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Sample records for non-rotating stellar core

  1. Star-gas decoupling and a non-rotating stellar core in He 2-10. Integral field spectroscopy with FLAMES/ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquart, T.; Fathi, K.; Östlin, G.; Bergvall, N.; Cumming, R. J.; Amram, P.

    2007-10-01

    Aims:We study the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the stellar and gaseous components in the centre of the blue compact dwarf galaxy He 2-10. The aim is to compare the kinematics of gas and stars in order to determine whether they are consistent with one another, or if stars and gas can be decoupled due to gravitational perturbations and feedback from star formation. Methods: We have used the integral field unit ARGUS, part of FLAMES on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, to target the Ca ii λλ8498,8542,8662 Å triplet in the central 300 × 480 parsecs of He 2-10. The selected wavelength regime includes several prominent spectral features, including the Paschen series and the [S iii] emission-line, which we have used to derive the kinematics of the ionised interstellar medium. Results: We find no systematic trend in the velocities of the stars over the observed field of view and conclude that the stellar kinematics is governed by random motions. This is in contrast to the motions the ionised interstellar medium, where we find spatial velocity variations up to 60 km s-1. Our gas velocity field is consistent with previous studies of both the molecular gas and the feedback-driven outflow in He 2-10. We interpret the kinematic decoupling between the stars and the gas as He 2-10 being in the process of transformation to a dwarf elliptical galaxy. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under observing programme 74.B-0771.

  2. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  3. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Observations of Pre-Stellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafalla, M.

    2005-08-01

    Our understanding of the physical and chemical structure of pre-stellar cores, the simplest star-forming sites, has significantly improved since the last IAU Symposium on Astrochemistry (South Korea, 1999). Research done over these years has revealed that major molecular species like CO and CS systematically deplete onto dust grains in the interior of pre-stellar cores, while species like N2H+ and NH3 survive in the gas phase and can usually be detected toward the core centers. Such a selective behavior of molecular species gives rise to a differentiated (onion-like) chemical composition, and manifests itself in molecular maps as a dichotomy between centrally peaked and ring-shaped distributions. From the point of view of star-formation studies, the identification of molecular inhomogeneities in cores helps to resolve past discrepancies between observations made using different tracers, and brings the possibility of self-consistent modelling of the core internal structure. Here I present recent work on determining the physical and chemical structure of two pre-stellar cores, L1498 and L1517B, using observations in a large number of molecules and Monte Carlo radiative transfer analysis. These two cores are typical examples of the pre-stellar core population, and their chemical composition is characterized by the presence of large `freeze out holes' in most molecular species. In contrast with these chemically processed objects, a new population of chemically young cores has begun to emerge. The characteristics of its most extreme representative, L1521E, are briefly reviewed.

  5. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, A.; Collier, B. L.; Basu, S.; Demarque, P.

    2005-12-01

    The extent of the central convective region is one of the crucial factors that govern the structure and evolution of massive stars. It has been suggested that observations of seismic waves that penetrate the deepest layers of a star might be used to estimate the size of such convective cores. This would allow a rigorous test of the current theories of convection and stellar evolution. We investigate whether suitable diagnostics can be constructed from the frequencies of low degree modes of oscillation which are sensitive to the size and evolution of the stellar core. SB and BC are partially supported in this research by grant ATM-0348837 from NSF. PD is supported by NASA grant NAG5-13299.

  6. Core Density Turbulence in the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Faber, B.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Density fluctuations are measured in the core of the HSX stellarator using a non-perturbing, multi-channel, interferometer system. Measurements show that broadband density turbulences with k⊥ < 2 cm-1, f = (20-200) kHz correlates with density gradient and plasma flow. The density fluctuation level is observed to decrease with increasing ECRH power as both the electron temperature, and its gradient, along with plasma flow increase. Electron temperature gradient is eliminated as drive for the observed turbulence. GENE simulations show that the density-gradient-driven TEM may be responsible for the observed density fluctuations. Low-frequency coherent modes are also observed in different magnetic configurations, mirror and QHS. The identifications of these coherent modes will be explored. Supported by USDOE Grants DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  7. Core Density Turbulence in the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Briesemeister, A.; Kumar, S.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    Density fluctuation measurements on the HSX stellarator reveal broadband turbulence that correlates with plasma density gradient and flow. For quasi-helically symmetric plasmas, significant increases in the turbulent density fluctuations are observed when plasma heating location is moved from on-axis to inboard high-field side. Measurements show that the plasma flow velocity also decreases significantly for off-axis heating. In addition, as the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating power is decreased, core density fluctuations rise while the plasma parallel flow is reduced. When HSX is operated without quasi-helical symmetry, both plasma flow and turbulence characteristics are little changed. No sensitivity to electron temperature gradient is observed. Increased fluctuation amplitude correlates with both increasing density gradient and reduced flow, suggesting a causal relation. In addition to improved neoclassical confinement, quasi-helical symmetry can also lead to increased flow (and flow shear) in the direction of symmetry along with reduced fluctuations and anomalous transport. Supported by USDOE grants DE-FG03-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  8. Perturbation analysis of a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2009-12-01

    For dynamic background models of Goldreich & Weber and Lou & Cao, we examine three-dimensional perturbation properties of oscillations and instabilities in a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core of a relativistically hot medium with a polytropic index γ = 4/3. Perturbation behaviours, especially internal gravity g modes, depend on the variation of specific entropy in the collapsing core. Among possible perturbations, we identify acoustic p modes and surface f modes as well as internal gravity g+ and g- modes. As in stellar oscillations of a static star, we define g+ and g- modes by the sign of the Brunt-Väisälä buoyancy frequency squared for a collapsing stellar core. A new criterion for the onset of instabilities is established for a homologous stellar core collapse. We demonstrate that the global energy criterion of Chandrasekhar is insufficient to warrant the stability of general polytropic equilibria. We confirm the acoustic p-mode stability of Goldreich & Weber, even though their p-mode eigenvalues appear in systematic errors. Unstable modes include g- modes and sufficiently high-order g+ modes, corresponding to core instabilities. Such instabilities occur before the stellar core bounce, in contrast to instabilities in other models of supernova (SN) explosions. The breakdown of spherical symmetry happens earlier than expected in numerical simulations so far. The formation and motion of the central compact object are speculated to be much affected by such g-mode instabilities. By estimates of typical parameters, unstable low-order l = 1 g-modes may produce initial kicks of the central compact object. Other high-order and high-degree unstable g modes may shred the nascent neutron core into pieces without an eventual compact remnant (e.g. SN 1987A). Formation of binary pulsars and planets around neutron stars might originate from unstable l = 2 g-modes and high-order high-degree g modes, respectively.

  9. Stellar core collapse. I - Infall epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Riper, K. A.; Lattimer, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    Simulations of the collapse of the central iron core of a 15-solar-mass spherically symmetric star are reported. In this paper the infall epoch, between the onset of collapse and core bounce, is considered. The models use the recent equation of state of Lamb, Lattimer, Pethick, and Ravenhall and general-relativistic hydrodynamics. The electron capture rates on nuclei proceed rapidly for densities less than 10 to the 11th g/cu cm, but are suppressed at higher densities where the neutron number of the nucleus, N, exceeds 40 (Fuller, Fowler, and Newman). Neutrino transport is treated by a leakage scheme. The effects of changes in the neutrino trapping density and of qualitative changes in the electron capture reactions on the evolution are explored. Greater lepton loss during collapse leads to larger pressure deficits, more rapid collapse, and smaller inner homologous cores. The entropy change during the infall is small, the absolute value of delta s being less than 0.8. The mass of inner core is given, to about 20%, by the formula of Goldreich and Weber. Because the collapsing core is far from equilibrium, the effects of general relativity are small.

  10. Stellar evolution at high mass with convective core overshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.; Chin, C.-W.

    1985-01-01

    The transition from stellar evolution models with no convective core overshooting (CCO) at all to models in which homogeneous mixing due to CCO reaches far beyond the formal convective core boundary is systematically explored. Overshooting is parameterized in terms of the ratio d/H(p), where d is the distance of convective overshoot beyond the formal convective core boundary and H(p) is the local pressure scale height. It is concluded that CCO in very massive main sequence stars produces a great expansion of the stellar envelope if d/H(p) is large but not excessively large. CCO does not entirely suppress convective instability above the overshoot zone in the envelopes of main sequence stars more massive than about 15 solar masses. A general comparison of theoretically constructed isochrones for young stars with observed main sequence turnups indicates that the observed turnups are longer, brighter, and cooler at the tip than those expected on thfe basis of standard evolutionary theory.

  11. Magnetic braking of stellar cores in red giants and supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    Maeder, André; Meynet, Georges E-mail: georges.meynet@unige.ch

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic configurations, stable on the long term, appear to exist in various evolutionary phases, from main-sequence stars to white dwarfs and neutron stars. The large-scale ordered nature of these fields, often approximately dipolar, and their scaling according to the flux conservation scenario favor a fossil field model. We make some first estimates of the magnetic coupling between the stellar cores and the outer layers in red giants and supergiants. Analytical expressions of the truncation radius of the field coupling are established for a convective envelope and for a rotating radiative zone with horizontal turbulence. The timescales of the internal exchanges of angular momentum are considered. Numerical estimates are made on the basis of recent model grids. The direct magnetic coupling of the core to the extended convective envelope of red giants and supergiants appears unlikely. However, we find that the intermediate radiative zone is fully coupled to the core during the He-burning and later phases. This coupling is able to produce a strong spin down of the core of red giants and supergiants, also leading to relatively slowly rotating stellar remnants such as white dwarfs and pulsars. Some angular momentum is also transferred to the outer convective envelope of red giants and supergiants during the He-burning phase and later.

  12. The dependence of convective core overshooting on stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.; Torres, G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Convective core overshooting extends the main-sequence lifetime of a star. Evolutionary tracks computed with overshooting are very different from those that use the classical Schwarzschild criterion, which leads to rather different predictions for the stellar properties. Attempts over the last two decades to calibrate the degree of overshooting with stellar mass using detached double-lined eclipsing binaries have been largely inconclusive, mainly because of a lack of suitable observational data. Aims: We revisit the question of a possible mass dependence of overshooting with a more complete sample of binaries, and examine any additional relation there might be with evolutionary state or metal abundance Z. Methods: We used a carefully selected sample of 33 double-lined eclipsing binaries strategically positioned in the H-R diagram with accurate absolute dimensions and component masses ranging from 1.2 to 4.4 M⊙. We compared their measured properties with stellar evolution calculations to infer semi-empirical values of the overshooting parameter αov for each star. Our models use the common prescription for the overshoot distance dov = αovHp, where Hp is the pressure scale height at the edge of the convective core as given by the Schwarzschild criterion, and αov is a free parameter. Results: We find a relation between αov and mass, which is defined much more clearly than in previous work, and indicates a significant rise up to about 2 M⊙ followed by little or no change beyond this mass. No appreciable dependence is seen with evolutionary state at a given mass, or with metallicity at a given mass although the stars in our sample span a range of a factor of ten in [Fe/H], from -1.01 to + 0.01.

  13. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  14. The stellar population in the core of M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Paresce, Francesco

    1994-01-01

    The inner core of the globular cluster M15 within approximately 2 sec of the geometrical center has been explored with high-resolution images taken through several broad-band UV filter with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Approximately 210 stars in this region down to a 5 sigma detection limit of m(sub 220) = 21.5 were reliably identified and located on a UV - U color magnitude diagram for the first time. A majority of stars (about 70% of the total) observed this way lie above the expected main-sequence turn-off of this cluster and below the sparsely populated horizontal branch. The extension of the main sequence above the turn-off separates this population in two roughly equal components situated to the right and left of this line. Most of the former must be classical blue stragglers while the rest belong to a new, as yet unidentified, population of very blue stars. Possibilities include, but are not restricted to, well-mixed single stars, subdwarfs, and helium white dwarfs. Similar objects are also found just outside the core out to approximately 6 sec from the center, but the brighter, presumably more massive ones, are sharply confined to the core itself. The measured excess of bright blue stars and the relative deficiency of bright red giants in the core are consistent with the blue inward color gradient measured from the ground and imply that dynamical evolution can significantly affect the stellar population in the very dense central regions of a high-concentration globular cluster like M15.

  15. Stellar electron capture rates on neutron-rich nuclei and their impact on stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2017-02-01

    During the late stages of gravitational core-collapse of massive stars, extreme isospin asymmetries are reached within the core. Due to the lack of microscopic calculations of electron-capture (EC) rates for all relevant nuclei, in general simple analytic parametrizations are employed. We study here several extensions of these parametrizations, allowing for a temperature, electron density, and isospin dependence as well as for odd-even effects. The latter extra degrees of freedom considerably improve the agreement with large-scale microscopic rate calculations. We find, in particular, that the isospin dependence leads to a significant reduction of the global EC rates during core collapse with respect to fiducial results, where rates optimized on calculations of stable f p -shell nuclei are used. Our results indicate that systematic microscopic calculations and experimental measurements in the N ≈50 neutron-rich region are desirable for realistic simulations of the core collapse.

  16. Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Stellarators are toroidal devices where the required rotational transform of the magnetic field lines is generated by external field coils and not via an induced net toroidal plasma current. This confinement scheme has the advantages that, in principle, steady-state plasma operation is possible and that it does not have to brace itself against disruptions of a toroidal plasma current. At the cost of having to give up toroidal symmetry the properties of the stellarator field can be tailored to suit reactor needs. Research focuses on the plasma confinement properties of different stellarator fields and investigates the problems arising when one extrapolates to reactor parameters.

  17. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE AND HOST GALAXY STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-11-10

    We have used images and spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to examine the host galaxies of 519 nearby supernovae (SN). The colors at the sites of the explosions, as well as chemical abundances, and specific star formation rates (SFRs) of the host galaxies provide circumstantial evidence on the origin of each SN type. We examine separately SN II, SN IIn, SN IIb, SN Ib, SN Ic, and SN Ic with broad lines (SN Ic-BL). For host galaxies that have multiple spectroscopic fibers, we select the fiber with host radial offset most similar to that of the SN. Type Ic SN explode at small host offsets, and their hosts have exceptionally strongly star-forming, metal-rich, and dusty stellar populations near their centers. The SN Ic-BL and SN IIb explode in exceptionally blue locations, and, in our sample, we find that the host spectra for SN Ic-BL show lower average oxygen abundances than those for SN Ic. SN IIb host fiber spectra are also more metal-poor than those for SN Ib, although a significant difference exists for only one of two strong-line diagnostics. SN Ic-BL host galaxy emission lines show strong central specific SFRs. In contrast, we find no strong evidence for different environments for SN IIn compared to the sites of SN II. Because our SN sample is constructed from a variety of sources, there is always a risk that sampling methods can produce misleading results. We have separated the SN discovered by targeted surveys from those discovered by galaxy-impartial searches to examine these questions and show that our results do not depend sensitively on the discovery technique.

  18. The Nonlinear Evolution of Massive Stellar Core Collapses That ``Fizzle''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, James N.; Pickett, Brian K.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    Core collapse in a massive rotating star may pause before nuclear density is reached, if the core contains total angular momentum J>~1049 g cm2 s-1. In such aborted or ``fizzled'' collapses, temporary equilibrium objects form that, although rapidly rotating, are secularly and dynamically stable because of the high electron fraction per baryon Ye>0.3 and the high entropy per baryon Sb/k~1-2 of the core material at neutrino trapping. These fizzled collapses are called ``fizzlers.'' In the absence of prolonged infall from the surrounding star, the evolution of fizzlers is driven by deleptonization, which causes them to contract and spin up until they either become stable neutron stars or reach the dynamic instability point for barlike modes. The barlike instability case is of current interest because the bars would be sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. In this paper, we use linear and nonlinear techniques, including three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, to study the behavior of fizzlers that have deleptonized to the point of reaching dynamic bar instability. The simulations show that the GW emission produced by bar-unstable fizzlers has rms strain amplitude r15h=10-23 to 10-22 for an observer on the rotation axis, with wave frequency of roughly 60-600 Hz. Here h is the strain and r15= (r/15 Mpc) is the distance to the fizzler in units of 15 Mpc. If the bars that form by dynamic instability can maintain GW emission at this level for 100 periods or more, they may be detectable by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory at the distance of the Virgo Cluster. They would be detectable as burst sources, defined as sources that persist for ~10 cycles or less, if they occurred in the Local Group of galaxies. The long-term behavior of the bars is the crucial issue for the detection of fizzler events. The bars present at the end of our simulations are dynamically stable but will evolve on longer timescales because of a variety of effects, such as

  19. Stellar encounters involving neutron stars in globular cluster cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Encounters between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star and a 0.8 solar mass red giant (RG) and between a 1.4 solar mass neutron star (NS) and an 0.8 solar mass main-sequence (MS) star have been successfully simulated. In the case of encounters involving an RG, bound systems are produced when the separation at periastron passage R(MIN) is less than about 2.5 R(RG). At least 70 percent of these bound systems are composed of the RG core and NS forming a binary engulfed in a common envelope of what remains of the former RG envelope. Once the envelope is ejected, a tight white dwarf-NS binary remains. For MS stars, encounters with NSs will produce bound systems when R(MIN) is less than about 3.5 R(MS). Some 50 percent of these systems will be single objects with the NS engulfed in a thick disk of gas almost as massive as the original MS star. The ultimate fate of such systems is unclear.

  20. Structure, Dynamics, and Deuterium Fractionation of Massive Pre-stellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodson, Matthew D.; Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Heitsch, Fabian; Caselli, Paola

    2016-12-01

    High levels of deuterium fraction in N2H+ are observed in some pre-stellar cores. Single-zone chemical models find that the timescale required to reach observed values ({D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+}\\equiv {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+/{{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+≳ 0.1) is longer than the free-fall time, possibly 10 times longer. Here, we explore the deuteration of turbulent, magnetized cores with 3D magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We use an approximate chemical model to follow the growth in abundances of N2H+ and N2D+. We then examine the dynamics of the core using each tracer for comparison to observations. We find that the velocity dispersion of the core as traced by N2D+ appears slightly sub-virial compared to predictions of the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan, except at late times just before the onset of protostar formation. By varying the initial mass surface density, the magnetic energy, the chemical age, and the ortho-to-para ratio of H2, we also determine the physical and temporal properties required for high deuteration. We find that low initial ortho-to-para ratios (≲ 0.01) and/or multiple free-fall times (≳ 3) of prior chemical evolution are necessary to reach the observed values of deuterium fraction in pre-stellar cores.

  1. Generic gravitational-wave signals from the collapse of rotating stellar cores.

    PubMed

    Dimmelmeier, H; Ott, C D; Janka, H-T; Marek, A; Müller, E

    2007-06-22

    We perform general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse to a protoneutron star, using a microphysical equation of state (EOS) and an approximation of deleptonization. We show that for a wide range of rotation rates and profiles the gravitational-wave (GW) burst signals from the core bounce are generic, known as type I. In our systematic study, using both GR and Newtonian gravity, we identify and quantify the influence of rotation, the EOS, and deleptonization on this result. Such a generic type of signal templates will facilitate a more efficient search in current and future GW detectors of both interferometric and resonant type.

  2. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  3. NH3 (10-00) in the pre-stellar core L1544

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Keto, E.; Sipilä, O.; Tafalla, M.; Pagani, L.; Kristensen, L. E.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Codella, C.; Nisini, B.; Aikawa, Y.; Faure, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-07-01

    Pre-stellar cores represent the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation, therefore it is important to study their physical and chemical structure. Because of their volatility, nitrogen-bearing molecules are key to study the dense and cold gas present in pre-stellar cores. The NH3 rotational transition detected with Herschel-HIFI provides a unique combination of sensitivity and spectral resolution to further investigate physical and chemical processes in pre-stellar cores. Here we present the velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI observations of the ortho-NH3(10 - 00) line at 572 GHz and study the abundance profile of ammonia across the pre-stellar core L1544 to test current theories of its physical and chemical structure. Recently calculated collisional coefficients have been included in our non-LTE radiative transfer code to reproduce Herschel observations. A gas-grain chemical model, including spin-state chemistry and applied to the (static) physical structure of L1544 is also used to infer the abundance profile of ortho-NH3. The hyperfine structure of ortho-NH3(10 - 00) is resolved for the first time in space. All the hyperfine components are strongly self-absorbed. The profile can be reproduced if the core is contracting in quasi-equilibrium, consistent with previous work, and if the NH3 abundance is slightly rising toward the core centre, as deduced from previous interferometric observations of para-NH3(1, 1). The chemical model overestimates the NH3 abundance at radii between ≃4000 and 15 000 AU by about two orders of magnitude and underestimates the abundance toward the core centre by more than one order of magnitude. Our observations show that chemical models applied to static clouds have problems in reproducing NH3 observations. Based on observations carried out with Herschel, an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by a European-led Principal Investigator consortium and with important participation from NASA.

  4. THE AGE, STELLAR CONTENT, AND STAR FORMATION TIMESCALE OF THE B59 DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, K. R.; Lada, C. J.; Muench, A. A.; Forbrich, J.; Ascenso, J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.

    2010-10-20

    We have investigated the stellar content of Barnard 59 (B59), the most active star-forming core in the Pipe Nebula. Using the SpeX spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we obtained moderate resolution, near-infrared (NIR) spectra for 20 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in B59 and a representative sample of NIR and mid-IR bright sources distributed throughout the Pipe. Measuring luminosity and temperature sensitive features in these spectra, we identified likely background giant stars and measured each star's spectral type, extinction, and NIR continuum excess. To measure B59's age, we place its candidate YSOs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and compare their location to YSOs in several well-studied star-forming regions, as well as predictions of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models. We find that B59 is composed of late-type (K4-M6) low-mass (0.9-0.1 M{sub sun}) YSOs whose median stellar age is comparable to, if not slightly older than, that of YSOs within the {rho} Oph, Taurus, and Chameleon star-forming regions. Deriving absolute age estimates from PMS models computed by D'Antona et al., and accounting only for statistical uncertainties, we measure B59's median stellar age to be 2.6 {+-} 0.8 Myr. Including potential systematic effects increases the error budget for B59's median (DM98) stellar age to 2.6{sup +4.1}{sub -2.6} Myr. We also find that the relative age orderings implied by PMS evolutionary tracks depend on the range of stellar masses sampled, as model isochrones possess significantly different mass dependences. The maximum likelihood median stellar age we measure for B59, and the region's observed gas properties, suggests that the B59 dense core has been stable against global collapse for roughly six dynamical timescales and is actively forming stars with a star formation efficiency per dynamical time of {approx}6%. While the {approx}150% uncertainties associated with our age measurement propagate directly into these

  5. Bayesian reconstruction of gravitational wave burst signals from simulations of rotating stellar core collapse and bounce

    SciTech Connect

    Roever, Christian; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Christensen, Nelson; Dimmelmeier, Harald; Heng, Ik Siong; Meyer, Renate

    2009-11-15

    Presented in this paper is a technique that we propose for extracting the physical parameters of a rotating stellar core collapse from the observation of the associated gravitational wave signal from the collapse and core bounce. Data from interferometric gravitational wave detectors can be used to provide information on the mass of the progenitor model, precollapse rotation, and the nuclear equation of state. We use waveform libraries provided by the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse models in general relativity, and from them create an orthogonal set of eigenvectors using principal component analysis. Bayesian inference techniques are then used to reconstruct the associated gravitational wave signal that is assumed to be detected by an interferometric detector. Posterior probability distribution functions are derived for the amplitudes of the principal component analysis eigenvectors, and the pulse arrival time. We show how the reconstructed signal and the principal component analysis eigenvector amplitude estimates may provide information on the physical parameters associated with the core collapse event.

  6. Gravitational collapse of a rotating iron stellar core: The limiting case of transparency to neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imshennik, V. S.; Molokanov, V. O.

    2010-10-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the collapse of a rotating iron stellar core is used to determine the neutrino spectra in the limiting case of total transparency to neutrino emission (without any deposition effect). The derived spectra allow the previously constructed spectra used to theoretically estimate the number of events in the LSD underground neutrino detector from SN 1987A to be refined. At typical iron stellar core parameters, including those that characterize the core rotation specified in the initial conditions of the model, this number has turned out to be 1.6, which is close in order of magnitude to its experimental value of 5. Here, we compare in detail these results by assuming that the transparency of the collapsing iron core itself could be attributable to the development of its three-dimensional dynamical instability—the subject of future theoretical studies. The physical formulation of the problem coincides closely with the collapse model proposed in our previous paper, where the above number of events turned out to be 0.5. We have confirmed the previously published results with regard to the neutrino spectra, including the significant superiority of electron neutrinos over electron antineutrinos in them. The hydrostatically equilibrium configuration (a rotating collapsar) obtained in our model calculation is discussed in comparison with self-similar solutions that are close in physical formulation of the problem. This result seems a nontrivial consequence of the included rotation effects that hinder nonstop collapse established in the mentioned self-similar solutions.

  7. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-10-10

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T<10 K), has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modelling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly-extinguished continuum peak with A V ≥30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A V ~7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core's center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors ~2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3) but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modelling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  8. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T<10 K), has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modelling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly-extinguished continuum peak with AV ≥30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average AV ~7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3 and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors ~2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3) but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modelling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains. PMID:27733899

  9. The Spatial Distribution of Complex Organic Molecules in the L1544 Pre-stellar Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun; Vasyunin, Anton I.; Caselli, Paola; Marcelino, Nuria; Billot, Nicolas; Viti, Serena; Testi, Leonardo; Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Rafael

    2016-10-01

    The detection of complex organic molecules (COMs) toward cold sources such as pre-stellar cores (with T < 10 K) has challenged our understanding of the formation processes of COMs in the interstellar medium. Recent modeling on COM chemistry at low temperatures has provided new insight into these processes predicting that COM formation depends strongly on parameters such as visual extinction and the level of CO freeze out. We report deep observations of COMs toward two positions in the L1544 pre-stellar core: the dense, highly extinguished continuum peak with A V ≥ 30 mag within the inner 2700 au; and a low-density shell with average A V ˜ 7.5-8 mag located at 4000 au from the core’s center and bright in CH3OH. Our observations show that CH3O, CH3OCH3, and CH3CHO are more abundant (by factors of ˜2-10) toward the low-density shell than toward the continuum peak. Other COMs such as CH3OCHO, c-C3H2O, HCCCHO, CH2CHCN, and HCCNC show slight enhancements (by factors ≤3), but the associated uncertainties are large. This suggests that COMs are actively formed and already present in the low-density shells of pre-stellar cores. The modeling of the chemistry of O-bearing COMs in L1544 indicates that these species are enhanced in this shell because (i) CO starts freezing out onto dust grains driving an active surface chemistry; (ii) the visual extinction is sufficiently high to prevent the UV photo-dissociation of COMs by the external interstellar radiation field; and (iii) the density is still moderate to prevent severe depletion of COMs onto grains.

  10. The collapse of degenerate iron stellar cores and a supernova model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, L. N.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    1981-10-01

    The paper examines the collapse of iron stellar cores having envelopes with reserves of thermonuclear fuel. A model involving the neutronization of matter is used to explain the collapse, and it is shown that, depending on the temperature of the matter of the envelope before the start of the hydrodynamic contraction, a compact remnant similar to a neutron star or white dwarf results. In the thermonuclear supernova model, the maximum energy of the cast-off envelope resulting from a thermonuclear explosion is approximately (5-7) x 10 to the 49th erg.

  11. The evolutionary status of the stellar population in the rho Ophiuchi cloud core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Karen M.; Kepner, Jeremy; Strom, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    This contribution reports the results of an infrared imaging survey aimed at characterizing the stellar populations associated with the three densest star-forming cores in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex. The survey has sufficient sensitivity at J, H, and K (at 5 sigma limits of 16.5, 15.4, and 14.2) to provide a complete census of embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) with masses greater than the hydrogen-burning limit, provided that their ages are less than 3 Myr and that they are obscured by no more than approximately 18 mag of visual extinction. Our data suggest (1) a large fraction (greater than 70%) of the sources located within the cores are still surrounded by circumstellar disks and/or envelopes; and (2) the shape of the initial mass function for masses, M less than 1 solar mass, appears to be consistent with that derived from the solar neighborhood. We also report the results of a deeper imaging survey of centimeter continuum sources (14 sources) in these star-forming cores and in the larger Ophiuchus complex (eight sources). A large fraction (11/14) of the radio sources associated with the cores appear to have infrared excesses diagnostic of circumstellar accretion disks and/or infalling circumstellar envelopes. In these cases, the centimeter continuum radiation most likely diagnoses the ionized component of energetic winds or jets which characterizes YSOs during the disk accretion phase. By contrast, of the eight radio sources located outside dense cores, only two show infrared excesses.

  12. FIRST DETECTION OF WATER VAPOR IN A PRE-STELLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Caselli, Paola; Douglas, Thomas; Keto, Eric; Bergin, Edwin A.; Tafalla, Mario; Aikawa, Yuri; Pagani, Laurent; Yildiz, Umut A.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Van der Tak, Floris F. S.; Walmsley, C. Malcolm; Codella, Claudio; Nisini, Brunella

    2012-11-10

    Water is a crucial molecule in molecular astrophysics as it controls much of the gas/grain chemistry, including the formation and evolution of more complex organic molecules in ices. Pre-stellar cores provide the original reservoir of material from which future planetary systems are built, but few observational constraints exist on the formation of water and its partitioning between gas and ice in the densest cores. Thanks to the high sensitivity of the Herschel Space Observatory, we report on the first detection of water vapor at high spectral resolution toward a dense cloud on the verge of star formation, the pre-stellar core L1544. The line shows an inverse P-Cygni profile, characteristic of gravitational contraction. To reproduce the observations, water vapor has to be present in the cold and dense central few thousand AU of L1544, where species heavier than helium are expected to freeze out onto dust grains, and the ortho:para H{sub 2} ratio has to be around 1:1 or larger. The observed amount of water vapor within the core (about 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun }) can be maintained by far-UV photons locally produced by the impact of galactic cosmic rays with H{sub 2} molecules. Such FUV photons irradiate the icy mantles, liberating water vapor in the core center. Our Herschel data, combined with radiative transfer and chemical/dynamical models, shed light on the interplay between gas and solids in dense interstellar clouds and provide the first measurement of the water vapor abundance profile across the parent cloud of a future solar-type star and its potential planetary system.

  13. Observational Studies of Pre-Stellar Cores and Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Paola

    2011-12-01

    Stars like our Sun and planets like our Earth form in dense regions within interstellar molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs). PSCs provide the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation. In the past 15 years, detailed observations of (low-mass) PSCs in nearby molecular cloud complexes have allowed us to find that they are cold (T < 10K) and quiescent (molecular line widths are close to thermal), with a chemistry profoundly affected by molecular freeze-out onto dust grains. In these conditions, deuterated molecules flourish, becoming the best tools to unveil the PSC physical and chemical structure. Despite their apparent simplicity, PSCs still offer puzzles to solve and they are far from being completely understood. For example, what is happening to the gas and dust in their nuclei (the future stellar cradles) is still a mystery that awaits for ALMA. Other important questions are: how do different environments and external conditions affect the PSC physical/chemical structure? Are PSCs in high-mass star forming regions similar to the well-known low-mass PSCs? Here I review observational and theoretical work on PSCs in nearby molecular cloud complexes and the ongoing search and study of massive PSCs embedded in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), which host the initial conditions for stellar cluster and high-mass star formation.

  14. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - X. A suggested evolutionary diagram for pre-stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R. J.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2011-10-01

    We propose an evolutionary path for pre-stellar cores on the radius-mass diagram, which is analogous to stellar evolutionary paths on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations of L1688 in the Ophiuchus star-forming complex, we analyse the HCO+ (J= 4 → 3) spectral line profiles of pre-stellar cores. We find that of the 58 cores observed, 14 show signs of infall in the form of a blue-asymmetric double-peaked line profile. These 14 cores all lie beyond the Jeans mass line for the region on a radius-mass plot. Furthermore, another 10 cores showing tentative signs of infall, in their spectral line profile shapes, appear on or just over the Jeans mass line. We therefore propose the manner in which a pre-stellar core evolves across this diagram. We hypothesize that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasi-statically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability, it begins to collapse, decreasing in radius, towards the region of the diagram where protostellar cores are seen.

  15. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ☉}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ☉}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ☉}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ∼10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ☉}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ☉}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t

  16. Radio Properties of Young Stellar Objects in the Core of the Serpens South Infrared Dark Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Nicholas S.; Keown, Jared A.; Tobin, John J.; Mead, Adrian; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep radio continuum observations of the star-forming core of the Serpens South Infrared Dark Cloud with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. Observations were conducted in two bands centered at 7.25 GHz (4.14 cm) and 4.75 GHz (6.31 cm) with a {σ }{rms} of 8.5 and 11.1 μJy/beam, respectively. We also use 2MASS, Spitzer and Herschel data to put our radio observations in the context of young stellar populations characterized by near and far-infrared observations. Within a 5‧ × 5‧ region of interest around the central cluster, we detect roughly eighteen radio sources, seven of which we determine are protostellar in nature due to their radio spectral indices and their association with infrared sources. We find evidence for a previously undetected embedded Class 0 protostar and reaffirm Class 0 protostellar classifications determined by previous millimeter wavelength continuum studies. We use our infrared data to derive mid-infrared luminosities for three of our protostellar sources and find relative agreement between the known young stellar object (YSO) radio luminosity versus bolometric luminosity correlation. Lastly, we marginally detect an additional six radio sources at the 2-3σ level that lie within two arcseconds of infrared YSO candidates, providing motivation for higher sensitivity studies to clarify the nature of these sources and further probe embedded and/or low luminosity YSOs in Serpens South.

  17. Core-halo age gradients and star formation in the Orion Nebula and NGS 2024 young stellar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    We analyze age distributions of two nearby rich stellar clusters, the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) and Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Our analysis is based on samples from the MYStIX survey and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, Age{sub JX} , derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. To overcome the problem of uncertain individual ages and large spreads of age distributions for entire clusters, we compute median ages and their confidence intervals of stellar samples within annular subregions of the clusters. We find core-halo age gradients in both the NGC 2024 cluster and ONC: PMS stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than PMS stars in cluster peripheries. These findings are further supported by the spatial gradients in the disk fraction and K-band excess frequency. Our age analysis is based on Age{sub JX} estimates for PMS stars and is independent of any consideration of OB stars. The result has important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. One basic implication is that clusters form slowly and the apparent age spreads in young stellar clusters, which are often controversial, are (at least in part) real. The result further implies that simple models where clusters form inside-out are incorrect and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  18. STAR FORMATION: STATISTICAL MEASURE OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PRESTELLAR CORE MASS FUNCTION AND THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, Gilles; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2010-12-10

    We present a simple statistical analysis of recent numerical simulations exploring the correlation between the core mass function (CMF) obtained from the fragmentation of a molecular cloud and the stellar mass function which forms from these collapsing cores. Our analysis shows that the distributions of bound cores and sink particles obtained in the simulations are consistent with the sinks being formed predominantly from their parent core mass reservoir, with a statistical dispersion of the order of one-third of the core mass. Such a characteristic dispersion suggests that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is relatively tightly correlated to the parent CMF, leading to two similar distributions, as observed. This in turn argues in favor of the IMF being essentially determined at the early stages of core formation and being only weakly affected by the various environmental factors beyond the initial core mass reservoir, at least in the mass range explored in the present study. Accordingly, the final IMF of a star-forming region should be determined reasonably accurately, statistically speaking, from the initial CMF, provided some uniform efficiency factor. The calculations also show that these statistical fluctuations, due to, e.g., variations among the core properties, broaden the low-mass tail of the IMF compared with the parent CMF, providing an explanation for the fact that the latter appears to underestimate the number of 'pre brown dwarf' cores compared with the observationally derived brown dwarf IMF.

  19. Maximal acceleration is non-rotating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    1998-06-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer whose acceleration vector is Fermi-Walker transported is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer. The converse is also true if the spacetime is symmetric under reversing both t and 0264-9381/15/6/020/img1 together. Thus a congruence of non-rotating acceleration worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a stationary congruence accelerating locally extremely (SCALE). These congruences are defined completely locally, unlike the case of zero angular momentum observers (ZAMOs), which requires knowledge around a symmetry axis. The SCALE subcase of a stationary congruence accelerating maximally (SCAM) is made up of stationary worldlines that may be considered to be locally most nearly at rest in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. Formulae for the angular velocity and other properties of the SCALEs are given explicitly on a generalization of an equatorial plane, infinitesimally near a symmetry axis, and in a slowly rotating gravitational field, including the far-field limit, where the SCAM is shown to be counter-rotating relative to infinity. These formulae are evaluated in particular detail for the Kerr-Newman metric. Various other congruences are also defined, such as a stationary congruence rotating at minimum (SCRAM), and stationary worldlines accelerating radially maximally (SWARM), both of which coincide with a SCAM on an equatorial plane of reflection symmetry. Applications are also made to the gravitational fields of maximally rotating stars, the Sun and the Solar System.

  20. Stellar Bar Evolution in Cuspy and Flat-cored Triaxial CDM Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berentzen, Ingo; Shlosman, Isaac; Jogee, Shardha

    2006-02-01

    We analyze the formation and evolution of stellar bars in galactic disks embedded in mildly triaxial cold dark matter (CDM) halos that have density distributions ranging from large flat cores to cuspy profiles. We have applied tailored numerical simulations of analytical and live halos that include the feedback from disk/bar system onto the halo in order to test and extend earlier work by El-Zant and Shlosman. The latter employed the method of Liapunov exponents to analyze the fate of bars in analytical asymmetric halos. We find the following: (1) The bar growth is very similar in all rigid axisymmetric and triaxial halos. (2) Bars in live models experience vertical buckling instability and the formation of a pseudobulge with a boxy/peanut shape, while bars in rigid halos do not buckle. (3) In live axisymmetric halos, the bar strength varies by a factor of <~2, in growth or decay, during the secular evolution following the buckling. The bar pattern speed evolution (i.e., deceleration) anticorrelates with the halo core size. In such halos, the bar strength is larger for smaller disk-to-halo mass ratios (D/H) within disk radii, the bar size correlates with the halo core sizes, and the bar pattern speeds correlate with the halo central mass concentration. In contrast, bars embedded in live triaxial halos have a starkly different fate: they dissolve on a timescale of ~1.5-5 Gyr due to the onset of chaos over continuous zones, sometimes leaving behind a weak oval distortion. The onset of chaos is related to the halo triaxiality, the fast-rotating bar, and the halo cuspiness. Before the bar dissolves, the region outside it develops strong spiral structures, especially in the live triaxial halos. (4) More angular momentum is absorbed (fractionally) by the triaxial halos than in the axisymmetric models. The disk-halo angular momentum exchange is mediated by the lower resonances in the latter models. (5) Cuspy halos are more susceptible than flat-core halos to having their

  1. The ISO and XMM Newton observations of a few pre-stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrzebska, Magdalena

    2007-12-01

    Molecular clouds are places where matter evolves from embryos to star and planetary systems. Molecules that are particularly sensitive to different routes of formations and that may be useful in distinguishing between a variety of environments (van Dishoeck & Blake 1998). Chemistry in the first phase of star formation (the Prestellar Core phase) may affect the chemical composition of the objects that will eventually form the planetary system (Ceccarelli et al. 2006 ). During this time, matter slowly accumulates towards the center. As the density increases, gaseous molecules start to freeze-out into the cold dust grains, forming dirty, H2O- dominated ice mantles. In this time envelope is so thick that the SED is totally dominated by cold outer regions of the envelope (Class 0 sources). Class 0 envelopes consist of two chemically distinct regions: the outer envelopes and the inner regions - hot corinos. In the hot corinos the chemistry is dominated by the evaporation of the mantles, built up during the pre-collapse phase. The mantle components are in the gas phase, they undergo successive reactions leading to the formations of many complex molecules (Ceccarelli et al. 2006). Observations (Huang et al. 2005) show the chemical connection between dark clouds, massive star-forming regions and solar-type hot corinos. Conversely to high mass, low mass protostars are strong X-ray emitters. The understanding of how X-ray can modified (yes or no) the first phase chemistry is a fascinating question. In this work I present ISO and XMM observations of a few pre-stellar cores: LDN1527, B68, L1448.

  2. An ultraviolet-optical flare from the tidal disruption of a helium-rich stellar core.

    PubMed

    Gezari, S; Chornock, R; Rest, A; Huber, M E; Forster, K; Berger, E; Challis, P J; Neill, J D; Martin, D C; Heckman, T; Lawrence, A; Norman, C; Narayan, G; Foley, R J; Marion, G H; Scolnic, D; Chomiuk, L; Soderberg, A; Smith, K; Kirshner, R P; Riess, A G; Smartt, S J; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Grav, T; Heasley, J N; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R-P; Magnier, E A; Morgan, J S; Price, P A

    2012-05-02

    The flare of radiation from the tidal disruption and accretion of a star can be used as a marker for supermassive black holes that otherwise lie dormant and undetected in the centres of distant galaxies. Previous candidate flares have had declining light curves in good agreement with expectations, but with poor constraints on the time of disruption and the type of star disrupted, because the rising emission was not observed. Recently, two 'relativistic' candidate tidal disruption events were discovered, each of whose extreme X-ray luminosity and synchrotron radio emission were interpreted as the onset of emission from a relativistic jet. Here we report a luminous ultraviolet-optical flare from the nuclear region of an inactive galaxy at a redshift of 0.1696. The observed continuum is cooler than expected for a simple accreting debris disk, but the well-sampled rise and decay of the light curve follow the predicted mass accretion rate and can be modelled to determine the time of disruption to an accuracy of two days. The black hole has a mass of about two million solar masses, modulo a factor dependent on the mass and radius of the star disrupted. On the basis of the spectroscopic signature of ionized helium from the unbound debris, we determine that the disrupted star was a helium-rich stellar core.

  3. The young stellar population in the Serpens Cloud Core: An ISOCAM survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaas, A. A.; Olofsson, G.; Bontemps, S.; André, P.; Nordh, L.; Huldtgren, M.; Prusti, T.; Persi, P.; Delgado, A. J.; Motte, F.; Abergel, A.; Boulanger, F.; Burgdorf, M.; Casali, M. M.; Cesarsky, C. J.; Davies, J.; Falgarone, E.; Montmerle, T.; Perault, M.; Puget, J. L.; Sibille, F.

    2004-07-01

    We present results from an ISOCAM survey in the two broad band filters LW2 (5-8.5 μm) and LW3 (12-18 μm) of a 0.13 square degree coverage of the Serpens Main Cloud Core. A total of 392 sources were detected in the 6.7 μm band and 139 in the 14.3 μm band to a limiting sensitivity of ˜2 mJy. We identified 53 Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) with mid-IR excess from the single colour index [14.3/6.7], and 8 additional YSOs from the H-K/K-m6.7 diagram. Only 32 of these 61 sources were previously known to be YSO candidates. Only about 50% of the mid-IR excess sources show excesses in the near-IR J-H/H-K diagram. In the 48 square arcmin field covering the central Cloud Core the Class I/Class II number ratio is 19/18, i.e. about 10 times larger than in other young embedded clusters such as ρ Ophiuchi or Chamaeleon. The mid-IR fluxes of the Class I and flat-spectrum sources are found to be on the average larger than those of Class II sources. Stellar luminosities are estimated for the Class II sample, and its luminosity function is compatible with a coeval population of about 2 Myr which follows a three segment power-law IMF. For this age about 20% of the Class IIs are found to be young brown dwarf candidates. The YSOs are in general strongly clustered, the Class I sources more than the Class II sources, and there is an indication of sub-clustering. The sub-clustering of the protostar candidates has a spatial scale of 0.12 pc. These sub-clusters are found along the NW-SE oriented ridge and in very good agreement with the location of dense cores traced by millimeter data. The smallest clustering scale for the Class II sources is about 0.25 pc, similar to what was found for ρ Ophiuchi. Our data show evidence that star formation in Serpens has proceeded in several phases, and that a ``microburst'' of star formation has taken place very recently, probably within the last 105 yrs. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States

  4. Neutronization of matter in a stellar core and convection during gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    The roles of neutrinos and convective instability in collapsing supernovae are considered. Spherically symmetrical computations of the collapse using the Boltzmann equation for the neutrinos lead to the formation of the condition of convective instability, {( {{partial P}/{partial s}} )_{ρ {Y_l}}}{ds}/{dr} + {( {{partial P}/{partial {Y_L}}} )_{ρ s}}{d{Y_L}}/{dr} < 0, in a narrow region of matter accretion above the neutrinosphere. If instability arises in this region, the three-dimensional solution will represent a correction to the spherically symmetrical solution for the gravitational collapse. The mean neutrino energies change only negligibly in the narrow region of accretion. Nuclear statistical equilibrium is usually assumed in the hot proto-neutron stellar core, to simplify the computations of the collapse. Neutronization with the participation of free neutrons is most efficient. However, the decay of nuclei into nucleons is hindered during the collapse, because the density grows too rapidly compared to the growth in the temperature, and an appreciable fraction of the energy is carried away by neutrinos. The entropy of the matter per nucleon is modest at the stellar center. All the energy is in degenerate electrons during the collapse. If the large energy of these degenerate electrons is taken into account, neutrons are efficiently formed, even in cool matter with reduced Y e (the difference between the numbers of electrons and positrons per nucleon). This process brings about an increase in the optical depth to neutrinos, the appearance of free neutrons, and an increase in the entropy per nucleon at the center. The convectively unstable region at the center increases. The development of large-scale convection is illustrated using a multi-dimensional gas-dynamical model for the evolution of a stationary, unstable state (without taking into account neutrino transport). The time for the development of convective instability (several milliseconds) does not

  5. Radio Measurements of the Stellar Proper Motions in the Core of the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Gómez, Laura; Forbrich, Jan; Menten, Karl M.; Kounkel, Marina A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Hartmann, Lee; Tobin, John J.; Rivera, Juana L.

    2017-01-01

    Using multi-epoch Very Large Array observations, covering a time baseline of 29.1 years, we have measured the proper motions of 88 young stars with compact radio emission in the core of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the neighboring BN/KL region. Our work increases the number of young stars with measured proper motion at radio frequencies by a factor of 2.5 and enables us to perform a better statistical analysis of the kinematics of the region than was previously possible. Most stars (79 out of 88) have proper motions consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered on \\overline{{μ }α \\cos δ }=1.07+/- 0.09 mas yr‑1, and \\overline{{μ }δ }=-0.84+/- 0.16 mas yr‑1, with velocity dispersions of {σ }α =1.08+/- 0.07 mas yr‑1, {σ }δ =1.27+/- 0.15 mas yr‑1. We looked for organized movements of these stars but found no clear indication of radial expansion/contraction or rotation. The remaining nine stars in our sample show peculiar proper motions that differ from the mean proper motions of the ONC by more than 3σ. One of these stars, V 1326 Ori, could have been expelled from the Orion Trapezium 7000 years ago. Two could be related to the multi-stellar disintegration in the BN/KL region, in addition to the previously known sources BN, I and n. The others either have high uncertainties (so their anomalous proper motions are not firmly established) or could be foreground objects.

  6. New Era in 3-D Modeling of Convection and Magnetic Dynamos in Stellar Envelopes and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, J.; Augustson, K. C.; Brown, B. P.; Browning, M. K.; Brun, A. S.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    consider dynamo action within the cores of rotating A-type stars, finding that striking super-equipartition magnetic fields can be built there. These families of 3-D simulations are showing that a new era of detailed stellar modeling is becoming feasible through rapid advances in supercomputing, and these have the potential to help interpret and possibly even guide some of the observational efforts now under way.

  7. STELLAR AGES AND CONVECTIVE CORES IN FIELD MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: FIRST ASTEROSEISMIC APPLICATION TO TWO KEPLER TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S.; Deheuvels, S.; Brandao, I. M.; Cunha, M. S.; Sousa, S. G.; Dogan, G.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Serenelli, A. M.; Garcia, R. A.; Ballot, J.; Weiss, A.; Appourchaux, T.; Casagrande, L.; Cassisi, S.; Creevey, O. L.; Lebreton, Y.; Noels, A.; and others

    2013-06-01

    Using asteroseismic data and stellar evolution models we obtain the first detection of a convective core in a Kepler field main-sequence star, putting a stringent constraint on the total size of the mixed zone and showing that extra mixing beyond the formal convective boundary exists. In a slightly less massive target the presence of a convective core cannot be conclusively discarded, and thus its remaining main-sequence lifetime is uncertain. Our results reveal that best-fit models found solely by matching individual frequencies of oscillations corrected for surface effects do not always properly reproduce frequency combinations. Moreover, slightly different criteria to define what the best-fit model is can lead to solutions with similar global properties but very different interior structures. We argue that the use of frequency ratios is a more reliable way to obtain accurate stellar parameters, and show that our analysis in field main-sequence stars can yield an overall precision of 1.5%, 4%, and 10% in radius, mass, and age, respectively. We compare our results with those obtained from global oscillation properties, and discuss the possible sources of uncertainties in asteroseismic stellar modeling where further studies are still needed.

  8. Detection of the HC3NH+ and HCNH+ ions in the L1544 pre-stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénard, D.; Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2017-09-01

    The L1544 pre-stellar core was observed as part of the ASAI (Astrochemical Surveys At IRAM) Large Program. We report the first detection in a pre-stellar core of the HCNH+ and HC3NH+ ions. The high spectral resolution of the observations allows us to resolve the hyperfine structure of HCNH+. Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis leads to derive a column density equal to (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1013 cm-2 for HCNH+ and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 1011 cm-2 for HC3NH+. We also present non-LTE analysis of five transitions of HC3N, three transitions of H13CN and one transition of HN13C, all of them linked to the chemistry of HCNH+ and HC3NH+. We computed for HC3N, HCN and HNC a column density of (2.0 ± 0.4) × 1013 cm-2, (3.6 ± 0.9) × 1014 cm-2 and (3.0 ± 1.0) × 1014 cm-2, respectively. We used the gas-grain chemical code nautilus to predict the abundances of all these species across the pre-stellar core. Comparison of the observations with the model predictions suggests that the emission from HCNH+ and HC3NH+ originates in the external layer where non-thermal desorption of other species was previously observed. The observed abundance of both ionic species ([HCNH+] ≃ 3 × 10-10 and [HC3NH+] ≃ [1.5 - 3.0] × 10-12, with respect to H2) cannot be reproduced at the same time by the chemical modelling within the error bars of the observations only. We discuss the possible reasons for the discrepancy and suggest that the current chemical models are not fully accurate or complete. However, the modelled abundances are within a factor of 3, consistent with the observations, considering a late stage of the evolution of the pre-stellar core, compatible with previous observations.

  9. A Survey of X-Ray Luminosity Limits for Unobserved Compact Stellar Remnants in Core-Collapse SNRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Anthony Glenn; Herbst, Ashley; Clark, Nina; Thongkham, Paul; Cooper, Eric; Carino, Alexandria; Mathews, Robert; Schenck, Andrew; Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook

    2017-01-01

    Based on archival Chandra data, we revisit a number of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way Galaxy and Large Magellanic Cloud. While the core-collapse explosion of a massive star (M > 8 M_sun) has been established or suggested for the origin of some of those SNRs, the compact stellar remnant has yet to be detected within their boundaries. We estimate upper limits on the X-ray luminosity for several of those putative compact remnants. We compare our results with previous estimates, where available, and briefly entertain physical implications of our estimates.

  10. STRUCTURAL GLITCHES NEAR THE CORES OF RED GIANTS REVEALED BY OSCILLATIONS IN G-MODE PERIOD SPACINGS FROM STELLAR MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, M. S.; Avelino, P. P.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Townsend, R. H. D.

    2015-06-01

    With recent advances in asteroseismology it is now possible to peer into the cores of red giants, potentially providing a way to study processes such as nuclear burning and mixing through their imprint as sharp structural variations—glitches—in the stellar cores. Here we show how such core glitches can affect the oscillations we observe in red giants. We derive an analytical expression describing the expected frequency pattern in the presence of a glitch. This formulation also accounts for the coupling between acoustic and gravity waves. From an extensive set of canonical stellar models we find glitch-induced variation in the period spacing and inertia of non-radial modes during several phases of red giant evolution. Significant changes are seen in the appearance of mode amplitude and frequency patterns in asteroseismic diagrams such as the power spectrum and the échelle diagram. Interestingly, along the red giant branch glitch-induced variation occurs only at the luminosity bump, potentially providing a direct seismic indicator of stars in that particular evolution stage. Similarly, we find the variation at only certain post-helium-ignition evolution stages, namely, in the early phases of helium core burning and at the beginning of helium shell burning, signifying the asymptotic giant branch bump. Based on our results, we note that assuming stars to be glitch-free, while they are not, can result in an incorrect estimate of the period spacing. We further note that including diffusion and mixing beyond classical Schwarzschild could affect the characteristics of the glitches, potentially providing a way to study these physical processes.

  11. rhapsody-g simulations - I. The cool cores, hot gas and stellar content of massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Martizzi, Davide; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-09-01

    We present the rhapsody-g suite of cosmological hydrodynamic zoom simulations of 10 massive galaxy clusters at the Mvir ∼ 1015 M⊙ scale. These simulations include cooling and subresolution models for star formation and stellar and supermassive black hole feedback. The sample is selected to capture the whole gamut of assembly histories that produce clusters of similar final mass. We present an overview of the successes and shortcomings of such simulations in reproducing both the stellar properties of galaxies as well as properties of the hot plasma in clusters. In our simulations, a long-lived cool-core/non-cool-core dichotomy arises naturally, and the emergence of non-cool cores is related to low angular momentum major mergers. Nevertheless, the cool-core clusters exhibit a low central entropy compared to observations, which cannot be alleviated by thermal active galactic nuclei feedback. For cluster scaling relations, we find that the simulations match well the M500-Y500 scaling of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters but deviate somewhat from the observed X-ray luminosity and temperature scaling relations in the sense of being slightly too bright and too cool at fixed mass, respectively. Stars are produced at an efficiency consistent with abundance-matching constraints and central galaxies have star formation rates consistent with recent observations. While our simulations thus match various key properties remarkably well, we conclude that the shortcomings strongly suggest an important role for non-thermal processes (through feedback or otherwise) or thermal conduction in shaping the intracluster medium.

  12. Rhapsody-G simulations I: the cool cores, hot gas and stellar content of massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver; Martizzi, Davide; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August E.; Teyssier, Romain; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-01-01

    We present the RHAPSODY-G suite of cosmological hydrodynamic AMR zoom simulations of ten massive galaxy clusters at the Mvir ˜ 1015 M⊙ scale. These simulations include cooling and sub-resolution models for star formation and stellar and supermassive black hole feedback. The sample is selected to capture the whole gamut of assembly histories that produce clusters of similar final mass. We present an overview of the successes and shortcomings of such simulations in reproducing both the stellar properties of galaxies as well as properties of the hot plasma in clusters. In our simulations, a long-lived cool-core/non-cool core dichotomy arises naturally, and the emergence of non-cool cores is related to low angular momentum major mergers. Nevertheless, the cool-core clusters exhibit a low central entropy compared to observations, which cannot be alleviated by thermal AGN feedback. For cluster scaling relations we find that the simulations match well the M500 - Y500 scaling of Planck SZ clusters but deviate somewhat from the observed X-ray luminosity and temperature scaling relations in the sense of being slightly too bright and too cool at fixed mass, respectively. Stars are produced at an efficiency consistent with abundance matching constraints and central galaxies have star formation rates consistent with recent observations. While our simulations thus match various key properties remarkably well, we conclude that the shortcomings strongly suggest an important role for non-thermal processes (through feedback or otherwise) or thermal conduction in shaping the intra-cluster medium.

  13. Rhapsody-G simulations I: the cool cores, hot gas and stellar content of massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, Oliver; Martizzi, Davide; Wu, Hao -Yi; ...

    2017-01-25

    We present the rhapsody-g suite of cosmological hydrodynamic zoom simulations of 10 massive galaxy clusters at the Mvir ~1015 M⊙ scale. These simulations include cooling and subresolution models for star formation and stellar and supermassive black hole feedback. The sample is selected to capture the whole gamut of assembly histories that produce clusters of similar final mass. We present an overview of the successes and shortcomings of such simulations in reproducing both the stellar properties of galaxies as well as properties of the hot plasma in clusters. In our simulations, a long-lived cool-core/non-cool-core dichotomy arises naturally, and the emergence ofmore » non-cool cores is related to low angular momentum major mergers. Nevertheless, the cool-core clusters exhibit a low central entropy compared to observations, which cannot be alleviated by thermal active galactic nuclei feedback. For cluster scaling relations, we find that the simulations match well the M500–Y500 scaling of Planck Sunyaev–Zeldovich clusters but deviate somewhat from the observed X-ray luminosity and temperature scaling relations in the sense of being slightly too bright and too cool at fixed mass, respectively. Stars are produced at an efficiency consistent with abundance-matching constraints and central galaxies have star formation rates consistent with recent observations. In conclusion, while our simulations thus match various key properties remarkably well, we conclude that the shortcomings strongly suggest an important role for non-thermal processes (through feedback or otherwise) or thermal conduction in shaping the intracluster medium.« less

  14. THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS-SPHEROID STELLAR MASS RELATION FOR SERSIC AND CORE-SERSIC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Nicholas; Graham, Alister W; Schombert, James

    2013-05-01

    We have examined the relationship between supermassive black hole mass (M{sub BH}) and the stellar mass of the host spheroid (M{sub sph,*}) for a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. To derive the spheroid stellar masses we used improved Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s}-band photometry from the ARCHANGEL photometry pipeline. Dividing our sample into core-Sersic and Sersic galaxies, we find that they are described by very different M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relations. For core-Sersic galaxies-which are typically massive and luminous, with M{sub BH} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to} M{sub sph,*}{sup 0.97{+-}0.14}, consistent with other literature relations. However, for the Sersic galaxies-with typically lower masses, M{sub sph,*} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to}M{sub sph,*}{sup 2.22{+-}0.58}, a dramatically steeper slope that differs by more than 2 standard deviations. This relation confirms that, for Sersic galaxies, M{sub BH} is not a constant fraction of M{sub sph,*}. Sersic galaxies can grow via the accretion of gas which fuels both star formation and the central black hole, as well as through merging. Their black hole grows significantly more rapidly than their host spheroid, prior to growth by dry merging events that produce core-Sersic galaxies, where the black hole and spheroid grow in lockstep. We have additionally compared our Sersic M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relation with the corresponding relation for nuclear star clusters, confirming that the two classes of central massive object follow significantly different scaling relations.

  15. The Hydra I cluster core. I. Stellar populations in the cD galaxy NGC 3311

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, C. E.; Arnaboldi, M.; Coccato, L.; Hilker, M.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Richtler, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The history of the mass assembly of brightest cluster galaxies may be studied by mapping the stellar populations at large radial distances from the galaxy centre, where the dynamical times are long and preserve the chemodynamical signatures of the accretion events. Aims: We provide extended and robust measurements of the stellar population parameters in NGC 3311, the cD galaxy at the centre of the Hydra I cluster, and out to three effective radii. We wish to characterize the processes that drove the build-up of the stellar light at all these radii. Methods: We obtained the spectra from several regions in NGC 3311 covering an area of ~3 arcmin2 in the wavelength range 4800 ≲ λ(Å) ≲ 5800, using the FORS2 spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in the MXU mode. We measured the equivalent widths of seven absorption-features defined in the Lick/IDS system, which were modelled by single stellar populations, to provide luminosity-weighted ages, metallicities, and alpha element abundances. Results: The trends in the Lick indices and the distribution of the stellar population parameters indicate that the stars of NGC 3311 may be divided in two radial regimes, one within and the another beyond one effective radius, Re = 8.4 kpc, similar to the distinction between the inner galaxy and the external halo derived from the NGC 3311 velocity dispersion profile. The inner galaxy (R ≤ Re) is old (age ~14 Gyr), has negative metallicity gradients and positive alpha element gradients. The external halo is also very old, but has a negative age gradient. The metal and element abundances of the external halo both have a large scatter, indicating that stars from a variety of satellites with different masses have been accreted. The region in the extended halo associated with the off-centred envelope at 0°< PA < 90° has higher metallicity with respect to the symmetric external halo. Conclusions: The different stellar populations in the inner galaxy and extended halo

  16. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  17. The effect of neutrino transport on the collapse of iron stellar cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myra, E. S.; Bludman, S. A.; Hoffman, Y.; Lichtenstadt, I.; Sack, N.

    1987-01-01

    A multigroup flux-limited diffusion approximation to neutrino transport, correct to first order in material velocities, is described. The role of neutrino-electron scattering in determining core deleptonization is studied using a modified Fokker-Planck approximation in which adjacent neutrino energy groups are coupled. The moderate deleptonizaton obtained during infall restricts homologous core masses to less than 0.8 solar mass. With 0.6-0.8 solar mass of outer core to traverse, nuclear dissociation alone stalls the shock waves produced at core bounce. In addition, neutrino energy losses remove at least another 4 x 10 to the 51st ergs. In no case is matter ejected promptly as a direct result of the initial shock wave.

  18. Silicate core-organic refractory mantle particles as interstellar dust and as aggregated in comets and stellar disks.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J M; Li, A

    1997-01-01

    The principal observational properties of silicate core-organic refractory mantle interstellar dust grains in the infrared at 3.4 microns and at 10 microns and 20 microns are discussed in terms of the cyclic evolution of particles forming in stellar atmospheres and undergoing subsequent accretion, photoprocessing and destruction (erosion). Laboratory plus space emulation of the photoprocessing of laboratory analog ices and refractories are discussed. The aggregated interstellar dust model of comets is summarized. The same properties required to explain the temperature and infrared properties of comet coma dust are shown to be needed to account for the infrared silicate and continuum emission of the beta Pictoris disk as produced by a cloud of comets orbiting the star.

  19. Search for gravitational waves on short duration in TAMA300 data: stellar core collapse and black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, R.; Kanda, N.; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Tsunesada, Y.; TAMA Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    We present in the results of TAMA300 data analysis for short duration gravitational waves. The excess power filter, alternative linear filter (ALF) and TF(time-frequency) clustering methods have been employed for burst gravitational waves from stellar-core collapse, and matched filtering method used for the ringdown gravitational waves from black hole quasi-normal oscillations. The observational range of TAMA for the burst gravitational waves is roughly ~ 1 kpc, and the range for black hole ringdown covers most of our galaxy. We have been developed new method 'time-frequency (TF) clustering' to find the burst waves. This is a TF clustering method on spectrogram (sonogram). Using this method, we can efficiently identify some predicted gravitational wave forms[2] and can exclude typical unstable spike like noises.

  20. TIR optics for non-rotationally symmetric illumination design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domhardt, André; Weingaertner, Simon; Rohlfing, Udo; Lemmer, Uli

    2008-09-01

    High-Power-LEDs have reached a development stage that affords their reasonable application to general illumination. Nonimaging total internal reflection optics (TIR optics) that generate non-rotationally symmetric light distributions are proper components to preserve the advantages associated with this type of light source. Thus, high efficiency has to be reconciled, e.g., with the use of freeform surfaces. This contribution investigates the development of TIR optics for LED-based illumination applications. First, we consider rotationally symmetric TIR optics in order to illustrate their functional principle and demonstrate some special design criteria. Second, we apply them to non-rotationally cases using the tailoring technique. Finally, we illustrate various aspects of the design process with selected examples.

  1. On presupernova dynamical mass ejection by non-detonated stellar cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchler, J.-R.; Mazurek, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Stars in the range of 4 to 8 solar masses are known to develop degenerate carbon-oxygen cores of about 1.4 solar masses. Arguments are presented why, contrary to past assumption, carbon ignition may not lead to the formation of a detonation wave. Rather, an initially subsonic burning front results which subsequently may be brought under control by adiabatic expansion. This dynamic phase leads to a centrally incinerated and expanded core. The loosely bound red-giant envelope is ejected to form an extended nebula. Neutrino cooling of the core finally induces collapse. Provided that sufficient energy is liberated in the dynamic formation of a neutron star, a supernova event will result. The distended nebula is ideally suited for the production of the visible supernova light curves. Thus, carbon nondetonation may give a viable alternative evolution to supernovae that avoids the impasse encountered by the detonation-disrupted models.

  2. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Neutrinos from stellar core collapses: present status of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazhskaya, Ol'ga G.

    2006-10-01

    The responses of the existing underground detectors to neutrino bursts from collapsing stars evolving in accordance with various models are considered. The interpretation of the results of detecting neutrino radiation from the SN1987A supernova explosion is discussed. A combination of large scintillation counters interlayered with iron slabs (as a target for the electron neutrino interaction) is suggested as a detector for core collapse neutrinos. Bounds for the galactic rate of core collapses based on 28 years of observations by neutrino telescopes of RAS INR, LSD, and LVD detectors are presented.

  3. Non-rotational aspherical models of the human optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanzana, S.; Kasprzak, H. T.; Pałucki, B.; Ţălu, Ş.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define three-dimensional (3D) non-rotational aspherical parametric models for the human cornea and lens using computational geometry and CAD representations. The hyperbolic cosine based function is used for the cornea and a parametric model is used for lens modeling. Data analysis and visualization of 3D non-rotational models were made using the Rhinoceros CAD software and MATLAB software was used for numeric computation. We combined, implemented, and evaluated these models with a 3D ray-tracing in order to fully analyze the human eye model. It was found that 3D non-rotational aspherical models for the human eye could be more accurately modeled and rendered for analysis with finite element method. The objective of this study is to present and analyze mathematical models of the cornea and lens and to highlight the potential of optical applications of the eye models containing astigmatic surfaces, which are more close to the real eye than spherosymmetric eye models.

  4. Constraining structural models of stellar helium cores using the pulsations of Feige 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Mike; Jeffery, C. Simon; Telting, John; Quick, Breanna

    2014-02-01

    Asteroseismology is the art of using stellar pulsations to discern a star's detailed structure and evolutionary history. When many stars of similar structure and/or evolution can be studied, the results can be extremely powerful; examples of which include white dwarf and red giant seismology. However, the key to these successes are twofold: Observed pulsation frequencies must first be identified with spherical harmonics (modes) and mature models must exist for comparison. For subdwarf B (sdB) stars, Kepler observations have allowed progress with the former, but have indicated weaknesses in the latter. We propose using time- resolved spectroscopy combined with multicolor photometry to identify pulsation modes and constrain structure models. We propose to re-observe Feige 48 (KY UMa). We were allocated time during 2010A, but inclement weather prevented fully exploiting the pulsations. Yet those data provided surprising clues. Feige 48's an important sdB in a short-period binary, with constrained inclination and some constraints on three pulsation modes. Our proposed observations will constrain both the star and the binary system and provide calibration for models. This provides an arsenal of seismic tools for testing structure and evolution models of Feige 48 and other, previously observed, sdB stars.

  5. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  6. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  7. Pygmy and core polarization dipole modes in 206Pb: Connecting nuclear structure to stellar nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Tsoneva, N.; Bhatia, C.; Arnold, C. W.; Goriely, S.; Hammond, S. L.; Kelley, J. H.; Kwan, E.; Lenske, H.; Piekarewicz, J.; Raut, R.; Rusev, G.; Shizuma, T.; Tornow, W.

    2017-10-01

    A high-resolution study of the electromagnetic response of 206Pb below the neutron separation energy is performed using a (γ → ,γ‧) experiment at the HI γ → S facility. Nuclear resonance fluorescence with 100% linearly polarized photon beams is used to measure spins, parities, branching ratios, and decay widths of excited states in 206Pb from 4.9 to 8.1 MeV. The extracted ΣB (E 1) ↑ and ΣB (M 1) ↑ values for the total electric and magnetic dipole strength below the neutron separation energy are 0.9 ± 0.2 e2fm2 and 8.3 ± 2.0 μN2, respectively. These measurements are found to be in very good agreement with the predictions from an energy-density functional (EDF) plus quasiparticle phonon model (QPM). Such a detailed theoretical analysis allows to separate the pygmy dipole resonance from both the tail of the giant dipole resonance and multi-phonon excitations. Combined with earlier photonuclear experiments above the neutron separation energy, one extracts a value for the electric dipole polarizability of 206Pb of αD = 122 ± 10 mb /MeV. When compared to predictions from both the EDF+QPM and accurately calibrated relativistic EDFs, one deduces a range for the neutron-skin thickness of Rskin206 = 0.12- 0.19 fm and a corresponding range for the slope of the symmetry energy of L = 48- 60 MeV. This newly obtained information is also used to estimate the Maxwellian-averaged radiative cross section 205Pb (n , γ)206Pb at 30 keV to be σ = 130 ± 25 mb. The astrophysical impact of this measurement-on both the s-process in stellar nucleosynthesis and on the equation of state of neutron-rich matter-is discussed.

  8. Dependence of weak interaction rates on the nuclear composition during stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Nagakura, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influences of the nuclear composition on the weak interaction rates of heavy nuclei during the core collapse of massive stars. The nuclear abundances in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) are calculated by some equation of state (EOS) models including in-medium effects on nuclear masses. We systematically examine the sensitivities of electron capture and neutrino-nucleus scattering on heavy nuclei to the nuclear shell effects and the single-nucleus approximation. We find that the washout of the shell effect at high temperatures brings significant change to weak rates by smoothing the nuclear abundance distribution: the electron capture rate decreases by ˜20 % in the early phase and increases by ˜40 % in the late phase at most, while the cross section for neutrino-nucleus scattering is reduced by ˜15 % . This is because the open-shell nuclei become abundant instead of those with closed neutron shells as the shell effects disappear. We also find that the single-nucleus description based on the average values leads to underestimations of weak rates. Electron captures and neutrino coherent scattering on heavy nuclei are reduced by ˜80 % in the early phase and by ˜5 % in the late phase, respectively. These results indicate that NSE like EOS accounting for shell washout is indispensable for the reliable estimation of weak interaction rates in simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  9. Looking for high-mass young stellar objects: H2O and OH masers in ammonia cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codella, C.; Cesaroni, R.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Furuya, R.; Testi, L.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The earliest stages of high-mass star formation have yet to be characterised well, because high-angular resolution observations are required to infer the properties of the molecular gas hosting the newly formed stars. Aims: We search for high-mass molecular cores in a large sample of 15 high-mass star-forming regions that are observed at high-angular resolution, extending a pilot survey based on a smaller number of objects. Methods: The sample was chosen from surveys of H2O and OH masers to favour the earliest phases of high-mass star formation. Each source was first observed with the 32-m single-dish Medicina antenna in the (1, 1) and (2, 2) inversion transitions at 1.3 cm of ammonia, which is an excellent tracer of dense gas. High-resolution maps in the NH3(2, 2) and (3, 3) lines and the 1.3 cm continuum were obtained successively with the VLA interferometer. Results: We detect continuum emission in almost all the observed star-forming regions, which corresponds to extended and UCHii regions created by young stellar objects with typical luminosities of ˜10^4~L⊙. However, only in three cases do we find a projected overlap between Hii regions and H2O and OH maser spots. On the other hand, the VLA images detect eight ammonia cores closely associated with the maser sources. The ammonia cores have sizes of ˜10^4 AU, and high masses (up to 104M⊙), and are very dense (from ˜10^6 to a few ×10^9 cm-3). The typical relative NH3 abundance is ≤10-7, in agreement with previous measurements in high-mass star-forming regions. Conclusions: The statistical analysis of the distribution between H2O and OH masers, NH3 cores, and Hii regions confirms that the earliest stages of high-mass star formation are characterised by high-density molecular cores with temperatures of on average ≥30 K, either without a detectable ionised region or associated with a hypercompact Hii region.

  10. 3D representation of the non-rotating origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Viron, O.; Dehant, V.

    2005-09-01

    In the frame of the IAU working group of Nomenclature in Fundamental Astronomy (of which one of the objectives is to make educational efforts for addressing the implementation of the IAU 2000 Resolutions for a large community of scientists), we have developed a set of didactic animation in order to give a physical understanding to the concept of non-rotating origin (NRO). In this paper, we give a short explanation on the existing animations, in order to encourage their use. A complete zip file with all the material is available on : http://danof.obspm.fr/iauWGnfa/Educational.html.

  11. Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates due to weak interaction processes on sd-shell nuclei in stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayaz, Muhammad; Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Gamma ray heating and neutrino cooling rates, due to weak interaction processes, on sd-shell nuclei in stellar core are calculated using the proton neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The recent extensive experimental mass compilation of Wang et al. (Chin. Phys. C 36:1603, 2012), other improved model input parameters including nuclear quadrupole deformation (Raman et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 78(1):1-128, 2001; Möller et al. in At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 109:1-204, 2016) and physical constants are taken into account in the current calculation. The purpose of this work is two fold, one is to improve the earlier calculation of weak rates performed by Nabi and Klapdor-Kleingrothaus (At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 71:149, 1999a) using the same theory. We further compare our results with previous calculations. The selected sd-shell nuclei, considered in this work, are of special interest for the evolution of O-Ne-Mg core in 8-10 M_{⊙} stars due to competitive gamma ray heating rates and cooling by URCA processes. The outcome of these competitions is to determine, whether the stars end up as a white dwarf (Nabi in Phys. Rev. C 78(4):045801, 2008b), an electron-capture supernova (Jones et al. in Astrophys. J. 772(2):150, 2013) or Fe core-collapse supernova (Suzuki et al. in Astrophys. J. 817(2):163, 2016). The selected sd-shell nuclei for calculation of associated weak-interaction rates include ^{20,23}O, ^{20,23}F, ^{20,23,24}Ne, {}^{20,23-25}Na, and {}^{23-25}Mg. The cooling and heating rates are calculated for density range (10 ≤ ρ (g cm^{-3}) ≤ 10^{11}) and temperature range (0.01× 109≤ T(K)≤ 30× 109). The calculated gamma heating rates are orders of magnitude bigger than the shell model rates (except for ^{25}Mg at low densities). At high temperatures the gamma heating rates are in reasonable agreement. The calculated cooling rates are up to an order of magnitude bigger for odd-A nuclei.

  12. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  13. Research on flight stability of non rotating fin arrow shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yachao; He, Guanglin; Zhang, Jiashuo

    2017-09-01

    To research the influence of the variable density fin arrow shaft warhead on flight stability, three different structures of non rotating fin arrow shaft warhead of the individual small caliber cluster arrow projectile is put forward and designed. The aerodynamic characteristics, static stability reserve and the change of the attack angle in the fin arrow shaft warhead are calculated and analyzed through using the static stability reserve theory and the rigid body trajectory equations. The results show that the static stability reserve of the variable density steel-aluminum composite fin arrow shaft warhead is about 21% ~ 27%, which is obviously higher than 13% ~ 17% of the single density steel material. When the initial velocity is 280 m/s and range is 100 m, the attack angle of the fin arrow shaft warhead of variable density and single density are reduced from ± 5 degree to within ± 1 degree.It is indicated that dynamic stability is guaranteed; however, dynamic stability of the former is better than that of the latter according to the decay rate of the attack angle.

  14. Bulk viscosity of accretion disks around non rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeen Moghaddas, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Keplerian, relativistic accretion disks around the non rotating black holes with the bulk viscosity. Many of authors studied the relativistic accretion disks around the black holes, but they ignored the bulk viscosity. We introduce a simple method to calculate the bulk in these disks. We use the simple form for the radial component of the four velocity in the Schwarzschild metric, then the other components of the four velocity and the components of the shear and the bulk tensor are calculated. Also all components of the bulk viscosity, the shear viscosity and stress tensor are calculated. It is seen that some components of the bulk tensor are comparable with the shear tensor. We calculate some of the thermodynamic quantities of the relativistic disks. Comparison of thermodynamic quantities shows that in some states influences of the bulk viscosity are important, especially in the inner radiuses. All calculations are done analytically and we do not use the boundary conditions. Finally, we find that in the relativistic disks around the black holes, the bulk viscosity is non-negligible in all the states.

  15. Stellar Ro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Featherstone, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Our understanding of the interior dynamics that give rise to a stellar dynamo draws heavily from investigations of similar dynamics in the solar context. Unfortunately, an outstanding gap persists in solar dynamo theory. Convection, an indispensable component of the dynamo, occurs in the midst of rotation, and yet we know little about how the influence of that rotation manifests across the broad range of convective scales present in the Sun. We are nevertheless well aware that the interaction of rotation and convection profoundly impacts many aspects of the dynamo, including the meridional circulation, the differential rotation, and the helicity of turbulent EMF. The rotational constraint felt by solar convection ultimately hinges on the characteristic amplitude of deep convective flow speeds, and such flows are difficult to measure helioseismically. Those measurements of deep convective power which do exist disagree by orders of magnitude, and until this disagreement is resolved, we are left with the results of models and those less ambiguous measurements derived from surface observations of solar convection. I will present numerical results from a series of nonrotating and rotating convection simulations conducted in full 3-D spherical geometry. This presentation will focus on how convective spectra differ between the rotating and non-rotating models and how that behavior changes as simulations are pushed toward more turbulent and/or more rotationally-constrained regimes. I will discuss how the surface signature of rotationally-constrained interior convection might naturally lead to observable signatures in the surface convective pattern, such as supergranulation and a dearth of giant cells.

  16. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  17. The relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution. Stars with degenerate neutron cores. 1: Structure of equilibrium models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Zytkow, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    The general relativistic equations of stellar structure and evolution are reformulated in a notation which makes easy contact with Newtonian theory. Also, a general relativistic version of the mixing-length formalism for convection is presented. Finally, it is argued that in previous work on spherical systems general relativity theorists have identified the wrong quantity as "total mass-energy inside radius r."

  18. The regulation of star formation in cool-core clusters: imprints on the stellar populations of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubser, S. I.; Babul, A.; Hoekstra, H.; Mahdavi, A.; Donahue, M.; Bildfell, C.; Voit, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    A fraction of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) show bright emission in the ultraviolet and the blue part of the optical spectrum, which has been interpreted as evidence of recent star formation. Most of these results are based on the analysis of broad-band photometric data. Here, we study the optical spectra of a sample of 19 BCGs hosted by X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 stellar populations as well as composite populations, consisting of a young stellar component superimposed on an intermediate/old stellar component, to accurately constrain their star formation histories. We detect prominent young (˜200 Myr) stellar populations in four of the 19 galaxies. Of the four, the BCG in Abell 1835 shows remarkable A-type stellar features indicating a relatively large population of young stars, which is extremely unusual even amongst star-forming BCGs. We constrain the mass contribution of these young components to the total stellar mass to be typically between 1 and 3 per cent, but rising to 7 per cent in Abell 1835. We find that the four of the BCGs with strong evidence for recent star formation (and only these four galaxies) are found within a projected distance of 5 kpc of their host cluster's X-ray peak, and the diffuse, X-ray gas surrounding the BCGs exhibits a ratio of the radiative cooling-to-free-fall time (tc/tff) of ≤10. These are also some of the clusters with the lowest central entropy. Our results are consistent with the predictions of the precipitation-driven star formation and active galactic nucleus feedback model, in which the radiatively cooling diffuse gas is subject to local thermal instabilities once the instability parameter tc/tff falls below ˜10, leading to the condensation and precipitation of cold gas. The number of galaxies in our sample where the host cluster satisfies all the

  19. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  20. Stellar kinematics and structural properties of virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies from the SMAKCED project. I. Kinematically decoupled cores and implications for infallen groups in clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Ryś, A.; Janz, J.; Lisker, T.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Paudel, S.

    2014-03-10

    We present evidence for kinematically decoupled cores (KDCs) in two dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster, VCC 1183 and VCC 1453, studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. These KDCs have radii of 1.''8 (0.14 kpc) and 4.''2 (0.33 kpc), respectively. Each of these KDCs is distinct from the main body of its host galaxy in two ways: (1) inverted sense of rotation and (2) younger (and possibly more metal-rich) stellar population. The observed stellar population differences are probably associated with the KDC, although we cannot rule out the possibility of intrinsic radial gradients in the host galaxy. We describe a statistical analysis method to detect, quantify the significance of, and characterize KDCs in long-slit rotation curve data. We apply this method to the two dE galaxies presented in this paper and to five other dEs for which KDCs have been reported in the literature. Among these seven dEs, there are four significant KDC detections, two marginal KDC detections, and one dE with an unusual central kinematic anomaly that may be an asymmetric KDC. The frequency of occurrence of KDCs and their properties provide important constraints on the formation history of their host galaxies. We discuss different formation scenarios for these KDCs in cluster environments and find that dwarf-dwarf wet mergers or gas accretion can explain the properties of these KDCs. Both of these mechanisms require that the progenitor had a close companion with a low relative velocity. This suggests that KDCs were formed in galaxy pairs residing in a poor group environment or in isolation whose subsequent infall into the cluster quenched star formation.

  1. Implementation of multifilter based twin-prototypes for core electron temperature measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.; Molinero, A.; Chercoles, J.

    2010-10-15

    The design and preliminary results from a prototype of a multifilter based electron temperature diagnostic for the TJ-II stellarator are presented. The diagnostic consists of four photodiodes with filters of different thicknesses to determine the electron temperature in a wide variety of plasma compositions, thanks to the set of six different signal-pairs ratios available. The impurity transport code IONEQ, the TJ-II soft x-ray tomography, and the VUV survey diagnostics give the necessary information to assess the proposed diagnostic reliability. In parallel, a vacuum-compatible multichannel electronic board has been designed for a future linear array to determine electron temperature profiles in high-density plasmas.

  2. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on 24Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2008-09-01

    A few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass-accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming an O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g. 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br and 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8-10 Modot which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on 24Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using the shell model and the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time, a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on 24Mg on an extensive temperature-density scale is presented here. This type of scale is more appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculations are done using the pn-QRPA theory using a separable interaction. The deformation parameter, believed to be a key parameter in QRPA calculations, is adopted from experimental data to increase the reliability of the QRPA results further. The resulting calculated rates are up to a factor of 14 or more enhanced as compared to shell model rates and may lead to some interesting scenarios for core collapse simulators.

  3. OT2_lolmi_3: The physical and chemical state of high-mass pre- and proto-stellar cores identified by the Hi-GAL survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.

    2011-09-01

    We propose to investigate the physical, chemical and dynamical properties of a sample of newly found high-mass pre- and proto-stellar cores identified by the ``Herschel infrared GALactic Plane Survey'' (Hi-GAL; Molinari et al. 2010). We will perform observations of the o-NH3(1_0-0_0) line (and, simultaneously, also of the o-H2O(1_10-1_01) transition) that will allow us to identify both similarities and differences between the physical and chemical conditions before and after the formation of a warm/hot source inside the dusty core identified in the SPIRE/PACS maps. Hence, these observations will improve our knowledge of the earliest phases in the evolution of high-mass stars. We will also attempt the detection of the NH(1-0) line towards a smaller sample of sources, in order to improve our knowledge of the N-chemistry during early high-mass star formation.

  4. Vlasov formalism for extended relativistic mean field models: The crust-core transition and the stellar matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Providência, Constança

    2016-07-01

    The Vlasov formalism is extended to relativistic mean field hadron models with nonlinear terms up to fourth order and applied to the calculation of the crust-core transition density. The effect of the nonlinear ω ρ and σ ρ coupling terms on the crust-core transition density and pressure and on the macroscopic properties of some families of hadronic stars is investigated. For that purpose, six families of relativistic mean field models are considered. Within each family, the members differ in the symmetry energy behavior. For all the models, the dynamical spinodals are calculated, and the crust-core transition density and pressure and the neutron star mass-radius relations are obtained. The effect on the star radius of the inclusion of a pasta calculation in the inner crust is discussed. The set of six models that best satisfy terrestrial and observational constraints predicts a radius of 13.6 ±0.3 km and a crust thickness of 1.36 ±0.06 km for a 1.4 M⊙ star.

  5. A Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the (rho) Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the (rho) Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5m and at the Keck 10m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0'.5 and 0'.25 resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. Among the 22 multiple systems observed, 15 were resolved and their individual component fluxes determined. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend approx.4 x 10(exp 5) yr in the flat-spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large-amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. Although a general trend of mid-infrared excess and near-infrared veiling exists progressing through SED classes, with Class I objects generally exhibiting r(sub K) >= 1, flat-spectrum objects with r(sub K) >= 0.58, and Class III objects with r(sub K) =0, Class II objects exhibit the widest range of r(sub K) values, ranging from 0 <= r(sub K) <= 4.5. However, the highly variable value of veiling that a single source can exhibit in any of the SED classes in which active disk accretion can take place is striking and is direct observational evidence for highly time-variable accretion activity in disks. Finally, by comparing mid-infrared versus near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk-clearing mechanisms are explored. The results are consistent with disk clearing proceeding from the inside out.

  6. A Ground-Based Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony, M.; Ressler, M. E.; Marsh, K. A.

    2004-12-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the ρ Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5-m and at the Keck 10-m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0.5'' and 0.25'' resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend ˜ 3 × 105 yr in the Flat Spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. The highly variable value of K-band veiling that a single source can exhibit in any of the SED classes in which active disk accretion can take place is striking, and is direct observational evidence for highly time-variable accretion activity in disks. Finallly, by comparing mid-infrared vs. near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk clearing mechanisms are explored. Financial support for this project through NSF grants AST 00-96087 (CAREER), AST 97-53229 (POWRE), and AST 02-06146 is gratefully acknowledged. MB further thanks the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship program at JPL, that made this work possible.

  7. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  8. Modification of magicity toward the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of core-collapse dynamics and the subsequent supernova explosion is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron-rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse and the corresponding electron-capture rate. To this end, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability. We study the effect of this quenching on the average electron-capture rate. We show that the pre-eminence of the closed shells with N =50 and N =82 in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of 78Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron-capture rate of up to 30% can be expected, depending on the strength of magicity quenching. This finding has potentially important consequences on the entropy generation, the neutrino emissivity, and the mass of the core at bounce. Our work underlines the importance of new experimental measurements in this region of the nuclear chart, the most crucial information being the nuclear mass and the Gamow-Teller strength. Reliable microscopic calculations of the associated elementary rate, in a wide range of temperatures and electron densities, optimized on these new empirical information, will be additionally needed to get quantitative predictions of the collapse dynamics.

  9. The Dominance of Dynamic Barlike Instabilities in the Evolution of a Massive Stellar Core Collapse That ``Fizzles''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, James N.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2001-03-01

    Core collapse in a massive rotating star may halt at subnuclear density if the core contains angular momentum J>~1049 g cm2 s-1. An aborted collapse can lead to the formation of a rapidly rotating equilibrium object, which, because of its high electron fraction, Ye>0.4, and high entropy per baryon, Sb/k~1-2, is secularly and dynamically stable. The further evolution of such a ``fizzler'' is driven by deleptonization and cooling of the hot, dense material. These processes cause the fizzler both to contract toward neutron star densities and to spin up, driving it toward instability points of the barlike modes. Using linear stability analyses to study the latter case, we find that the stability properties of fizzlers are similar to those of Maclaurin spheroids and polytropes despite the nonpolytropic nature and extreme compressibility of the fizzler equation of state. For fizzlers with the specific angular momentum distribution of the Maclaurin spheroids, secular and dynamic barlike instabilities set in at T/|W|~0.14 and 0.27, respectively, where T is the rotational kinetic energy and W is the gravitational energy of the fizzler, the same limits as found for Maclaurin spheroids. For fizzlers in which angular momentum is more concentrated toward the equator, the secular stability limits drop dramatically. For the most extreme angular momentum distribution we consider, the secular stability limit for the barlike modes falls to T/|W|~0.038, compared with T/|W|~0.09-0.10 for the most extreme polytropic cases known previously (Imamura et al.). For fixed equation-of-state parameters, the secular and dynamic stability limits occur at roughly constant mass over the range of typical fizzler central densities. Deleptonization and cooling decrease the limiting masses on timescales shorter than the growth time for secular instability. Consequently, unless an evolving fizzler reaches neutron star densities first, it will always encounter dynamic barlike instabilities before

  10. An asteroseismic study of the β Cephei star θ Ophiuchi: constraints on global stellar parameters and core overshooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briquet, M.; Morel, T.; Thoul, A.; Scuflaire, R.; Miglio, A.; Montalbán, J.; Dupret, M.-A.; Aerts, C.

    2007-11-01

    We present a seismic study of the β Cephei star θ Ophiuchi. Our analysis is based on the observation of one radial mode, one rotationally split l = 1 triplet and three components of a rotationally split l = 2 quintuplet for which the m values were well identified by spectroscopy. We identify the radial mode as fundamental, the triplet as p1 and the quintuplet as g1. Our non-local thermodynamic equilibrium abundance analysis results in a metallicity and CNO abundances in full agreement with the most recent updated solar values. With X ∈ [0.71, 0.7211] and Z ∈ [0.009, 0.015], and using the Asplund et al. mixture but with a Ne abundance about 0.3 dex larger, the matching of the three independent modes enables us to deduce constrained ranges for the mass (M = 8.2 +/- 0.3Msolar) and central hydrogen abundance (Xc = 0.38 +/- 0.02) of θ Oph and to prove the occurrence of core overshooting (αov = 0.44 +/- 0.07). We also derive an equatorial rotation velocity of 29 +/- 7 km s-1. Moreover, we show that the observed non-equidistance of the l = 1 triplet can be reproduced by the second-order effects of rotation. Finally, we show that the observed rotational splitting of two modes cannot rule out a rigid rotation model.

  11. Planetary Nebulae and their parent stellar populations. Tracing the mass assembly of M87 and Intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse extended outer regions of galaxies are hard to study because they are faint, with typical surface brightness of 1% of the dark night sky. We can tackle this problem by using resolved star tracers which remain visible at large distances from the galaxy centers. This article describes the use of Planetary Nebulae as tracers and the calibration of their properties as indicators of the star formation history, mean age and metallicity of the parent stars in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies. We then report on the results from a deep, extended, planetary nebulae survey in a 0.5 deg2 region centered on the brightest cluster galaxy NGC 4486 (M87) in the Virgo cluster core, carried out with SuprimeCam@Subaru and FLAMES-GIRAFFE@VLT. Two planetary nebulae populations are identified out to 150 kpc distance from the center of M87. One population is associated with the M87 halo and the second one with the intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core. They have different line-of-sight velocity and spatial distributions, as well as different planetary nebulae specific frequencies and luminosity functions. The intracluster planetary nebulae in the surveyed region correspond to a luminosity of four times the luminosity of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The M87 halo planetary nebulae trace an older, more metal-rich, parent stellar population. A substructure detected in the projected phase-space of the line-of-sight velocity vs. major axis distance for the M87 halo planetary nebulae provides evidence for the recent accretion event of a satellite galaxy with luminosity twice that of M33. The satellite stars were tidally stripped about 1 Gyr ago, and reached apocenter at a major axis distance of 60-90 kpc from the center of M87. The M87 halo is still growing significantly at the distances where the substructure is detected.

  12. Singularity-free cosmological solutions with non-rotating perfect fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández–Jambrina, L.

    2005-02-01

    A conjecture stated by Raychaudhuri which claims that the only physical perfect fluid non-rotating non-singular cosmological models are comprised in the Ruiz Senovilla and Fernández Jambrina families is shown to be incorrect. An explicit counterexample is provided and the failure of the argument leading to the result is explicitly pointed out.

  13. Quantum tunneling from the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole with GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Jafar; Reza Shajiee, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper, the quantum corrections to the temperature, entropy and specific heat capacity of the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole are studied by the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism. It is shown that quantum corrected entropy would be of the form of predicted entropy in quantum gravity theories like string theory and loop quantum gravity.

  14. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  15. Possible pair-instability supernovae at solar metallicity from magnetic stellar progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Meynet, Georges; Ekström, Sylvia; Wade, Gregg A.; Petit, Véronique; Keszthelyi, Zsolt; Hirschi, Raphael

    2017-03-01

    Near-solar metallicity (and low-redshift) pair-instability supernova (PISN) candidates challenge stellar evolution models. Indeed, at such a metallicity, even an initially very massive star generally loses so much mass by stellar winds that it will avoid the electron-positron pair-creation instability. We use recent results showing that a magnetic field at the surface of a massive star can significantly reduce its effective mass-loss rate to compute magnetic models of very massive stars (VMSs) at solar metallicity and explore the possibility that such stars end as PISNe. We implement the quenching of the mass loss produced by a surface dipolar magnetic field into the Geneva stellar evolution code and compute new stellar models with an initial mass of 200 M⊙ at solar metallicity, with and without rotation. This considerably reduces the total amount of mass lost by the star during its life. For the non-rotating model, the total (CO-core) mass of the models is 72.8 M⊙ (70.1 M⊙) at the onset of the electron-positron pair-creation instability. For the rotating model, we obtain 65.6 M⊙ (62.4 M⊙). In both cases, a significant fraction of the internal mass lies in the region where pair instability occurs in the log (T)-log (ρ) plane. The interaction of the reduced mass loss with the magnetic field efficiently brakes the surface of the rotating model, producing a strong shear and hence a very efficient mixing that makes the star evolve nearly homogeneously. The core characteristics of our models indicate that solar metallicity models of magnetic VMSs may evolve to PISNe (and pulsation PISNe).

  16. NuGrid Stellar Data Set. I.Stellar Yields from H to Bi for Stars with Metallicities Z = 0.02 and Z = 0.01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Hirschi, R.; Bennett, M.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C.; Timmes, F. X.; Ritter, C.; Heger, A.; Jones, S.; Battino, U.; Dotter, A.; Trappitsch, R.; Diehl, S.; Frischknecht, U.; Hungerford, A.; Magkotsios, G.; Travaglio, C.; Young, P.

    2016-08-01

    We provide a set of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis calculations that applies established physics assumptions simultaneously to low- and intermediate-mass and massive star models. Our goal is to provide an internally consistent and comprehensive nuclear production and yield database for applications in areas such as presolar grain studies. Our non-rotating models assume convective boundary mixing (CBM) where it has been adopted before. We include 8 (12) initial masses for Z = 0.01 (0.02). Models are followed either until the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase or the end of Si burning, complemented by simple analytic core-collapse supernova (SN) models with two options for fallback and shock velocities. The explosions show which pre-SN yields will most strongly be effected by the explosive nucleosynthesis. We discuss how these two explosion parameters impact the light elements and the s and p process. For low- and intermediate-mass models, our stellar yields from H to Bi include the effect of CBM at the He-intershell boundaries and the stellar evolution feedback of the mixing process that produces the {}13{{C}} pocket. All post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations use the same nuclear reaction rate network and nuclear physics input. We provide a discussion of the nuclear production across the entire mass range organized by element group. The entirety of our stellar nucleosynthesis profile and time evolution output are available electronically, and tools to explore the data on the NuGrid VOspace hosted by the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre are introduced.

  17. Jet Engine Bird Ingestion Simulations: Comparison of Rotating to Non-Rotating Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; Hammer, Jeremiah; Carney, Kelly S.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bird strike events in commercial airliners are a fairly common occurrence. According to data collected by the US Department of Agriculture, over 80,000 bird strikes were reported in the period 1990-2007 in the US alone [1]. As a result, bird ingestion is an important factor in aero engine design and FAA certification. When it comes to bird impacts on engine fan blades, the FAA requires full-scale bird ingestion tests on an engine running at full speed to pass certification requirements. These rotating tests are complex and very expensive. To reduce development costs associated with new materials for fan blades, it is desirable to develop more cost effective testing procedures than full-scale rotating engine tests for material evaluation. An impact test on a non-rotating single blade that captures most of the salient physics of the rotating test would go a long way towards enabling large numbers of evaluative material screening tests. NASA Glenn Research Center has been working to identify a static blade test procedure that would be effective at reproducing similar results as seen in rotating tests. The current effort compares analytical simulations of a bird strike on various nonrotating blades to a bird strike simulation on a rotating blade as a baseline case. Several different concepts for simulating the rotating loads on a non-rotating blade were analyzed with little success in duplicating the deformation results seen in the rotating case. The rotating blade behaves as if it were stiffer than the non-rotating blade resulting in less plastic deformation from a given bird impact. The key factor limiting the success of the non-rotating blade simulations is thought to be the effect of gyroscopics. Prior to this effort, it was anticipated the difficulty would be in matching the pre-stress in the blade due to centrifugal forces Additional work is needed to verify this assertion, and to determine if a static test procedure can simulate the gyroscopic effects in a

  18. Jet Engine Bird Ingestion Simulations: Comparison of Rotating to Non-Rotating Fan Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; Hammer, Jeremiah T.; Carney, Kelly S.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bird strike events in commercial airliners are a fairly common occurrence. According to data collected by the US Department of Agriculture, over 80,000 bird strikes were reported in the period 1990 to 2007 in the US alone (Ref. 1). As a result, bird ingestion is an important factor in aero engine design and FAA certification. When it comes to bird impacts on engine fan blades, the FAA requires full-scale bird ingestion tests on an engine running at full speed to pass certification requirements. These rotating tests are complex and very expensive. To reduce development costs associated with new materials for fan blades, it is desirable to develop more cost effective testing procedures than full-scale rotating engine tests for material evaluation. An impact test on a nonrotating single blade that captures most of the salient physics of the rotating test would go a long way towards enabling large numbers of evaluative material screening tests. NASA Glenn Research Center has been working to identify a static blade test procedure that would be effective at reproducing similar results as seen in rotating tests. The current effort compares analytical simulations of a bird strike on various non-rotating blades to a bird strike simulation on a rotating blade as a baseline case. Several different concepts for simulating the rotating loads on a non-rotating blade were analyzed with little success in duplicating the deformation results seen in the rotating case. The rotating blade behaves as if it were stiffer than the non-rotating blade resulting in less plastic deformation from a given bird impact. The key factor limiting the success of the non-rotating blade simulations is thought to be the effect of gyroscopics. Prior to this effort, it was anticipated the difficulty would be in matching the prestress in the blade due to centrifugal forces Additional work is needed to verify this assertion, and to determine if a static test procedure can simulate the gyroscopic effects in

  19. Modeling of non-rotating neutron stars in minimal dilatonic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiziev, P.; Marinov, K.

    2017-01-01

    The model of minimal dilatonic gravity (MDG), called also the massive Branse-Dicke model with ω =0, is an alternative model of gravitation, which uses one Branse-Dicke gravitation-dilaton field Φ and offers a simultaneous explanation of the effects of dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM). Here we present an extensive research of non-rotating neutron star models in MDG with four different realistic equations of state (EOS), which are in agreement with the latest observational data. The equations describing static spherically symmetric stars in MDG are solved numerically. The effects corresponding to DE and DM are clearly seen and discussed.

  20. General theory of Relativity: does a rapidly rotating body fall slower than a non-rotating body?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, C.

    2003-11-01

    Does a rapidly rotating body fall slower than a non-rotating body? This difficult question requires the choice of suitable relativistic generalizations. The vertical free fall of a rotating dumb-bell in a Schwarzschild field and that of an horizontal rotating ring are both integrable. Their differences with the free fall of non-rotating bodies are extremely small. Notice that this effect differs from the precession of their spin.

  1. Simulation of the spherically symmetric stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a star of 13 solar masses with boltzmann neutrino transport, and its implications for the supernova mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mezzacappa, A; Liebendörfer, M; Messer, O E; Hix, W R; Thielemann, F K; Bruenn, S W

    2001-03-05

    With exact three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport, we simulate the stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a 13M star in spherical symmetry, the Newtonian limit, without invoking convection. In the absence of convection, prior spherically symmetric models, which implemented approximations to Boltzmann transport, failed to produce explosions. We consider exact transport to determine if these failures were due to the transport approximations made and to answer remaining fundamental questions in supernova theory. The model presented here is the first in a sequence of models beginning with different progenitors. In this model, a supernova explosion is not obtained.

  2. US of the shoulder: rotator cuff and non-rotator cuff disorders.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Ellinas, Panagiotis; Takis, Fotios; Tsanis, Antonios; Maris, Ioannis; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has been shown to be an effective imaging modality in the evaluation of both rotator cuff and non-rotator cuff disorders, usually serving in a complementary role to magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder. US technique for shoulder examination depends on patient positioning, scanning protocol for every tendon and anatomic part, and dynamic imaging. The primary US signs for rotator cuff supraspinatus tendon tears are tendon nonvisualization for complete tears, focal tendon defect for full-thickness tears, a hypoechoic defect of the articular side of the tendon for an articular-side partial-thickness tear, and flattening of the bursal surface of the tendon for a bursal-side partial-thickness tear. Secondary US signs such as cortical irregularity of the greater tuberosity and joint and subacromial-subdeltoid bursal fluid are helpful when correlated with the primary signs. Tendon degeneration, tendinosis, and intrasubstance tear are demonstrated as internal heterogeneity. Long-head biceps tendon abnormalities include instability, acute or chronic tear, and tendinosis. The acromioclavicular joint is assessed for dislocation, fluid collection, cysts, and bone erosions. Other non-rotator cuff disorders include synovial disorders such as adhesive capsulitis and synovial osteochondromatosis; degenerative disorders such as osteoarthritis, amyloid arthropathy, hemarthrosis, and chondrocalcinosis; infectious disorders such as septic arthritis and bursitis; and space-occupying lesions.

  3. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  4. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  5. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  6. Investigation of the validity of the non-rotating planet assumption for three-dimensional earth atmospheric entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasopoulos, Harry A.

    1988-06-01

    The assumption of a non-rotating planet, common in most analytical entry trajectory analyses, has been shown to produce significant errors in some solutions for the lifting atmospheric entry to the earth. This thesis investigates the validity of the non-rotating planet assumption for general three-dimensional Earth atmospheric entry. First, the three-dimensional equations of motion for lifting atmospheric entry are expanded to include a rotating planet model. A strictly exponential atmosphere, rotating at the same rate as the planet, is assumed with density as a function of radial distance from the planet's surface. Solutions are developed for the non-rotating Earth equations of motion and for one of the rotating Earth equations of motion using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. It is shown that the non-rotating Earth assumption produces incorrect entry trajectory results for entry orbital inclination angles between 0.5 and 75.0 deg and vehicle speeds ranging from circular orbital velocities to low supersonic speeds. However, a variety of realistic trajectory states exist where some of the non-rotating Earth equations of motion are found to be valid for the same entry trajectory states.

  7. Apparatus and method for forming a workpiece surface into a non-rotationally symmetric shape

    DOEpatents

    Dow, Thomas A.; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Moorefield, II, George M.; Taylor, Lauren W.

    1995-11-21

    A turning machine includes a controller for generating both aspherical and non-symmetrical shape components defining the predetermined shape, and a controller for controlling a spindle and a positionable cutting blade to thereby form a predetermined non-rotationally symmetric shape in a workpiece surface. The apparatus includes a rotatable spindle for rotatably mounting the workpiece about an axis, a spindle encoder for sensing an angular position of the rotating workpiece, the cutting blade, and radial and transverse positioners for relatively positioning the cutting blade and workpiece along respective radial and transverse directions. The controller cooperates with a fast transverse positioner for positioning the cutting blade in predetermined varying transverse positions during a revolution of the workpiece.

  8. EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN ASPHERICAL SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION OF A NON-ROTATING 15 M{sub sun} STAR WITH SOLAR METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-09-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a non-rotating 15 M{sub sun} star with solar metallicity that explodes by a neutrino-heating supernova (SN) mechanism aided by both standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection. To trigger explosions in our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we approximate the neutrino transport with a simple light-bulb scheme and systematically change the neutrino fluxes emitted from the protoneutron star. By a post-processing calculation, we evaluate abundances and masses of the SN ejecta for nuclei with a mass number {<=}70, employing a large nuclear reaction network. Aspherical abundance distributions, which are observed in nearby core-collapse SN remnants, are obtained for the non-rotating spherically symmetric progenitor, due to the growth of a low-mode SASI. The abundance pattern of the SN ejecta is similar to that of the solar system for models whose masses range between (0.4-0.5) M{sub sun} of the ejecta from the inner region ({<=}10, 000 km) of the precollapse core. For the models, the explosion energies and the {sup 56}Ni masses are {approx_equal} 10{sup 51}erg and (0.05-0.06) M{sub sun}, respectively; their estimated baryonic masses of the neutron star are comparable to the ones observed in neutron-star binaries. These findings may have little uncertainty because most of the ejecta is composed of matter that is heated via the shock wave and has relatively definite abundances. The abundance ratios for Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe observed in the Cygnus loop are reproduced well with the SN ejecta from an inner region of the 15 M{sub sun} progenitor.

  9. Absolute evaporation rates of non-rotating neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montillaud, J.; Joblin, C.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as candidates for evaporating very small grains, which are thought to be precursors of free-flying PAHs. Evaporation rates have been calculated so far only for species containing up to a few 100-C atoms, whereas interstellar PAH clusters could contain up to ~1000 C atoms. Aims: We present a method that generalises the calculation of the statistical evaporation rate of large PAH clusters and provides rates for species containing up to ~1000 C-atoms. Methods: The evaporation of non-rotating neutral homo-molecular PAH clusters containing up to 12 molecules from a family of highly symmetric compact PAHs is studied. Statistical calculations were performed and completed with molecular dynamics simulations at high internal energies to provide absolute values for the evaporation rate and distributions of kinetic energy released. The calculations used explicit atom-atom Lennard-Jones potentials in the rigid molecule approximation. A new method is proposed to take both inter- and intra-molecular vibrations into account. Results: Without any parameter adjustment, the calculated evaporation rates agree well with available experimental data. We find that the non-rotation assumption has a limited impact on the evaporation rates. The photostability of PAH clusters increases dramatically with the size of molecules in the clusters, and to a lesser extent with the number of molecules in the clusters. For values of the UV radiation field that are typical of the regions where evaporating very small grains are observed, the smallest clusters in this study (~50 C-atoms) are found to be quickly photo-evaporated, whereas the largest clusters (~1000 C-atoms) are photostable. Conclusions: Our results support the idea that large PAH clusters are good candidates for evaporating very small grains.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NuGrid stellar data set I. Yields from H to Bi (Pignatari+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Hirschi, R.; Bennett, M.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C.; Timmes, F. X.; Ritter, C.; Heger, A.; Jones, S.; Battino, U.; Dotter, A.; Trappitsch, R.; Diehl, S.; Frischknecht, U.; Hungerford, A.; Magkotsios, G.; Travaglio, C.; Young, P.

    2016-10-01

    We provide a set of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis calculations that applies established physics assumptions simultaneously to low- and intermediate-mass and massive star models. Our goal is to provide an internally consistent and comprehensive nuclear production and yield database for applications in areas such as presolar grain studies. Our non-rotating models assume convective boundary mixing (CBM) where it has been adopted before. We include 8 (12) initial masses for Z=0.01 (0.02). Models are followed either until the end of the asymptotic giant branch phase or the end of Si burning, complemented by simple analytic core-collapse supernova (SN) models with two options for fallback and shock velocities. The explosions show which pre-SN yields will most strongly be effected by the explosive nucleosynthesis. We discuss how these two explosion parameters impact the light elements and the s and p process. For low- and intermediate-mass models, our stellar yields from H to Bi include the effect of CBM at the He-intershell boundaries and the stellar evolution feedback of the mixing process that produces the 13C pocket. All post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations use the same nuclear reaction rate network and nuclear physics input. We provide a discussion of the nuclear production across the entire mass range organized by element group. The entirety of our stellar nucleosynthesis profile and time evolution output are available electronically, and tools to explore the data on the NuGrid VOspace hosted by the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre are introduced. (12 data files).

  11. Stellar shrapnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-15

    Several thousand years ago, a star some 160 000 light-years away from us exploded, scattering stellar shrapnel across the sky. The aftermath of this energetic detonation is shown here in this striking image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3. The exploding star was a white dwarf located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest neighbouring galaxies. Around 97% of stars within the Milky Way that are between a tenth and eight times the mass of the Sun are expected to end up as white dwarfs. These stars can face a number of different fates, one of which is to explode as supernovae, some of the brightest events ever observed in the Universe. If a white dwarf is part of a binary star system, it can siphon material from a close companion. After gobbling up more than it can handle — and swelling to approximately one and a half times the size of the Sun — the star becomes unstable and ignites as a Type Ia supernova. This was the case for the supernova remnant pictured here, which is known as DEM L71. It formed when a white dwarf reached the end of its life and ripped itself apart, ejecting a superheated cloud of debris in the process. Slamming into the surrounding interstellar gas, this stellar shrapnel gradually diffused into the separate fiery filaments of material seen scattered across this skyscape.

  12. Stellar cannibalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astronomers have obtained evidence that stars can literally swallow other stars, leading to the ejection of stellar material into space and the formation of extremely close pairs of stars, according to the National Science Foundation (NSF). The discovery supports theoretical predictions of the evolution of double stars.While studying the central stars of planetary nebulae—disk-shaped gas clouds that vaguely resemble planets—Albert D. Grauer of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Howard E. Bond of Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge found that several of these central stars are actually very close stellar pairs. Previously, it had been thought that the central star in a planetary nebula was a single star that expelled a gas cloud as it neared the end of its life. Their latest discovery, the central star of planetary nebula Abell 41, consists of a pair of stars that orbit each other in 2 hours and 43 minutes. The researchers also have found three other central star pairs that have orbital periods of between 11 and 16 hours.

  13. STELLARATOR INJECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1962-09-01

    A method and means are described for injecting energetic neutral atoms or molecular ions into dense magnetically collimated plasma columns of stellarators and the like in such a manner that the atoms or ions are able to significantly penetrate the column before being ionized by collision with the plasma constituent particles. Penetration of the plasma column by the neutral atoms or molecular ions is facilitated by superposition of two closely spaced magnetic mirrors on the plasma confinement field. The mirrors are moved apart to magnetically sweep plasma from a region between the mirrors and establish a relatively low plasma density therein. By virture of the low density, neutral atoms or molecular ions injected into the region significantly penetrate the plasma column before being ionized. Thereafter, the mirrors are diminished to permit the injected material to admix with the plasma in the remainder of the column. (AEC)

  14. Stellar evolution in blue populous clusters of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the problems of envelope semiconvection and convective core overshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1992-01-01

    New theoretical evolutionary sequences of models for stars with low metallicities, appropriate to the Small Magellanic Cloud, are derived with both standard Cox-Stewart opacities and the new Rogers-Iglesias opacities. Only those sequences with little or no convective core overshooting are found to be capable of reproducing the two most critical observations: the maximum effective temperature displayed by the hot evolved stars and the difference between the average bolometric magnitudes of the hot and cool evolved stars. An upper limit to the ratio of the mean overshoot distance beyond the classical Schwarzschild core boundary to the local pressure scale height is set at 0.2. It is inferred from the frequency of cool supergiants in NGC 330 that the Ledoux criterion, rather than the Schwarzschild criterion, for convection and semiconvection in the envelopes of massive stars is strongly favored. Residuals from the fitting for NGC 330 suggest the possibility of fast interior rotation in the stars of this cluster. NGC 330 and NGC 458 have ages of about 3 x 10 exp 7 and about 1 x 10 exp 8 yr, respectively.

  15. Stellar evolution in blue populous clusters of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the problems of envelope semiconvection and convective core overshooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1992-01-01

    New theoretical evolutionary sequences of models for stars with low metallicities, appropriate to the Small Magellanic Cloud, are derived with both standard Cox-Stewart opacities and the new Rogers-Iglesias opacities. Only those sequences with little or no convective core overshooting are found to be capable of reproducing the two most critical observations: the maximum effective temperature displayed by the hot evolved stars and the difference between the average bolometric magnitudes of the hot and cool evolved stars. An upper limit to the ratio of the mean overshoot distance beyond the classical Schwarzschild core boundary to the local pressure scale height is set at 0.2. It is inferred from the frequency of cool supergiants in NGC 330 that the Ledoux criterion, rather than the Schwarzschild criterion, for convection and semiconvection in the envelopes of massive stars is strongly favored. Residuals from the fitting for NGC 330 suggest the possibility of fast interior rotation in the stars of this cluster. NGC 330 and NGC 458 have ages of about 3 x 10 exp 7 and about 1 x 10 exp 8 yr, respectively.

  16. Stellar Vampires Unmasked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-10-01

    result in anomalous abundances. ESO PR Photo 37/06 ESO PR Photo 37/06 Abundances in Blue Straggler Stars In the core of a globular cluster, stars are packed extremely close to each other: more than 4000 stars are found in the innermost light-year-sized cube of 47 Tucanae. Thus, stellar collisions are thought to be very frequent and the collision channel for the formation of blue stragglers should be extremely efficient. The chemical signature detected by these observations demonstrates that also the binary mass-transfer scenario is fully active even in a high-density cluster like 47 Tuc. "Our discovery is therefore a fundamental step toward the solution of the long-standing mystery of blue straggler formation in globular clusters," said Ferraro. Measurements of so many faint stars are only possible since the advent of 8-m class telescopes equipped with multiplexing capability spectrographs. In this case, the astronomers used the FLAMES/Giraffe instrument that allows the simultaneous observation of up to 130 targets at a time, making it ideally suited for surveying individual stars in closely populated fields.

  17. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  18. Far-infrared/submillimetre properties of pre-stellar cores L1521E, L1521F and L1689B as revealed by the Herschel SPIRE instrument - I. Central positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiwa, G.; Naylor, D. A.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Eyres, S.; Abergel, A.; Köhler, M.

    2016-05-01

    Dust grains play a key role in the physics of star-forming regions, even though they constitute only ˜1 per cent of the mass of the interstellar medium. The derivation of accurate dust parameters such as temperature (Td), emissivity spectral index (β) and column density requires broad-band continuum observations at far-infrared wavelengths. We present Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Array (SPIRE) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) measurements of three starless cores: L1521E, L1521F and L1689B, covering wavelengths between 194 and 671 μm. This paper is the first to use our recently updated SPIRE-FTS intensity calibration, yielding a direct match with SPIRE photometer measurements of extended sources. In addition, we carefully assess the validity of calibration schemes depending on-source extent and on the strength of background emission. The broad-band far-infrared spectra for all three sources peak near 250 μm. Our observations therefore provide much tighter constraints on the spectral energy distribution (SED) shape than measurements that do not probe the SED peak. The spectra are fitted using modified blackbody functions, allowing both Td and β to vary as free parameters. This yields Td of 9.8±0.2, 15.6±0.5 and 10.9±0.2 K and corresponding β of 2.6∓0.9, 0.8∓0.1 and 2.4∓0.8 for L1521E, L1521F and L1689B, respectively. The derived core masses are 1.0±0.1, 0.10±0.01 and 0.49±0.05 M⊙, respectively. The core mass/Jeans mass ratios for L1521E and L1689B exceed unity indicating that they are unstable to gravitational collapse, and thus pre-stellar cores. By comparison, the elevated temperature and gravitational stability of L1521F support previous arguments that this source is more evolved and likely a protostar.

  19. NEW TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS BY THE NEUTRINO-HEATING MECHANISM: EVIDENCE FOR DIFFERENT INSTABILITY REGIMES IN COLLAPSING STELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Heger, Alexander E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-12-10

    The neutrino-driven explosion mechanism for core-collapse supernovae in its modern flavor relies on the additional support of hydrodynamical instabilities in achieving shock revival. Two possible candidates, convection and the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI), have been proposed for this role. In this paper, we discuss new successful simulations of supernova explosions that shed light on the relative importance of these two instabilities. While convection has so far been observed to grow first in self-consistent hydrodynamical models with multi-group neutrino transport, we here present the first such simulation in which the SASI grows faster while the development of convection is initially inhibited. We illustrate the features of this SASI-dominated regime using an explosion model of a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, which is contrasted with a convectively dominated model of an 8.1 M{sub Sun} progenitor with subsolar metallicity, whose early post-bounce behavior is more in line with previous 11.2 M{sub Sun} and 15 M{sub Sun} explosion models. We analyze the conditions discriminating between the two different regimes, showing that a high mass-accretion rate and a short advection timescale are conducive for strong SASI activity. We also briefly discuss some important factors for capturing the SASI-driven regime, such as general relativity, the progenitor structure, a nuclear equation of state leading to a compact proto-neutron star, and the neutrino treatment. Finally, we evaluate possible implications of our findings for two-dimensional and three-dimensional supernova simulations.

  20. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  1. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  2. Advanced stellarator power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The stellarator is a class of helical/toroidal magnetic fusion devices. Recent international progress in stellarator power plant conceptual design is reviewed and comparisons in the areas of physics, engineering, and economics are made with recent tokamak design studies.

  3. Initiating solar system formation through stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Myhill, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and other meteoritical components require nucleosynthesis in stellar interiors, condensation into dust grains in stellar envelopes, transport of the grains through the interstellar medium by stellar outflows, and finally injection of the grains into the presolar nebula. The proximity of the presolar cloud to these energetic stellar events suggests that a shock wave from a stellar outflow might have initiated the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud. We have begun to study the interactions of stellar shock waves with thermally supported, dense molecular cloud cores, using a three spatial dimension (3D) radiative hydrodynamics code. Supernova shock waves have been shown by others to destroy quiescent clouds, so we are trying to determine if the much smaller shock speeds found in, e.g., asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star winds, are strong enough to initiate collapse in an otherwise stable, rotating, solar-mass cloud core, without leading to destruction of the cloud.

  4. Stellarator status, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F. ); Grieger, G.; Rau, F. ); Iiyoshi, A. ); Navarro, A.P. ); Kovrizhnykh, L.M. . Inst. Obshchey Fiziki); Pavlichenko, O.S. (AN Ukrain

    1990-07-01

    The present status of stellarator experiments and recent progress in stellarator research (both experimental and theoretical) are reported by groups in the United States, the USSR, Japan, Australia, and the European Community (the Federal Republic of Germany and Spain). Experiments under construction and studies of large, next-generation stellarators are also described. 73 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. STELLAR ENCOUNTER RATE IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bahramian, Arash; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Gladstone, Jeanette C.

    2013-04-01

    The high stellar densities in the cores of globular clusters cause significant stellar interactions. These stellar interactions can produce close binary mass-transferring systems involving compact objects and their progeny, such as X-ray binaries and radio millisecond pulsars. Comparing the numbers of these systems and interaction rates in different clusters drives our understanding of how cluster parameters affect the production of close binaries. In this paper we estimate stellar encounter rates ({Gamma}) for 124 Galactic globular clusters based on observational data as opposed to the methods previously employed, which assumed 'King-model' profiles for all clusters. By deprojecting cluster surface brightness profiles to estimate luminosity density profiles, we treat 'King-model' and 'core-collapsed' clusters in the same way. In addition, we use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the effects of uncertainties in various observational parameters (distance, reddening, surface brightness) on {Gamma}, producing the first catalog of globular cluster stellar encounter rates with estimated errors. Comparing our results with published observations of likely products of stellar interactions (numbers of X-ray binaries, numbers of radio millisecond pulsars, and {gamma}-ray luminosity) we find both clear correlations and some differences with published results.

  6. The Solar-Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunker, Hannah

    2015-08-01

    The influence of rotation on stellar magnetism, and the importance of the shear layer between a radiative core and the convective envelope for the generation of magnetic fields are key to understanding solar-like dynamos. Despite having an abundance of observational constraints, the answer to the solar dynamo problem remains tantalisingly out of reach. With the advent of space-based instrumentation for asteroseismology including Kepler, CoRoT, and in the future PLATO, we can exploit the sheer number of observations, and complementary techniques to constrain the rotation of Sun-like stars.

  7. Granular ripples under rotating flow: a new experimental technique for studying ripples in non-rotating, geophysical applications?

    PubMed

    Thomas, P J; Zoueshtiagh, F

    2005-07-15

    A review of our research investigating a new pattern formation process in granular material underlying a rotating fluid is given. The purpose of this summary is to introduce the phenomenon to the geophysical research community and to draw attention to the potential practical benefits of our new experimental method. To this end, the applied and scientific advantages of the technique over traditional studies employing, for instance, water channels, are discussed for the first time. It is shown here that the system rotation in our new technique does not appear to affect the scaling law expressing the dependence of the ripple-pattern wavelength on the governing independent experimental parameters. This suggests that it may become possible to extrapolate appropriate results from rotating to non-rotating systems and, hence, to geophysical environments. Consequently, our new technique may find applications in the context of geophysical research on the formation of sedimentary granular ripple structures.

  8. Exact vibrational energies of non-rotating H 2O and D 2O using an accurate ab initio potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Zúñiga, Jose

    1988-09-01

    Variationally exact vibrational energies are reported for non-rotating H 2O and D 2O using the recent CCSDT-1 ab initio potential of Bartlett, Cole, Purvis, Ermler, Hsieh and Shavitt as fit to an SPF quartic force field by Ermler. Twenty vibrational states are calculated for H 2O and D 2O and compared with experimental data. The agreement with experiment is fairly good; however, when the second-order bending force constant is reduced slightly, the agreement with experiment improves significantly. For eighteen states of H 2O the largest error is 15 cm -1 and the average absolute error is 6 cm -1. For eight states of D 2O the largest error is 7 cm -1 and the average absolute error is 4 cm -1.

  9. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  10. A Novel Approach to Constraining Uncertain Stellar Evolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Girardi, Leo; Dalcanton, Julianne; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bressan, Alessandro; Fouesneau, Morgan

    2017-01-01

    Stellar evolution models are fundamental to nearly all studies in astrophysics. They are used to interpret spectral energy distributions of distant galaxies, to derive the star formation histories of nearby galaxies, and to understand fundamental parameters of exoplanets. Despite the success in using stellar evolution models, some important aspects of stellar evolution remain poorly constrained and their uncertainties rarely addressed. We present results using archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of 10 stellar clusters in the Magellanic Clouds to simultaneously constrain the values and uncertainties of the strength of core convective overshooting, metallicity, interstellar extinction, cluster distance, binary fraction, and age.

  11. Classical Cepheids and real-time stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding; Miller, Cassandra

    2017-06-01

    Classical Cepheids are one of the most powerful standard candles available as well as important laboratories for probing stellar evolution. We combine previous measurements of Cepheid rates of period change with recent GAIA parallax measurement to test stellar evolution models against measurements of real-time stellar evolution. We compute new stellar evolution models with different assumptions of convective core overshooting and initial rotation to compare with observed period changes. From this comparison we find that many models are consistent with Cepheid properties but there are some outliers. We discuss some potential explanations for the outliers.

  12. Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary stellar tracks and relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory Alexander

    Strong evidence exists showing that stellar evolution models are unable to accurately predict the fundamental properties of low-mass stars. Observations of low-mass stars in detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) indicate that stellar models under-predict real stellar radii by 5 -- 10% and predict eUective temperatures that are 3 -- 5% too hot. This dissertation provides a careful examination of this problem using the Dartmouth stellar evolution code. Accurate models of the three stars in KOI-126 are presented. These models represent the first successful stellar evolution models of fully convective stars. I then introduce a novel method for estimating the ages of young, low-mass DEBs. The method takes advantage of apsidal motion to enable the use of stellar interior structure to predict ages instead of stellar surface properties, which are prone to significant uncertainty. Next, a reanalysis of the magnitude of the mass-radius discrepancies is performed with models that account for realistic metallicity and age variation. Results suggest that discrepancies are about a factor of two smaller than previously believed, although the problem is not entirely resolved. Lastly, I describe the development of a new one-dimensional stellar evolution code that includes eUects of a globally pervasive magnetic field. This is done within the framework of the existing Dartmouth code. I find that model radius and eUective temperature discrepancies can be reconciled with a magnetic field in stars with a radiative core. The predictions from these models can be observationally tested. Fully convective stars appear insensitive to the influence of magnetic fields, in contradiction with previous studies. I suggest that deficiencies in fully convective stars may instead be related to metallicity.

  13. Stellar yields of rotating first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-05-02

    First stars, also called population III stars, are born in the earliest universe without any heavy elements. These stars are the first nuclear reactor in the universe and affect their circumstances emitting synthesized materials. Not only the stellar evolution, but also their chemical yields have many distinctive characteristics. We have modeled evolution of population III stars including effect of stellar rotation. Internal mixing induced by rotation naturally results in primary nitrogen production. Evolution of rotating massive stars is followed until the core collapse phase. The new Pop III yield model will consistently explain the observed abundances of metal-poor systems.

  14. Stability in straight stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-07-01

    The stability of the straight stellarator against localized interchange modes is investigated employing the Mercier-Greene-Johnson criterion. Critical values of ..beta.. are obtained both numerically and analytically. The conclusion is that for classical helical stellarators the average limiting ..beta..'s are quite low of order three to four percent.

  15. Unaltered instrumental learning and attenuated body-weight gain in rats during non-rotating simulated shiftwork.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, C H C; Kalsbeek, A; Hanegraaf, M A J; Foppen, E; Joosten, R N J M A; Post, G; Dematteis, M; Feenstra, M G P; van Someren, E J W

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to shiftwork has been associated with multiple health disorders and cognitive impairments in humans. We tested if we could replicate metabolic and cognitive consequences of shiftwork, as reported in humans, in a rat model comparable to 5 wks of non-rotating night shifts. The following hypotheses were addressed: (i) shiftwork enhances body-weight gain, which would indicate metabolic effects; and (ii) shiftwork negatively affects learning of a simple goal-directed behavior, i.e., the association of lever pressing with food reward (instrumental learning), which would indicate cognitive effects. We used a novel method of forced locomotion to model work during the animals' normal resting period. We first show that Wistar rats, indeed, are active throughout a shiftwork protocol. In contrast with previous findings, the shiftwork protocol attenuated the normal weight gain to 76 ± 8 g in 5 wks as compared to 123 ± 15 g in the control group. The discrepancy with previous work may be explained by the concurrent observation that with our shiftwork protocol rats did not adjust their between-work circadian activity pattern. They maintained a normal level of activity during the "off-work" periods. In the control experiment, rats were kept active during the dark period, normally dominated by activity. This demonstrated that forced activity, per se, did not affect body-weight gain (mean ± SEM: 85 ± 11 g over 5 wks as compared to 84 ± 11 g in the control group). Rats were trained on an instrumental learning paradigm during the fifth week of the protocol. All groups showed equivalent increases in lever pressing from the first (3.8 ± .7) to the sixth (21.3 ± 2.4) session, and needed a similar amount of sessions (5.1 ± .3) to reach a learning criterion (≥ 27 out of 30 lever presses). These results suggest that while on prolonged non-rotating shiftwork, not fully reversing the circadian rhythm might actually be beneficial to prevent body-weight gain and cognitive

  16. Enhancing Friction Stir Weldability of 6061-T6 Al and AZ31B Mg Alloys Assisted by External Non-rotational Shoulder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shude; Huang, Ruofei; Meng, Xiangchen; Zhang, Liguo; Huang, Yongxian

    2017-05-01

    In order to increase cooling rate and then reduce the amounts of intermetallic compounds, external non-rotational shoulder tool system derived from traditional tool in friction stir welding was used to join dissimilar Al and Mg alloys. In this study, based on the external non-rotational shoulder, the weldability of Al and Mg alloys was significantly improved. The non-rotational shoulder tool is propitious to make more materials into weld, increase cooling rate and then reduce material adhesion of rotational pin, obtaining sound joint with smaller flashes and smooth surface. Importantly, the thickness of intermetallic compounds layer is reduced compared with traditional tool. Meanwhile, hardness values of dissimilar joint present uneven distribution, resulting from complex intercalated structures in nugget zone (NZ) featured by intermetallic compound layers and fine recrystallized Mg and Al grains. Compared with traditional tool, non-rotational shoulder is beneficial to higher tensile properties of joint. Due to the intermetallic compound layer formed in the interface of Al-Mg, the welding joint easily fractures at the NZ, presenting the typical brittle fracture mode.

  17. Comparison of CFD simulations to non-rotating MEXICO blades experiment in the LTT wind tunnel of TUDelft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; van Zuijlen, Alexander; van Bussel, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, three dimensional flow over non-rotating MEXICO blades is simulated by CFD methods. The numerical results are compared with the latest MEXICO wind turbine blades measurements obtained in the low speed low turbulence (LTT) wind tunnel of Delft University of Technology. This study aims to validate CFD codes by using these experimental data measured in well controlled conditions. In order to avoid use of wind tunnel corrections, both the blades and the wind tunnel test section are modelled in the simulations. The ability of Menter's k - ω shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model is investigated at both attached flow and massively separated flow cases. Steady state Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are solved in these computations. The pressure distribution at three measured sections are compared under the conditions of different inflow velocities and a range of angles of attack. The comparison shows that at attached flow condition, good agreement can be obtained for all three airfoil sections. Even with massively separated flow, still fairly good pressure distribution comparison can be found for the DU and NACA airfoil sections, although the RISØ section shows poor comparison. At the near stall case, considerable deviations exists on the forward half part of the upper surface for all three sections.

  18. How does stellar irradiation make hot Jupiters puffy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-Jie; Gu, Pin-Gao

    2017-06-01

    Hot Jupiters appear to be re-inflated as their host stars evolve and become more luminous, shedding more light on the intriguing correlation between stellar irradiation and the size of hot Jupiters. To account for the phenomenon, one of the well-known models is the thermal-tide scenario proposed by Arras and Socrates. We present a linear analysis of semi-diurnal thermal tides in a hot Jupiter. The Coriolis effect is added to our equation, which generates more wave modes than non-rotating models, such as Rossby, Yanai, and inertial waves. We attempt to investigate where and which mode contributes most of the torque that maintains the planet in an asynchronous state against gravitational tides, leading to re-inflation of a hot Jupiter.

  19. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  20. Spectroscopy of Stellar Coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    I review the important spectroscopic results that have come from observations of stellar coronae, mainly by EUVE and ASCA, but also from HST. The plasma parameters that can be determined from such spectra include the electron density and temperature distributions, and relative element abundances. With high resolution spectra dynamical information can be obtained. Such parameters can then be used to put constraints on models of the heating and structure of stellar coronae. Throughout, I try to emphasise the similarities and differences between stellar coronal spectroscopy and that of the solar corona.

  1. Frontiers of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses theoretical and observational views of star formation, spectroscopic constraints on the evolution of massive stars, very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, asteroseismology, globular clusters as tests of stellar evolution, observational tests of stellar evolution, and mass loss from cool evolved giant stars. Also discussed are white dwarfs and hot subdwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, supernovae from single stars, close binaries with evolved components, accretion disks in interacting binaries, supernovae in binary systems, stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution, and interacting binaries containing compact components.

  2. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  3. Evolving sparse stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual, Gustavo; Gladis Magris, C.; Hernández-Pérez, Fabiola

    2017-03-01

    We examine the role that stochastic fluctuations in the IMF and in the number of interacting binaries have on the spectro-photometric properties of sparse stellar populations as a function of age and metallicity.

  4. Stellar atmospheric structural patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics of stellar atmospheres is discussed. Particular attention is given to the relation between theoretical modeling and empirical evidence. The characteristics of distinctive atmospheric regions and their radical structures are discussed.

  5. Introduction to Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.

    1999-06-01

    Preface; 1. Historical overview; 2. Observations of stellar winds; 3. Basic concepts: isothermal winds; 4. Basic concepts: non-isothermal winds; 5. Coronal winds; 6. Sound wave driven winds; 7. Dust driven winds; 8. Line driven winds; 9. Magnetic rotator theory; 10. Alfvén wave driven winds; 11. Outflowing disks from rotating stars; 12. Winds colliding with the interstellar medium; 13. The effects of mass loss on stellar evolution; 14. Problems; Appendices; Bibliography; Object index; Index.

  6. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  7. Oscillations in stellar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, A.; Ringuelet, A. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric excitation and propagation of oscillations are analyzed for typical pulsating stars. The linear, plane-parallel approach for the pulsating atmosphere gives a local description of the phenomenon. From the local analysis of oscillations, the minimum frequencies are obtained for radially propagating waves. The comparison of the minimum frequencies obtained for a variety of stellar types is in good agreement with the observed periods of the oscillations. The role of the atmosphere in the globar stellar pulsations is thus emphasized.

  8. PREFACE: A Stellar Journey A Stellar Journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, M.

    2008-10-01

    The conference A Stellar Journey was held in Uppsala, Sweden, 23 27June 2008, in honour of Professor Bengt Gustafsson's 65th birthday. The choice of Uppsala as the location for this event was obvious given Bengt's long-standing association with the city stemming back to his school days. With the exception of a two-year postdoc stint in Copenhagen, five years as professor at Stockholm University and two years as director of the Sigtuna foundation, Bengt has forged his illustrious professional career at Uppsala University. The symposium venue was Museum Gustavianum, once the main building of the oldest university in Scandinavia. The title of the symposium is a paraphrasing of Bengt's popular astronomy book Kosmisk Resa (in English: Cosmic Journey) written in the early eighties. I think this aptly symbolizes his career that has been an astronomical voyage from near to far, from the distant past to the present. The original book title was modified slightly to reflect that most of his work to date has dealt with stars in one way or another. In addition it also gives credit to Bengt's important role as a guiding light for a very large number of students, colleagues and collaborators, indeed for several generations of astronomers. For me personally, the book Kosmisk Resa bears particular significance as it has shaped my life rather profoundly. Although I had already decided to become an astronomer, when I first read the book as a 14-year-old I made up my mind then and there that I would study under Bengt Gustafsson and work on stars. Indeed I have remained true to this somewhat audacious resolution. I suspect that a great number of us have similar stories how Bengt has had a major influence on our lives, whether on the professional or personal level. Perhaps Bengt's most outstanding characteristic is his enthralling enthusiasm. This is equally true whether he is pondering some scientific conundrum, supervising students or performing in front of an audience, be it an

  9. Las Campanas Stellar Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan; Beletsky, Yuri; Worthey, Guy

    2015-08-01

    Stellar libraries are fundamental tools required to understand stellar populations in star clusters and galaxies as well as properties of individual stars. Comprehensive libraries exist in the optical domain, but the near-infrared (NIR) domain stays a couple of decades behind. Here we present the Las Campanas Stellar Library project aiming at obtaining high signal-to-noise intermediate-resolution (R=8000) NIR spectra (0.83<λ<2.5μm) for a sample of 1200 stars in the Southern sky using the Folded-port InfraRed Echelette spectrograph at the 6.5-m Magellan Baade telescope. We developed a dedicated observing strategy and customized the telescope control software in order to achieve the highest possible level of data homogeniety. As of 2015, we observed about 600 stars of all spectral types and luminosity classes making our library the largest homogeneous collection of stellar spectra covering the entire NIR domain. We also re-calibrated in flux and wavelength the two existing optical stellar libraries, INDO-US and UVES-POP and followed up about 400 non-variable stars in the NIR in order to get complete optical-NIR coverage. Worth mentioning that our current sample includes about 80 AGB stars and a few dozens of bulge/LMC/SMC stars.

  10. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2011-01-15

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source, robust, efficient, thread-safe libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESAstar, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESAstar solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. State-of-the-art modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, element diffusion data, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own explicitly defined public interface to facilitate independent development. Several detailed examples indicate the extensive verification and testing that is continuously performed and demonstrate the wide range of capabilities that MESA possesses. These examples include evolutionary tracks of very low mass stars, brown dwarfs, and gas giant planets to very old ages; the complete evolutionary track of a 1 M {sub sun} star from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to a cooling white dwarf; the solar sound speed profile; the evolution of intermediate-mass stars through the He-core burning phase and thermal pulses on the He-shell burning asymptotic giant branch phase; the interior structure of slowly pulsating B Stars and Beta Cepheids; the complete evolutionary tracks of massive stars from the PMS to the onset of core collapse; mass transfer from stars undergoing Roche lobe overflow; and the evolution of helium accretion onto a neutron star. MESA can be downloaded from the project Web site (http://mesa.sourceforge.net/).

  11. On the universal stellar law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander

    In this work, we consider a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to derive and develop the universal stellar law for extrasolar systems. Previously, the statistical theory for a cosmogonic body forming (so-called spheroidal body)has been proposed [1-3]. This theory starts from the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula; it permits us to derive the form of distribution functions, mass density, gravitational potentials and strengths both for immovable and rotating spheroidal bodies as well as to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum[1-3]. If we start from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a protostar (in particular, proto-Sun) inside a prestellar (presolar) nebula then the derived distribution functions of particle (as well as the mass density of an immovable spheroidal body) characterizes the first stage of evolution: from a prestellar molecular cloud (the presolar nebula) to the forming core of protostar (the proto-Sun) together with its shell as a stellar nebula (the solar nebula). This work derives the equation of state of an ideal stellar substance based on conception of gravitating spheroidal body. Using this equation, we obtain the universal stellar law (USL) for the planetary systems connecting temperature, size and mass of each of stars. This work also considers the Solar corona in the connection with USL. Then it is accounting under calculation of the ratio of temperature of the Solar corona to effective temperature of the Sun’ surfaceand modification of USL. To test justice of the modified USLfor different types of stars, the temperature of stellar corona is estimated. The prediction of parameters of stars is carrying out by means of the modified USL,as well as the Hertzsprung-Russell’s dependence [5-7]is derivedby means of USL directly. This paper also shows that knowledge of some characteristics for multi-planet extrasolar systems refines own parameters of

  12. Origins of Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2016-08-01

    This contribution reviews ideas about the origins of stellar halos. It includes discussion of the theoretical understanding of and observational evidence for stellar populations formed ``in situ'' (meaning formed in orbits close to their current ones), ``kicked-out'' (meaning formed in the inner galaxy in orbits unlike their current ones) and ``accreted'' (meaning formed in a dark matter halo other than the one they currently occupy). At this point there is general agreement that a significant fraction of any stellar halo population is likely ``accreted''. There is modest evidence for the presence of a ``kicked-out'' population around both the Milky Way and M31. Our theoretical understanding of and the observational evidence for an ``in situ'' population are less clear.

  13. The Galactic stellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Bensby, T.

    2008-12-01

    The study of the Milky Way stellar discs in the context of galaxy formation is discussed. In particular, we explore the properties of the Milky Way disc using a new sample of about 550 dwarf stars for which we have recently obtained elemental abundances and ages based on high-resolution spectroscopy. For all the stars we also have full kinematic information as well as information about their stellar orbits. We confirm results from previous studies that the thin and the thick discs have distinct abundance patterns. But we also explore a larger range of orbital parameters than what has been possible in our previous studies. Several new results are presented. We find that stars that reach high above the Galactic plane and have eccentric orbits show remarkably tight abundance trends. This implies that these stars formed out of well-mixed gas that had been homogenized over large volumes. We find some evidence that suggest that the event that most likely caused the heating of this stellar population happened a few billion years ago. Through a simple, kinematic exploration of stars with super-solar [Fe/H], we show that the solar neighbourhood contains metal-rich, high velocity stars that are very likely associated with the thick disc. Additionally, the HR1614 moving group and the Hercules and Arcturus stellar streams are discussed and it is concluded that, probably, a large fraction of the groups and streams so far identified in the disc are the result of evolution and interactions within the stellar disc rather than being dissolved stellar clusters or engulfed dwarf galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Also based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain, and at the European Southern Observatories on La Silla and Paranal, Chile, Proposals no. 65.L-0019(B), 67.B-0108(B), 69.B-0277.

  14. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  15. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  16. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G H; Brown, T G; Gates, D A; Lu, K P; Zarnstorff, M C; Boozer, A H; Harris, J H; Meneghini, O; Mynick, H E; Pomphrey, N; Reiman, A H; Xanthopoulos, P

    2011-01-05

    The quasi-axisymmetric stellarator (QAS) concept offers a promising path to a more compact stellarator reactor, closer in linear dimensions to tokamak reactors than previous stellarator designs. Concept improvements are needed, however, to make it more maintainable and more compatible with high plant availability. Using the ARIES-CS design as a starting point, compact stellarator designs with improved maintenance characteristics have been developed. While the ARIES-CS features a through-the-port maintenance scheme, we have investigated configuration changes to enable a sector-maintenance approach, as envisioned for example in ARIES AT. Three approaches are reported. The first is to make tradeoffs within the QAS design space, giving greater emphasis to maintainability criteria. The second approach is to improve the optimization tools to more accurately and efficiently target the physics properties of importance. The third is to employ a hybrid coil topology, so that the plasma shaping functions of the main coils are shared more optimally, either with passive conductors made of high-temperature superconductor or with local compensation coils, allowing the main coils to become simpler. Optimization tools are being improved to test these approaches.

  17. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  18. Stellar Ontogeny: From Dust...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of star formation. Infrared and radio astronomy, particularly microwave astronomy is used to provide information on different stages of stellar formation. The role of dust and gas which swirl through the interstellar regions of a galaxy and the collapse of a cloud in star formation are also presented. (HM)

  19. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  20. Introduction to Stellar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    This book is the final one in a series of three texts which together provide a modern, complete and authoritative account of our present knowledge of the stars. It discusses the internal structure and the evolution of stars, and is completely self-contained. There is an emphasis on the basic physics governing stellar structure and the basic ideas on which our understanding of stellar structure is based. The book also provides a comprehensive discussion of stellar evolution. Careful comparison is made between theory and observation, and the author has thus provided a lucid and balanced introductory text for the student. As for volumes 1 and 2, volume 3 is self-contained and can be used as an independent textbook. The author has not only taught but has also published many original papers in this subject. Her clear and readable style should make this text a first choice for undergraduate and beginning graduate students taking courses in astronomy and particularly in stellar astrophysics.

  1. Stellar Coronal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio; Micela, Giuseppina

    2003-10-01

    Coronal astronomy is by now a fairly mature discipline, with a quarter century having gone by since the detection of the first stellar X-ray coronal source (Capella), and having benefitted from a series of major orbiting observing facilities. Serveral observational characteristics of coronal X-ray and EUV emission have been solidly established through extensive observations, and are by now common, almost text-book, knowledge. At the same time the implications of coronal astronomy for broader astrophysical questions (e.g.Galactic structure, stellar formation, stellar structure, etc.) have become appreciated. The interpretation of stellar coronal properties is however still often open to debate, and will need qualitatively new observational data to book further progress. In the present review we try to recapitulate our view on the status of the field at the beginning of a new era, in which the high sensitivity and the high spectral resolution provided by Chandra and SMM-Newton will address new questions which were not accessible before.

  2. Opacity of stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F J

    1998-09-17

    New efforts to calculate opacity have produced significant improvements in the quality of stellar models. The most dramatic effect has been large opacity enhancements for stars subject to large amplitude pulsations. Significant improvement in helioseismic modeling has also been obtained. A description and comparisons of the new opacity efforts are give

  3. Trends of stellar entropy along stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Guilherme Bronzato, Marcio; Alvares de Souza, Rodrigo; Horvath, Jorge Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to discussing the difference in the thermodynamic entropy budget per baryon in each type of stellar object found in the Universe. We track and discuss the actual decrease of the stored baryonic thermodynamic entropy from the most primitive molecular cloud up to the final fate of matter in black holes, passing through evolved states of matter as found in white dwarfs and neutron stars. We then discuss the case of actual stars with different masses throughout their evolution, clarifying the role of the virial equilibrium condition for the decrease in entropy and related issues. Finally, we discuss the role of gravity in driving the composition and the structural changes of stars with different Main Sequence masses during their evolution up to the final product. Particularly, we discuss the entropy of a black hole in this context arguing that the dramatic increase in its entropy, differently from the other cases, is due to the gravitational field itself.

  4. Radiation Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Protostellar Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, K.

    2013-04-01

    We perform 3D nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse from molecular cloud cores to protostellar cores with and without Ohmic dissipation of magnetic fields. We describe formation of circumstellar disks and multi-component outflows with our new code involving improved treatment of radiation transfer and thermodynamics. In the ideal RMHD models, the evolution of the protostellar core is very similar to that in the spherically symmetric non-rotating model because magnetic fields transport angular momentum very efficiently. However, if the resistivity is present, angular momentum transport is considerably suppressed due to loss of magnetic flux, and a rotationally-supported circumstellar disk is rapidly built up in the vicinity of the protostellar core. Magnetic fields are amplified by rotation and a fast well-collimated bipolar outflow is launched from the protostellar core via magnetic pressure gradient force.

  5. Neoclassical Viscosities and Anomalous Flows in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Spong, D. A.; Breyfogle, M.; Marine, T.

    2009-05-01

    We present initial work to use neoclassical viscosities calculated with the PENTA code [1] in a transport model that includes Reynolds stress generation of flows [2]. The PENTA code uses a drift kinetic equation solver to calculate neoclassical viscosities and flows in general three-dimensional geometries over a range of collisionalities. The predicted neoclassical viscosities predicted by PENTA can be flux-surfaced average and applied in a 1-D transport model that includes anomalous flow generation. This combination of codes can be used to test the impact of stellarator geometry on anomalous flow generation. As a test case, we apply the code to modeling flows in the HSX stellarator. Due to variations in the neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  6. Stellar activity: Astrophysics relevant to global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1994-01-01

    FRESIP will obtain a great deal of data on stellar activity and flares on F, G and K dwarfs. Rotation periods, flare distributions and possibly stellar cycles will emerge. This apparently curiosity-driven research actually has implications for our understanding of global climate change. Significant climate change during the seventeenth-century Maunder Minimum is thought to be related to a change in the solar condition. Recently acquired data from the Greenland Ice-core Project suggest that far greater climate changes on decade time scales may have occurred during the previous interglacial. It is possible that a yet more drastic change in state of the Sun was responsible. We have no relevant solar data, but can begin to explore this possibility by observing an ensemble of solar-like stars.

  7. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations.

  8. Absolute stellar photometry on moderate-resolution FPA images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive database of star (and Moon) images has been collected by the ground-based RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) as part of the US Geological Survey program for lunar calibration. The stellar data are used to derive nightly atmospheric corrections for the observations from extinction measurements, and absolute calibration of the ROLO sensors is based on observations of Vega and published reference flux and spectrum data. The ROLO telescopes were designed for imaging the Moon at moderate resolution, thus imposing some limitations for the stellar photometry. Attaining accurate stellar photometry with the ROLO image data has required development of specialized processing techniques. A key consideration is consistency in discriminating the star core signal from the off-axis point spread function. The analysis and processing methods applied to the ROLO stellar image database are described. ?? 2009 BIPM and IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. DOLPHOT: Stellar photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    DOLPHOT is a stellar photometry package that was adapted from HSTphot for general use. It supports two modes; the first is a generic PSF-fitting package, which uses analytic PSF models and can be used for any camera. The second mode uses ACS PSFs and calibrations, and is effectively an ACS adaptation of HSTphot. A number of utility programs are also included with the DOLPHOT distribution, including basic image reduction routines.

  10. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.; Johnson, B.; Swaminathan, N.

    1989-01-01

    Software and hardware assembled to support specific engineering activities. Stellar Inertial Navigation Workstation (SINW) is integrated computer workstation providing systems and engineering support functions for Space Shuttle guidance and navigation-system logistics, repair, and procurement activities. Consists of personal-computer hardware, packaged software, and custom software integrated together into user-friendly, menu-driven system. Designed to operate on IBM PC XT. Applied in business and industry to develop similar workstations.

  11. Explosions from stellar collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.

    The collapse of a massive star releases a considerable amount of gravitational potential energy. This energy is believed to be the power source of some of the largest explosions in the universe: supernovae, hypernovae, gamma-ray bursts. In this proceedings, we review the mechanisms by which the potential energy from stellar collapse can be tapped to produce these strong explosions, emphasizing how our understanding of massive stars can help constrain these mechanisms.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar models with rotation. 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrom, S.; Georgy, C.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Mowlavi, N.; Wyttenbach, A.; Granada, A.; Decressin, T.; Hirschi, R.; Frischknecht, U.; Charbonnel, C.; Maeder, A.

    2011-11-01

    Many topical astrophysical research areas, such as the properties of planet host stars, the nature of the progenitors of different types of supernovae and gamma ray bursts, and the evolution of galaxies, require complete and homogeneous sets of stellar models at different metallicities in order to be studied during the whole of cosmic history. We present here a first set of models for solar metallicity, where the effects of rotation are accounted for in a homogeneous way. We computed a grid of 48 different stellar evolutionary tracks, both rotating and non-rotating, at Z=0.014, spanning a wide mass range from 0.8 to 120M⊙. For each of the stellar masses considered, electronic tables provide data for 400 stages along the evolutionary track and at each stage, a set of 43 physical data are given. These grids thus provide an extensive and detailed data basis for comparisons with the observations. The rotating models start on the ZAMS with a rotation rate vini/vcrit=0.4. The evolution is computed until the end of the central carbon-burning phase, the early AGB phase, or the core helium-flash for, respectively, the massive, intermediate, and both low and very low mass stars. The initial abundances are those deduced by Asplund et collaborators, which best fit the observed abundances of massive stars in the solar neighbourhood. We update both the opacities and nuclear reaction rates, and introduce new prescriptions for the mass-loss rates as stars approach the Eddington and/or the critical velocity. We account for both atomic diffusion and magnetic braking in our low-mass star models. The present rotating models provide a good description of the average evolution of non-interacting stars. In particular, they reproduce the observed MS width, the positions of the red giant and supergiant stars in the HR diagram, the observed surface compositions and rotational velocities. Very interestingly, the enhancement of the mass loss during the RSG stage, when the luminosity becomes

  13. Neoclassical transport in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.D.M.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    The stellarator neoclassical transport due to particles trapped in local helical wells is calculated in the low-collisionality regime using a systematic expansion. The behavior of electron transport is found to be the same over a wide range of energies, but the behavior of ion transport for low energy ions is found to be different than that for high energy ions. Furthermore, the electron fluxes do not vary with the change in the radial ambipolar electric field nearly as much as do the ion fluxes. Thus, the particle diffusion is controlled by the electrons. A nonradial ambipolar electric field is induced by ion drift. This electric field enhances the transport by about 15 to 20%. A convenient graphical method that allows one to determine the magnitude of the radial ambipolar field for machines with different parameters is presented. Numerical examples show that electron energy confinement time is comparable to the ion energy confinement time for all the different size stellarators studied. Although the neoclassical losses are large, it is shown that ignition can be achieved in a reasonably sized stellarator reactor. Finally, from the standpoint of reactor economics, the confinement scaling law shows that in order to increase n tau, it is better to increase the aspect ratio than the overall dimensions of the reactor.

  14. Convective Overshoot in Stellar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2015-07-01

    clusters Hyades, Praesepe, NGC6633, NGC752, NGC3680, and M67, using the model and parameter same to the solar case to deal with the convective envelope overshoot mixing, the lithium abundances on the surface of the stellar models were consistent with the observations. In the case of the binary HY Vir, the same model and parameter also make the radii and effective temperatures of HY Vir stars with convective cores be consistent with the observations. Based on the implications of the above results, we found that the simple overshoot mixing model may need to be improved significantly. Motivated by those implications, we established a new model of the overshoot mixing based on the fluid dynamic equations, and worked out the diffusion coefficient of convective mixing. The diffusion coefficient shows different behaviors in convection zone and overshoot region. In the overshoot region, the buoyancy does negative works on flows, thus the fluid flows around the equilibrium location, which leads to a small scale and low efficiency of overshoot mixing. The physical properties are significantly different from the classical NMLT, and consistent with the helioseismic studies and numerical simulations. The new model was tested in stellar evolution, and its parameter was calibrated.

  15. Stellar dynamics around a massive black hole - I. Secular collisionless theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, S.; Touma, Jihad R.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory in three parts, of the secular dynamics of a (Keplerian) stellar system of mass M orbiting a black hole of mass M• ≫ M. Here we describe the collisionless dynamics; Papers II and III are on the (collisional) theory of resonant relaxation. The mass ratio, ε = M/M• ≪ 1, is a natural small parameter implying a separation of time-scales between the short Kepler orbital periods and the longer orbital precessional periods. The collisionless Boltzmann equation (CBE) for the stellar distribution function (DF) is averaged over the fast Kepler orbital phase using the method of multiple scales. The orbit-averaged system is described by a secular DF, F, in a reduced phase space. F obeys a secular CBE that includes stellar self-gravity, general relativistic corrections up to 1.5 post-Newtonian order, and external sources varying over secular times. Secular dynamics, even with general time dependence, conserves the semimajor axis of every star. This additional integral of motion promotes extra regularity of the stellar orbits, and enables the construction of equilibria, F0, through a secular Jeans theorem. A linearized secular CBE determines the response and stability of F0. Spherical, non-rotating equilibria may support long-lived, warp-like distortions. We also prove that an axisymmetric, zero-thickness, flat disc is secularly stable to all in-plane perturbations, when its DF, F0, is a monotonic function of the angular momentum at fixed energy.

  16. The impact of stellar evolution on planetary system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The connection between stellar evolution and planet formation is investigated. Particular attention is given to the problem posed by the fact that the formation of Jupiter occurred before the formation of Mars and that the formation of the solid core of Saturn was completed before the dissipation of the gas in the nebula. Several possible solutions to this problem are suggested.

  17. Qualitative analysis by interviews and video recordings to establish the components of a skilled low-cavity non-rotational vacuum delivery.

    PubMed

    Bahl, R; Murphy, D J; Strachan, B

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to define the components of a skilled low-cavity non-rotational vacuum delivery (occiput anterior, vertex at station +2 or below and less than 45-degree rotation from midline) and to facilitate the transfer of skills from expert to trainee obstetricians. Qualitative study using interviews and video recordings. Two university teaching hospitals (St Michael's Hospital, Bristol, and Ninewell's Hospital, Dundee). Ten obstetricians and eight midwives identified as experts in conducting or supporting operative vaginal deliveries. Semi-structured interviews were carried out using routine clinical scenarios. The experts were also video recorded conducting low-cavity vacuum deliveries in a simulation setting. The interviews and video recordings were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic coding. The anonymised data were independently coded by three researchers and compared for consistency of interpretation. The experts reviewed the coded interviews and video data for respondent validation and clarification. The themes that emerged following the final coding were used to formulate a list of skills. Key technical skills of a low-cavity non-rotational delivery. The final list included detailed technical skills required for conducting a low-cavity vacuum delivery. The combination of semi-structured interviews and simulation videos allowed the formulation of a comprehensive skills tool for future evaluation. This explicitly defined skills list could aid trainees understanding of the technique of low-cavity vacuum delivery. This is an important first step in evaluating clinical competence in intrapartum procedures.

  18. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Frequencies in AN Accretion Disk and Comparison with the Numerical Results from Non-Rotating Black Hole Computed by the Grh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    The shocked wave created on the accretion disk after different physical phenomena (accretion flows with pressure gradients, star-disk interaction etc.) may be responsible observed Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries. We present the set of characteristics frequencies associated with accretion disk around the rotating and non-rotating black holes for one particle case. These persistent frequencies are results of the rotating pattern in an accretion disk. We compare the frequency's from two different numerical results for fluid flow around the non-rotating black hole with one particle case. The numerical results are taken from Refs. 1 and 2 using fully general relativistic hydrodynamical code with non-selfgravitating disk. While the first numerical result has a relativistic tori around the black hole, the second one includes one-armed spiral shock wave produced from star-disk interaction. Some physical modes presented in the QPOs can be excited in numerical simulation of relativistic tori and spiral waves on the accretion disk. The results of these different dynamical structures on the accretion disk responsible for QPOs are discussed in detail.

  19. Using modern stellar observables to constrain stellar parameters and the physics of the stellar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Saders, Jennifer L.

    2014-05-01

    The current state and future evolution of a star is, in principle, specified by a only a few physical quantities: the mass, age, hydrogen, helium, and metal abundance. These same fundamental quantities are crucial for reconstructing the history of stellar systems ranging in scale from planetary systems to galaxies. However, the fundamental parameters are rarely directly observable, and we are forced to use proxies that are not always sensitive or unique functions of the stellar parameters we wish to determine. Imprecise or inaccurate determinations of the fundamental parameters often limit our ability to draw inferences about a given system. As new technologies, instruments, and observing techniques become available, the list of viable stellar observables increases, and we can explore new links between the observables and fundamental quantities in an effort to better characterize stellar systems. In the era of missions such as Kepler, time-domain observables such as the stellar rotation period and stellar oscillations are now available for an unprecedented number of stars, and future missions promise to further expand the sample. Furthermore, despite the successes of stellar evolution models, the processes and detailed structure of the deep stellar interior remains uncertain. Even in the case of well-measured, well understood stellar observables, the link to the underlying parameters contains uncertainties due to our imperfect understanding of stellar interiors. Model uncertainties arise from sources such as the treatment of turbulent convection, transport of angular momentum and mixing, and assumptions about the physical conditions of stellar matter. By carefully examining the sensitivity of stellar observables to physical processes operating within the star and model assumptions, we can design observational tests for the theory of stellar interiors. I propose a series of tools based on new or revisited stellar observables that can be used both to constrain

  20. The solar-stellar connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.

    2016-07-01

    A review of some principal results achieved in the area of stellar astrophysics with its origins in solar physics - the Solar-Stellar Connection - is presented from the perspective of an observational astronomer. The historical origins of the Solar-Stellar Connection are discussed followed by a review of key results from observations of stellar cycles analogous to the solar cycle in terms of parameters relevant to dynamo theory. A review of facets of angular momentum evolution and irradiance variations, each of which is determined by emergent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields, is given. Recent considerations of the impacts of stellar magnetic activity on the ambient radiative and energetic particle environment of the habitable zone of exoplanet systems are summarized. Some anticipated directions of the Solar-Stellar Connection in the new era of astronomy as defined by the advent of transformative facilities are presented.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Geneva stellar evolution tracks and isochrones (Lejeune+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, T.; Schaerer, D.

    2001-02-01

    This database was created from an updated version of the empirically and semi-empirically calibrated BaSeL library of synthetic stellar spectra of Lejeune et al. (1997, Cat. , 1998, Cat. ) and Westera et al. (1999, ASP Conference Series 192, 203-206) to calculate synthetic photometry in the (UBV)J(RI)C JHKLL'M, HST-WFPC2, Geneva, and Washington systems for the entire set of non-rotating Geneva stellar evolution models covering masses from 0.4-0.8 to 120-150M⊙ and metallicities Z=0.0004 (1/50Z⊙) to 0.1 (5Z⊙). The results are provided in a database which includes all individual stellar tracks and the corresponding isochrones covering ages from 103yr to 16-20Gyr in time steps of Δlogt=0.05dex. The database also includes a new grid of stellar tracks of very metal-poor stars (Z=0.0004) from 0.8-150M⊙ calculated with the Geneva stellar evolution code. The complete stellar grids are tabulated in the files table1.dat (summary), evol.dat (evolutionary models), and in the files ubv.dat, hst.dat, gen.dat and cmt.dat (synthetic colors in the different photometric systems). These grids are also available as mod* files in subdirectories evol, ubv, hst, gen and cmt. The isochrones for the different photometric systems are summarized in the file table2.dat; the parameters of the isochrones are tabulated in the file iso.dat, the detailed isochrones being available as files iso* in the subdirectories ubv, hst, gen and cmt. (8 data files).

  2. Advances in stellarator gyrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Bird, T.; Jenko, F.; Kleiber, R.; Plunk, G. G.; Proll, J. H. E.; Riemann, J.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-01

    Recent progress in the gyrokinetic theory of stellarator microinstabilities and turbulence simulations is summarized. The simulations have been carried out using two different gyrokinetic codes, the global particle-in-cell code EUTERPE and the continuum code GENE, which operates in the geometry of a flux tube or a flux surface but is local in the radial direction. Ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped-electron modes are studied and compared with their counterparts in axisymmetric tokamak geometry. Several interesting differences emerge. Because of the more complicated structure of the magnetic field, the fluctuations are much less evenly distributed over each flux surface in stellarators than in tokamaks. Instead of covering the entire outboard side of the torus, ITG turbulence is localized to narrow bands along the magnetic field in regions of unfavourable curvature, and the resulting transport depends on the normalized gyroradius ρ* even in radially local simulations. Trapped-electron modes can be significantly more stable than in typical tokamaks, because of the spatial separation of regions with trapped particles from those with bad magnetic curvature. Preliminary non-linear simulations in flux-tube geometry suggest differences in the turbulence levels in Wendelstein 7-X and a typical tokamak.

  3. Opacities for Stellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.; Yan, Y.; Mihalas, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1994-02-01

    We define stellar envelopes to be those regions of stellar interiors in which atoms exist and are not markedly perturbed by the plasma environment. Availability of accurate and extensive atomic data is a prime requirement for the calculation of envelope opacities. For envelopes we adopt the criterion of mass density p < 0.01 ρ≥g cm-3. We present radiative Rosseland mean opacities for envelopes obtained using atomic data calculated in an international collaboration referred to as the Opacity Project, or OP. Equations of state are calculated using an occupation-probability formalism. To a good approximation, ionization equilibria and level populations in envelopes depend only on the temperature T and electron density Ne and are insensitive to chemical mixtures. Monochromatic opacities for all abundant chemical elements are therefore calculated on a grid of (T, Ne) values and are archived. Rosseland mean opacities are then readily calculated for any chemical mixture. Tables of Rosseland means, for any required mixtures and as functions of ρ and T, are available on request in computer-readable form. The present, op, results are compared with those from another recent study, referred to as OPAL, by C. A. Iglesias and F. A. Rogers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The agreement between the OP and OPAL calculations is generally good, although there are some differences. Both calculations give results larger than those obtained in earlier work, by factors of up to 3 or more.

  4. The spatial structure of young stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Michael A.

    . This apparent contradiction may be evidence of more rapid dynamical evolution accelerated by the merger of subclusters. Overall, 142 subclusters of young stars are found in the 17 MSFRs using the statistical "finite-mixture model" cluster analysis method, and the intrinsic stellar populations for these clusters are inferred using "initial mass functions" and "X-ray luminosity functions." Four structural classes are seen in MSFR: linear chains of subclusters, clumpy structures, core-halo structures, and simple isolated clusters. The subclusters do follow the structure of the molecular clouds, but do not appear to be coeval with each other. There is strong evidence in the subcluster properties for gas expulsion and subcluster expansion (e.g., the density ~ radius and age ~ radius relations), and evidence that is consistent with subcluster mergers (e.g., the ellipticity distribution and the number ~ density relation). The cluster analysis provides evidence to support hierarchical models of stellar cluster formation, which have been theorized to explain mass segregation and dynamical relaxation in very young clusters. The ~1 Myr age spreads in the subclusters of a MSFR appear to require slower star-formation in giant molecular clouds with continually driven turbulence, rather than clouds with rapidly decaying turbulence. And, the diverse range of stellar surface density environment in MSFRs will have implications for models of cluster survival after gas removal.

  5. Pycnonuclear reactions in dense stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Levenfish, K. P.; Gnedin, O. Y.

    2005-09-01

    We discuss pycnonuclear burning of highly exotic atomic nuclei in deep crusts of neutron stars, at densities up to 1013 g cm-3. As an application, we consider pycnonuclear burning of matter accreted on a neutron star in a soft X-ray transient (SXT, a compact binary containing a neutron star and a low-mass companion). The energy released in this burning, while the matter sinks into the stellar crust under the weight of newly accreted material, is sufficient to warm up the star and initiate neutrino emission in its core. The surface thermal radiation of the star in quiescent states becomes dependent on the poorly known equation of state (EOS) of supranuclear matter in the stellar core, which gives a method to explore this EOS. Four qualitatively different model EOSs are tested against observations of SXTs. They imply different levels of the enhancement of neutrino emission in massive neutron stars by 1) the direct Urca process in nucleon/hyperon matter; 2) pion condensates; 3) kaon condensates; 4) Cooper pairing of neutrons in nucleon matter with the forbidden direct Urca process. A low level of the thermal quiescent emission of two SXTs, SAX J1808.4-3658 and Cen X-4, contradicts model 4). Observations of SXTs test the same physics of dense matter as observations of thermal radiation from cooling isolated neutron stars, but the data on SXTs are currently more conclusive.

  6. Stellar Evolution Models of Classical Cepheids Require Enhanced Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding; Langer, N.; Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.; Izzard, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. In this work, we compare rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates whereas including enhanced mass loss yield predicted rates in better agreement with observations. The results suggest that enhanced mass loss must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

  7. Confronting uncertainties in stellar physics. II. Exploring differences in main-sequence stellar evolution tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, R. J.; Fossati, L.; Passy, J.-C.; Schneider, F. R. N.

    2016-02-01

    We assess the systematic uncertainties in stellar evolutionary calculations for low- to intermediate-mass, main-sequence stars. We compare published stellar tracks from several different evolution codes with our own tracks computed using the stellar codes stars and mesa. In particular, we focus on tracks of 1 and 3 M⊙ at solar metallicity. We find that the spread in the available 1 M⊙ tracks (computed before the recent solar composition revision) can be covered by tracks between 0.97-1.01 M⊙ computed with the stars code. We assess some possible causes of the origin of this uncertainty, including how the choice of input physics and the solar constraints used to perform the solar calibration affect the tracks. We find that for a 1 M⊙ track, uncertainties of around 10% in the initial hydrogen abundance and initial metallicity produce around a 2% error in mass. For the 3 M⊙ tracks, there is very little difference between the tracks from the various different stellar codes. The main difference comes in the extent of the main sequence, which we believe results from the different choices of the implementation of convective overshooting in the core. Uncertainties in the initial abundances lead to a 1-2% error in the mass determination. These uncertainties cover only part of the total error budget, which should also include uncertainties in the input physics (e.g., reaction rates, opacities, convective models) and any missing physics (e.g., radiative levitation, rotation, magnetic fields). Uncertainties in stellar surface properties such as luminosity and effective temperature will further reduce the accuracy of any potential mass determinations.

  8. Tidal effects on stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2017-10-01

    The architecture of many exoplanetary systems is different from the solar system, with exoplanets being in close orbits around their host stars and having orbital periods of only a few days. We can expect interactions between the star and the exoplanet for such systems that are similar to the tidal interactions observed in close stellar binary systems. For the exoplanet, tidal interaction can lead to circularization of its orbit and the synchronization of its rotational and orbital period. For the host star, it has long been speculated if significant angular momentum transfer can take place between the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation. In the case of the Earth-Moon system, such tidal interaction has led to an increasing distance between Earth and Moon. For stars with Hot Jupiters, where the orbital period of the exoplanet is typically shorter than the stellar rotation period, one expects a decreasing semimajor axis for the planet and enhanced stellar rotation, leading to increased stellar activity. Also excess turbulence in the stellar convective zone due to rising and subsiding tidal bulges may change the magnetic activity we observe for the host star. I will review recent observational results on stellar activity and tidal interaction in the presence of close-in exoplanets, and discuss the effects of enhanced stellar activity on the exoplanets in such systems.

  9. A catalog of stellar spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pyper, D. M.; Shore, S. N.; White, R. E.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A machine-readable catalog of stellar spectrophotometric measurements made with rotating grating scanner is introduced. Consideration is given to the processes by which the stellar data were collected and calibrated with the fluxes of Vega (Hayes and Latham, 1975). A sample page from the spectrophotometric catalog is presented.

  10. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  11. Chromospheric activity and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kippenhahn, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study of stellar chromospheres based on the internal structure of particular stars is presented. Used are complex flow diagrams of the linkage paths between mass loss, angular momentum loss, magnetic field from the turbulent dynamo and its relations to differential rotations and the convection zone, and stellar evolution.

  12. Three-dimensional stellarator codes

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional computer codes have been used to develop quasisymmetric stellarators with modular coils that are promising candidates for a magnetic fusion reactor. The mathematics of plasma confinement raises serious questions about the numerical calculations. Convergence studies have been performed to assess the best configurations. Comparisons with recent data from large stellarator experiments serve to validate the theory. PMID:12140367

  13. Radioactive elements in stellar atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gopka, Vira; Yushchenko, Alexander; Goriely, Stephane; Shavrina, Angelina; Kang, Young Woon

    2006-07-12

    The identification of lines of radioactive elements (Tc, Pm and elements with 83stellar atmospheres, contamination of stellar atmosphere by recent SN explosion, and spallation reactions.

  14. Lectures on stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    The aim of these lectures is to give some understanding of how orbits react to the gravity of other orbits and how these reactions can lead to cooperative instabilities. We show that Angle-Action variables are peculiarly well adapted to this problem. Although these variables may at first seem unfamiliar or even esoteric, I and many others have come to appreciate them as a vital tool in galactic dynamics - so much so that those who do .not use them are working at a severe disadvantage. I strongly advocate that you make the effort to learn them now. Although much of this material has been developed over the years since 1971, some parts have been developed more recently with my students J.L. Collett and C. Pichon for whose collaboration I am most grateful. In Part II we discuss the evolution of globular clusters under the influence of the gravitational stellar encounters. In part III, the dynamics of relativistic disks is discussed.

  15. Lectures on stellar dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    The aim of these lectures is to give some understanding of how orbits react to the gravity of other orbits and how these reactions can lead to cooperative instabilities. The author shows that Angle-Action variables are peculiarly well adapted to this problem. Although these variables may at first seem unfamiliar or even esoteric, he and many others have come to appreciate them as a vital tool in galactic dynamics - so much so that those who do not use them are working at a severe disadvantage. Although much of this material has been developed over the years since 1971, some parts have been developed more recently with J. L. Collett and C. Pichon. In Part II, the author discusses the evolution of globular clusters under the influence of the gravitational stellar encounters. In Part III, the dynamics of relativistic disks is discussed.

  16. Extragalactic Stellar Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, D. J.; Smartt, S. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Herrero, A.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Venn, K.; McCarthy, J.

    1999-09-01

    The advent of large 8-10m telescopes heralds a new age in stellar astronomy. It is now possible to carry out detailed spectroscopic observations at high resolution of the brightest stars of galaxies in the Local Group, and it is envisaged that intermediate resolution observations will be extended to stars in the nearest galaxy clusters such as Virgo and Fornax. For some years the authors have been carrying out the groundwork involved in identifying young massive supergiant stars in nearby resolved galaxies, with a view to performing follow-up detailed studies of selected samples. In this article we summarize the contribution that the William Herschel Telescope has made to this project, and further, show that even a 4.2m telescope with a blue sensitive, large format CCD at a good site with dependable sub-arcsecond seeing can make an important contribution to the detailed study of our nearest spiral neighbours M31 and M33.

  17. Nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Axelrod, T.S.; Weaver, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The final evolution and explosion of stars from 10 M/sub solar/ to 10/sup 6/ M/sub solar/ are reviewed with emphasis on factors affecting the expected nucleosynthesis. We order our paper in a sequence of decreasing mass. If, as many suspect, the stellar birth function was peaked towards larger masses at earlier times (see e.g., Silk 1977; but also see Palla, Salpeter, and Stahler 1983), this sequence of masses might also be regarded as a temporal sequence. At each stage of Galactic chemical evolution stars form from the ashes of preceding generations which typically had greater mass. A wide variety of Type I supernova models, most based upon accreting white dwarf stars, are also explored using the expected light curves, spectra, and nucleosynthesis as diagnostics. No clearly favored Type I model emerges that is capable of simultaneously satisfying all three constraints.

  18. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  19. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  20. Resolving stellar surface spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Carroll, T.; Rice, J. B.; Savanov, I. S.

    Doppler imaging of stellar surfaces is a novel technique with similarities to medical brain tomography (instead of a fixed brain and a rotating scanner, astronomers have a fixed spectrograph and a rotating brain, star of course). The number of free (internal) parameters is of the order of the number of surface grid points and only constrained by the number of input data points. This obviously ill-posed situation requires modern inversion algorithms with penalty functions of the form of maximum entropy or Tikhonov etc.. We present a brief status review of our Doppler imaging codes at AIP that span from temperature and spot-filling-factor mapping to full Stokes-based magnetic field mapping.

  1. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  2. Modelling of stellar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Friedrich; Muthsam, Herbert J.

    2017-07-01

    The review considers the modelling process for stellar convection rather than specific astrophysical results. For achieving reasonable depth and length we deal with hydrodynamics only, omitting MHD. A historically oriented introduction offers first glimpses on the physics of stellar convection. Examination of its basic properties shows that two very different kinds of modelling keep being needed: low dimensional models (mixing length, Reynolds stress, etc.) and "full" 3D simulations. A list of affordable and not affordable tasks for the latter is given. Various low dimensional modelling approaches are put in a hierarchy and basic principles which they should respect are formulated. In 3D simulations of low Mach number convection the inclusion of then unimportant sound waves with their rapid time variation is numerically impossible. We describe a number of approaches where the Navier-Stokes equations are modified for their elimination (anelastic approximation, etc.). We then turn to working with the full Navier-Stokes equations and deal with numerical principles for faithful and efficient numerics. Spatial differentiation as well as time marching aspects are considered. A list of codes allows assessing the state of the art. An important recent development is the treatment of even the low Mach number problem without prior modification of the basic equation (obviating side effects) by specifically designed numerical methods. Finally, we review a number of important trends such as how to further develop low-dimensional models, how to use 3D models for that purpose, what effect recent hardware developments may have on 3D modelling, and others.

  3. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  4. Stellar 'Incubators' Seen Cooking up Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

    This image composite compares visible-light and infrared views from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope of the glowing Trifid Nebula, a giant star-forming cloud of gas and dust located 5,400 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius.

    Visible-light images of the Trifid taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, Baltimore, Md. (inside left, figure 1) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, Ariz., (outside left, figure 1) show a murky cloud lined with dark trails of dust. Data of this same region from the Institute for Radioastronomy millimeter telescope in Spain revealed four dense knots, or cores, of dust (outlined by yellow circles), which are 'incubators' for embryonic stars. Astronomers thought these cores were not yet ripe for stars, until Spitzer spotted the warmth of rapidly growing massive embryos tucked inside.

    These embryos are indicated with arrows in the false-color Spitzer picture (right, figure 1), taken by the telescope's infrared array camera. The same embryos cannot be seen in the visible-light pictures (left, figure 1). Spitzer found clusters of embryos in two of the cores and only single embryos in the other two. This is one of the first times that multiple embryos have been observed in individual cores at this early stage of stellar development.

  5. Stellar Temporal Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Tan Peng

    Stellar intensity interferometry was developed by Hanbury-Brown & Twiss [1954, 1956b, 1957, 1958] to bypass the diffraction limit of telescope apertures, with successful measurements including the determination of 32 stellar angular diameters using the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer [Hanbury-Brown et al., 1974]. This was achieved by measuring the intensity correlations between starlight received by a pair of telescopes separated by varying baselines b which, by invoking the van Cittert-Zernicke theorem [van Cittert, 1934; Zernicke, 1938], are related to the angular intensity distributions of the stellar light sources through a Fourier transformation of the equal-time complex degree of coherence gamma(b) between the two telescopes. This intensity correlation, or the second order correlation function g(2) [Glauber, 1963], can be described in terms of two-photoevent coincidence measurements [Hanbury-Brown, 1974] for our use of photon-counting detectors. The application of intensity interferometry in astrophysics has been largely restricted to the spatial domain but not found widespread adoption due to limitations by its signal-to-noise ratio [Davis et al., 1999; Foellmi, 2009; Jensen et al., 2010; LeBohec et al., 2008, 2010], although there is a growing movement to revive its use [Barbieri et al., 2009; Capraro et al., 2009; Dravins & Lagadec, 2014; Dravins et al., 2015; Dravins & LeBohec, 2007]. In this thesis, stellar intensity interferometry in the temporal domain is investigated instead. We present a narrowband spectral filtering scheme [Tan et al., 2014] that allows direct measurements of the Lorentzian temporal correlations, or photon bunching, from the Sun, with the preliminary Solar g(2)(tau = 0) = 1.3 +/- 0.1, limited mostly by the photon detector response [Ghioni et al., 2008], compared to the theoretical value of g(2)(0) = 2. The measured temporal photon bunching signature of the Sun exceeded the previous records of g(2)(0) = 1.03 [Karmakar et al

  6. SUPER-CRITICAL GROWTH OF MASSIVE BLACK HOLES FROM STELLAR-MASS SEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Madau, Piero; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    We consider super-critical accretion with angular momentum onto stellar-mass black holes as a possible mechanism for growing billion-solar-mass black holes from light seeds at early times. We use the radiatively inefficient ''slim disk'' solution—advective, optically thick flows that generalize the standard geometrically thin disk model—to show how mildly super-Eddington intermittent accretion may significantly ease the problem of assembling the first massive black holes when the universe was less than 0.8 Gyr old. Because of the low radiative efficiencies of slim disks around non-rotating as well as rapidly rotating black holes, the mass e-folding timescale in this regime is nearly independent of the spin parameter. The conditions that may lead to super-critical growth in the early universe are briefly discussed.

  7. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  8. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  9. The Hibernating Stellar Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Optically Active Magnetar-Candidate Discovered Astronomers have discovered a most bizarre celestial object that emitted 40 visible-light flashes before disappearing again. It is most likely to be a missing link in the family of neutron stars, the first case of an object with an amazingly powerful magnetic field that showed some brief, strong visible-light activity. Hibernating Stellar Magnet ESO PR Photo 31/08 The Hibernating Stellar Magnet This weird object initially misled its discoverers as it showed up as a gamma-ray burst, suggesting the death of a star in the distant Universe. But soon afterwards, it exhibited some unique behaviour that indicates its origin is much closer to us. After the initial gamma-ray pulse, there was a three-day period of activity during which 40 visible-light flares were observed, followed by a brief near-infrared flaring episode 11 days later, which was recorded by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Then the source became dormant again. "We are dealing with an object that has been hibernating for decades before entering a brief period of activity", explains Alberto J. Castro-Tirado, lead author of a paper in this week's issue of Nature. The most likely candidate for this mystery object is a 'magnetar' located in our own Milky Way galaxy, about 15 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Vulpecula, the Fox. Magnetars are young neutron stars with an ultra-strong magnetic field a billion billion times stronger than that of the Earth. "A magnetar would wipe the information from all credit cards on Earth from a distance halfway to the Moon," says co-author Antonio de Ugarte Postigo. "Magnetars remain quiescent for decades. It is likely that there is a considerable population in the Milky Way, although only about a dozen have been identified." Some scientists have noted that magnetars should be evolving towards a pleasant retirement as their magnetic fields decay, but no suitable source had been identified up to now as evidence for

  10. Advancing Nucleosynthesis in Core-Collapse Supernovae Models Using 2D CHIMERA Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. A.; Hix, W. R.; Chertkow, M. A.; Bruenn, S. W.; Lentz, E. J.; Messer, O. B.; Mezzacappa, A.; Blondin, J. M.; Marronetti, P.; Yakunin, K.

    2014-01-01

    The deaths of massive stars as core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) serve as a crucial link in understanding galactic chemical evolution since the birth of the universe via the Big Bang. We investigate CCSN in polar axisymmetric simulations using the multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition in CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species α-network. However, the limited capacity of the α-network to accurately evolve detailed composition, the neutronization and the nuclear energy generation rate has fettered the ability of prior CCSN simulations to accurately reproduce the chemical abundances and energy distributions as known from observations. These deficits can be partially ameliorated by "post-processing" with a more realistic network. Lagrangian tracer particles placed throughout the star record the temporal evolution of the initial simulation and enable the extension of the nuclear network evolution by incorporating larger systems in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. We present post-processing results of the four ab initio axisymmetric CCSN 2D models of Bruenn et al. (2013) evolved with the smaller α-network, and initiated from stellar metallicity, non-rotating progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M⊙ from Woosley & Heger (2007). As a test of the limitations of post-processing, we provide preliminary results from an ongoing simulation of the 15 M⊙ model evolved with a realistic 150 species nuclear reaction network in situ. With more accurate energy generation rates and an improved determination of the thermodynamic trajectories of the tracer particles, we can better unravel the complicated multidimensional "mass-cut" in CCSN simulations and probe for less energetically significant nuclear processes like the νp-process and the r-process, which require still larger networks.

  11. Stellar populations of stellar halos: Results from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. A.; Conroy, C.; Pillepich, A.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of both major and minor mergers is expected to significantly affect gradients of stellar ages and metallicities in the outskirts of galaxies. Measurements of observed gradients are beginning to reach large radii in galaxies, but a theoretical framework for connecting the findings to a picture of galactic build-up is still in its infancy. We analyze stellar populations of a statistically representative sample of quiescent galaxies over a wide mass range from the Illustris simulation. We measure metallicity and age profiles in the stellar halos of quiescent Illustris galaxies ranging in stellar mass from 1010 to 1012 M ⊙, accounting for observational projection and luminosity-weighting effects. We find wide variance in stellar population gradients between galaxies of similar mass, with typical gradients agreeing with observed galaxies. We show that, at fixed mass, the fraction of stars born in-situ within galaxies is correlated with the metallicity gradient in the halo, confirming that stellar halos contain unique information about the build-up and merger histories of galaxies.

  12. The Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer: a 50th birthday tribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.

    2014-07-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary since the first scientific measurements were produced with the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer, which was constructed in the early 1960's by Robert Hanbury Brown and Richard Twiss. A collaboration between the Universities of Sydney and Manchester, the interferometer was the culmination of a series of experiments which pioneered the technique of intensity interferometry. The immediate controversy surrounding the quantum implications of the technique enveloped some of the most eminent physicists of the day, sparking a debate about nonlocal effects and optical coherence. A full explanation of the workings of the intensity interferometer in a quantum context was finally put forward by Roy Glauber, ultimately earning him the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics. The intensity interferometer rekindled the field of high resolution stellar imaging, which had been extinguished for a half century (following the failure of Pease's 50-foot beam on Mt Wilson), while delivering the first ever measurements of the sizes of normal stars - establishing an effective temperature scaling relationship which has underpinned stellar astronomy for 50 years. This directly paved the way for the next generation of Michelson Stellar Interferometers. Intensity interferometry itself has found application in several fields (notably particle physics), and plans are in active development for modern reprises within stellar interferometry. However undoubtedly the greatest legacy lies in the Hanbury Brown Twiss (HBT) effect being the foundational experiment for what is now known as Quantum Optics - a field which underpins a huge sector of the technology which enables our modern world. This invited review discuses the development of the interferometer, including the controversy that its underlying principles generated within the contemporary physics community. The core scientific output generated by the instrument is presented, together with the impact of the

  13. Stellar duplicity and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, Rob

    2014-09-01

    Half or more of all stars more massive than our Sun are orbited by one (or more) companion stars. Many companions are close enough that the evolution of both stars is greatly altered by the transfer of mass and angular momentum from one star to the other. Such mass transfer is highly likely during the late stages of evolution, such as on the giant branches, which are quite coincidentally also when stars undergo interesting nucleosynthesis. Direct mass transfer truncates the (A)GB prematurely compared to single stars and the ensuing stellar envelope is ejected perhaps to form a (chemically peculiar?) planetary nebula. In wider binaries, where one star has captured material from a long-dead companion, we can probe the nucleosynthesis that happened in ancient stars as well as fundamental astrophysical phenomena like wind accretion and circumbinary disc formation. I will focus on recent quantitative work on nucleosynthesis in mass-transfer systems, such as carbon-enhanced metal-poor and barium stars, and highlight some of the key open questions - and opportunities - that will dominate the next decade of duplicitous nucleosynthesis.

  14. Devastated Stellar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the nasty effects of living near a group of massive stars: radiation and winds from the massive stars (white spot in center) are blasting planet-making material away from stars like our sun. The planetary material can be seen as comet-like tails behind three stars near the center of the picture. The tails are pointing away from the massive stellar furnaces that are blowing them outward.

    The picture is the best example yet of multiple sun-like stars being stripped of their planet-making dust by massive stars.

    The sun-like stars are about two to three million years old, an age when planets are thought to be growing out of surrounding disks of dust and gas. Astronomers say the dust being blown from the stars is from their outer disks. This means that any Earth-like planets forming around the sun-like stars would be safe, while outer planets like Uranus might be nothing more than dust in the wind.

    This image shows a portion of the W5 star-forming region, located 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. It is a composite of infrared data from Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer. Light with a wavelength of 3.5 microns is blue, while light from the dust of 24 microns is orange-red.

  15. Ultraviolet stellar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Kondo, Y.; Ocallaghan, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During all three Skylab missions, prism-on observations were obtained in 188 starfields and prism-off observations in 31 starfields. In general, the fields are concentrated in the Milky Way where the frequency of hot stars is highest. These fields cover an area approximately 3660 degrees and include roughly 24 percent of a band 30 deg wide centered on the plane of the Milky Way. A census of stars in the prism-on fields shows that nearly 6,000 stars have measurable flux data at a wavelength of 2600A, that 1,600 have measurable data at 2000A, and that 400 show useful data at 1500A. Obvious absorption or emission features shortward of 2000A are visible in approximately 120 stars. This represents a bonanza of data useful for statistical studies of stellar classification and of interstellar reddening as well as for studies of various types of peculiar stars.

  16. Stellar Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Champagne, A.E.

    2005-04-05

    It is possible to measure some stellar cross sections without worrying too much about why the nuclei are built the way that they are. At the same time, many cross sections are impossible to measure because they are either too small or involve short-lived nuclei. Also, at high temperatures and densities, nucleosynthesis is governed by masses, shell structure, etc., not by individual reaction rates. Thus, at the limits, nuclear astrophysics can be thought of as nuclear structure applied to large objects. One area where there is a clear convergence between nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics is the r-process. Here, advances in observation, experiment and theory point towards real progress on what has been a long-standing problem in astrophysics. Although the r-process is perhaps the most recognized astrophysical venue for nuclear structure, it is by no means the only one. This talk will highlight some of the areas where nuclear structure plays a leading role in addressing questions in astrophysics.

  17. SI: The Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Karovska, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager (SI) will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 milliarcsec resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and simple snapshots into spellbinding evolving views. SI s science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI s prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era by imaging a sample of magnetically active stars with enough resolution to map their evolving dynamo patterns and their internal flows. By exploring the Universe at ultra-high resolution, SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magnetohydrodynamically controlled structures and processes in the Universe.

  18. UNIFYING THE ZOO OF JET-DRIVEN STELLAR EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzati, Davide; Blackwell, Christopher H.; Morsony, Brian J.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2012-05-01

    We present a set of numerical simulations of stellar explosions induced by relativistic jets emanating from a central engine sitting at the center of compact, dying stars. We explore a wide range of durations of the central engine activity, two candidate stellar progenitors, and two possible values of the total energy release. We find that even if the jets are narrowly collimated, their interaction with the star unbinds the stellar material, producing a stellar explosion. We also find that the outcome of the explosion can be very different depending on the duration of the engine activity. Only the longest-lasting engines result in successful gamma-ray bursts. Engines that power jets only for a short time result in relativistic supernova (SN) explosions, akin to observed engine-driven SNe such as SN2009bb. Engines with intermediate durations produce weak gamma-ray bursts, with properties similar to nearby bursts such as GRB 980425. Finally, we find that the engines with the shortest durations, if they exist in nature, produce stellar explosions that lack sizable amounts of relativistic ejecta and are therefore dynamically indistinguishable from ordinary core-collapse SNe.

  19. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  20. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  1. Drift waves in stellarator geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, M.; Nadeem, M.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Gardner, H.J.

    2000-02-07

    Drift waves are investigated in a real three-dimensional stellarator geometry. A linear system, based on the cold ion fluid model and a ballooning mode formalism, is solved numerically in the geometry of the stellarator H1-NF. The spectra of stable and unstable modes, as well as localization, are discussed. The dependence of the spectrum of the unstable modes on the wavevector, plasma density variation, and the location in the plasma is presented.

  2. Stellar winds of hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stee, Ph.; Chesneau, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we summarize the basic properties of radiative stellar winds from the theoretical and observational point of views. We illustrate two examples of a radiative code applied to stellar physics: the SIMECA code successfully used to constrain the physics of the circumstellar environment of the Be star α Arae constrained by VLTI-AMBER spectrally resolved measurements and the CMFGEN code applied to the BA supergiants Deneb and Rigel constrained by CHARA-VEGA measurements.

  3. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  4. Distinctive translational and self-rotational motion of lymphoma cells in an optically induced non-rotational alternating current electric field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Yang, Xieliu; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the translational motion and self-rotational behaviors of the Raji cells, a type of B-cell lymphoma cell, in an optically induced, non-rotational, electric field have been characterized by utilizing a digitally programmable and optically activated microfluidics chip with the assistance of an externally applied AC bias potential. The crossover frequency spectrum of the Raji cells was studied by observing the different linear translation responses of these cells to the positive and negative optically induced dielectrophoresis force generated by a projected light pattern. This digitally projected spot served as the virtual electrode to generate an axisymmetric and non-uniform electric field. Then, the membrane capacitance of the Raji cells could be directly measured. Furthermore, Raji cells under this condition also exhibited a self-rotation behavior. The repeatable and controlled self-rotation speeds of the Raji cells to the externally applied frequency and voltage were systematically investigated and characterized via computer-vision algorithms. The self-rotational speed of the Raji cells reached a maximum value at 60 kHz and demonstrated a quadratic relationship with respect to the applied voltage. Furthermore, optically projected patterns of four orthogonal electrodes were also employed as the virtual electrodes to manipulate the Raji cells. These results demonstrated that Raji cells located at the center of the four electrode pattern could not be self-rotated. Instead any Raji cells that deviated from this center area would also self-rotate. Most importantly, the Raji cells did not exhibit the self-rotational behavior after translating and rotating with respect to the center of any two adjacent electrodes. The spatial distributions of the electric field generated by the optically projected spot and the pattern of four electrodes were also modeled using a finite element numerical simulation. These simulations validated that the electric field

  5. Distinctive translational and self-rotational motion of lymphoma cells in an optically induced non-rotational alternating current electric field.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Xieliu; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the translational motion and self-rotational behaviors of the Raji cells, a type of B-cell lymphoma cell, in an optically induced, non-rotational, electric field have been characterized by utilizing a digitally programmable and optically activated microfluidics chip with the assistance of an externally applied AC bias potential. The crossover frequency spectrum of the Raji cells was studied by observing the different linear translation responses of these cells to the positive and negative optically induced dielectrophoresis force generated by a projected light pattern. This digitally projected spot served as the virtual electrode to generate an axisymmetric and non-uniform electric field. Then, the membrane capacitance of the Raji cells could be directly measured. Furthermore, Raji cells under this condition also exhibited a self-rotation behavior. The repeatable and controlled self-rotation speeds of the Raji cells to the externally applied frequency and voltage were systematically investigated and characterized via computer-vision algorithms. The self-rotational speed of the Raji cells reached a maximum value at 60 kHz and demonstrated a quadratic relationship with respect to the applied voltage. Furthermore, optically projected patterns of four orthogonal electrodes were also employed as the virtual electrodes to manipulate the Raji cells. These results demonstrated that Raji cells located at the center of the four electrode pattern could not be self-rotated. Instead any Raji cells that deviated from this center area would also self-rotate. Most importantly, the Raji cells did not exhibit the self-rotational behavior after translating and rotating with respect to the center of any two adjacent electrodes. The spatial distributions of the electric field generated by the optically projected spot and the pattern of four electrodes were also modeled using a finite element numerical simulation. These simulations validated that the electric field

  6. Paleomagnetism and magnetic fabric of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia: Evidence for oblique convergence and non-rotational reactivation of a Mesozoic intra-continental rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Díaz, G.; Speranza, F.; Faccenna, C.; Bayona, G.; Mora, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Cordillera of Colombia (EC) is a double-verging mountain system inverting a Mesozoic rift, and bounded by major reverse faults that locally involve crystalline and metamorphic Precambrian-Lower Paleozoic basement rocks, as well as Upper Paleozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic sequences. In map view the EC is a curved mountain belt with a regional structural strike that ranges from NNE in the southern part to NNW in the northern part. The origin of its curvature has not been studied or discussed so far. We report on an extensive paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) investigation of the EC, in order to address to test its non-rotational vs. oroclinal nature. Fifty-eight sites were gathered from Cretaceous to Miocene marine and continental strata, both from the southern and northern parts of the EC; additionally, we examined the southern Maracaibo plate, at the junction between the Santander Massif and the Merida Andes of Colombia (Cucuta zone). Twenty-three sites reveal no rotation of the EC range with respect to stable South America. In contrast, a 35°±9° clockwise rotation is documented in four post-Miocene magnetically overprinted sites from the Cucuta zone. Magnetic lineations from AMS analysis do not trend parallel to the chain, but are oblique to the main strike of the orogenic belt. By also considering GPS evidence of a ~1 cm/yr ENE displacement of central-western Colombia accommodated by the EC, we suggest that the late Miocene-recent deformation occurred by a ENE oblique convergence reactivating a NNE rift zone. Our data show that the EC is a non-rotational chain, and that the locations of the Mesozoic rift and the mountain chain roughly correspond. One possible solution is that the oblique shortening is partitioned in pure dip-slip shear characterizing thick-skinned frontal thrust sheets (well-known along both chain fronts), and by range-parallel right-lateral strike-slip fault(s), which have not been identified

  7. INTERRUPTED STELLAR ENCOUNTERS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan W. C. E-mail: nleigh@amnh.org

    2015-07-20

    Strong encounters between single stars and binaries play a pivotal role in the evolution of star clusters. Such encounters can also dramatically modify the orbital parameters of binaries, exchange partners in and out of binaries, and are a primary contributor to the rate of physical stellar collisions in star clusters. Often, these encounters are studied under the approximation that they happen quickly enough and within a small enough volume to be considered isolated from the rest of the cluster. In this paper, we study the validity of this assumption through the analysis of a large grid of single–binary and binary–binary scattering experiments. For each encounter we evaluate the encounter duration, and compare this with the expected time until another single or binary star will join the encounter. We find that for lower-mass clusters, similar to typical open clusters in our Galaxy, the percent of encounters that will be “interrupted” by an interloping star or binary may be 20%–40% (or higher) in the core, though for typical globular clusters we expect ≲1% of encounters to be interrupted. Thus, the assumption that strong encounters occur in relative isolation breaks down for certain clusters. Instead, many strong encounters develop into more complex “mini-clusters,” which must be accounted for in studying, for example, the internal dynamics of star clusters, and the physical stellar collision rate.

  8. The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danchi, W. C.; Allen, R. J.; Benford, D. J.; Deming, D.; Gezari, D. Y.; Kuchner, M.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Linfield, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Monnier, J. D.; Mumma, M.; Mundy, L. G.; Noecker, C.; Rajagopal, J.; Seager, S.; Traub, W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for an imaging and nulling interferometer for the mid-infrared spectral region (5- 28 microns). FKSI is conceived as a scientific and technological pathfinder to TPF/DARWIN as well as the NASA Vision Missions SAFIR and SPECS. It will also be a high angular resolution infrared space observatory complementary to JWST. The scientific emphasis of the mission is on detection and spectroscopy of the atmospheres of Extra-solar Giant Planets (EGPs), the search for Brown Dwarfs and other low mass stellar companions, and the evolution of protostellar systems. FKSI can observe these systems from just after the collapse of the precursor molecular cloud core, through the formation of the disk surrounding the protostar, the formation of planets in the disk, and eventual dispersal of the disk material. FKSI could also play a very powerful role in the investigation of the structure of active galactic nuclei and extra-galactic star formation. We present the major results of a set of detailed design studies for the FKSI mission that were performed as a method of understanding major trade-offs pertinent to schedule, cost, and risk in preparation for submission of a Discovery proposal.

  9. Stellar Death by Weak or Failed Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Scott Michael

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) - the violent deaths of massive stars - are among the most luminous events in the Universe and play an important role in galaxy evolution and the production and distribution of the heavy elements necessary for planet formation and life. Despite decades of effort it is still unclear how these SNe explode. While SNe have been identified with close to the maximum theoretically possible energies, the lower bounds on SN energies and luminosities are less well-constrained. There is also no requirement that the core collapse always results in a successful SN explosion. In fact, there are multiple lines of evidence that suggest that 10 - 30% of core collapses might result in failed SNe, forming a black hole without a dramatic external explosion. The primary focus of this dissertation is to explore the lower bounds of the possible explosion energies and luminosities of core-collapse SNe. I discuss three observational strategies to help understand how massive stars die. Due to the development of advanced facilities for the detection of neutrinos and gravitational waves, the next Galactic SN will offer an unprecedented opportunity to study the SN explosion mechanism. To aid preparations for this event, I model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for a Galactic SN, its shock breakout radiation, and progenitor. I also analyze the archetypes of two types of SN "impostors" and show that they may be genuine SNe, but with energies lower than previously observed. I present results from an ambitious survey that has been monitoring a million massive stars for 7 years to search for failed SNe. I follow-up the first identified failed SN candidate and find that the massive stellar progenitor appears to have vanished leaving behind a faint, fading IR source that may be due to fallback accretion onto a newly formed black hole. Finally, I set new constraints on the fraction of core collapses that result in failed SNe.

  10. Physics and chemistry of the late stages of stellar evolution — an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2016-07-01

    The stellar evolution from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to planetary nebulae (PN) contains some of the most interesting physical and chemical processes in the Universe. Within a time period of one million years starting from the nucleosynthesis of carbon in the core, we witness the chemical synthesis of molecules in the atmosphere, followed by the condensation of minerals and organics in the stellar outflow. Different phases of supersonic stellar winds, both spherical symmetric and highly collimated, and their interactions lead to a series of dynamical processes and morphological transformation of the stellar ejecta. Most interestingly, PN are now known to be major sources of complex organics in the Galaxy. Organic compounds of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structures have been observed to form in the post-AGB evolution over time scales as short as hundreds of years. There is likely that these stellar organics journeyed through the Galaxy and were embedded in early Solar System.

  11. Dynamical effects of successive mergers on the evolution of spherical stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok

    1987-08-01

    The dynamical effects of high-mass stars formed out of successive mergers among tidally captured binaries on the evolution of spherical stellar systems are investigated. It is assumed that all tidally captured systems become mergers. Stellar evolution is simulated by computing the mean age of the mass group and applying a specific death rate, as a function of mean age. Successive mergers and stellar evolution are efficient for reversing core-collapse in clusters with large N. For stellar systems with N = 105-6, three-body binary heating among high-mass stars provides significant energy to drive the bounce and postcollapse expansion. For small N, three-body binaries among light stars provide most of the energy to drive the postcollapse expansion. Stellar systems with very large N (⪆107) are vulnerable to the "merger instability," which may lead to the formation of a central black hole.

  12. Towards 21st century stellar models: Star clusters, supercomputing and asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. W.; Constantino, T. N.; D'Orazi, V.; Meakin, C.; Stello, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kuehn, C.; De Silva, G. M.; Arnett, W. D.; Lattanzio, J. C.; MacLean, B. T.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar models provide a vital basis for many aspects of astronomy and astrophysics. Recent advances in observational astronomy - through asteroseismology, precision photometry, high-resolution spectroscopy, and large-scale surveys - are placing stellar models under greater quantitative scrutiny than ever. The model limitations are being exposed and the next generation of stellar models is needed as soon as possible. The current uncertainties in the models propagate to the later phases of stellar evolution, hindering our understanding of stellar populations and chemical evolution. Here we give a brief overview of the evolution, importance, and substantial uncertainties of core helium burning stars in particular and then briefly discuss a range of methods, both theoretical and observational, that we are using to advance the modelling. This study uses observational data from from HST, VLT, AAT, Kepler, and supercomputing resources in Australia provided by the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and Pawsey Supercomputing Centre.

  13. Progress in the engineering design of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    SciTech Connect

    Reiersen, W.T.; Brooks, A.; Brown, T.

    2000-01-21

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a proof-of-principle experiment whose objective is to demonstrate high beta operation in a quasi-axisymmetric stellarator. NCSX will be housed in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX-M) test cell. Many of the existing site assets including the test cell, TF and PF coils, power supplies, neutral beam heating systems, and site utilities can be re-used, minimizing the cost of the project. Saddle coils are used in the reference design. The stellarator core is pre-fabricated and dropped into place on the PBX-M platform. The existing TF and PF coils are then reassembled around the stellarator core. Alternate coil topologies are also being explored.

  14. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  15. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  16. Stellar model chromospheres. VI - Empirical estimates of the chromospheric radiative losses of late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Ayres, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is developed for estimating the nonradiative heating of stellar chromospheres by measuring the net radiative losses in strong Fraunhofer line cores. This method is applied to observations of the Mg II resonance lines in a sample of 32 stars including the sun. At most a small dependence of chromospheric nonradiative heating on stellar surface gravity is found, which is contrary to the large effect predicted by recent calculations based on acoustic-heating theories.

  17. Testing the Formation Mechanism of Sub-Stellar Objects in Lupus (A SOLA Team Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Lopez, C.; Takahashi, S.; Santamaria-Miranda

    2017-06-01

    The international SOLA team (Soul of Lupus with ALMA) has identified a set of pre- and proto-stellar candidates in Lupus 1 and 3 of substellar nature using 1.1mm ASTE/AzTEC maps and our optical to submillimeter database. We have observed with ALMA the most promising pre- and proto-brown dwarfs candidates. Our aims are to provide insights on how substellar objects form and evolve, from the equivalent to the pre-stellar cores to the Class II stage in the low mass regime of star formation. Our sample comprises 33 pre-stellar objects, 7 Class 0 and I objects, and 22 Class II objects.

  18. Stellar energy loss rates in the pair-annihilation process beyond the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ruíz, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A.; González-Sánchez, A.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the stellar energy loss due to neutrino-pair production in e+e- annihilation in the context of a 331 model, a left-right symmetric model and a simplest little Higgs model in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. We also present some simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core. We find that the stellar energy loss is almost independent of the parameters of the models in the allowed range for these parameters. This work complements other studies on the stellar energy loss rate in e+e- annihilation.

  19. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  20. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  1. Stellar population and kinematics of NGC 404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, A.; Prugniel, P.; Koleva, M.; Sharina, M.

    2010-04-01

    Context. NGC 404 is a nearly face-on, nearby low-luminosity lenticular galaxy. Probing its characteristics provides a wealth of information on the details of the possible evolution processes of dS0 galaxies, which may not be possible in other, more distant objects. Aims: We study the internal kinematics and the spatial distribution of the star formation history in NGC 404. Methods: We obtained long-slit spectroscopy at the OHP 1m93 telescope along the major and minor axes of NGC 404. The spectra had a resolution R = 3600 covering a wavelength range from 4600 to 5500 Å. The data were fitted against the Pegase. HR stellar population models to derive the internal stellar kinematics, ages, and metallicities simultaneously. All this was done while taking any instrumental contamination to the line-of-sight velocity distribution into account. First, the global properties of the galaxy were analysed by fitting a single model to the data and looking at the kinematic variations and SSP equivalent age and metallicities as a function of radius. Afterwards, the stellar populations were decomposed into 4 individually analysed components. Results: NGC 404 clearly shows two radial velocity inversions along its major axis. The kinematically decoupled core rotates in the same direction as the neutral hydrogen shell that surrounds the galaxy. We resolved the star formation history in the core of the galaxy into 4 events: a very young (< 150 Myr, and [Fe/H] = 0.4) component with constant ongoing star formation, a second young (430 Myr) component with [Fe/H] = 0.1, an intermediate population (1.7 Gyr) that has [Fe/H] = -0.05, and finally an old (12 Gyr) component with [Fe/H] = -1.26. The two young components fade very quickly with radius, leaving only the intermediate and old population at a radius of 25´´ (370 pc) from the centre. Conclusions: We conclude that NGC 404 had a spiral morphology about 1 Gyr ago and that one or many merger events has triggered a morphological transition

  2. White Dwarf Pulsational Constraints on Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Bart H.; Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Brien, Patrick C.; Hermes, J. J.; Fuchs, Joshua T.

    2017-01-01

    The complex processes that convert a protostellar cloud into a carbon/oxygen-core white dwarf star are distilled and modeled in state of the art stellar evolution codes. Many of these processes are well-constrained, but several are uncertain or must be parameterized in the models because a complete treatment would be computationally prohibitive—turbulent motions such as convective overshoot cannot, for example, be modeled in 1D. Various free parameters in the models must therefore be calibrated. We will discuss how white dwarf pulsations can inform such calibrations. The results of all prior evolution are cemented into the interiors of white dwarf stars and, so, hidden from view. However, during certain phases of their cooling, pulsations translate the star's evolutionary history into observable surface phenomena. Because the periods of a pulsating white dwarf star depend on an internal structure assembled as it evolved to its final state, white dwarf pulsation periods can be viewed as observable endpoints of stellar evolution. For example, the thickness of the helium layer in a white dwarf directly affects its pulsations; the observed periods are, therefore, a function of the number of thermal pulses during which the star converts helium into core material on the asymptotic giant branch. Because they are also a function of several other significant evolutionary processes, several pulsation modes are necessary to tease all of these apart. Unfortunately, white dwarf pulsators typically do not display enough oscillation modes to constrain stellar evolution. To avoid this limitation, we consider the pulsations of the entire collection of hot pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAVs). Though any one star may not have sufficient information to place interesting constraints on its evolutionary history, taken together, the stars show a pattern of modes that allows us to test evolutionary models. For an example set of published evolutionary models, we show a

  3. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  4. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan

    2015-02-10

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ∼20-100 M {sub ☉}. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 10{sup 6} stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ∼10{sup 3}) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer {sup m}ass segregation instability{sup )} is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  5. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo ); Benvenuto, O.G. La Plata ); Vucetich, H. La Plata )

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  6. Hydrodynamic simulations of mechanical stellar feedback in a molecular cloud formed by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2017-09-01

    We have used the AMR hydrodynamic code, mg, to perform 3D hydrodynamic simulations with self-gravity of stellar feedback in a spherical clumpy molecular cloud formed through the action of thermal instability. We simulate the interaction of the mechanical energy input from 15, 40, 60 and 120 M⊙ stars into a 100 pc diameter 16 500 M⊙ cloud with a roughly spherical morphology with randomly distributed high-density condensations. The stellar winds are introduced using appropriate non-rotating Geneva stellar evolution models. In the 15 M⊙ star case, the wind has very little effect, spreading around a few neighbouring clumps before becoming overwhelmed by the cloud collapse. In contrast, in the 40, 60 and 120 M⊙ star cases, the more powerful stellar winds create large cavities and carve channels through the cloud, breaking out into the surrounding tenuous medium during the wind phase and considerably altering the cloud structure. After 4.97, 3.97 and 3.01 Myr, respectively, the massive stars explode as supernovae (SNe). The wind-sculpted surroundings considerably affect the evolution of these SN events as they both escape the cloud along wind-carved channels and sweep up remaining clumps of cloud/wind material. The 'cloud' as a coherent structure does not survive the SN from any of these stars, but only in the 120 M⊙ case is the cold molecular material completely destabilized and returned to the unstable thermal phase. In the 40 and 60 M⊙ cases, coherent clumps of cold material are ejected from the cloud by the SN, potentially capable of further star formation.

  7. Gaseous models of globular clusters with stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiters, S.; Spurzem, R.

    Comparing different approaches for modelling the evolution of star clusters, gaseous models have the advantage of high "particle numbers" but --- until now --- the disadvantage of a lack of realism (Giersz & Spurzem 1994, MNRAS 269, 24 1). To improve gaseous models towards a more realistic description of globular clusters one has to take the effects of stellar evolution and many (primordial) binaries into account and add a consistent treatment of the tidal field of the galaxy (Chernoff & Weinberg 1990, ApJ 351, 121; Portegies Zwart 1998, AA in press). We want to present the first steps on our way towards more realistic gaseous models: We show results of the first implementation of stellar evolution in a spherically symmetric anisotropic gaseous model. We subdivide our model in several dynamical components, each with different stellar mass, whose stellar evolution is followed in a parameterized way. Thus we can simulate the effects of the evolution of stars of different masses in the cluster: During their evolution the stars lose a significant amount of their initial mass, which can easily escape from the cluster. Hence the binding energy of the cluster is reduced. We show several models with different initial conditions with and without the effects of stellar evolution. Their evolution is followed into core bounce and during the post-collapse phase. Dynamical properties of the clusters for the different initial conditions are compared. If time allows we will focus briefly on the treatment of a (time-independent) tidal boundary, modelling the gravitational field of the mother galaxy in our models and give an outlook on the next steps towards more realism in our models of globular clusters, e.g. the inclusion of stochastic binaries (Spurzem & Giersz 1996, MNRAS 283, 805) and stellar finite-size effects.

  8. Early Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horedt, G. P.

    2013-08-01

    Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents γ between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r -1 and r -2.5. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast >~ 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 105 years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

  9. The Evolution of Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DÍaz, Angeles I.; Hardy, Eduardo

    We summarize the discussion section on `Evolution of Stellar Populations' we led on May 27, 2000 in Granada, Spain, as part of the Euroconference on The Evolution of Galaxies. I- Observational Clues. The discussion was organized around two groups of topics. In the first, Population Synthesis, the accent was partially placed on the use of tools and techniques centered around the question of the unicity of the models, their sensitivity to input and the question of the age-metallicity degeneracy. In the second group, Stellar Systems a stronger accent was placed on astrophysical questions, although we included there the need for `truth tests' that apply spectral synthesis techniques to objects for which there is detailed a priori knowledge of their stellar populations. We also provide a partial comparison between the present knowledge of these topics and that which existed at the time of the Crete Conference of 1995.

  10. Stellar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Fortuitous stellar alignments can be fitted to structural orientations with relative ease by the unwary. Nonetheless, cautious approaches taking into account a broader range of cultural evidence, as well as paying due attention to potential methodological pitfalls, have been successful in identifying credible stellar alignments—and constructing plausible assessments of their cultural significance—in a variety of circumstances. These range from single instances of alignments upon particular asterisms where the corroborating historical or ethnographic evidence is strong to repeated instances of oriented structures with only limited independent cultural information but where systematic, data-driven approaches can be productive. In the majority of cases, the identification and interpretation of putative stellar alignments relates to groups of similar monuments or complex single sites and involves a balance between systematic studies of the alignments themselves, backed up by statistical analysis where appropriate, and the consideration of a range of contextual evidence, either derived from the archaeological record alone or from other relevant sources.

  11. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  12. Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José, Jordi

    2015-12-01

    Stars are the main factories of element production in the universe through a suite of complex and intertwined physical processes. Such stellar alchemy is driven by multiple nuclear interactions that through eons have transformed the pristine, metal-poor ashes leftover by the Big Bang into a cosmos with 100 distinct chemical species. The products of stellar nucleosynthesis frequently get mixed inside stars by convective transport or through hydrodynamic instabilities, and a fraction of them is eventually ejected into the interstellar medium, thus polluting the cosmos with gas and dust. The study of the physics of the stars and their role as nucleosynthesis factories owes much to cross-fertilization of different, somehow disconnected fields, ranging from observational astronomy, computational astrophysics, and cosmochemistry to experimental and theoretical nuclear physics. Few books have simultaneously addressed the multidisciplinary nature of this field in an engaging way suitable for students and young scientists. Providing the required multidisciplinary background in a coherent way has been the driving force for Stellar Explosions: Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis. Written by a specialist in stellar astrophysics, this book presents a rigorous but accessible treatment of the physics of stellar explosions from a multidisciplinary perspective at the crossroads of computational astrophysics, observational astronomy, cosmochemistry, and nuclear physics. Basic concepts from all these different fields are applied to the study of classical and recurrent novae, type I and II supernovae, X-ray bursts and superbursts, and stellar mergers. The book shows how a multidisciplinary approach has been instrumental in our understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, particularly during explosive events.

  13. Transonic canards and stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Paul; Knobloch, Edgar; Wechselberger, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Parker’s classical stellar wind solution [20] describing steady spherically symmetric outflow from the surface of a star is revisited. Viscous dissipation is retained. The resulting system of equations has slow-fast structure and is amenable to analysis using geometric singular perturbation theory. This technique leads to a reinterpretation of the sonic point as a folded saddle and the identification of shock solutions as canard trajectories in space [22]. The results shed light on the location of the shock and its sensitivity to the system parameters. The related spherically symmetric stellar accretion solution of Bondi [4] is described by the same theory.

  14. Hughes, Rosner, Weiss: Stellar MHD: Magnetohydrodynamics of stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Rosner, Robert; Weiss, Nigel

    2005-08-01

    David Hughes, Robert Rosner and Nigel Weiss describe what was achieved during a programme on stellar magnetic fields at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge. Over a four-month period more than 90 participants visited the Institute for a mixture of structured workshops and informal collaboration.

  15. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.

    2014-12-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than ∼2-2.5 km s{sup –1}. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 which can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit observations of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. For HD 189733, we estimate the stellar inclination to be i=84{sub −20}{sup +6} deg, which implies a star-planet obliquity of ψ=4{sub −4}{sup +18} considering previous measurements of the spin-orbit angle. For α Cen B, we derive an inclination of i=45{sub −19}{sup +9}, which implies that the rotational spin of the star is not aligned with the orbital spin of the α Cen binary system. In addition, assuming that α Cen Bb is aligned with its host star, no transit would occur. The inclination of α Cen B can be measured using 40 radial-velocity measurements, which is remarkable given that the projected rotational velocity of the star is smaller than 1.15 km s{sup –1}.

  16. Stellar Imager (SI) Space Mission: Stellar Magnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV-Optical, Space-Based interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and stellar interiors (via asteroseismology) and of the Universe in general. SI is identified as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005). The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes: The 0.1 mas resolution of this deep-space telescope will transform point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI'S science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. SI'S prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we will discuss the science goals of the SI Mission and a mission architecture that could meet those goals.

  17. A stellar fingerprint

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-29

    Showcased at the centre of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is an emission-line star known as IRAS 12196-6300. Located just under 2300 light-years from Earth, this star displays prominent emission lines, meaning that the star’s light, dispersed into a spectrum, shows up as a rainbow of colours marked with a characteristic pattern of dark and bright lines. The characteristics of these lines, when compared to the “fingerprints” left by particular atoms and molecules, can be used to reveal IRAS 12196-6300’s chemical composition. Under 10 million years old and not yet burning hydrogen at its core, unlike the Sun, this star is still in its infancy. Further evidence of IRAS 12196-6300’s youth is provided by the presence of reflection nebulae. These hazy clouds, pictured floating above and below IRAS 12196-6300, are created when light from a star reflects off a high concentration of nearby dust, such as the dusty material still remaining from IRAS 12196-6300’s formation.

  18. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  19. β-DECAY of Key Titanium Isotopes in Stellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Bakhadir, Irgaziev

    Amongst iron regime nuclei, β-decay rates on titanium isotopes are considered to be important during the late phases of evolution of massive stars. The key β-decay isotopes during presupernova evolution were searched from available literature and a microscopic calculation of the decay rates were performed using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. As per earlier simulation results, electron capture and β-decay on certain isotopes of titanium are considered to be important for the presupernova evolution of massive stars. Earlier the stellar electron capture rates and neutrino energy loss rates due to relevant titanium isotopes were presented. In this paper we finally present the β-decay rates of key titanium isotopes in stellar environment. The results are also compared against previous calculations. The pn-QRPA β-decay rates are bigger at high stellar temperatures and smaller at high stellar densities compared to the large scale shell model results. This study can prove useful for the core-collapse simulators.

  20. CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOT MIXING IN MODELS OF THE STELLAR INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q. S.

    2013-04-01

    Convective overshoot mixing plays an important role in stellar structure and evolution. However, overshoot mixing is also a long-standing problem; it is one of the most uncertain factors in stellar physics. As is well known, convective overshoot mixing is determined by the radial turbulent flux of the chemical component. In this paper, a local model of the radial turbulent flux of the chemical component is established based on hydrodynamic equations and some model assumptions and is tested in stellar models. The main conclusions are as follows. (1) The local model shows that convective overshoot mixing could be regarded as a diffusion process and the diffusion coefficient for different chemical elements is the same. However, if the non-local terms i.e., the gradient of the third-order moments, are taken into account, the diffusion coefficient for each chemical element should in general be different. (2) The diffusion coefficient of convective/overshoot mixing shows different behaviors in the convection zone and in the overshoot region because the characteristic length scale of the mixing is large in the convection zone and small in the overshoot region. Overshoot mixing should be regarded as a weak mixing process. (3) The diffusion coefficient of mixing is tested in stellar models, and it is found that a single choice of our central mixing parameter leads to consistent results for a solar convective envelope model as well as for core convection models of stars with masses from 2 M to 10 M.

  1. Introduction to the Theory of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, Giacomo; Carraro, Giovanni

    Stars form from the collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds. After this first stage of formation and evolution as a pre-main-sequence object, a star begins its life in the main sequence stage through the ignition of Hydrogen in its core. From here after, the life of a star is simply described as the evolution of a gaseous mass through well defined stages of equilibrium between gravitational energy and the energy produced by the nuclear reactions in its interior. Depending on its initial mass, heavier and heavier chemical elements are processed in the stellar core up to iron for the most massive stars. Finally, the star will end its life by simply cooling down as a white dwarf or exploding as a supernova, depending once again on its initial mass. In this introductory chapter, we briefly review the most important aspects concerning the evolution and nucleosynthesis of single stars, form the early stage of its formation to the final stages and death.

  2. A SAURON Study of Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: Kinematics and Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús

    Dwarf elliptical galaxies (dEs) are the most common galaxy type in nearby galaxy clusters; even so, many of their basic properties have yet to be quantified. Here we present the results of our study of 4 Virgo dwarf ellipticals obtained with the SAURON integral field unit on the William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain). While traditional long-slit observations are likely to miss more complicated kinematic features, with SAURON we are able to study both kinematics and stellar populations in two dimensions, obtaining a much more detailed view of the mass distribution and star formation histories. What is visible even in such a small sample is that dEs are not a uniform group, not only morphologically, but also as far as their kinematic and stellar population properties are concerned. We find the presence of substructures, varying degrees of flattening and of rotation, as well as differences in age and metallicity gradients. We confirm that two of our galaxies are significantly flattened, yet non-rotating objects, which makes them likely triaxial systems. The comparison between the dwarf and the giant groups shows that dEs could be a low-mass extension of Es in the sense that they do seem to follow the same trends with mass. However, dEs as progenitors of Es seem less likely as we have seen that dEs have much lower abundance ratios.

  3. Summary of the Stellar Chromospheres Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, O. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies on solar-type stellar chromospheres include diagnostic techniques, observations on different kinds of apparently existing chromospheres, enhancement dynamics of chromospheric activity, and interpretation of stellar spectroscopy with theoretical explanations for chromospheric lines.

  4. Stellar Feedback Up and Close

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadotti, Dimitri; Timer Team

    2017-07-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of ongoing stellar feedback in the star-bursting nuclear ring of a nearby spiral galaxy, as part of the TIMER survey with MUSE. Combining MUSE and ALMA data we show bubbles of ionised gas expanding from the ring and shocking with the cold ISM. We demonstrate how much energy is being released into the ISM corresponding to the star formation observed, how fast the heated ISM is expanding from the centre, and provide a physical description of the shocks happening at the interface between the heated and cold phases of the ISM. Further, we quantitatively show how the exchange of energy between the two phases impacts the dynamics of the cold ISM. Finally, applying a model to the spatially-resolved spectral properties of this system, we find that about 60% of the energy input into the ISM is produced via the direct transfer of momentum from photons scattering onto dust grains, and 27% produced by mass loss in supernova explosions. The remaining energy input is produced via photoionisation heating ( 12%) and stellar winds ( 1%). These analyses provide invaluable measurements against which our theoretical understanding of stellar feedback can be compared, particularly state-of-the-art simulations that aim at reproducing star formation and stellar feedback in galaxies.

  5. Chandrasekhar and modern stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    2011-03-01

    Stellar dynamics occupied Chandrasekhar's interest for a brief interlude between his more prolonged studies of stellar structure and radiative transfer. This paper traces the history of one of his ideas -- namely, that the shape of the galactic potential controls the orientation of the stellar velocity dispersion tensor. It has its roots in papers by Eddington (1915) and Chandrasekhar (1939), and provoked a fascinating dispute between these two great scientists -- less well-known than their famous controversy over the white dwarf stars. In modern language, Eddington claimed that the integral curves of the eigenvectors of the velocity dispersion tensor provide a one-dimensional foliation into mutually orthogonal surfaces. Chandrasekhar challenged this, and explicitly constructed a counter-example. In fact, the work of neither of these great scientists was without flaws, though further developments in stellar dynamics were to ultimately draw more on Eddington's insight than Chandrasekhar's. We conclude with a description of modern attempts to measure the orientation of the velocity dispersion tensor for populations in the Milky Way Galaxy, a subject that is coming into its own with the dawning of the age of precision astrometry.

  6. Chandrasekhar and modern stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stellar dynamics occupied Chandrasekhar's interest for a brief interlude between his more prolonged studies of stellar structure and radiative transfer. This paper traces the history of one of his ideas - namely, that the shape of the galactic potential controls the orientation of the stellar velocity dispersion tensor. It has its roots in papers by Eddington (1915) and Chandrasekhar (1939), and provoked a fascinating dispute between these two great scientists - less well-known than their famous controversy over the white dwarf stars. In modern language, Eddington claimed that the integral curves of the eigenvectors of the velocity dispersion tensor provide a one-dimensional foliation into mutually orthogonal surfaces. Chandrasekhar challenged this, and explicitly constructed a counter-example. In fact, the work of neither of these great scientists was without flaws, though further developments in stellar dynamics were to ultimately draw more on Eddington's insight than Chandrasekhar's. We conclude with a description of modern attempts to measure the orientation of the velocity dispersion tensor for populations in the Milky Way Galaxy, a subject that is coming into its own with the dawning of the age of precision astrometry.

  7. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  8. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  9. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  10. Synthetic stellar libraries for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, R.

    A large database of synthetic stellar libraries has been collected for the Gaia mission. I will present the libraries in the context of their usage in APSIS, the system of algorithms developed to deal with the automated classification and parameter determination of the observed sources.

  11. Grigori Kuzmin and Stellar Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, P. Tim; van de Ven, Glenn

    Grigori Kuzmin was a very gifted dynamicist and one of the towering figures in the distinguished history of the Tartu Observatory. He obtained a number of important results in relative isolation which were later rediscovered in the West. This work laid the foundation for further advances in the theory of stellar systems in dynamical equilibrium, thereby substantially increasing our understanding of galaxy dynamics.

  12. Stellar Ontogeny:...to Ashes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the process of stellar death and the correlation between the size of a star in solar masses and its way of death. The amount of mass loss that occurs during the life and death of a star is also discussed. (HM)

  13. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  14. Rotational signature of the Milky Way stellar halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermani, Francesco; Schönrich, Ralph

    2013-07-01

    We measure the rotation of the Milky Way stellar halo on two samples of blue horizontal branch (BHB) field halo stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with four different methods. The two samples comprise 1582 and 2563 stars, respectively, and reach out to ˜50 kpc in galactocentric distance. Two of the methods to measure rotation rely exclusively on line-of-sight (l.o.s.) velocities, namely the popular double power-law model and a direct estimate of the de-projected l.o.s. velocity. The other two techniques use the full 3D motions: the radial velocity based rotation estimator of Schönrich et al. and a simple 3D azimuthal velocity mean. In this context we (a) critique the popular model and (b) assess the reliability of the estimators. All four methods agree on a weakly prograde or non-rotating halo. Further, we observe no duality in the rotation of sub-samples with different metallicities or at different radii. We trace the rotation gradient across metallicity measured by Deason et al. on a similar sample of BHB stars back to the inclusion of regions in the apparent magnitude-surface gravity plane known to be contaminated. In the spectroscopically selected sample of Xue et al., we flag ˜500 hot metal-poor stars for their peculiar kinematics w.r.t. to both their cooler metal-poor counterparts and the metal-rich stars in the same sample. They show a seemingly retrograde behaviour in l.o.s. velocities, which is not confirmed by the 3D estimators. Their anomalous vertical motion hints at either a pipeline problem or a stream-like component rather than a smooth retrograde population.

  15. Consequences of nuclear electron capture in core collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Hix, W R; Messer, O E B; Mezzacappa, A; Liebendörfer, M; Sampaio, J; Langanke, K; Dean, D J; Martínez-Pinedo, G

    2003-11-14

    The most important weak nuclear interaction to the dynamics of stellar core collapse is electron capture, primarily on nuclei with masses larger than 60. In prior simulations of core collapse, electron capture on these nuclei has been treated in a highly parametrized fashion, if not ignored. With realistic treatment of electron capture on heavy nuclei come significant changes in the hydrodynamics of core collapse and bounce. We discuss these as well as the ramifications for the postbounce evolution in core collapse supernovae.

  16. Evolution of stars with suppressed core convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.; Chin, C.

    1972-01-01

    Stellar evolution on the upper main sequence was computed for models of stars with cores assumed to be in radiative equilibrium, up to the point of central helium ignition. The role of the Schonberg-Chandrasekhar limit for an isothermal core is found to be critical for the evolutionary tracks. Observational data are used to rule out the hypothesis of evolution with radiative cores (in upper main-sequence stars) and, by implication, of magnetic fields that are sufficiently strong to have suppressed the core convention.

  17. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  18. Binaries and Multiple Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, Elliott

    Binary and multiple stellar systems have importance in three main areas of astronomy and astrophysics. First, because of the relatively simple gravitational interaction at work in the case of binary stars, these systems provide a basic check on stellar structure and evolution theory since the masses may be determined through observation. When these masses can be linked to other properties of the two stars, such as luminosity, color, and radius, they can provide very stringent constraints on stellar models. Second, the statistics of binary and multiple star systems provide clues to star formation mechanisms and environmental effects in the galactic gravitational potential and in clusters. Although a number of good results have been obtained in nearby star clusters and associations, knowledge of the field population has been somewhat limited until recently by a lack of large, complete samples of binaries. However, there appears to be a great deal of promise in this area for the coming decade in part due to astrometric satellites such as Hipparcos and Gaia. Third, the binary scenario is invoked to explain several important types of astrophysical phenomena such as Type Ia supernovae, cataclysmic variables, and stellar x-ray sources. Since the first of these mentioned is a standard candle for the extragalactic distance scale, it may even be said binary stars play a minor role in field of cosmology. However, in this chapter, the focus will mainly be on normal stars in binary and multiple-stellar systems. The basic physics of binaries will be reviewed, and the observational methods in use today will be discussed together with their limitations and prospects for the future. Finally, an overview of the current science in the three main areas mentioned where binaries have a significant impact will be given.

  19. Imaging stellar faint companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Canales, Vidal F.

    In the past six years more than 40 planets have been discovered in orbit around nearby stars. Indirect measurement confirms their existence in a considerable figure. However, direct imaging would offer information hidden to other detection techniques and would allow us to observe Earth like planets which can not be detected using other techniques. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated to a star, which is a much brighter source of light. The image of this star after atmospheric distortion and adaptive partial compensation is composed by a bright core surrounded by a speckled halo. Consequently, it is difficult to distinguish the planet from the residual scattered star light. It has been suggested to use infrared wavelength between 5 and 10 mm. In this range of wavelengths many of young giant planets are self luminous and the star/planet intensity ratio is about 106 instead of the factor 1010 typically obtained in visible wavelengths. The signal-to-noise ratio in these wavelengths would be enough to detect the planet if atmosphere did not distort the incoming wavefronts.However, the effect of these distortions can be compensated using the nulling interferometer assisted with Adaptive Optics. Hinz et al. have shown, using images of Betelgeuse, that light from an unresolved star almost disappears, while a source 0.2 arcsec apart remains. These successful results encouraged us to combine the nulling interferometer with the use of the Dark Speckle technique proposed by Labeyrie, both in the visible and IR wavelengths. The technique consists on detecting the probability of zero counts in every pixel of the whole image plane. Deviations of the expected zero-count Probability Distribution will indicate the presence of a planet. Taking advantage of the statistics of the intensity in the focal plane of a telescope, it is possible to develop a simple model to predict the behavior of the Dark Speckle technique obtained by a nulling interferometer

  20. Targeted Optimization of Quasi-Symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, Chris C.; Anderson, D. T.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2016-10-06

    The proposed research focuses on targeted areas of plasma physics dedicated to improving the stellarator concept. Research was pursued in the technical areas of edge/divertor physics in 3D configurations, magnetic island physics in stellarators, the role of 3D shaping on microinstabilities and turbulent transport and energetic ion confinement in stellarators.

  1. RETENTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Morscher, Meagan; Umbreit, Stefan; Farr, Will M.; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-01-20

    Globular clusters should be born with significant numbers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). It has been thought for two decades that very few of these BHs could be retained through the cluster lifetime. With masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }, BHs are {approx}20 times more massive than an average cluster star. They segregate into the cluster core, where they may eventually decouple from the remainder of the cluster. The small-N core then evaporates on a short timescale. This is the so-called Spitzer instability. Here we present the results of a full dynamical simulation of a globular cluster containing many stellar-mass BHs with a realistic mass spectrum. Our Monte Carlo simulation code includes detailed treatments of all relevant stellar evolution and dynamical processes. Our main finding is that old globular clusters could still contain many BHs at present. In our simulation, we find no evidence for the Spitzer instability. Instead, most of the BHs remain well mixed with the rest of the cluster, with only the innermost few tens of BHs segregating significantly. Over the 12 Gyr evolution, fewer than half of the BHs are dynamically ejected through strong binary interactions in the cluster core. The presence of BHs leads to long-term heating of the cluster, ultimately producing a core radius on the high end of the distribution for Milky Way globular clusters (and those of other galaxies). A crude extrapolation from our model suggests that the BH-BH merger rate from globular clusters could be comparable to the rate in the field.

  2. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  3. The axisymmetric stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Hillier, D. John; Harries, Tim J.; Howarth, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the Luminous Blue Variable AG Carinae obtained after a recent visual brightness increase. The absence of He II lambda 4686 emission, together with the weakening of the He I spectrum and the appearance of Fe lines in the region around 5300 A, confirm that AG Car has started a new excursion across the HR diagram. The H alpha line profile exhibits very extended line wings that are polarized differently in both amount and position angle from either the continuum or the line core. The polarization changes across H alpha, together with variable continuum polarization, indicate the presence of intrinsic polarization. Coexistence of the line-wing polarization with extended flux-line wings evidences that both are formed by electron scattering in a dense wind. The position angle rotates across the line profiles, in a way that presently available models suggest is due to rotation and expansion of the scattering material. AG Car displays very large variations of its linear polarization with time, Delta P approximately 1.2%, indicating significant variations in envelope opacity. We find that the polarization varies along a preferred position angle of approximately 145 deg (with a scatter of +/- 10 deg) which we interpret as a symmetry axis of the stellar wind (with an ambiguity of 90 deg). This position angle is co-aligned with the major axis of the AG Car ring nebula and perpendicular to the AG Car jet. Our observations thus suggest that the axisymmetric geometry seen in the resolved circumstellar environment at various distances already exists within a few stellar radii of AG Car. From the H alpha polarization profile we deduce an interstellar polarization of Q = 0.31%, U = -1.15% at H alpha. The inferred interstellar polarization implies that the intrinsic polarization is not always of the same sign. This indicates either significant temporal changes in the envelope geometry, or it may arise from effects of multiple scattering

  4. Spectral evolution of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    An evolutionary sequence, from protostars to pre-main-sequence stars, is suggested for the classification of young stellar objects. This sequence is derived by comparing the predictions of the theoretical models of Adams and Shu with the morphological classification scheme of Lada and Wilking. We first define the spectral index in the near- and mid-infrared, n is identical to d log(nu F sub nu)/d log nu, and then interpret the class of sources with negative spectral indices as protostars. The inferred mass infall rates for these objects are generally consistent with the measured gas temperatures of approx. 35 K in Ophiuchus, and of approx. 10 K in Taurus. Fitting the data requires us to adopt cloud rotation rates in Ophiuchus which are typically an order of magnitude greater than in Taurus, and we speculate on the mechanistic origin for this difference. Next, we consider a subclass of T Tauri stars with near- and mid-infrared excesses and positive or zero spectral indices. We find that the objects with the steeper indices can be understood as the post-infall products from the collapse of rotating cloud cores, where the infrared excesses arise from the simple reprocessing of visible stellar photons in optically thick but spatially thin disks. The sources with flatter spectra may require massive accretion disks. Given the existence of protostars and naked star/disk systems, there is a natural interpretation of another subclass of T Tauri stars, those with two peaks in their emergent spectral energy distributions. These are readily explained as intermediate cases in which dust envelopes still surround the stars and disks. Finally, we find that the theory can be extended to explain the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis, a famous outburst source. Our model suggests that FU Orionis has a disk, but it offers no discrimination between the competing ideas that the outburst took place on the star or in the disk.

  5. The axisymmetric stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Hillier, D. John; Harries, Tim J.; Howarth, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the Luminous Blue Variable AG Carinae obtained after a recent visual brightness increase. The absence of He II lambda 4686 emission, together with the weakening of the He I spectrum and the appearance of Fe lines in the region around 5300 A, confirm that AG Car has started a new excursion across the HR diagram. The H alpha line profile exhibits very extended line wings that are polarized differently in both amount and position angle from either the continuum or the line core. The polarization changes across H alpha, together with variable continuum polarization, indicate the presence of intrinsic polarization. Coexistence of the line-wing polarization with extended flux-line wings evidences that both are formed by electron scattering in a dense wind. The position angle rotates across the line profiles, in a way that presently available models suggest is due to rotation and expansion of the scattering material. AG Car displays very large variations of its linear polarization with time, Delta P approximately 1.2%, indicating significant variations in envelope opacity. We find that the polarization varies along a preferred position angle of approximately 145 deg (with a scatter of +/- 10 deg) which we interpret as a symmetry axis of the stellar wind (with an ambiguity of 90 deg). This position angle is co-aligned with the major axis of the AG Car ring nebula and perpendicular to the AG Car jet. Our observations thus suggest that the axisymmetric geometry seen in the resolved circumstellar environment at various distances already exists within a few stellar radii of AG Car. From the H alpha polarization profile we deduce an interstellar polarization of Q = 0.31%, U = -1.15% at H alpha. The inferred interstellar polarization implies that the intrinsic polarization is not always of the same sign. This indicates either significant temporal changes in the envelope geometry, or it may arise from effects of multiple scattering

  6. Fast core rotation in red-giant stars as revealed by gravity-dominated mixed modes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul G; Montalban, Josefina; Kallinger, Thomas; De Ridder, Joris; Aerts, Conny; García, Rafael A; Hekker, Saskia; Dupret, Marc-Antoine; Mosser, Benoit; Eggenberger, Patrick; Stello, Dennis; Elsworth, Yvonne; Frandsen, Søren; Carrier, Fabien; Hillen, Michel; Gruberbauer, Michael; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Miglio, Andrea; Valentini, Marica; Bedding, Timothy R; Kjeldsen, Hans; Girouard, Forrest R; Hall, Jennifer R; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A

    2011-12-07

    When the core hydrogen is exhausted during stellar evolution, the central region of a star contracts and the outer envelope expands and cools, giving rise to a red giant. Convection takes place over much of the star's radius. Conservation of angular momentum requires that the cores of these stars rotate faster than their envelopes; indirect evidence supports this. Information about the angular-momentum distribution is inaccessible to direct observations, but it can be extracted from the effect of rotation on oscillation modes that probe the stellar interior. Here we report an increasing rotation rate from the surface of the star to the stellar core in the interiors of red giants, obtained using the rotational frequency splitting of recently detected 'mixed modes'. By comparison with theoretical stellar models, we conclude that the core must rotate at least ten times faster than the surface. This observational result confirms the theoretical prediction of a steep gradient in the rotation profile towards the deep stellar interior.

  7. A young cluster with an extended main-sequence turnoff: confirmation of a prediction of the stellar rotation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, N.; Niederhofer, F.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Salaris, M.; Larsen, S.; Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Cordero, M.; Ekström, S.; Geisler, D.; Georgy, C.; Hilker, M.; Kacharov, N.; Li, C.; Mackey, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Platais, I.

    2016-07-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope photometry of NGC 1850, a ˜100 Myr, ˜105 M⊙ cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The colour-magnitude diagram clearly shows the presence of an extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO). The use of non-rotating stellar isochrones leads to an age spread of ˜40 Myr. This is in good agreement with the age range expected when the effects of rotation in the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars are wrongly interpreted in terms of age spread. We also do not find evidence for multiple, isolated episodes of star formation bursts within the cluster, in contradiction to scenarios that invoke actual age spreads to explain the eMSTO phenomenon. NGC 1850 therefore continues the trend of eMSTO clusters, where the inferred age spread is proportional to the age of the cluster. While our results confirm a key prediction of the scenario where stellar rotation causes the eMSTO feature, direct measurements of the rotational rate of MSTO stars is required to definitively confirm or refute whether stellar rotation is the origin of the eMSTO phenomenon or if it is due to an as yet undiscovered effect.

  8. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  9. Multiple stellar populations in Magellanic Cloud clusters - V. The split main sequence of the young cluster NGC 1866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; D'Antona, F.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Jerjen, H.; Anderson, J.; Dotter, A.; Criscienzo, M. Di; Lagioia, E. P.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most unexpected results in the field of stellar populations of the last few years is the discovery that some Magellanic Cloud globular clusters younger than ∼400 Myr exhibit bimodal main sequences (MSs) in their colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Moreover, these young clusters host an extended main-sequence turn-off (eMSTO) in close analogy with what is observed in most ∼1-2 Gyr old clusters of both Magellanic Clouds. We use high-precision Hubble Space Telescope photometry to study the young star cluster NGC 1866 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discover an eMSTO and a split MS. The analysis of the CMD reveals that (i) the blue MS is the less populous one, hosting about one-third of the total number of MS stars; (ii) red MS stars are more centrally concentrated than blue MS stars; (iii) the fraction of blue MS stars with respect to the total number of MS stars drops by a factor of ∼2 in the upper MS with mF814W ≲ 19.7. The comparison between the observed CMDs and stellar models reveals that the observations are consistent with ∼200 Myr old highly rotating stars on the red MS, with rotation close to critical value, plus a non-rotating stellar population spanning an age interval between ∼140 and 220 Myr, on the blue MS. Noticeable, neither stellar populations with different ages only, nor coeval stellar models with different rotation rates, properly reproduce the observed split MS and eMSTO. We discuss these results in the context of the eMSTO and multiple MS phenomenon.

  10. Theory of stellar convection - II. First stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few per cent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the `calibrated' MT theory for main-sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  11. The resolved stellar populations around 12 Type IIP supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maund, Justyn R.

    2017-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) are found in regions associated with recent massive star formation. The stellar population observed around the location of a SN can be used as a probe of the origins of the progenitor star. We apply a Bayesian mixture model to fit isochrones to the massive star population around 12 Type IIP SNe, for which constraints on the progenitors are also available from fortuitous pre-explosion images. Using the high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3, we study the massive star population found within 100 pc of each of our target SNe. For most of the SNe in our sample, we find that there are multiple age components in the surrounding stellar populations. In the cases of SNe 2003gd and 2005cs, we find that the progenitor does not come from the youngest stellar population component and, in fact, these relatively low mass progenitors (∼8 M⊙) are found in close proximity to stars as massive as 15 and 50-60 M⊙, respectively. Overall, the field extinction (Galactic and host) derived for these populations is ∼0.3 mag higher than the extinction that was generally applied in previously reported progenitor analyses. We also find evidence, in particular for SN 2004dj, for significant levels of differential extinction. Our analysis for SN 2008bk suggests a significantly lower extinction for the population than the progenitor, but the lifetime of the population and mass determined from pre-explosion images agree. Overall, assuming that the appropriate age component can be suitably identified from the multiple stellar population components present, we find that our Bayesian approach to studying resolved stellar populations can match progenitor masses determined from direct imaging to within ±3 M⊙.

  12. THE CLOSE STELLAR COMPANIONS TO INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Trenti, Michele

    2016-03-01

    When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, but also tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct N-body simulations. We study clusters initially composed of 10{sup 5} or 2 × 10{sup 5} stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and we follow their evolution for 6–10 Gyr. A tight, innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with an orbital semimajor axis at least three times tighter than the second-most-bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods on the order of years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for ∼10{sup 7} years. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse: they include both main-sequence, giant stars and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. The most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. The stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects occur with promising frequency.

  13. The Close Stellar Companions to Intermediate-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Trenti, Michele; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    When embedded in dense cluster cores, intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) acquire close stellar or stellar-remnant companions. These companions are not only gravitationally bound, but also tend to hierarchically isolate from other cluster stars through series of multibody encounters. In this paper we study the demographics of IMBH companions in compact star clusters through direct N-body simulations. We study clusters initially composed of 105 or 2 × 105 stars with IMBHs of 75 and 150 solar masses, and we follow their evolution for 6-10 Gyr. A tight, innermost binary pair of IMBH and stellar object rapidly forms. The IMBH has a companion with an orbital semimajor axis at least three times tighter than the second-most-bound object over 90% of the time. These companionships have typical periods on the order of years and are subject to cycles of exchange and destruction. The most frequently observed, long-lived pairings persist for ˜107 years. The demographics of IMBH companions in clusters are diverse: they include both main-sequence, giant stars and stellar remnants. Companion objects may reveal the presence of an IMBH in a cluster in one of several ways. The most-bound companion stars routinely suffer grazing tidal interactions with the IMBH, offering a dynamical mechanism to produce repeated flaring episodes like those seen in the IMBH candidate HLX-1. The stellar winds of companion stars provide a minimum quiescent accretion rate for IMBHs, with implications for radio searches for IMBH accretion in globular clusters. Finally, gravitational wave inspirals of compact objects occur with promising frequency.

  14. Rapid rotational crust-core relaxation in magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    If a magnetar interior B-field exceeds 1015 G, it will unpair the proton superconductor in the stellar core by inducing diamagnetic currents that destroy the Cooper pair coherence. Then, the P-wave neutron superfluid in these non-superconducting regions will couple to the stellar plasma by scattering of protons off the quasiparticles that are confined in the cores of neutron vortices by the strong (nuclear) force. The dynamical timescales associated with this interaction span from several minutes at the crust-core interface to a few seconds in the deep core. We show that (a) the rapid crust-core coupling is incompatible with oscillation models of magnetars that completely decouple the core superfluid from the crust and (b) magnetar precession is damped by the coupling of normal fluids to the superfluid core and, if observed, needs to be forced or continuously excited by seismic activity.

  15. Ambitious Survey Spots Stellar Nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    -dimensional geometry of the Magellanic system. Chris Evans from the VMC team adds: "The VISTA images will allow us to extend our studies beyond the inner regions of the Tarantula into the multitude of smaller stellar nurseries nearby, which also harbour a rich population of young and massive stars. Armed with the new, exquisite infrared images, we will be able to probe the cocoons in which massive stars are still forming today, while also looking at their interaction with older stars in the wider region." The wide-field image shows a host of different objects. The bright area above the centre is the Tarantula Nebula itself, with the RMC 136 cluster of massive stars in its core. To the left is the NGC 2100 star cluster. To the right is the tiny remnant of the supernova SN1987A (eso1032). Below the centre are a series of star-forming regions including NGC 2080 - nicknamed the "Ghost Head Nebula" - and the NGC 2083 star cluster. The VISTA Magellanic Cloud Survey is one of six huge near-infrared surveys of the southern sky that will take up most of the first five years of operations of VISTA. Notes [1] VISTA ― the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy ― is the newest telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. VISTA is a survey telescope working at near-infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. The telescope is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 m across. In photographic terms it can be thought of as a 67-megapixel digital camera with a 13 000 mm f/3.25 mirror lens. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  16. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  17. STELLAR WIND INFLUENCE ON PLANETARY DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyner, Daniel; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Schmitt, Dieter

    2012-05-10

    We examine the possible influence of early stellar wind conditions on the evolution of planetary dynamo action. In our model, the dynamo operates within a significant ambient magnetospheric magnetic field generated by the interaction between the stellar wind and the planetary magnetic field. This provides a negative feedback mechanism which quenches the dynamo growth. The external magnetic field magnitude which the dynamo experiences, and thus the strength of the quenching, depends on the stellar wind dynamic pressure. As this pressure significantly changes during stellar evolution, we argue that under early stellar system conditions the coupling between the stellar wind and the interior dynamics of a planet is much more important than has been thought up to now. We demonstrate the effects of the feedback coupling in the course of stellar evolution with a planet at a similar distance to the central star as Mercury is to the Sun.

  18. Transport analysis of stellarator reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Australian National Univ., Canberra . Research School of Physical Sciences); Lyon, J.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The performance of deuterium-tritium stellarator reactors is studied with a new, fast one-dimensional (1-D) transport survey code that is based on the spectral collocation method. Two operating modes with different signs of the assumed radial electric field are identified. The operating mode with a positive electric field is characterized by high temperatures and moderate densities, whereas the other mode has lower temperatures and higher densities. Both modes lead to possible reactors that could tolerate a large alpha-particle energy loss. The sensitivity to device parameters and to profile assumptions is examined. Scaling expressions useful for parametric studies are obtained for different quantities of interest, and the 1-D code results are compared with results derived from an empirical scaling relation. Deuterium-helium-3 (D-{sup 3}He) operation is also feasible but is more demanding. The implications for stellarator reactor design optimization are discussed. 47 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Investigating Exoplanets Within Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Joseph Paul; Reisinger, Tyler; Thornton, Jonathan; McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent surveys exploring nearby open clusters have yielded noticeable differences in the planetary population from that seen in the Field. This is surprising, as it is widely accepted that a majority of stars form within clustered environments before dispersing throughout the galaxy. Though dynamical arguments have been used to explain this discrepancy in the past, previous surveys' observational statistics and detection biases can also be used to argue that the open cluster planet population is indistinguishable from the Field.Our group aims to explore the role of stellar close encounters and interplanetary interactions in producing the observed exoplanet populations for both open cluster stars and Field stars. We employ a variety of different computational techniques to investigate these effects, ranging from traditional Monte Carlo scattering experiments to multi-scale n-body simulations. We are interested in: the effects of stellar binaries; Hot Jupiter migrations; long-period ice giants; and the habitability history of terrestrial planets.

  20. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  1. Virtual Observatory for stellar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O.; Zolotukhin, I.

    2013-10-01

    The principal idea of the Virtual Observatory is to achieve real transparency for astronomical data, similar to transparency for all the world's documents in the World Wide Web. In the Virtual Observatory, all the world's astronomical data is available from one's desktop. All archives understand the same query language, can be accessed through a uniform interface, and diverse data can be analyzed with the same tools. In particular, facilities of the Virtual Observatory allow users to make a fast and correct analysis of objects from various surveys. It yields multi-photometry data on registered objects and makes it possible to determine stellar parameters. Methods of astronomical data analysis as well as their application to various areas of stellar astronomy are discussed in this paper.

  2. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  3. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor concept

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physics basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations. The approach and results presented herein will be modified in the course of ongoing work to form a firmer basis for a detailed conceptual design of the MSR.

  4. The Solar/Stellar Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Allan Sacha

    2015-08-01

    The Sun is the archetype of magnetic star. Its proximity and the wealth of very high accuracy observations that this has allowed us to gather over many decades have greatly helped us understanding how solar-like stars (e.g with a convective envelope) redistribute angular momentum and generate a cyclic magnetic field. However most models have been so fine tuned that when they are straightforwardly extended to other solar-like stars and are compared with the ever growing stellar magnetism and differential rotation observations the agreement is not as good as one could hope. In this review I will discuss based on theoretical considerations and multi-D MHD stellar models what can be considered as robust properties of solar-like star dynamics and magnetism and what is still speculative.

  5. Integrated inertial stellar attitude sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Tye M. (Inventor); Kourepenis, Anthony S. (Inventor); Wyman, Jr., William F. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An integrated inertial stellar attitude sensor for an aerospace vehicle includes a star camera system, a gyroscope system, a controller system for synchronously integrating an output of said star camera system and an output of said gyroscope system into a stream of data, and a flight computer responsive to said stream of data for determining from the star camera system output and the gyroscope system output the attitude of the aerospace vehicle.

  6. Solar and Stellar Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budding, E.

    2007-05-01

    The special circumstance of solar eclipse affords an opportunity to review its background, particularly in the cultural context of western Anatolia. This links with a current project of çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. Turning to the more general subject of stellar eclipses, topics of particular note concern: choice of fitting functions, disk eclipses, spot eclipses and the gravity-darkening effect. These topics arise within new era eclipsing binary studies and are relevant to active researches on remote binaries and extrasolar planets.

  7. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  8. Gyrokinetic Turbulence Simulations for Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, F.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Gorler, T.; Jenko, F.; Mikkelsen, D.

    2007-11-01

    While there is an abundance of publications on plasma microturbulence in tokamaks, not much is presently known about its character in nonaxisymmetric devices. The present work constitutes the first attempt to investigate turbulent transport in modern stellarators, using the gyrokinetic turbulence code Gene and realistic magnetic equilibria. First, linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes are presented for the optimized stellarator Wendelstein 7-X which is currently under construction at Greifswald, Germany. The newly developed code Tracer -- based on field line tracing -- is employed to extract the required geometric information from the MHD equilibria [Phys. Plasmas 13, 092301 (2006)]. Extensive linear studies reveal substantial differences with respect to axisymmetric geometry [Phys. Plasmas 14, 042501 (2007)]. Nonlinear ITG simulations are also presented [Phys. Rev. Lett., in print]. Several fundamental features are discussed, including the role of zonal flows for turbulence saturation, the resulting flux-gradient relationship and the co-existence of ITG modes with trapped ion modes in the saturated state. Similar studies will be presented for the stellarator experiment NCSX at PPPL with the aim to comprehend the effects of quasi-axisymmetric geometry on the properties - both linear and nonlinear - of various microinstabilities.

  9. Stellar Echo Imaging of Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Chris; Lerch, Kieran; Lucente, Mark; Meza-Galvan, Jesus; Mitchell, Dan; Ruedin, Josh; Williams, Spencer; Zollars, Byron

    2016-01-01

    All stars exhibit intensity fluctuations over several timescales, from nanoseconds to years. These intensity fluctuations echo off bodies and structures in the star system. We posit that it is possible to take advantage of these echoes to detect, and possibly image, Earth-scale exoplanets. Unlike direct imaging techniques, temporal measurements do not require fringe tracking, maintaining an optically-perfect baseline, or utilizing ultra-contrast coronagraphs. Unlike transit or radial velocity techniques, stellar echo detection is not constrained to any specific orbital inclination. Current results suggest that existing and emerging technology can already enable stellar echo techniques at flare stars, such as Proxima Centauri, including detection, spectroscopic interrogation, and possibly even continent-level imaging of exoplanets in a variety of orbits. Detection of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars appears to be extremely challenging, but cannot be fully quantified without additional data on micro- and millisecond-scale intensity fluctuations of the Sun. We consider survey missions in the mold of Kepler and place preliminary constraints on the feasibility of producing 3D tomographic maps of other structures in star systems, such as accretion disks. In this report we discuss the theory, limitations, models, and future opportunities for stellar echo imaging.

  10. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  11. Grids of stellar models with rotation. I. Models from 0.8 to 120 M⊙ at solar metallicity (Z = 0.014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, S.; Georgy, C.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Mowlavi, N.; Wyttenbach, A.; Granada, A.; Decressin, T.; Hirschi, R.; Frischknecht, U.; Charbonnel, C.; Maeder, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Many topical astrophysical research areas, such as the properties of planet host stars, the nature of the progenitors of different types of supernovae and gamma ray bursts, and the evolution of galaxies, require complete and homogeneous sets of stellar models at different metallicities in order to be studied during the whole of cosmic history. We present here a first set of models for solar metallicity, where the effects of rotation are accounted for in a homogeneous way. Methods: We computed a grid of 48 different stellar evolutionary tracks, both rotating and non-rotating, at Z = 0.014, spanning a wide mass range from 0.8 to 120 M⊙. For each of the stellar masses considered, electronic tables provide data for 400 stages along the evolutionary track and at each stage, a set of 43 physical data are given. These grids thus provide an extensive and detailed data basis for comparisons with the observations. The rotating models start on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a rotation rate υini/υcrit = 0.4. The evolution is computed until the end of the central carbon-burning phase, the early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, or the core helium-flash for, respectively, the massive, intermediate, and both low and very low mass stars. The initial abundances are those deduced by Asplund and collaborators, which best fit the observed abundances of massive stars in the solar neighbourhood. We update both the opacities and nuclear reaction rates, and introduce new prescriptions for the mass-loss rates as stars approach the Eddington and/or the critical velocity. We account for both atomic diffusion and magnetic braking in our low-mass star models. Results: The present rotating models provide a good description of the average evolution of non-interacting stars. In particular, they reproduce the observed main-sequence width, the positions of the red giant and supergiant stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram, the observed surface compositions and

  12. Particle transport after pellet injection in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Satake, S.; López-Bruna, D.; Alonso, A.; Calvo, I.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Hernández, J.; García, R.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Perfilov, S.; Sánchez, E.; Soleto, A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Zhezhera, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-08-01

    We study radial particle transport in stellarator plasmas using cryogenic pellet injection. By means of perturbative experiments, we estimate the experimental particle flux and compare it with neoclassical simulations. Experimental evidence is obtained of the fact that core depletion in helical devices can be slowed-down even by pellets that do not reach the core region. This phenomenon is well captured by neoclassical predictions with DKES and FORTEC-3D.

  13. Results of Compact Stellarator Engineering Trade Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Brown, L. Bromberg, M. Cole

    2009-05-27

    number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  14. Results of Compact Stellarator Eengineering Trade Studies

    SciTech Connect

    T. Brown, L. Bromberg, and M. Cole

    2009-09-25

    A number of technical requirements and performance criteria can drive stellarator costs, e.g., tight tolerances, accurate coil positioning, low aspect ratio (compactness), choice of assembly strategy, metrology, and complexity of the stellarator coil geometry. With the completion of a seven-year design and construction effort of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) it is useful to interject the NCSX experience along with the collective experiences of the NCSX stellarator community to improving the stellarator configuration. Can improvements in maintenance be achieved by altering the stellarator magnet configuration with changes in the coil shape or with the combination of trim coils? Can a mechanical configuration be identified that incorporates a partial set of shaped fixed stellarator coils along with some removable coil set to enhance the overall machine maintenance? Are there other approaches that will simplify the concepts, improve access for maintenance, reduce overall cost and improve the reliability of a stellarator based power plant? Using ARIES-CS and NCSX as reference cases, alternative approaches have been studied and developed to show how these modifications would favorably impact the stellarator power plant and experimental projects. The current status of the alternate stellarator configurations being developed will be described and a comparison made to the recently designed and partially built NCSX device and the ARIES-CS reactor design study.

  15. Stellar nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution of the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    1988-01-01

    Current theoretical models of nucleosynthesis (N) in stars are reviewed, with an emphasis on their implications for Galactic chemical evolution. Topics addressed include the Galactic population II red giants and early N; N in the big bang; star formation, stellar evolution, and the ejection of thermonuclearly evolved debris; the chemical evolution of an idealized disk galaxy; analytical solutions for a closed-box model with continuous infall; and nuclear burning processes and yields. Consideration is given to shell N in massive stars, N related to degenerate cores, and the types of observational data used to constrain N models. Extensive diagrams, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  16. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Universe. Westerlund 1 will certainly provide new opportunities in the long-standing quest for more and finer details about how stars, and especially massive ones, do form. ... and the Most Dense The large number of stars in Westerlund 1 was not the only surprise awaiting Clark and his colleagues. From their observations, the team members also found that all these stars are packed into an amazingly small volume of space, indeed less than 6 light-years across. In fact, this is more or less comparable to the 4 light-year distance to the star nearest to the Sun, Proxima Centauri! It is incredible: the concentration in Westerlund 1 is so high that the mean separation between stars is quite similar to the extent of the Solar System. "With so many stars in such a small volume, some of them may collide", envisages Simon Clark. "This could lead to the formation of an intermediate-mass black hole more massive than 100 solar masses. It may well be that such a monster has already formed at the core of Westerlund 1." The huge population of massive stars in Westerlund 1 suggests that it will have a very significant impact on its surroundings. The cluster contains so many massive stars that in a time span of less than 40 million years, it will be the site of more than 1,500 supernovae. A gigantic firework that may drive a fountain of galactic material! Because Westerlund 1 is at a distance of only about 10,000 light-years, high-resolution cameras such as NAOS/CONICA on ESO's Very Large Telescope can resolve its individual stars. Such observations are now starting to reveal smaller stars in Westerlund 1, including some that are less massive than the Sun. Astronomers will thus soon be able to study this exotic galactic zoo in great depth. More information The research presented in this ESO Press Release will soon appear in the leading research journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("On the massive stellar population of the Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1" by J.S. Clark and colleagues). The

  17. STELLAR BINARY COMPANIONS TO SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-12-20

    For typical models of binary statistics, 50%-80% of core-collapse supernova (ccSN) progenitors are members of a stellar binary at the time of the explosion. Independent of any consequences of mass transfer, this has observational consequences that can be used to study the binary properties of massive stars. In particular, the secondary companion to the progenitor of a Type Ib/c SN is frequently (approx50%) the more optically luminous star since the high effective temperatures of the stripped progenitors make it relatively easy for a lower luminosity, cooler secondary to emit more optical light. Secondaries to the lower mass progenitors of Type II SN will frequently produce excess blue emission relative to the spectral energy distribution of the red primary. Available data constrain the models weakly. Any detected secondaries also provide an independent lower bound on the progenitor mass and, for historical SN, show that it was not a Type Ia event. Bright ccSN secondaries have an unambiguous, post-explosion observational signature-strong, blueshifted, relatively broad absorption lines created by the developing SN remnant (SNR). These can be used to locate historical SN with bright secondaries, confirm that a source is a secondary, and, potentially, measure abundances of ccSN ejecta. Luminous, hot secondaries will re-ionize the SNR on timescales of 100-1000 yr that are faster than re-ionization by the reverse shock, creating peculiar H II regions due to the high metallicity and velocities of the ejecta.

  18. Neoclassical and anomalous flows in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, A. S.; Marine, T.; Spong, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    The impact of magnetic geometry and plasma profiles on flows and viscosities in stellarators is investigated. This work examines both neoclassical and anomalous flows for a number of configurations including a particular focus on the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) and other quasi-symmetric configurations. Neoclassical flows and viscosities are calculated using the PENTA code [1]. For anomalous flows, the neoclassical viscosities from PENTA are used in a transport code that includes Reynolds stress flow generation [2]. This is done for the standard quasi-helically symmetric configuration of HSX, a symmetry-breaking mirror configuration and a hill configuration. The impact of these changes in the magnetic geometry on neoclassical viscosities and flows in HSX are discussed. Due to variations in neoclassical viscosities, HSX can have strong neoclassical flows in the core region. In turn, these neoclassical flows can provide a seed for anomalous flow generation. These effects are shown to vary as the ratio of electron to ion temperature varies. In particular, as the ion temperature increases relative to the electron flow shear is shown to increase. [1] D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005). [2] D. E. Newman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 938 (1998).

  19. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  20. Modeling Small Stellar Populations Using Starburst99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Gerardo A.; Leitherer, Claus

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have developed a new approach to form stars from clusters first, where massive stars are formed from fractions of mass of small stellar clusters. This new approximation is based on the empirical power law found in recent years and the maximum stellar mass that can be formed in a cluster. To produce the new models we have used the most recent version of Starburst99 that incorporates the most recent stellar evolution models with rotation. At the verge of solving nearby stellar populations and observing small stellar populations across the universe, this new approach brings a new scope on trying to disentangle the nature of hyper and supermassive stars in small stellar populations. Models for NGC 3603 and NGC 604 are presented. Our most important result is a strong ionizing power from small clusters by forming enough supermassive stars in a cluster of ~ 104 M⊙.

  1. Stellar polarimetry with ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Espadons Project Team

    ESPaDOnS is a new-generation cross-dispersed échelle spectropolarimeter, the commissioning phase of which is scheduled at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) for autumn 2003. This instrument will provide full coverage of the optical domain (370nm to 1000nm) in all polarization states (circular and linear) at a resolving power of about 70 000, with a peak efficiency of 20% (telescope and detector included). It includes a bench-mounted spectrograph, fiber-fed from a Cassegrain-mounted module including all polarimetric and calibration facilities.ESPaDOnS should be the most powerful tool dedicated to stellar spectropolarimetry, therefore opening unprecedented perspectives for major issues of stellar physics, from studies of stellar interiors to investigations of stellar atmospheres, stellar surfaces, stellar magnetic fields, and to observations of circumstellar environments and extra-solar planets.

  2. Research on stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Kotenko, V. G.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Nemov, V. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Kalyuzhnyi, V. N.; Hagnestål, A.; Källne, J.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2014-09-01

    The development of a stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid concept is reviewed. The hybrid comprises of a fusion neutron source and a powerful sub-critical fast fission reactor core. The aim is the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and safe fission energy production. In its fusion part, neutrons are generated in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma, confined magnetically in a stellarator-type system with an embedded magnetic mirror. Based on kinetic calculations, the energy balance for such a system is analyzed. Neutron calculations have been performed with the MCNPX code, and the principal design of the reactor part is developed. Neutron outflux at different outer parts of the reactor is calculated. Numerical simulations have been performed on the structure of a magnetic field in a model of the stellarator-mirror device, and that is achieved by switching off one or two coils of toroidal field in the Uragan-2M torsatron. The calculations predict the existence of closed magnetic surfaces under certain conditions. The confinement of fast particles in such a magnetic trap is analyzed.

  3. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost. Code description and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudiksen, B. V.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. H.; Hayek, W.; Leenaarts, J.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric radiation, radiative transfer in an isothermal scattering atmosphere, hydrogen ionization and thermal conduction. Results.Bifrost completes the tests with good results and shows near linear efficiency scaling to thousands of computing cores.

  4. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: plasma mixing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward; Lasenby, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on light scalars and vectors with a variety of SM couplings. In particular, we improve the bounds on light ( m ≲ keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors. Scalars with mass ≲ 2 keV that couple through the Higgs portal are constrained to mixing angle sin θ ≲ 3 × 10-10, which gives the dominant bound for scalar masses above ˜ 0 .2eV.

  5. Physics of Compact Advanced Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Zarnstorff; L.A. Berry; A. Brooks; E. Fredrickson; G.-Y. Fu; S. Hirshman; S. Hudson; L.-P. Ku; E. Lazarus; D. Mikkelsen; D. Monticello; G.H. Neilson; N. Pomphrey; A. Reiman; D. Spong; D. Strickler; A. Boozer; W.A. Cooper; R. Goldston; R. Hatcher; M. Isaev; C. Kessel; J. Lewandowski; J. Lyon; P. Merkel; H. Mynick; B.E. Nelson; C. Nuehrenberg; M. Redi; W. Reiersen; P. Rutherford; R. Sanchez; J. Schmidt; R.B. White

    2001-08-14

    Compact optimized stellarators offer novel solutions for confining high-beta plasmas and developing magnetic confinement fusion. The 3-D plasma shape can be designed to enhance the MHD stability without feedback or nearby conducting structures and provide drift-orbit confinement similar to tokamaks. These configurations offer the possibility of combining the steady-state low-recirculating power, external control, and disruption resilience of previous stellarators with the low-aspect ratio, high beta-limit, and good confinement of advanced tokamaks. Quasi-axisymmetric equilibria have been developed for the proposed National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) with average aspect ratio 4-4.4 and average elongation of approximately 1.8. Even with bootstrap-current consistent profiles, they are passively stable to the ballooning, kink, vertical, Mercier, and neoclassical-tearing modes for beta > 4%, without the need for external feedback or conducting walls. The bootstrap current generates only 1/4 of the magnetic rotational transform at beta = 4% (the rest is from the coils), thus the equilibrium is much less nonlinear and is more controllable than similar advanced tokamaks. The enhanced stability is a result of ''reversed'' global shear, the spatial distribution of local shear, and the large fraction of externally generated transform. Transport simulations show adequate fast-ion confinement and thermal neoclassical transport similar to equivalent tokamaks. Modular coils have been designed which reproduce the physics properties, provide good flux surfaces, and allow flexible variation of the plasma shape to control the predicted MHD stability and transport properties.

  6. From stellar nebula to planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Alibert, Yann; Cabral, Nahuel; Benz, Willy

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar and extrasolar comets and extrasolar planets are the subject of numerous studies in order to determine their chemical composition and internal structure. In the case of planetesimals, their compositions are important as they govern in part the composition of future planets. Aims: The present works aims at determining the chemical composition of icy planetesimals, believed to be similar to present day comets, formed in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. The main objective of this work is to provide valuable theoretical data on chemical composition for models of planetesimals and comets, and models of planet formation and evolution. Methods: We have developed a model that calculates the composition of ices formed during the cooling of the stellar nebula. Coupled with a model of refractory element formation, it allows us to determine the chemical composition and mass ratio of ices to rocks in icy planetesimals throughout in the protoplanetary disc. Results: We provide relationships for ice line positions (for different volatile species) in the disc, and chemical compositions and mass ratios of ice relative to rock for icy planetesimals in stellar systems of solar chemical composition. From an initial homogeneous composition of the nebula, a wide variety of chemical compositions of planetesimals were produced as a function of the mass of the disc and distance to the star. Ices incorporated in planetesimals are mainly composed of H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, and NH3. The ice/rock mass ratio is equal to 1 ± 0.5 in icy planetesimals following assumptions. This last value is in good agreement with observations of solar system comets, but remains lower than usual assumptions made in planet formation models, taking this ratio to be of 2-3.

  7. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  8. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  9. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  10. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  11. Physical Processes in Stellar Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank-Kamenetskii, D. A.

    1962-01-01

    The author set himself three fundamental tasks: (1) To show how modern atomic and nuclear physics can contribute to the description of processes in stellar interiors. (2) To present the fundamentals of the methods for calculating physical processes taking place at temperatures of millions of degrees. (3) To provide the required minimum of information on problems of atomic and nuclear physics to astrophysicists, and on astronomical problems to physicists. The book is divided into four parts, the Introduction, the Theory of Stationary Processes, the Applications of the Theory of Stationary Processes and the Theory of Non-Stationary Processes.

  12. Envelope Inflation or Stellar Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, S.; Matzner, C. D.

    We an optically-thick, transonic, steady wind model for a H-free Wolf-Rayet star. A bifurcation is found across a critical mass loss rate Mb. Slower winds M < Mb extend by several hydrostatic stellar radii, reproduce features of envelope in ation from Petrovic et al. (2006) and Gräfener et al. (2012), and are energetically unbound. This work is of particular interest for extended envelopes and winds, radiative hydrodynamic instabilities (eg. wind stagnation, clumping, etc.), and NLTE atmospheric models.

  13. Development of quasi-isodynamic stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, Jürgen

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical stellarator research from MHD-stable stellarators via quasi-helically symmetric ones to Wendelstein 7-X, quasi-axisymmetric tokamaks and quasi-isodynamic stellarators is sketched. Research strategy, computational aspects and various favorable properties are emphasized. The results found, but only together with the completion of according experimental devices and their scientific exploitation, may form a basis for selecting the confinement geometry most viable for fusion.

  14. Icarus: Stellar binary light curve synthesis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Rene

    2016-11-01

    Icarus is a stellar binary light curve synthesis tool that generates a star, given some basic binary parameters, by solving the gravitational potential equation, creating a discretized stellar grid, and populating the stellar grid with physical parameters, including temperature and surface gravity. Icarus also evaluates the outcoming flux from the star given an observer's point of view (i.e., orbital phase and orbital orientation).

  15. Symmetry breaking of quasihelical stellarator equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-04-01

    A mean-field Ohm's law is used to determine the effects of the bootstrap current on quasihelically symmetric stellarator equilibria. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the effects of the bootstrap current break the quasihelical stellarator symmetry at second order in an inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic field strength. The level of symmetry breaking suggests that good approximations to quasihelical stellarator fusion reactors may not be attainable.

  16. The Anemic Stellar Halo of M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, Benne

    2014-10-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that massive disk galaxies should have richly-structured extended stellar halos, containing ~10% of a galaxy's stars, originating in large part from the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies. Observations of a number of nearby disk galaxies have generally agreed with these expectations. Recent new observations in integrated light with a novel array of low scattered-light telephoto lenses have failed to convincingly detect a stellar halo in the nearby massive face-on disk galaxy M101 (van Dokkum et al. 2014). They argue that any halo has to have <0.3% of the mass of the galaxy. This halo would be the least massive of any massive disk galaxy in the local Universe (by factors of several) -- such a halo is not predicted or naturally interpreted by the models, and would present a critical challenge to the picture of ubiquitous stellar halos formed from the debris of disrupting dwarf galaxies.We propose to resolve the stellar populations of this uniquely anemic stellar halo for 6 orbits with HST (ACS and WFC3), allowing us to reach surface brightness limits sufficient to clearly detect and characterize M101's stellar halo if it carries more than 0.1% of M101's mass. With resolved stellar populations, we can use the gradient of stellar populations as a function of radius to separate stellar halo from disk, which is impossible using integrated light observations. The resolved stellar populations will reveal the halo mass to much greater accuracy, measure the halo radial profile, constrain any halo lopsidedness, estimate the halo's stellar metallicity, and permit an analysis of outer disk stellar populations.

  17. Stellar Tools for High Resolution Population Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, M.; Bertone, E.; Rodríguez-Merino, L.; Buzzoni, A.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the application of a new stellar library of high-resolution synthetic spectra (based upon ATLAS9 and SYNTHE codes developed by R. L. Kurucz) in the calculation of the ultraviolet-optical spectral energy distribution of simple stellar populations (SSPs). For this purpose, the library has been coupled with Buzzoni's population synthesis code. Part of this paper is also devoted to illustrate quantitatively the extent to which synthetic stellar libraries represent real stars.

  18. Application of the stellarator expansion for plasma-stability studies in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Anania, G.; Johnson, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    A numerical code, which utilizes the stellarator expansion, is developed and tested. It is used to investigate the magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of several stellarator configurations, including Heliotron E, Wendelstein VII-A, a modular-coil device, and ATF-1.

  19. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  20. Physical formulation of mixed modes of stellar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Masao

    2016-12-01

    The frequency condition for eigenmodes of nonradial stellar oscillations with a mixed character, which have been extensively detected in red giants and subgiants, is generally examined by a simple physical model based on a progressive-wave picture. The coupling coefficient between the gravity-wave oscillation in the core and the acoustic-wave oscillation in the envelope is expressed in terms of the reflection coefficient at the intermediate evanescent region. This relation is fully consistent with the recent asymptotic analysis for dipolar modes, but disagrees with the conventional asymptotic analysis, which assumes that the coupling is weak. The expression for the amplitude ratio between the core and envelope oscillations is also derived. The upper and lower bounds of the ratio are found to be determined by the reflection coefficient at the intermediate region. It is also argued that the eigenmode condition should appropriately be modified if the wave generated near the surface and transmitted to the core is (partially) lost either by damping or scattering in the core. The developed formulation opens a possibility to characterize the core damping (or scattering) of the red giant stars in terms of the formal reflection coefficient at the inner boundary of the inner cavity, which would provide a valuable insight into those physical processes.

  1. Stellarator Research at Columbia University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Caliri, C.; Clark, A. W.; Febre, A.; Hammond, K. C.; Massidda, S. D.; Sweeney, R. M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Sarasola, X.; Spong, D. A.; Kornbluth, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Neutral plasmas were formed and heated by Electron Cyclotron and Electron Bernstein Waves at 2.45 GHz in the Columbia Nonneutral Torus (CNT) and were characterized with Langmuir probe and fast camera measurements. Future research will take advantage of the low aspect ratio (A = 2.3-2.7), high fraction of trapped particles and large vessel of CNT. The first plasma was obtained in a prototype circular coil tokamak-stellarator hybrid (Proto-CIRCUS). As a result of the toroidal-field coils being tilted and interlinked with each other, the device can be operated at lower plasma-current than a tokamak of comparable size and field, with implications for disruptions and steady state. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced. Comparisons between field-line calculations and experimental mapping is expected to confirm the generation of rotational transform and its dependence on the radial location and tilt of the coils, both of which can be varied. Finally we propose a small EC-heated classical stellarator to improve the production-rate and charge-state of ions in EC-resonant ion sources (ECRIS) over the conventional magnetic-mirror design, and discuss how ions would be extracted, for injection in research and medical accelerators.

  2. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  3. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  4. Compact stellarators with modular coils.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, P R

    2000-07-18

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan.

  5. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  6. Neoclassical transport simulations for stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, Y.; Beidler, C. D.; Maassberg, H.; Murakami, S.; Wakasa, A.; Tribaldos, V.

    2011-02-15

    The benchmarking of the thermal neoclassical transport coefficients is described using examples of the Large Helical Device (LHD) and TJ-II stellarators. The thermal coefficients are evaluated by energy convolution of the monoenergetic coefficients obtained by direct interpolation or neural network techniques from the databases precalculated by different codes. The temperature profiles are calculated by a predictive transport code from the energy balance equations with the ambipolar radial electric field estimated from a diffusion equation to guarantee a unique and smooth solution, although several solutions of the ambipolarity condition may exist when root-finding is invoked; the density profiles are fixed. The thermal transport coefficients as well as the ambipolar radial electric field are compared and very reasonable agreement is found for both configurations. Together with an additional W7-X case, these configurations represent very different degrees of neoclassical confinement at low collisionalities. The impact of the neoclassical optimization on the energy confinement time is evaluated and the confinement times for different devices predicted by transport modeling are compared with the standard scaling for stellarators. Finally, all configurations are scaled to the same volume for a direct comparison of the volume-averaged pressure and the neoclassical degree of optimization.

  7. Stellarator physics-evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Harris, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A wide range of stellarator/torsatron configurations is evaluated and compared using vacuum field flux surface topology, MHD equilibrium beta limits and guiding center orbit confinement as optimization criteria. The torsatron is found to be a better choice for a near term physics experiment than the modular stellarator or helical configurations studied. The best torsatron geometry has an equilibrium beta limit of <..beta..> = 4 to 5% for a plasma aspect ratio of 7 and 7 to 8% for an aspect ratio of 14. A feasible torsatron modularization scheme which retains the physics properties is shown. A wide variety of flux surface geometries can be produced due to the additional flexibility introduced by toroidally-directed windbacks and compensating coils. The effects of different methods of calculating MHD equilibrium/stability, different pressure profiles, and different vertical fields on the results are discussed. Guiding center orbit containment is a less sensitive indicator of configuration quality than is the equilibrium beta limit. Orbits for thermal and fast ions are calculated in field line (flux) coordinates using actual fields and including electric fields, pitch angle scattering and fast ion slowing down.

  8. Flexible helical-axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hender, Timothy C.; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Cantrell, Jack L.; Morris, Robert N.

    1988-01-01

    An 1=1 helical winding which spirals about a conventional planar, circular central conductor of a helical-axis stellarator adds a significant degree of flexibility by making it possible to control the rotational transform profile and shear of the magnetic fields confining the plasma in a helical-axis stellarator. The toroidal central conductor links a plurality of toroidal field coils which are separately disposed to follow a helical path around the central conductor in phase with the helical path of the 1=1 winding. This coil configuration produces bean-shaped magnetic flux surfaces which rotate around the central circular conductor in the same manner as the toroidal field generating coils. The additional 1=1 winding provides flexible control of the magnetic field generated by the central conductor to prevent the formation of low-order resonances in the rotational transform profile which can produce break-up of the equilibrium magnetic surfaces. Further, this additional winding can deepen the magnetic well which together with the flexible control provides increased stability.

  9. Stellar x-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, B.; Uchida, Y.; Kosugi, T.; Hudson, H. S.

    1995-01-01

    What is the importance of stellar X-ray flares to astrophysics, or even more, to the world at large? In the case of the Sun, changes in solar activity at the two temporal extremes can have quite significant consequences. Longterm changes in solar activity, such as the Maunder Minimum, can apparently lead to non-negligible alterations of the earth's climate. The extreme short term changes are solar flares, the most energetic of which can cause communications disruptions, power outages and ionizing radiation levels amounting to medical X-ray dosages on long commercial flights and even potentially lethal exposures for unshielded astronauts. Why does the Sun exhibit such behaviour? Even if we had a detailed knowledge of the relevant physical processes on the Sun - which we may be on the way to having in hand as evidenced by these Proceedings- our understanding would remain incomplete in regard to fundamental causation so long as we could not say whether the Sun is, in this respect, unique among the stars. This current paper discusses the stellar x-ray flare detections and astronomical models (quasi-static cooling model and two-ribbon model) that are used to observe the x-ray emission.

  10. The Ultra-Low Aspect Ratio Stellarator SCR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso; Vargas, Ivan; Mora, Jaime; Zamora, Esteban; Asenjo, Jose; Ribas, Leonardo; Guadamuz, Saul

    2012-10-01

    The world most compact stellarator is currently being designed at the Costa Rica Institute of Technology (ITCR). The SCR-1(Stellarator of Costa Rica 1) is a 2-field period modular device with a circular cross-section vessel (Ro=0.238m, a=0.097m, Ro{/a≈ 2.5}, 0.014m3, {4mm} thickness 6061-T6 aluminum). The expected D-shaped high elongated plasma cross section has a maximum average radius of < a> ≈ 0.062m, leading to Ro/< a> ≥ 3.8. Such compactness was reached after a SCR-1 earlier proposal [1] was redesigned, both based on the low shear stellarator UST/1: Ro/< a> ≈ 6, ι =0.32/0.28 (core/edge) [2]. The set field at centre is 88mT produced by 12 copper modular coils, 8.7kA-turn each. This field is EC resonant at Ro with a 2.45GHz μ w, 1st harmonic, from 2/3kW magnetrons which will produce a second time-scale plasma pulse. The coil current will be produced by a bank of cell batteries. Poincar'{e} and EC deposition plots will be presented using COMSOL Multiphysics software. SCR-1 will be synergetic to the ST MEDUSA currently under donation to ITCR [3]. Both will benefit of the local new activities in technological plasmas.[4pt] [1] Barillas L et al., Proc.19th Int.Conf. Nucl.Eng., Japan, 2011[0pt] [2] Queral V, Stellarator News, 118, 2008[0pt] [3] Ribeiro C et al., 54th APS, Plasma Phys. Div., US, 2012

  11. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database and the ACS Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters II. Stellar Evolution Tracks, Isochrones, Luminosity Functions, and Synthetic Horizontal-Branch Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dotter, A; Chaboyer, B; Jevremovic, D; Kostov, V; Baron, E; Ferguson, J; Sarajedini, A; Anderson, J

    The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is a collection of stellar evolution tracks and isochrones that spans a range of [Fe/H] from -2.5 to +0.5, [a/Fe] from -0.2 to +0.8 (for [Fe/H]<=0) or +0.2 (for [Fe/H]>0), and initial He mass fractions from Y=0.245 to 0.40. Stellar evolution tracks were computed for masses between 0.1 and 4 Msolar, allowing isochrones to be generated for ages as young as 250 Myr. For the range in masses where the core He flash occurs, separate He-burning tracks were computed starting from the zero age horizontal branch. The tracks and isochrones have been transformed to the observational plane in a variety of photometric systems including standard UBV(RI)C, Stromgren uvby, SDSS ugriz, 2MASS JHKs, and HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2. The Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Database is accessible through a Web site at http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/ where all tracks, isochrones, and additional files can be downloaded. [Copied from online abstract of paper titled "Darmouth Stellar Evolution Database" authored by Dotter, Chaboyer, Jevremovic, Kostov, Baron, Ferguson, and Jason. Abstract is located at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJS..178...89D] Web tools are also available at the home page (http://stellar.dartmouth.edu/~models/index.html). These tools allow users to create isochrones and convert them to luminosity functions or create synthetic horizontal branch models.

  12. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  13. Approximating proto-stellar structure without a computer (The proto-sun at 50 earth radii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    1991-09-01

    An analytical method that facilitates the description of main-sequence stellar structure is applied to protostars to model the core in formation. The model is based on Motz dimensionless variables which permit the stellar interior equations to be converted into a linearly approximate form. Equations for the mass, pressure, and temperature gradients of the protosun's hydrostatic core at 50 earth radii are given, and an approximation is presented for a one-solar-mass protostar that is contracting down to the main sequence. Comparisons are made between the analytical values and values from observations and computer models, and IR data confirm some analytically derived protostellar characteristics. It is concluded that the core of a protostar is composed of a spherical ball of gas in hydrostatic equilibrium where accretion very gradually becomes a factor.

  14. Stellar evolution and the triple-α reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Takuma

    2014-05-02

    Nuclear reaction rates play a crucial role in the evolution of stars. For low-mass stars, the triple-α reaction controls the helium burning stars in the red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. More importantly, the cross section of the triple-α reaction has a great impact on the helium ignition at the center of the electron degenerate helium core of red giants and on the helium shell flashes of AGB stars. It is to be noted that stellar evolution models are influenced not only by the value of the cross section, but also by the temperature dependence of the reaction rate. In this paper, I present the impact of the triple-α reaction rates on the evolution of low-mass metal-free stars and intermediate-mass AGB stars. According to the previous study, the constraint on the triple-α reaction rate is derived based on stellar evolution theory. It is found that the recent revisions of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations satisfy the condition for the ignition of the helium core flash in low-mass stars.

  15. The Dark Matter Halo Profile Of NGC 2976 Via Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Joshua J.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Blanc, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    The observations of kinematics in low surface brightness (LSB) and dwarf late type galaxies have stubbornly resisted giving clear evidence for the cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) dark matter (DM) halo profiles that simulations with ΛCDM inputs predict. Instead, most LSBs and late type dwarfs suggest cored DM halos or the observations are not yet constraining enough to rule out cusps. One viable theory to explain cored DM halos relies on the gravitational perturbation of a growing baryonic disk that is then rapidly removed causing the halo to expand to a cored equilibrium. Weakly self-interacting dark matter has also been invoked to explain cored DM halos. This problem may loom large over small galaxy formation and growth. However, different measurements can be taken to further test the apparent problem. Most previous data have relied on HI or Hα as kinematic tracers. A small number of works have studied the problem with longslit stellar kinematics. Ideally, the advantages of 2D spectroscopic coverage and a collisionless kinematic tracer would be combined. So far, NGC 2976 has made one of the cleanest cases for a cored DM halo via integral field spectroscopy in Hα. We here report on observations of NGC 2976 with the large field-of-view fiber-fed Visible Integral field Replicable Unit Spectrograph Prototype (VIRUS-P) at R=3200 to concurrently measure the gaseous and stellar kinematics and probe the DM halo. We find that the gas and stellar kinematics disagree both in the magnitude of their second velocity moments and their detailed profiles. We unexpectedly find emission features in one of NGC 2976's two large star-forming regions which may be indicative of carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet stars. A putative bar further complicates the use of gaseous tracers. We solve the Jeans equations with stellar kinematics to reevaluate the DM profile in this exemplar galaxy of the core-cusp problem.

  16. Magnetic diagnostic responses for compact stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Steven P. Hirshman; Edward A. Lazarus; James D. Hanson; Stephen F. Knowlton; Lang L. Lao,

    2004-02-01

    The formulation of magnetic diagnostic response functions for a 3-dimensional stellarator plasma is described. Reciprocity relations are used to compute unique response functions for each type of magnetic diagnostic. Green's function response tables (databases) are generated from which both external and internal plasma current contributions to diagnostic signals can be rapidly computed. Applications to compact stellarators are described.

  17. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  18. Stellar-opacity calculations. II. Lecture 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-03-14

    We turn to the effects on opacities of atomic lines and molecular bands. It was the realization that these atomic lines were important for the opacity and the radiation flow in stars that allowed the field of stellar evolution to greatly flower in the 1960's and 1970's. Our understanding of stellar structure and evolution is now very deep.

  19. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  20. Truncated accretion discs around stellar mass objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, C. R. M. X.

    2011-03-01

    This thesis explores dynamical and radiative processes that occur in accretion flows around various stellar-mass objects. The work is divided into two separate themes: the interaction between strong stellar magnetic fields and accretion flows (chapters 2, 3, and 4) and radiative processes and accretion flow geometry in black holes at low luminosity (chapter 5).

  1. PRINCIPLES OF STELLAR EVOLUTION AND NUCLEOSYNTHESIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The fields of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis comprise one of the most vital and intriguing areas of modern sceintific research. The recent...which they are formed. This is the first text to present the basic physical principles of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis . The book provides a

  2. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  3. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, L. G.; Han, J. L.; Kong, M. Z.; Wu Xuebing

    2011-05-10

    Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are classified into several types depending on the dominance of starburst or active galactic nucleus (AGN) components. We conducted a stellar population analysis for a sample of 160 ULIRGs to study the evolution of ULIRGs. We found that the dominance of intermediate-age and old stellar populations increases along the sequence of H II-like ULIRGs, Seyfert-H II composite ULIRGs, and Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. Consequently, the typical mean stellar age and stellar mass increase along the sequence. Comparing the gas mass estimated from the CO measurements to the stellar mass estimated from the optical spectra, we found that the gas fraction is anti-correlated with stellar mass. Even so, the total masses of H II-like ULIRGs with small stellar masses and a large fraction of gas are not comparable to the small masses of Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. This indicates that H II-like ULIRGs with small stellar masses have no evolutionary connections with massive Seyfert 2 ULIRGs. Only massive ULIRGs may follow the evolution sequence toward AGNs, and massive H II-like ULIRGs are probably in an earlier stage of the sequence.

  4. Stellar Evolution with Rotation: Mixing Processes in AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driebe, T.; Blöcker, T.

    We included diffusive angular momentum transport and rotationally induced mixing processes in our stellar evolution code and studied the influence of rotation on the evolution of intermediate mass stars (M*=2dots6 Msolar) towards and along the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). The calculations start in the fully convective pre-main sequence phase and the initial angular momentu m was adjusted such that on the zero-age main sequence vrot=200 km/ s is achieved. The diffusion coefficients for the five rotational instabilities considered (dynamical shear, secular shear, Eddington-Sweet (ES) circulation, Solberg-Høiland-instability and Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability) were adopted from Heger et al. (2000, ApJ 528, 368). Mixing efficiency and sensitivity of these processes against molecular weight gradients have been determined by calibration of the main sequence width. In this study we focus on the abundance evolution of carbon. On the one hand, the surface abundance ratios of 12C/13C a nd 12C/16O at the base of the AGB were found to be ≈ 7dots 10 and ≈ 0.1, resp., being a factor of two lower than in non-rotating models. This results from the slow but continuously operating rotationally induced mixing due to the ES-circulation and the GSF-instability during the long main sequence phase. On the other hand, 13C serves as neutron source for interior s-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars vi a 13C(α,n)16O. Herwig et al. (1997, A&A 324, L81) found that a 13C pocket is forme d in the intershell region of 3 Msolar AGB star if diffusive overshoot is considered. Our calculations show, that mixing processes due to rotation open an alternative channel for the formation of a 13C pocket as found by Langer et al. (1999, A&A 346, L37). Again, ES-circulation and GSF-instability are the predominant rotational mixing processes.

  5. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brian E

    Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM). These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Lyα absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  6. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  7. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  8. Polarimetric Investigations of Stellar Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachikian, E. Ye.; Eritsian, M. A.; Hovhannessian, R. Kh.

    2002-07-01

    The degree of polarization of light from stars in 44 O B associations as a function of interstellar absorption is investigated. It is shown that the character of the dependence of P on A V for stars in associations and stars not in associations depends on the value of A V: for A V 2 m .5 it has a linear character and is the same for both groups of stars. For A V > 2 m .5 the dependence of P on A V for stars in and not in associations departs from linearity and for A V = 4 m .5 it reaches P ass = 1.8% and P nonass = 1%, respectively. Such a difference is explained by the additional depolarization in stellar associations. Such strong depolarization in associations may be due to the overall magnetic field of the Galaxy and to physical peculiarities in the association itself.

  9. Magnetohydodynamics stability of compact stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Ku, L.P.; Cooper, W.A.; Hirshman, S.H.

    2000-01-03

    Recent stability results of external kink modes and vertical modes in compact stellarators are presented. The vertical mode is found to be stabilized by externally generated poloidal flux. A simple stability criterion is derived in the limit of large aspect ratio and constant current density. For a wall at infinite distance from the plasma, the amount of external flux needed for stabilization is given by Fi = (k2 {minus} k)=(k2 + 1), where k is the axisymmetric elongation and Fi is the fraction of the external rotational transform. A systematic parameter study shows that the external kink mode in QAS can be stabilized at high beta ({approximately} 5%) without a conducting wall by magnetic shear via 3D shaping. It is found that external kinks are driven by both parallel current and pressure gradient. The pressure contributes significantly to the overall drive through the curvature term and the Pfirsch-Schluter current.

  10. Stellarmak a hybrid stellarator: Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, C.W.

    1980-01-04

    This paper discusses hybridization of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or adding average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting ..beta.., and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams.

  11. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  12. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  13. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. EXors and the stellar birthline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Mackenzie S. L.; Stahler, Steven W.

    2017-04-01

    We assess the evolutionary status of EXors. These low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars repeatedly undergo sharp luminosity increases, each a year or so in duration. We place into the HR diagram all EXors that have documented quiescent luminosities and effective temperatures, and thus determine their masses and ages. Two alternate sets of pre-main-sequence tracks are used, and yield similar results. Roughly half of EXors are embedded objects, i.e., they appear observationally as Class I or flat-spectrum infrared sources. We find that these are relatively young and are located close to the stellar birthline in the HR diagram. Optically visible EXors, on the other hand, are situated well below the birthline. They have ages of several Myr, typical of classical T Tauri stars. Judging from the limited data at hand, we find no evidence that binarity companions trigger EXor eruptions; this issue merits further investigation. We draw several general conclusions. First, repetitive luminosity outbursts do not occur in all pre-main-sequence stars, and are not in themselves a sign of extreme youth. They persist, along with other signs of activity, in a relatively small subset of these objects. Second, the very existence of embedded EXors demonstrates that at least some Class I infrared sources are not true protostars, but very young pre-main-sequence objects still enshrouded in dusty gas. Finally, we believe that the embedded pre-main-sequence phase is of observational and theoretical significance, and should be included in a more complete account of early stellar evolution.

  15. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  16. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  17. Parametrizing the stellar haloes of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Richard; Kauffman, Guinevere; Wang, Jing; Vegetti, Simona

    2014-09-01

    We study the stellar haloes of galaxies out to 70-100 kpc as a function of stellar mass and galaxy type by stacking aligned r- and g-band images from a sample of 45 508 galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9 in the redshift range 0.06 ≤ z ≤ 0.1 and in the mass range 1010.0 M⊙ < M* < 1011.4 M⊙. We derive surface brightness profiles to a depth of almost μr ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2. We find that the ellipticity of the stellar halo is a function of galaxy stellar mass and that the haloes of high-concentration galaxies are more elliptical than those of low-concentration galaxies. Where the g - r colour of the stellar halo can be measured, we find that the stellar light is always bluer than in the main galaxy. The colour of the stellar halo is redder for more massive galaxies. We further demonstrate that the full two-dimensional surface intensity distribution of our galaxy stacks can only be fit through multicomponent Sérsic models. Using the fraction of light in the outer component of the models as a proxy for the fraction of accreted stellar light, we show that this fraction is a function of stellar mass and galaxy type. The fraction of accreted stellar light rises from 30 to 70 per cent and from 2 to 25 per cent for high- and low-concentration galaxies, respectively, over the mass range 1010.0-1011.4 M⊙.

  18. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GOULD BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Allen, Lori E.; Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Cieza, Lucas A.; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda C.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Hatchell, Jennifer; Heiderman, Amanda; Huard, Tracy L.; Kirk, Jason M.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Peterson, Dawn E.; Young, Kaisa E.

    2015-09-15

    We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope “cores to disks” (c2d) and “Gould Belt” (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the GB. We compile extinction corrected spectral energy distributions for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0 + I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background Asymptotic Giant Branch stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40–0.78 Myr for Class 0 + I YSOs and 0.26–0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the adopted assumptions. Including information from (sub)millimeter wavelengths, one-third of the Class 0 + I sample is classified as Class 0, leading to durations of 0.13–0.26 Myr (Class 0) and 0.27–0.52 Myr (Class I). We revisit infrared color–color diagrams used in the literature to classify YSOs and propose minor revisions to classification boundaries in these diagrams. Finally, we show that the bolometric temperature is a poor discriminator between Class II and Class III YSOs.

  19. Effects of nonlinear viscosity on plasma flow induced island healing in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    The theory of island healing by plasma flows in stellarators [1] is extended to include the effects of nonlinear neoclassical viscosity. The theory was developed in an effort to explain observations from LHD that showed spontaneous healing of vacuum islands when a critical β is exceeded. The theory uses torque balance and island evolution equations to describe transitions between states with large non-rotating islands to states where rotation shielding suppresses island formation. The balance of neoclassical damping and cross-field viscosity produces a radial boundary layer for the plasma rotation profile outside the separatrix of a locked magnetic island. The boundary layer width is related to the strength of the healing viscous torque. This work is extended by accounting for the nonlinear dependence of the neoclassical flow damping coefficients on the plasma flow. In the small flow limit, the resulting viscous torque is linear with the plasma flow. However, in sufficiently collisionless plasmas, nonlinear viscosity effects are important and the resultant viscous torque is proportional to the square-root of the plasma flow velocity. Implications for magnetic island/transport barrier interactions will be discussed. [4pt] [1] C. C. Hegna, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113017 (2011)

  20. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH A SCHUSTER MASS DISTRIBUTION. I. STATIONARY WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Palous, Jan; Wuensch, Richard; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic models for spherically symmetric winds driven by young stellar clusters with a generalized Schuster stellar density profile are explored. For this we use both semi-analytic models and one-dimensional numerical simulations. We determine the properties of quasi-adiabatic and radiative stationary winds and define the radius at which the flow turns from subsonic to supersonic for all stellar density distributions. Strongly radiative winds significantly diminish their terminal speed and thus their mechanical luminosity is strongly reduced. This also reduces their potential negative feedback into their host galaxy interstellar medium. The critical luminosity above which radiative cooling becomes dominant within the clusters, leading to thermal instabilities which make the winds non-stationary, is determined, and its dependence on the star cluster density profile, core radius, and half-mass radius is discussed.

  1. Applications of the k-ω Model in Stellar Evolutionary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan

    2017-05-01

    The k-ω model for turbulence was first proposed by Kolmogorov. A new k-ω model for stellar convection was developed by Li, which could reasonably describe turbulent convection not only in the convectively unstable zone, but also in the overshooting regions. We revised the k-ω model by improving several model assumptions (including the macro-length of turbulence, convective heat flux, and turbulent mixing diffusivity, etc.), making it applicable not only for convective envelopes, but also for convective cores. Eight parameters are introduced in the revised k-ω model. It should be noted that the Reynolds stress (turbulent pressure) is neglected in the equation of hydrostatic support. We applied it into solar models and 5 M ⊙ stellar models to calibrate the eight model parameters, as well as to investigate the effects of the convective overshooting on the Sun and intermediate mass stellar models.

  2. On the universal stellar law for extrasolar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we consider a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to derive and develop an universal stellar law for extrasolar systems. Previously, it has been proposed the statistical theory for a cosmogonic body forming (so-called spheroidal body). The proposed theory starts from the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula; it permits us to derive the form of distribution functions, mass density, gravitational potentials and strengths both for immovable and rotating spheroidal bodies as well as to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum. If we start from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a protostar (in particular, proto-Sun) inside a prestellar (presolar) nebula then the derived distribution functions of particle as well as the mass density of an immovable spheroidal body characterize the first stage of evolution: from a prestellar molecular cloud (the presolar nebula) to a forming core or a protostar (the proto-Sun) together with its shell as a stellar nebula (the solar nebula). This paper derives the equation of state of an ideal stellar substance based on conception of gravitating spheroidal body. Using this equation we obtain the universal stellar law (USL) for the planetary systems connecting temperature, size and mass of each of stars. This work also considers the solar corona in the connection with USL. Then it is accounting under calculation of the ratio of temperature of the solar corona to effective temperature of the Sun' surface and modification of USL. To test justice of the modified USL for different types of stars, temperature of the stellar corona is estimated. The prediction of parameters of stars is carrying out by means of the modified USL as well as the known Hertzsprung-Russell's dependence is derived from USL directly. This paper also shows that knowledge of some characteristics for multi-planet extrasolar systems refines own parameters of stars. In

  3. RESOLVED NEAR-INFRARED STELLAR POPULATIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosenfield, Philip A.; Gilbert, Karoline E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2012-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for the resolved stellar populations within 26 fields of 23 nearby galaxies ({approx}< 4 Mpc), based on images in the F110W and F160W filters taken with the Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The CMDs are measured in regions spanning a wide range of star formation histories, including both old dormant and young star-forming populations. We match key NIR CMD features with their counterparts in more familiar optical CMDs, and identify the red core helium-burning (RHeB) sequence as a significant contributor to the NIR flux in stellar populations younger than a few 100 Myr old. The strength of this feature suggests that the NIR mass-to-light ratio can vary significantly on short timescales in star-forming systems. The NIR luminosity of star-forming galaxies is therefore not necessarily proportional to the stellar mass. We note that these individual RHeB stars may also be misidentified as old stellar clusters in images of nearby galaxies. For older stellar populations, we discuss the CMD location of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the HST filter set and explore the separation of AGB subpopulations using a combination of optical and NIR colors. We empirically calibrate the magnitude of the NIR tip of the red giant branch in F160W as a function of color, allowing future observations in this widely adopted filter set to be used for distance measurements. We also analyze the properties of the NIR red giant branch (RGB) as a function of metallicity, showing a clear trend between NIR RGB color and metallicity. However, based on the current study, it appears unlikely that the slope of the NIR RGB can be used as an effective metallicity indicator in extragalactic systems with comparable data. Finally, we highlight issues with scattered light in the WFC3, which becomes significant for exposures taken close to a bright Earth limb.

  4. Virgo cluster and field dwarf ellipticals in 3D - I. On the variety of stellar kinematic and line-strength properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryś, Agnieszka; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-02-01

    We present the first large-scale stellar kinematic and line-strength maps for dwarf elliptical galaxies (nine in the Virgo cluster and three in the field environment) obtained with the SAURON (Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae) integral-field unit. No two galaxies in our sample are alike: we see that the level of rotation is not tied to flattening (we have, e.g., round rotators and flattened non-rotators); we observe kinematic twists in one Virgo and one field object; we discover large-scale kinematically decoupled components in two field galaxies; we see varying gradients in line-strength maps, from nearly flat to strongly peaked in the centre. The great variety of morphological, kinematic and stellar population parameters seen in our data points to a formation scenario in which properties are shaped stochastically. A combined effect of ram-pressure stripping and galaxy harassment is the most probable explanation. We show the need for a comprehensive analysis of kinematic, dynamical and stellar population properties which will enable us to place dwarf ellipticals and processes that govern their evolution in the wider context of galaxy formation.

  5. KEPLER MISSION STELLAR AND INSTRUMENT NOISE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Miglio, Andrea; Dunham, Edward W.; Argabright, Vic S.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Buzasi, Derek L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F.

    2011-11-01

    Kepler mission results are rapidly contributing to fundamentally new discoveries in both the exoplanet and asteroseismology fields. The data returned from Kepler are unique in terms of the number of stars observed, precision of photometry for time series observations, and the temporal extent of high duty cycle observations. As the first mission to provide extensive time series measurements on thousands of stars over months to years at a level hitherto possible only for the Sun, the results from Kepler will vastly increase our knowledge of stellar variability for quiet solar-type stars. Here, we report on the stellar noise inferred on the timescale of a few hours of most interest for detection of exoplanets via transits. By design the data from moderately bright Kepler stars are expected to have roughly comparable levels of noise intrinsic to the stars and arising from a combination of fundamental limitations such as Poisson statistics and any instrument noise. The noise levels attained by Kepler on-orbit exceed by some 50% the target levels for solar-type, quiet stars. We provide a decomposition of observed noise for an ensemble of 12th magnitude stars arising from fundamental terms (Poisson and readout noise), added noise due to the instrument and that intrinsic to the stars. The largest factor in the modestly higher than anticipated noise follows from intrinsic stellar noise. We show that using stellar parameters from galactic stellar synthesis models, and projections to stellar rotation, activity, and hence noise levels reproduce the primary intrinsic stellar noise features.

  6. Structure and evolution of high-mass stellar mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebbeek, Evert; Gaburov, Evghenii; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Pols, Onno R.

    2013-10-01

    In young dense clusters repeated collisions between massive stars may lead to the formation of a very massive star (above 100 M⊙). In the past, the study of the long-term evolution of merger remnants has mostly focused on collisions between low-mass stars (up to about 2 M⊙) in the context of blue-straggler formation. The evolution of collision products of more massive stars has not been as thoroughly investigated. In this paper, we study the long-term evolution of a number of stellar mergers formed by the head-on collision of a primary star with a mass of 5-40 M⊙ with a lower mass star at three points in its evolution in order to better understand their evolution. We use smooth particle hydrodynamics calculations to model the collision between the stars. The outcome of this calculation is reduced to one dimension and imported into a stellar evolution code. We follow the subsequent evolution of the collision product through the main sequence at least until the onset of helium burning. We find that little hydrogen is mixed into the core of the collision products, in agreement with previous studies of collisions between low-mass stars. For collisions involving evolved stars, we find that during the merger the surface nitrogen abundance can be strongly enhanced. The evolution of most of the collision products proceeds analogously to that of normal stars with the same mass, but with a larger radius and luminosity. However, the evolution of collision products that form with a hydrogen-depleted core is markedly different from that of normal stars with the same mass. They undergo a long-lived period of hydrogen-shell burning close to the main-sequence band in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and spend the initial part of core-helium burning as compact blue supergiants.

  7. Core transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collections—the geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other states—are now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  8. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66‑71Ni in stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66‑71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  9. IFU spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei- IV. Properties of the circumnuclear stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    The study of stellar kinematic properties may provide hints on the formation and evolution of elliptical and lenticular galaxies. Although most previous studies have focused on the large scale of these galaxies, their central regions (scales of ˜100 pc) may contain important clues about their structure, such as kinematically decoupled cores. This is the fourth paper on a sample of 10 massive (σ > 200 km s-1) and nearby (d < 31 Mpc) early-type galaxies, observed with the integral field unit of the Gemini South Multi Object Spectrograph. Here, we analyse the properties of the stellar kinematics in the circumnuclear region. We fitted the line-of-sight velocity distribution with a Gauss-Hermite function. In seven galaxies of the sample, we detected a rotation pattern in their radial velocity maps that are anti-correlated with h3. We interpret this as stellar structures in rotation embedded in the bulges of the objects. Comparing the stellar kinematic results with the PCA Tomography results and also with the gas kinematic results of IC 5181, it seems that this object may have a non-axisymmetric potential at its centre. The velocity dispersion maps of four objects have a nuclear peak, which must correspond, in part, to unresolved stellar rotation. In NGC 1404, we detected a kinematic decoupled core with an extension of ˜200 pc. This galaxy also has a σ-drop in the centre, which may be related to both stellar components in counter-rotation or with a kinematically cold star-forming region.

  10. Star Formation in Isolated Cores: A Solitary Existence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee; Allen, Lori; Chapman, Nicholas; Harvey, Paul; Lai, Shih-Ping; Looney, Leslie; Myers, Phil

    2004-09-01

    The standard theories of star formation address the formation of a single star in isolation. Dark cloud cores are often cited as examples of isolated, individual star formation. Because of the density of these cores, observations to date have not had the sensitivity to really examine the core structure and search for the youngest and lowest mass sub-stellar objects. We propose to observe ten dark cores, five without associated stars and five with an associated star in all four IRAC bands and MIPS 24 micron. In addition, we will combine these observations with deep JHK ground-based imaging. We will observe the youngest sub-stellar objects down to 10 Jupiter masses, map the column density structure via extinction measurements, and image faint extended emission, such as outflows that are indicative of cloud-star interaction. Our overall goal is to test standard star formation theory by identifying the entire stellar and sub-stellar content of the cores and the relation of these objects to the gas and dust distribution.

  11. EZ_Ages: Stellar population age calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Genevieve J.

    2014-07-01

    EZ_Ages is an IDL code package that computes the mean, light-weighted stellar population age, [Fe/H], and abundance enhancements [Mg/Fe], [C/Fe], [N/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for unresolved stellar populations. This is accomplished by comparing Lick index line strengths between the data and the stellar population models of Schiavon (2007), using a method described in Graves & Schiavon (2008). The algorithm uses the inversion of index-index model grids to determine ages and abundances, and exploits the sensitivities of the various Lick indices to measure Mg, C, N, and Ca enhancements over their solar abundances with respect to Fe.

  12. Stellar Populations in BL Lac type Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serote Roos, Margarida

    The relationship between an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) and its host galaxy is a crucial question in the study of galaxy evolution. We present an estimate of the stellar contribution in a sample of low luminosity BL Lac type objects. We have performed stellar population synthesis for a sample of 19 objects selected from Marchã et al. (1996, MNRAS 281, 425). The stellar content is quantified using the equivalent widths of all absorption features available throughout the spectrum. The synthesis is done by a variant of the GPG method (Pelat: 1997, MNRAS 284, 365).

  13. A newcomer: the Wendelstein 7-X Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Stellarators ("star generators") belong to the earliest concepts for magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas. In May 1951, a confidential report authored by Lyman Spitzer at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) was issued, in which he proposed the "figure eight" stellarator based on the idea to generate the required rotational transform of magnetic field lines by twisting the torus into a figure-8. The first experimental device based on this idea started operation in early 1953. In the 1950's a series of stellarator experiments were built, most of them at PPPL.

  14. Integrated Spectrophotometric Properties of Multiple Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-chul; Cartwright, Charles

    2016-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that almost all the Milky Way globular clusters (MWGCs) are of multiple stellar populations. Several earlier works have revealed that the color-magnitude diagrams of MWGCs are best reproduced by the combination of stellar populations with different ages and metallicities. However, their integrated spectrophotometric properties have not yet been validated. In this work, we employ the most up-to-dated stellar evolutionary tracks and isochrones from several different groups and calculate the integrated broadband colors and spectral indices for the Milky Way globular clusters and compare the theoretical predictions to the observations.

  15. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  16. Selected Problems in Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Fritz James

    Three long standing "problems" for stellar evolution are addressed either directly or indirectly. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) have been proposed as a solution to the "solar neutrino problem" but numerical instabilities have hampered the analysis of their impact on solar and stellar models. These instabilities are analyzed and resolved. If WIMPs exist and they solve the solar neutrino problem, then they will affect the deduced ages of globular clusters. It is shown that WIMPs can reduce globular cluster age estimates, which are an important factor in constraining cosmological models. The lithium depletion observed in the Sun and stars (particularly in the Hyades cluster) has resisted a satisfactory explanation for roughly 25 years. Two mechanisms for depleting lithium are investigated: lithium dilution through main-sequence mass-loss and lithium burning occurring during PMS evolution. A thorough investigation of the mass-loss mechanism shows that it cannot be responsible for the pattern of lithium depletion seen in the Hyades G- and K-dwarfs, but that it could potentially explain (though in an ad hoc fashion) the depletion seen in open cluster F-dwarfs and in the Sun. It is shown that the PMS lithium burning mechanism does appear to be the explanation of the lithium depletion seen in Hyades G- and K-dwarfs (the very recent OPAL opacities are fundamental to this conclusion), but it apparently cannot completely explain the depletion seen in the Sun (although it is a significant contributor). Extensively investigated is the impact of opacity changes (including OPAL opacities) on solar PMS lithium burning and on the structure of solar models, particularly with regard to the discrepancy between the depth of the convective zone as determined from solar oscillations and that deduced from models. Also included in the thesis is a discussion outlining why observations of lithium depletion in the G- and K-stars of young clusters (ages less than {~}5 times 10

  17. Dark matter cores all the way down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Agertz, O.; Collins, M. L. M.

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformations at the edge of galaxy formation: M200 = 107-109 M⊙. We work at a resolution (˜4 pc minimum cell size; ˜250 M⊙ per particle) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical `sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the stellar half-mass radius r1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyr for the M200 = 108 M⊙ and ˜14 Gyr for the 109 M⊙ dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter `CORENFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected stellar half-mass radius. Our results have several implications: (i) we make a strong prediction that if Λcold dark matter is correct, then `pristine' dark matter cusps will be found either in systems that have truncated star formation and/or at radii r > r1/2; (ii) complete core formation lowers the projected velocity dispersion at r1/2 by a factor of ˜2, which is sufficient to fully explain the `too-big-to-fail problem'; and (iii) cored dwarfs will be much more susceptible to tides, leading to a dramatic scouring of the sub-halo mass function inside galaxies and groups.

  18. A Large Stellar Evolution Database for Population Synthesis Studies. II. Stellar Models and Isochrones for an α-enhanced Metal Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrinferni, Adriano; Cassisi, Santi; Salaris, Maurizio; Castelli, Fiorella

    2006-05-01

    We present a large, new set of stellar evolution models and isochrones for an α-enhanced metal distribution typical of Galactic halo and bulge stars; it represents a homogeneous extension of our stellar model library for a scaled-solar metal distribution already presented by Pietrinferni et al. The effect of the α-element enhancement has been properly taken into account in the nuclear network, opacity, equation of state, and for the first time in the bolometric corrections and color transformations. This allows us to avoid the inconsistent use-common to all α-enhanced model libraries currently available-of scaled-solar bolometric corrections and color transformations for α-enhanced models and isochrones. We show how bolometric corrections to magnitudes obtained for the U, B portion of stellar spectra for Teff<=6500 K are significantly affected by the metal mixture, especially at the higher metallicities. Our models cover both an extended mass range (between 0.5 and 10 Msolar, with a fine mass spacing) and a broad metallicity range, including 11 values of the metal mass fraction Z, corresponding to the range -2.6<=[Fe/H]<=0.05. The initial He mass fraction is Y=0.245 for the most metal-poor models, and it increases with Z, according to ΔY/ΔZ=1.4. Models with and without the inclusion of overshoot from the convective cores during the central H-burning phase are provided, as well as models with different mass loss efficiencies. We also provide complete sets of evolutionary models for low-mass, He-burning stellar structures cover the whole metallicity range. This database, used in combination with our scaled-solar model library, is a valuable tool for investigating both Galactic and extragalactic simple and composite stellar populations, using stellar population synthesis techniques.

  19. ZFIRE: Similar Stellar Growth in Halpha-emitting Cluster and Field Galaxies at z~2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy; Alcorn, Leo; Kacprzak, Glenn; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Straatman, Caroline; Yuan, Tiantian; Cowley, Michael; Dave, Romeel; Glazebrook, Karl; Kewley, Lisa J.; Labbe, Ivo; martizzi, davide; Papovich, Casey J.; Quadri, Ryan; Spitler, Lee; Tomczak, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    We compare galaxy scaling relations as a function of environment at z~2 with our ZFIRE survey where we have measured Halpha fluxes for 90 galaxies selected from a mass-limited sample based on ZFOURGE. The cluster galaxies (37) are part of a spectroscopically confirmed system at z=2.095 and the field galaxies (53) have redshifts of 1.9stellar mass, galaxy size, star formation rate surface density, and stellar age distributions. Approximately 20-25% of Halpha-emitting galaxies in both the cluster and field are IR-luminous. In our combined cluster and field sample, IR-luminous galaxies have ~5 times more stellar mass and radii that are ~70% larger than the low-IR galaxies. To track stellar growth, we separate galaxies into those that lie above, on, and below the Halpha star-forming main sequence (SFMS) using delta[SFR]=+/-0.2 dex. Galaxies above the SFMS (starbursts) tend to have higher Halpha SFR surface densities and younger stellar ages compared to galaxies below the SFMS. Our results indicate that starbursts (+SFMS) in the cluster and field at z~2 are growing their stellar cores. Lastly, we compare to the (SFR-stellar mass) relation predicted by the RHAPSODY galaxy cluster simulations and find that the predicted slope is nominally consistent with the observations. However, the predicted cluster SFRs tend to be too low by a factor of ~2 which suggests that simulations may be over-predicting how efficient environment is at quenching star formation.

  20. Recent Advances in Stellarator Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, David; Brown, T.; Breslau, J.; Landreman, M.; Lazerson, S. A.; Mynick, H.; Neilson, G. H.; Pomphrey, N.

    2016-10-01

    Computational optimization has revolutionized the field of stellarator design. To date, optimizations have focused primarily on optimization of neoclassical confinement and ideal MHD stability, although limited optimization of other parameters has also been performed. One criticism that has been levelled at this method of design is the complexity of the resultant field coils. Recently, a new coil optimization code, COILOPT + + , was written and included in the STELLOPT suite of codes. The advantage of this method is that it allows the addition of real space constraints on the locations of the coils. As an initial exercise, a constraint that the windings be vertical was placed on large major radius half of the non-planar coils. Further constraints were also imposed that guaranteed that sector blanket modules could be removed from between the coils, enabling a sector maintenance scheme. Results of this exercise will be presented. We have also explored possibilities for generating an experimental database that could check whether the reduction in turbulent transport that is predicted by GENE as a function of local shear would be consistent with experiments. To this end, a series of equilibria that can be made in the now latent QUASAR experiment have been identified. This work was supported by U.S. DoE Contract #DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  2. A stellar tracking reference system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klestadt, B.

    1971-01-01

    A stellar attitude reference system concept for satellites was studied which promises to permit continuous precision pointing of payloads with accuracies of 0.001 degree without the use of gyroscopes. It is accomplished with the use of a single, clustered star tracker assembly mounted on a non-orthogonal, two gimbal mechanism, driven so as to unwind satellite orbital and orbit precession rates. A set of eight stars was found which assures the presence of an adequate inertial reference on a continuous basis in an arbitrary orbit. Acquisition and operational considerations were investigated and inherent reference redundancy/reliability was established. Preliminary designs for the gimbal mechanism, its servo drive, and the star tracker cluster with its associated signal processing were developed for a baseline sun-synchronous, noon-midnight orbit. The functions required of the onboard computer were determined and the equations to be solved were found. In addition detailed error analyses were carried out, based on structural, thermal and other operational considerations.

  3. Deuterium and the stellar birthline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    A series of simplified evolutionary calculations are used to show that deuterium burning acts as an effective thermostat in low-mass protostars over a plausible range of initial conditions and mass accretion rates. The thermostat keeps the central temperature of the accreting hydrostatic core close to 10 to the 6th K, and thereby tightly constrains the core's mass-radius relation. This relation, when combined with premain-sequence evolutionary tracks, yields a theoretical birthline or upper envelope for young stars in the H-R diagram which maintains excellent agreement with observations of T Tauri stars in nearby molecular cloud complexes. This derivation of the birthline helps to explain its insensitivity to protostellar collapse conditions. The calculations indicate that the birthline will be little affected by the inclusion of rotation as long as the newly visible stars have lost most of their accreted angular momentum.

  4. The Cores of Elliptical Galaxies in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, John

    1995-07-01

    The cores of galaxies are astrophysically unique. They canhost high energy nuclei, star formation and perhaps even blackholes. HST observations have established that the cores ofellipticals are related to their global properties, and so canbe used as diagnostics of the physical processes occurring atthe time of formation. HST images of galaxy cores havedistinguished two different types of core luminosity profiles:`soft' and `hard' types. It is suggested that luminous, slowlyrotating galaxies have `soft' cores and the less luminousdisky galaxies have `hard' cores. This can be interpreted interms of a formation scenario based on a merger hierarchy inwhich the low luminosity systems experience highly dissipativemergers, but as the luminous systems are assembled the mergersbecome increasingly stellar. In this picture, the type of corea galaxy generates is intimately related to its evolutionaryhistory, i.e. the degree of interaction/merging experiencedand the availability of cold gas. In turn, this should notonly depend on luminosity but also on the galaxy's localenvironment. Here we propose to test the gaseous/stellarmerger picture by imaging a set of Coma cluster ellipticalsfrom a wide range of cluster radii. In the gas poorenvironment of the cluster core there may be insufficent coldgas for the low luminosity galaxies to form `hard' cores.Similarly, at the cluster turnround radius even luminousgalaxies may have experienced a dissipative core formation andpossess

  5. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  6. Systematic Problems With Stellar Halo Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailin, Jeremy

    2012-05-01

    Stellar halos contain a small fraction of the stellar mass of a galaxy. The dynamic range required to model the substructure within this small component while simultaneously modeling the main galaxy is currently unobtainable, which has lead to the prevalence of stellar halo models that tag stellar content onto dark matter particles in pure dark matter simulations, making it computationally feasible (e.g. Bullock & Johnston 2005; Cooper et al. 2010). Using paired simulations with identical initial conditions, we estimate the magnitude of the systematic effects these simplifications have on the structure of the halos. We find that (1) "painting" and (2) neglecting baryonic processes each introduce factor-of-several changes to the amount of substructure predicted. We therefore urge caution when interpreting differences between models and observations that are at this level.

  7. Stellar astrophysics: The mystery of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nota, Antonella; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of multiple stellar populations -- formed at different times -- in several young star clusters adds to the debate on the nature and origin of such populations in globular clusters from the early Universe. See Letter p.502

  8. Chemical element transport in stellar evolution models

    PubMed Central

    Cassisi, Santi

    2017-01-01

    Stellar evolution computations provide the foundation of several methods applied to study the evolutionary properties of stars and stellar populations, both Galactic and extragalactic. The accuracy of the results obtained with these techniques is linked to the accuracy of the stellar models, and in this context the correct treatment of the transport of chemical elements is crucial. Unfortunately, in many respects calculations of the evolution of the chemical abundance profiles in stars are still affected by sometimes sizable uncertainties. Here, we review the various mechanisms of element transport included in the current generation of stellar evolution calculations, how they are implemented, the free parameters and uncertainties involved, the impact on the models and the observational constraints. PMID:28878972

  9. Stellar Activity with BRITE: the ``Aurigae'' field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.

    2008-01-01

    Photometric time series of active stars can pin down some of the ingredients that govern the stellar magnetic field, itself being the driver of all non-thermal stellar emissions. Among the most important -- and least understood -- astrophysical ingredients is stellar rotation and its subtle latitudinal dependence called differential rotation. Rotation switches on and maintains the internal dynamo, itself a phenomenon from the interaction of turbulent plasma motions and large-scale shearing forces in the deep stellar interior. I propose to observe the active binary Capella, made up of two giants in exposed locations in the HR-diagram. Along with Capella (α Aur), another eight stars brighter than 4th magnitude would be in the field-of-view of BRITE, among them such benchmark variables as ζ Aur or θ Aur.

  10. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  11. Constructing a small modular stellarator in Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, V. I.; Mora, J.; Asenjo, J.; Zamora, E.; Otárola, C.; Barillas, L.; Carvajal-Godínez, J.; González-Gómez, J.; Soto-Soto, C.; Piedras, C.

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims at briefly describing the design and construction issues of the stellarator of Costa Rica 1 (SCR-1). The SCR-1 is a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma developed by the Plasma Laboratory for Fusion Energy and Applications of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica (ITCR). SCR-1 will be a 2-field period small modular stellarator with an aspect ratio > 4.4; low shear configuration with core and edge rotational transform equal to 0.32 and 0.28; it will hold plasma in a 6061-T6 aluminum torus shaped vacuum vessel with an minor plasma radius 54.11 mm, a volume of 13.76 liters (0.01 m3), and major radius R = 238 mm. Plasma will be confined in the volume by on axis magnetic field 43.8 mT generated by 12 modular coils with 6 turns each, carrying a current of 767.8 A per turn providing a total toroidal field (TF) current of 4.6 kA-turn per coil. The coils will be supplied by a bank of cell batteries of 120 V. Typical length of the plasma pulse will be between 4 s to 10 s. The SCR-1 plasmas will be heated by ECH second harmonic at 2.45 GHz with a plasma density cut-off value of 7.45 × 1016 m-3. Two magnetrons with a maximum output power of 2 kW and 3 kW will be used.

  12. The WEGA Stellarator: Results and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, M.; Andruczyk, D.; Koenig, R.; Laqua, H. P.; Lischtschenko, O.; Marsen, S.; Schacht, J.; Podoba, Y. Y.; Wagner, F.; Warr, G. B.; Holzhauer, E.; Howard, J.; Krupnik, L.; Zhezhera, A.; Urban, J.; Preinhalter, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this article an overview is given on results from magnetic flux surface measurements, applied ECR heating scenarios for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, fluctuation and transport studies and plasma edge biasing experiments performed in the WEGA stellarator. Examples for the development of new diagnostics and the machine control system are given that will be used at Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald.

  13. The WEGA Stellarator: Results and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, M.; Andruczyk, D.; Holzhauer, E.; Howard, J.; König, R.; Krupnik, L.; Laqua, H. P.; Lischtschenko, O.; Marsen, S.; Schacht, J.; Urban, J.; Podoba, Y. Y.; Preinhalter, J.; Wagner, F.; Warr, G. B.; Zhezhera, A.

    2008-03-01

    In this article an overview is given on results from magnetic flux surface measurements, applied ECR heating scenarios for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, fluctuation and transport studies and plasma edge biasing experiments performed in the WEGA stellarator. Examples for the development of new diagnostics and the machine control system are given that will be used at Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald.

  14. Spatially resolved stellar populations with SAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    Using data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey we measure azimuthally averaged stellar age and metallicity profiles for ~ 500 galaxies, using both luminosity-weighted Lick indices and mass-weighted full spectral fitting. We find a weak trend for steeper (i.e. more negative) metallicity gradients in more massive galaxies, however, below stellar masses ~ 1010.5 M⊙, the scatter in metallicity gradient increases dramatically.

  15. The Zeeman effect in stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    A short biography of Pieter Zeeman is presented. The main formulae for the normal, anomalous, quadratic Zeeman effects and Paschen-Back effect are given. Instrumentation for Zeeman effect measurements in stellar spectra is described, the most important scientific achievements in magnetic stars investigations with the world's largest telescopes for 50 years are demonstrated. The devices for magnetic measurements made at SAO and the main results of stellar magnetic observations obtained with the 6 m telescope are described in detail.

  16. IRMA - A prototype infrared Michelson stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, H. M.; Benson, J. A.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1993-06-01

    We describe a prototype near-infrared Michelson stellar interferometer used to estimate stellar diameters by measuring visibility amplitudes. In particular, details are given for the performance of the device, including the stability, limiting sensitivity, and sources of errors in the visibility amplitudes. We compare the results for stars measured in common with the French interferometer at CERGA. An improved diameter for the red supergiant Alpha Herculis is also presented.

  17. Stellar Atmospheres, Atmospheric Extension, and Fundamental Parameters: Weighing Stars Using the Stellar Mass Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Baron, Fabien; Norris, Ryan; Kloppenborg, Brian; Lester, John B.

    2016-10-01

    One of the great challenges of understanding stars is measuring their masses. The best methods for measuring stellar masses include binary interaction, asteroseismology, and stellar evolution models, but these methods are not ideal for red giant and supergiant stars. In this work, we propose a novel method for inferring stellar masses of evolved red giant and supergiant stars using interferometric and spectrophotometric observations combined with spherical model stellar atmospheres to measure what we call the stellar mass index, defined as the ratio between the stellar radius and mass. The method is based on the correlation between different measurements of angular diameter, used as a proxy for atmospheric extension, and fundamental stellar parameters. For a given star, spectrophotometry measures the Rosseland angular diameter while interferometric observations generally probe a larger limb-darkened angular diameter. The ratio of these two angular diameters is proportional to the relative extension of the stellar atmosphere, which is strongly correlated to the star’s effective temperature, radius, and mass. We show that these correlations are strong and can lead to precise measurements of stellar masses.

  18. Does the Stellar Distribution Flare? A Comparison of Stellar Scale Heights with LAB H I Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Dedes, L.; Haud, U.

    2014-10-01

    The question of whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in the flaring of scale heights as observed for the H I gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach, at large galactocentric distances, high altitudes, which are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with H I data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  19. Does the stellar distribution flare? A comparison of stellar scale heights with LAB H I data

    SciTech Connect

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Dedes, L.; Haud, U.

    2014-10-10

    The question of whether the stellar populations in the Milky Way take part in the flaring of scale heights as observed for the H I gas is a matter of debate. Standard mass models for the Milky Way assume a constant scale height for each of the different stellar distributions. However, there is mounting evidence that at least some of the stellar distributions reach, at large galactocentric distances, high altitudes, which are incompatible with a constant scale height. We discuss recent observational evidence for stellar flaring and compare it with H I data from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey. Within the systemic and statistical uncertainties we find a good agreement between both.

  20. Featured Image: A Looping Stellar Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    This negative image of NGC 5907 (originally published inMartinez-Delgadoet al. 2008; click for the full view!) reveals the faint stellar stream that encircles the galaxy, forming loops around it a fossil of a recent merger. Mergers between galaxies come in several different flavors: major mergers, in which the merging galaxies are within a 1:5 ratio in stellar mass; satellite cannibalism, in which a large galaxy destroys a small satellite less than a 50th of its size; and the in-between case of minor mergers, in which the merging galaxieshave stellar mass ratios between 1:5 and 1:50. These minor mergers are thought to be relatively common, and they can have a significant effect on the dynamics and structure of the primary galaxy. A team of scientists led by Seppo Laine (Spitzer Science Center Caltech) has recently analyzed the metallicity and age of the stellar population in the stream around NGC 5907. By fitting these observations with a stellar population synthesis model, they conclude that this stream is an example of a massive minor merger, with a stellar mass ratio of at least 1:8. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationSeppo Laine et al 2016 AJ 152 72. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/3/72

  1. On plasma radiative properties in stellar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; Delahaye, F.; Gilles, D.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.

    2009-09-01

    The knowledge of stellar evolution is evolving quickly thanks to an increased number of opportunities to scrutinize the stellar internal plasma properties by stellar seismology and by 1D and 3D simulations. These new tools help us to introduce the internal dynamical phenomena in stellar modeling. A proper inclusion of these processes supposes a real confidence in the microscopic physics used, partly checked by solar or stellar acoustic modes. In the present paper we first recall which fundamental physics has been recently verified by helioseismology. Then we recall that opacity is an important ingredient of the secular evolution of stars and we point out why it is necessary to measure absorption coefficients and degrees of ionization in the laboratory for some well identified astrophysical conditions. We examine two specific experimental conditions which are accessible to large laser facilities and are suitable to solve some interesting questions of the stellar community: are the solar internal radiative interactions properly estimated and what is the proper role of the opacity in the excitation of the non-radial modes in the envelop of the β Cepheids and the Be stars? At the end of the paper we point out the difficulties of the experimental approach that we need to overcome.

  2. Ubiquitous time variability of integrated stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Choi, Jieun

    2015-11-26

    Long-period variable stars arise in the final stages of the asymptotic giant branch phase of stellar evolution. They have periods of up to about 1,000 days and amplitudes that can exceed a factor of three in the I-band flux. These stars pulsate predominantly in their fundamental mode, which is a function of mass and radius, and so the pulsation periods are sensitive to the age of the underlying stellar population. The overall number of long-period variables in a population is directly related to their lifetimes, which is difficult to predict from first principles because of uncertainties associated with stellar mass-loss and convective mixing. The time variability of these stars has not previously been taken into account when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies. Here we construct time-dependent stellar population models that include the effects of long-period variable stars, and report the ubiquitous detection of this expected 'pixel shimmer' in the massive metal-rich galaxy M87. The pixel light curves display a variety of behaviours. The observed variation of 0.1 to 1 per cent is very well matched to the predictions of our models. The data provide a strong constraint on the properties of variable stars in an old and metal-rich stellar population, and we infer that the lifetime of long-period variables in M87 is shorter by approximately 30 per cent compared to predictions from the latest stellar evolution models.

  3. The distribution of stellar populations within galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novais, P. M.; Sodré, L., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    The study of stellar populations in galaxies is particularly interesting, since they are a fossil record of several physical processes associated with the formation and evolution of galaxies. In this work we present the first results of our approach to study the spatial distribution of stellar populations inside galaxies. We are using ugriz magnitudes and principal component analysis (PCA) to obtain pixel-by-pixel proxies of the stellar populations and their distributions inside each galaxy. The distribution of these populations are then investigated with a variety of statistical tools, including Gini Indices and the Euler-Poincaré characteristic. Our approach aims to be a step forward with respect to the conventional profile fitting, allowing to obtain quantitative estimates on how the different stellar populations are distributed within a galaxy, bringing hints on how galaxies grow and evolve. The pixel-by-pixel analysis of a small sample of 15 galaxies of different types show that the stellar populations tend to evolve from inside to out in spiral and late spiral galaxies, while elliptical galaxies seem to have young stellar populations in the center. This first results show that this approach is effective and will be explored and improve in future works.

  4. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    I discusses practical aspects of the so-called "solar-stellar" connection; namely, the fundamental principles, the tools at the disposal of the stellar astronomer, and a few recent examples of the connection in action. I provide an overall evolutionary context for coronal activity, calling attention to the very different circumstances of low mass main sequence stars like the Sun, which are active mainly early in their lives; compared with more massive stars, whose coronally active phase occurs near the end of their lives, during their brief incursion into the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as yellow and then red giants. On the instrumental slide, I concentrate primarily on spectroscopy, in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands where coronae leave their most obvious signatures. I present an early glimpse of the type of moderate resolution spectra we can expect from the recently launched Chandra observatory, and contemporaneous HST STIS high-resolution UV measurements of the CXO calibration star Capella (alpha Aur; G8 III + G1 III). I compare STIS spectra of solar-type dwarfs-zeta Dor (F7 V), an active coronal source; and alpha Cen A (G2 V), a near twin of the Sun-to a trace obtained with the SOHO SUMER imaging UV spectrometer. I also compare STIS line profiles of the active coronal dwarf to the corresponding features in the mixed-activity "hybrid-chromosphere" bright giant alpha TrA (K2 II) and the archetype "noncoronal" red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo; K2 III). The latter shows dramatic evidence for a "cool absorber" in its outer atmosphere that is extinguishing the "hot lines" (like Si IV lambda1393 and N V lambda1238) below about 1500 A, probably through absorption in the Si I lambda1525 and C I lambda1240 photoionization continua. The disappearance of coronae across the "Linsky-Haisch" dividing line near K1 III thus apparently is promoted by a dramatic overturning in the outer atmospheric structure, namely the coronae of the red giants seem to lie beneath

  5. The SOHO-Stellar Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    I discusses practical aspects of the so-called "solar-stellar" connection; namely, the fundamental principles, the tools at the disposal of the stellar astronomer, and a few recent examples of the connection in action. I provide an overall evolutionary context for coronal activity, calling attention to the very different circumstances of low mass main sequence stars like the Sun, which are active mainly early in their lives; compared with more massive stars, whose coronally active phase occurs near the end of their lives, during their brief incursion into the cool half of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as yellow and then red giants. On the instrumental slide, I concentrate primarily on spectroscopy, in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands where coronae leave their most obvious signatures. I present an early glimpse of the type of moderate resolution spectra we can expect from the recently launched Chandra observatory, and contemporaneous HST STIS high-resolution UV measurements of the CXO calibration star Capella (alpha Aur; G8 III + G1 III). I compare STIS spectra of solar-type dwarfs-zeta Dor (F7 V), an active coronal source; and alpha Cen A (G2 V), a near twin of the Sun-to a trace obtained with the SOHO SUMER imaging UV spectrometer. I also compare STIS line profiles of the active coronal dwarf to the corresponding features in the mixed-activity "hybrid-chromosphere" bright giant alpha TrA (K2 II) and the archetype "noncoronal" red giant Arcturus (alpha Boo; K2 III). The latter shows dramatic evidence for a "cool absorber" in its outer atmosphere that is extinguishing the "hot lines" (like Si IV lambda1393 and N V lambda1238) below about 1500 A, probably through absorption in the Si I lambda1525 and C I lambda1240 photoionization continua. The disappearance of coronae across the "Linsky-Haisch" dividing line near K1 III thus apparently is promoted by a dramatic overturning in the outer atmospheric structure, namely the coronae of the red giants seem to lie beneath

  6. Radiative accelerations in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    In stars which are sufficiently quiescent, changes in the relative abundances of the chemical elements can result from gravitational settling and from levitation produced by radiation pressure forces, usually expressed as radiative accelerations g_rad. Those changes can affect the structure of such stars, due to modifications in opacities, and can lead to marked peculiarities in observed atmospheric abundances. It is necessary to consider diffusive movements both in the atmospheres and in much deeper layers of the stellar envelopes. For the envelopes the equation of radiative transfer can be solved in a diffusion approximation and, for an element k in ionization stage j, one obtains expressions for g_rad(j, k) proportional to the total radiative flux, to the Rosseland-mean opacity kappa_R (which may depend on the abundance of k), and to a dimensionless quantity gamma(j, k) which, due to saturation effects, can be sensitive to the abundance of k. The radiative accelerations are required for each ionization stage, because the diffusion coefficients depend on j. Using atomic data obtained in the course of the work of the Opacity Project (OP), we calculate kappa_R and gamma(j, k) for the chemical elements C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. We start from standard Solar system abundances, and then vary the abundance of one element at a time (element k) by a factor chi. The following results are obtained and are available at the Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). (1) Files stages.zz (where zz specifies the nuclear charge of the selected element k) containing values of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) on a mesh of values of (T, N_e, chi), where T is temperature, and N_e is electron density. We include derivatives of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) with respect to chi, which are used for making interpolations. (2) A code add.f which reads a file stages.zz and writes a file acc.zz containing values of gamma(k) obtained on summing the gamma(j, k

  7. The Formation of Brown Dwarfs as Ejected Stellar Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Clarke, Cathie

    2001-07-01

    We conjecture that brown dwarfs are substellar objects because they have been ejected from small newborn multiple systems that have decayed in dynamical interactions. In this view, brown dwarfs are stellar embryos for which the star formation process was aborted before the hydrostatic cores could build up enough mass to eventually start hydrogen burning. The disintegration of a small multiple system is a stochastic process, which can be described only in terms of the half-life of the decay. A stellar embryo competes with its siblings in order to accrete infalling matter, and the one that grows slowest is most likely to be ejected. With better luck, a brown dwarf would therefore have become a normal star. This interpretation of brown dwarfs readily explains the rarity of brown dwarfs as close companions to normal stars, the absence of wide brown dwarf binaries, and the flattening of the low-mass end of the initial mass function. Possible observational tests of this scenario include statistics of brown dwarfs near Class 0 sources and the kinematics of brown dwarfs in star-forming regions, while they still retain a kinematic signature of their expulsion. Because the ejection process limits the amount of gas brought along in a disk, it is predicted that substellar equivalents to the classical T Tauri stars should be rather short-lived.

  8. THE FATE OF STELLAR MASS LOSS IN CENTRAL CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2011-09-10

    Star formation within the central galaxies of galaxy clusters is often interpreted as being fueled by cooling of the hot intracluster medium. However, the star-forming gas is dusty, and Spitzer spectra show that the dust properties are similar to those in more normal star-forming environments, in which the dust has come from the winds of dying stars. Here we consider whether the primary source of the star-forming gas in central cluster galaxies could be normal stellar mass loss. We show that the overall stellar mass-loss rate in a large central galaxy ({approx}4-8 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) is at least as large as the observed star formation rates in all but the most extreme cases and must be included in any assessment of the gas-mass budget of a central cluster galaxy. We also present arguments suggesting that the gas shed by stars in galaxy clusters with high core pressures and short central cooling times may remain cool and distinct from its hot surroundings, thereby preserving the dust within it.

  9. New Frontiers in Stellar Astrophysics: Massive Stars as Cosmological Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars are crucial building blocks in the study of star-forming galaxies, stellar evolution, and transient events, and their applications as fundamental astrophysical tools span a broad range of subfields. Unfortunately, many key traits of massive stars - from their physical properties and ionizing radiation to their evolution and core-collapse deaths - remain poorly understood. I will discuss several current research programs focused on developing a comprehensive picture of massive stars across the cosmos. These include observational surveys and population synthesis models of star-forming galaxies; progenitor and host environment studies of transient phenomena such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts; and the remarkable reach of extragalactic stellar observations, which recently led to the discovery of the first Thorne-Zytkow object candidate. With cutting-edge theoretical models and the capabilities of current ground-based and orbital observatories, we are ideally poised to make substantial progress in our understanding of massive stars over the coming decade. This in turn will equip us with the tools we need to take full advantage of the frontiers opened up by new observational facilities such as JWST, the ELTs, and LSST, allowing us to immediately begin probing the new corners of the universe that they reveal.

  10. On the local stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Klaus; Chini, Rolf; Kaderhandt, Lena; Chen, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of the local stellar populations from a volume-complete all-sky survey of the about 500 bright stars with distances less than 25 pc and down to main-sequence effective temperatures Teff ≥ 5300 K. The sample is dominated by a 93 per cent fraction of Population I stars, only 22 sources (5 per cent) are Population II stars, and 9 sources (2 per cent) are intermediate-disc stars. No source belongs to the halo. By following the mass of the stars instead of their light, the resulting subset of 136 long-lived stars distributes as 22 (16.2 per cent):6 (4.4 per cent):108 (79.4 per cent) for the Population II:intermediate disc:Population I, respectively. Along with the much larger scaleheight reached by Population II, this unbiased census of long-lived stars provides plain evidence for a starburst epoch in the early Milky Way, with the formation of a massive, rotationally supported, and dark Population II. The same conclusion arises from the substantial early chemical enrichment levels, exemplified here by the elements magnesium and iron, as it arises also from the local Population II white dwarfs. The kinematics, metallicity distribution functions, star formation rates, age-metallicity relations, the inventory of young stars, and the occurrence of blue straggler stars are discussed. A potentially new aspect of the survey is the possibility for substructure among the local Population II stars that may further subdivide into metal-poor and metal-rich sources.

  11. IUVS/MAVEN Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröller, Hannes; Yelle, Roger; Montmessin, Franck; Lacombe, Gaetan; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Nakagawa, Hiromu; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results from stellar occultations observed with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. So far 9 campaigns have been executed on average every two months since MAVEN began orbiting Mars. Approximately 50 occultations are recorded in each campaign. The IUVS instrument observes in two spectral regions, the far- and mid-UV. The FUV channel covers wavelengths from 110 to 190 nm and the MUV channel from 170 to 350 nm. By combining those two channels we cover the whole altitude range starting from around 30 km to 150 km. We present the geometric dependent CO2, O2, and O3 number densities from these occultations. The derived O2 mixing ratio varies between 1.5 × 10-3 and 5 × 10-3. In some of the MUV occultations we also can see aerosol extinction. In addition we present temperatures derived from the CO2 densities assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. We retrieved mean temperatures of around 180 K at lower altitudes, which decreasing with altitudes down to a mean of around 130 K at higher altitudes. We see a constantly cold layer with temperatures of 105 - 120 K at a pressure level at roughly 7 × 10-6 Pa, equivalent to an altitude of around 140 km. We also discuss possible wave structures with amplitudes between 5 and 15 K and wavelengths between 10 and 15 km in the obtained temperature profiles. The temperature profiles, retrieved with the IUVS instrument, are mostly in agreement with predicted values from the Mars Climate Database model, except where we see the cold layer around 140 km.

  12. On impurity handling in high performance stellarator/heliotron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhenn, R.; Feng, Y.; Ida, K.; Maassberg, H.; McCarthy, K. J.; Kalinina, D.; Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Nozato, H.; Okamura, S.; Sudo, S.; Suzuki, C.; Tamura, N.; Weller, A.; Yoshinuma, M.; Zurro, B.

    2009-06-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X, under construction) are experiments specially designed to demonstrate long-pulse (quasi steady state) operation, which is an intrinsic property of stellarators and heliotrons. Significant progress has been made in establishing high performance plasmas. A crucial point is the increasing impurity confinement at high density observed at several machines (TJ-II, W7-AS, LHD) which can lead to impurity accumulation and early pulse termination by radiation collapse. In addition, theoretical predictions for non-axisymmetric configurations predict the absence of impurity screening by ion temperature gradients in standard ion-root plasmas. Nevertheless, scenarios were found where impurity accumulation was successfully avoided in LHD and W7-AS due to the onset of friction forces in the (high density and low temperature) scrape-off-layer (SOL), the generation of magnetic islands at the plasma boundary and to a certain degree also by edge localized modes, flushing out impurities and reducing the net impurity influx into the core. In both the W7-AS high density H-mode regime and in the case of application of sufficient electron cyclotron radiation heating power a reduction in impurity core confinement was observed. The exploration of such purification mechanisms is a demanding task for successful steady-state operation. Impurity transport at the plasma edge/SOL was identified to play a major role for the global impurity behaviour in addition to the core confinement.

  13. Aspherical abundance distribution of ejecta from neutrino-driven core collapse supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-Ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-Aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-08-01

    We examine explosive nucleosynthesis during a delayed neutrino-driven, supernova explosion aided by standing accretion shock instability, based on two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion of a 15Msolar progenitor. We find that abundance pattern of the supernova ejecta is similar to that of the solar system, for cases with high explosion energies of ~=1051 ergs. Aspherical distribution of Fe, Si, and O, which is observed in a nearby core-collapse SN remnant such as Cas A, is obtained in spite of the explosion of the non-rotating, spherical progenitor.

  14. Luck Reveals Stellar Explosion's First Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Through a stroke of luck, astronomers have witnessed the first violent moments of a stellar explosion known as a supernova. Astronomers have seen thousands of these stellar explosions, but all previous supernovae were discovered days after the event had begun. This is the first time scientists have been able to study a supernova from its very beginning. Seeing one just moments after the event began is a major breakthrough that points the way to unraveling longstanding mysteries about how such explosions really work. Galaxy Before Supernova Explosion NASA's Swift satellite took these images of SN 2007uy in galaxy NGC 2770 before SN 2008D exploded. An X-ray image is on the left; image at right is in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels Galaxy After Supernova Explosion On January 9, 2008, Swift caught a bright X-ray burst from an exploding star. A few days later, SN 2008D appeared in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels "For years, we have dreamed of seeing a star just as it was exploding," said team leader Alicia Soderberg, a Hubble and Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University. "This newly-born supernova is going to be the Rosetta Stone of supernova studies for years to come." Theorists had predicted for four decades that a bright burst of X-rays should be produced as the shock wave from a supernova blasts out of the star and through dense material surrounding the star. However, in order to see this burst, scientists faced the nearly-impossible challenge of knowing in advance where to point their telescopes to catch a supernova in the act of exploding. On January 9, luck intervened. Soderberg and her colleagues were making a scheduled observation of the galaxy NGC 2770, 88 million light-years from Earth, using the X-ray telescope on NASA's Swift satellite. During that observation, a bright burst of X

  15. Diquark abundance in stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E.; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A.; de Araujo, J.C.N. )

    1992-11-15

    The clustering of quarks into pairs (diquarks) has been suggested recently to play an important role in dense matter and its astrophysical realization in neutron-star cores. We address in this work the features of diquark matter by employing an accurate equation of state valid for the effective {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} diquark theory, and find milder (although non-negligible) effects than in previous calculations. Some considerations on the very presence of a diquark-dominated region immediately above the deconfinement density are also given.

  16. Stellar wind models of subluminous hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, J.; Krtičková, I.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Mass-loss rate is one of the most important stellar parameters. Mass loss via stellar winds may influence stellar evolution and modifies stellar spectrum. Stellar winds of subluminous hot stars, especially subdwarfs, have not been studied thoroughly. Aims: We aim to provide mass-loss rates as a function of subdwarf parameters and to apply the formula for individual subdwarfs, to predict the wind terminal velocities, to estimate the influence of the magnetic field and X-ray ionization on the stellar wind, and to study the interaction of subdwarf wind with mass loss from Be and cool companions. Methods: We used our kinetic equilibrium (NLTE) wind models with the radiative force determined from the radiative transfer equation in the comoving frame (CMF) to predict the wind structure of subluminous hot stars. Our models solve stationary hydrodynamical equations, that is the equation of continuity, equation of motion, and energy equation and predict basic wind parameters. Results: We predicted the wind mass-loss rate as a function of stellar parameters, namely the stellar luminosity, effective temperature, and metallicity. The derived wind parameters (mass-loss rates and terminal velocities) agree with the values derived from the observations. The radiative force is not able to accelerate the homogeneous wind for stars with low effective temperatures and high surface gravities. We discussed the properties of winds of individual subdwarfs. The X-ray irradiation may inhibit the flow in binaries with compact components. In binaries with Be components, the winds interact with the disk of the Be star. Conclusions: Stellar winds exist in subluminous stars with low gravities or high effective temperatures. Despite their low mass-loss rates, they are detectable in the ultraviolet spectrum and cause X-ray emission. Subdwarf stars may lose a significant part of their mass during the evolution. The angular momentum loss in magnetic subdwarfs with wind may explain their

  17. Depleted galaxy cores and dynamical black hole masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rusli, S. P.; Erwin, P.; Saglia, R. P.; Thomas, J.; Fabricius, M.; Bender, R.; Nowak, N.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow cores in bright, massive galaxies are commonly thought to be the result of scouring of stars by mergers of binary supermassive black holes. Past investigations have suggested correlations between the central black hole mass and the stellar light or mass deficit in the core, using proxy measurements of M {sub BH} or stellar mass-to-light ratios (Y). Drawing on a wealth of dynamical models which provide both M {sub BH} and Y, we identify cores in 23 galaxies, of which 20 have direct, reliable measurements of M {sub BH} and dynamical stellar mass-to-light ratios (Y{sub *,dyn}). These cores are identified and measured using Core-Sérsic model fits to surface brightness profiles which extend out to large radii (typically more than the effective radius of the galaxy); for approximately one-fourth of the galaxies, the best fit includes an outer (Sérsic) envelope component. We find that the core radius is most strongly correlated with the black hole mass and that it correlates better with total galaxy luminosity than it does with velocity dispersion. The strong core-size-M {sub BH} correlation enables estimation of black hole masses (in core galaxies) with an accuracy comparable to the M {sub BH}-σ relation (rms scatter of 0.30 dex in log M {sub BH}), without the need for spectroscopy. The light and mass deficits correlate more strongly with galaxy velocity dispersion than they do with black hole mass. Stellar mass deficits span a range of 0.2-39 M {sub BH}, with almost all (87%) being <10 M {sub BH}; the median value is 2.2 M {sub BH}.

  18. Primordial and Stellar Nucleosynthesis Chemical Evolution of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Chiosi, Cesare

    2010-03-01

    Following a brief introduction to early Universe cosmology, we present in some detail the results of primordial nucleosynthesis. Then we summarize the basic theory of nuclear reactions in stars and sketch the general rules of stellar evolution. We shortly review the subject of supernova explosions both by core collapse in massive stars (Type II) and carbon-deflagration in binary systems when one of the components is a White Dwarf accreting mass from the companion (Type Ia). We conclude the part dedicated to nucleosynthesis with elementary notions on the s- and r-process. Finally, we shortly address the topic of galactic chemical evolution and highlight some simple solutions aimed at understanding the main observational data on abundances and abundance ratios.

  19. IRAS 20050+2720: Anatomy of a Young Stellar Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.; Wolk, S. J.; Spitzbart, B.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Forbrich, J.; Wright, N. J.; Allen, L.; Bourke, T. L.; Megeath, S. T.; Pipher, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    IRAS 20050+2720 is young star-forming region at a distance of 700 pc without apparent high-mass stars. We present results of our multi-wavelength study of IRAS 20050+2720 which includes observations by Chandra and Spitzer, and Two Micron All Sky Survey and UBVRI photometry. In total, about 300 young stellar objects (YSOs) in different evolutionary stages are found. We characterize the distribution of YSOs in this region using a minimum spanning tree analysis. We newly identify a second cluster core, which consists mostly of class II objects, about 10' from the center of the cloud. YSOs of earlier evolutionary stages are more clustered than more evolved objects. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of IRAS 20050+2720 is roughly lognormal, but steeper than the XLF of the more massive Orion Nebula complex. IRAS 20050+2720 shows a lower N H/AK ratio compared with the diffuse interstellar medium.

  20. Measuring the Sun's motion with stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhan, Khyati; Ibata, Rodrigo A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a method for measuring the Sun's motion using the proper motions of Galactic halo star streams. The method relies on the fact that the motion of the stars perpendicular to a stream from a low-mass progenitor is close to zero when viewed from a non-rotating frame at rest with respect to the Galaxy, and that the deviation from zero is due to the reflex motion of the observer. The procedure we implement here has the advantage of being independent of the Galactic mass distribution. We run a suite of simulations to test the algorithm we have developed, and find that we can recover the input solar motion to good accuracy with data of the quality that will soon become available from the ESA/Gaia mission.

  1. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) and 1.3 mm continuum survey of 32 high-mass surface density regions of seven infrared dark clouds, with the aim of finding massive starless cores that may form the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C18O(2-1), DCN(3-2), and DCO+(3-2). Over 100 {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm, based on connected structures in position–velocity space. The most massive core has ∼ 70 {M}ȯ (potentially ∼ 170 {M}ȯ ) and so may be representative of the initial conditions or early stages of massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores with strongest {{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+(3-2) line emission, finding results that are generally consistent with virial equilibrium of pressure confined cores.

  2. Scaling Laws of Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Stern, Robert A.; Güdel, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures Tp, flare peak volume emission measures EMp, and flare durations τf from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EMp propto T4.7p, but the stellar flares exhibit ≈250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(Tp) propto T0.9p and the flare duration τF(Tp) propto T0.9p as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) propto L2.4, we predict a scaling law of EMp propto T4.3p, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, np propto T2p/L propto T1.1p. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, np = (EMp/qVV)1/2, using volume filling factors of qV = 0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Solar and stellar flares are expected to have similar electron densities for equal flare peak temperatures Tp, but the higher emission measures of detected stellar flares most likely represent a selection bias of larger flare volumes and higher volume filling factors, due to low detector sensitivity at higher temperatures. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  3. Exploring Non-Standard Stellar Physics with Lithium Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Garrett

    2016-07-01

    For over a century, astronomers have been building physical models to study the internal constitution of stars. These efforts have culminated in the so-called "standard stellar model" (SSM), the computational bedrock upon which the modern theory of stellar evolution stands. SSMs have been extremely successful at describing many observational properties of stars, including the intricate morphology of the color-magnitude diagrams of star clusters, the observed mass-radius relationship on the hydrogen-burning main sequence, and the detailed interior structure of the Sun. Nonetheless, there remain several outstanding features of the galactic stellar pattern that SSMs fail to predict, and it is these discrepancies which point to interesting physical processes occurring in stars that have heretofore been neglected. One significant tool for uncovering deficiencies in the SSM is the abundance of the light element lithium. Li is rapidly destroyed deep inside stellar atmospheres, duly depleting the observed abundance at the surface, and in principle revealing detailed information about the temperatures, mixing processes, and physical conditions of the interiors of stars. SSMs make strong predictions for the destruction of Li in solar-type stars, namely that a mass-dependent depletion pattern is imprinted on the pre-main sequence, and persists in an unaltered state for the entirety of the main sequence. However, these predictions are strongly contradicted by numerous observations, which implying unequal rates of Li burning at fixed mass and composition during the pre-main sequence, and variable, long-timescale Li destruction during the main sequence. Unraveling the underlying processes driving this non-standard Li depletion will inform our understanding of the physical phenomena which are ignored in our standard picture, but are influential to the structure and evolution of stars. In this dissertation, I report on my progress reconciling SSMs with the open cluster Li pattern

  4. Stellar Firework in a Whirlwind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    VLT Image of Supernova in Beautiful Spiral Galaxy NGC 1288 Stars do not like to be alone. Indeed, most stars are members of a binary system, in which two stars circle around each other in an apparently never-ending cosmic ballet. But sometimes, things can go wrong. When the dancing stars are too close to each other, one of them can start devouring its partner. If the vampire star is a white dwarf - a burned-out star that was once like our Sun - this greed can lead to a cosmic catastrophe: the white dwarf explodes as a Type Ia supernova. In July 2006, ESO's Very Large Telescope took images of such a stellar firework in the galaxy NGC 1288. The supernova - designated SN 2006dr - was at its peak brightness, shining as bright as the entire galaxy itself, bearing witness to the amount of energy released. ESO PR Photo 39/07 ESO PR Photo 39/07 SN 2006dr in NGC 1288 NGC 1288 is a rather spectacular spiral galaxy, seen almost face-on and showing multiple spiral arms pirouetting around the centre. Bearing a strong resemblance to the beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 1232, it is located 200 million light-years away from our home Galaxy, the Milky Way. Two main arms emerge from the central regions and then progressively split into other arms when moving further away. A small bar of stars and gas runs across the centre of the galaxy. The first images of NGC 1288, obtained during the commissioning period of the FORS instrument on ESO's VLT in 1998, were of such high quality that they have allowed astronomers [1] to carry out a quantitative analysis of the morphology of the galaxy. They found that NGC 1288 is most probably surrounded by a large dark matter halo. The appearance and number of spiral arms are indeed directly related to the amount of dark matter in the galaxy's halo. The supernova was first spotted by amateur astronomer Berto Monard. On the night of 17 July 2006, Monard used his 30-cm telescope in the suburbs of Pretoria in South Africa and discovered the supernova as an

  5. Stellar Populations in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacArthur, L. A.; Courteau, S.; Bell, E. F.; Holtzman, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    We investigate optical and near-IR color gradients in a sample of 172 low-inclination galaxies spanning Hubble types S0--Irr. The colors are compared to stellar population synthesis models from which luminosity-weighted average ages and metallicities are determined. We explore the effects of different underlying star formation histories and additional bursts of star formation. Because the observed gradients show radial structure, we measure ``inner'' and ``outer'' disk age and metallicity gradients. Relative trends in age and metallicity and their gradients are explored as a function of Hubble type, rotational velocity, total near-IR galaxy magnitude, central surface brightness, and scale length. We find strong correlations in age and metallicity with Hubble type, rotational velocity, total magnitude, and central surface brightness in the sense that earlier-type, faster rotating, more luminous, and higher surface brightness galaxies are older and more metal-rich, suggesting an early and more rapid star formation history for these galaxies. The increasing trends level off for T ⪉ 4 (Sbc and earlier), V {rot} ⪆ 120 km s-1, MK ⪉ -23 mag, and μ 0 ⪉ 18.5 mag arcsec-2. Outer disk gradients are weaker than the inner gradients as expected for a slower variation of the potential and surface brightness in the outer parts. We find that stronger age gradients are associated with weaker metallicity gradients. Relative trends in gradients with galaxy parameters do not agree with predictions of semi-analytic models of hierarchical galaxy formation, possibly as a result of bar-induced radial flows. However, the observed trends are in agreement with chemo-spectro photometric models of spiral galaxy evolution based on CDM-motivated scaling laws but including none of the hierarchical merging characteristics. This implies a strong dependence of the star formation history of spiral galaxies on the galaxy potential and halo spin parameter. L.A.M. and S.C acknowledge support

  6. SEXTANS' COLD SUBSTRUCTURES AS A DYNAMICAL JUDGE: CORE, CUSP, OR MOND?

    SciTech Connect

    Lora, V.; Grebel, E. K.; Just, A.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2013-11-01

    The cold dark matter model predicts cuspy dark matter (DM) halos. However, it has been found that in some low-mass galaxies, cored dark halos provide a better description of their internal dynamics. Here we give constraints on the dark halo profile in the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy by studying the longevity of two cold kinematic substructures detected in this galaxy. We perform N-body simulations of a stellar clump in the Sextans dwarf galaxy, including a live DM halo and the main stellar component. We find that if the dark halo is cuspy, stellar clumps orbiting with semi-major axis ≈400 pc are disrupted in ∼5 Gyr, even if the clump is initially as compact stellar cluster with a radius of r{sub c} = 5 pc. Stellar clusters in an initial orbit with semi-major axis ≤250 pc may survive to dissolution, but their orbits decay toward the center by dynamical friction. In contrast, the stellar clumps can persist for a Hubble time within a cored DM halo, even if the initial clump's radius is as extended as r{sub c} = 80 pc. We also study the evolution of the clump in the MONDian context. In this scenario, we find that even an extended stellar clump with radius r{sub c} = 80 pc survives for a Hubble time, but an unrealistic value for the stellar mass-to-light ratio of 9.2 is needed.

  7. Fundamental properties of core-collapse supernova and GRB progenitors: predicting the look of massive stars before death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Jose H.; Meynet, Georges; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the fundamental properties of core-collapse supernova (SN) progenitors from single stars at solar metallicity. For this purpose, we combine Geneva stellar evolutionary models with initial masses of Mini = 20-120 M⊙ with atmospheric and wind models using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN. We provide synthetic photometry and high-resolution spectra of hot stars at the pre-SN stage. For models with Mini = 9-20 M⊙, we supplement our analysis using publicly available MARCS model atmospheres of RSGs to estimate their synthetic photometry. We employ well-established observational criteria of spectroscopic classification and find that, depending on their initial mass and rotation, massive stars end their lives as red supergiants (RSG), yellow hypergiants (YHG), luminous blue variables (LBV), and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the WN and WO spectral types. For rotating models, we obtained the following types of SN progenitors: WO1-3 (Mini ≥ 32 M⊙), WN10-11 (25 < Mini < 32 M⊙), LBV (20 ≤ Mini ≤ 25 M⊙), G1 Ia+ (18 < Mini < 20 M⊙), and RSGs (9 ≤ Mini ≤ 18 M⊙). For non-rotating models, we found spectral types WO1-3 (Mini > 40 M⊙), WN7-8 (25 < Mini ≤ 40 M⊙), WN11h/LBV (20 < Mini ≤ 25 M⊙), and RSGs (9 ≤ Mini ≤ 20 M⊙). Our rotating models indicate that SN IIP progenitors are all RSG, SN IIL/b progenitors are 56% LBVs and 44% YHGs, SN Ib progenitors are 96% WN10-11 and 4% WOs, and SN Ic progenitors are all WO stars. We find that the most massive and luminous SN progenitors are not necessarily the brightest ones in a given filter, since this depends on their luminosity, temperature, wind density, and the way the spectral energy distribution compares to a filter bandpass. We find that SN IIP progenitors (RSGs) are bright in the RIJHKS filters and faint in the UB filters. SN IIL/b progenitors (LBVs and YHGs), and SN Ib progenitors (WNs) are relatively bright in optical/infrared filters, while SN Ic progenitors (WOs) are faint in all

  8. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  9. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-01

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  10. Stellarator Coil Design and Plasma Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2010-11-03

    The rich information contained in the plasma response to external magnetic perturbations can be used to help design stellarator coils more effectively. We demonstrate the feasibility by first devel- oping a simple, direct method to study perturbations in stellarators that do not break stellarator symmetry and periodicity. The method applies a small perturbation to the plasma boundary and evaluates the resulting perturbed free-boundary equilibrium to build up a sensitivity matrix for the important physics attributes of the underlying configuration. Using this sensitivity information, design methods for better stellarator coils are then developed. The procedure and a proof-of-principle application are given that (1) determine the spatial distributions of external normal magnetic field at the location of the unperturbed plasma boundary to which the plasma properties are most sen- sitive, (2) determine the distributions of external normal magnetic field that can be produced most efficiently by distant coils, (3) choose the ratios of the magnitudes of the the efficiently produced magnetic distributions so the sensitive plasma properties can be controlled. Using these methods, sets of modular coils are found for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) that are either smoother or can be located much farther from the plasma boundary than those of the present design.

  11. Catalyzed D-D stellarator reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald A.

    2016-05-12

    The advantages of using the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) approach for a fusion reactor—lower and less energetic neutron flux and no need for a tritium breeding blanket—have been evaluated in previous papers, giving examples of both tokamak and stellarator reactors. This paper presents an update for the stellarator example, taking account of more recent empirical transport scaling results and design studies of lower-aspect-ratio stellarators. We use a modified version of the Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor model to cost a stellarator-type reactor. Recently, this model has been updated to reflect the improved science and technology base and costs in the magnetic fusion program. Furthermore, it is shown that an interesting catalyzed D-D, stellarator power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved: R/ ≈ 4, required improvement factor to ISS04 scaling, FR = 0.9 to 1.15, <β> ≈ 8.0% to 11.5%, Zeff ≈ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ≈ 0.07, Bm ≈ 14 to 16 T, and R ≈ 18 to 24 m.

  12. Catalyzed D-D stellarator reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald A.

    2016-05-12

    The advantages of using the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) approach for a fusion reactor—lower and less energetic neutron flux and no need for a tritium breeding blanket—have been evaluated in previous papers, giving examples of both tokamak and stellarator reactors. This paper presents an update for the stellarator example, taking account of more recent empirical transport scaling results and design studies of lower-aspect-ratio stellarators. We use a modified version of the Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor model to cost a stellarator-type reactor. Recently, this model has been updated to reflect the improved science and technology base and costs in the magnetic fusionmore » program. Furthermore, it is shown that an interesting catalyzed D-D, stellarator power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved: R/ ≈ 4, required improvement factor to ISS04 scaling, FR = 0.9 to 1.15, <β> ≈ 8.0% to 11.5%, Zeff ≈ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ≈ 0.07, Bm ≈ 14 to 16 T, and R ≈ 18 to 24 m.« less

  13. Kinetic properties of fractal stellar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.; Rastorguev, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic processes in fractal stellar media are analysed in terms of the approach developed in our earlier paper involving a generalization of the nearest neighbour and random force distributions to fractal media. Diffusion is investigated in the approximation of scale-dependent conditional density based on an analysis of the solutions of the corresponding Langevin equations. It is shown that kinetic parameters (time-scales, coefficients of dynamic friction, diffusion, etc.) for fractal stellar media can differ significantly both qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding parameters for a quasi-uniform random media with limited fluctuations. The most important difference is that in the fractal case, kinetic parameters depend on spatial scalelength and fractal dimension of the medium studied. A generalized kinetic equation for stellar media (fundamental equation of stellar dynamics) is derived in the Fokker-Planck approximation with the allowance for the fractal properties of the spatial stellar density distribution. Also derived are its limit forms that can be used to describe small departures of fractal gravitating medium from equilibrium.

  14. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  15. Scaling Stellar Mass Estimates of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Brandon Michael; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Williams, Benjamin F.; van Zee, Liese

    2017-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical imaging of resolved stellar populations has been used to constrain the star formation history (SFH) and chemical evolution of many nearby dwarf galaxies. However, even for dwarf galaxies, the angle subtended by nearby systems can be greater than the HST field of view. Thus, estimates of stellar mass from the HST footprint do not accurately represent the total mass of the system, impacting how SFH results can be used in holistic comparisons of galaxy properties. Here, we use the SFHs of dwarfs combined with stellar population synthesis models to determine mass-to-light ratios for individual galaxies, and compare these values with measured infrared luminosities from Spitzer IRAC data. In this way, we determine what fraction of mass is not included in the HST field of view. To test our methodology, we focus on dwarfs whose stellar disks are contained within the HST observations. Then, we also apply this method to galaxies with larger angular sizes to scale the stellar masses accordingly.

  16. The Stellar Imager (SI)"Vision Mission"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ken; Danchi, W.; Leitner, J.; Liu, A.; Lyon, R.; Mazzuca, L.; Moe, R.; Chenette, D.; Karovska, M.; Allen, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a "Vision" mission in the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) Roadmap, conceived for the purpose of understanding the effects of stellar magnetic fields, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar/stellar magnetic activity and its impact on life in the Universe. The science goals of SI require an ultra-high angular resolution, at ultraviolet wavelengths, on the order of 100 micro-arcsec and thus baselines on the order of 0.5 km. These requirements call for a large, multi-spacecraft (less than 20) imaging interferometer, utilizing precision formation flying in a stable environment, such as in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point. SI's resolution will make it an invaluable resource for many other areas of astrophysics, including studies of AGN s, supernovae, cataclysmic variables, young stellar objects, QSO's, and stellar black holes. ongoing mission concept and technology development studies for SI. These studies are designed to refine the mission requirements for the science goals, define a Design Reference Mission, perform trade studies of selected major technical and architectural issues, improve the existing technology roadmap, and explore the details of deployment and operations, as well as the possible roles of astronauts and/or robots in construction and servicing of the facility.

  17. Catalyzed D-D stellarator reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, John; Spong, Donald A.

    2016-05-12

    The advantages of using the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) approach for a fusion reactor—lower and less energetic neutron flux and no need for a tritium breeding blanket—have been evaluated in previous papers, giving examples of both tokamak and stellarator reactors. This paper presents an update for the stellarator example, taking account of more recent empirical transport scaling results and design studies of lower-aspect-ratio stellarators. We use a modified version of the Generic Magnetic Fusion Reactor model to cost a stellarator-type reactor. Recently, this model has been updated to reflect the improved science and technology base and costs in the magnetic fusion program. Furthermore, it is shown that an interesting catalyzed D-D, stellarator power plant might be possible if the following parameters could be achieved: R/ ≈ 4, required improvement factor to ISS04 scaling, FR = 0.9 to 1.15, <β> ≈ 8.0% to 11.5%, Zeff ≈ 1.45 plus a relativistic temperature correction, fraction of fast ions lost ≈ 0.07, Bm ≈ 14 to 16 T, and R ≈ 18 to 24 m.

  18. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. II. Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Proll, J. H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2013-12-15

    Microinstabilities exhibit a rich variety of behavior in stellarators due to the many degrees of freedom in the magnetic geometry. It has recently been found that certain stellarators (quasi-isodynamic ones with maximum-J geometry) are partly resilient to trapped-particle instabilities, because fast-bouncing particles tend to extract energy from these modes near marginal stability. In reality, stellarators are never perfectly quasi-isodynamic, and the question thus arises whether they still benefit from enhanced stability. Here, the stability properties of Wendelstein 7-X and a more quasi-isodynamic configuration, QIPC, are investigated numerically and compared with the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and the DIII-D tokamak. In gyrokinetic simulations, performed with the gyrokinetic code GENE in the electrostatic and collisionless approximation, ion-temperature-gradient modes, trapped-electron modes, and mixed-type instabilities are studied. Wendelstein 7-X and QIPC exhibit significantly reduced growth rates for all simulations that include kinetic electrons, and the latter are indeed found to be stabilizing in the energy budget. These results suggest that imperfectly optimized stellarators can retain most of the stabilizing properties predicted for perfect maximum-J configurations.

  19. Population Gradients in Stellar Halos from GHOSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailin, Jeremy; Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Ghosts Survey

    2015-01-01

    We report on recent results from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks, and Star clusters (GHOSTS) survey, an HST ACS+WFC3 imaging survey to study stellar populations in and around 16 nearby spiral galaxies. By using HST resolution to resolve the stellar halos into individual red giant branch (RGB) stars, we are able to detect distinct stellar populations at several points throughout the halo of the half dozen massive highly-inclined galaxies in the sample. In approximately half of these galaxies, we detect a gradient in the color of the RGB; which we interpret as a metallicity gradient. Stellar halo formation models predict a wide variety of metallicity gradients: those in which the halos are dominated by stars formed in situ predict stronger gradients than we observe, while accretion-dominated halo models predict weaker or nonexistent gradients. Our measurements therefore provide a useful discriminator between stellar halo models, and at first look appear most consistent with the accretion-based model of Cooper et al. (2010).

  20. Planetary nebulae and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Newly defined characteristics of planetary nebulae (PN) derived from analysis of a photometric survey of 57 PN are reported. The data were combined with measurements of 27 other PN made since 1918 and were found to indicate core masses ranging from 0.55-1.0 solar mass. N/O elemental abundance ratios observed were correlated with the planetary nuclei masses, and were in direct proportion. IUE data on PN that overlapped a large part of the survey indicated that the PN in the galactic disk are more massive than PN in the halo. It is suggested that PN evolve into white dwarfs, a hypothesis supported by astrometric solutions for three nearby visual binaries featuring white dwarfs with well-determined masses. It is noted, however, that PN with masses exceeding one solar mass have been sighted in the Magellanic Clouds.

  1. The mass spectrum of compact remnants from the PARSEC stellar evolution tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela; Bressan, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    The mass spectrum of stellar mass black holes (BHs) is highly uncertain. Dynamical mass measurements are available only for few (˜10) BHs in X-ray binaries, while theoretical models strongly depend on the hydrodynamics of supernova (SN) explosions and on the evolution of massive stars. In this paper, we present and discuss the mass spectrum of compact remnants that we obtained with SEVN, a new public population-synthesis code, which couples the PARSEC stellar evolution tracks with up-to-date recipes for SN explosion (depending on the carbon-oxygen mass of the progenitor, on the compactness of the stellar core at pre-SN stage and on a recent two-parameter criterion based on the dimensionless entropy per nucleon at pre-SN stage). SEVN can be used both as a stand-alone code and in combination with direct-summation N-body codes (STARLAB, HIGPUS). The PARSEC stellar evolution tracks currently implemented in SEVN predict significantly larger values of the carbon-oxygen core mass with respect to previous models. For most of the SN recipes we adopt, this implies substantially larger BH masses at low metallicity (≤2 × 10-3), than other population synthesis codes. The maximum BH mass found with SEVN is ˜25, 60 and 130 M⊙ at metallicity Z = 2 × 10-2, 2 × 10-3 and 2 × 10-4, respectively. Mass loss by stellar winds plays a major role in determining the mass of BHs for very massive stars (≥90 M⊙), while the remnant mass spectrum depends mostly on the adopted SN recipe for lower progenitor masses. We discuss the implications of our results for the transition between neutron star and BH mass, and for the expected number of massive BHs (with mass >25 M⊙) as a function of metallicity.

  2. The binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1: Accretion of matter from an intense Wolf-Rayet stellar wind onto a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Fedorova, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The current evolutionary stage of the binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1, which contain a massive black hole and a Wolf-Rayet star with a strong stellar wind that does not fill its Roche lobe, is considered. The high X-ray luminosity and X-ray properties testify to the presence of accretion disks in these systems. The consistency of the conditions for the existence of such a disk and the possibility of reproducing the observed X-ray luminosity in the framework of the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory for a spherically symmetric stellar wind is analyzed. A brief review of information about the mass-loss rates of Wolf-Rayet stars and the speeds of their stellar winds is given. The evolution of these systems at the current stage is computed. Estimates made using the derived parameters show that it is not possible to achieve consistency, since the conditions for the existence of an accretion disk require that the speed of the Wolf-Rayetwind be appreciably lower than is required to reproduce the observedX-ray luminosity. Several explanations of this situation are possible: (1) the real pattern of the motion of the stellar-wind material in the binary is substantially more complex than is assumed in the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory, changing the conditions for the formation of an accretion disk and influencing the accretion rate onto the black hole; (2) some of the accreting material leaves the accretor due to X-ray heating; (3) the accretion efficiency in these systems is nearly an order of magnitude lower than in the case of accretion through a thin disk onto a non-rotating black hole; (4) the intensity of the Wolf-Rayet wind is one to two orders of magnitude lower than has been suggested by modern studies.

  3. Planetary nebulae as tracers of galaxy stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, Alberto; Arnaboldi, Magda; Corradi, Romano L. M.

    2006-05-01

    We address the general problem of the luminosity-specific planetary nebula (PN) number, better known as the `α' ratio, given by α=NPN/Lgal, and its relationship with the age and metallicity of the parent stellar population. Our analysis relies on population synthesis models that account for simple stellar populations (SSPs), and more elaborate galaxy models covering the full star formation range of the different Hubble morphological types. This theoretical framework is compared with the updated census of the PN population in Local Group (LG) galaxies and external ellipticals in the Leo group, and the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The main conclusions of our study can be summarized as follows. (i) According to the post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stellar core mass, PN lifetime in a SSP is constrained by three relevant regimes, driven by the nuclear (Mcore>~ 0.57Msolar), dynamical (0.57Msolar>~Mcore>~ 0.55Msolar) and transition (0.55Msolar>~Mcore>~ 0.52Msolar) time-scales. The lower limit for Mcore also sets the minimum mass for stars to reach the AGB thermal-pulsing phase and experience the PN event. (ii) Mass loss is the crucial mechanism to constrain the value of α, through the definition of the initial-to-final mass relation (IFMR). The Reimers mass-loss parametrization, calibrated on Pop II stars of Galactic globular clusters, poorly reproduces the observed value of α in late-type galaxies, while a better fit is obtained using the empirical IFMR derived from white dwarf observations in the Galaxy open clusters. (iii) The inferred PN lifetime for LG spirals and irregulars exceeds 10000yr, which suggests that Mcore<~ 0.65Msolar cores dominate, throughout. (iv) The relative PN deficiency in elliptical galaxies, and the observed trend of α with galaxy optical colours, support the presence of a prevailing fraction of low-mass cores (Mcore<~ 0.55Msolar) in the PN distribution and a reduced visibility time-scale for the nebulae as a consequence of the increased AGB

  4. Studying stellar halos with future facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greggio, Laura; Falomo, Renato; Uslenghi, Michela

    2016-08-01

    Stellar halos around galaxies retain fundamental evidence of the processes which lead to their build up. Sophisticated models of galaxy formation in a cosmological context yield quantitative predictions about various observable characteristics, including the amount of substructure, the slope of radial mass profiles and three dimensional shapes, and the properties of the stellar populations in the halos. The comparison of such models with the observations provides constraints on the general picture of galaxy formation in the hierarchical Universe, as well as on the physical processes taking place in the halos formation. With the current observing facilities, stellar halos can be effectively probed only for a limited number of nearby galaxies. In this paper we illustrate the progress that we expect in this field with the future ground based large aperture telescopes (E-ELT) and with space based facilities as JWST.

  5. Nanoflare Heating of Solar and Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that much, and perhaps most, of the Sun's corona is heated by small unresolved bursts of energy called nanoflares. It seems likely that stellar coronae are heated in a similar fashion. Kanoflares are here taken to mean any impulsive heating that occurs within a magnetic flux strand. Many mechanisms have this property, including waves, but we prefer Parker's picture of tangled magnetic fields. The tangling is caused by turbulent convection at the stellar surface, and magnetic energy is released when the stresses reach a critical level. We suggest that the mechanism of energy release is the "secondary instability" of electric current sheets that are present at the boundaries between misaligned strands. I will discuss the collective evidence for solar and stellar nanoflares and hopefully present new results from the Solar Dynamics Observatory that was just launched.

  6. Solar and stellar coronae and winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Moira

    2017-10-01

    Solar-like stars influence their environments through their coronal emis- sion and winds. These processes are linked through the physics of the stellar magnetic field, whose strength and geometry has now been explored for a large number of stars through spectropolarimetric observations. We have now detected trends with mass and rotation rate in the distribution of magnetic energies in different geometries and on also different length scales. This has implications both for the dynamo processes that generate the fields and also for the dynamics and evolution of the coronae and winds. Modelling of the surface driving processes on stars of various masses and rotation rates has revealed tantalising clues about the dynamics of stellar coronae and their ejecta. These new observations have also prompted a resurgence in the modelling of stellar winds, which is now uncovering the range of different interplanetary conditions that exoplanets might experience as they evolve.

  7. The Stellar Imager (SI) "Vision Mission"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K.; Danchi, W.; Leitner, J.; Liu, A.; Lyon, R.; Mazzuca, L.; Moe, R.; Chenette, D.; Schrijver, C.; Kilston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a Vision Mission in the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) NASA Roadmap, conceived for the purpose of understanding the effects of stellar magnetic fields, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar/stellar activity and its impact on life in the Universe. The science goals of SI require an ultra-high angular resolution, a t ultraviolet wavelengths, on the order of 100 micro-arcsec and baselines on the order of 0.5 km. These requirements call for a large, multi-spacecraft (>20) imaging interferometer, utilizing precision formation flying in a stable environment, such as in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point. In this paper, we present an update on the ongoing SI mission concept and technology development studies.

  8. The Stellar Imager (SI) "Vision Mission"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K.; Danchi, W.; Leitner, J.; Liu, A.; Lyon, R.; Mazzuca, L.; Moe, R.; Chenette, D.; Schrijver, C.; Kilston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a Vision Mission in the Sun-Earth Connection (SEC) NASA Roadmap, conceived for the purpose of understanding the effects of stellar magnetic fields, the dynamos that generate them, and the internal structure and dynamics of the stars in which they exist. The ultimate goal is to achieve the best possible forecasting of solar/stellar activity and its impact on life in the Universe. The science goals of SI require an ultra-high angular resolution, at ultraviolet wavelengths, on the order of 100 micro-arcsec and baselines on the order of 0.5 km. These requirements call for a large, multi-spacecraft (greater than 20) imaging interferometer, utilizing precision formation flying in a stable environment, such as in a Lissajous orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point. In this paper, we present an update on the ongoing SI mission concept and technology development studies.

  9. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2011-11-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid γ Dor/ δ Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as η Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  10. Kinetic efficiencies of stellar wind bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, D.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical fraction of a stellar wind's energy converted into the kinetic energy of an expanding swept-up shell is 20 percent in the classical theory of stellar wind bubbles. Observational estimates of this conversion factor based on the amount of ionized material in wind-swept shells about Wolf-Rayet stars generally yield results of 1 percent. If there is a substantial amount of neutral material in the shell, it will not be counted and the kinetic efficiency will be underestimated. Presented here is a dynamical estimate which accounts for this neutral material in deducing the kinetic efficiencies of stellar wind bubbles. Bubbles classified as wind-blown shells have kinetic efficiencies in line with theoretical expectations for energy-conserving evolution in a homogeneous medium. Ringlike nebulae have significantly lower efficiencies, probably because they have been 'poisoned' by the photoevaporation of clouds engulfed during evolution into a cloudy substrate.

  11. Abundances of Elements in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Interest in stellar coronal abundances was piqued several years ago by the launch of satellites that were able to study the compositions of coronae on stars other than the sun. Motivated by the possibility that other stellar coronae might share the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect solar abundance anomaly, we have in recent years been attempting to determine coronal element abundances in other stars. I will review these results, together with similar results reported in the literature, from a critical perspective of understanding the true uncertainties involved in the measurements. The importance of element abundances for coronal physics will be highlighted, and it will be shown that the differences in the chemical compositions of active stars allow us to draw new conclusions regarding the nature of stellar coronae and coronal heating.

  12. On stellar limb darkening and exoplanetary transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This paper examines how to compare stellar limb-darkening coefficients evaluated from model atmospheres with those derived from photometry. Different characterizations of a given model atmosphere can give quite different numerical results (even for a given limb-darkening 'law'), while light-curve analyses yield limb-darkening coefficients that are dependent on system geometry, and that are not directly comparable to any model-atmosphere representation. These issues are examined in the context of exoplanetary transits, which offer significant advantages over traditional binary-star eclipsing systems in the study of stellar limb darkening. 'Like for like' comparisons between light-curve analyses and new model-atmosphere results, mediated by synthetic photometry, are conducted for a small sample of stars. Agreement between the resulting synthetic-photometry/atmosphere-model (SPAM) limb-darkening coefficients and empirical values ranges from very good to quite poor, even though the targets investigated show only a small dispersion in fundamental stellar parameters.

  13. A daylight experiment for teaching stellar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illarramendi, M. A.; Hueso, R.; Zubia, J.; Aldabaldetreku, G.; Durana, G.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the design of a simple experiment that reproduces the operation of the Michelson stellar interferometer. The emission of stellar sources has been simulated using light emerging from circular end-faces of step-index polymer optical fibers and from diffuse reflections of laser beams. Interference fringes have been acquired using a digital camera, coupled to a telescope obscured by a double aperture lid. The experiment is analogous to the classical determination of stellar sizes by Michelson and can be used during the day. Using this experimental set-up, we can determine the size of extended sources, located at a distance of about 75 m from our telescope, with errors less than 25%.

  14. Angular Momentum Loss Via Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Sean; Pinzon, G.; Greene, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of stellar spin rates observed during star formation is not yet understood, due primarily to the fact that it is still not clear which mechanism(s) is responsible for removing angular momentum. Stellar winds may exert significant torques during pre-main-sequence evolution, provided that the mass loss rates are enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to their main sequence values. This may be possible, if the winds are powered by the accretion process. We present new calculations of the angular momentum loss from enhanced stellar winds and address how this may help our understanding of young star spins. SPM was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at Ames Research Center, administered by ORAU through a contract with NASA.

  15. Nanoflare Heating of Solar and Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that much, and perhaps most, of the Sun's corona is heated by small unresolved bursts of energy called nanoflares. It seems likely that stellar coronae are heated in a similar fashion. Kanoflares are here taken to mean any impulsive heating that occurs within a magnetic flux strand. Many mechanisms have this property, including waves, but we prefer Parker's picture of tangled magnetic fields. The tangling is caused by turbulent convection at the stellar surface, and magnetic energy is released when the stresses reach a critical level. We suggest that the mechanism of energy release is the "secondary instability" of electric current sheets that are present at the boundaries between misaligned strands. I will discuss the collective evidence for solar and stellar nanoflares and hopefully present new results from the Solar Dynamics Observatory that was just launched.

  16. Solar and stellar activity - The theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvedere, G.

    1985-10-01

    The unified approach to understanding solar and stellar activity is examined. Stellar activity observations have stimulated theoretical work, mostly within the framework of the alpha-omega dynamo theory. A number of uncertainties and intrinsic limits in dynamo theory do still exist, and these are discussed together with alternative or complementary suggestions. The relevance is stressed of nonlinear problems in dynamo theory - magnetoconvection, growth and stability of flux tubes against magnetic buoyancy, hydromagnetic global dynamos - to improve the understanding of both small and large scale interaction of rotation, turbulent convection and magnetic fields, and the transition from the linear to the nonlinear regime. Recent dynamo models of stellar activity are critically reviewed regarding the dependence of activity indexes and cycles on rotation rate and spectral type. Open problems to be solved by future work are outlined.

  17. Effect of finite. beta. on stellarator transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1984-04-01

    A theory of the modification of stellarator transport due to the presence of finite plasma pressure is developed, and applied to a range of stellarator configurations. For many configurations of interest, plasma transport can change by more than an order of magnitude in the progression from zero pressure to the equilibrium ..beta.. limit of the device. Thus, a stellarator with transport-optimized vacuum fields can have poor confinement at the desired operating ..beta... Without an external compensating field, increasing ..beta.. tends to degrade confinement, unless the initial field structure is very carefully chosen. The theory permits one to correctly determine this vacuum structure, in terms of the desired structure of the field at a prescribed operating ..beta... With a compensating external field, the deleterious effect of finite ..beta.. on transport can be partially eliminated.

  18. Neutrino trapping in nonstrange dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chiapparini, M.; Duarte, S.B.

    1996-08-01

    Neutrino trapping effects on the properties of dense stellar matter in nonstrange supranuclear regime are studied with the purpose of applying to supernovae dynamical evolution. The hadronic and leptonic compositions of stellar matter are obtained in the framework of the relativistic mean-field theory coupled with the {beta}-equilibrium condition, and maintaining the charge neutrality of the stellar medium. It is shown that the matter composition depends dramatically upon the confined electronic-leptonic fraction. The softness of the equation of state and the lowering of the nuclear incompressibility values, when compared with the situation in which neutrino confinement is not considered, are the remarkable results. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Recent advances in modeling stellar interiors (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    Advances in stellar interior modeling are being driven by new data from large-scale surveys and high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Here we focus on single stars in normal evolutionary phases; we will not discuss the many advances in modeling star formation, interacting binaries, supernovae, or neutron stars. We review briefly: (1) updates to input physics of stellar models; (2) progress in two and three-dimensional evolution and hydrodynamic models; (3) insights from oscillation data used to infer stellar interior structure and validate model predictions (asteroseismology). We close by highlighting a few outstanding problems, e.g., the driving mechanisms for hybrid {gamma} Dor/{delta} Sct star pulsations, the cause of giant eruptions seen in luminous blue variables such as {eta} Car and P Cyg, and the solar abundance problem.

  20. Progress in stellarator research in Kharkov IPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsenya, V. S.; Shapoval, A. N.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Pankratov, I. M.; Chechkin, V. V.; Moiseenko, V. E.; Lozin, A. V.; Dreval, N. B.; Grigor'eva, L. I.; Konovalov, V. G.; Tarasov, I. K.; Lesnyakov, G. G.; Beletskii, A. A.; Berezhnyj, V. L.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Chernyshenko, V. Ya; Filippov, V. V.; Kasilov, A. A.; Korovin, V. B.; Kotsubanov, V. D.; Kozulya, M. M.; Kramskoi, Ye D.; Kulaga, A. E.; Maznichenko, S. M.; Makhov, M. N.; Mironov, Yu K.; Nikol'skij, I. K.; Romanov, V. S.; Slavnyj, A. S.; Shtan', A. F.; Sitnikov, D. A.; Tarasov, M. I.; Tsybenko, S. A.; Zamanov, N. V.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2014-05-01

    Recent results of the experimental program on the stellarator-type device Uragan-3M at the IPP in Kharkov are presented. Efforts were focused mainly on optimization of the operation of the frame-type radiofrequency antenna to produce a target plasma for the three-half-turn antenna. Different regimes of the Uragan-3M operation, which are characterized by different temporal behavior of the average plasma density, electron cyclotron emission radiation intensity and particle confinement time, are considered. Elementary atomic processes responsible for plasma creation are studied. The particle confinement time for the Uragan-3M plasmas is estimated. Measurements of energy spectra of charge exchange atoms are carried out. The principal possibility of realizing a ‘stellarator-magnetic mirror’ scheme as a prototype of a stellarator-mirror fusion-fission hybrid is shown for Uragan-2M. Future plans are discussed.

  1. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  2. EFFECTS OF RESISTIVITY ON MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sawai, H.; Suzuki, H.; Yamada, S.; Kotake, K.

    2013-02-10

    We studied the role of turbulent resistivity in the core-collapse of a strongly magnetized massive star, carrying out two-dimensional resistive-MHD simulations. Three cases with different initial strengths of magnetic field and rotation are investigated: (1) a strongly magnetized rotating core, (2) a moderately magnetized rotating core, and (3) a very strongly magnetized non-rotating core. In each case, one ideal-MHD model and two resistive-MHD models are computed. As a result of these computations, each model shows an eruption of matter assisted by magnetic acceleration (and also by centrifugal acceleration in the rotating cases). We found that resistivity attenuates the explosion in cases 1 and 2, while it enhances the explosion in case 3. We also found that in the rotating cases, the main mechanisms for the amplification of a magnetic field in the post-bounce phase are an outward advection of the magnetic field and a twisting of poloidal magnetic field lines by differential rotation, which are somewhat dampened down with the presence of resistivity. Although magnetorotational instability seems to occur in the rotating models, it plays only a minor role in magnetic field amplification. Another impact of resistivity is that on the aspect ratio. In the rotating cases, a large aspect ratio of the ejected matter, >2.5, attained in an ideal-MHD model is reduced to some extent in a resistive model. These results indicate that resistivity possibly plays an important role in the dynamics of strongly magnetized supernovae.

  3. Fossil Cores In The Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian

    Most gas giant exoplanets with orbital periods < few days are unstable against tidal decay and may be tidally disrupted before their host stars leave the main sequence. These gas giants probably contain rocky/icy cores, and so their cores will be stranded near their progenitor's Roche limit (few hours orbital period). These fossil cores will evade the Kepler mission's transit search because it is focused on periods > 0.5 days, but finding these fossil cores would provide unprecedented insights into planetary interiors and formation ? e.g., they would be a smoking gun favoring formation of gas giants via core accretion. We propose to search for and characterize fossil cores in the Kepler dataset. We will vet candidates using the Kepler photometry and auxiliary data, collect ground-based spectra of the host stars and radial-velocity (RV) and adaptive optics (AO) data to corroborate candidates. We will also constrain stellar tidal dissipation efficiencies (parameterized by Q) by determining our survey's completeness, elucidating dynamical origins and evolution of exoplanets even if we find no fossil cores. Our preliminary search has already found several dozen candidates, so the proposed survey has a high likelihood of success.

  4. Chemical Evolution of Infrared Dark Cloud Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Susanna C.; Jackson, J. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Rathborne, J. M.; Simon, R.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are molecular clouds seen as extinction features against the mid-infrared Galactic background. Studies of IRDCs have shown them to be cold (< 25 K), dense (> 10^5 cm^-3), and have very high column densities ( 10^23-10^25 cm^-2, e.g., Egan et al. 1998; Carey et al. 1998, 2000). IRDCs host the earliest stages of high-mass star and cluster formation (Rathborne et al. 2005, 2006, 2007). We have mapped 59 IRDC protostellar cores in the fourth Galactic quadrant using the ATNF Mopra telescope simultaneously in HCN (1-0), HC3N (10-9), HCO+ (1-0), HNC (1-0), N2H+ (1-0), and SiO (2-1). We found that the ratios of intensities of the different molecular tracers vary greatly from cloud to cloud, and from core to core within clouds. These different line ratios probably correspond to chemical differences which arise in different evolutionary sequences. We show that specific line ratios distinguish cold pre-stellar cores from warm star-forming cores. N2H+ was found to be a good tracer of active star-forming cores, correlating well with cores containing "green fuzzies,” i.e., extended 4.5 micron emission due to shocked gas (Chambers et al., in press). This work was funded by NSF grant AST-0808001.

  5. Stellar Astrophysics for the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Herrero, A.; Sánchez, F.

    2011-06-01

    1. Fundamentals of stellar evolution theory: understanding the HRD C. Chiosi; 2. Observations of the most luminous stars in local group galaxies P. Massey; 3. Quantitative spectroscopy of the brightest blue supergiant stars in galaxies R. P. Kudritzki; 4. Calibration of the extragalactic distance scale B. F. Madore and W. L. Freedman; 5. Dwarf galaxies G. S. Da Costa; 6. Resolved stellar populations of the luminous galaxies in the local group M. Mateo; 7. Chemical evolution of the ISM in nearby galaxies E. D. Skillman; 8. Populations of massive stars and the interstellar medium C. Leitherer.

  6. X-rays from stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of X-ray observations of flares on dMe, active spectroscopic binaries and young stars is presented. Consideration is given to the energy associated with the X-ray emission and its relation to other components of the flare energy budget, the time behavior of the flaring plasma as seen by the X-ray emission, and comparisons of stellar flare parameters with solar compact and two ribbon flares. Flares are easily detected when the contrast in the emission from the flaring plasma relative to the stellar photosphere is large as in the X-ray, microwave, and UV regions of the spectrum.

  7. ZASPE: Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordan, Andres; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar

    2016-07-01

    ZASPE (Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator) computes the atmospheric stellar parameters (Teff, log(g), [Fe/H] and vsin(i)) from echelle spectra via least squares minimization with a pre-computed library of synthetic spectra. The minimization is performed only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. The uncertainities and covariances computed by ZASPE assume that the principal source of error is the systematic missmatch between the observed spectrum and the sythetic one that produces the best fit. ZASPE requires a grid of synthetic spectra and can use any pre-computed library minor modifications.

  8. Imaging of NGC 5907's stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Seppo; Grillmair, Carl J.; Martínez-Delgado, David; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Capak, Peter L.; Arendt, Richard G.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Davies, James E.; Majewski, Steven R.; Gabany, R. Jay

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained deep g, r, and i-band Subaru and ultra-deep 3.6 μm IRAC images of parts of the multiply-wrapped stellar stream around the nearby edge-on galaxy NGC 5907. We have fitted the surface brightness measurements of the stream with FSPS stellar population synthesis models to derive the metallicity and age of the brightest parts of the stream. The resulting relatively high metallicity ([Fe/H] = -0.3) is consistent with a major merger scenario but a satellite accretion event cannot be ruled out.

  9. Approximate input physics for stellar modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pols, Onno R.; Tout, Christopher A.; Eggleton, Peter P.; Han, Zhanwen

    1995-06-01

    We present a simple and efficient, yet reasonably accurate, equation of state, which at the moderately low temperatures and high densities found in the interiors of stars less massive than the Sun is substantially more accurate than its predecessor by Eggleton, Faulkner & Flannery. Along with the most recently available values in tabular form of opacities, neutrino loss rates, and nuclear reaction rates for a selection of the most important reactions, this provides a convenient package of input physics for stellar modelling. We briefly discuss a few results obtained with the updated stellar evolution code.

  10. Observation of stellar remnants from recent supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Becker, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The current observational situation regarding the presence or absence of collapsed stellar objects associated with supernova remnants is reviewed. The theoretical expectations and observational evidence for the various possible classes of stellar remnants are discussed. The results of searches for these objects in the radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray regions of the spectrum are outlined with the conclusion that nine bona fide candidates are currently known. The implications of these results for the origin and evolution of compact objects are summarized.

  11. Stellar Astrophysics with the K2 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.

    2016-06-01

    After two years of operation, NASA's K2 spacecraft has established itself as not simply a repurposed Kepler, but as a uniquely capable mission in its own right. While each field of view is observed for only ~80 days, in contrast to the 4+ years achieved by Kepler, the varied locations of the pointings along the ecliptic have made possible a wide range of new astrophysical applications. In this talk, I will discuss recent K2 results in the area of stellar astrophysics, focusing on studies of stellar activity and asteroseismology. I will also present an overview of the different data reduction pipelines available for working with K2 data.

  12. Distinct Turbulence Saturation Regimes in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the complex 3D magnetic fields of stellarators, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence is shown to have two distinct saturation regimes, as revealed by petascale numerical simulations and explained by a simple turbulence theory. The first regime is marked by strong zonal flows and matches previous observations in tokamaks. The newly observed second regime, in contrast, exhibits small-scale quasi-two-dimensional turbulence, negligible zonal flows, and, surprisingly, a weaker heat flux scaling. Our findings suggest that key details of the magnetic geometry control turbulence in stellarators.

  13. Stellar populations of Shapley constellation III

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, N.; Mould, J.; Thompson, I.

    1987-12-01

    A V-I color-magnitude diagram is presented for a 0.6-sq deg field encompassing part of the LMC's Shapley III star-formation region. The pronounced luminosity function peak exhibited by the main-sequence stars is identified with the turnoff of the first star-forming burst, and then used as an age indicator with which to compare stellar evolutionary models with the dynamical age estimate determined by Dopita et al. (1985); the initial luminosity and mass functions are derived. The dynamical clock in Shapley III is in better agreement with the stellar evolutionary clock if models without convective overshoot are adopted. 42 references.

  14. Study of stellarator devices by expansion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.; Boozer, A.H.; Koniges, A.E.; Kuo-Petravic, G.; Manickam, J.; Monticello, D.A.; Mynick, H.; Park, W.; Reiman, A.; Rewoldt, G.

    1984-09-01

    Expansion techniques have led to new tools for designing stellarators and interpreting experimental results. The stellarator expansion is coupled with Hamiltonian techniques to investigate the effect of plasma pressure on magnetic surface structure. An expansion for nonplanar-axis systems is described. A reduced-equation initial-value formalism is used to create three-dimensional heliac equilibria. A low-..beta.. expansion with an auxiliary expansion about the magnetic axis makes possible the determination of island widths in heliacs and allows analytic determination of the effect of equilibrium modifications associated with plasma pressure on radial transport.

  15. Equilibrium stellar systems with genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gularte, E.; Carpintero, D. D.

    In 1979, M Schwarzschild showed that it is possible to build an equilibrium triaxial stellar system. However, the linear programmation used to that goal was not able to determine the uniqueness of the solution, nor even if that solution was the optimum one. Genetic algorithms are ideal tools to find a solution to this problem. In this work, we use a genetic algorithm to reproduce an equilibrium spherical stellar system from a suitable set of predefined orbits, obtaining the best solution attainable with the provided set. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  16. Stellar compass for the Clementine Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.

    1994-11-15

    A CCD sensor with 42 x 28 degrees FOV and 576 x 384 pixels was built by the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) in the Physics Department at LLNL. That sensor, called the StarTracker camera, is used on the Clementine Lunar Mapping mission between January and May, 1994. Together with the Stellar Compass software, the StarTracker camera provided a way of identifying its orientation to within about 150 microradians in camera body pitch and yaw. This presentation will be an overview of basically how the Stellar Compass software works, along with showing some of its performance results.

  17. New Theory of Stellar Convection without the mixing-length parameter: new stellar atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, Stefano; Chiosi, Cesare; Cropper, Mark; Grebel, Eva K.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar convection is customarily described by the mixing-length theory, which makes use of the mixing-length scale to express the convective flux, velocity, and temperature gradients of the convective elements and stellar medium. The mixing-length scale is taken to be proportional to the local pressure scale height, and the proportionality factor (the mixing-length parameter) must be determined by comparing the stellar models to some calibrator, usually the Sun.No strong arguments exist to claim that the mixing-length parameter is the same in all stars and all evolutionary phases. Because of this, all stellar models in literature are hampered by this basic uncertainty.In a recent paper (Pasetto et al 2014) we presented a new theory of stellar convection that does not require the mixing length parameter. Our self-consistent analytical formulation of stellar convection determines all the properties of stellar convection as a function of the physical behaviour of the convective elements themselves and the surrounding medium. The new theory of stellar convection is formulated starting from a conventional solution of the Navier-Stokes/Euler equations, i.e. the Bernoulli equation for a perfect fluid, but expressed in a non-inertial reference frame co-moving with the convective elements. In our formalism, the motion of stellar convective cells inside convective-unstable layers is fully determined by a new system of equations for convection in a non-local and time dependent formalism.We obtained an analytical, non-local, time-dependent solution for the convective energy transport that does not depend on any free parameter. The predictions of the new theory are now compared with those from the standard mixing-length paradigm with very satisfactory results for atmosphere models of the Sun and all the stars around the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.

  18. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Erwin, P.; Fabricius, M.

    2014-02-10

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude on the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius r{sub b} , the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter β(r) are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they quantitatively match the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.

  19. Time-Domain Studies as a Probe of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam Andrew

    This dissertation focuses on the use of time-domain techniques to discover and characterize these rare astrophysical gems, while also addressing some gaps in our understanding of the earliest and latest stages of stellar evolution. The observational studies presented herein can be grouped into three parts: (i) the study of stellar death (supernovae); (ii) the study of stellar birth; and (iii) the use of modern machine-learning algorithms to discover and classify variable sources. I present observations of supernova (SN) 2006gy, the most luminous SN ever at the time of discovery, and the even-more luminous SN 2008es. Together, these two supernovae (SNe) demonstrate that core-collapse SNe can be significantly more luminous than thermonuclear type Ia SNe, and that there are multiple channels for producing these brilliant core-collapse explosions. For SN 2006gy I show that the progenitor star experienced violent, eruptive mass loss on multiple occasions during the centuries prior to explosion, a scenario that was completely unexpected within the cannon of massive-star evolution theory. I also present observations of SN 2008iy, one of the most unusual SNe ever discovered. Typical SNe take ≲3 weeks to reach peak luminosity; SN 2008iy exhibited a slow and steady rise for ˜400 days before reaching maximum brightness. The best explanation for such behavior is that the progenitor of SN 2008iy experienced an episodic phase of mass loss ˜100 yr prior to explosion. The three SNe detailed in this dissertation have altered our understanding of massive-star mass loss, namely, these SNe provide distinct evidence that post-main sequence mass loss, for at least some massive stars, occurs in sporatic fits, rather than being steady. They also demonstrate that core collapse is not restricted to the red supergiant and Wolf-Rayet stages of stellar evolution as theory predicted. Instead, some massive stars explode while in a luminous blue variable-like state. I also present

  20. New axes for the stellar mass fundamental plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L* Schechter, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Multiple lines of argument, both observational and theoretical, point to a tight correlation between the stellar velocity dispersion observed for an early-type galaxy and the mass of the dark matter halo in which it is embedded. While effective radius and surface brightness measure properties of the stellar (baryonic) component, the stellar velocity dispersion tells us the mass, virial radius and velocity dispersion of the dark matter component. The stellar effective radius may be divided by the halo radius, and the stellar mass (inferred from the stellar surface brightness) divided by the halo mass to give new axes for the fundamental plane. The stellar velocity dispersion is then a measure of the overall size of the dark matter halo. The two dimensionless axes tell us the ratios of the stellar mass to halo mass and stellar extent to halo extent. If themass of a halo alone determined everything about the embedded galaxy, there would be a unique stellar mass fraction and a unique stellar radius fraction for a given dispersion, forming a fundamental line. If there is a range of stellar mass fractions and a range of stellar radius fractions, and if they are independent, the line will blow up into a sausage. The fact that it fans out into a plane and not a sausage tells us that the deviations in mass fraction and radius fraction from the fundamental line must be strongly correlated.