron star binaries on Japanese supercomputer "K." We focus on a binary that is subject to tidal disruption and subsequent formation of a massive accretion torus. We find the launch of thermally driven torus wind, subsequent formation of a funnel wall above the torus and a magnetosphere with collimated poloidal magnetic field, and high Blandford-Znajek luminosity. We show for the first time this picture in a self-consistent simulation. The turbulencelike motion induced by the nonaxisymmetric magnetorotational instability as well as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability inside the accretion torus works as an agent to drive the mass accretion and converts the accretion energy to thermal energy, which results in the generation of a strong wind. By an in-depth resolution study, we reveal that high resolution is essential to draw such a picture. We also discuss the implication for the r-process nucleosynthesis, the radioactively powered transient emission, and short gamma ray bursts.

  2. Occurrence Rates and Heating Effects of Tangential and Rotational Discontinuities as Obtained from Three-dimensional Simulation of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Yang, Liping; Wang, Xin; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua

    2015-05-01

    MHD discontinuities are ubiquitous in the solar wind and are often found at the origin of turbulence intermittency. They may also play a key role in the turbulence dissipation and heating of the solar wind. The tangential discontinuities (TDs) and rotational discontinuities (RDs) are the two most important types of discontinuities. Recently, the connection between turbulence intermittency and proton thermodynamics has been observationally investigated. Here, we present numerical results from a three-dimensional MHD simulation with pressure anisotropy and we define new methods for identifying and distinguishing TDs and RDs. Three statistical results obtained for the relative occurrence rates and heating effects are highlighted: (1) RDs tend to take up the majority of the discontinuities along with time; (2) the thermal states embedding TDs tend to be associated with extreme plasma parameters or instabilities while RDs do not; (3) TDs have a higher average T as well as perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot }. The simulation shows that TDs and RDs evolve and contribute to solar wind heating differently. These results will improve our understanding of the mechanisms that generate discontinuities and cause plasma heating.

  3. Compressible magnetohydrodynamic sawtooth crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2014-02-01

    In a toroidal magnetically confined plasma at low resistivity, compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predicts that an m = 1/n = 1 sawtooth has a fast, explosive crash phase with abrupt onset, rate nearly independent of resistivity, and localized temperature redistribution similar to experimental observations. Large scale numerical simulations show that the 1/1 MHD internal kink grows exponentially at a resistive rate until a critical amplitude, when the plasma motion accelerates rapidly, culminating in fast loss of the temperature and magnetic structure inside q < 1, with somewhat slower density redistribution. Nonlinearly, for small effective growth rate the perpendicular momentum rate of change remains small compared to its individual terms ∇p and J × B until the fast crash, so that the compressible growth rate is determined by higher order terms in a large aspect ratio expansion, as in the linear eigenmode. Reduced MHD fails completely to describe the toroidal mode; no Sweet-Parker-like reconnection layer develops. Important differences result from toroidal mode coupling effects. A set of large aspect ratio compressible MHD equations shows that the large aspect ratio expansion also breaks down in typical tokamaks with rq =1/Ro≃1/10 and a /Ro≃1/3. In the large aspect ratio limit, failure extends down to much smaller inverse aspect ratio, at growth rate scalings γ =O(ɛ2). Higher order aspect ratio terms, including B˜ϕ, become important. Nonlinearly, higher toroidal harmonics develop faster and to a greater degree than for large aspect ratio and help to accelerate the fast crash. The perpendicular momentum property applies to other transverse MHD instabilities, including m ≥ 2 magnetic islands and the plasma edge.

  4. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  5. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  6. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  7. Parabolized Navier-Stokes Code for Computing Magneto-Hydrodynamic Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B. (Technical Monitor); Tannehill, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of two published papers, 'Computation of Magnetohydrodynamic Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm' and 'Numerical Simulation of Turbulent MHD Flows Using an Iterative PNS Algorithm'.

  8. Non-planar interconnects in double-sided flexible Cu-PET substrates using a laser-assisted maskless microdeposition process: 3D finite element modeling and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Tong, Steven; Azhari, Amir; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Non-planar (3D) interconnects have an important role in the electronic packaging industry these days. These unconventional interconnects allow manufacturers to save materials and space while connecting circuit components on flexible and non-planar substrates. Among a variety of flexible boards, double-sided flexible substrates have attracted the electronic industry to effectively and compactly develop miniaturized flexible devices such as sensors-on-chips. This study reports our developmental procedure for the creation of non-planar silver interconnects on the edge of double-sided copper substrates separated by a layer of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM). The article consists of the characterization of the LAMM process to effectively deposit Ag nanoparticles for production of conductive interconnects. Several parameters, including the deposition and laser processing parameters, are optimized to achieve interconnects free of pores, cracks and delamination. For investigating the topography and microstructure of interconnects, various analytical tools, such as SEM, XRD, Profilometery, and EDS were used. Furthermore, a 3D finite element numerical model was developed to predict the laser processing of silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The model includes a coupled thermal and structural governing physics to derive the temperature history throughout the simulation as well as strain/displacement within the substrate, which is identified the major source of cark formation in Ag tracks. The SEM micrographs of the laser processed nanoparticles suggest that a minimum of 1.24 W laser power was needed for an effective nanoparticles sintering to obtain conductive 3D interconnects with minimum amount of cracks whereas a 1.7 W laser power caused PET to decompose.

  9. A Comprehensive Model for Real Gas Transport in Shale Formations with Complex Non-planar Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiyue; Huang, Zhongwei; Yu, Wei; Li, Gensheng; Ren, Wenxi; Zuo, Lihua; Tan, Xiaosi; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Tian, Shouceng; Sheng, Mao

    2016-11-01

    A complex fracture network is generally generated during the hydraulic fracturing treatment in shale gas reservoirs. Numerous efforts have been made to model the flow behavior of such fracture networks. However, it is still challenging to predict the impacts of various gas transport mechanisms on well performance with arbitrary fracture geometry in a computationally efficient manner. We develop a robust and comprehensive model for real gas transport in shales with complex non-planar fracture network. Contributions of gas transport mechanisms and fracture complexity to well productivity and rate transient behavior are systematically analyzed. The major findings are: simple planar fracture can overestimate gas production than non-planar fracture due to less fracture interference. A “hump” that occurs in the transition period and formation linear flow with a slope less than 1/2 can infer the appearance of natural fractures. The sharpness of the “hump” can indicate the complexity and irregularity of the fracture networks. Gas flow mechanisms can extend the transition flow period. The gas desorption could make the “hump” more profound. The Knudsen diffusion and slippage effect play a dominant role in the later production time. Maximizing the fracture complexity through generating large connected networks is an effective way to increase shale gas production.

  10. A Comprehensive Model for Real Gas Transport in Shale Formations with Complex Non-planar Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiyue; Huang, Zhongwei; Yu, Wei; Li, Gensheng; Ren, Wenxi; Zuo, Lihua; Tan, Xiaosi; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Tian, Shouceng; Sheng, Mao

    2016-01-01

    A complex fracture network is generally generated during the hydraulic fracturing treatment in shale gas reservoirs. Numerous efforts have been made to model the flow behavior of such fracture networks. However, it is still challenging to predict the impacts of various gas transport mechanisms on well performance with arbitrary fracture geometry in a computationally efficient manner. We develop a robust and comprehensive model for real gas transport in shales with complex non-planar fracture network. Contributions of gas transport mechanisms and fracture complexity to well productivity and rate transient behavior are systematically analyzed. The major findings are: simple planar fracture can overestimate gas production than non-planar fracture due to less fracture interference. A “hump” that occurs in the transition period and formation linear flow with a slope less than 1/2 can infer the appearance of natural fractures. The sharpness of the “hump” can indicate the complexity and irregularity of the fracture networks. Gas flow mechanisms can extend the transition flow period. The gas desorption could make the “hump” more profound. The Knudsen diffusion and slippage effect play a dominant role in the later production time. Maximizing the fracture complexity through generating large connected networks is an effective way to increase shale gas production. PMID:27819349

  11. Thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-traditional/non-planar substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsifer, Drew Patrick

    Conformal thin films have a wide variety of uses in the microelectronics, optics, and coatings industries. The ever-increasing capabilities of these conformal thin films have enabled tremendous technological advancement in the last half century. During this period, new thin-film deposition techniques have been developed and refined. While these techniques have remarkable performance for traditional applications which utilize planar substrates such as silicon wafers, they are not suitable for the conformal coating of non-traditional substrates such as biological material. The process of thermally evaporating a material under vacuum conditions is one of the oldest thin-film deposition techniques which is able to produce functional film morphologies. A drawback of thermally evaporated thin films is that they are not intrinsically conformal. To overcome this, while maintaining the advantages of thermal evaporation, a procedure for varying the substrates orientation with respect to the incident vapor flux during deposition was developed immediately prior to the research undertaken for this doctoral dissertation. This process was shown to greatly improve the conformality of thermally evaporated thin films. This development allows for several applications of thermally evaporated conformal thin films on non-planar/non-traditional substrates. Three settings in which to evaluate the improved conformal deposition of thermally evaporated thin films were investigated for this dissertation. In these settings the thin-film morphologies are of different types. In the first setting, a bioreplication approach was used to fabricate artificial visual decoys for the invasive species Agrilus planipennis, commonly known as the emerald ash borer (EAB). The mating behavior of this species involves an overflying EAB male pouncing on an EAB female at rest on an ash leaflet before copulation. The male spots the female on the leaflet by visually detecting the iridescent green color of the

  12. "Abnormal" bromination reaction selectivity of 5-diarylamino-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene caused by a "non-planar" conjugated model: Synthesis and theoretical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bian-Peng; Pang, Mei-Li; Tan, Ting-Feng; Meng, Ji-Ben

    2013-01-01

    5-Diarylamino-2-methylbenzo[b]thiophene was a new kind of triphenylamine-based charge-transporting material. For further modification of the compounds, bromination selectivity was studied through experiments and molecular simulation using Gaussian 09 program under B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) aided by Gaussian View 05 and Multiwfn Program. The results showed that bromination of 5-diarylamino-2-methyl-benzo[b]thiophene would occurred at an "abnormal" positions (4- and/or 4'-position) rather than at the "normal" position (3-position), which was different from those benzo[b]thiophene derivatives with simple 5-substitutes reported in literatures. The "abnormal" selectivity resulted from a special electron structure in which there was an "interfinger-like" frontier orbital or a special "non-planar" conjugated model. Electrons would be donated to the o- and p-positions of linked aromatic rings by this manner of electron delocalization, so that TPA unit rather than thiophene ring became the main factor in the selectivity, and reaction active energy at 4-position was lowest. The results were confirmed by the synthesis of three 4-Br and/or 4'-Br derivatives, compound 4, 5 and 6. Single crystal X-ray diffraction of compound 6 gave conclusive evidence on the abnormal selectivity.

  13. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  14. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  15. Numerical Investigations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence studied by large-scale direct numerical simulations has revealed a number of new interesting facets. The Goldreich-Sridhar phenomenology partly breaks down in turbulence subject to a strong mean magnetic field. This leads to a measureable anisotropy of two-point statistics. The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic (E^K) and magnetic energy (E^M) is the result of a dynamical equilibrium of Alfvén effect and a small-sale dynamo leading to a scaling relation between total and residual energy: (E^M-E^K)~ k(E^K+E^M)2. The probability density functions of cascading quantities are found to exhibit mono-scaling.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate at JSC has researched the physical processes that create planetary magnetic fields through dynamo action since 2007. The "dynamo problem" has existed since 1600, when William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, recognized that the Earth was a giant magnet. In 1919, Joseph Larmor proposed that solar (and by implication, planetary) magnetism was due to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), but full acceptance did not occur until Glatzmaier and Roberts solved the MHD equations numerically and simulated a geomagnetic reversal in 1995. JSC research produced a unique theoretical model in 2012 that provided a novel explanation of these physical observations and computational results as an essential manifestation of broken ergodicity in MHD turbulence. Research is ongoing, and future work is aimed at understanding quantitative details of magnetic dipole alignment in the Earth as well as in Mercury, Jupiter and its moon Ganymede, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the Sun and other stars.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic production of relativistic jets.

    PubMed

    Meier, D L; Koide, S; Uchida, Y

    2001-01-05

    A number of astronomical systems have been discovered that generate collimated flows of plasma with velocities close to the speed of light. In all cases, the central object is probably a neutron star or black hole and is either accreting material from other stars or is in the initial violent stages of formation. Supercomputer simulations of the production of relativistic jets have been based on a magnetohydrodynamic model, in which differential rotation in the system creates a magnetic coil that simultaneously expels and pinches some of the infalling material. The model may explain the basic features of observed jets, including their speed and amount of collimation, and some of the details in the behavior and statistics of different jet-producing sources.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research results concerning forced, dissipative, rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence will be discussed. In particular, we present new results from long-time Fourier method (periodic box) simulations in which forcing contains varying amounts of magnetic and kinetic helicity. Numerical results indicate that if MHD turbulence is forced so as to produce a state of relatively constant energy, then the largest-scale components are dominant and quasistationary, and in fact, have an effective dipole moment vector that aligns closely with the rotation axis. The relationship of this work to established results in ideal MHD turbulence, as well as to models of MHD turbulence in a spherical shell will also be presented. These results appear to be very pertinent to understanding the Geodynamo and the origin of its dominant dipole component. Our conclusion is that MHD turbulence, per se, may well contain the origin of the Earth's dipole magnetic field.

  19. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  20. Future of Magnetohydrodynamic Ship Propulsion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-16

    83 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION by A.P. Baranov DTIQ ~E tJ Approved for public release; 0.. distribution...MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION By: A.P. Baranov -,English pages: 10 Source: Sudostroyeniye, Nr. 12, December 1966, pp. 3-6 . Country of origin: USSR X...equations, etc. merged into this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION A. P

  1. Resolving a Long-Standing Ambiguity: the Non-Planarity of gauche-1,3-BUTADIENE Revealed by Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.; Patterson, David; Eibenberger, Sandra; Buckingham, Grant; Baraban, Joshua H.; Ellison, Barney; Stanton, John F.

    2016-06-01

    The preferred conformation of cis-1,3-butadiene (CH_2=CH-CH=CH_2) has been of long-standing importance in organic chemistry because of its role in Diels-Alder transition states. The molecule could adopt a planar s-cis conformation, in favor of conjugations in the carbon chain, or a non-planar gauche conformation, as a result of steric interactions between the terminal H atoms. To resolve this ambiguity, we have now measured the pure rotational spectrum of this isomer in the microwave region, unambiguously establishing a significant inertial defect, and therefore a gauche conformation. Experimental measurements of gauche-1,3-butadiene and several of its isotopologues using cavity Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy in a supersonic expansion and chirped-pulse FTMW spectroscopy in a 4 K buffer gas cell will be summarized, as will new quantum chemical calculations.

  2. Comment on a spurious prediction of a non-planar geometry for benzene at the MP2 level of theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Nagaprasad Reddy; Jordan, Kenneth D.

    2017-02-01

    MP2 calculations with the full aug-cc-pVTZ basis set give a non-planar structure for benzene. Although this non-physical result can be avoided by using the smaller aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or by scaling or deleting selected functions from the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, such changes to the basis set can result in calculated values of the frequencies of the b2g out-of-plane vibrations that are considerably underestimated. The origin of this behavior is traced to linear dependency problems with the aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets when used for benzene.

  3. The influence of non-planar geometry on the flow within a distal end-to-side anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, S. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Peiro, J.; Caro, C. G.

    1998-11-01

    The pattern of the flow in arteries is strongly influenced by the three-dimensional shape of the geometry. Curvature and torsion of the wall geometry alters the axial velocity distribution, and introduces cross flow velocity components. In this investigation we have considered flow in a model geometry of a fully occluded 45^o distal end-to-side anastomosis. Previous investigations have typically focused on planar end-to-side anastomoses where the bypass and host vessels have a plane of symmetry. We have increased the complexity of the model by considering a non-planar geometry produced by deforming the bypass vessel out of the plane of symmetry. The flows have been numerically and experimentally investigated using a spectral/hp element algorithm and magnetic resonance imaging. The significant effect of the non-planar geometry is to introduce a bulk rotation of the two secondary flow cells present in flow within a planar geometry. A reduction in wall shear stress is observed at the bed of the anastomosis and a larger absolute flux of velocity is seen within the occluded region proximal to the anastomosis. Current investigations have considered the role of pulsatility in the form of a non-reversing sinusoidal oscillation. In this case a separation bubble, not present in the steady case, is seen at the toe of the anastomosis during the systolic part of the cycle. The role of geometry and pulsatility on particle motion has also been addressed with a view to determining the shear exposure on particle within these types of flows.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  5. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  6. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  7. Hall-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with electron inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. N.; Andres, N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (one-fluid) model is often regarded as a reasonable description of the dynamics of a plasma. One-fluid models are useful in the context of large scale dynamics, but when a more detailed description is needed (for instance, when the physical context favors the development of small scales) it is most appropriate to consider two-fluid models. Within the framework of two-fluid MHD for a fully ionized hydrogen plasma, we study the effect of the Hall term and electron inertia in MHD turbulence, observing whether these effects change the energy cascade, the characteristic scales of the flow and the dynamics of global magnitudes, with particular interest in the dissipation processes. Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RHMHD) and 2.5-D Hall-MHD including electron inertia are performed for different values of the ion and electron skin depth (controlling the impact of the Hall term and the electron inertia).

  8. Fast Domain Partitioning Method for dynamic boundary integral equations applicable to non-planar faults dipping in 3-D elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-11-01

    The elastodynamic boundary integral equation method (BIEM) in real space and in the temporal domain is an accurate semi-analytical tool to investigate the earthquake rupture dynamics on non-planar faults. However, its heavy computational demand for a historic integral generally increases with a time complexity of O(MN3)for the number of time steps N and elements M due to volume integration in the causality cone. In this study, we introduce an efficient BIEM, termed the `Fast Domain Partitioning Method' (FDPM), which enables us to reduce the computation time to the order of the surface integral, O(MN2), without degrading the accuracy. The memory requirement is also reduced to O(M2) from O(M2N). FDPM uses the physical nature of Green's function for stress to partition the causality cone into the domains of the P and S wave fronts, the domain in-between the P and S wave fronts, and the domain of the static equilibrium, where the latter two domains exhibit simpler dependences on time and/or space. The scalability of this method is demonstrated on the large-scale parallel computing environments of distributed memory systems. It is also shown that FDPM enables an efficient use of memory storage, which makes it possible to reduce computation times to a previously unprecedented level. We thus present FDPM as a powerful tool to break through the current fundamental difficulties in running dynamic simulations of coseismic ruptures and earthquake cycles under realistic conditions of fault geometries.

  9. A magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Jovian magnetosphere and a magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the out flowing plasma from a comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    A three-dimensional code for a rapidly rotating magnetosphere in which the MHD equations and the Maxwell equations were solved by using the two step Lax Endroff scheme, was developed. Preliminary results were presented at the Fall AGU meeting in San Francisco. The basic simulation model to study the solar wind interactions was adapted to other bodies in addition to Jupiter. Because of the recent comet flybys, a comet was chosen as the first model. The aim was to model the formation of the contact surface and the plasma tail. Later, work was begun on a three-dimensional model which would include the effects of mass loading. This model was designed to study the weak cometary bow shocks observed by the probes to comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner. The model was successful in reproducing the position and shape of the bow shock which was determined by using observations from the Suisei spacecraft.

  10. Computational Methods for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercher, Andrew D.

    Numerical schemes for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are widely used for modeling space weather and astrophysical flows. They are designed to resolve the different waves that propagate through a magnetohydro fluid, namely, the fast, Alfven, slow, and entropy waves. Numerical schemes for ideal magnetohydrodynamics that are based on the standard finite volume (FV) discretization exhibit pseudo-convergence in which non-regular waves no longer exist only after heavy grid refinement. A method is described for obtaining solutions for coplanar and near coplanar cases that consist of only regular waves, independent of grid refinement. The method, referred to as Compound Wave Modification (CWM), involves removing the flux associated with non-regular structures and can be used for simulations in two- and three-dimensions because it does not require explicitly tracking an Alfven wave. For a near coplanar case, and for grids with 213 points or less, we find root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) that are as much as 6 times smaller. For the coplanar case, in which non-regular structures will exist at all levels of grid refinement for standard FV schemes, the RMSE is as much as 25 times smaller. A multidimensional ideal MHD code has been implemented for simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). Performance measurements were conducted for both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and Intel Xeon E5645 processor. The GPU is shown to perform one to two orders of magnitude greater than the CPU when using a single core, and two to three times greater than when run in parallel with OpenMP. Performance comparisons are made for two methods of storing data on the GPU. The first approach stores data as an Array of Structures (AoS), e.g., a point coordinate array of size 3 x n is iterated over. The second approach stores data as a Structure of Arrays (SoA), e.g. three separate arrays of size n are iterated over simultaneously. For an AoS, coalescing does not occur, reducing memory efficiency

  11. Synthesis and processing strategies to tune the film structure and optoelectronic properties of non-planar molecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiszpanski, Anna Maria

    Molecular semiconductors have generated significant interest for their potential use in lightweight and mechanically flexible electronic devices. Yet, predicting how new molecular semiconductors will perform in devices remains a challenge because devices are comprised of polycrystalline thin films of molecular semiconductors, and charge transport in these films depends greatly on the details of their microstructure whose heterogeneities can span multiple length scales. The microstructure typically evolves during deposition, and thus developing organic electronics not only hinges on the success of materials discovery, but also on the ability to fine-tune deposition and processing parameters to access the thin-film structure most conducive for charge transport. This thesis explores chemical modification of a non-planar organic semiconductor, contorted hexabenzocoronene, cHBC, to tune its optoelectronic properties and processing strategies to induce structural changes in thin films. We primarily explore fluorine- and chlorine-substitution at the peripheral aromatic rings of cHBC to lower its energy levels and optical bandgap, and we demonstrate such halogenated derivatives as electron acceptors in organic solar cells. Substitution with these larger atoms also increases cHBC's intramolecular steric hindrance, providing access to an alternative molecular conformation with an order of magnitude higher solubility and systematic shifts in absorption and emission characteristics. cHBC's non-planarity provides an added dimension of tunability as it frustrates crystallization during deposition, producing amorphous films that can be subsequently crystallized with post-deposition processing. Decoupling structural development from deposition allows us to fabricate transistors from differently treated cHBC films and elucidate the effects of changes in film structure on charge transport, as measured by the field-effect mobility. With different processing, the extent of c

  12. Direct mapping of the electric permittivity of heterogeneous non-planar thin films at gigahertz frequencies by scanning microwave microscopy.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Maria Chiara; Badino, Giorgio; Fabregas, Rene; Gramse, Georg; Fumagalli, Laura; Gomila, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    We obtained maps of electric permittivity at ∼19 GHz frequencies on non-planar thin film heterogeneous samples by means of combined atomic force-scanning microwave microscopy (AFM-SMM). We show that the electric permittivity maps can be obtained directly from the capacitance images acquired in contact mode, after removing the topographic cross-talk effects. This result demonstrates the possibility of identifying the electric permittivity of different materials in a thin film sample irrespectively of their thickness by just direct imaging and processing. We show, in addition, that quantitative maps of the electric permittivity can be obtained with no need for any theoretical calculation or complex quantification procedures when the electric permittivity of one of the materials is known. To achieve these results the use of contact mode imaging is a key factor. For non-contact imaging modes the effects of local sample thickness and of the imaging distance make the interpretation of the capacitance images in terms of the electric permittivity properties of the materials much more complex. The present results represent a substantial contribution to the field of nanoscale microwave dielectric characterization of thin film materials with important implications for the characterization of novel 3D electronic devices and 3D nanomaterials.

  13. Optical 3D Deformation Measurement Utilizing Non-planar Surface for the Development of an “Intelligent Tire”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Hiraoka, Naoki; Todoroki, Akira; Mizutani, Yoshihiro

    Intelligent tires, also known as smart tires, are equipped with sensors to monitor the strain of the interior surface and the rolling radius of tire, and are expected to improve the reliability of tires and tire control systems such as anti-lock braking systems (ABS). However, the high stiffness of an attached sensor like a strain gauge causes sensors to debond from the tire rubber. In the present study, a novel optical method is used for the concurrent monitoring of in-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement (rolling radius) utilizing the non-planar surface of the monitoring object. The optical method enables noncontact measurement of strain distribution. The in-plane strain and out-of-plane displacement are calculated by using image processing with an image of the interior surface of a tire that is taken with a single CCD camera fixed on the wheel rim. This new monitoring system is applied to an aluminum beam and a commercially available radial tire. As a result, the monitoring system provides concurrent measurement of in-plane strain, out-of-plane displacement and tire pressure, and is shown to be an effective monitoring system for intelligent tires.

  14. Conservation of circulation in magnetohydrodynamics

    PubMed

    Bekenstein; Oron

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate at both the Newtonian and (general) relativistic levels the existence of a generalization of Kelvin's circulation theorem (for pure fluids) that is applicable to perfect magnetohydrodynamics. The argument is based on the least action principle for magnetohydrodynamic flow. Examples of the new conservation law are furnished. The new theorem should be helpful in identifying new kinds of vortex phenomena distinct from magnetic ropes or fluid vortices.

  15. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  17. Classes of Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulent Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina

    2017-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of decaying hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We classify our time-dependent solutions by their evolutionary tracks in parametric plots between instantaneous scaling exponents. We find distinct classes of solutions evolving along specific trajectories toward points on a line of self-similar solutions. These trajectories are determined by the underlying physics governing individual cases, while the infrared slope of the initial conditions plays only a limited role. In the helical case, even for a scale-invariant initial spectrum (inversely proportional to wave number k ), the solution evolves along the same trajectory as for a Batchelor spectrum (proportional to k4).

  18. Multi-symplectic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-10-01

    A multi-symplectic formulation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed based on the Clebsch variable variational principle in which the Lagrangian consists of the kinetic minus the potential energy of the MHD fluid modified by constraints using Lagrange multipliers that ensure mass conservation, entropy advection with the flow, the Lin constraint, and Faraday's equation (i.e. the magnetic flux is Lie dragged with the flow). The analysis is also carried out using the magnetic vector potential à where α=Ã. d x is Lie dragged with the flow, and B=∇×Ã. The multi-symplectic conservation laws give rise to the Eulerian momentum and energy conservation laws. The symplecticity or structural conservation laws for the multi-symplectic system corresponds to the conservation of phase space. It corresponds to taking derivatives of the momentum and energy conservation laws and combining them to produce n(n-1)/2 extra conservation laws, where n is the number of independent variables. Noether's theorem for the multi-symplectic MHD system is derived, including the case of non-Cartesian space coordinates, where the metric plays a role in the equations.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamics in Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to melt, pump, stir, and stabilize liquid metals. This provides a nonintrusive means of controlling the flow of metal in commercial casting and refining operations. The quest for greater efficiency and more control in the production of steel, aluminum, and high-performance superalloys has led to a revolution in the application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to process metallurgy. Three typical applications are described here, chosen partially on the basis of their general interest to fluid dynamicists, and partially because of their considerable industrial importance. We look first at magnetic stirring, where a rotating magnetic field is used to agitate and homogenize the liquid zone of a partially-solidified ingot. This is a study in Ekman pumping. Next, we consider magnetic damping, where an intense, static magnetic field is used to suppress fluid motion. In particular, we look at the damping of jets, vortices, and turbulence. We conclude with a discussion of the magnetic destabilization of liquid-liquid interfaces. This is of particular importance in aluminum production.

  20. Detection of latent fingerprints using high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy in non-planar acquisition scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Stefan; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    In digitized forensics the support of investigators in any manner is one of the main goals. Using conservative lifting methods, the detection of traces is done manually. For non-destructive contactless methods, the necessity for detecting traces is obvious for further biometric analysis. High resolutional 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) grants the possibility for a detection by segmentation approach with improved detection results. Optimal scan results with CLSM are achieved on surfaces orthogonal to the sensor, which is not always possible due to environmental circumstances or the surface's shape. This introduces additional noise, outliers and a lack of contrast, making a detection of traces even harder. Prior work showed the possibility of determining angle-independent classification models for the detection of latent fingerprints (LFP). Enhancing this approach, we introduce a larger feature space containing a variety of statistical-, roughness-, color-, edge-directivity-, histogram-, Gabor-, gradient- and Tamura features based on raw data and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) using high resolutional data. Our test set consists of eight different surfaces for the detection of LFP in four different acquisition angles with a total of 1920 single scans. For each surface and angles in steps of 10, we capture samples from five donors to introduce variance by a variety of sweat compositions and application influences such as pressure or differences in ridge thickness. By analyzing the present test set with our approach, we intend to determine angle- and substrate-dependent classification models to determine optimal surface specific acquisition setups and also classification models for a general detection purpose for both, angles and substrates. The results on overall models with classification rates up to 75.15% (kappa 0.50) already show a positive tendency regarding the usability of the proposed methods for LFP detection on varying surfaces in non-planar

  1. Excretion pattern of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyls in ovine milk and faeces

    SciTech Connect

    Vrecl, Milka . E-mail: milka.vrecl@vf.uni-lj.si; Ursic, Matjaz; Pogacnik, Azra; Zupancic-Kralj, Lucija; Jan, Janja

    2005-04-15

    This study employed the gas chromatography with electron capture detection to determine residual levels and excretion patterns of two pairs of structurally diverse polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (IUPAC Nos. 54, 80, 155, and 169) administered to lactating sheep by intramuscular injection. PCB levels and excretion patterns in blood, milk, and faeces were time-dependent and differed from the composition of PCB congeners administered. Lactational transfer substantially exceeded the faecal transfer. Between days 3 and 7, the amount of PCB congeners 54 and 169 excreted in milk was around 50- and 800-fold higher than the amount of these two congeners excreted via faeces. During the same period, the relative contribution of co-planar PCB congeners (80 and 169) in PCB pattern decreased in blood and increased in milk and faeces compared with non-planar PCBs (54 and 155). On day 3, the ratio PCB 169 to 54 was 7-fold higher in milk than in faeces. PCB congeners with log K{sub ow} values under 6.5 reached peaks of their excretion in milk within the first three days after administration, while the super-lipophilic PCB 169 congener with log K{sub ow} value of over 7 has not reached the plateau until day 10, but afterwards, its level remained relatively high throughout the observation period. During the 57-day follow-up period, the excretion of PCB 80, 155, and 169 in milk was 4.5-, 14-, and 46-fold greater compared with PCB 54. Differences in levels and patterns were explained with some physico-chemical properties of individual PCB congeners, such as lipophilicity, planarity, metabolic stability, sorption/diffusion properties.

  2. Episodic slow slip process in a non-planar fault model constrained by non-volcanic tremor locations along Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are observed in the circum-Pacific subduction zones and exhibit a wide diversity of source parameters (including equivalent moment, duration and recurrence interval). Gao et al [2012] compiled source parameters of SSEs around the world and revealed their empirical scaling relations distinct from those of regular earthquakes. However, the nature of this diversity is unclear. Previous 3-D numerical simulations in a simplified plate model have reproduced the along-strike segmentation of episodic SSEs in Cascadia margin and their source scaling relations in the framework of rate- and state- friction law [Liu, 2014]. But the planar fault model is inefficient to investigate the effect of the fault geometry on the source characteristics of SSEs in a specific subduction zone. In this study, we adopt a non-planar Cascadia subduction fault geometry constrained by relocated seismicity [McCrory et al. 2012] in the rate-state friction model. We have reproduced episodic SSEs beneath Vancouver Island and Washington arising every ~1.5 year with a maximum cumulative slip of ~2.5 cm. We find three phases characteristic in cumulative moment rate and slip rate in each episode. These three phases, defined as nucleation, fast-spreading and healing, lasting for ~160, ~60 and ~140 days, respectively. Both the nucleation and healing phases are beneath GPS detection threshold but the nucleation phase is spatially correlated with the small tremor activities arising deeper than episodic tremor and slip (ETS). To further investigate the diversity of SSEs in Cascadia, we introduce the recent 6-year tremor locations in Cascadia (http://pnsn.org/tremor) to constrain the near-lithostatic pore pressure distribution at the SSE depths in an 800km-long Cascadia fault model. Additionally, we set a step change of effective normal stress in SSE region from 1.5 MPa in Vancouver Island and Washington to 2.0 MPa in Oregon. The results show that the modeled SSEs exhibit distinct slip

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Under this grant we have undertaken a series of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation and data analysis studies to help better understand the configuration and dynamics of Jupiter's magnetosphere. We approached our studies of Jupiter's magnetosphere in two ways. First we carried out a number of studies using our existing MHD code. We carried out simulation studies of Jupiter s magnetospheric boundaries and their dependence on solar wind parameters, we studied the current systems which give the Jovian magnetosphere its unique configuration and we modeled the dynamics of Jupiter s magnetosphere following a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Second we worked to develop a new simulation code for studies of outer planet magnetospheres.

  4. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS OF THE WEAKLY IONIZED SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Cameron, Robert H.

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the importance of ambipolar diffusion and Hall currents for high-resolution comprehensive ({sup r}ealistic{sup )} photospheric simulations. To do so, we extended the radiative magnetohydrodynamics code MURaM to use the generalized Ohm's law under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We present test cases comparing analytical solutions with numerical simulations for validation of the code. Furthermore, we carried out a number of numerical experiments to investigate the impact of these neutral-ion effects in the photosphere. We find that, at the spatial resolutions currently used (5-20 km per grid point), the Hall currents and ambipolar diffusion begin to become significant-with flows of 100 m s{sup -1} in sunspot light bridges, and changes of a few percent in the thermodynamic structure of quiet-Sun magnetic features. The magnitude of the effects is expected to increase rapidly as smaller-scale variations are resolved by the simulations.

  5. GRIM: General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Foucart, Francois; Gammie, Charles F.

    2017-02-01

    GRIM (General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics) evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Non-ideal effects are modeled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. GRIM, which runs on CPUs as well as on GPUs, combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using only the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexible regarding time-stepping schemes.

  6. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  7. Action Principle for Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al., which uses a noncanonical bracket to implement constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed.

  8. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    1997-01-01

    Under this contract, we have continued our investigations of the large scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere using global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. These computations have also formed the basis for studies of coronal mass ejections (CMES) using realistic coronal configurations. We have developed a technique for computing realistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the solar corona and inner heliosphere. To perform computations that can be compared with specific observations, it is necessary to incorporate solar observations into the boundary conditions. We have used the Wilcox Solar Observatory synoptic maps (collected during a solar rotation by daily measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field at central meridian) to specify the radial magnetic field (B,) at the photosphere. For the initial condition, we use a potential magnetic field consistent with the specified distribution of B, at the lower boundary, and a wind solution consistent with the specified plasma density and temperature at the solar surface. Together this initial condition forms a (non-equilibrium) approximation of the state of the solar corona for the time-dependent MHD computation. The MHD equations are then integrated in time to steady state. Here we describe solutions relevant to a recent solar eclipse, as well as Ulysses observations. We have also developed a model configuration of solar minimum, useful for studying CME initiation and propagation.

  9. Subgrid-scale modeling for the study of compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, A. A.; Karelsky, K. V.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2014-05-01

    A state-of-the-art review is given of research by computing physics methods on compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in space plasmas. The presence of magnetic fields and compressibility in this case makes space plasma turbulence much less amenable to direct numerical simulations than a neutral incompressible fluid. The large eddy simulation method is discussed, which was developed as an alternative to direct modeling and which filters the initial magnetohydrodynamic equations and uses the subgrid-scale modeling of universal small-scale turbulence. A detailed analysis is made of both the method itself and different subgrid-scale parametrizations for compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows in polytropic and heat-conducting plasmas. The application of subgrid-scale modeling to study turbulence in the local interstellar medium and the scale-invariant spectra of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are discussed.

  10. A Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation Study of the Dynamic Variations in the Configuration, Convection and Auroral Emissions in Saturn's Magnetosphere Driven by the Observed Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; Fukazawa, K.; Eriksson, S.

    2015-12-01

    In our previous simulations we have used constant and simple solar wind conditions to understand the basic behavior of the Kronian magnetosphere. In this study we used Cassini observations of the solar wind upstream of Saturn to drive a massively parallel simulation. Using these solar wind data we simulated the Kronian magnetosphere from 2008-02-12/14:00:31 to 2008-02-13/01:59:31. During this interval the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observed Kronian UV auroral emissions. For these solar wind conditions there are several enhancements of the solar wind dynamic pressure (shocks) and a polarity reversal in the IMF components. From these simulations we obtained the dynamically changing shape and convection pattern of the Kronian magnetosphere in response to the variations in solar wind dynamic pressure and IMF direction. For instance the magnetopause and bow shock location at the subsolar point changed by 40% during one solar wind pressure increase and 22% during another. After the pressure increases a layered convection pattern formed between the corotation dominated region and the magnetopause. The layers in this convection system interacted with each other, forming large vortices. We calculated the configuration of field aligned currents from the simulation and found layered and patchy distributions in the ionosphere. The pattern of these upward field aligned currents (FACs) in the dawn side ionosphere resembles the configuration of auroral emissions observed by HST well. To confirm the relationship between the layered configuration and upward FACs, we have calculated the footprint of magnetic field lines from the layered convection pattern to the polar region.

  11. Hall magneto-hydrodynamics in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, W.; Lesur, G.; Ferreira, J.

    2016-12-01

    Protoplanetary discs exhibit large-scale, organised structures. Because they are dense and cold, they should be weakly ionized, and hence concerned by non-ideal plasma effects, such as the Hall effect. We perform numerical simulations of non-stratified Keplerian discs, in the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic framework. We show that the Hall effect causes self-organisation through three distinct stages. A weak Hall effect enhances turbulent transport. At intermediate strength, it produces magnetized vortices. A strong Hall effect generates axisymmetric zonal flows. These structures may trap dust particles, and thus influence planetary formation. The transport of angular momentum is quenched in the organised state, impugning the relevance of magneto-rotational turbulence as a driving mechanism of accretion in Hall dominated regions.

  12. Multidimensional numerical scheme for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2007-12-01

    The paper describes a new upwind conservative numerical scheme for special relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics with scalar resistivity. The magnetic field is kept approximately divergence free and the divergence of the electric field is kept consistent with the electric charge distribution via the method of Generalized Lagrange Multiplier. The hyperbolic fluxes are computed using the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) prescription and the source terms are accounted via the time-splitting technique. The results of test simulations show that the scheme can handle equally well both resistive current sheets and shock waves, and thus can be a useful tool for studying phenomena of relativistic astrophysics that involve both colliding supersonic flows and magnetic reconnection.

  13. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  14. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  15. Non-Planar Structures of the High-Energy Rotational Conformers of 2-METHYLBUTA-1,3-DIENE (isoprene) and 2,3-DIMETHYLBUTA-1,3-DIENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Bock, Ch. W.; Larkin, J. D.; Abramenkov, A. V.; Kühnemann, F.

    2009-06-01

    Optimization of the geometrical parameters and determination of the force fields for rotamers of the title molecules were performed at the MP2(FC)/aug-cc-pVDZ//MP2(FC)/aug-cc-pVDZ computational level. The vibrational analyses of these conformers were carried out using scaled quantum-mechanical force field methodology. Recent experimental wavenumbers for these conformers and their deuteroisomers were incorporated into these analyses. The theoretical non-planar structures of the high-energy conformers of 2-methylbuta-1,3-diene (isoprene) and 2,3-dimethylbuta-1,3-diene were corroborated by good agreement between the experimental and theoretical wavenumbers of the molecules under investigation. The dihedral angles of the non-planar high-energy conformers for rotation around the =C-C= bond are as follows: 41.6^° for 2-methylbuta-1,3-diene (isoprene) and 47.0^° for 2,3-dimethylbuta-1,3-diene. Previous studies performed at the HF/6-31G level gave 41.0^° and 48.5^° for the first and second compounds, respectively. Yu. N. Panchenko, Ch. W. Bock, J. D. Larkin, A. V. Abramenkov, F. Kühnemann, Struct. Chem. 19, 421 (2008). Yu. N. Panchenko, Ch. W. Bock, J. D. Larkin, A. V. Abramenkov, Struct. Chem. 19, 793 (2008)

  16. Helicity Injection by Knotted Antennas into Electron Magnetohydrodynamical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1997-08-01

    A fully three-dimensional computer simulation of an ideal electron magnetohydrodynamical plasma is performed. By introducing various pulsed inductive antenna sources, magnetic helicity ( H = A˙B dV) injection is studied. Confirming experimental results, a simple loop provides no net helicity injection. Linked and knotted antennas, however, do inject helicity and preferentially radiate whistler wave packets parallel or antiparallel to the ambient magnetic field. Relative efficiencies of these antennas are reported as well as their unique directional properties.

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15. II. DYNAMICS CONNECTING THE SOLAR FLARE AND THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Hayashi, K.; Park, Y. D.

    2015-04-20

    We clarify a relationship between the dynamics of a solar flare and a growing coronal mass ejection (CME) by investigating the dynamics of magnetic fields during the X2.2-class flare taking place in the solar active region 11158 on 2011 February 15, based on simulation results obtained from Inoue et al. We found that the strongly twisted lines formed through tether-cutting reconnection in the twisted lines of a nonlinear force-free field can break the force balance within the magnetic field, resulting in their launch from the solar surface. We further discover that a large-scale flux tube is formed during the eruption as a result of the tether-cutting reconnection between the eruptive strongly twisted lines and these ambient weakly twisted lines. The newly formed large flux tube exceeds the critical height of the torus instability. Tether-cutting reconnection thus plays an important role in the triggering of a CME. Furthermore, we found that the tangential fields at the solar surface illustrate different phases in the formation of the flux tube and its ascending phase over the threshold of the torus instability. We will discuss these dynamics in detail.

  18. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Detection and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Pouquet, A.; Rosenberg, D.; Mininni, P. D.; Donovan, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 15363 points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities.

  19. Non-planar Fault Model of the 2008 Yutian Normal Faulting Earthquake (M7.2), Xinjiang, China, and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, M.; Yasuda, T.

    2010-12-01

    On 20 March 2008, a normal-faulting earthquake (M7.2/USGS) struck Yutian county, Xinjiang, China. The epicenter is close to the southern-edge of the Tarim basin, where three prominent fault systems, the Altyn-Tagh Fault, Karakax Fault, and Longmu-Gozha Co Fault, meet together at the northwest of the Tibetan plateau. The associated crustal deformation signals, if detected and examined in detail, will provide us with important constraints on how the continental crust in Tibetan plateau has been deforming, which has been contentious over the decades. Also, it could suggest clues on why normal faulting earthquakes prevail over the central to northern areas of Tibet. Here, based on our detected co-seismic crustal deformation signals by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, we report a non-planar kinematic fault source model that suggests the normal faulting rupture occurred in a dilatational step-over region of two oblique left-lateral strike slip faults. We used L-band ALOS/PALSAR data for the ascending track and C-band Envisat/ASAR data for the descending track. The observed data showed that the overall strike was from NE to SW, consistent with Shao and Ji (2008)'s preliminary source model. The largest slipped area in the InSAR data, however, indicates that the strike direction is almost NS, and that the rupture reached to the surface. The pixel-offset data also illustrate that the strike direction changed around the middle of the fault trace on the surface, suggesting that the fault slip occurred on a non-planar surface. In order to realistically represent the non-planar geometry, we employed an analytical formulation for the triangular dislocation element to invert the slip distribution (e.g., Mearten et al., 2005; Mead, 2007). In inverting the fault slip, both the non-negativity constraint on the slip direction and the smoothing constraint on the slip distribution were applied. Optimum fault source and its implications for regional tectonics and mechanism for the

  20. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

    1980-06-24

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  1. Action principle for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-04-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al. [Ann. Phys. 169, 29 (1986)], which uses a noncanonical bracket to effect constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed. Two significant byproducts of this formalism are the introduction of a new divergence-free 4-vector variable for the magnetic field, and a new Lie-dragged form for the theory.

  2. Magneto-Hydrodynamics Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    In microfluidic devices, it is necessary to propel samples and reagents from one part of the device to another, stir fluids, and detect the presence of chemical and biological targets. Given the small size of these devices, the above tasks are far from trivial. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers an elegant means to control fluid flow in microdevices without a need for mechanical components. In this paper, we review the theory of MHD for low conductivity fluids and describe various applications of MHD such as fluid pumping, flow control in fluidic networks, fluid stirring and mixing, circular liquid chromatography, thermal reactors, and microcoolers. PMID:20046890

  3. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  4. General relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics with the Einstein Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, Philipp; Mundim, Bruno; Faber, Joshua; Noble, Scott; Bode, Tanja; Haas, Roland; Loeffler, Frank; Ott, Christian; Reisswig, Christian; Schnetter, Erik

    2013-04-01

    The Einstein Toolkit Consortium is developing and supporting open software for relativistic astrophysics. Its aim is to provide the core computational tools that can enable new science, broaden our community, facilitate interdisciplinary research and take advantage of petascale computers and advanced cyberinfrastructure. The Einstein Toolkit currently consists of an open set of over 100 modules for the Cactus framework, primarily for computational relativity along with associated tools for simulation management and visualization. The toolkit includes solvers for vacuum spacetimes as well as relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics. This talk will present the current capabilities of the Einstein Toolkit with a particular focus on recent improvements made to the general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics modeling and will point to information how to leverage it for future research.

  5. Reconnection events in two-dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, S.; Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Dmitruk, P.; Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Cassak, P. A.

    2012-09-15

    The statistical study of magnetic reconnection events in two-dimensional turbulence has been performed by comparing numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD). The analysis reveals that the Hall term plays an important role in turbulence, in which magnetic islands simultaneously reconnect in a complex way. In particular, an increase of the Hall parameter, the ratio of ion skin depth to system size, broadens the distribution of reconnection rates relative to the MHD case. Moreover, in HMHD the local geometry of the reconnection region changes, manifesting bifurcated current sheets and quadrupolar magnetic field structures in analogy to laminar studies, leading locally to faster reconnection processes in this case of reconnection embedded in turbulence. This study supports the idea that the global rate of energy dissipation is controlled by the large scale turbulence, but suggests that the distribution of the reconnection rates within the turbulent system is sensitive to the microphysics at the reconnection sites.

  6. Numerical evaluation of high energy particle effects in magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Wu, Y.

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of high energy ions with magnetohydrodynamic modes is analyzed. A numerical code is developed which evaluates the contribution of the high energy particles to mode stability using orbit averaging of motion in either analytic or numerically generated equilibria through Hamiltonian guiding center equations. A dispersion relation is then used to evaluate the effect of the particles on the linear mode. Generic behavior of the solutions of the dispersion relation is discussed and dominant contributions of different components of the particle distribution function are identified. Numerical convergence of Monte-Carlo simulations is analyzed. The resulting code ORBIT provides an accurate means of comparing experimental results with the predictions of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics. The method can be extended to include self consistent modification of the particle orbits by the mode, and hence the full nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system.

  7. White emission from non-planar InGaN/GaN MQW LEDs grown on GaN template with truncated hexagonal pyramids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Lun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Tu, Shang-Ju; Chen, P C; Lai, Wei-Chih; Sheu, Jinn-Kong

    2015-04-06

    Non-planar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures are grown on a GaN template with truncated hexagonal pyramids (THPs) featuring c-plane and r-plane surfaces. The THP array is formed by the regrowth of the GaN layer on a selective-area Si-implanted GaN template. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the InGaN/GaN epitaxial layers regrown on the THPs exhibit different growth rates and indium compositions of the InGaN layer between the c-plane and r-plane surfaces. Consequently, InGaN/GaN MQW light-emitting diodes grown on the GaN THP array emit multiple wavelengths approaching near white light.

  8. Effects of non-extensive electrons and positive /negative dust particles on modulational instability of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in non-planar geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghbali, M.; Farokhi, B.; Eslamifar, M.

    2017-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) envelope solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of dust particles with opposite polarity and non-extensive distribution of electron is investigated. By using the reductive perturbation method, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in cylindrical and spherical geometry is obtained. The modulational instability (MI) of DIA waves governed by the NLS equation is also presented. The effects of different ranges of the non-extensive parameter q on the MI are studied. The growth rate of the MI is also given for different values of q. It is found that the basic features of the DIA waves are significantly modified by non-extensive electron distribution, polarity of the net dust-charge number density and non-planar geometry.

  9. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-15

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  10. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  11. MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) Simulation of a Comet Magnetosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-12

    Rosenberg ATTN: Reading Roo Harvard University Princeton University Center for Astrophysics Princeton, New Jersey 08540 60 Garden Street Attn...Thomas Moore (SEL, R-43) Stevens Institute of Technology W. Bernstein Hoboken, Kew Jersey 07030 D. Williams ATTN: Z . Rosen G. Schmidt Sandia

  12. Numerical solutions of the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic alpha model.

    PubMed

    Mininni, Pablo D; Montgomery, David C; Pouquet, Annick

    2005-04-01

    We present direct numerical simulations and alpha -model simulations of four familiar three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence effects: selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, and the helical dynamo effect. The MHD alpha model is shown to capture the long-wavelength spectra in all these problems, allowing for a significant reduction of computer time and memory at the same kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers. In the helical dynamo, not only does the alpha model correctly reproduce the growth rate of magnetic energy during the kinematic regime, it also captures the nonlinear saturation level and the late generation of a large scale magnetic field by the helical turbulence.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, F; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1/2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, F.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1 / 2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere.

  15. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, Don H.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core 10 of a first metal, a tubular sleeve 12 of a second metal, and an outer sheath 14, 16, 18 of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket 14. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MDH channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core 10 and the second metal of the sleeve 12 strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  17. Micromachined magnetohydrodynamic actuators and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and microsensor which utilizes micromachining to integrate the electrodes with microchannels and includes a magnet for producing magnetic fields perpendicular to both the electrical current direction and the fluid flow direction. The magnet can also be micromachined and integrated with the micropump using existing technology. The MHD micropump, for example, can generate continuous, reversible flow, with readily controllable flow rates. The flow can be reversed by either reversing the electrical current flow or reversing the magnetic field. By mismatching the electrodes, a swirling vortex flow can be generated for potential mixing applications. No moving parts are necessary and the dead volume is minimal. The micropumps can be placed at any position in a fluidic circuit and a combination of micropumps can generate fluidic plugs and valves.

  18. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  19. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  20. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-01

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations EB(f ) . We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  2. Weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.M.; Brio, M.; Kruse, M.T.; Zank, G.P.

    1999-06-01

    Equations describing weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interactions in one Cartesian space dimension are discussed. For wave propagation in uniform media, the wave interactions of interest consist of: (a) three-wave resonant interactions in which high frequency waves, may evolve on long space and time scales if the wave phases satisfy the resonance conditions; (b) Burgers self-wave steepening for the magnetoacoustic waves, and (c) mean wave field effects, in which a particular wave interacts with the mean wave field of the other waves. For wave propagation in non-uniform media, further linear wave mixing terms appear in the equations. The equations describe four types of resonant triads: slow-fast magnetosonic wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-entropy wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-magnetosonic wave interaction; and magnetosonic-entropy wave interaction. The formalism is restricted to coherent wave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Restoring in-phase emissions from non-planar radiating elements using a transformation optics based lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jianjia; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Piau, Gérard-Pascal; de Lustrac, André

    2015-07-01

    The broadband directive in-phase emission from an array of sources conformed cylindrically is numerically and experimentally reported. Such manipulation is achieved through the use of a lens designed by transformation optics concept. The all-dielectric lens prototype is realized through three-dimensional (3D) polyjet printing and presents a graded refractive index. A microstrip antenna array fabricated using standard lithography techniques and conformed on a cylindrical surface is used as TE-polarized wave launcher for the lens. To experimentally demonstrate the broadband focusing properties and in-phase directive emissions, both the far-field radiation patterns and the near-field distributions have been measured. Experimental measurements agreeing qualitatively with numerical simulations validate the proposed lens and open the way to inexpensive all-dielectric microwave lenses for beam forming and collimation.

  4. Restoring in-phase emissions from non-planar radiating elements using a transformation optics based lens

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jianjia; Burokur, Shah Nawaz Lustrac, André de; Piau, Gérard-Pascal

    2015-07-13

    The broadband directive in-phase emission from an array of sources conformed cylindrically is numerically and experimentally reported. Such manipulation is achieved through the use of a lens designed by transformation optics concept. The all-dielectric lens prototype is realized through three-dimensional (3D) polyjet printing and presents a graded refractive index. A microstrip antenna array fabricated using standard lithography techniques and conformed on a cylindrical surface is used as TE-polarized wave launcher for the lens. To experimentally demonstrate the broadband focusing properties and in-phase directive emissions, both the far-field radiation patterns and the near-field distributions have been measured. Experimental measurements agreeing qualitatively with numerical simulations validate the proposed lens and open the way to inexpensive all-dielectric microwave lenses for beam forming and collimation.

  5. Relaxation model for extended magnetohydrodynamics: Comparison to magnetohydrodynamics for dense Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, C. E.; Martin, M. R.

    2011-01-15

    It is shown that the two-fluid model under a generalized Ohm's law formulation and the resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can both be described as relaxation systems. In the relaxation model, the under-resolved stiff source terms constrain the dynamics of a set of hyperbolic equations to give the correct asymptotic solution. When applied to the collisional two-fluid model, the relaxation of fast time scales associated with displacement current and finite electron mass allows for a natural transition from a system where Ohm's law determines the current density to a system where Ohm's law determines the electric field. This result is used to derive novel algorithms, which allow for multiscale simulation of low and high frequency extended-MHD physics. This relaxation formulation offers an efficient way to implicitly advance the Hall term and naturally simulate a plasma-vacuum interface without invoking phenomenological models. The relaxation model is implemented as an extended-MHD code, which is used to analyze pulsed power loads such as wire arrays and ablating foils. Two-dimensional simulations of pulsed power loads are compared for extended-MHD and MHD. For these simulations, it is also shown that the relaxation model properly recovers the resistive-MHD limit.

  6. A Global Magnetohydrodynamic Model of Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a new global magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with the solar wind. Observations from 28 orbits of Jupiter by Galileo along with those from previous spacecraft at Jupiter, Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager I and 2 and Ulysses, have revealed that the Jovian magnetosphere is a vast, complicated system. The Jovian aurora also has been monitored for several years. Like auroral observations at Earth, these measurements provide us with a global picture of magnetospheric dynamics. Despite this wide range of observations, we have limited quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and how it interacts with the solar wind. For the past several years we have been working toward a quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind by employing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations to model the magnetosphere. Our model has been an explicit MHD code (previously used to model the Earth's magnetosphere) to study Jupiter's magnetosphere. We continue to obtain important insights with this code, but it suffers from some severe limitations. In particular with this code we are limited to considering the region outside of 15RJ, with cell sizes of about 1.5R(sub J). The problem arises because of the presence of widely separated time scales throughout the magnetosphere. The numerical stability criterion for explicit MHD codes is the CFL limit and is given by C(sub max)(Delta)t/(Delta)x less than 1 where C(sub max) is the maximum group velocity in a given cell, (Delta)x is the grid spacing and (Delta)t is the time step. If the maximum wave velocity is C(sub w) and the flow speed is C(sub f), C(sub max) = C(sub w) + C(sub f). Near Jupiter the Alfven wave speed becomes very large (it approaches the speed of light at one Jovian radius). Operating with this time step makes the calculation essentially intractable. Therefore under this funding we have been designing a

  7. COUNTER-ROTATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C.; Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K.; Matsakos, T.; Lima, J. J. G.

    2014-06-10

    Young stellar object observations suggest that some jets rotate in the opposite direction with respect to their disk. In a recent study, Sauty et al. showed that this does not contradict the magnetocentrifugal mechanism that is believed to launch such outflows. Motion signatures that are transverse to the jet axis, in two opposite directions, have recently been measured in M87. One possible interpretation of this motion is that of counter-rotating knots. Here, we extend our previous analytical derivation of counter-rotation to relativistic jets, demonstrating that counter-rotation can indeed take place under rather general conditions. We show that both the magnetic field and a non-negligible enthalpy are necessary at the origin of counter-rotating outflows, and that the effect is associated with a transfer of energy flux from the matter to the electromagnetic field. This can be realized in three cases: if a decreasing enthalpy causes an increase of the Poynting flux, if the flow decelerates, or if strong gradients of the magnetic field are present. An illustration of the involved mechanism is given by an example of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jet simulation.

  8. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    A review is made of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulation of outflows from disks for different distributions of magnetic field threading the disk. In one limit of a relatively weak, initially diverging magnetic field, both thermal and magnetic pressure gradients act to drive matter to an outflow, while a toroidal magnetic field develops which strongly collimates the outflow. The collimation greatly reduces the field divergence and the mass outflow rate decreases after an initial peak. In a second limit of a strong magnetic field, the initial field configuration was taken with the field strength on the disk decreasing outwards to small values so that collimation was reduced. As a result, a family of stationary solutions was discovered where matter is driven mainly by the strong magnetic pressure gradient force. The collimation in this case depends on the pressure of an external medium. These flows are qualitatively similar to the analytic solutions for magnetically driven outflows. The problem of the opening of a closed field line configuration linking a magnetized star and an accretion disk is also discussed.

  10. Numerical Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in General Relativity.

    PubMed

    Font, José A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of numerical hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) in general relativity. Some significant additions have been incorporated with respect to the previous two versions of this review (2000, 2003), most notably the coverage of general-relativistic MHD, a field in which remarkable activity and progress has occurred in the last few years. Correspondingly, the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general-relativistic hydrodynamics is enlarged to account for recent relevant advances, while those dealing with general-relativistic MHD are amply covered in this review for the first time. The basic outline of this article is nevertheless similar to its earlier versions, save for the addition of MHD-related issues throughout. Hence, different formulations of both the hydrodynamics and MHD equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of numerical approaches for solving such hyperbolic systems of equations is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. As previously stated, a comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is also presented. These are detailed in three basic sections, namely gravitational collapse, black-hole accretion, and neutron-star evolutions; despite the boundaries, these sections may (and in fact do) overlap throughout the discussion. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances in the formulation of the gravitational field, hydrodynamics and MHD equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them. To keep the length of this article reasonable, an effort has

  11. Helicity Injection by Knotted Antennas into Electron Magnetohydrodynamical Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, C.L.; Stenzel, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    A fully three-dimensional computer simulation of an ideal electron magnetohydrodynamical plasma is performed. By introducing various pulsed inductive antenna sources, magnetic helicity (H={bold A}{center_dot}{bold B}dV) injection is studied. Confirming experimental results, a simple loop provides no net helicity injection. Linked and knotted antennas, however, do inject helicity and preferentially radiate whistler wave packets parallel or antiparallel to the ambient magnetic field. Relative efficiencies of these antennas are reported as well as their unique directional properties. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Tissue distribution of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyl isomers in guinea pigs after oral ingestion

    SciTech Connect

    Jan, J.; Logar, B.; Jan, J.

    1996-03-01

    Food ingestion is the most important route for the uptake of lipophilic organochlorine contaminants. Uptake and transfer of the contaminants from the digestive tract to target organs can be used for risk evaluation. The bioconcentration and migration of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) is highly structure - dependent. Bioconcentration is correlated with lipophilicity on the basis of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient in its logarithmic form - logKow. However, some factors e.g. diffusion through cell membranes, accumulation in specific organs and tissues, uptake and deputation kinetics and metabolism can also influence the bioconcentration. Individual PCB compounds of commercial PCB preparation are taken up by organisms to markedly different extents. Until now little is known about the distribution of non-planar and co-planar PCBs in different tissues. Co-planar PCBs have dioxin - like toxicity. This study examines differences in the bioconcentration of two pairs of tetra and hexa chlorobiphenyls from the digestive tract and their distribution in different tissues of guinea pigs.

  13. Relationship between High-frequency Radiation and Asperity Ruptures, Revealed by Hybrid Back-projection with a Non-planar Fault Model

    PubMed Central

    Okuwaki, Ryo; Yagi, Yuji; Hirano, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency seismic waves are generated by abrupt changes of rupture velocity and slip-rate during an earthquake. Therefore, analysis of high-frequency waves is crucial to understanding the dynamic rupture process. Here, we developed a hybrid back-projection method that considers variations in focal mechanisms by introducing a non-planar fault model that reflects the subducting slab geometry. We applied it to teleseismic P-waveforms of the Mw 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake to estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of high-frequency (0.5–2.0 Hz) radiation. By comparing the result with the coseismic slip distribution obtained by waveform inversion, we found that strong high-frequency radiation can precede and may trigger a large asperity rupture. Moreover, in between the large slip events, high-frequency radiation of intermediate strength was concentrated along the rupture front. This distribution suggests that by bridging the two large slips, this intermediate-strength high-frequency radiation might play a key role in the interaction of the large slip events. PMID:25406638

  14. Impact of the non-planar morphology of pre-patterned substrates on the structural and electronic properties of embedded site-controlled InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T. V.; Tommila, J.; Schramm, A.; Guina, M.; Luna, E.

    2013-11-07

    We present an experimental and theoretical analysis of the influence of a surface nanopattern on the properties of embedded InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD). In particular, we analyze QDs grown on nanoimprint lithography (NIL) patterned grooves and investigate the influence of the non-planar surface morphology on the size, shape, strain distribution, and electronic structure of the embedded QDs. We show that the height reduction of InAs QDs during GaAs capping is significantly less pronounced for the QDs grown on the pattern than for the self-assembled QDs. Furthermore, the pattern has a strong impact on the strain and composition profile within the QD. The experimentally observed strain distribution was successfully reproduced with a three-dimensional model assuming an inverse-cone type composition gradient. Moreover, we show that the specific morphology of the QDs grown in the grooves gives rise to an increase of the vertically polarized photoluminescence emission which was explained by employing 8-band k.p calculations. Our findings emphasize that the surface curvature of the pattern not only determines the nucleation sites of the QDs but also has a strong impact on their morphological properties including shape, size, composition profile, and strain distribution. These properties are strongly cross-correlated and determine the electronic and optical characteristics of the QDs.

  15. Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling Cooperative Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Sovinec

    2008-02-15

    The Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) is developing computer simulation models for predicting the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. Over the first phase of support from the Department of Energy’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative, the focus has been on macroscopic dynamics that alter the confinement properties of magnetic field configurations. The ultimate objective is to provide computational capabilities to predict plasma behavior—not unlike computational weather prediction—to optimize performance and to increase the reliability of magnetic confinement for fusion energy. Numerical modeling aids theoretical research by solving complicated mathematical models of plasma behavior including strong nonlinear effects and the influences of geometrical shaping of actual experiments. The numerical modeling itself remains an area of active research, due to challenges associated with simulating multiple temporal and spatial scales. The research summarized in this report spans computational and physical topics associated with state of the art simulation of magnetized plasmas. The tasks performed for this grant are categorized according to whether they are primarily computational, algorithmic, or application-oriented in nature. All involve the development and use of the Non-Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics with Rotation, Open Discussion (NIMROD) code, which is described at http://nimrodteam.org. With respect to computation, we have tested and refined methods for solving the large algebraic systems of equations that result from our numerical approximations of the physical model. Collaboration with the Terascale Optimal PDE Solvers (TOPS) SciDAC center led us to the SuperLU_DIST software library [http://crd.lbl.gov/~xiaoye/SuperLU/] for solving large sparse matrices using direct methods on parallel computers. Switching to this solver library boosted NIMROD’s performance by a factor of five in typical large

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Gabriel I.; Dudley, Scott C.

    2004-10-01

    The cinema industry can sometimes prove to be an ally when searching for material with which to motivate students to learn physics. Consider, for example, the electromagnetic force on a current in the presence of a magnetic field. This phenomenon is at the heart of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion systems. A submarine employing this type of propulsion was immortalized in the movie Hunt for Red October. While mentioning this to students certainly gets their attention, it often elicits comments that it is only fiction and not physically possible. Imagine their surprise when a working system is demonstrated! It is neither difficult nor expensive to construct a working system that can be demonstrated in the front of a classroom.2 In addition, all aspects of the engineering hurdles that must be surmounted and myths concerning this "silent propulsion" system are borne out in a simple apparatus. This paper details how to construct an inexpensive MHD propulsion boat that can be demonstrated for students in the classroom.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven droplet mixer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Miles, Robin R.

    2004-05-11

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system mixes a first substance and a second substance. A first substrate section includes a first flow channel and a first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the first flow channel. A second substrate section includes a second flow channel and a second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the second flow channel. A third substrate section includes a third flow channel and a third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the third flow channel. A magnetic section and a control section are operatively connected to the spaced electrodes. The first substrate section, the second substrate section, the third substrate section, the first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the magnetic section, and the control section are operated to move the first substance through the first flow channel, the second substance through the second flow channel, and both the first substance and the second substance into the third flow channel where they are mixed.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analyses of various forms of activity and their propagation through helio spheric space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical modeling of solar activity and its effects on the solar atmosphere within the context of magnetohydrodynamics were examined. Specifically, the scientific objectives were concerned with the physical mechanisms for the flare energy build-up and subsequent release. In addition, transport of this energy to the corona and solar wind was also investigated. Well-posed, physically self-consistent, numerical simulation models that are based upon magnetohydrodynamics were sought. A systematic investigation of the basic processes that determine the macroscopic dynamic behavior of solar and heliospheric phenomena was conducted. A total of twenty-three articles were accepted and published in major journals. The major achievements are summarized.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic models of bipolar knotty jet in henize 2-90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Sahai, R.

    2004-01-01

    A remarkably linear, bipolar, knotty jet was recently discovered in Hen 2-90, an object classified as a young planetary nebula. Using two-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate periodic variations in jet density and velocity as the mechanism for producing the jet and its knotty structures.

  20. A Comparison of Two Intermediate State HLLC Solvers for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurski, K. F.

    2008-04-01

    This paper compares a solver based on the HLLC (Harten-Lax-van Leer-contact wave) approximate nonlinear Riemann solver for gas dynamics for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with the HLL, Roe, Linde, and Li solvers. Simulation results are given for three one-dimensional test cases not previously shown in the original paper presenting the smooth HLLC solver for MHD.

  1. From the Einstein-Szilard Patent to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povh, I. L.; Barinberg, A. D.

    1979-01-01

    Examines present-day and future prospects of the applications of modern magnetohydrodynamics in a number of countries. Explains how the electromagnetic pump, which was invented by Einstein and Leo Szilard, led to the development of applied magnetohydrodynamics. (HM)

  2. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  3. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  4. NON-LOCALITY OF HYDRODYNAMIC AND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2010-12-20

    We compare non-locality of interactions between different scales in hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a strongly magnetized medium. We use three-dimensional incompressible direct numerical simulations to evaluate non-locality of interactions. Our results show that non-locality in MHD turbulence is much more pronounced than that in HD turbulence. Roughly speaking, non-local interactions count for more than 10% of total interactions in our MHD simulation on a grid of 512{sup 3} points. However, there is no evidence that non-local interactions are important in our HD simulation with the same numerical resolution. We briefly discuss how non-locality affects the energy spectrum.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Solar System Processes on Geodesic Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional "Cartesian" frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  6. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES ON GEODESIC GRIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional 'Cartesian' frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  7. Variational Integrators for Ideal and Reduced Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Maj, Omar; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    Ideal and reduced magnetohydrodynamics are simplified sets of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. Discrete exterior calculus is used for the discretisation of the field variables in order to preserve their geometrical character. The resulting integrators preserve important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As these integrators are free of numerical resistivity, the magnetic field line topology is preserved and spurious reconnection is absent in the ideal case. Only when effects of finite electron mass are added, magnetic reconnection takes place. The excellent conservation properties of the methods are exemplified with numerical examples in 2D. We conclude with an outlook towards the treatment of general geometries in 3D and full magnetohydrodynamics.

  8. DFT versus Møller-Plesset conformational profile and vibrational assignments of non- planar phenoxyacetic acid and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenoxyacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.

    2010-08-01

    The structural stability of phenoxyacetic acid and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenoxyacetic acid was investigated by the DFT-B3LYP and the ab initio MP2 calculations with the 6-311G ** basis set. For the parent acid the calculations were extended to the MP4(SDQ) level of theory. At the DFT-B3LYP level of calculation the planar Tttp ( transoid O dbnd C sbnd O sbnd H) was predicted to be about 0.5 and 1.3 kcal/mol lower in energy than the non-planar Cgcpp and Tgcpp ( cisoid O dbnd C sbnd O sbnd H) forms, respectively. At the MP2 and the MP4(SDQ) levels the Cgcpp form was predicted to be about 0.8 and 1.4 kcal/mol lower in energy than the Tgcpp and the Tttcp structures, respectively. On the basis of the Møller-Plesset calculations the Cgcpp and the Tgcpp conformations were adopted as the low and high energy structures of phenoxyacetic acid. The observed spectral intensities of phenoxyacetic acid were consistence with the Cgcpp conformation being the predominant form of the acid at room temperature. At the DFT and MP2 levels of theory 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenoxyacetic acid was predicted to exist predominantly in the Cgcpp structure. The vibrational wavenumbers were computed at the B3LYP level of theory and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of combined theoretical and experimental infrared and Raman data of both molecules.

  9. Growth-induced non-planar magnetic anisotropy in FeCoZr-CaF{sub 2} nanogranular films: Structural and magnetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kasiuk, J. V.; Fedotova, J. A.; Przewoznik, J. Zukrowski, J.; Sikora, M.; Kapusta, Cz.; Grce, A.; Milosavljević, M.

    2014-07-28

    The relation between nanoscale structure, local atomic order and magnetic properties of (FeCoZr){sub x}(CaF{sub 2}){sub 100−x} (29 ≤ x ≤ 73 at. %) granular films is studied as a function of metal/insulator fraction ratio. The films of a thickness of 1–6 μm were deposited on Al-foils and glass-ceramic substrates, by ion sputtering of targets of different metal/insulator contents. Structural characterization with X-ray and electron diffraction as well as transmission electron microscopy revealed that the films are composed of isolated nanocrystalline bcc α-FeCo(Zr) alloy and insulating fcc CaF{sub 2} matrix. They grow in a columnar structure, where elongated metallic nanograins are arranged on top of each other within the columns almost normal to the substrate surface. Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry results indicate that their easy magnetization axes are oriented at an angle of 65°–74° to the surface in films with x between 46 and 74, above the electrical percolation threshold, which is attributed to the growth-induced shape anisotropy. Interatomic distances characteristic for metallic state of α-FeCo(Zr) nanograins were revealed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. The results show a lack of surface oxidation of the alloy nanograins, so the growth-induced orientation of nanograins in the films cannot be attributed to this effect. The study is among the first to report a growth-induced non-planar magnetic anisotropy in metal/insulator granular films above the percolation threshold and to reveal the origin of it.

  10. The transverse field Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.; Pullin, D. I.; Gehre, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated for the case where the initial magnetic field is unperturbed and aligned with the mean interface location. For this initial condition, the magnetic field lines penetrate the perturbed density interface, forbidding a tangential velocity jump and therefore the presence of a vortex sheet. Through simulation, we find that the vorticity distribution present on the interface immediately after the shock acceleration breaks up into waves traveling parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field, which transport the vorticity. The interference of these waves as they propagate causes the perturbation amplitude of the interface to oscillate in time. This interface behavior is accurately predicted over a broad range of parameters by an incompressible linearized model derived presently by solving the corresponding impulse driven, linearized initial value problem. Our use of an equilibrium initial condition results in interface motion produced solely by the impulsive acceleration. Nonlinear compressible simulations are used to investigate the behavior of the transverse field magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and the performance of the incompressible model, over a range of shock strengths, magnetic field strengths, perturbation amplitudes and Atwood numbers.

  11. New approach to nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    We provide a novel action principle for nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the Eulerian scheme exploiting a Clebsch-type parametrisation. Both Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations have been considered. Within the Hamiltonian framework, two complementary approaches have been discussed using Dirac's constraint analysis. In one case the Hamiltonian is canonical involving only physical variables but the brackets have a noncanonical structure, while the other retains the canonical structure of brackets by enlarging the phase space. The special case of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics is also considered where, again, both the approaches are discussed in the Hamiltonian framework. The conservation of the stress tensor reveals interesting aspects of the theory.

  12. On energy conservation in extended magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    A systematic study of energy conservation for extended magnetohydrodynamic models that include Hall terms and electron inertia is performed. It is observed that commonly used models do not conserve energy in the ideal limit, i.e., when viscosity and resistivity are neglected. In particular, a term in the momentum equation that is often neglected is seen to be needed for conservation of energy.

  13. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  14. Potential vorticity formulation of compressible magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-04

    Compressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics is formulated in terms of the time evolution of potential vorticity and magnetic flux per unit mass using a compact Lie bracket notation. It is demonstrated that this simplifies analytic solution in at least one very important situation relevant to magnetic fusion experiments. Potentially important implications for analytic and numerical modelling of both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are also discussed.

  15. Physical consistency in modeling interplanetary magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Velli, Grappin and Mangeney (1989) model is evaluated. It is argued that the model is incorrect because it mixes different dynamical models, assumes weak nonlinearities, makes predictions that vary with observations, and violates causality. It is proposed that self-similar behavior in the coronal source region of the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations cause the Kolmogorov-like spectra.

  16. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field,more » which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.« less

  17. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2013-12-14

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called “textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss-Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  18. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations - so-called 'textbook' multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss-Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  19. Toward textbook multigrid efficiency for fully implicit resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mark F.; Samtaney, Ravi; Brandt, Achi

    2010-09-01

    Multigrid methods can solve some classes of elliptic and parabolic equations to accuracy below the truncation error with a work-cost equivalent to a few residual calculations – so-called ‘‘textbook” multigrid efficiency. We investigate methods to solve the system of equations that arise in time dependent magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with textbook multigrid efficiency. We apply multigrid techniques such as geometric interpolation, full approximate storage, Gauss–Seidel smoothers, and defect correction for fully implicit, nonlinear, second-order finite volume discretizations of MHD. We apply these methods to a standard resistive MHD benchmark problem, the GEM reconnection problem, and add a strong magnetic guide field, which is a critical characteristic of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We show that our multigrid methods can achieve near textbook efficiency on fully implicit resistive MHD simulations.

  20. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a

  1. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  3. Undriven magnetic reconnection in magnetohydrodynamics and Hall magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottermoser, R.-F.; Scholer, M.

    1997-03-01

    Undriven magnetic reconnection in a one-dimensional current sheet is investigated by means of a two-dimensional compressible and resistive Hall MHD (HMHD) code. Reconnection is set up by applying a spatially limited resistivity in the center of an isothermal Harris sheet. Although the magnetic fields on the two sides of the initial current sheet are equal and exactly antiparallel, both magnetic field and flow velocity components out of the simulation plane are self-consistently generated in the course of the reconnection process. The quasi steady state exhibits all features of Petschek-like reconnection, such as two pairs of shock waves attached to the diffusion region, a strongly converging flow toward the field line reversal region, and a weak fast mode expansion of the inflowing plasma. The reconnection rate measured in terms of the Alfvén Mach number well upstream of the diffusion region is within the analytic limits for compressible Petschek reconnection and slightly higher than in the corresponding MHD case. In contrast to MHD, the shock in HMHD is a subfast, strong (2->4), intermediate shock; the thickness is ~=10ion inertial lengths, and the shocks exhibit an internal structure. The trailing left-handed slow mode wave train predicted from the integration of the stationary one-dimensional Hall MHD equations is not found. This is probably due to the fact that waves downstream of the shock are smeared out along the shock layer by the fast outflow jet. The shock waves generated during the decay of a current sheet are studied by a one-dimensional (1-D) Hall MHD simulation. In the 1-D case, the shocks are of slow mode type, and thus a left-handed intermediate mode wave train can form upstream of the shocks. The shock thickness is estimated to be at least a factor of 3 thicker than in 2-D HMHD fast reconnection. The intermediate shock in the 2-D HMHD simulation as well as the slow shock in the 1-D HMHD simulation exhibit an S-shaped hodogram. When starting the

  4. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, G. R. Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.; Hudson, S. R.

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  5. Temporal intermittency of energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-02-13

    Energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is known to be highly intermittent in space, being concentrated in sheetlike coherent structures. Much less is known about intermittency in time, another fundamental aspect of turbulence which has great importance for observations of solar flares and other space or astrophysical phenomena. In this Letter, we investigate the temporal intermittency of energy dissipation in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. We consider four-dimensional spatiotemporal structures, "flare events," responsible for a large fraction of the energy dissipation. We find that although the flare events are often highly complex, they exhibit robust power-law distributions and scaling relations. We find that the probability distribution of dissipated energy has a power-law index close to α≈1.75, similar to observations of solar flares, indicating that intense dissipative events dominate the heating of the system. We also discuss the temporal asymmetry of flare events as a signature of the turbulent cascade.

  6. Lagrangian Frequency Spectrum as a Diagnostic for Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, Angela; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2010-12-03

    For the phenomenological description of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence competing models exist, e.g., Boldyrev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 115002 (2006)] and Gogoberidze [Phys. Plasmas 14, 022304 (2007)], which predict the same Eulerian inertial-range scaling of the turbulent energy spectrum although they employ fundamentally different basic interaction mechanisms. A relation is found that links the Lagrangian frequency spectrum with the autocorrelation time scale of the turbulent fluctuations {tau}{sub ac} and the associated cascade time scale {tau}{sub cas}. Thus, the Lagrangian energy spectrum can serve to identify weak ({tau}{sub ac}<<{tau}{sub cas}) and strong ({tau}{sub ac{approx}{tau}cas}) interaction mechanisms providing insight into the turbulent energy cascade. The new approach is illustrated by results from direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional incompressible MHD turbulence.

  7. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  8. Inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolf-Christian; Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Busse, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic helicity HM, which is responsible for large-scale magnetic structure formation in electrically conducting turbulent media, is investigated in forced and decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. This is done with the help of high-resolution direct numerical simulations and statistical closure theory. The numerically observed spectral scaling of HM is at variance with earlier work using a statistical closure model [Pouquet et al., J. Fluid Mech. 77, 321 (1976)]. By revisiting this theory, a universal dynamical balance relation is found that includes the effects of kinetic helicity as well as kinetic and magnetic energies on the inverse cascade of HM and explains the above-mentioned discrepancy. Consideration of the result in the context of mean-field dynamo theory suggests a nonlinear modification of the α-dynamo effect, which is important in the context of magnetic-field excitation in turbulent plasmas.

  9. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.; Hussein, M. E-mail: m_hussein@physics.umanitoba.ca

    2014-10-10

    A model for noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence was recently proposed. This model was already used to study the random walk of magnetic field lines. In the current article we use the same model to investigate the diffusion of energetic particles across the mean magnetic field. To compute the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, two analytical theories are used, namely, the Non-Linear Guiding Center theory and the Unified Non-Linear Transport (UNLT) theory. It is shown that the two theories provide different results for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. We also perform test-particle simulations for the aforementioned turbulence model. We show that only the UNLT theory describes perpendicular transport accurately, confirming that this is a powerful tool in diffusion theory.

  10. Quantitative analytical model for magnetic reconnection in hall magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Andrei N

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is of fundamental importance for laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. Reconnection usually develops on time scales which are much shorter than those associated with classical collisional dissipation processes, and which are not fully understood. While such dissipation-independent (or 'fast') reconnection rates have been observed in particle and Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and predicted analytically in electron MHD, a quantitative analytical theory of fast reconnection valid for arbitrary ion inertial lengths d{sub i} has been lacking. Here we propose such a theory without a guide field. The theory describes two-dimensional magnetic field diffusion regions, provides expressions for the reconnection rates, and derives a formal criterion for fast reconnection in terms of dissipation parameters and di. It also demonstrates that both open X-point and elongated diffusion regions allow dissipation-independent reconnection and reveals a possibility of strong dependence of the reconnection rates on d{sub i}.

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  12. New cellular automaton model for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Matthaeus, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of two-dimensional cellular automation method is introduced for computation of magnetohydrodynamic fluid systems. Particle population is described by a 36-component tensor referred to a hexagonal lattice. By appropriate choice of the coefficients that control the modified streaming algorithm and the definition of the macroscopic fields, it is possible to compute both Lorentz-force and magnetic-induction effects. The method is local in the microscopic space and therefore suited to massively parallel computations.

  13. Nuclear Electric Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion for Submarine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Theory 24 2.3 MHD Pump Analysis 29 2.4 Maximum Pump Efficiency and Power 33 2.5 MHD Electrical Generator 40 2.6 MHD Generator Requirements 44 3...propulsion was first demon- strated by Stewart Way who published a very complete and mathematically rigorous analysis of an external duct, DC...in simple analysis and still apply in a complicated cases which require computer or physical modeling. As mentioned before, the MHD generator works on

  14. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  15. TURBULENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC RECONNECTION MEDIATED BY THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-10

    It has been established that the Sweet–Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet–Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from −2.3 to −2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from −2.5 to −2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich–Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  16. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Reconnection Mediated by the Plasmoid Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from -2.3 to -2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from -2.5 to -2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  17. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  18. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics by Galerkin-method computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Xiaowen; Montgomery, David; Chen, Hudong

    1991-01-01

    A fully spectral numerical code is used to explore the properties of voltage-driven dissipative magnetofluids inside a periodic cylinder with circular cross section. The trial functions are orthonormal eigenfunctions of the curl (Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions). Transitions are observed from axisymmetric resistive equilibria without flow to helically deformed laminar states with flow, and between pairs of helical laminar states with different pairs of poloidal and toroidal m and n numbers. States of minimum energy dissipation rate seem to be preferred. At high values of the pinch ratio, fully developed magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is observed.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  20. PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Maron, Jason L. E-mail: jmaron@amnh.org

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is required to ensure the particles fill the computational volume and gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. We have parallelized the code by adapting the framework provided by GADGET-2. A set of standard test problems, including 10{sup -6} amplitude linear magnetohydrodynamics waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is presented. Finally, we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. This paper documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1.

  1. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1997-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  2. Double-duct liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic engine

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, Carsten M.

    1995-01-01

    An internal combustion, liquid metal (LM) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) engine and an alternating current (AC) magnetohydrodynamic generator, are used in combination to provide useful AC electric energy output. The engine design has-four pistons and a double duct configuration, with each duct containing sodium potassium liquid metal confined between free pistons located at either end of the duct. The liquid metal is forced to flow back and forth in the duct by the movement of the pistons, which are alternatively driven by an internal combustion process. In the MHD generator, the two LM-MHD ducts pass in close proximity through a Hartmann duct with output transformer. AC power is produced by operating the engine with the liquid metal in the two generator ducts always flowing in counter directions. The amount of liquid metal maintained in the ducts may be varied. This provides a variable stroke length for the pistons. The engine/generator provides variable AC power at variable frequencies that correspond to the power demands of the vehicular propulsion. Also the engine should maintain nearly constant efficiency throughout the range of power usage. Automobiles and trucks could be powered by the invention, with no transmission or power converter devices being required.

  3. Analytical study of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi, M. Y.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper an analytical solution for the stability of the fully developed flow drive in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump with pulsating transverse Eletro-magnetic fields is presented. To do this, a theoretical model of the flow is developed and the analytical results are obtained for both the cylindrical and Cartesian configurations that are proper to use in the propulsion of marine vessels. The governing parabolic momentum PDEs are transformed into an ordinary differential equation using approximate velocity distribution. The numerical results are obtained and asymptotic analyses are built to discover the mathematical behavior of the solutions. The maximum velocity in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump versus time for various values of the Stuart number, electro-magnetic interaction number, Reynolds number, aspect ratio, as well as the magnetic and electrical angular frequency and the shift of the phase angle is presented. Results show that for a high Stuart number there is a frequency limit for stability of the fluid flow in a certain direction of the flow. This stability frequency is dependent on the geometric parameters of a channel.

  4. Efficient acceleration of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, galactic microquasars, and gamma-ray bursts are widely considered to be magnetohydrodynamically driven by black hole accretion systems, although the conversion mechanism from the Poynting into the particle kinetic energy flux is still open. Recent detailed numerical and analytical studies of global structures of steady, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with specific boundary conditions have not reproduced as rapid an energy conversion as required by observations. In order to find more suitable boundary conditions, we focus on the flow along a poloidal magnetic field line just inside the external boundary, without treating the transfield force balance in detail. We find some examples of the poloidal field structure and corresponding external pressure profile for an efficient and rapid energy conversion as required by observations, and that the rapid acceleration requires a rapid decrease of the external pressure above the accretion disk. We also clarify the differences between the fast magnetosonic point of the MHD flow and the sonic point of the de Laval nozzle.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of stochastically driven accretion flows.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Chattopadhyay, Amit K

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (or hydromagnetic as coined by Chandrasekhar) perturbations in the presence of stochastic noise in rotating shear flows. The particular emphasis is the flows whose angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows, however, are Rayleigh stable but must be turbulent in order to explain astrophysical observed data and, hence, reveal a mismatch between the linear theory and observations and experiments. The mismatch seems to have been resolved, at least in certain regimes, in the presence of a weak magnetic field, revealing magnetorotational instability. The present work explores the effects of stochastic noise on such magnetohydrodynamic flows, in order to resolve the above mismatch generically for the hot flows. We essentially concentrate on a small section of such a flow which is nothing but a plane shear flow supplemented by the Coriolis effect, mimicking a small section of an astrophysical accretion disk around a compact object. It is found that such stochastically driven flows exhibit large temporal and spatial autocorrelations and cross-correlations of perturbation and, hence, large energy dissipations of perturbation, which generate instability. Interestingly, autocorrelations and cross-correlations appear independent of background angular velocity profiles, which are Rayleigh stable, indicating their universality. This work initiates our attempt to understand the evolution of three-dimensional hydromagnetic perturbations in rotating shear flows in the presence of stochastic noise.

  6. A moving mesh unstaggered constrained transport scheme for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker; Vogelsberger, Mark; Marinacci, Federico; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-11-01

    We present a constrained transport (CT) algorithm for solving the 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations on a moving mesh, which maintains the divergence-free condition on the magnetic field to machine-precision. Our CT scheme uses an unstructured representation of the magnetic vector potential, making the numerical method simple and computationally efficient. The scheme is implemented in the moving mesh code AREPO. We demonstrate the performance of the approach with simulations of driven MHD turbulence, a magnetized disc galaxy, and a cosmological volume with primordial magnetic field. We compare the outcomes of these experiments to those obtained with a previously implemented Powell divergence-cleaning scheme. While CT and the Powell technique yield similar results in idealized test problems, some differences are seen in situations more representative of astrophysical flows. In the turbulence simulations, the Powell cleaning scheme artificially grows the mean magnetic field, while CT maintains this conserved quantity of ideal MHD. In the disc simulation, CT gives slower magnetic field growth rate and saturates to equipartition between the turbulent kinetic energy and magnetic energy, whereas Powell cleaning produces a dynamically dominant magnetic field. Such difference has been observed in adaptive-mesh refinement codes with CT and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics codes with divergence-cleaning. In the cosmological simulation, both approaches give similar magnetic amplification, but Powell exhibits more cell-level noise. CT methods in general are more accurate than divergence-cleaning techniques, and, when coupled to a moving mesh can exploit the advantages of automatic spatial/temporal adaptivity and reduced advection errors, allowing for improved astrophysical MHD simulations.

  7. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, T. S.; Price, D. J.; Federrath, C.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small- scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of starforming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning method may be used to achieve ∇ • B = 0 to machine precision, albeit at significant computational expense.

  8. A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE 2006 DECEMBER 13 ERUPTIVE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2011-10-20

    We present a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation that qualitatively models the coronal magnetic field evolution associated with the eruptive flare that occurred on 2006 December 13 in the emerging {delta}-sunspot region NOAA 10930 observed by the Hinode satellite. The simulation is set up to drive the emergence of an east-west-oriented magnetic flux rope at the lower boundary into a preexisting coronal field constructed from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager full-disk magnetogram at 20:51:01 UT on 2006 December 12. The resulting coronal flux rope embedded in the ambient coronal magnetic field first settles into a stage of quasi-static rise and then undergoes a dynamic eruption, with the leading edge of the flux rope cavity accelerating to a steady speed of about 830 km s{sup -1}. The pre-eruption coronal magnetic field shows morphology that is in qualitative agreement with that seen in the Hinode soft X-ray observation in both the magnetic connectivity as well as the development of an inverse-S-shaped X-ray sigmoid. We examine the properties of the erupting flux rope and the morphology of the post-reconnection loops, and compare them with the observations.

  9. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Alexander J.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  10. Criticality and turbulence in a resistive magnetohydrodynamic current sheet.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Alexander J; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2017-02-01

    Scaling properties of a two-dimensional (2d) plasma physical current-sheet simulation model involving a full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with current-dependent resistivity are investigated. The current sheet supports a spatial magnetic field reversal that is forced through loading of magnetic flux containing plasma at boundaries of the simulation domain. A balance is reached between loading and annihilation of the magnetic flux through reconnection at the current sheet; the transport of magnetic flux from boundaries to current sheet is realized in the form of spatiotemporal avalanches exhibiting power-law statistics of lifetimes and sizes. We identify this dynamics as self-organized criticality (SOC) by verifying an extended set of scaling laws related to both global and local properties of the current sheet (critical susceptibility, finite-size scaling of probability distributions, geometric exponents). The critical exponents obtained from this analysis suggest that the model operates in a slowly driven SOC state similar to the mean-field state of the directed stochastic sandpile model. We also investigate multiscale correlations in the velocity field and find them numerically indistinguishable from certain intermittent turbulence (IT) theories. The results provide clues on physical conditions for SOC behavior in a broad class of plasma systems with propagating instabilities, and suggest that SOC and IT may coexist in driven current sheets which occur ubiquitously in astrophysical and space plasmas.

  11. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OF SELF-COLLIMATING RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Vaidya, Bhargav; Meliani, Zakaria E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-08-10

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow-magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000{sup 2} Schwarzschild radii allowing jets to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting-dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of {Gamma} {approx_equal} 8 and is collimated to 1{sup 0}. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive very long baseline interferometry radio and (sub-) millimeter diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra, and Faraday rotation measure (RM) directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate depolarization and the detectability of a {lambda}{sup 2}-law RM depending on beam resolution and observing frequency. We find non-monotonic intrinsic RM profiles that could be detected at a resolution of 100 Schwarzschild radii. In our collimating jet geometry, the strict bimodality in the polarization direction (as predicted by Pariev et al.) can be circumvented. Due to relativistic aberration, asymmetries in the polarization vectors across the jet can hint at the spin direction of the central engine.

  12. LOCAL RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITIES IN MAGNETICALLY STRATIFIED MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer

    2011-11-20

    We study local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. We include the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. Apart from factors that depend on wavenumber orientation, the Parker instability exists for wavelengths longer than a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sub tran}, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub tran}. The growth rate in the Parker regime is independent of the orientation of the horizontal component of the wavenumber when radiative diffusion is rapid, but the range of Parker-like wavenumbers is extended if there exists strong horizontal shear between field lines (i.e., horizontal wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field). Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short-wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at short wavelengths. We also consider the effects of differential rotation with accretion disk applications in mind. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths.

  13. Resistive magnetohydrodynamic reconnection: Resolving long-term, chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, R.; Restante, A. L.; Lapenta, G.; Porth, O.; Galsgaard, K.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Parnell, C.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we address the long-term evolution of an idealised double current system entering reconnection regimes where chaotic behavior plays a prominent role. Our aim is to quantify the energetics in high magnetic Reynolds number evolutions, enriched by secondary tearing events, multiple magnetic island coalescence, and compressive versus resistive heating scenarios. Our study will pay particular attention to the required numerical resolutions achievable by modern (grid-adaptive) computations, and comment on the challenge associated with resolving chaotic island formation and interaction. We will use shock-capturing, conservative, grid-adaptive simulations for investigating trends dominated by both physical (resistivity) and numerical (resolution) parameters, and confront them with (visco-)resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed with very different, but equally widely used discretization schemes. This will allow us to comment on the obtained evolutions in a manner irrespective of the adopted discretization strategy. Our findings demonstrate that all schemes used (finite volume based shock-capturing, high order finite differences, and particle in cell-like methods) qualitatively agree on the various evolutionary stages, and that resistivity values of order 0.001 already can lead to chaotic island appearance. However, none of the methods exploited demonstrates convergence in the strong sense in these chaotic regimes. At the same time, nonperturbed tests for showing convergence over long time scales in ideal to resistive regimes are provided as well, where all methods are shown to agree. Both the advantages and disadvantages of specific discretizations as applied to this challenging problem are discussed.

  14. Statistical properties of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskamp, D.; Welter, H.; Walter, M.

    1990-12-01

    The statistical properties of two-dimensional (2-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are studied by means of high-resolution numerical simulations. As a theoretical point of reference, the β model of intermittent turbulence is adapted to the MHD case. Comparison of simulation results for energy spectra with the β-model predictions shows intermittency corrections to be small, δ<0.2, while fourth-order correlation functions exhibit a stronger effect δ≂0.35, consistent with the numerically observed Reynolds-number dependence of the flatness factor F∝R1/2λ. An argument is given that this scaling valid for Rλ˜102 is, however, not characteristic of the asymptotic regime Rλ→∞, where a constant value of F is to be expected. The probability distributions of the field difference δv(x,t), δB(x,t) are Gaussian for large separation x or t, approaching an approximately exponential distribution for x, t→0. This behavior can be understood by a simple probabilistic argument. The probability distribution of the local energy dissipation rate ɛ is roughly consistent with a log-normal distribution at larger ɛ but shows a different behavior at small ɛ.

  15. Bcl-2 promoter sequence G-quadruplex interactions with three planar and non-planar cationic porphyrins: TMPyP4, TMPyP3, and TMPyP2.

    PubMed

    Le, Vu H; Nagesh, Narayana; Lewis, Edwin A

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of three related cationic porphyrins, TMPyP4, TMPyP3 and TMPyP2, with a WT 39-mer Bcl-2 promoter sequence G-quadruplex were studied using Circular Dichroism, ESI mass spectrometry, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, and Fluorescence spectroscopy. The planar cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 (5, 10, 15, 20-meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine) is shown to bind to a WT Bcl-2 G-quadruplex via two different binding modes, an end binding mode and a weaker mode attributed to intercalation. The related non-planar ligands, TMPyP3 and TMPyP2, are shown to bind to the Bcl-2 G-quadruplex by a single mode. ESI mass spectrometry experiments confirmed that the saturation stoichiometry is 4:1 for the TMPyP4 complex and 2:1 for the TMPyP2 and TMPyP3 complexes. ITC experiments determined that the equilibrium constant for formation of the (TMPyP4)1/DNA complex (K1 = 3.7 × 10(6)) is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than the equilibrium constant for the formation of the (TMPyP2)1/DNA complex, (K1 = 7.0 × 10(4)). Porphyrin fluorescence is consistent with intercalation in the case of the (TMPyP4)3/DNA and (TMPyP4)4/DNA complexes. The non-planar shape of the TMPyP2 and TMPyP3 molecules results in both a reduced affinity for the end binding interaction and the elimination of the intercalation binding mode.

  16. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two

  17. Simplified variational principles for non-barotropic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahalom, Asher

    2016-04-01

    > Variational principles for magnetohydrodynamics were introduced by previous authors both in Lagrangian and Eulerian form. In this paper we introduce simpler Eulerian variational principles from which all the relevant equations of non-barotropic magnetohydrodynamics can be derived for certain field topologies. The variational principle is given in terms of five independent functions for non-stationary barotropic flows. This is less than the eight variables which appear in the standard equations of barotropic magnetohydrodynamics which are the magnetic field the velocity field , the entropy and the density .

  18. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  19. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the spheromak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.

    1982-01-19

    Results are presented of a parametric study of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of the spheromak, or compact torus, configuration. In the absence of a nearby conducting wall, the spheromak is always unstable to at least one current driven mode. With a conducting wall at the surface, the spheromak can be unstable to current driven modes if the current is too peaked, i.e., q/sub o/(R/a) less than or equal to 2/3, or if the shear is too low at the origin. The Mercier criterion sets an upper limit on the pressure gradient everywhere, but configurations that are everywhere Mercier stable can be unstable to pressure driven low-n modes. Stable toroidal configurations exist with a spherical wall separated by half a minor radius, and with ..beta../sub theta/ = 30%.

  20. Exploring Astrophysical Magnetohydrodynamics in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario

    2014-10-01

    Plasma evolution in many astrophysical systems is dominated by magnetohydrodynamics. Specifically of interest to this talk are collimated outflows from accretion systems. Away from the central object, the Euler equations can represent the plasma dynamics well and may be scaled to a laboratory system. We have performed experiments to investigate the effects of a background magnetic field on an otherwise hydrodynamically collimated plasma. Laser-irradiated, cone targets produce hydrodynamically collimated plasma jets and a pulse-powered solenoid provides a constant background magnetic field. The application of this field is shown to completely disrupt the original flow and a new magnetically-collimated, hollow envelope is produced. Results from these experiments and potential implications for their astrophysical analogs will be discussed.

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  2. Rarefaction wave in relativistic steady magnetohydrodynamic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sapountzis, Konstantinos Vlahakis, Nektarios

    2014-07-15

    We construct and analyze a model of the relativistic steady-state magnetohydrodynamic rarefaction that is induced when a planar symmetric flow (with one ignorable Cartesian coordinate) propagates under a steep drop of the external pressure profile. Using the method of self-similarity, we derive a system of ordinary differential equations that describe the flow dynamics. In the specific limit of an initially homogeneous flow, we also provide analytical results and accurate scaling laws. We consider that limit as a generalization of the previous Newtonian and hydrodynamic solutions already present in the literature. The model includes magnetic field and bulk flow speed having all components, whose role is explored with a parametric study.

  3. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  4. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, Alfredo; Sagaceta-Mejía, Alma R.; García-Perciante, Ana L.

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field [J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 38 (2013), 141-151]. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowski space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context, the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach [Sitz. Ber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. (1921), 966-972; Gen. Rel. Grav. 39 (2007), 1287-1296; Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000), 4823-4830]. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  5. Action principles for extended magnetohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keramidas Charidakos, I.; Lingam, M.; Morrison, P. J.; White, R. L.; Wurm, A.

    2014-09-01

    The general, non-dissipative, two-fluid model in plasma physics is Hamiltonian, but this property is sometimes lost or obscured in the process of deriving simplified (or reduced) two-fluid or one-fluid models from the two-fluid equations of motion. To ensure that the reduced models are Hamiltonian, we start with the general two-fluid action functional, and make all the approximations, changes of variables, and expansions directly within the action context. The resulting equations are then mapped to the Eulerian fluid variables using a novel nonlocal Lagrange-Euler map. Using this method, we recover Lüst's general two-fluid model, extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and electron MHD from a unified framework. The variational formulation allows us to use Noether's theorem to derive conserved quantities for each symmetry of the action.

  6. Remarkable connections between extended magnetohydrodynamics models

    SciTech Connect

    Lingam, M. Morrison, P. J. Miloshevich, G.

    2015-07-15

    Through the use of suitable variable transformations, the commonality of all extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models is established. Remarkable correspondences between the Poisson brackets of inertialess Hall MHD and inertial MHD (which has electron inertia, but not the Hall drift) and extended MHD (which has both effects) are established. The helicities (two in all) for each of these models are obtained through these correspondences. The commonality of all the extended MHD models is traced to the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms, which are closely associated with the canonical momenta of the two underlying species. The Lie-dragging of these 2-forms by suitable velocities also leads to the correct equations of motion. The Hall MHD Poisson bracket is analyzed in detail, the Jacobi identity is verified through a detailed proof, and this proof ensures the Jacobi identity for the Poisson brackets of all the models.

  7. A photolithographic fabrication technique for magnetohydrodynamic micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenstner, Stephen; Baylor, Martha-Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) devices use perpendicular electric and magnetic fields to exert a Lorentz body force on a conducting fluid. Miniaturized MHD devices have been used to create pumps, stirrers, heat exchangers, and microfluidic networks. Compared to mechanical micropumps, MHD micropumps are appealing because they require no moving parts, which simplifies fabrication, and because they are amenable to electronic control. This abstract reports the fabrication and testing of a centimeter-scale MHD pump using a thiol-ene/methacrylate-based photopolymer and mask-based photolithographic technique. Pumps like this one could simplify the fabrication of sophisticated optofluidic devices, including liquid-core, liquid cladding (L2) waveguides, which are usually created with PDMS using stamps, or etched into silicon wafers. The photolithographic technique demonstrated here requires only one masking step to create fluid channels with complex geometries.

  8. Numerical Methods for Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics in Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Stone, J M

    2007-11-20

    We describe numerical methods for solving the equations of radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for astrophysical fluid flow. Such methods are essential for the investigation of the time-dependent and multidimensional dynamics of a variety of astrophysical systems, although our particular interest is motivated by problems in star formation. Over the past few years, the authors have been members of two parallel code development efforts, and this review reflects that organization. In particular, we discuss numerical methods for MHD as implemented in the Athena code, and numerical methods for radiation hydrodynamics as implemented in the Orion code. We discuss the challenges introduced by the use of adaptive mesh refinement in both codes, as well as the most promising directions for future developments.

  9. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<

  10. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  11. Viscosity and Vorticity in Reduced Magneto-Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Ilon

    2015-08-12

    Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) critically relies on viscous forces in order for an accurate determination of the electric eld. For each charged particle species, the Braginskii viscous tensor for a magnetized plasma has the decomposition into matrices with special symmetries.

  12. An AC magnetohydrodynamic micropump: towards a true integrated microfluidic system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A P; Lemoff, A V; McConaghy, C F; Miles, R R

    1999-03-01

    An AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump has been demonstrated in which the Lorentz force is used to propel an electrolytic solution along a microchannel etched in silicon. This micropump has no moving parts, produces a continuous (not pulsatile) flow, and is compatible with solutions containing biological specimens. micropump, using the Lorentz force as the pumping mechanism for biological analysis. The AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump investigated produces a continuous flow and allows for complex microchannel design.

  13. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    López Ariste, A; Collados, M; Khomenko, E

    2013-08-23

    We describe the presence of wave front dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfvén waves, as well as in general magnetoacoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  14. Government research and development summaries: Magnetohydrodynamic project briefs. Irregular

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Project Briefs describe the status of all R and D programs submitted to the Power Information Center by the government sponsors in energy conversion involving the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interaction between electromagnetic fields and electrically conducting fields, including fuels, materials, plasma dynamics, and combustion. The document is not to be reproduced, in whole or in part, for dissemination outside your own organization nor may it be reproduced for advertising or sales promotion purposes.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmentation of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-28

    system will either be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle , with en- ergy being used without maximum gain. Magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ...to their potentially superior performance over constant pressure cycle engines. Yet due to its unsteady chamber pressure, the PDE system will either...be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle , with energy being used without maximum gain. Magnetohydrodynamic ( MHD ) augmentation offers

  16. Government research and development summaries: Magnetohydrodynamic project briefs. Irregular

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Project Briefs describe the status of all R and D programs submitted to the Power Information Center by the government sponsors in energy conversion involving the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interaction between electromagnetic fields and electrically conducting fields, including fuels, materials, plasma dynamics, and combustion. The document is not to be reproduced, in whole or in part, for dissemination outside your own organization nor may it be reproduced for advertising or sales promotion purposes.

  17. The classification of magnetohydrodynamic regimes of thermonuclear combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-10

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  18. Inverse cascades and the evolution of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Berera, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    Ensemble averaged high resolution direct numerical simulations of inverse cascade are presented, extending on the many single realization numerical studies done up to now. This identifies inverse cascade as a statistical property of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and thus permits reliable numerical exploration of its dynamics. Our results show that at early times during the decay the properties of the ensemble average are represented by one realization, as the deviations between realizations are small. In contrast, at late times we measure significant deviations between realizations, thus the ensemble average cannot be avoided in this time frame. This is important for measurements of the magnetic energy decay exponent, which has been determined from these ensemble runs to be nE = (0 . 47 +/- 0 . 03) + (13 . 9 +/- 0 . 8) /Rλ for initially helical magnetic fields. We show for the first time that even after removing the Lorentz force term in the momentum equation, thus decoupling it from the induction equation, inverse cascade persists. The induction equation is now a linear partial differential equation with an externally imposed velocity field, thus amenable to numerous analysis techniques. A new door has opened for analyzing inverse cascade, with various ideas discussed. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing services HECToR and ARCHER, made available through ECDF. AB acknowledges funding from STFC, and ML is supported by EPSRC.

  19. Can non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics solve the magnetic braking catastrophe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether or not the low ionization fractions in molecular cloud cores can solve the `magnetic braking catastrophe', where magnetic fields prevent the formation of circumstellar discs around young stars. We perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of the gravitational collapse of one solar mass molecular cloud cores, incorporating the effects of ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic resistivity and the Hall effect alongside a self-consistent calculation of the ionization chemistry assuming 0.1 μm grains. When including only ambipolar diffusion or Ohmic resistivity, discs do not form in the presence of strong magnetic fields, similar to the cases using ideal MHD. With the Hall effect included, disc formation depends on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the rotation vector of the gas cloud. When the vectors are aligned, strong magnetic braking occurs and no disc is formed. When the vectors are anti-aligned, a disc with radius of 13 au can form even in strong magnetic when all three non-ideal terms are present, and a disc of 38 au can form when only the Hall effect is present; in both cases, a counter-rotating envelope forms around the first hydrostatic core. For weaker, anti-aligned fields, the Hall effect produces massive discs comparable to those produced in the absence of magnetic fields, suggesting that planet formation via gravitational instability may depend on the sign of the magnetic field in the precursor molecular cloud core.

  20. Magnetic discontinuities in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Mason, Joanne; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2012-04-27

    Recent measurements of solar wind turbulence report the presence of intermittent, exponentially distributed angular discontinuities in the magnetic field. In this Letter, we study whether such discontinuities can be produced by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We detect the discontinuities by measuring the fluctuations of the magnetic field direction, Δθ, across fixed spatial increments Δx in direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field B(0). A large region of the probability density function (pdf) for Δθ is found to follow an exponential decay, proportional to exp(-Δθ/θ(*)), with characteristic angle θ(*)≈(14°)(b(rms)/B(0))(0.65) for a broad range of guide-field strengths. We find that discontinuities observed in the solar wind can be reproduced by MHD turbulence with reasonable ratios of b(rms)/B(0). We also observe an excess of small angular discontinuities when Δx becomes small, possibly indicating an increasing statistical significance of dissipation-scale structures. The structure of the pdf in this case closely resembles the two-population pdf seen in the solar wind. We thus propose that strong discontinuities are associated with inertial-range MHD turbulence, while weak discontinuities emerge from dissipation-range turbulence. In addition, we find that the structure functions of the magnetic field direction exhibit anomalous scaling exponents, which indicates the existence of intermittent structures.

  1. Two-dimensional state in driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sebastien

    2011-02-15

    The dynamics of the two-dimensional (2D) state in driven three-dimensional (3D) incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated through high-resolution direct numerical simulations and in the presence of an external magnetic field at various intensities. For such a flow the 2D state (or slow mode) and the 3D modes correspond, respectively, to spectral fluctuations in the plane k{sub ||}=0 and in the area k{sub ||}>0. It is shown that if initially the 2D state is set to zero it becomes nonnegligible in few turnover times, particularly when the external magnetic field is strong. The maintenance of a large-scale driving leads to a break for the energy spectra of 3D modes; when the driving is stopped, the previous break is removed and a decay phase emerges with Alfvenic fluctuations. For a strong external magnetic field the energy at large perpendicular scales lies mainly in the 2D state, and in all situations a pinning effect is observed at small scales.

  2. Nonlinear evolution of double tearing mode in Hall magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. L.; Ma, Z. W.

    2009-12-15

    Nonlinear evolution of a double tearing mode for different plasma resistivities (eta) and ion inertial lengths (d{sub i}) is investigated using Hall magnetohydrodynamics simulations. In the Hall dominant regime, the magnetic field configuration in the reconnection region evolves from Y-type to X-type geometry, which leads to fast reconnection in the nonlinear growth phase. The maximum growth rate of total kinetic energy of plasma gamma{sub max} in the explosive growth phase is found to have a d{sub i}{sup 2/5}eta{sup 1/10} scaling and the maximum total kinetic energy (E{sub k}){sub max} scales as d{sub i}{sup 4/5}. In the regime with weak Hall effect, it is found that the elongated thin current sheet formed in the early phase is broken into two X-points, forming a magnetic island in the late stage, instead of shrinking to an X-type geometry.

  3. Statistics of passive tracers in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, Angela; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Homann, Holger; Grauer, Rainer

    2007-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is studied from the Lagrangian viewpoint by following fluid particle tracers in high resolution direct numerical simulations. Results regarding turbulent diffusion and dispersion as well as Lagrangian structure functions are presented. Whereas turbulent single-particle diffusion exhibits essentially the same behavior in Navier-Stokes and MHD turbulence, two-particle relative dispersion in the MHD case differs significantly from the Navier-Stokes behavior. This observation is linked to the local anisotropy of MHD turbulence which is clearly reflected by quantities measured in a Lagrangian frame of reference. In the MHD case the Lagrangian structure functions display a lower level of intermittency as compared to the Navier-Stokes case contrasting Eulerian results. This is not only true for short time increments [H. Homann, R. Grauer, A. Busse, and W.-C. Mueller, J. Plasma Phys. 73, 821 (2007)] but also holds for increments up to the order of the integral time scale. The apparent discrepancy can be explained by the difference in the characteristic shapes of fluid particle trajectories in the vicinity of most singular dissipative structures.

  4. Structure Formation through Magnetohydrodynamical Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.

    2000-12-01

    The shear flow instabilities under the presence of magnetic fields in the protoplanetary disk can greatly facilitate the formation of density structures that serve as seeds prior to the onset of the gravitational Jeans instability. Such a seeding process may explain several outstanding puzzles in the planetary genesis that are further compounded by the new discoveries of extrasolar planets and a new insight into the equation of state of dense matter. This puzzle also includes the apparent narrow window of the age difference of the Sun and the Earth. We evaluate the effects of the Parker, magnetorotational(Balbus-Hawley), and kinematic dynamo instabilities by comparing the properties of these instabilities. We calculate the mass spectra of aggregated density structures by the above mechanism in the radial direction for an axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) torus equiblium and power-law density profile models. The mass spectrum of the magnetorotational instability may describe the origin of giant planets away from the central star such as Jupiter. Our local three-dimentional MHD simulation indicates that the coupling of the Parker and magnetorotational instabilities creates spiral arms and gas blobs in the accretion disk, reinforcing the theory and model.

  5. Approximate Riemann solvers for the cosmic ray magnetohydrodynamical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Yuki; Hanawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the cosmic ray magnetohydrodynamic (CR MHD) equations to improve the numerical simulations. We propose to solve them in the fully conservation form, which is equivalent to the conventional CR MHD equations. In the fully conservation form, the CR energy equation is replaced with the CR `number' conservation, where the CR number density is defined as the three-fourths power of the CR energy density. The former contains an extra source term, while latter does not. An approximate Riemann solver is derived from the CR MHD equations in the fully conservation form. Based on the analysis, we propose a numerical scheme of which solutions satisfy the Rankine-Hugoniot relation at any shock. We demonstrate that it reproduces the Riemann solution derived by Pfrommer et al. for a 1D CR hydrodynamic shock tube problem. We compare the solution with those obtained by solving the CR energy equation. The latter solutions deviate from the Riemann solution seriously, when the CR pressure dominates over the gas pressure in the post-shocked gas. The former solutions converge to the Riemann solution and are of the second-order accuracy in space and time. Our numerical examples include an expansion of high-pressure sphere in a magnetized medium. Fast and slow shocks are sharply resolved in the example. We also discuss possible extension of the CR MHD equations to evaluate the average CR energy.

  6. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  7. Primitive Variable Solvers for Conservative General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Scott C.; Gammie, Charles F.; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Del Zanna, Luca

    2006-04-01

    Conservative numerical schemes for general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) require a method for transforming between ``conserved'' variables such as momentum and energy density and ``primitive'' variables such as rest-mass density, internal energy, and components of the four-velocity. The forward transformation (primitive to conserved) has a closed-form solution, but the inverse transformation (conserved to primitive) requires the solution of a set of five nonlinear equations. Here we discuss the mathematical properties of the inverse transformation and present six numerical methods for performing the inversion. The first method solves the full set of five nonlinear equations directly using a Newton-Raphson scheme and a guess from the previous time step. The other methods reduce the five nonlinear equations to either one or two nonlinear equations that are solved numerically. Comparisons between the methods are made using a survey over phase space, a two-dimensional explosion problem, and a general relativistic MHD accretion disk simulation. The run time of the methods is also examined. Code implementing the schemes is available with the electronic edition of the article.

  8. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament χ, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more `broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in χ hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for χ does not initiate large turbulent instabilities in either the perpendicular or oblique field cases but rather draws the filament out into long tendrils which may eventually fragment. In addition, flux ropes are only formed in parallel magnetic fields. The length of the filament is, however, not as important for the evolution and destruction of a filament.

  9. Numerical magneto-hydrodynamics for relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inghirami, Gabriele; Del Zanna, Luca; Beraudo, Andrea; Moghaddam, Mohsen Haddadi; Becattini, Francesco; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-12-01

    We present an improved version of the ECHO-QGP numerical code, which self-consistently includes for the first time the effects of electromagnetic fields within the framework of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics (RMHD). We discuss results of its application in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity of the plasma. After reviewing the relevant covariant 3+1 formalisms, we illustrate the implementation of the evolution equations in the code and show the results of several tests aimed at assessing the accuracy and robustness of the implementation. After providing some estimates of the magnetic fields arising in non-central high-energy nuclear collisions, we perform full RMHD simulations of the evolution of the quark-gluon plasma in the presence of electromagnetic fields and discuss the results. In our ideal RMHD setup we find that the magnetic field developing in non-central collisions does not significantly modify the elliptic flow of the final hadrons. However, since there are uncertainties in the description of the pre-equilibrium phase and also in the properties of the medium, a more extensive survey of the possible initial conditions as well as the inclusion of dissipative effects are indeed necessary to validate this preliminary result.

  10. PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. I. ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason L.; McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: cmcnally@amnh.org

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. Local, third-order, least-squares, polynomial interpolations (Moving Least Squares interpolations) are calculated from the field values of neighboring particles to obtain field values and spatial derivatives at the particle position. Field values and particle positions are advanced in time with a second-order predictor-corrector scheme. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is implemented to ensure the particles fill the computational volume, which gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. Particle addition and deletion is based on a local void and clump detection algorithm. Dynamic artificial viscosity fields provide stability to the integration. The resulting algorithm provides a robust solution for modeling flows that require Lagrangian or adaptive discretizations to resolve. This paper derives and documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1. A following paper presents the implementation and test problem results.

  11. A switch to reduce resistivity in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence S.; Price, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    Artificial resistivity is included in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamic simulations to capture shocks and discontinuities in the magnetic field. Here, we present a new method for adapting the strength of the applied resistivity so that shocks are captured but the dissipation of the magnetic field away from shocks is minimized. Our scheme utilizes the gradient of the magnetic field as a shock indicator, setting αB = h | ∇ B | / | B |, such that resistivity is switched on only where strong discontinuities are present. The advantage to this approach is that the resistivity parameter does not depend on the absolute field strength. The new switch is benchmarked on a series of shocktube tests demonstrating its ability to capture shocks correctly. It is compared against a previous switch proposed by Price & Monaghan, showing that it leads to lower dissipation of the field, and in particular, that it succeeds at capturing shocks in the regime where the Alfvén speed is much less than the sound speed (i.e. when the magnetic field is very weak). It is also simpler. We also demonstrate that our recent constrained divergence cleaning algorithm has no difficulty with shocktube tests, in contrast to other implementations.

  12. Statistics of passive tracers in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Angela; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Homann, Holger; Grauer, Rainer

    2007-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is studied from the Lagrangian viewpoint by following fluid particle tracers in high resolution direct numerical simulations. Results regarding turbulent diffusion and dispersion as well as Lagrangian structure functions are presented. Whereas turbulent single-particle diffusion exhibits essentially the same behavior in Navier-Stokes and MHD turbulence, two-particle relative dispersion in the MHD case differs significantly from the Navier-Stokes behavior. This observation is linked to the local anisotropy of MHD turbulence which is clearly reflected by quantities measured in a Lagrangian frame of reference. In the MHD case the Lagrangian structure functions display a lower level of intermittency as compared to the Navier-Stokes case contrasting Eulerian results. This is not only true for short time increments [H. Homann, R. Grauer, A. Busse, and W.-C. Müller, J. Plasma Phys. 73, 821 (2007)] but also holds for increments up to the order of the integral time scale. The apparent discrepancy can be explained by the difference in the characteristic shapes of fluid particle trajectories in the vicinity of most singular dissipative structures.

  13. Characterizing Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley K.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nature of turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using several diagnostics known to provide information on magnetohydrodynamic sonic and Alfven Mach numbers. We calculated the 2nd, 3rd and 4th statistical moments of the SMC, i.e. variance, skewness and kurtosis, respectively. It is known that a strong dependence of variance, skewness and kurtosis with Ms exists. An analysis of 3rd and 4th order moments give us a average Ms=3-4 for the SMC. We explore moments of smaller scale features in the SMC by making 'moment maps’ with a circular beam aperture. These maps indicate large turbulence in star forming regions and at regions on the interface of supershells. We also investigate how the spatial power spectral slope, which is known to get shallower with increasing sonic Mach number, of the SMC compares with that of simulations. We find that this method gives Ms 3 and suggests the SMC may be super-Alfvenic. We also calculate the sonic Mach number of the SMC using the ratio of kinetic to spin temperature, and obtain a median value for the cold gas of Ms = 7.12 ± 3.41. In addition to these techniques we apply the bispectrum, a new tool for statistical studies of the interstellar medium, in order to study turbulence wave-wave interactions. Unlike the ordinary power spectrum, the bispectrum preserves phase information in the stochastic field. We compare the bispectrum of the SMC with that of 3D isothermal simulations. We explore the bispectrum of the SMC for a variety of velocity channel samplings. We compare the bispectrum of the SMC to bispectrum of simulations of strong and weakly magnetized turbulence and find that the bispectrum of the SMC shows similar properties to supersonic turbulence. This work was in part supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the solar eruption on 2010 April 8

    SciTech Connect

    Kliem, B.; Su, Y. N.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2013-12-20

    The structure of the coronal magnetic field prior to eruptive processes and the conditions for the onset of eruption are important issues that can be addressed through studying the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and evolution of nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models. This paper uses data-constrained NLFFF models of a solar active region (AR) that erupted on 2010 April 8 as initial conditions in MHD simulations. These models, constructed with the techniques of flux rope insertion and magnetofrictional relaxation (MFR), include a stable, an approximately marginally stable, and an unstable configuration. The simulations confirm previous related results of MFR runs, particularly that stable flux rope equilibria represent key features of the observed pre-eruption coronal structure very well, and that there is a limiting value of the axial flux in the rope for the existence of stable NLFFF equilibria. The specific limiting value is located within a tighter range, due to the sharper discrimination between stability and instability by the MHD description. The MHD treatment of the eruptive configuration yields a very good agreement with a number of observed features, like the strongly inclined initial rise path and the close temporal association between the coronal mass ejection and the onset of flare reconnection. Minor differences occur in the velocity of flare ribbon expansion and in the further evolution of the inclination; these can be eliminated through refined simulations. We suggest that the slingshot effect of horizontally bent flux in the source region of eruptions can contribute significantly to the inclination of the rise direction. Finally, we demonstrate that the onset criterion, formulated in terms of a threshold value for the axial flux in the rope, corresponds very well to the threshold of the torus instability in the considered AR.

  15. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  16. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  17. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  18. Inertial-Range Reconnection in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and in the Solar Wind.

    PubMed

    Lalescu, Cristian C; Shi, Yi-Kang; Eyink, Gregory L; Drivas, Theodore D; Vishniac, Ethan T; Lazarian, Alexander

    2015-07-10

    In situ spacecraft data on the solar wind show events identified as magnetic reconnection with wide outflows and extended "X lines," 10(3)-10(4) times ion scales. To understand the role of turbulence at these scales, we make a case study of an inertial-range reconnection event in a magnetohydrodynamic simulation. We observe stochastic wandering of field lines in space, breakdown of standard magnetic flux freezing due to Richardson dispersion, and a broadened reconnection zone containing many current sheets. The coarse-grain magnetic geometry is like large-scale reconnection in the solar wind, however, with a hyperbolic flux tube or apparent X line extending over integral length scales.

  19. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wavenumbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wavenumbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum.

  20. Fluctuation dynamo amplified by intermittent shear bursts in convectively driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Busse, A.; Müller, W.-C.

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent large-scale high-shear flows are found to occur frequently and spontaneously in direct numerical simulations of statistically stationary turbulent Boussinesq magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convection. The energetic steady state of the system is sustained by convective driving of the velocity field and small-scale dynamo action. The intermittent emergence of flow structures with strong velocity and magnetic shearing generates magnetic energy at an elevated rate on time scales that are longer than the characteristic time of the large-scale convective motion. The resilience of magnetic energy amplification suggests that intermittent shear bursts are a significant driver of dynamo action in turbulent magnetoconvection.

  1. Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Modeling - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott

    2016-02-14

    This project funding supported approximately 74 percent of a Ph.D. graduate student, not including costs of travel and supplies. We had a highly successful research project including the development of a second-order implicit electromagnetic kinetic ion hybrid model [Cheng 2013, Sturdevant 2016], direct comparisons with the extended MHD NIMROD code and kinetic simulation [Schnack 2013], modeling of slab tearing modes using the fully kinetic ion hybrid model and finally, modeling global tearing modes in cylindrical geometry using gyrokinetic simulation [Chen 2015, Chen 2016]. We developed an electromagnetic second-order implicit kinetic ion fluid electron hybrid model [Cheng 2013]. As a first step, we assumed isothermal electrons, but have included drift-kinetic electrons in similar models [Chen 2011]. We used this simulation to study the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode in slab geometry, including nonlinear evolution and saturation [Cheng 2013]. Later, we compared this model directly to extended MHD calculations using the NIMROD code [Schnack 2013]. In this study, we investigated the ion-temperature-gradient instability with an extended MHD code for the first time and got reasonable agreement with the kinetic calculation in terms of linear frequency, growth rate and mode structure. We then extended this model to include orbit averaging and sub-cycling of the ions and compared directly to gyrokinetic theory [Sturdevant 2016]. This work was highlighted in an Invited Talk at the International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas in 2015. The orbit averaging sub-cycling multi-scale algorithm is amenable to hybrid architectures with GPUS or math co-processors. Additionally, our participation in the Center for Extend Magnetohydrodynamics motivated our research on developing the capability for gyrokinetic simulation to model a global tearing mode. We did this in cylindrical geometry where the results could be benchmarked with existing eigenmode

  2. Imbalanced relativistic force-free magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jungyeon; Lazarian, A.

    2014-01-01

    When magnetic energy density is much larger than that of matter, as in pulsar/black hole magnetospheres, the medium becomes force-free and we need relativity to describe it. As in non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Alfvénic MHD turbulence in the relativistic limit can be described by interactions of counter-traveling wave packets. In this paper, we numerically study strong imbalanced MHD turbulence in such environments. Here, imbalanced turbulence means the waves traveling in one direction (dominant waves) have higher amplitudes than the opposite-traveling waves (sub-dominant waves). We find that (1) spectrum of the dominant waves is steeper than that of sub-dominant waves, (2) the anisotropy of the dominant waves is weaker than that of sub-dominant waves, and (3) the dependence of the ratio of magnetic energy densities of dominant and sub-dominant waves on the ratio of energy injection rates is steeper than quadratic (i.e., b{sub +}{sup 2}/b{sub −}{sup 2}∝(ϵ{sub +}/ϵ{sub −}){sup n} with n > 2). These results are consistent with those obtained for imbalanced non-relativistic Alfvénic turbulence. This corresponds well to the earlier reported similarity of the relativistic and non-relativistic balanced magnetic turbulence.

  3. Large-scale quasi-geostrophic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of a shallow fluid layer on a rapidly rotating planet or star. The presence of a background toroidal magnetic field is assumed, and the 'shallow water' beta-plane approximation is used. We derive a single equation for the slow large length scale dynamics. The range of validity of this equation fits the MHD of the lighter fluid at the top of Earth's outer core. The form of this equation is similar to the quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) equation (for usual ocean or atmosphere), but the parameters are essentially different. Our equation also implies the inverse cascade; but contrary to the usual Q-G situation, the energy cascades to smaller length scales, while the enstrophy cascades to the larger scales. We find the Kolmogorov-type spectrum for the inverse cascade. The spectrum indicates the energy accumulation in larger scales. In addition to the energy and enstrophy, the obtained equation possesses an extra (adiabatic-type) invariant. Its presence implies energy accumulation in the 30° sector around zonal direction. With some special energy input, the extra invariant can lead to the accumulation of energy in zonal magnetic field; this happens if the input of the extra invariant is small, while the energy input is considerable.

  4. Global invariants in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, John V.

    2013-10-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an important though incompletely understood factor affecting the dynamics of many astrophysical, geophysical, and technological plasmas. As an approximation, viscosity and resistivity may be ignored, and ideal MHD turbulence may be investigated by statistical methods. Incompressibility is also assumed and finite Fourier series are used to represent the turbulent velocity and magnetic field. The resulting model dynamical system consists of a set of independent Fourier coefficients that form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function (PDF). This PDF is similar in form to that of Boltzmann, except that its argument may contain not just the energy multiplied by an inverse temperature, but also two other invariant integrals, the cross helicity and magnetic helicity, each multiplied by its own inverse temperature. However, the cross and magnetic helicities, as usually defined, are not invariant in the presence of overall rotation or a mean magnetic field, respectively. Although the generalized form of the magnetic helicity is known, a generalized cross helicity may also be found, by adding terms that are linear in the mean magnetic field and angular rotation vectors, respectively. These general forms are invariant even in the presence of overall rotation and a mean magnetic field. We derive these general forms, explore their properties, examine how they extend the statistical theory of ideal MHD turbulence, and discuss how our results may be affected by dissipation and forcing.

  5. INVERSE CASCADE IN IMBALANCED ELECTRON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hoonkyu; Cho, Jungyeon E-mail: jcho@cnu.ac.kr

    2015-03-10

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a fluid-like description of small-scale magnetized plasmas. Balanced EMHD turbulence has been studied for a long time. However, driven imbalanced EMHD turbulence, in which waves moving in one direction (dominant waves) have higher amplitudes than waves moving in the other direction (sub-dominant waves), has not been well studied. In this paper, we numerically study driven three-dimensional imbalanced weak EMHD turbulence. We find the following results. First, in driven imbalanced EMHD turbulence, we clearly observe inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, as well as magnetic energy. This is because magnetic helicity is a conserved quantity and non-zero magnetic helicity is injected into the system in driven imbalanced EMHD turbulence. Second, the magnetic energy spectrum of the dominant waves on scales larger than the energy injection scale does not show a single power-law spectrum, which indicates that the inverse cascade is not a self-similar process. The peak of the spectrum roughly follows a k {sup –3/2} spectrum, which can be explained by a Kolmogorov-type argument for weak turbulence. Third, a small amount of sub-dominant waves is induced by the dominant waves on large scales and the ratio of helicity densities of the dominant and the sub-dominant waves on large scales seems to converge to a certain value.

  6. Energetic particle effects on global magnetohydrodynamic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of energetic particles on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) type modes are studied using analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (nova-k) [Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, 1987), p. 185]. In particular, the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant ``fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances are addressed. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the nova-k results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonant heating, a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha-particle pressure.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in an Asymmetric Magnetic Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allcock, Matthew; Erdélyi, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Analytical models of solar atmospheric magnetic structures have been crucial for our understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave behaviour and in the development of the field of solar magneto-seismology. Here, an analytical approach is used to derive the dispersion relation for MHD waves in a magnetic slab of homogeneous plasma enclosed on its two sides by non-magnetic, semi-infinite plasma with different densities and temperatures. This generalises the classic magnetic slab model, which is symmetric about the slab. The dispersion relation, unlike that governing a symmetric slab, cannot be decoupled into the well-known sausage and kink modes, i.e. the modes have mixed properties. The eigenmodes of an asymmetric magnetic slab are better labelled as quasi-sausage and quasi-kink modes. Given that the solar atmosphere is highly inhomogeneous, this has implications for MHD mode identification in a range of solar structures. A parametric analysis of how the mode properties (in particular the phase speed, eigenfrequencies, and amplitudes) vary in terms of the introduced asymmetry is conducted. In particular, avoided crossings occur between quasi-sausage and quasi-kink surface modes, allowing modes to adopt different properties for different parameters in the external region.

  8. Global invariants in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an important though incompletely understood factor affecting the dynamics of many astrophysical, geophysical, and technological plasmas. As an approximation, viscosity and resistivity may be ignored, and ideal MHD turbulence may be investigated by statistical methods. Incompressibility is also assumed and finite Fourier series are used to represent the turbulent velocity and magnetic field. The resulting model dynamical system consists of a set of independent Fourier coefficients that form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function (PDF). This PDF is similar in form to that of Boltzmann, except that its argument may contain not just the energy multiplied by an inverse temperature, but also two other invariant integrals, the cross helicity and magnetic helicity, each multiplied by its own inverse temperature. However, the cross and magnetic helicities, as usually defined, are not invariant in the presence of overall rotation or a mean magnetic field, respectively. Although the generalized form of the magnetic helicity is known, a generalized cross helicity may also be found, by adding terms that are linear in the mean magnetic field and angular rotation vectors, respectively. These general forms are invariant even in the presence of overall rotation and a mean magnetic field. We derive these general forms, explore their properties, examine how they extend the statistical theory of ideal MHD turbulence, and discuss how our results may be affected by dissipation and forcing.

  9. Energetic particle effects on global magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1990-06-01

    The effects of energetic particles on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) type modes are studied using analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) ({ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Theory} {ital of} {ital Fusion} {ital Plasmas}, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, 1987), p. 185). In particular, the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances are addressed. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVAresults. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonant heating, a stability window for the {ital n}=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the {ital n}=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha-particle pressure.

  10. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  11. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field defines the structure of the solar corona, the position of the heliospheric current sheet, the regions of fast and slow solar wind, and the most likely sites of coronal mass ejections. There are few measurements of the magnetic fields in the corona, but the line-of-sight component of the global magnetic fields in the photosphere have been routinely measured for many years (for example, at Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory, and at the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak). The SOI/MDI instrument is now providing high-resolution full-disk magnetograms several times a day. Understanding the large-scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere requires accurately mapping the measured photospheric magnetic field into the corona and outward. Ideally, a model should not only extrapolate the magnetic field, but should self-consistently reconstruct both the plasma and magnetic fields in the corona and solar wind. Support from our NASA SR&T contract has allowed us to develop three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the solar corona that incorporate observed photospheric magnetic fields into the boundary conditions. These calculations not only describe the magnetic field in the corona and interplanetary spice, but also predict the plasma properties as well. Our computations thus far have been successful in reproducing many aspects of both coronal and interplanetary data, including the structure of the streamer belt, the location of coronal hole boundaries, and the position and shape of the heliospheric current sheet. The most widely used technique for extrapolating the photospheric magnetic field into the corona and heliosphere are potential field models, such as the potential field source-surface model (PFSS),and the potential field current-sheet (PFCS) model

  12. On stability criteria for kinetic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The existence of a potential energy functional in the zero-Larmor-radius collisionless plasma theory of Kruskal & Oberman (Phys. Fluids, vol. 1, 1958 p. 275), Rosenbluth & Rostoker (Phys. Fluids, vol. 2, 1959, p. 23) allows us to derive easily sufficient conditions for linear stability. However, this kinetic magnetohydrodynamics (KMHD) theory does not have a self-adjointness property, making it difficult to derive necessary conditions. In particular, the standard methods to prove that an instability follows if some trial perturbation makes the incremental potential energy negative, which rely on the self-adjointness of the force operator or on the existence of a complete basis of normal modes, are not applicable to KMHD. This paper investigates KMHD linear stability criteria based on the time evolution of initial-value solutions, without recourse to the classic bounds or comparison theorems of Kruskal-Oberman and Rosenbluth-Rostoker for the KMHD potential energy. The adopted approach does not solve the kinetic equations by integration along characteristics and does not require that the particle orbits be periodic or nearly periodic. Most importantly, the investigation of a necessary condition for stability does not require the self-adjointness of the force operator or the existence of a complete basis of normal modes. It is thereby shown that stability in isothermal ideal-MHD is a sufficient condition for stability in KMHD and that, with a proviso on the long-time behaviour of oscillations about stable equilibria, stability in the double-adiabatic fluid theory, including the variation of the parallel fluid displacement, would be a necessary condition for stability in KMHD.

  13. Magneto-Hydrodynamic Modeling in the Design and Interpretation of Wire Array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N. P.; Jennings, C. A.

    2009-01-21

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations provide a powerful tool for improving our understanding of the complex physical processes underlying the behavior of wire array Z-pinches. We show how, by using large scale parallel 3D simulations of the array as a whole, it is possible to encompass all of the important features of the wire ablation, implosion and stagnation phases and to observe how these phenomena control the X-ray pulse that is achieved. Comparison of code results with experimental data from the 'Z' and MAGPIE pulsed power generators is shown to provide a detailed benchmark test for the models. The simulation results are also used to highlight key areas for future research.

  14. Statistical Analysis of Current Sheets in Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Perez, Jean C.; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-01

    We develop a framework for studying the statistical properties of current sheets in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with a strong guide field, as modeled by reduced MHD. We describe an algorithm that identifies current sheets in a simulation snapshot and then determines their geometrical properties (including length, width, and thickness) and intensities (peak current density and total energy dissipation rate). We then apply this procedure to simulations of reduced MHD and perform a statistical analysis on the obtained population of current sheets. We evaluate the role of reconnection by separately studying the populations of current sheets which contain magnetic X-points and those which do not. We find that the statistical properties of the two populations are different in general. We compare the scaling of these properties to phenomenological predictions obtained for the inertial range of MHD turbulence. Finally, we test whether the reconnecting current sheets are consistent with the Sweet-Parker model.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamics in stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes: A fully covariant approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgoulhon, Eric; Markakis, Charalampos; Uryu, Koji; Eriguchi, Yoshiharu

    2011-05-15

    A fully geometrical treatment of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics is developed under the hypotheses of perfect conductivity, stationarity, and axisymmetry. The spacetime is not assumed to be circular, which allows for greater generality than the Kerr-type spacetimes usually considered in general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. Expressing the electromagnetic field tensor solely in terms of three scalar fields related to the spacetime symmetries, we generalize previously obtained results in various directions. In particular, we present the first relativistic version of the Soloviev transfield equation, subcases of which lead to fully covariant versions of the Grad-Shafranov equation and of the Stokes equation in the hydrodynamical limit. We have also derived, as another subcase of the relativistic Soloviev equation, the equation governing magnetohydrodynamical equilibria with purely toroidal magnetic fields in stationary and axisymmetric spacetimes.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A bow wave was previously observed in the solar wind upstream of each of the first six planets. The observed properties of these bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, and those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory. An account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies is provided. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared.

  17. CIRCUMBINARY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION INTO INSPIRALING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Scott C.; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela; Zlochower, Yosef; Krolik, Julian H.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2012-08-10

    We have simulated the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a circumbinary disk surrounding an equal-mass binary comprising two non-spinning black holes during the period in which the disk inflow time is comparable to the binary evolution time due to gravitational radiation. Both the changing spacetime and the binary orbital evolution are described by an innovative technique utilizing high-order post-Newtonian approximations. Prior to the beginning of the inspiral, the structure of the circumbinary disk is predicted well by extrapolation from Newtonian results: a gap of roughly two binary separation radii is cleared, and matter piles up at the outer edge of this gap as inflow is retarded by torques exerted by the binary; the accretion rate is roughly half its value at large radius. During inspiral, the inner edge of the disk initially moves inward in coordination with the shrinking binary, but-as the orbital evolution accelerates-the inward motion of the disk edge falls behind the rate of binary compression. In this stage, the binary torque falls substantially, but the accretion rate decreases by only 10%-20%. When the binary separation is tens of gravitational radii, the rest-mass efficiency of disk radiation is a few percent, suggesting that supermassive binary black holes could be very luminous at this stage of their evolution. Inner disk heating is modulated at a beat frequency comparable to the binary orbital frequency. However, a disk with sufficient surface density to be luminous may be optically thick, suppressing periodic modulation of the luminosity.

  18. Local conservative regularizations of compressible magnetohydrodynamic and neutral flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Sachdev, Sonakshi; Thyagaraja, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ideal systems like magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Euler flow may develop singularities in vorticity ( w =∇×v ). Viscosity and resistivity provide dissipative regularizations of the singularities. In this paper, we propose a minimal, local, conservative, nonlinear, dispersive regularization of compressible flow and ideal MHD, in analogy with the KdV regularization of the 1D kinematic wave equation. This work extends and significantly generalizes earlier work on incompressible Euler and ideal MHD. It involves a micro-scale cutoff length λ which is a function of density, unlike in the incompressible case. In MHD, it can be taken to be of order the electron collisionless skin depth c/ωpe. Our regularization preserves the symmetries of the original systems and, with appropriate boundary conditions, leads to associated conservation laws. Energy and enstrophy are subject to a priori bounds determined by initial data in contrast to the unregularized systems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is developed and applied to generalize the constitutive relation to bound higher moments of vorticity. A "swirl" velocity field is identified, and shown to transport w/ρ and B/ρ, generalizing the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Alfvén theorems. The steady regularized equations are used to model a rotating vortex, MHD pinch, and a plane vortex sheet. The proposed regularization could facilitate numerical simulations of fluid/MHD equations and provide a consistent statistical mechanics of vortices/current filaments in 3D, without blowup of enstrophy. Implications for detailed analyses of fluid and plasma dynamic systems arising from our work are briefly discussed.

  19. On the performance of exponential integrators for problems in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einkemmer, Lukas; Tokman, Mayya; Loffeld, John

    2017-02-01

    Exponential integrators have been introduced as an efficient alternative to explicit and implicit methods for integrating large stiff systems of differential equations. Over the past decades these methods have been studied theoretically and their performance was evaluated using a range of test problems. While the results of these investigations showed that exponential integrators can provide significant computational savings, the research on validating this hypothesis for large scale systems and understanding what classes of problems can particularly benefit from the use of the new techniques is in its initial stages. Resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling is widely used in studying large scale behavior of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In many problems numerical solution of MHD equations is a challenging task due to the temporal stiffness of this system in the parameter regimes of interest. In this paper we evaluate the performance of exponential integrators on large MHD problems and compare them to a state-of-the-art implicit time integrator. Both the variable and constant time step exponential methods of EPIRK-type are used to simulate magnetic reconnection and the Kevin-Helmholtz instability in plasma. Performance of these methods, which are part of the EPIC software package, is compared to the variable time step variable order BDF scheme included in the CVODE (part of SUNDIALS) library. We study performance of the methods on parallel architectures and with respect to magnitudes of important parameters such as Reynolds, Lundquist, and Prandtl numbers. We find that the exponential integrators provide superior or equal performance in most circumstances and conclude that further development of exponential methods for MHD problems is warranted and can lead to significant computational advantages for large scale stiff systems of differential equations such as MHD.

  20. Fast reconnection in relativistic plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamics tearing instability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Landi, S.; Bugli, M.; Bucciantini, N.

    2016-08-01

    Fast reconnection operating in magnetically dominated plasmas is often invoked in models for magnetar giant flares, for magnetic dissipation in pulsar winds, or to explain the gamma-ray flares observed in the Crab nebula; hence, its investigation is of paramount importance in high-energy astrophysics. Here we study, by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the linear phase and the subsequent non-linear evolution of the tearing instability within the framework of relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), as appropriate in situations where the Alfvén velocity approaches the speed of light. It is found that the linear phase of the instability closely matches the analysis in classical MHD, where the growth rate scales with the Lundquist number S as S-1/2, with the only exception of an enhanced inertial term due to the thermal and magnetic energy contributions. In addition, when thin current sheets of inverse aspect ratio scaling as S-1/3 are considered, the so-called ideal tearing regime is retrieved, with modes growing independently of S and extremely fast, on only a few light crossing times of the sheet length. The overall growth of fluctuations is seen to solely depend on the value of the background Alfvén velocity. In the fully non-linear stage, we observe an inverse cascade towards the fundamental mode, with Petschek-type supersonic jets propagating at the external Alfvén speed from the X-point, and a fast reconnection rate at the predicted value {R}˜ (ln S)^{-1}.

  1. NICIL: Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James

    2016-08-01

    NICIL (Non-Ideal magnetohydrodynamics Coefficients and Ionisation Library) calculates the ionization values and the coefficients of the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics terms of Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. Written as a standalone Fortran90 module that can be implemented in existing codes, NICIL is fully parameterizable, allowing the user to choose which processes to include and decide the values of the free parameters. The module includes both cosmic ray and thermal ionization; the former includes two ion species and three species of dust grains (positively charged, negatively charged and neutral), and the latter includes five elements which can be doubly ionized.

  2. Three-dimensional models of astrophysical magnetohydrodynamical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Gareth C.

    2007-05-01

    In the previous fifty years it has become clear that jets and outflows play a vital role in the formation of stars and compact objects. Jets from young stellar objects typically show Herbig-Haro knots and bow shocks. Additionally, it now appears that (1) most stars form in binaries, and (2) jets from young stars are multiple and episodic outflows. Several groups have carried out large-scale simulations of jets, but often assuming a uniform ambient medium and a single disk and star. In this thesis the problems associated with non-uniform media and binary systems are explored. In order to understand the role of jets in star formation the questions are asked: how do jets from binary stars behave? What is the effect of the prehistory of jets on their collimation, acceleration and morphology? To answer these questions, a parallel adaptive-grid magnetohydrodynamics code, ATLAS, is modified to include optically thin atomic radiative cooling losses. The code is rigorously tested, with particular reference to the shock-capturing and the radiative cooling. The tests used include one-dimensional shock-tube tests, two-dimensional blast waves, double Mach reflection of a strong shock from a wedge, the overstable radiatively cooling shock, and the Orszag-Tang vortex. A comparison of the code with another code, PLUTO, for the type of jet problems solved in this thesis is also performed. Using ATLAS, the propagation of jets in complex environments is studied. The first ever simulations of binary jets are performed. Three aspects of the problem are studied, the effects of source orbiting, the effects of interaction, and the role of the magnetic field. It is shown that jets from binary stars can interact and the signature of the interaction is demonstrated. The negligible effect of source orbiting is demonstrated. A toroidal magnetic field is placed in the ambient environment and further accentuates the interaction. Following on from this work, the evolution of the jet when the

  3. ACCELERATION AND COLLIMATION OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC DISK WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.d

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 x 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied-an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically-implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow-an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface-similar to the spine-sheath structure currently

  4. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  5. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  6. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  7. Decay rates of the magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Xu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas. We prove the optimal decay rates for the solution to the constant state in the whole space in the Lp-norm with 2≤ p≤ 6 and its first derivatives in L2-norm. The proof is based on the optimal decay of the linearized equation and nonlinear energy estimates.

  8. A stochastic approach to the solution of magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Floriani, E.; Vilela Mendes, R.

    2013-06-01

    The construction of stochastic solutions is a powerful method to obtain localized solutions in configuration or Fourier space and for parallel computation with domain decomposition. Here a stochastic solution is obtained for the magnetohydrodynamics equations. Some details are given concerning the numerical implementation of the solution which is illustrated by an example of generation of long-range magnetic fields by a velocity source.

  9. Instability of the magnetohydrodynamics system at vanishing Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouya, Ismaël

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this note is to study the dynamo properties of the magnetohydrodynamics system at vanishing R m . Improving the analysis in Gérard-Varet (SIAM J Math Anal 37(3):815-840, 2006), we shall establish a generic Lyapunov instability result.

  10. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic studies of implosion modes of nested wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jun; Ding, Ning Xue, Chuang; Sun, Shunkai

    2014-07-15

    Implosion dynamics of nested wire arrays in (r, θ) geometry was studied with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulations. Three different implosion modes are obtained by just changing the wire number of the outer array, when the other conditions, such as the initial radius, length, mass of each array, the wire number of the inner array, and the discharge voltage waveform, are fixed. Simulation results show that the effect of discrete wires, which cannot be described by the thin shell inductive model, will influence the distribution of current between the outer and inner arrays at the early stage, and the discrepancy between results from MHD and thin shell model increases with the interwire gap of the outer array.

  11. On the spatio-temporal behavior of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugones, R.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.; Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2016-11-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, the spatio-temporal behavior of magnetic field fluctuations is analyzed. Cases with relatively small, medium, and large values of a mean background magnetic field are considered. The (wavenumber) scale dependent time correlation function is directly computed for different simulations, varying the mean magnetic field value. From this correlation function, the time decorrelation is computed and compared with different theoretical times, namely, the local non-linear time, the random sweeping time, and the Alfvénic time, the latter being a wave effect. It is observed that time decorrelations are dominated by sweeping effects, and only at large values of the mean magnetic field and for wave vectors mainly aligned with this field time decorrelations are controlled by Alfvénic effects.

  12. Data-driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a flux-emerging active region leading to solar eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xuesheng; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar eruptions are well-recognized as major drivers of space weather but what causes them remains an open question. Here we show how an eruption is initiated in a non-potential magnetic flux-emerging region using magnetohydrodynamic modelling driven directly by solar magnetograms. Our model simulates the coronal magnetic field following a long-duration quasi-static evolution to its fast eruption. The field morphology resembles a set of extreme ultraviolet images for the whole process. Study of the magnetic field suggests that in this event, the key transition from the pre-eruptive to eruptive state is due to the establishment of a positive feedback between the upward expansion of internal stressed magnetic arcades of new emergence and an external magnetic reconnection which triggers the eruption. Such a nearly realistic simulation of a solar eruption from origin to onset can provide important insight into its cause, and also has the potential for improving space weather modelling. PMID:27181846

  13. Hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Invariants, cascades, and locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluie, Hussein

    This dissertation employs the coarse-graining approach, commonly used as a modeling tool in the LES community, to analyze scale interactions in turbulent flows, following [1]. The main scientific contributions of this dissertation to the fields of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are: (1) Establishing necessary conditions for turbulent MHD flows to sustain cascades of energy and cross-helicity to arbitrarily small scales, and proving that it is impossible for magnetic-helicity to undergo a forward cascade. These results provide rigorous constraints on any phenomenological theory of MHD turbulence. (2) Presenting both rigorous results and physical theory on the breakdown of magnetic flux conservation for plasmas by nonlinear effects, independent of any microscopic non-ideality. It shows that instantaneous violation of flux-conservation can occur if singular current sheets and vortex sheets both exist and intersect in sets of non-zero length. This result gives analytical support to and rigorous constraints on theories of fast turbulent reconnection. (3) Establishing scale-locality of the energy cascade in a turbulent flow using Fourier analysis and showing that the primary participants in the process are triplets of "eddies" comprised of adjacent logarithmic bands of Fourier modes. The analysis disproves an alternate picture of "local transfer by nonlocal triads" by showing that such triads make a vanishingly small contribution to the energy flux in the inertial range and that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain the cascade to small scales. It also shows that the SGS definition of the flux is the proper measure of the cascading energy and demonstrates the danger in the widespread notion that the elementary interactions in turbulence are those involving triads of single Fourier modes. Numerical support is presented from simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. (4

  14. Lagrangian-averaged model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the absence of bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Pietarila Graham, Jonathan; Mininni, Pablo D; Pouquet, Annick

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate that, for the case of quasiequipartition between the velocity and the magnetic field, the Lagrangian-averaged magnetohydrodynamics (LAMHD) alpha model reproduces well both the large-scale and the small-scale properties of turbulent flows; in particular, it displays no increased (superfilter) bottleneck effect with its ensuing enhanced energy spectrum at the onset of the subfilter scales. This is in contrast to the case of the neutral fluid in which the Lagrangian-averaged Navier-Stokes alpha model is somewhat limited in its applications because of the formation of spatial regions with no internal degrees of freedom and subsequent contamination of superfilter-scale spectral properties. We argue that, as the Lorentz force breaks the conservation of circulation and enables spectrally nonlocal energy transfer (associated with Alfvén waves), it is responsible for the absence of a viscous bottleneck in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), as compared to the fluid case. As LAMHD preserves Alfvén waves and the circulation properties of MHD, there is also no (superfilter) bottleneck found in LAMHD, making this method capable of large reductions in required numerical degrees of freedom; specifically, we find a reduction factor of approximately 200 when compared to a direct numerical simulation on a large grid of 1536;{3} points at the same Reynolds number.

  15. The impact of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics on binary star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the effect of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on the formation of binary stars using a suite of three-dimensional smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the gravitational collapse of 1 M⊙, rotating, perturbed molecular-cloud cores. Alongside the role of Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, we also examine the effects of magnetic field strength, orientation and amplitude of the density perturbation. When modelling sub-critical cores, ideal MHD models do not collapse whereas non-ideal MHD models collapse to form single protostars. In supercritical ideal MHD models, increasing the magnetic field strength or decreasing the initial-density perturbation amplitude decreases the initial binary separation. Strong magnetic fields initially perpendicular to the rotation axis suppress the formation of binaries and yield discs with magnetic fields ∼10 times stronger than if the magnetic field was initially aligned with the rotation axis. When non-ideal MHD is included, the resulting discs are larger and more massive, and the binary forms on a wider orbit. Small differences in the supercritical cores caused by non-ideal MHD effects are amplified by the binary interaction near periastron. Overall, the non-ideal effects have only a small impact on binary formation and early evolution, with the initial conditions playing the dominant role.

  16. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien; Kiyani, Khurom H.

    2016-03-01

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field b0e^∥ a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present, for the first time, direct evidence of such a transition using a decaying three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a grid resolution of 30722×256 . From large to small scales, the change of regime is characterized by (i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately -2 to -3 /2 , (ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of χc˜1 /3 , (iii) a modification of the isocontours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical-balance-type phenomenology, and (iv) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfvén modes. The changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence. Furthermore, we observe a significant nonlocal three-wave coupling between strongly and weakly nonlinear modes resulting in an inverse transfer of energy from small to large scales.

  17. Evolution of accretion discs around a kerr black hole using extended magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F.; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-02-01

    Black holes accreting well below the Eddington rate are believed to have geometrically thick, optically thin, rotationally supported accretion discs in which the Coulomb mean free path is large compared to GM/c2. In such an environment, the disc evolution may differ significantly from ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predictions. We present non-ideal global axisymmetric simulations of geometrically thick discs around a rotating black hole. The simulations are carried out using a new code GRIM, which evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal MHD. Non-ideal effects are modelled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines, and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. We find that the pressure anisotropy grows to match the magnetic pressure, at which point it saturates due to the mirror instability. The pressure anisotropy produces outward angular momentum transport with a magnitude comparable to that of MHD turbulence in the disc, and a significant increase in the temperature in the wall of the jet. We also find that, at least in our axisymmetric simulations, conduction has a small effect on the disc evolution because (1) the heat flux is constrained to be parallel to the field and the field is close to perpendicular to temperature gradients, and (2) the heat flux is choked by an increase in effective collisionality associated with the mirror instability.

  18. Particle-acceleration by turbulent magnetohydrodynamic reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Test particles in a two dimensional, turbulent MHD simulation are found to undergo significant acceleration. The magnetic field configuration is a periodic sheet pinch which undergoes reconnection. The test particles are trapped in the reconnection region for times of order an Alfven transit time in the large electric fields that characterize the turbulent reconnection process at the relatively large magnetic Reynolds number used in the simulation. The maximum speed attained by these particles is consistent with an analytic estimate which depends on the reconnection electric field, the Alfven speed, and the ratio of Larmor period to the Alfven transit time.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and Reconnection in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Richard, Robert L.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Walker, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    We have used a global MHD simulation with high spatial resolution to investigate the origin and properties of turbulence in the plasma sheet. In this simulation we imposed a steady southward IMF with a magnitude of 5 nT at the upstream simulation boundary for more than three hours followed by ninety minutes of northward IMF of the same magnitude. The solar wind number density was 20 cm-3, the thermal pressure was 20 pPa, and the velocity was 500 km/s in the x direction. The moderately high dynamic pressure confined the magnetotail to the high-grid resolution region. Even for these nominal solar wind parameters and steady driving the plasma sheet became turbulent. The power spectral densities and probability distribution functions computed from the simulations were comparable to those obtained from spacecraft observations. The largest scale vortices were associated with reconnection outflows and, in the southward IMF case, with the diversion of high speed flows in the near-Earth region. Both time and space domain analyses revealed that there were three scales present, the large scale of the driving processes, the intermediate inertial scale and the dissipative scale.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, Jack A.; Micheletti, David A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheletti, David A.; Baughman, Jack A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  2. Dissipative, forced turbulence in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Montgomery, D.; Joyce, G.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion for turbulent two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flows are solved in the presence of finite viscosity and resistivity, for the case in which external forces (mechanical and/or magnetic) act on the fluid. The goal is to verify the existence of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo effect which is represented mathematically by a substantial back-transfer of mean square vector potential to the longest allowed Fourier wavelengths. External forces consisting of a random part plus a fraction of the value at the previous time step are employed, after the manner of Lilly for the Navier-Stokes case. The regime explored is that for which the mechanical and magnetic Reynolds numbers are in the region of 100 to 1000. The conclusions are that mechanical forcing terms alone cannot lead to dynamo action, but that dynamo action can result from either magnetic forcing terms or from both mechanical and magnetic forcing terms simultaneously.

  3. Anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Turner, L.

    1981-01-01

    A strong external dc magnetic field introduces a basic anisotropy into incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The modifications that this is likely to produce in the properties of the turbulence are explored for the high Reynolds number case. The conclusion is reached that the turbulent spectrum splits into two parts: an essentially two dimensional spectrum with both the velocity field and magnetic fluctuations perpendicular to the dc magnetic field, and a generally weaker and more nearly isotropic spectrum of Alfven waves. A minimal characterization of the spectral density tensors is given. Similarities to measurements from the Culham-Harwell Zeta pinch device and the UCLA Macrotor Tokamak are remarked upon, as are certain implications for the Belcher and Davis measurements of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind.

  4. Theory of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. )

    1994-05-01

    The resonant excitations of high-[ital n] magnetohydrodynamic instabilities by the energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks are theoretically analyzed. Here, [ital n] is the toroidal mode number. The magnetohydrodynamic eigenmodes, typically, consist of two-scale structures; one corresponds to the singular ( inertial'') region and the other the regular (ideal) region. Due to the finite-size orbits, the energetic particle contributions in the singular region are suppressed. Analytical dispersion relations can be derived via the asymptotic matching analysis. The dispersion relations have the generic form of the fishbone'' dispersion relation [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 52], 1122 (1984)] and demonstrate, in particular, the existence of two types of modes; that is, the discrete gap mode and the energetic-particle continuum mode. Specific expressions are given for both the kinetic ballooning modes and the toroidal Alfven modes.

  5. Numerical Modeling on Plasma Gases in an Explosively-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Seo, Min Su; Kim, Inho

    2002-11-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional simulation has been carried out on the argon and air plasmas in an explosively-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator. To compute the thermodynamic properties of the plasma gases during the shock compression and jet extraction, we utilize the equation-of-state data calculated from a detailed physical model. The plasma conductivities are given by the mixing rule that compromises the weakly-ionized and fully-ionized limits. The effects of initial gas pressure and applied magnetic field strength are investigated for optimal design of the MHD power generator. For the case of the initial channel pressure of 400 torr and the magnetic field 0.3 T, the maximum output power is estimated up to 0.1 GW with the pulse duration 20 ms, which shows a good agreement with the measured profile.

  6. Magnetic dynamo action in two-dimensional turbulent magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fyfe, D.; Joyce, G.; Montgomery, D.

    1976-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is explored by means of numerical simulation. Previous analytical theory, based on non-dissipative constants of the motion in a truncated Fourier representation, is verified by following the evolution of highly non-equilibrium initial conditions numerically. Dynamo action (conversion of a significant fraction of turbulent kinetic energy into long-wavelength magnetic field energy) is observed. It is conjectured that in the presence of dissipation and external forcing, a dual cascade will be observed for zero-helicity situations. Energy will cascade to higher wave numbers simultaneously with a cascade of mean square vector potential to lower wave numbers, leading to an omni-directional magnetic energy spectrum which varies as 1/k 3 at lower wave numbers, simultaneously with a buildup of magnetic excitation at the lowest wave number of the system. Equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies is expected at the highest wave numbers in the system.

  7. Nonlinear acceleration of the electron inertia-dominated magnetohydrodynamic modes due to electron parallel compressibility

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Taro; Naitou, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Shinji; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2005-09-15

    The behavior of the collisionless magnetohydrodynamics modes is investigated by the gyrokinetic particle simulation in a cylindrical tokamak plasma in the parameter region where the effects of electron inertia and electron parallel compressibility are competitive for magnetic reconnection. Although the linear growth of the m=1 internal kink-tearing mode is dominated by the electron inertia, it is found that the growth rate can be nonlinearly accelerated due to the electron parallel compressibility proportional to the ion sound Larmor radius {rho}{sub s}. It is also found that, as decreasing the electron skin depth {delta}{sub e}, the maximum growth rate before the internal collapse saturates independently of the microscopic scales such as {delta}{sub e} and {rho}{sub s}. The acceleration of growth rate is also observed in the nonlinear phase of the m=2 double tearing mode.

  8. Control of flow around a circular cylinder wrapped with a porous layer by magnetohydrodynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovand, M.; Rashidi, S.; Esfahani, J. A.; Saha, S. C.; Gu, Y. T.; Dehesht, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present study focuses on the analysis of two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a circular cylinder wrapped with a porous layer in different laminar flow regimes. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model has been used for simulating flow in porous medium using finite volume based software, Fluent 6.3. In order to analyze the MHD flow, the mean and instantaneous drag and lift coefficients and stream patterns are computed to elucidate the role of Stuart number, N and Darcy number, Da. It is revealed that the magnetic fields are capable to stabilize flow and suppress the vortex shedding of vortices. The N-Re plane shows the curves for separating steady and periodic flow regimes, Ncr and disappearing of vortex, Ndiss. For validate the solution, the obtained CD and St are compared with available results of literature.

  9. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Westerhof, E. Pratt, J.

    2014-10-15

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J{sub EC}). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands. The new model contains the model put forward by Giruzzi et al. [Nucl. Fusion 39, 107 (1999)] in one of its limits.

  10. Multi-D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of pulsar wind nebulae: recent progress and open questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Mignone, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of pulsar wind nebulae, and of the Crab nebula in particular, has been highly successful, with many of the observed dynamical and emission properties reproduced down to the finest detail. Here, we critically discuss the results of some of the most recent studies: namely the investigation of the origin of the radio emitting particles and the quest for the acceleration sites of particles of different energies along the termination shock, by using wisp motions as a diagnostic tool; the study of the magnetic dissipation process in high magnetization nebulae by means of new long-term three-dimensional simulations of the pulsar wind nebula evolution; the investigation of the relativistic tearing instability in thinning current sheets, leading to fast reconnection events that might be at the origin of the Crab nebula gamma-ray flares.

  11. Cancellation properties in Hall magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. N.; De Vita, G.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Dmitruk, P.; Nigro, G.; Primavera, L.; Carbone, V.

    2013-12-01

    We present a signed measure analysis of compressible Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. Signed measure analysis allows us to characterize the scaling behavior of the sign-oscillating flow structures and their geometrical properties (fractal dimensions of structures). A reduced numerical model, valid when a strong guide magnetic field is present, is used here. In order to discuss the effect of the Hall term, different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. Results show that as the Hall term is increased, the fractal dimension of the current and vorticity sheets decreases. This observation, together with previous analysis of the same fields, provides a comprehensive description of the effect of the Hall force on the formation of structures. Two main processes are identified, namely, the widening and unraveling of the sheets.

  12. Magnetic reversals in a simple model of magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Benzi, Roberto; Pinton, Jean-François

    2010-07-09

    We study a simple magnetohydrodynamical approach in which hydrodynamics and MHD turbulence are coupled in a shell model, with given dynamo constraints in the large scales. We consider the case of a low Prandtl number fluid for which the inertial range of the velocity field is much wider than that of the magnetic field. Random reversals of the magnetic field are observed and it shown that the magnetic field has a nontrivial evolution--linked to the nature of the hydrodynamics turbulence.

  13. Investigation of a liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.; Hays, L. G.; Cerini, D. J.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic power conversion is being investigated for nuclear-electric propulsion. A liquid-metal MHD converter has no moving mechanical parts and requires a heat source temperature of only 1300 K. Cycle efficiencies of 5% to 8% for single-stage converters and 10% for multistage converters appear attainable. The specific weight of a 240 kWe MHD power plant has been estimated as 30 kg/kWe with shielding for unmanned science missions.

  14. Exact solutions of the incompressible dissipative Hall magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Zhenwei; Yang, Weihong

    2015-03-15

    By using analytical method, the exact solutions of the incompressible dissipative Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations are derived. It is found that a phase difference may occur between the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations when the kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers are both very large. Since velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are both circular polarized, the phase difference makes them no longer parallel or anti-parallel like that in the incompressible ideal Hall MHD.

  15. Analytical and experimental studies of the helical magnetohydrodynamic thruster design

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.B. II; Lin, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the results of analytical and experimental studies of a helical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thruster using a 8-Tesla (T) solenoid magnet. The application of this work is in marine vehicle propulsion. Analytical models are developed to predict the performance of the helical MHD thruster in a closed-loop condition. The analytical results are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion by using convexly divergent channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    We describe a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generator equipped with a convexly divergent channel, as determined through shock-tunnel-based experiments. The quality of MHD power-generating plasma and the energy conversion efficiency in the convexly divergent channel are compared with those from previous linearly divergent channel. The divergence enhancement in the channel upstream is effective for suppressing an excessive increase in static pressure, whereby notably high isentropic efficiency is achieved.

  17. HARM: A Numerical Scheme for General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles, F.; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tóth, Gábor

    2012-09-01

    HARM uses a conservative, shock-capturing scheme for evolving the equations of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. The fluxes are calculated using the Harten, Lax, & van Leer scheme. A variant of constrained transport, proposed earlier by Tóth, is used to maintain a divergence-free magnetic field. Only the covariant form of the metric in a coordinate basis is required to specify the geometry. On smooth flows HARM converges at second order.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-11-16

    Project Title: Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications PI: Michael R. Brown, Swarthmore College The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion by using convexly divergent channel

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-21

    We describe a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generator equipped with a convexly divergent channel, as determined through shock-tunnel-based experiments. The quality of MHD power-generating plasma and the energy conversion efficiency in the convexly divergent channel are compared with those from previous linearly divergent channel. The divergence enhancement in the channel upstream is effective for suppressing an excessive increase in static pressure, whereby notably high isentropic efficiency is achieved.

  20. Edge localized linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in an extended-magnetohydrodynamic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, B. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Zhu, P.; Snyder, P. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Howell, E. C.

    2010-03-01

    A linear benchmark between the linear ideal MHD stability codes ELITE [H. R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1277 (2002)], GATO [L. Bernard et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981)], and the extended nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al.., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is undertaken for edge-localized (MHD) instabilities. Two ballooning-unstable, shifted-circle tokamak equilibria are compared where the stability characteristics are varied by changing the equilibrium plasma profiles. The equilibria model an H-mode plasma with a pedestal pressure profile and parallel edge currents. For both equilibria, NIMROD accurately reproduces the transition to instability (the marginally unstable mode), as well as the ideal growth spectrum for a large range of toroidal modes (n =1-20). The results use the compressible MHD model and depend on a precise representation of "ideal-like" and "vacuumlike" or "halo" regions within the code. The halo region is modeled by the introduction of a Lundquist-value profile that transitions from a large to a small value at a flux surface location outside of the pedestal region. To model an ideal-like MHD response in the core and a vacuumlike response outside the transition, separate criteria on the plasma and halo Lundquist values are required. For the benchmarked equilibria the critical Lundquist values are 108 and 103 for the ideal-like and halo regions, respectively. Notably, this gives a ratio on the order of 105, which is much larger than experimentally measured values using Te values associated with the top of the pedestal and separatrix. Excellent agreement with ELITE and GATO calculations are made when sharp boundary transitions in the resistivity are used and a small amount of physical dissipation is added for conditions very near and below marginal ideal stability.

  1. Edge localized linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in an extended-magnetohydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, B. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Zhu, P.; Snyder, P. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Howell, E. C.

    2010-03-15

    A linear benchmark between the linear ideal MHD stability codes ELITE [H. R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1277 (2002)], GATO [L. Bernard et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981)], and the extended nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al.., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is undertaken for edge-localized (MHD) instabilities. Two ballooning-unstable, shifted-circle tokamak equilibria are compared where the stability characteristics are varied by changing the equilibrium plasma profiles. The equilibria model an H-mode plasma with a pedestal pressure profile and parallel edge currents. For both equilibria, NIMROD accurately reproduces the transition to instability (the marginally unstable mode), as well as the ideal growth spectrum for a large range of toroidal modes (n=1-20). The results use the compressible MHD model and depend on a precise representation of 'ideal-like' and 'vacuumlike' or 'halo' regions within the code. The halo region is modeled by the introduction of a Lundquist-value profile that transitions from a large to a small value at a flux surface location outside of the pedestal region. To model an ideal-like MHD response in the core and a vacuumlike response outside the transition, separate criteria on the plasma and halo Lundquist values are required. For the benchmarked equilibria the critical Lundquist values are 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 3} for the ideal-like and halo regions, respectively. Notably, this gives a ratio on the order of 10{sup 5}, which is much larger than experimentally measured values using T{sub e} values associated with the top of the pedestal and separatrix. Excellent agreement with ELITE and GATO calculations are made when sharp boundary transitions in the resistivity are used and a small amount of physical dissipation is added for conditions very near and below marginal ideal stability.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The observed properties of bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, along with those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory as opposed to a more detailed multicomponent particle and field plasma theory. The primary objectives are to provide an account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared. A number of deficiencies, ambiguities, and suggestions for improvements are discussed, and several significant extensions of the theory required to provide comparable results for all planets, their satellites, and comets are noted.

  3. Minimal flow units for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of two minimal flow units (MFUs) to investigate the differences between inviscid and viscous simulations, and the different behavior of the evolution for conducting fluids. In these circumstances the introduction of the Lorentz force in the momentum equation produces different scenarios. The Taylor-Green vortex, in the past, was an MFU widely considered for both conducting and non-conducting fluids. The simulations were performed by pseudo-spectral numerical methods; these are repeated here by using a finite difference second-order accurate, energy-conserving scheme for ν =0. Having observed that this initial condition could be inefficient for capturing the eventual occurrence of a finite time singularity a potentially more efficient MFU consisting of two interacting Lamb dipoles was considered. It was found that the two flows have a different time evolution in the vortical dominated stage. In this stage, turbulent structures of different size are generated leading to spectra, in the inviscid conditions, with a {k}-3 range. In real conditions the viscosity produces smaller scales characteristic of fully developed turbulence with energy spectra with well defined exponential and inertial ranges. In the presence of non-conducting conditions the passive vector behaves as the vorticity. The evolution is different in the presence of conducting conditions. Although the time evolution is different, both flows lead to spectra in Kolmogorov units with the same shape at high and intermediate wave numbers.

  4. A new class of finite element variational multiscale turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Sondak, D.; Shadid, J. N.; Oberai, A. A.; ...

    2015-04-29

    New large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) derived from the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation for finite element simulations are introduced. The new models include the variational multiscale formulation, a residual-based eddy viscosity model, and a mixed model that combines both of these component models. Each model contains terms that are proportional to the residual of the incompressible MHD equations and is therefore numerically consistent. Moreover, each model is also dynamic, in that its effect vanishes when this residual is small. The new models are tested on the decaying MHD Taylor Green vortex at low and highmore » Reynolds numbers. The evaluation of the models is based on comparisons with available data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the time evolution of energies as well as energy spectra at various discrete times. Thus a numerical study, on a sequence of meshes, is presented that demonstrates that the large eddy simulation approaches the DNS solution for these quantities with spatial mesh refinement.« less

  5. A new class of finite element variational multiscale turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sondak, D.; Shadid, J. N.; Oberai, A. A.; Pawlowski, R. P.; Cyr, E. C.; Smith, T. M.

    2015-04-29

    New large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) derived from the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation for finite element simulations are introduced. The new models include the variational multiscale formulation, a residual-based eddy viscosity model, and a mixed model that combines both of these component models. Each model contains terms that are proportional to the residual of the incompressible MHD equations and is therefore numerically consistent. Moreover, each model is also dynamic, in that its effect vanishes when this residual is small. The new models are tested on the decaying MHD Taylor Green vortex at low and high Reynolds numbers. The evaluation of the models is based on comparisons with available data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the time evolution of energies as well as energy spectra at various discrete times. Thus a numerical study, on a sequence of meshes, is presented that demonstrates that the large eddy simulation approaches the DNS solution for these quantities with spatial mesh refinement.

  6. HELIOS-CR A 1-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code with inline atomic kinetics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Woodruff, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    HELIOS-CR is a user-oriented 1D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code to simulate the dynamic evolution of laser-produced plasmas and z-pinch plasmas. It includes an in-line collisional-radiative (CR) model for computing non-LTE atomic level populations at each time step of the hydrodynamics simulation. HELIOS-CR has been designed for ease of use, and is well-suited for experimentalists, as well as graduate and undergraduate student researchers. The energy equations employed include models for laser energy deposition, radiation from external sources, and high-current discharges. Radiative transport can be calculated using either a multi-frequency flux-limited diffusion model, or a multi-frequency, multi-angle short characteristics model. HELIOS-CR supports the use of SESAME equation of state (EOS) tables, PROPACEOS EOS/multi-group opacity data tables, and non-LTE plasma properties computed using the inline CR modeling. Time-, space-, and frequency-dependent results from HELIOS-CR calculations are readily displayed with the HydroPLOT graphics tool. In addition, the results of HELIOS simulations can be post-processed using the SPECT3D Imaging and Spectral Analysis Suite to generate images and spectra that can be directly compared with experimental measurements. The HELIOS-CR package runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OSX platforms, and includes online documentation. We will discuss the major features of HELIOS-CR, and present example results from simulations.

  7. Structure of the electromagnetic field in three-dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitruk, Pablo; Matthaeus, W.H.

    2006-04-15

    Numerical simulations of freely evolving three-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are performed, with and without the Hall term in Ohm's law. The parameter controlling the presence of the Hall term is the ratio of the ion skin depth to the macroscopic scale of the turbulence. The ion skin depth is set to be slightly larger than the dissipation length scale (controlled by the resistivity) for the Hall MHD simulations, while it is set to zero for non-Hall MHD simulations. Small initial cross helicity, hybrid helicity, and magnetic helicity are considered. The system is left to evolve for a few turbulent characteristic times and the magnetic field and electric field are analyzed in real and wavenumber space. Distributions (histograms) of the fields are also computed. It is found that the turbulent magnetic field (as well as the velocity field) is almost unaffected by the presence of the Hall term, while the electric field is affected at scales smaller than the ion skin depth, that is, close to the dissipation range in these simulations. The importance of each term in Ohm's law for the electric field is analyzed in wavenumber space. Furthermore, reconnection-like zones are identified, where the importance of each term in Ohm's law can be seen in real space. Reconnection-like zones with magnetic field B=0 (or small) and B{ne}0 are found within the turbulent state of the system.

  8. Multiscale Pressure-Balanced Structures in Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liping; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Li, Shengtai; Zhang, Lei; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua; Wang, Xin; Feng, Xueshang

    2017-02-01

    Observations of solar wind turbulence indicate the existence of multiscale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) in the solar wind. In this work, we conduct a numerical simulation to investigate multiscale PBSs and in particular their formation in compressive magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By the use of the higher-order Godunov code Athena, a driven compressible turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field is simulated. The simulation results show that both the magnetic pressure and the thermal pressure exhibit a turbulent spectrum with a Kolmogorov-like power law, and that in many regions of the simulation domain they are anticorrelated. The computed wavelet cross-coherence spectra of the magnetic pressure and the thermal pressure, as well as their space series, indicate the existence of multiscale PBSs, with the small PBSs being embedded in the large ones. These multiscale PBSs are likely to be related to the highly oblique-propagating slow-mode waves, as the traced multiscale PBS is found to be traveling in a certain direction at a speed consistent with that predicted theoretically for a slow-mode wave propagating in the same direction.

  9. Modeling Eruptive Coronal Magnetohydrodynamic Systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel

    2010-05-01

    I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if it is a necessary component. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a confined flux rope theory for CME initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal MHD instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. I demonstrate that some eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  10. BAYESIAN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY OF CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A. E-mail: aasensio@iac.es

    2011-10-10

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well-localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inhomogeneity length scale and to estimate real error bars for each parameter. When observational estimates for the density contrast are used, the method enables us to fully constrain the three parameters of interest. These results can serve to improve our current estimates of unknown physical parameters in coronal loops and to test the assumed theoretical model.

  11. The Biermann Catastrophe in Numerical Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Carlo; Tzeferacos, Petros; Lee, Dongwook; Lamb, Donald Q.; Weide, Klaus; Fatenejad, Milad; Miller, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    The Biermann battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in high-energy density laboratory physics experiments. Generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann effect due to misaligned density and temperature gradients in smooth flow behind shocks is well known. We show that a Biermann-effect magnetic field is also generated within shocks. Direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes does not capture this physical process, and worse, it produces unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note two novel physical effects: a resistive magnetic precursor, in which a Biermann-generated field in the shock “leaks” resistively upstream, and a thermal magnetic precursor, in which a field is generated by the Biermann effect ahead of the shock front owing to gradients created by the shock’s electron thermal conduction precursor. Both effects appear to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities. We reexamine published studies of magnetogenesis in galaxy cluster formation and conclude that the simulations in question had inadequate resolution to reliably estimate the field generation rate. Corrected estimates suggest primordial field values in the range B˜ {{10}-22}-10-19 G by z = 3.

  12. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  13. New Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Hall magnetohydrodynamics is a mono-fluid plasma model appropriate for probing Final{some of the} physical processes (other than pure kinetic effects) at length scales smaller than the scales of standard MHD. In sub-ionic space plasma turbulence (e.g. the solar wind) this fluid model has been proved to be useful. Three-dimensional incompressible Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) possesses three inviscid invariants which are the total energy, the magnetic helicity and the generalized helicity. In this presentation, we would like to discuss new exact relations for helicities (magnetic helicities and generalized helicities) which are derived for homogeneous stationary (not necessarily isotropic) Hall MHD turbulence (and also for its inertialess electron MHD limit) in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. The universal laws are written only in terms of mixed second-order structure functions, i.e. the scalar product of two different increments and are written simply as ηM = di < δ ( {b} × {j}) \\cdot δ {b} >, with ηM the average magnetic helicity flux rate, {b} the magnetic field, {j} the current and ± ηG = < δ ( {v} × {Ω} ) \\cdot δ {Ω} > , with ηM the average generalized helicity flux rate, {v} the fluid velocity and {Ω} = {b} + dI {ω} being the generalized helicity where ω is simply the fluid vorticity ( = nabla × {v}). It provides, therefore, a direct measurement of the dissipation rates for the corresponding helicities even in case of an anisotropic plasma turbulence. This study shows that the generalized helicity cascade is strongly linked to the left polarized fluctuations while the magnetic helicity cascade is linked to the right polarized fluctuations. The newly derived relations also show that like energy, a non-zero helicity flux can only be associated to a departure of Beltrami flow state. {Reference} S. Banerjee & S. Galtier, {Chiral Exact Relations for Helicities in Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence} (submitted).

  14. Quantitative, comprehensive, analytical model for magnetic reconnection in Hall magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Andrei N; Chacón, L

    2008-09-05

    Dissipation-independent, or "fast", magnetic reconnection has been observed computationally in Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and predicted analytically in electron MHD. However, a quantitative analytical theory of reconnection valid for arbitrary ion inertial lengths, d{i}, has been lacking and is proposed here for the first time. The theory describes a two-dimensional reconnection diffusion region, provides expressions for reconnection rates, and derives a formal criterion for fast reconnection in terms of dissipation parameters and d{i}. It also confirms the electron MHD prediction that both open and elongated diffusion regions allow fast reconnection, and reveals strong dependence of the reconnection rates on d{i}.

  15. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  16. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence - Cylindrical, non-dissipative model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Vahala, G.

    1979-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is treated in the presence of cylindrical boundaries which are perfectly conducting and rigidly smooth. The model treated is non-dissipative and two-dimensional, the variation of all quantities in the axial direction being ignored. Equilibrium Gibbs ensemble predictions are explored assuming the constraint of constant axial current (appropriate to tokamak operation). No small-amplitude approximations are made. The expectation value of the turbulent kinetic energy is found to approach zero for the state of maximum mean-square vector potential to energy ratio. These are the only states for which large velocity fluctuations are not expected.

  17. Hall current effects in the Lewis magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, L. D.; Sovie, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data obtained in a magnetohydrodynamic generator are compared with theoretical values calculated by using the Dzung theory. The generator was operated with cesium-seeded argon as the working fluid. The gas temperature varied from 1800 to 2100 K, the gas pressure from 19 to 22 N/sq cm, the Mach number from 0.3 to 0.5, and the magnetic field strength from 0.2 to 1.6 T. The analysis indicates that there is incomplete seed vaporization and that Hall current shorting paths (through the working fluid to ground at both the entrance and exit of the channel) limit generator performance.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Generalized formulation and extension to compressible cases

    SciTech Connect

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2008-06-15

    A general framework that incorporates the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan (IK) and Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) phenomenalogies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is developed. This affords a clarification of the regimes of validity of the IK and GS models and hence help resolve some controversies on this aspect. This general formulation appears to have a certain robustness as revealed here by its form invariance with respect to inclusion of compressible effects. Generalizations of the IK and GS spectra to compressible MHD turbulence are given. These two branches are shown to merge with the MHD shockwave spectrum, as to be expected, in the infinite compressibility limit.

  19. Energy decay laws in strongly anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien; Politano, Hélène

    2008-02-22

    We investigate the influence of a uniform magnetic field B(0)=B(0)e( parallel) on energy decay laws in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The nonlinear transfer reduction along B(0) is included in a model that distinguishes parallel and perpendicular directions, following a phenomenology of Kraichnan. We predict a slowing down of the energy decay due to anisotropy in the limit of strong B(0), with distinct power laws for energy decay of shear- and pseudo-Alfvén waves. Numerical results from the kinetic equations of Alfvén wave turbulence recover these predictions, and MHD numerical results clearly tend to follow them in the lowest perpendicular planes.

  20. The Analysis of a Vortex Type Magnetohydrodynamic Induction Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel, L. L.

    1962-01-01

    Consideration it is given to the performance to the characteristics of an AC magnetohydrodynamic power generator, A rotating magnetic field is imposed on the vortex flow of an electrically conducting fluid, which is injected tangentially into an annulus formed by two nonconducting concentric cylinders and two nonconducting end plates. A perturbation technique is used to determine the two dimensional velocity and three dimensional electromagnetic field and current distributions. Finally, the generated power, the ohmic losses, the effective power and the electrical efficiency of the converter system are calculated.