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Sample records for non-threshold lnt dose-based

  1. Regulatory implications of a linear non-threshold (LNT) dose-based risks.

    PubMed

    Aleta, C R

    2009-01-01

    Current radiation protection regulatory limits are based on the linear non-threshold (LNT) theory using health data from atomic bombing survivors. Studies in recent years sparked debate on the validity of the theory, especially at low doses. The present LNT overestimates radiation risks since the dosimetry included only acute gammas and neutrons; the role of other bomb-caused factors, e.g. fallout, induced radioactivity, thermal radiation (UVR), electromagnetic pulse (EMP), and blast, were excluded. Studies are proposed to improve the dose-response relationship. PMID:19299154

  2. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT

    PubMed Central

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations (∼40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas. PMID:20585443

  3. LNT IS THE BEST WE CAN DO - TO-DAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particularly at low doses, is the subject of an ongoing and spirited debate. The present review describes the current data base and basis for establishing a low dose, linear no threshold (LNT) mode...

  4. Do non-targeted effects increase or decrease low dose risk in relation to the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model?

    PubMed

    Little, M P

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we review the evidence for departure from linearity for malignant and non-malignant disease and in the light of this assess likely mechanisms, and in particular the potential role for non-targeted effects. Excess cancer risks observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in many medically and occupationally exposed groups exposed at low or moderate doses are generally statistically compatible. For most cancer sites the dose-response in these groups is compatible with linearity over the range observed. The available data on biological mechanisms do not provide general support for the idea of a low dose threshold or hormesis. This large body of evidence does not suggest, indeed is not statistically compatible with, any very large threshold in dose for cancer, or with possible hormetic effects, and there is little evidence of the sorts of non-linearity in response implied by non-DNA-targeted effects. There are also excess risks of various types of non-malignant disease in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in other groups. In particular, elevated risks of cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and digestive disease are observed in the A-bomb data. In contrast with cancer, there is much less consistency in the patterns of risk between the various exposed groups; for example, radiation-associated respiratory and digestive diseases have not been seen in these other (non-A-bomb) groups. Cardiovascular risks have been seen in many exposed populations, particularly in medically exposed groups, but in contrast with cancer there is much less consistency in risk between studies: risks per unit dose in epidemiological studies vary over at least two orders of magnitude, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. In the absence of a convincing mechanistic explanation of epidemiological evidence that is, at present, less than persuasive, a cause-and-effect interpretation of the reported statistical associations for cardiovascular disease is unreliable but cannot be excluded. Inflammatory processes are the most likely mechanism by which radiation could modify the atherosclerotic disease process. If there is to be modification by low doses of ionizing radiation of cardiovascular disease through this mechanism, a role for non-DNA-targeted effects cannot be excluded. PMID:20105434

  5. Ammonia Production and Utilization in a Hybrid LNT+SCR System

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Parks, II, James E

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid LNT+SCR system is used to control NOx from a light-duty diesel engine with in-cylinder regeneration controls. A diesel oxidation catalyst and diesel particulate filter are upstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts. Ultraviolet (UV) adsorption spectroscopy performed directly in the exhaust path downstream of the LNT and SCR catalysts is used to characterize NH3 production and utilization in the system. Extractive exhaust samples are analyzed with FTIR and magnetic sector mass spectrometry (H2) as well. Furthermore, standard gas analyzers are used to complete the characterization of exhaust chemistry. NH3 formation increases strongly with extended regeneration (or over regeneration ) of the LNT, but the amount of NOx reduction occurring over the SCR catalyst is limited by the amount of NH3 produced as well as the amount of NOx available downstream of the LNT. Control of lean-rich cycling parameters enables control of the ratio of NOx reduction between the LNT and SCR catalysts. During lean-rich cycling, fuel penalties are similar for either LNT dominant or LNT with supplemental SCR NOx reduction. However, stored NH3 after multiple lean-rich cycles can enable continued NOx reduction by the SCR after lean-rich cycling stops; thus, requirements for active regeneration of the LNT+SCR system can be modified during transient operation.

  6. The LNT Debate in Radiation Protection: Science vs. Policy

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in revisiting LNT theory as the basis for the system of radiation protection in the US and worldwide. Arguing the scientific merits of policy options is not likely to be fruitful because the science is not robust enough to support one theory to the exclusion of others. Current science cannot determine the existence of a dose threshold, a key piece to resolving the matter scientifically. The nature of the scientific evidence is such that risk assessment at small effective doses (defined as <100 mSv) is highly uncertain, and several policy alternatives, including threshold and non-linear dose-response functions, are scientifically defensible. This paper argues for an alternative approach by looking at the LNT debate as a policy question and analyzes the problem from a social and economic perspective. In other words, risk assessment and a strictly scientific perspective are insufficiently broad enough to resolve the issue completely. A wider perspective encompassing social and economic impacts in a risk management context is necessary, but moving the debate to the policy and risk management arena necessarily marginalizes the role of scientists. PMID:22740781

  7. The Integration of LNT and Hormesis for Cancer Risk Assessment Optimizes Public Health Protection.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new cancer risk assessment strategy and methodology that optimizes population-based responses by yielding the lowest disease/tumor incidence across the entire dose continuum. The authors argue that the optimization can be achieved by integrating two seemingly conflicting models; i.e., the linear no-threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-response models. The integration would yield the optimized response at a risk of 10 with the LNT model. The integrative functionality of the LNT and hormetic dose response models provides an improved estimation of tumor incidence through model uncertainty analysis and major reductions in cancer incidence via hormetic model estimates. This novel approach to cancer risk assessment offers significant improvements over current risk assessment approaches by revealing a regulatory sweet spot that maximizes public health benefits while incorporating practical approaches for model validation. PMID:26808876

  8. Origin of the linearity no threshold (LNT) dose-response concept.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2013-09-01

    This paper identifies the origin of the linearity at low-dose concept [i.e., linear no threshold (LNT)] for ionizing radiation-induced mutation. After the discovery of X-ray-induced mutations, Olson and Lewis (Nature 121(3052):673-674, 1928) proposed that cosmic/terrestrial radiation-induced mutations provide the principal mechanism for the induction of heritable traits, providing the driving force for evolution. For this concept to be general, a LNT dose relationship was assumed, with genetic damage proportional to the energy absorbed. Subsequent studies suggested a linear dose response for ionizing radiation-induced mutations (Hanson and Heys in Am Nat 63(686):201-213, 1929; Oliver in Science 71:44-46, 1930), supporting the evolutionary hypothesis. Based on an evaluation of spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced mutation with Drosophila, Muller argued that background radiation had a negligible impact on spontaneous mutation, discrediting the ionizing radiation-based evolutionary hypothesis. Nonetheless, an expanded set of mutation dose-response observations provided a basis for collaboration between theoretical physicists (Max Delbruck and Gunter Zimmer) and the radiation geneticist Nicolai Timoféeff-Ressovsky. They developed interrelated physical science-based genetics perspectives including a biophysical model of the gene, a radiation-induced gene mutation target theory and the single-hit hypothesis of radiation-induced mutation, which, when integrated, provided the theoretical mechanism and mathematical basis for the LNT model. The LNT concept became accepted by radiation geneticists and recommended by national/international advisory committees for risk assessment of ionizing radiation-induced mutational damage/cancer from the mid-1950s to the present. The LNT concept was later generalized to chemical carcinogen risk assessment and used by public health and regulatory agencies worldwide. PMID:23887208

  9. Perspective on the use of LNT for radiation protection and risk assessment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    PubMed

    Puskin, Jerome S

    2009-08-21

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) bases its risk assessments, regulatory limits, and nonregulatory guidelines for population exposures to low level ionizing radiation on the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, which assumes that the risk of cancer due to a low dose exposure is proportional to dose, with no threshold. The use of LNT for radiation protection purposes has been repeatedly endorsed by authoritative scientific advisory bodies, including the National Academy of Sciences' BEIR Committees, whose recommendations form a primary basis of EPA's risk assessment methodology. Although recent radiobiological findings indicate novel damage and repair processes at low doses, LNT is supported by data from both epidemiology and radiobiology. Given the current state of the science, the consensus positions of key scientific and governmental bodies, as well as the conservatism and calculational convenience of the LNT assumption, it is unlikely that EPA will modify this approach in the near future.

  10. Lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt1) is dispensable for protein O-mannosylation by Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Dávalos, Laura Elena; Espitia, Clara; González-Cerón, Gabriela; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Servín-González, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A protein glycosylation system related to that for protein mannosylation in yeast is present in many actinomycetes. This system involves polyprenyl phosphate mannose synthase (Ppm), protein mannosyl transferase (Pmt), and lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). In this study, we obtained a series of mutants in the ppm (sco1423), lnt1 (sco1014), and pmt (sco3154) genes of Streptomyces coelicolor, which encode Ppm, Lnt1, and Pmt, to analyze their requirement for glycosylation of the heterologously expressed Apa glycoprotein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results show that both Ppm and Pmt were required for Apa glycosylation, but that Lnt1 was dispensable for both Apa and the bacteriophage φC31 receptor glycosylation. A bacterial two-hybrid assay revealed that contrary to M. tuberculosis, Lnt1 of S. coelicolor does not interact with Ppm. The D2 catalytic domain of M. tuberculosisPpm was sufficient for complementation of an S. coelicolor double mutant lacking Lnt1 and Ppm, both for Apa glycosylation and for glycosylation of φC31 receptor. On the other hand, M. tuberculosisPmt was not active in S. coelicolor, even when correctly localized to the cytoplasmic membrane, showing fundamental differences in the requirements for Pmt activity in these two species.

  11. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Morbus Bechterew, radon treatments are beneficial, with the positive effect lasting until at least 6 months after the normally 3-week treatment by inhalation or bathes. Studies on the mechanism of these effects are progressing. In other cases of extensive use of radon treatment for a wide spectrum of various diseases, for example, in the former Soviet Union, the positive results are not so well established. However, according to a century of radon treatment experience (after millenniums of unknown radon therapy), in particular in Germany and Austria, the positive medical effects for some diseases far exceed any potential detrimental health effects. The total amount of available data in this field is too large to be covered in a brief review. Therefore, less known — in particular recent — work from Central Europe has been analyzed in an attempt to summarize new developments and trends. This includes cost/benefit aspects of radon reduction programs. As a test case for the LNT (linear non-threshold) hypothesis and possible biopositive effects of low radiation exposures, the data support a nonlinear human response to low and medium-level radon exposures. PMID:19330110

  12. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, Michael; Crocker, Mark; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Luss, Dan; Choi, Jae-Soon; Dearth, Mark; McCabe, Bob; Theis, Joe

    2013-09-30

    Oxides of nitrogen in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) commonly referred to as NO{sub x}, is one of the two chemical precursors that lead to ground-level ozone, a ubiquitous air pollutant in urban areas. A major source of NO{sub x} is generated by equipment and vehicles powered by diesel engines, which have a combustion exhaust that contains NO{sub x} in the presence of excess O{sub 2}. Catalytic abatement measures that are effective for gasoline-fueled engines such as the precious metal containing three-way catalytic converter (TWC) cannot be used to treat O2-laden exhaust containing NO{sub x}. Two catalytic technologies that have emerged as effective for NO{sub x} abatement are NO{sub x} storage and reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). NSR is similar to TWC but requires much larger quantities of expensive precious metals and sophisticated periodic switching operation, while SCR requires an on-board source of ammonia which serves as the chemical reductant of the NO{sub x}. The fact that NSR produces ammonia as a byproduct while SCR requires ammonia to work has led to interest in combining the two together to avoid the need for the cumbersome ammonia generation system. In this project a comprehensive study was carried out of the fundamental aspects and application feasibility of combined NSR/SCR. The project team, which included university, industry, and national lab researchers, investigated the kinetics and mechanistic features of the underlying chemistry in the lean NOx trap (LNT) wherein NSR was carried out, with particular focus on identifying the operating conditions such as temperature and catalytic properties which lead to the production of ammonia in the LNT. The performance features of SCR on both model and commercial catalysts focused on the synergy between the LNT and SCR converters in terms of utilizing the upstream-generated ammonia and alternative reductants such as propylene, representing the

  13. On the origins of the linear no-threshold (LNT) dogma by means of untruths, artful dodges and blind faith.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2015-10-01

    This paper is an historical assessment of how prominent radiation geneticists in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s successfully worked to build acceptance for the linear no-threshold (LNT) dose-response model in risk assessment, significantly impacting environmental, occupational and medical exposure standards and practices to the present time. Detailed documentation indicates that actions taken in support of this policy revolution were ideologically driven and deliberately and deceptively misleading; that scientific records were artfully misrepresented; and that people and organizations in positions of public trust failed to perform the duties expected of them. Key activities are described and the roles of specific individuals are documented. These actions culminated in a 1956 report by a Genetics Panel of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) on Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR). In this report the Genetics Panel recommended that a linear dose response model be adopted for the purpose of risk assessment, a recommendation that was rapidly and widely promulgated. The paper argues that current international cancer risk assessment policies are based on fraudulent actions of the U.S. NAS BEAR I Committee, Genetics Panel and on the uncritical, unquestioning and blind-faith acceptance by regulatory agencies and the scientific community. PMID:26248082

  14. Consideration of non-linear, non-threshold and threshold approaches for assessing the carcinogenicity of oral exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Haney, J

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear approach, consistent with available mode of action (MOA) data, is most scientifically defensible for assessing the carcinogenicity of oral exposure to hexavalent chromium (CrVI). Accordingly, the current paper builds upon previous studies (Haney, 2015a, 2015b) to first develop a non-linear, non-threshold approach as well as a non-linear threshold approach for assessing the oral carcinogenicity of CrVI, and then utilizes available MOA analyses and information for selection of the most scientifically-supported approach. More specifically, a non-linear, non-threshold dose-response function was developed that adequately describes the non-linearity predicted for potential human excess risk versus oral dose due to the sub-linear relationship between oral dose and internal dose (added mg Cr/kg target tissue) across environmentally-relevant doses of regulatory interest. Additionally, benchmark dose modeling was used to derive a reference dose (RfD of 0.003 mg/kg-day) with cytotoxicity-induced regenerative hyperplasia as a key precursor event to carcinogenesis in the mouse small intestine. This RfD value shows remarkable agreement with that published previously (0.006 mg/kg-day) based on a more scientifically-sophisticated, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach (Thompson et al., 2013b). The RfD approach is the most scientifically-defensible approach based on the weight-of-evidence of available MOA information and analyses conducted for the most scientifically-supported MOA.

  15. A bounding estimate of neutron dose based on measured photon dose around single pass reactors at the Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Timothy D; Glover, Samuel E; Macievic, Gregory V; Hunacek, Mickey; Smith, Cheryl; DeBord, Gary W; Morris, Donald; Fix, Jack

    2010-07-01

    Neutron and photon radiation survey records have been used to evaluate and develop a neutron to photon (NP) ratio to reconstruct neutron doses to workers around Hanford's single pass reactors that operated from 1945 to 1972. A total of 5,773 paired neutron and photon measurements extracted from 57 boxes of survey records were used in the development of the NP ratio. The development of the NP ratio enables the use of the recorded dose from an individual's photon dosimeter badge to be used to estimate the unmonitored neutron dose. The Pearson rank correlation between the neutron and photon measurements was 0.71. The NP ratio best fit a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.8, a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.95, and the upper 95 th % of this distribution was 4.75. An estimate of the neutron dose based on this NP ratio is considered bounding due to evidence that up to 70% of the total photon exposure received by workers around the single pass reactors occurs during shutdown maintenance and refueling activities when there is no significant neutron exposure. Thus when this NP ratio is applied to the total measured photon dose from an individual film badge dosimeter, the resulting neutron dose is considered bounded.

  16. Changes in the planning target volume and liver volume dose based on the selected respiratory phase in respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Baek, Seong-Min

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the changes in the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume dose based on the respiratory phase to identify the optimal respiratory phase for respiratory-gated radiation therapy for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on the standardized procedure for respiratory-gated radiation therapy, we performed a 4-dimensional computed tomography simulation for 0 ˜ 90%, 30 ˜ 70%, and 40 ˜ 60% respiratory phases to assess the respiratory stability (S R ) and the defined PTV i for each respiratory phase i. A treatment plan was established, and the changes in the PTV i and dose volume of the liver were quantitatively analyzed. Most patients (91.5%) passed the respiratory stability test (S R = 0.111 ± 0.015). With standardized respiration training exercises, we were able to minimize the overall systematic error caused by irregular respiration. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis to identify the optimal respiratory phase revealed that when a short respiratory phase (40 ˜ 60%) was used, the changes in the PTV were concentrated inside the center line; thus, we were able to obtain both a PTV margin accounting for respiration and a uniform radiation dose within the PTV.

  17. SU-E-J-181: Effect of Prostate Motion On Combined Brachytherapy and External Beam Dose Based On Daily Motion of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, V; McLaughlin, P; Ealbaj, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the adequacy of target expansions on the combined external beam and implant dose was examined based on the measured daily motion of the prostate. Methods: Thirty patients received an I–125 prostate implant prescribed to dose of 90Gy. This was followed by external beam to deliver a dose of 90Gyeq (external beam equivalent) to the prostate over 25 to 30 fractions. An ideal IMRT plan was developed by optimizing the external beam dose based on the delivered implant dose. The implant dose was converted to an equivalent external beam dose using the linear quadratic model. Patients were set up on the treatment table by daily orthogonal imaging and aligning the marker seeds in the prostate. Orthogonal images were obtained at the end of treatment to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Based on the observed motion of the markers between the initial and final images, 5 individual plans showing the actual dose delivered to the patient were calculated. A final true dose distribution was established based on summing the implant dose and the 5 external beam plans. Dose to the prostate, seminal vesicles, lymphnodes and normal tissues, rectal wall, urethra and lower sphincter were calculated and compared to ideal. On 18 patients who were sexually active, dose to the corpus cavernosum and internal pudendal artery was also calculated. Results: The average prostate motion in 3 orthogonal directions was less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than +2 mm. Dose and volume parameters showed that there was no decrease in dose to the targets and a marginal decrease in dose to in normal tissues. Conclusion: Dose delivered by seed implant moves with the prostate, decreasing the impact of intrafractions dose movement on actual dose delivered. Combined brachytherapy and external beam dose delivered to the prostate was not sensitive to prostate motion.

  18. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". PMID:25916915

  19. Optimization of injection dose based on noise-equivalent count rate with use of an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom in three-dimensional 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazumasa; Kurosawa, Hideo; Tanaka, Takashi; Fukushi, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2012-07-01

    The optimal injection dose for imaging of the pelvic region in 3D FDG PET tests was investigated based on the noise-equivalent count (NEC) rate with use of an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom. Count rates obtained from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom were compared with those of pelvic images of 60 patients. The correlation between single photon count rates obtained from the pelvic regions of patients and the doses per body weight was also evaluated. The radioactivity at the maximum NEC rate was defined as an optimal injection dose, and the optimal injection dose for the body weight was evaluated. The image noise of a phantom was also investigated. Count rates obtained from an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom corresponded well with those from the human pelvis. The single photon count rate obtained from the phantom was 9.9 Mcps at the peak NEC rate. The coefficient of correlation between the single photon count rate and the dose per weight obtained from patient data was 0.830. The optimal injection doses for a patient with weighing 60 kg were estimated to be 375 MBq (6.25 MBq/kg) and 435 MBq (7.25 MBq/kg) for uptake periods of 60 and 90 min, respectively. The image noise was minimal at the peak NEC rate. We successfully estimated the optimal injection dose based on the NEC rate in the pelvic region on 3D FDG PET tests using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom.

  20. THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, P. A.

    2002-02-25

    The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

  1. Anomalous dielectric nonlinearity and dielectric relaxation in xBST-(1- x) (LMT-LNT) ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Liu, Peng

    2011-11-01

    xwt%Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3-(1- x)wt%[0.4La (Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3-0.6(La0.5Na0.5)TiO3] ( x=0.30, 0.40, 0.50, 0.60, 0.70, 0.80, 0.90, 0.95) ceramics were prepared via a traditional solid-state reaction route. Interesting anomalous dielectric nonlinearity (ADN)—permittivity increased with dc bias electric field ( E-field), and low-temperature dielectric relaxation (LTDR) behaviors—were observed within a x range of 0.30˜0.70 for the first time. Based on our experimental facts, it was suggested that the LTDR was originated from a charge-associated process between electron-oxygen vacancy pairs during a thermal stimulation, while the ADN was related with a metastable state of polarized nano-regions (PNRs).

  2. Scientific foundation of regulating ionizing radiation: application of metrics for evaluation of regulatory science information.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, A Alan; Gerraa, Vikrham Kumar; McBride, Dennis K; Swetnam, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper starts by describing the historical evolution of assessment of biologic effects of ionizing radiation leading to the linear non-threshold (LNT) system currently used to regulate exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper describes briefly the concept of Best Available Science (BAS) and Metrics for Evaluation of Scientific Claims (MESC) derived for BAS. It identifies three phases of regulatory science consisting of the initial phase, when the regulators had to develop regulations without having the needed scientific information; the exploratory phase, when relevant tools were developed; and the standard operating phase, when the tools were applied to regulations. Subsequently, an attempt is made to apply the BAS/MESC system to various stages of LNT. This paper then compares the exposure limits imposed by regulatory agencies and also compares them with naturally occurring radiation at several cities. Controversies about LNT are addressed, including judgments of the U.S. National Academies and their French counterpart. The paper concludes that, based on the BAS/MESC system, there is no disagreement between the two academies on the scientific foundation of LNT; instead, the disagreement is based on their judgment or speculation.

  3. Uses and Abuses of Models in Radiation Risk Management

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    1998-12-10

    This paper is a high-level overview of managing risks to workers, public, and the environment. It discusses the difference between a model and a hypothesis. The need for models in risk assessment is justified, and then it is shown that radiation risk models that are useable in risk management are highly simplistic. The weight of evidence is considered for and against the linear non-threshold (LNT) model for carcinogenesis and heritable ill-health that is currently the basis for radiation risk management. Finally, uses and misuses of this model are considered. It is concluded that the LNT model continues to be suitable for use as the basis for radiation protection.

  4. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-05

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  5. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis A.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  6. Radiation Hormesis: Historical Perspective and Implications for Low-Dose Cancer Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Vaiserman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Current guidelines for limiting exposure of humans to ionizing radiation are based on the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis for radiation carcinogenesis under which cancer risk increases linearly as the radiation dose increases. With the LNT model even a very small dose could cause cancer and the model is used in establishing guidelines for limiting radiation exposure of humans. A slope change at low doses and dose rates is implemented using an empirical dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). This imposes usually unacknowledged nonlinearity but not a threshold in the dose-response curve for cancer induction. In contrast, with the hormetic model, low doses of radiation reduce the cancer incidence while it is elevated after high doses. Based on a review of epidemiological and other data for exposure to low radiation doses and dose rates, it was found that the LNT model fails badly. Cancer risk after ordinarily encountered radiation exposure (medical X-rays, natural background radiation, etc.) is much lower than projections based on the LNT model and is often less than the risk for spontaneous cancer (a hormetic response). Understanding the mechanistic basis for hormetic responses will provide new insights about both risks and benefits from low-dose radiation exposure. PMID:20585444

  7. Setting standards for radiation protection: A time for change

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, H.W.; Hickman, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    In 1950, the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommended that ``certain radiation effects are irreversible and cumulative.`` Furthermore, the ICRP ``strongly recommended that every effort be made to reduce exposures to all types of ionizing radiations to the lowest possible level.`` Then in 1954, the ICRP published its assumption that human response to ionizing radiation was linear with dose, together with the recommendation that exposures be kept as low as practicable. These concepts are still the foundation of radiation protection policy today, even though, as Evans has stated, ``The linear non-threshold (LNT) model was adopted specifically on a basis of mathematical simplicity, not from radio-biological data.... Groups responsible for setting standards for radiation protection should be abreast of new developments and new data as they are published; however, this does not seem to be the case. For example, there have been many reports in scientific, peer-reviewed, and other publications during the last three decades that have shown the LNT model and the policy of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) to be invalid. However, none of these reports has been refuted or even discussed by standard-setting groups. We believe this mandates a change in the standard-setting process.

  8. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F.

    2010-01-01

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health. PMID:21191485

  9. Review of Chinese Environmental Risk Assessment Regulations and Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Yuchao; Lou, In Chio; Gao, Jixi

    2012-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment is an essential step in the development of solutions for pollution problems and new environmental regulations. An assessment system for environmental risks has been developed in China in recent decades. However, many of the Chinese technical guidelines, standards, and regulations were directly adapted from those of developed countries, and were not based on the Chinese environmental and socioeconomic context. Although existing environmental regulations for pollutants are usually obtained by extrapolations from high-dose toxicological data to low-dose scenarios using linear-non-threshold (LNT) models, toxicologists have argued that J-shaped or inverse J-shaped curves may dominate the dose–response relationships for environmental pollutants at low doses because low exposures stimulate biological protective mechanisms that are ineffective at higher doses. The costs of regulations based on LNT and J-shaped models could therefore be dramatically different. Since economic factors strongly affect the decision-making process, particularly for developing countries, it is time to strengthen basic research to provide more scientific support for Chinese environmental regulations. In this paper, we summarize current Chinese environmental policies and standards and the application of environmental risk assessment in China, and recommend a more scientific approach to the development of Chinese regulations. PMID:22740787

  10. [Diagnostic radiation and the risk of cancer].

    PubMed

    Kai, Michiaki

    2005-09-01

    The risk of radiation-related cancer following exposure to diagnostic radiation is of much concern. Diagnostic exposure is a repeated one to low dose radiation, while acute exposure occurred among atomic bomb survivors where the epidemiological survey contributes to the current cancer risk estimates of low doses. In several cohort studies on medical exposure at low doses, there is no statistical power of detection due to population size and no dose information. Even in cohort studies on occupational exposure there is no clear conclusion, however, a pooled analysis of nuclear workers in several countries is expected to produce a better basis for risk estimate at low doses. The risk estimate based on the linear non-threshold (LNT) dose response derived from the atomic bomb survivor data remains unresolved scientifically, and thus it has much uncertainty. Recent radiation biology suggests that a bystander effect and adaptive response might modify the estimated cancer risk based on the LNT model at low doses. However, there is no clear evidence in human data. The most effective way to clarify low-dose risk is to focus on the mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. The risk from almost all diagnostic X-rays may be so small that no excess cancer incidence can be statistically detected.

  11. Regulatory-Science: Biphasic Cancer Models or the LNT—Not Just a Matter of Biology!

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Paolo F.; Sammis, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    There is no doubt that prudence and risk aversion must guide public decisions when the associated adverse outcomes are either serious or irreversible. With any carcinogen, the levels of risk and needed protection before and after an event occurs, are determined by dose-response models. Regulatory law should not crowd out the actual beneficial effects from low dose exposures—when demonstrable—that are inevitably lost when it adopts the linear non-threshold (LNT) as its causal model. Because regulating exposures requires planning and developing protective measures for future acute and chronic exposures, public management decisions should be based on minimizing costs and harmful exposures. We address the direct and indirect effects of causation when the danger consists of exposure to very low levels of carcinogens and toxicants. The societal consequences of a policy can be deleterious when that policy is based on a risk assumed by the LNT, in cases where low exposures are actually beneficial. Our work develops the science and the law of causal risk modeling: both are interwoven. We suggest how their relevant characteristics differ, but do not attempt to keep them separated; as we demonstrate, this union, however unsatisfactory, cannot be severed. PMID:22740778

  12. Proposal of human spinal cord reirradiation dose based on collection of data from 40 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; Molls, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: Driven by numerous reports on recovery of occult radiation injury, reirradiation of the spinal cord today is considered a realistic option. In rodents, long-term recovery was observed to start at approximately 8 weeks. However, prospective clinical studies are lacking. Therefore, a combined analysis of all published clinical data might provide a valuable basis for future trials. Methods and materials: We collected data from 40 individual patients published in eight different reports after a comprehensive MEDLINE search. These represent all patients with data available for dose per fraction and total dose of each of both treatment courses. We recalculated the biologically effective dose (BED) according to the linear-quadratic model using an {alpha}/{beta} value of 2 Gy for the cervical and thoracic cord and 4 Gy for the lumbar cord. In this model, a dose of 50 Gy given in single daily fractions of 2 Gy is equivalent to a BED of 100 Gy{sub 2} or 75 Gy{sub 4}. For treatment with two daily fractions, a correction term was introduced to take incomplete repair of sublethal damage into account. Results: The cumulative doses ranged from 108 to 205 Gy{sub 2} (median dose, 135 Gy{sub 2}). The median interval between both series was 20 months. Three patients were treated to the lumbar segments only. The median follow-up was 17 months for patients without myelopathy. Eleven patients developed myelopathy after 4-25 months (median, 11 months). Myelopathy was seen only in patients who had received one course to a dose of {>=}102 Gy{sub 2} (n = 9) or were retreated after 2 months (n = 2). In the absence of these two risk factors, no myelopathy developed in 19 patients treated with {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} or 7 patients treated with 136-150 Gy{sub 2}. A risk score based on the cumulative BED, the greatest BED for all treatment series in a particular individual, and interval was developed. Low-risk patients remained free of myelopathy and 33% of intermediate-risk patients and 90% of high-risk patients developed myelopathy. Conclusion: On the basis of these literature data (and with due caution), the risk of myelopathy appears small after {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} when the interval is not shorter than 6 months and the dose of each course is {<=}98 Gy{sub 2}. We would recommend limiting the dose to this level, whenever technically feasible. However, it appears prudent to propose the collection of prospective data from a greater number of patients receiving doses in the range of 136-150 Gy{sub 2} to assess the safety of higher retreatment doses for those patients in whom limited doses might compromise tumor control.

  13. Considerations in assigning dose based on uncertainties from in vivo counting.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, G H

    1997-01-01

    Lung counting is highly geometry dependent, especially at low photon energies. Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine the magnitude of the errors obtained if it is assumed that the deposition is homogeneous, when in fact it is not. Simulation for a germanium lung counting system consisting of four, 70 mm x 30 mm diameter thick detectors have been performed for 70 deposition patterns. The detector efficiencies for 20, 40, 60, 120, 240, 660, and 1000 kiloelectron volts were calculated for a homogeneous deposition and these efficiencies were used to estimate the bias when the deposition was heterogeneous. A bias of 800% was not unusual. Whole-body counting is prone to errors that can arise from the activity distribution and/or size of the subject. The latter are geometry dependent and, for example, a bias result of 200% can be obtained when measuring children in a chair geometry using a calibration factor based on reference man. Thyroid counting is the least prone to error. If the measurement is done correctly, biases can usually be kept below 20%. However, if the measurement is made with a collimator or if the detector is in contact with the subject's neck, biases exceeding 200% can be obtained. PMID:9467050

  14. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed.

  15. Implications for human and environmental health of low doses of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2014-07-01

    The last 20 years have seen a major paradigm shift in radiation biology. Several discoveries challenge the DNA centric view which holds that DNA damage is the critical effect of radiation irrespective of dose. This theory leads to the assumption that dose and effect are simply linked - the more energy deposition, the more DNA damage and the greater the biological effect. This is embodied in radiation protection (RP) regulations as the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. However the science underlying the LNT model is being challenged particularly in relation to the environment because it is now clear that at low doses of concern in RP, cells, tissues and organisms respond to radiation by inducing responses which are not readily predictable by dose. These include adaptive responses, bystander effects, genomic instability and low dose hypersensitivity, and are commonly described as stress responses, while recognizing that "stress" can be good as well as bad. The phenomena contribute to observed radiation responses and appear to be influenced by genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors, meaning that dose and response are not simply related. The question is whether our discovery of these phenomena means that we need to re-evaluate RP approaches. The so-called "non-targeted" mechanisms mean that low dose radiobiology is very complex and supra linear or sub-linear (even hormetic) responses are possible but their occurrence is unpredictable for any given system level. Issues which may need consideration are synergistic or antagonistic effects of other pollutants. RP, at present, only looks at radiation dose but the new (NTE) radiobiology means that chemical or physical agents, which interfere with tissue responses to low doses of radiation, could critically modulate the predicted risk. Similarly, the "health" of the organism could determine the effect of a given low dose by enabling or disabling a critical response. These issues will be discussed. PMID:23664231

  16. NOx Storage-Reduction Characteristics of Ba-Based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Subjected to Simulated Road Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Fisk, Courtney; Easterling, Vencon; Graham, Uschi; Poole, Adam; Crocker, Mark; Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P; Wilson, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Although Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) catalyst technology has made significant strides in recent years, the issue of LNT durability remains problematic. Following on from our previous research concerning the effect of ceria addition on LNT preformance, in this study we focus on the role of ceria in ameliorating the deterioration of Ba-based LNT catalysts during aging. Indeed, we have observed that spectacular improvements in LNT durability can be achieved through the incorporation of CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} into the LNT formulation, and, to a lesser extent, La-stabilized ceria.

  17. A mobile bioassay laboratory for the assessment of internal doses based on in vivo and in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Dantas, B M; Lucena, E A; Dantas, A L A; Santos, M S; Julião, L Q C; Melo, D R; Sousa, W O; Fernandes, P C; Mesquita, S A

    2010-10-01

    Internal exposures may occur in nuclear power plants, radioisotope production, and in medicine and research laboratories. Such practices require quick response in case of accidents of a wide range of magnitudes. This work presents the design and calibration of a mobile laboratory for the assessment of accidents involving workers and the population as well as for routine monitoring. The system was set up in a truck with internal dimensions of 3.30 m × 1.60 m × 1.70 m and can identify photon emitters in the energy range of 100-3,000 keV in the whole body, organs, and in urine. A thyroid monitor consisting of a lead-collimated NaI(Tl)3" × 3" (7.62 × 7.62 cm) detector was calibrated with a neck-thyroid phantom developed at the IRD (Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria). Whole body measurements were performed with a NaI(Tl)8" × 4" (20.32 × 10.16 cm) detector calibrated with a plastic-bottle phantom. Urine samples were measured with another NaI(Tl) 3" × 3" (7.62 × 7.62 cm) detector set up in a steel support. Standard solutions were provided by the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation of the IRD. Urine measurements are based on a calibration of efficiency vs. energy for standard volumes. Detection limits were converted to minimum committed effective doses for the radionuclides of interest using standard biokinetic and dosimetric models in order to evaluate the applicability and limitations of the system. Sensitivities for high-energy activation and fission products show that the system is suitable for use in emergency and routine monitoring of individuals under risk of internal exposure by such radionuclides. PMID:20838084

  18. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B

    2014-10-01

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach.

  19. Non-Linear Adaptive Phenomena Which Decrease The Risk of Infection After Pre-Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Motamedifar, M.; Namdari, G.; Taheri, M.; Mortazavi, A.R.; Shokrpour, N.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation can result in resistance to the damage caused by a subsequently high-dose radiation or cause cross-resistance to other non-radiation stressors. Adaptive response contradicts the linear-non-threshold (LNT) dose-response model for ionizing radiation. We have previously reported that exposure of laboratory animals to radiofrequency radiation can induce a survival adaptive response. Furthermore, we have indicated that pre-exposure of mice to radiofrequency radiation emitted by a GSM mobile phone increased their resistance to a subsequent Escherichia coli infection. In this study, the survival rates in animals receiving both adapting (radiofrequency) and challenge dose (bacteria) and the animals receiving only the challenge dose (bacteria) were 56% and 20%, respectively. In this light, our findings contribute to the assumption that radiofrequency-induced adaptive response can be used as an efficient method for decreasing the risk of infection in immunosuppressed irradiated individuals. The implication of this phenomenon in human’s long term stay in the space is also discussed. PMID:24910582

  20. Comparison of the effect of rocuronium dosing based on corrected or lean body weight on rapid sequence induction and neuromuscular blockade duration in obese female patients

    PubMed Central

    Sakızcı-Uyar, Bahar; Çelik, Şeref; Postacı, Aysun; Bayraktar, Yeşim; Dikmen, Bayazit; Özkoçak-Turan, Işıl; Saçan, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare onset time, duration of action, and tracheal intubation conditions in obese patients when the intubation dose of rocuronium was based on corrected body weight (CBW) versus lean body weight (LBW) for rapid sequence induction. Methods: This prospective study was carried out at Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey between August 2013 and May 2014. Forty female obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into 2 groups. Group CBW (n=20) received 1.2 mg/kg rocuronium based on CBW, and group LBW (n=20) received 1.2 mg/kg rocuronium based on LBW. Endotracheal intubation was performed 60 seconds after injection of muscle relaxant, and intubating conditions were evaluated. Neuromuscular transmission was monitored using acceleromyography of the adductor pollicis. Onset time, defined as time to depression of the twitch tension to 95% of its control value, and duration of action, defined as time to achieve one response to train-of-four stimulation (T1) were recorded. Results: No significant differences were observed between the groups in intubation conditions or onset time (50-60 seconds median, 30-30 interquartile range [IQR]). Duration of action was significantly longer in the CBW group (60 minutes median, 12 IQR) than the LBW group (35 minutes median, 16 IQR; p<0.01). Conclusion: In obese patients, dosing of 1.2 mg/kg rocuronium based on LBW provides excellent or good tracheal intubating conditions within 60 seconds after administration and does not lead to prolonged duration of action. PMID:26739976

  1. Predictive Dose-Based Estimation of Systemic Exposure Multiples in Mouse and Monkey Relative to Human for Antisense Oligonucleotides With 2′-O-(2-Methoxyethyl) Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosie Z; Grundy, John S; Henry, Scott P; Kim, Tae-Won; Norris, Daniel A; Burkey, Jennifer; Wang, Yanfeng; Vick, Andrew; Geary, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of species differences and systemic exposure multiples (or ratios) in toxicological animal species versus human is an ongoing exercise during the course of drug development. The systemic exposure ratios are best estimated by directly comparing area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs), and sometimes by comparing the dose administered, with the dose being adjusted either by body surface area (BSA) or body weight (BW). In this study, the association between AUC ratio and the administered dose ratio from animals to human were studied using a retrospective data-driven approach. The dataset included nine antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl) modifications, evaluated in two animal species (mouse and monkey) following single and repeated parenteral administrations. We found that plasma AUCs were similar between ASOs within the same species, and are predictable to human exposure using a single animal species, either mouse or monkey. Between monkey and human, the plasma exposure ratio can be predicted directly based on BW-adjusted dose ratios, whereas between mouse and human, the exposure ratio would be nearly fivefold lower in mouse compared to human based on BW-adjusted dose values. Thus, multiplying a factor of 5 for the mouse BW-adjusted dose would likely provide a reasonable AUC exposure estimate in human at steady-state. PMID:25602582

  2. SU-D-201-02: Prediction of Delivered Dose Based On a Joint Histogram of CT and FDG PET Images

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Choi, Y; Cho, A; Hwang, S; Cha, J; Lee, N; Yun, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether pre-treatment images can be used in predicting microsphere distribution in tumors. When intra-arterial radioembolization using Y90 microspheres was performed, the microspheres were often delivered non-uniformly within the tumor, which could lead to an inefficient therapy. Therefore, it is important to estimate the distribution of microspheres. Methods: Early arterial phase CT and FDG PET images were acquired for patients with primary liver cancer prior to radioembolization (RE) using Y90 microspheres. Tumor volume was delineated on CT images and fused with FDG PET images. From each voxel (3.9×3.9×3.3 mm3) in the tumor, the Hounsfield unit (HU) from the CT and SUV values from the FDG PET were harvested. We binned both HU and SUV into 11 bins and then calculated a normalized joint-histogram in an 11×11 array.Patients also underwent a post-treatment Y90 PET imaging. Radiation dose for the tumor was estimated using convolution of the Y90 distribution with a dose-point kernel. We also calculated a fraction of the tumor volume that received a radiation dose great than 100Gy. Results: Averaged over 40 patients, 55% of tumor volume received a dose greater than 100Gy (range : 1.1 – 100%). The width of the joint histogram was narrower for patients with a high dose. For patients with a low dose, the width was wider and a larger fraction of tumor volume had low HU. Conclusion: We have shown the pattern of joint histogram of the HU and SUV depends on delivered dose. The patterns can predict the efficacy of uniform intra-arterial delivery of Y90 microspheres.

  3. Predictive dose-based estimation of systemic exposure multiples in mouse and monkey relative to human for antisense oligonucleotides with 2'-o-(2-methoxyethyl) modifications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Grundy, John S; Henry, Scott P; Kim, Tae-Won; Norris, Daniel A; Burkey, Jennifer; Wang, Yanfeng; Vick, Andrew; Geary, Richard S

    2015-01-20

    Evaluation of species differences and systemic exposure multiples (or ratios) in toxicological animal species versus human is an ongoing exercise during the course of drug development. The systemic exposure ratios are best estimated by directly comparing area under the plasma concentration-time curves (AUCs), and sometimes by comparing the dose administered, with the dose being adjusted either by body surface area (BSA) or body weight (BW). In this study, the association between AUC ratio and the administered dose ratio from animals to human were studied using a retrospective data-driven approach. The dataset included nine antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) with 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl) modifications, evaluated in two animal species (mouse and monkey) following single and repeated parenteral administrations. We found that plasma AUCs were similar between ASOs within the same species, and are predictable to human exposure using a single animal species, either mouse or monkey. Between monkey and human, the plasma exposure ratio can be predicted directly based on BW-adjusted dose ratios, whereas between mouse and human, the exposure ratio would be nearly fivefold lower in mouse compared to human based on BW-adjusted dose values. Thus, multiplying a factor of 5 for the mouse BW-adjusted dose would likely provide a reasonable AUC exposure estimate in human at steady-state.

  4. Tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: calculation of dose based on estimated patient weight can increase the risk of cerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    García-Pastor, Andrés; Díaz-Otero, Fernando; Funes-Molina, Carmen; Benito-Conde, Beatriz; Grandes-Velasco, Sandra; Sobrino-García, Pilar; Vázquez-Alén, Pilar; Fernández-Bullido, Yolanda; Villanueva-Osorio, Jose Antonio; Gil-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    A dose of 0.9 mg/kg of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Dosing of t-PA based on estimated patient weight (PW) increases the likelihood of errors. Our objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of estimated PW and assess the effectiveness and safety of the actual applied dose (AAD) of t-PA. We performed a prospective single-center study of AIS patients treated with t-PA from May 2010 to December 2011. Dose was calculated according to estimated PW. Patients were weighed during the 24 h following treatment with t-PA. Estimation errors and AAD were calculated. Actual PW was measured in 97 of the 108 included patients. PW estimation errors were recorded in 22.7 % and were more frequent when weight was estimated by stroke unit staff (44 %). Only 11 % of patients misreported their own weight. Mean AAD was significantly higher in patients who had intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after t-PA than in patients who did not (0.96 vs. 0.92 mg/kg; p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an increased risk of ICH for each 10 % increase in t-PA dose above the optimal dose of 0.90 mg/kg (OR 3.10; 95 % CI 1.14-8.39; p = 0.026). No effects of t-PA misdosing were observed on symptomatic ICH, functional outcome or mortality. Estimated PW is frequently inaccurate and leads to t-PA dosing errors. Increasing doses of t-PA above 0.90 mg/kg may increase the risk of ICH. Standardized weighing methods before t-PA is administered should be considered.

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  6. HOW RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORIES INFLUENCE PHYSICIAN IMAGING DECISIONS: A MULTICENTER RADIOLOGIST SURVEY STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Pandharipande, Pari V.; Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Avery, Laura L.; Gunn, Martin L.; Kang, Stella K.; Megibow, Alec J.; Turan, Ekin A.; Harvey, H. Benjamin; Kong, Chung Yin; Dowling, Emily C.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Donelan, Karen; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of patient-level radiation exposure histories on radiologists’ imaging decisions. Materials and Methods We conducted an IRB exempt, HIPAA compliant, physician survey study in three academic medical centers. Radiologists were asked to make a prospective imaging recommendation for a hypothetical patient with a history of multiple CT scans. We queried radiologists’ decision-making, evaluating whether they: incorporated cancer risks from previous imaging; reported acceptance (or rejection) of the linear no-threshold (LNT) model; and understood LNT model implications in this setting. Consistency between radiologists’ decisions and their LNT model beliefs was evaluated – those acting in accordance with the LNT model were expected to disregard previously incurred cancer risks. Fisher’s exact test was used to verify the generalizability of results across institutions and training levels (residents, fellows, and attendings). Results Fifty-six percent (322/578) of radiologists completed the survey. Most (92% (295/322)) incorporated risks from the patient’s exposure history during decision-making. Most (61% (196/322) also reported acceptance of the LNT model. Fewer (25% (79/322)) rejected the LNT model, and 15% (47/322) could not judge. Among radiologists reporting LNT model acceptance or rejection, the minority (36% (98/275)) made decisions in a manner consistent with their LNT model beliefs. This finding was not statistically different across institutions (p=0.070) or training levels (p=0.183). Few radiologists (4% (13/322)) demonstrated an accurate understanding of LNT model implications. Conclusion Most radiologists, when faced with patient exposure histories, make decisions that contradict their self-reported acceptance of the LNT model and the LNT model itself. These findings underscore a need for related educational initiatives. PMID:23701064

  7. Anti-tumor effect of β-glucan from Lentinus edodes and the underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Zou, Siwei; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lina

    2016-01-01

    β-Glucans are well known for its various bioactivities, but the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. This study focuses on the anti-tumor effect and the potential mechanism of a branched β-(1, 3)-glucan (LNT) extracted from Lentinus edodes. The in vivo data indicated that LNT showed a profound inhibition ratio of ~75% against S-180 tumor growth, even significantly higher than the positive control of Cytoxan (~54%). Interestingly, LNT sharply promoted immune cells accumulation into tumors accompanied by cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation during tumor development. Furthermore, LNT not only up-regulated expressions of the tumor suppressor p53, cell cycle arrestin p21 and pro-apoptotic proteins of Bax and caspase 3/9, but also down-regulated PARP1 and anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expressions in tumor tissues. It was first found that LNT initiated p53-dependent signaling pathway to suppress cell proliferation in vitro, and the caspase-dependent pathway to induce cell apoptosis in vivo. The underlying anti-tumor mechanism was proposed that LNT activated immune responses to induce cell apoptosis through caspase 3-dependent signaling pathway and to inhibit cell proliferation possibly via p53-dependent signaling pathway in vivo. Besides, LNT inhibited angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF expression, leading to slow progression of tumors. PMID:27353254

  8. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: a modeling study for radiocaesium ((134)Cs &(137)Cs).

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Cozic, Anne; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-03-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Japan resulted in the release of a large number of fission products that were transported worldwide. We study the effects of two of the most dangerous radionuclides emitted, (137)Cs (half-life: 30.2years) and (134)Cs (half-life: 2.06years), which were transported across the world constituting the global fallout (together with iodine isotopes and noble gasses) after nuclear releases. The main purpose is to provide preliminary cancer risk estimates after the Fukushima NPP accident, in terms of excess lifetime incident and death risks, prior to epidemiology, and compare them with those occurred after the Chernobyl accident. Moreover, cancer risks are presented for the local population in the form of high-resolution risk maps for 3 population classes and for both sexes. The atmospheric transport model LMDZORINCA was used to simulate the global dispersion of radiocaesium after the accident. Air and ground activity concentrations have been incorporated with monitoring data as input to the LNT-model (Linear Non-Threshold) frequently used in risk assessments of all solid cancers. Cancer risks were estimated to be small for the global population in regions outside Japan. Women are more sensitive to radiation than men, although the largest risks were recorded for infants; the risk is not depended on the sex at the age-at-exposure. Radiation risks from Fukushima were more enhanced near the plant, while the evacuation measures were crucial for its reduction. According to our estimations, 730-1700 excess cancer incidents are expected of which around 65% may be fatal, which are very close to what has been already published (see references therein). Finally, we applied the same calculations using the DDREF (Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor), which is recommended by the ICRP, UNSCEAR and EPA as an alternative reduction factor instead of using a threshold value (which is still unknown). Excess lifetime cancer

  9. A comparison approach to explain risks related to X-ray imaging for scoliosis, 2012 SOSORT award winner

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background X-ray imaging is frequently used as diagnostic approach for scoliosis in children and adolescents. X-ray procedures are considered as justified only when expected benefits exceed related risks. While benefits are well known to physicians, radiological risk awareness can be vague, impeding an optimal communication with patients’ parents and possibly leading to discomfort and anxiety. Objective of the study is the suggestion of a risk comparison approach for better communicating the radiological risks related to X-ray investigation of scoliosis. Methods Starting point of the analysis is the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) assumption for radiation stochastic effect, which states that for effective doses (E, Sievert – Sv) below 100 mSv, the probability of future stochastic damage is linearly related to E: absorbing two E’s in separate moments results in the addition of the risks related to each E. This allows to add E from different sources to calculate a cumulative risk of health detriment. Medline (Pubmed) was systematically searched in order to determine the average E delivered during X-ray investigation of scoliosis. Subsequently, the major natural sources of radiation were considered. The average yearly E due to natural sources was compared with E due to the imaging of the vertebral column. Results E’s due to X-ray scoliosis examinations show a large variability: under 7 years of age, 0.03-0.54 mSv; 7–12 years, 0.11-0.80 mSv; 13–18 years, 0.17-1.09 mSv. Overall, 65% of the world population is expected to be exposed to an annual E between 1 and 3 mSv. More in detail, worldwide the total annual average E due to natural sources is 2.4 mSv (range 1–10), of which half originates from Radon exposure. Other sources are cosmic rays and ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides. For example, one flight between Europe and America accounts for 0.030-0.045 mSv because of exposure to cosmic rays. Conclusions X-rays are carcinogenic and exposures to them

  10. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: a modeling study for radiocaesium ((134)Cs &(137)Cs).

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Cozic, Anne; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-03-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Japan resulted in the release of a large number of fission products that were transported worldwide. We study the effects of two of the most dangerous radionuclides emitted, (137)Cs (half-life: 30.2years) and (134)Cs (half-life: 2.06years), which were transported across the world constituting the global fallout (together with iodine isotopes and noble gasses) after nuclear releases. The main purpose is to provide preliminary cancer risk estimates after the Fukushima NPP accident, in terms of excess lifetime incident and death risks, prior to epidemiology, and compare them with those occurred after the Chernobyl accident. Moreover, cancer risks are presented for the local population in the form of high-resolution risk maps for 3 population classes and for both sexes. The atmospheric transport model LMDZORINCA was used to simulate the global dispersion of radiocaesium after the accident. Air and ground activity concentrations have been incorporated with monitoring data as input to the LNT-model (Linear Non-Threshold) frequently used in risk assessments of all solid cancers. Cancer risks were estimated to be small for the global population in regions outside Japan. Women are more sensitive to radiation than men, although the largest risks were recorded for infants; the risk is not depended on the sex at the age-at-exposure. Radiation risks from Fukushima were more enhanced near the plant, while the evacuation measures were crucial for its reduction. According to our estimations, 730-1700 excess cancer incidents are expected of which around 65% may be fatal, which are very close to what has been already published (see references therein). Finally, we applied the same calculations using the DDREF (Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor), which is recommended by the ICRP, UNSCEAR and EPA as an alternative reduction factor instead of using a threshold value (which is still unknown). Excess lifetime cancer

  11. Prediction of drug terminal half-life and terminal volume of distribution after intravenous dosing based on drug clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, and physiological parameters of the body.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2013-02-01

    The steady state, V(ss), terminal volume of distribution, V(β), and the terminal half-life, t(1/2), are commonly obtained from the drug plasma concentration-time profile, C(p)(t), following intravenous dosing. Unlike V(ss) that can be calculated based on the physicochemical properties of drugs considering the equilibrium partitioning between plasma and organ tissues, t(1/2) and V(β) cannot be calculated that way because they depend on the rates of drug transfer between blood and tissues. Considering the physiological pharmacokinetic model pertinent to the terminal phase of drug elimination, a novel equation that calculates t(1/2) (and consequently V(β)) was derived. It turns out that V(ss), the total body clearance, Cl, equilibrium blood-plasma concentration ratio, r; and the physiological parameters of the body such as cardiac output, and blood and tissue volumes are sufficient for determination of terminal kinetics. Calculation of t(1/2) by the obtained equation appears to be in good agreement with the experimentally observed vales of this parameter in pharmacokinetic studies in rat, monkey, dog, and human. The equation for the determination of the pre-exponent of the terminal phase of C(p)(t) is also found. The obtained equation allows to predict t(1/2) in human assuming that V(ss) and Cl were either obtained by allometric scaling or, respectively, calculated in silico or based on in vitro drug stability measurements. For compounds that have high clearance, the derived equation may be applied to calculate r just using the routine data on Cl, V(ss), and t(1/2), rather than doing the in vitro assay to measure this parameter.

  12. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Accident. Part 1: Internal Doses Based on Whole-body Measurements by NIRS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Tani, Kotaro; Hachiya, Misao; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 resulted in a release of radionuclides into the environment (I: 142.9 PBq, Cs:12.4 PBq). This study presents the results of internal doses to 174 residents living near the FDNPP at the time of the accident based on whole-body (WB) measurements performed by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period between 27 June and 28 July 2011. The 174 subjects consisted of 125 adults (≥18-y) and 49 children (<18-y) and included 90 persons of Namie town, one of the municipalities heavily contaminated with the radionuclides. The number of subjects with significant detection of both Cs and Cs was relatively small: 28.8% for the adults and 4.1% for the children. A significant gender difference in the Cs detection rate (males > females) was observed in the adults but not the children. In this study, the committed effective dose (CED) from Cs and Cs was calculated based on individual WB contents (Cs) corrected against body size, the observed body content ratio of Cs to Cs, and the assumed intake scenario (namely, acute inhalation of Type F compounds on 12 March 2011 when the first explosive event occurred at the site of the FDNPP). The 90th-percentile CED value for the adults was around 0.1 mSv and the maximum CED (0.63 mSv) was found in an elderly male. Comparable CED results were obtained in other WB measurements subsequently performed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in a similar manner to that of the NIRS, suggesting that the contribution of ingestion to the WB content observed would be trivial for most of the JAEA subjects. The intake ratio of I to Cs was evaluated to be 3~5 based on the I thyroid measurement data of Tokonami et al. Using the average intake ratio of 3.8, the resulting median and maximum thyroid-equivalent doses to the adult subjects of this study were estimated at 3.5 mSv and 84 mSv, respectively. PMID:27682904

  13. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Accident. Part 1: Internal Doses Based on Whole-body Measurements by NIRS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Nakano, Takashi; Tani, Kotaro; Hachiya, Misao; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 resulted in a release of radionuclides into the environment (I: 142.9 PBq, Cs:12.4 PBq). This study presents the results of internal doses to 174 residents living near the FDNPP at the time of the accident based on whole-body (WB) measurements performed by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period between 27 June and 28 July 2011. The 174 subjects consisted of 125 adults (≥18-y) and 49 children (<18-y) and included 90 persons of Namie town, one of the municipalities heavily contaminated with the radionuclides. The number of subjects with significant detection of both Cs and Cs was relatively small: 28.8% for the adults and 4.1% for the children. A significant gender difference in the Cs detection rate (males > females) was observed in the adults but not the children. In this study, the committed effective dose (CED) from Cs and Cs was calculated based on individual WB contents (Cs) corrected against body size, the observed body content ratio of Cs to Cs, and the assumed intake scenario (namely, acute inhalation of Type F compounds on 12 March 2011 when the first explosive event occurred at the site of the FDNPP). The 90th-percentile CED value for the adults was around 0.1 mSv and the maximum CED (0.63 mSv) was found in an elderly male. Comparable CED results were obtained in other WB measurements subsequently performed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in a similar manner to that of the NIRS, suggesting that the contribution of ingestion to the WB content observed would be trivial for most of the JAEA subjects. The intake ratio of I to Cs was evaluated to be 3~5 based on the I thyroid measurement data of Tokonami et al. Using the average intake ratio of 3.8, the resulting median and maximum thyroid-equivalent doses to the adult subjects of this study were estimated at 3.5 mSv and 84 mSv, respectively.

  14. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    SciTech Connect

    Soehn, Matthias . E-mail: Matthias.Soehn@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade {>=} 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed wor0008.

  15. Lipid Nanotube Tailored Fabrication of Uniquely Shaped Polydopamine Nanofibers as Photothermal Converters.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Chechetka, Svetlana A; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi; Aoyagi, Masaru; Minamikawa, Hiroyuki; Miyako, Eijiro

    2016-03-18

    Helically coiled and linear polydopamine (PDA) nanofibers were selectively fabricated with two different types of lipid nanotubes (LNTs) that acted as templates. The obtained coiled PDA-LNT hybrid showed morphological advantages such as higher light absorbance and photothermal conversion effect compared to a linear counterpart. Laser irradiation of the coiled PDA-LNT hybrid induced a morphological change and subsequent release of the encapsulated guest molecule. In cellular experiments, the coiled PDA-LNT efficiently eliminated HeLa cells because of its strong affinity with the tumor cells. This work illustrates the first approach to construct characteristic morphologies of PDA nanofibers using LNTs as simple templates, and the coiled PDA-LNT hybrid exhibits attractive photothermal features derived from its unique coiled shape.

  16. [Clinical evaluation of the combination treatment of intrapleural or intraperitoneal administration of lentinan and OK-432 for malignant effusion].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Shigefumi; Yoshida, Shin; Maeda, Noriko; Maeda, Yoshinari; Maeda, Kazunari; Hazama, Shoichi; Oka, Masaaki

    2010-11-01

    The combination treatment of non-specific immunomodulator Lentinan (LNT) and OK-432 is effective for controlling Th1/Th2 balance and inducing Th1 dominant status in cancer patients. According to this rationale, we tried an administration of LNT and OK-432 in the pleural or peritoneal cavity for patients with malignant effusion. In all 21 lesions of the 20 cases, 10 revealed a complete disappearance and 7 revealed diminution of the effusion. The efficacy of this treatment is 81%. All patients developed a clinical efficacy in 1 to 3 courses of this treatment, and 9 lesions developed clinical efficacy in only 1 course. None of patients developed toxic symptoms LNT, and 10 developed a low grade fever by OK-432. The combination of LNT and OK-432 is effective and for QOL conserving loco-regional treatment.

  17. Electric moulding of dispersed lipid nanotubes into a nanofluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Manabe, Tatsuhiko; Kagiyama, Eri; Hirano, Ken; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophilic nanotubes formed by lipid molecules have potential applications as platforms for chemical or biological events occurring in an attolitre volume inside a hollow cylinder. Here, we have integrated the lipid nanotubes (LNTs) by applying an AC electric field via plug-in electrode needles placed above a substrate. The off-chip assembly method has the on-demand adjustability of an electrode configuration, enabling the dispersed LNT to be electrically moulded into a separate film of parallel LNT arrays in one-step. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique as well as the digital microscopy visualised the overall filling of gold nanoparticles up to the inner capacity of an LNT film by capillary action, thereby showing the potential of this flexible film for use as a high-throughput nanofluidic device where not only is the endo-signalling and product in each LNT multiplied but also the encapsulated objects are efficiently transported and reacted. PMID:23835525

  18. Electric moulding of dispersed lipid nanotubes into a nanofluidic device.

    PubMed

    Frusawa, Hiroshi; Manabe, Tatsuhiko; Kagiyama, Eri; Hirano, Ken; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrophilic nanotubes formed by lipid molecules have potential applications as platforms for chemical or biological events occurring in an attolitre volume inside a hollow cylinder. Here, we have integrated the lipid nanotubes (LNTs) by applying an AC electric field via plug-in electrode needles placed above a substrate. The off-chip assembly method has the on-demand adjustability of an electrode configuration, enabling the dispersed LNT to be electrically moulded into a separate film of parallel LNT arrays in one-step. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique as well as the digital microscopy visualised the overall filling of gold nanoparticles up to the inner capacity of an LNT film by capillary action, thereby showing the potential of this flexible film for use as a high-throughput nanofluidic device where not only is the endo-signalling and product in each LNT multiplied but also the encapsulated objects are efficiently transported and reacted.

  19. Communicating Leave No Trace ethics and practices: Efficacy of two-day trainer courses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy recreational visitation within protected natural areas has resulted in many ecological impacts. Many of these impacts may be avoided or minimized through adoption of low-impact hiking and camping practices. Although ?No Trace? messages have been promoted in public lands since the 1970s, few studies have documented the reception and effectiveness of these messages. The U.S. Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics develops and promotes two-day Trainer courses that teach Leave No Trace (LNT) skills and ethics to outdoor professionals, groups, and interested individuals. This study examined the change in knowledge, ethics, and behavior of LNT Trainer course participants. The respondents were a convenience sample of participants in Trainer courses offered from April through August 2003. Trainer course instructors administered pre-course and post-course questionnaires to their participants, and we contacted participants individually with a followup questionnaire 4 months after completion of their course. Scores for each of the sections increased immediately following the course, and decreased slightly over the 4 months following the course. Overall, more than half of the knowledge and behavior items, and half of the ethics items, showed significant improvement from pre-course measures to the follow-up. Age, reported LNT experience, and backpacking experience affected the participants? pre-course knowledge and behavior scores. Younger, less experienced respondents also showed a greater improvement in behavior following the course. Trainer course participants also shared their LNT skills and ethics with others both formally and informally. In summary, the LNT Trainer course was successful in increasing participants? knowledge, ethics, and behavior, which they then shared with others. Since many low impact skills taught in the LNT curriculum are supported by scientific research, LNT educational programs have the potential to effectively minimize the environmental

  20. Night temperature and source–sink effects on overall growth, cell number and cell size in bell pepper ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Rebecca L.; Cruz-Huerta, Nicacio; Williamson, Jeffrey G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Ovary swelling, and resultant fruit malformation, in bell pepper flowers is favoured by low night temperature or a high source–sink ratio. However, the interaction between night temperature and source–sink ratio on ovary swelling and the contribution of cell size and cell number to ovary swelling are unknown. The present research examined the interactive effects of night temperature and source–sink ratio on ovary size, cell number and cell size at anthesis in bell pepper flowers. Methods Bell pepper plants were grown in growth chambers at night temperatures of either 20 °C (HNT) or 12 °C (LNT). Within each temperature treatment, plants bore either 0 (non-fruiting) or two developing fruits per plant. Ovary fresh weight, cell size and cell number were measured. Key Results Ovary fresh weights in non-fruiting plants grown at LNT were the largest, while fresh weights were smallest in plants grown at HNT with fruits. In general, mesocarp cell size in ovaries was largest in non-fruiting plants grown at either LNT or HNT and smallest in fruiting plants at HNT. Mesocarp cell number was greater in non-fruiting plants under LNT than in the rest of the night temperature/fruiting treatments. These responses were more marked in ovaries sampled after 18 d of treatment compared with those sampled after 40 d of treatment. Conclusions Ovary fresh weight of flowers at anthesis increased 65 % in non-fruiting plants grown under LNT compared with fruiting plants grown under HNT. This increase was due primarily to increases in mesocarp cell number and size. These results indicate that the combined effects of LNT and high source–sink ratio on ovary swelling are additive. Furthermore, the combined effects of LNT and low source–sink ratio or HNT and high source–sink ratio can partially overcome the detrimental effects of LNT and high source–sink ratio. PMID:22933415

  1. [Tremendous Human, Social, and Economic Losses Caused by Obstinate Application of the Failed Linear No-threshold Model].

    PubMed

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2015-01-01

    The linear no-threshold model (LNT) was recommended in 1956, with abandonment of the traditional threshold dose-response for genetic risk assessment. Adoption of LNT by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) became the standard for radiation regulation worldwide. The ICRP recommends a dose limit of 1 mSv/year for the public, which is too low and which terrorizes innocent people. Indeed, LNT arose mainly from the lifespan survivor study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors. The LSS, which asserts linear dose-response and no threshold, is challenged mainly on three points. 1) Radiation doses were underestimated by half because of disregard for major residual radiation, resulting in cancer risk overestimation. 2) The dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of 2 is used, but the actual DDREF is estimated as 16, resulting in cancer risk overestimation by several times. 3) Adaptive response (hormesis) is observed in leukemia and solid cancer cases, consistently contradicting the linearity of LNT. Drastic reduction of cancer risk moves the dose-response curve close to the control line, allowing the setting of a threshold. Living organisms have been evolving for 3.8 billion years under radiation exposure, naturally acquiring various defense mechanisms such as DNA repair mechanisms, apoptosis, and immune response. The failure of LNT lies in the neglect of carcinogenesis and these biological mechanisms. Obstinate application of LNT continues to cause tremendous human, social, and economic losses. The 60-year-old LNT must be rejected to establish a new scientific knowledge-based system. PMID:26521869

  2. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  3. Experimental Assessment of NOx Emissions from 73 Euro 6 Diesel Passenger Cars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuhanzi; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter; Kolke, Reinhard; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; German, John

    2015-12-15

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel passenger cars during real-world driving is one of the major technical challenges facing diesel auto manufacturers. Three main technologies are available for this purpose: exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn NOx traps (LNT), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Seventy-three Euro 6 diesel passenger cars (8 EGR only, 40 LNT, and 25 SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over both the European type-approval cycle (NEDC, cold engine start) and the more realistic Worldwide harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC version 2.0, hot start) between 2012 and 2015. Most vehicles met the legislative limit of 0.08 g/km of NOx over NEDC (average emission factors by technology: EGR-only 0.07 g/km, LNT 0.04 g/km, and SCR 0.05 g/km), but the average emission factors rose dramatically over WLTC (EGR-only 0.17 g/km, LNT 0.21 g/km, and SCR 0.13 g/km). Five LNT-equipped vehicles exhibited very poor performance over the WLTC, emitting 7-15 times the regulated limit. These results illustrate how diesel NOx emissions are not properly controlled under the current, NEDC-based homologation framework. The upcoming real-driving emissions (RDE) regulation, which mandates an additional on-road emissions test for EU type approvals, could be a step in the right direction to address this problem.

  4. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model Pt/Ba/Rh NOx Traps for Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Harold; Vemuri Balakotaiah

    2010-05-31

    In this project a combined experimental and theoretical approach was taken to advance our understanding of lean NOx trap (LNT) technology. Fundamental kinetics studies were carried out of model LNT catalysts containing variable loadings of precious metals (Pt, Rh), and storage components (BaO, CeO{sub 2}). The Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor provided transient data under well-characterized conditions for both powder and monolith catalysts, enabling the identification of key reaction pathways and estimation of the corresponding kinetic parameters. The performance of model NOx storage and reduction (NSR) monolith catalysts were evaluated in a bench scale NOx trap using synthetic exhaust, with attention placed on the effect of the pulse timing and composition on the instantaneous and cycle-averaged product distributions. From these experiments we formulated a global model that predicts the main spatio-temporal features of the LNT and a mechanistic-based microkinetic models that incorporates a detailed understanding of the chemistry and predicts more detailed selectivity features of the LNT. The NOx trap models were used to determine its ability to simulate bench-scale data and ultimately to evaluate alternative LNT designs and operating strategies. The four-year project led to the training of several doctoral students and the dissemination of the findings as 47 presentations in conferences, catalysis societies, and academic departments as well 23 manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals. A condensed review of NOx storage and reduction was published in an encyclopedia of technology.

  5. Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses DE-FG02-05 ER 63947 Final Technical Report 15 May 2005; 14 May 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, Simon

    2010-07-28

    This report provides a complete summary of the work undertaken and results obtained under US Department of Energy grant DF-FG02-05 ER 63947, Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses. There is ample epidemiological evidence indicating that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic in the higher dose range. This evidence, however, weakens and carries increasing uncertainties at doses below 100-200 mSv. At these low dose levels the form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancer cannot be determined reliably or directly from studies of human populations. Therefore animal, cellular and other experimental systems must be employed to provide supporting evidence on which to base judgements of risk at low doses. Currently in radiological protection a linear non-threshold (LNT) extrapolation of risk estimates derived from human epidemiological studies is used to estimate risks in the dose range of interest for protection purposes. Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation (eg UNSCEAR 2006; IARC 2000). Good animal models of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are available including strains such as CBA, RFM and SJL (eg Major and Mole 1978; Ullrich et al 1976; Resnitzky et al 1985). Early mechanistic studies using cytogenetic methods in these mouse models established that the majority of radiation-induced AMLs carried substantial interstitial deletions in one copy of chromosome (chr) 2 (eg Hayata et al 1983; Trakhtenbrot et al 1988; Breckon et al 1991; Rithidech et al 1993; Bouffler et al 1996). Chr2 aberrations are known to occur in bone marrow cells as early as 24 hours after in vivo irradiation (Bouffler et al 1997). Subsequent molecular mapping studies defined a distinct region of chr2 that is commonly lost in AMLs (Clark et al 1996; Silver et al 1999). Further, more detailed, analysis identified point mutations at a specific region of the Sfpi1/PU.1 haemopoietic transcription factor gene

  6. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    SciTech Connect

    Bushberg, J; Boreham, D; Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  7. Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Operation of a Switching Power Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Biswajit; Gerber, Scott S.; Patterson, Richard L.; Myers, Ira T.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a 42/28 V, 175 W, 50 kHz pulse-width modulated buck dc/dc switching power converter at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) is compared with room temperature operation. The power circuit as well as the control circuit of the converter, designed with commercially available components, were operated at LNT and resulted in a slight improvement in converter efficiency. The improvement in power MOSFET operation was offset by deteriorating performance of the output diode rectifier at LNT. Performance of the converter could be further improved at low temperatures by using only power MOSFET's as switches. The use of a resonant topology will further improve the circuit performance by reducing the switching noise and loss.

  8. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    PubMed

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  9. CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Pihl, Josh A; West, Brian H; Toops, Todd J; Adelman, Brad; Derybowski, Edward

    2011-10-01

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments

  10. Neural networks for tracking of unknown SISO discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Muhammad Saleheen; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a Lyapunov function based neural network tracking (LNT) strategy for single-input, single-output (SISO) discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems. The proposed LNT architecture is composed of two feedforward neural networks operating as controller and estimator. A Lyapunov function based back propagation learning algorithm is used for online adjustment of the controller and estimator parameters. The controller and estimator error convergence and closed-loop system stability analysis is performed by Lyapunov stability theory. Moreover, two simulation examples and one real-time experiment are investigated as case studies. The achieved results successfully validate the controller performance.

  11. Low-temperature magnetic viscosity in thin GaMnSb films containing MnSb clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. I.; Kostyuchenko, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The time dependences of the magnetic moment m(t) of thin GaMnSb films containing MnSb clusters are measured. It is found that the m(t) curves are straight in semilogarithmic coordinates m(lnt). The slope of the m(lnt) lines correspond to the magnetic viscosity S. It is found that the field dependences of the magnetic viscosity S(H) and magnetic moment m(H) at low temperatures are determined by a log-normal distribution of the magnetic anisotropy energy of the MnSb clusters.

  12. Neural networks for tracking of unknown SISO discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Muhammad Saleheen; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a Lyapunov function based neural network tracking (LNT) strategy for single-input, single-output (SISO) discrete-time nonlinear dynamic systems. The proposed LNT architecture is composed of two feedforward neural networks operating as controller and estimator. A Lyapunov function based back propagation learning algorithm is used for online adjustment of the controller and estimator parameters. The controller and estimator error convergence and closed-loop system stability analysis is performed by Lyapunov stability theory. Moreover, two simulation examples and one real-time experiment are investigated as case studies. The achieved results successfully validate the controller performance. PMID:26456201

  13. Practical Approaches for Teaching Leave No Trace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    As participation in outdoor recreation grows, natural resources suffer a variety of environmental and social impacts. A minimum-impact back country educational program first developed during the 1970s, Leave No Trace (LNT), has been revitalized by the National Outdoor Leadership School, six federal agencies, and members of the outdoor products…

  14. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  15. ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

    2004-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  16. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  17. Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal?**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmonotonic Dose-Response Curves and Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Fact or Falderal? The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncanc...

  18. Nonmonotonic dose response curves (NMDRCs) are common after Estrogen or Androgen signaling pathway disruption. Fact or Falderal? ###SETAC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the late 1940s. The debate originally focused on linear no threshold (LNT) vs threshold responses in the low dose range for cancer and noncancer related effects. Recently, claims have arisen tha...

  19. NONMONOTONIC DOSE RESPONSE CURVES (NMDRCS) ARE COMMON AFTER ESTROGEN OR ANDROGEN SIGNALING PATHWAY DISRUPTION. FACT OR FALDERAL?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: The shape of the dose response curve in the low dose region has been debated since the 1940s, originally focusing on linear no threshold (LNT) versus threshold responses for cancer and noncancer effects. Recently, it has been claimed that endocrine disrupters (EDCs...

  20. Revisiting the gram-negative lipoprotein paradigm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of lipoproteins (lpps) in Gram-negative bacteria is generally considered to be an essential pathway. Mature lipoproteins in these bacteria are triacylated, with the final fatty acid addition performed by Lnt, an apolipoprotein n-acyltransferase. The mature lipoproteins are then sorted...

  1. Investigation of the Dielectric Strength of Syntactic Foam at 77 K under DC Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, D.; Puffer, R.; Schnettler, A.

    2014-05-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) based electrical insulation systems for superconducting equipment of electrical power distribution networks are state of the art. Since LN2 is a cryogenic liquid it has some disadvantages when used as insulation. This paper deals with syntactic foam as an alternative insulation system for superconducting apparatus. Syntactic foam is a composite material consisting of a polymeric matrix and embedded hollow microspheres with diameters of several 10 μp?. As hollow microspheres are gas-filled, using those as filling material features significant reductions of the relative permittivity and of the thermal contraction due to cooling the material to liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, T = 77 K). In this study both an epoxy resin (ER) and an unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) serve as matrix material. The hollow microspheres used in this investigation are made of untreated and silanized glass. The results of measurements of the dielectric DC strength show, that the dielectric strength of all investigated syntactic foam compositions are significantly higher at LNT compared to ambient temperature (AT). Furthermore, the effect of a higher dielectric strength of syntactic foam with silanized glass spheres at ambient temperature vanishes at LNT. Hence, the dielectric strength at LNT is unaffected by silanization of glass microspheres.

  2. Emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion and affect on emission control devices

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Kass, Michael D; Huff, Shean P; Barone, Teresa L; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Storey, John Morse

    2010-01-01

    A light-duty diesel engine has been operated in advanced combustion modes known generally as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The emissions have been characterized for several load and speed combinations. Fewer NO{sub x} and particulate matter (PM) emissions are produced by PCCI, but higher CO and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions result. In addition, the nature of the PM differs from conventional combustion; the PM is smaller and has a much higher soluble organic fraction (SOF) content (68% vs. 30% for conventional combustion). Three catalyst technologies were studied to determine the affects of HECC on catalyst performance; the technologies were a lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT), diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), and diesel particulate filter (DPF). The LNT benefited greatly from the reduced NO{sub x} emissions associated with PCCI. NO{sub x} capacity requirements are reduced as well as overall tailpipe NO{sub x} levels particularly at low load and temperature conditions where regeneration of the LNT is difficult. The DOC performance requirements for PCCI are more stringent due to the higher CO and HC emissions; however, the DOC was effective at controlling the higher CO and HC emissions at conditions above the light-off temperature. Below light-off, CO and HC emissions are problematic. The study of DPF technology focused on the fuel penalties associated with DPF regeneration or 'desoot' due to the different PM loading rates from PCCI vs. conventional combustion. Less frequent desoot events were required from the lower PM from PCCI and, when used in conjunction with an LNT, the lower PM from less frequent LNT regeneration. The lower desoot frequency leads a {approx}3% fuel penalty for a mixture of PCCI and conventional loads vs. {approx}4% for conventional only combustion.

  3. Effects of Rapid High Temperature Cyclic Aging on a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, Nathan; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J; Howe, Janet E

    2009-01-01

    In this study, high-temperature deactivation of a fully-formulated lean NOx trap (LNT) is investigated with an accelerated aging protocol where accelerated aging is accomplished by rapid temperature cycling and by higher temperatures. Thermal aging is carried out in a bench-flow reactor at nominal temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C using an aging cycle consisting of a 130s lean-phase and a 50s rich-phase. After a prescribed number of lean/rich aging cycles, the NOx conversion of the aged LNT is evaluated at 200, 300, and 400 C. The NOx performance is obtained at a GHSV of 30,000 h-1 using an evaluation cycle consisting of a 60s lean-phase and 5s rich-phase. The effects of aging on the LNT washcoat are determined with EPMA, XRD, STEM/EDS, and BET. Aging at 700 and 800 C has a minimal effect on LNT performance and material properties. However, at aging temperatures of 900 and 1000 C reduction in surface area and sintering of PGM particles are observed and result in a drastic reduction in NOx conversion. Additionally, after aging at 900 C and 1000 C the NOx storage medium, BaCO3, is no longer visible in the XRD patterns, even though a Ba-phase identified by EPMA still exists in all aged samples. BaAl2O4 is not identified at any aging temperatures; possibly due to stabilization effects provided by washcoat additives present in this particular LNT.

  4. Experimental Assessment of NOx Emissions from 73 Euro 6 Diesel Passenger Cars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuhanzi; Franco, Vicente; Mock, Peter; Kolke, Reinhard; Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; German, John

    2015-12-15

    Controlling nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from diesel passenger cars during real-world driving is one of the major technical challenges facing diesel auto manufacturers. Three main technologies are available for this purpose: exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean-burn NOx traps (LNT), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Seventy-three Euro 6 diesel passenger cars (8 EGR only, 40 LNT, and 25 SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over both the European type-approval cycle (NEDC, cold engine start) and the more realistic Worldwide harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC version 2.0, hot start) between 2012 and 2015. Most vehicles met the legislative limit of 0.08 g/km of NOx over NEDC (average emission factors by technology: EGR-only 0.07 g/km, LNT 0.04 g/km, and SCR 0.05 g/km), but the average emission factors rose dramatically over WLTC (EGR-only 0.17 g/km, LNT 0.21 g/km, and SCR 0.13 g/km). Five LNT-equipped vehicles exhibited very poor performance over the WLTC, emitting 7-15 times the regulated limit. These results illustrate how diesel NOx emissions are not properly controlled under the current, NEDC-based homologation framework. The upcoming real-driving emissions (RDE) regulation, which mandates an additional on-road emissions test for EU type approvals, could be a step in the right direction to address this problem. PMID:26580818

  5. Lentinan mitigates therarubicin-induced myelosuppression by activating bone marrow-derived macrophages in an MAPK/NF-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Dong, Lei; Li, Hong; Yuan, Jia; Peng, Yuping; Dai, Shejiao

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) suppression (also known as myelosuppression) is the most common and most severe side-effect of therarubicin (THP) and thereby limits the clinical application of this anticancer agent. Lentinan (LNT), a glucan extracted from dried shiitake mushrooms (Lentinula edodes), exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of LNT on the myelosuppression of THP-treated mice and to examine the pharmacological mechanism of these effects. In vivo experiments indicated that non-cytotoxic levels of LNT strongly increased blood myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity; improved BM structural injuries; increased the numbers of leukocytes and neutrophils in the blood and BM; elevated the blood levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF); and reduced the self-healing period in THP-treated mice. In vitro experiments indicated that LNT increased the viability of BM-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in a time- and dose-dependent manner without toxic side-effects and markedly increased the release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF by BMDMs. Further analyses revealed that LNT activated the NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways and promoted the nuclear import of p65 and that BAY 11-7082 (a specific inhibitor of NF-κB) suppressed the release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF. Furthermore, we found that U0126, SB203580 and SP600125 (specific inhibitors of ERK, p38 and JNK, respectively) markedly inhibited the IKK/IκB/NF-κB-dependent release of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF. In conclusion, LNT induces the production of G-CSF, GM-CSF and M-CSF by activating the MAPK/NF-κB signalling pathway in BM cells, thereby mitigating THP-induced myelosuppression. PMID:27121155

  6. CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Strzelec, Andrea; Szanyi, Janos; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.

    2012-02-08

    DOE FY 2011 Advanced Combustion Technologies Annual Report. CLEERS is a research and development focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY 2011, more emphasis was placed on the SCR and LNT activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies. Objectives of this project are to lead and contribute to the Cross-Cut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulations (CLEERS) activities - (a) Provide project updates to the industry sub-team, solicit feedback, and adjust work scope accordingly; and (b) Lead technical discussions, invite distinguished speakers, and maintain an open dialogue on selective catalytic reduction (SCR), lean-NOx trap (LNT), and diesel particulate filter (DPF) modeling issues. Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Objectives are to: (1) Develop improved modeling capabilities for SCR and DPFs through fundamental experiments; and (2) Develop a fundamental understanding of SCR and LNT catalysts with primary focus on reaction mechanisms and material characterization. Some accomplishments are: (1) Participated in monthly CLEERS teleconferences and coordinated the calls focused on SCR, LNT and DPF technologies; (2) Updated PNNL's SCR model for the state-of-the-art commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst to extract kinetic parameters and to quantitatively describe the effects of hydrothermal aging; (3) Examined the effects of hydrothermal aging on the physicochemical properties and SCR reactions using the commercial Cu catalyst in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (4) Investigated the nature of Cu species and obtained kinetic

  7. Radiation Hormesis: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    PubMed Central

    Luckey, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Three aspects of hormesis with low doses of ionizing radiation are presented: the good, the bad, and the ugly. The good is acceptance by France, Japan, and China of the thousands of studies showing stimulation and/or benefit, with no harm, from low dose irradiation. This includes thousands of people who live in good health with high background radiation. The bad is the nonacceptance of radiation hormesis by the U. S. and most other governments; their linear no threshold (LNT) concept promulgates fear of all radiation and produces laws which have no basis in mammalian physiology. The LNT concept leads to poor health, unreasonable medicine and oppressed industries. The ugly is decades of deception by medical and radiation committees which refuse to consider valid evidence of radiation hormesis in cancer, other diseases, and health. Specific examples are provided for the good, the bad, and the ugly in radiation hormesis. PMID:18648595

  8. Update on microkinetic modeling of lean NOx trap chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Choi, Jae-Soon; Chakravarthy, V, Kalyana

    2010-04-01

    Our previously developed microkinetic model for lean NOx trap (LNT) storage and regeneration has been updated to address some longstanding issues, in particular the formation of N2O during the regeneration phase at low temperatures. To this finalized mechanism has been added a relatively simple (12-step) scheme that accounts semi-quantitatively for the main features observed during sulfation and desulfation experiments, namely (a) the essentially complete trapping of SO2 at normal LNT operating temperatures, (b) the plug-like sulfation of both barium oxide (NOx storage) and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites, (c) the degradation of NOx storage behavior arising from sulfation, (d) the evolution of H2S and SO2 during high temperature desulfation (temperature programmed reduction) under H2, and (e) the complete restoration of NOx storage capacity achievable through the chosen desulfation procedure.

  9. Effect of Ceria on the Storage and Regeneration Behavior of a Model Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Dr. Mark

    2007-01-01

    In this study the effect of ceria addition on the performance of a model Ba-based lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) catalyst was examined. The presence of ceria improved NO{sub x} storage capacity in the temperature range 200-400 C under both continuous lean and lean-rich cycling conditions. Temperature-programmed experiments showed that NO{sub x} stored in the ceria-containing catalyst was thermally less stable and more reactive to reduction with both H{sub 2} and CO as reductants, albeit at the expense of additional reductant consumed by reduction of the ceria. These findings demonstrate that the incorporation of ceria in LNTs not only improves NO{sub x} storage efficiency but also positively impacts LNT regeneration behavior.

  10. Effect of sulfur loading on the desulfation chemistry of a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Yezerets, Aleksey; Li, Junhui; Currier, Neal; Chen, Haiying; Hess, Howard ..; Engelhard, Mark H.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the effects of initial sulfur loadings on the desulfation chemistry and the subsequent final activity of a commercial LNT catalyst. Identical total amounts of SO2 are applied to the samples, albeit with the frequency of desulfation varied. The results indicate that performance is better with less frequent desulfations. The greater the amount of sulfur deposited before desulfation, the more amount of SO2 evolution before H2S is observed during desulfation, which can be explained by two sequential reactions; initial conversion of sulfate to SO2, followed by the reduction of SO2 to H2S. After completing all sulfation/desulfation steps, the sample with only a single desulfation results in a fairly uniform sulfur distribution along the z-axis inside of the monolith. We expect that the results obtained in this study will provide useful information for optimizing regeneration strategies in vehicles that utilize the LNT technology.

  11. Thermal management of low temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Louis C.; Sehmbey, Maninder S.; Mahefkey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Operation of electronics at liquid nitrogen temperature is a very attractive possibility. High temperature superconducting circuits operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have great potential in supercomputers and in the medical field. The limitations of superconducting switches in handling high power levels can be overcome by employing hybrid circuits where MOSFET switches are used in conjunction with superconducting elements. These hybrid circuits can be employed advantageously in many applications; for example, high-voltage power conversion, and superconducting-brushless-ac motors for locomotives. However, the thermal management of LNT electronics is an issue that has to be addressed. In this paper, two thermal management techniques, direct immersion cooling, and high-heat-flux spray cooling are discussed. Immersion cooling can handle relatively low heat flux levels (100 kW/m2) while spray cooling is capable of very high heat flux removal (over 1000 kW/m2).

  12. CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Szanyi, Janos; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Tran, Diana N.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Herling, Darrell R.

    2009-12-01

    Cross-Cut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulations (CLEERS) is a R&D focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory through CLEERS, focusing on the three most prominent technologies for diesel exhaust after-treatment: • Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) • Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) • Lean NOX Traps (LNT) Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY09, more emphasis was placed on the SCR and LNT activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies.

  13. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy of micro- and nanodiamonds: an implication for laboratory astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Gucsik, Arnold; Nishido, Hirotsugu; Ninagawa, Kiyotaka; Ott, Ulrich; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Kayama, Masahiro; Simonia, Irakli; Boudou, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Color centers in selected micro- and nanodiamond samples were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy at 298 K [room temperature (RT)] and 77 K [liquid-nitrogen temperature (LNT)] to assess the value of the technique for astrophysics. Nanodiamonds from meteorites were compared with synthetic diamonds made with different processes involving distinct synthesis mechanisms (chemical vapor deposition, static high pressure high temperature, detonation). A CL emission peak centered at around 540 nm at 77 K was observed in almost all of the selected diamond samples and is assigned to the dislocation defect with nitrogen atoms. Additional peaks were identified at 387 and 452 nm, which are related to the vacancy defect. In general, peak intensity at LNT at the samples was increased in comparison to RT. The results indicate a clear temperature-dependence of the spectroscopic properties of diamond. This suggests the method is a useful tool in laboratory astrophysics.

  14. Pooled Bayesian meta-analysis of two Polish studies on radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Fornalski, Krzysztof W

    2015-11-01

    The robust Bayesian regression method was applied to perform meta-analysis of two independent studies on influence of low ionising radiation doses on the occurrence of fatal cancers. The re-analysed data come from occupational exposure analysis of nuclear workers in Świerk (Poland) and from ecological study of cancer risk from natural background radiation in Poland. Such two different types of data were analysed, and three popular models were tested: constant, linear and quadratic dose-response dependencies. The Bayesian model selection algorithm was used for all models. The Bayesian statistics clearly indicates that the popular linear no-threshold (LNT) assumption is not valid for presented cancer risks in the range of low doses of ionising radiation. The subject of LNT hypothesis use in radiation risk prediction and assessment is also discussed. PMID:25956788

  15. Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P; Parks, II, James E; Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; Chambon, Paul H; Thomas, John F

    2010-01-01

    Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

  16. Development of the United States Leave No Trace programme: A historical perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Reid, S.; Usher, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the historical development of the U.S. Leave No Trace (LNT) educational program. It begins with a review of the need for the program and traces it?s conception and early development in the 1970`s, revitalization in 1991, creation of Leave No Trace, Inc., and the current status. The paper concludes with a discussion of the program?s elements that have made it successful and recommendations for the development of similar educational programs.

  17. A more flexible lipoprotein sorting pathway.

    PubMed

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G

    2015-05-01

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria occurs by a conserved pathway, each step of which is considered essential. In contrast to this model, LoVullo and colleagues demonstrate that the N-acyl transferase Lnt is not required in Francisella tularensis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This suggests the existence of a more flexible lipoprotein pathway, likely due to a modified Lol transporter complex, and raises the possibility that pathogens may regulate lipoprotein processing to modulate interactions with the host. PMID:25755190

  18. Mechanics of lipid bilayer junctions affecting the size of a connecting lipid nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Roger; Kurczy, Michael; Grzhibovskis, Richards; Adams, Kelly L.; Ewing, Andrew G.; Cans, Ann-Sofie; Voinova, Marina V.

    2011-06-01

    In this study we report a physical analysis of the membrane mechanics affecting the size of the highly curved region of a lipid nanotube (LNT) that is either connected between a lipid bilayer vesicle and the tip of a glass microinjection pipette (tube-only) or between a lipid bilayer vesicle and a vesicle that is attached to the tip of a glass microinjection pipette (two-vesicle). For the tube-only configuration (TOC), a micropipette is used to pull a LNT into the interior of a surface-immobilized vesicle, where the length of the tube L is determined by the distance of the micropipette to the vesicle wall. For the two-vesicle configuration (TVC), a small vesicle is inflated at the tip of the micropipette tip and the length of the tube L is in this case determined by the distance between the two interconnected vesicles. An electrochemical method monitoring diffusion of electroactive molecules through the nanotube has been used to determine the radius of the nanotube R as a function of nanotube length L for the two configurations. The data show that the LNT connected in the TVC constricts to a smaller radius in comparison to the tube-only mode and that tube radius shrinks at shorter tube lengths. To explain these electrochemical data, we developed a theoretical model taking into account the free energy of the membrane regions of the vesicles, the LNT and the high curvature junctions. In particular, this model allows us to estimate the surface tension coefficients from R( L) measurements.

  19. Correlation function for generalized Pólya urns: Finite-size scaling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shintaro; Hisakado, Masato

    2015-11-01

    We describe a universality class for the transitions of a generalized Pólya urn by studying the asymptotic behavior of the normalized correlation function C (t ) using finite-size scaling analysis. X (1 ),X (2 ),... are the successive additions of a red (blue) ball [X (t )=1 (0 )] at stage t and C (t )≡Cov[X (1 ),X (t +1 )]/Var[X (1 )] . Furthermore, z (t ) =∑s=1tX (s ) /t represents the successive proportions of red balls in an urn to which, at the (t +1 )th stage, a red ball is added [X (t +1 )=1 ] with probability q [z (t )]=(tanh{J [2 z (t )-1 ]+h }+1 )/2 ,J ≥0 , and a blue ball is added [X (t +1 )=0 ] with probability 1 -q [z (t )] . A boundary [Jc(h ) ,h ] exists in the (J ,h ) plane between a region with one stable fixed point and another region with two stable fixed points for q (z ) . C (t ) ˜c +c'.tl -1 with c =0 (>0 ) for J Jc) , and l is the (larger) value of the slope(s) of q (z ) at the stable fixed point(s). On the boundary J =Jc(h ) ,C (t ) ≃c +c'.(lnt) -α' and c =0 (c >0 ) ,α'=1 /2 (1 ) for h =0 (h ≠0 ) . The system shows a continuous phase transition for h =0 and C (t ) behaves as C (t ) ≃(lnt) -α'g [(1 -l ) lnt ] with a universal function g (x ) and a length scale 1 /(1 -l ) with respect to lnt . β =ν||.α' holds with β =1 /2 and ν||=1 .

  20. Lean NOx Trap Modeling in Vehicle Systems Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Conklin, Jim

    2010-09-01

    A one-dimensional model for simulating lean NOx trap (LNT) performance is developed and validated using both steady state cycling data and transient data from FTP testing cycles. The model consists of the conservation equations for chemical species and energy in the bulk flow, energy of the solid walls, O2 storage and NOx storage (in the form of nitrites and nitrates). Nitrites and nitrates are formed by diffusion of NO and NO2, respectively, into sorbent particles (assumed to be hemi-spherical in shape) along with O2 and their formation rates are controlled by chemical kinetics as well as solid-phase diffusion rates of NOx species. The model also accounts for thermal aging and sulfation of LNTs. Empirical correlations are developed on the basis of published experimental data to capture these effects. These empirical correlations depend on total mileage for which the LNT has been in use, the mileage accumulated since the last desulfation event in addition to the freshly degreened catalyst characteristics. The model has been used in studies of vehicle systems (integration, performance etc.) including hybrid powertrain configurations. Since the engines in hybrid vehicles turn on and off multiple number of times during single drive cycles, the exhaust systems may encounter multiple cold start transients. Accurate modeling of catalyst warm-up and cooling is, therefore, very important to simulate LNT performance in such vehicles. For this purpose, the convective heat loss from the LNT to the ambient is modeled using a Nusselt number correlation that includes effects of both forced convection and natural convection (with later being important when vehicle is stationary). Using the model, the fuel penalty associated with operating LNTs on small diesel engine powered car during FTP drive cycles is estimated.

  1. [Successful therapy with tegafur and lentinan after TAE for hepatocellular carcinoma--a case report].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Inagaki, Y; Miyairi, M

    1989-12-20

    A 46-year-old male (performance status 1) with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which diffusely involved the anterior segment of the right lobe, occluded the second portal branch and metastased to the left lobe (stage IV-A), was on combined therapy with TAE of lipiodol (LPD), mitomycin C (MMC) 10 mg and gelatin sponge at the time of angiography on March 16, 1987. Immunochemotherapy with tegafur suppository (Teg sp) 1,000 mg/day and OK432 i.m. was performed for one month after TAE. Instead of OK432, lentinan (LNT) 2 mg in 20% glucose sol. 20 ml i.v./wk was combined with Teg sp 1,000 mg/day from May 13, 1987. Teg sp was reduced to 1,000 mg/2 days from June of the same year, and since then the same therapy of Teg + LNT has been continuing even now. Serum AFP values showing 150 X 10(4) ng/ml at maximum were decreased down to less than 20 ng/ml 13 months after this therapy (total doses: Teg ca. 250 g, LNT 108 mg), remaining still normal. Marked reduction in the size of the lesion (PR) by the therapy has also been proved by the body CT. His PS is now in grade 0. Although in this case the initial steep decline in AFP values was possibly brought about by TAE, the successive antitumor effect indicated by persistent low AFP values may have been mainly due to Teg + LNT. Collection of data on the therapy is needed to clarify this point.

  2. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment.

  3. Travel time statistics under radially converging flow in single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Kekez, Toni; Malenica, Luka

    2015-04-01

    A stochastic methodology based on Adaptive Fup Monte Carlo Method is used to investigate transport of a conservative solute by steady flow to a single pumping well in two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous single fractures. The spatially variable hydraulic transmissivity is modeled as a stationary random function for three different correlation structures (multi-Gaussian, connected and disconnected fields with correlated mean, high and low lnT values, respectively, according to the Zinn and Harvey, 2003) and heterogeneity levels (lnT variance is 1 and 8). Initially, solute particles are injected at outer circle located at 32 correlation lengths from well according to the in flux and resident injection mode. Therefore, breakthrough curve (BTC) statistics in single well due to different spatial structures, heterogeneity levels, injection modes and dispersion influence is considered. For small heterogeneity, all considered effects have small influences on BTC and related moments. As expected in single fractures, high lnT variance is more usual case which considerably changes flow patterns including channelling effect and fact that only few narrow channels carry out most pumping flow rate. Channelling implies significant differences between different injection modes. Resident mode uniformly injects particles implying that most particles pass through "slower" zones that especially increase late arrivals and contribute to the non-Fickian behaviour of transport. Contrary, "in flux" mode drastically reduces first arrivals and mean values, especially for connected correlation fields. The results from two injection modes lie on different sides of homogeneous mean travel time solution and give complementary information for complete representation of conservative transport. For advection transport, correlation structure and especially lnT variance seems to have major influence on BTC characteristics. On the other side, influence of longitudinal and lateral local scale

  4. Effect of Grain Refinement on the Mechanical Behaviour of an Al6061 Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Valle, E.; Perez-Prado, M. T.; Murashkin, M. Yu.; Valiev, R. Z.; Bobruk, E. V.; Sabirov, I.

    2011-05-01

    A solution treated coarse grained (CG) Al6061 was subjected to high pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature resulting in the formation of a homogeneous ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure with an average grain size of 170 nm. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). The as-HPT UFG Al6061 alloy shows an increased strength at both RT and LNT. The decrease of testing temperature results in increased flow stress and in enhanced elongation to failure in both CG and UFG samples. The ratio σyLNT/σyRT was found to be larger for the CG Al6061 than for the UFG Al6061. Both surface relief and fracture surface observations were performed. The effect of the grain size and of the testing temperature on the mechanical behaviour of the Al6061 alloy is analyzed in detail. It is suggested that the solute atoms play an important role in the plastic deformation of the UFG Al6061 alloy.

  5. Radiation chemical effects on polybutadiene polymers, styrene-butadiene block copolymers, and isotactic polypropylene

    SciTech Connect

    Basheer, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) of the free radical structure resulting from high energy gamma LNT irradiation of the polymers revealed the presence of allylic free radicals of the type approx. CH.CH = CH.CH/sub 2/ approx. The presence of chemically trapped electrons in polybutadiene and styrene-butadiene (SB) block copolymers irradiated in the absence of light at LNT was determined by ESR measurements, and the trapping sites were shown to be impurities or additive molecules which were imbedded in between the polymer chains and which had not been completely removed by purification. Reaction kinetic studies of free radical decay indicated that the decay followed the equation derived for the case in which some free radicals decay by a second order mechanism in the presence of nondecaying free radicals. The same reaction scheme was found to describe the kinetics of alkyl free radical decay in LNT irradiated quenched and annealed isotactic polypropylene with the decay rate of quenched samples being higher than for annealed samples. Results of studies of radiation-induced crosslinking of the elastomers are also included. (BLM)

  6. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  7. Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Pihl, J.; West, B.; Toops, T.; Adelman, B.; Derybowski, E.

    2011-09-30

    Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT, also known as NOx adsorber catalyst) regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

  8. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte sequestration in the lungs and liver following soft-tissue trauma: an in vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Thoerne, J.B.; Blomquist, S.; Elmer, O.; Grafstroem, G.M.; Martensson, L.

    1989-04-01

    Neutrophils are thought to sequestrate in the lungs and the liver in association with shock. Indications for this have previously been demonstrated in different in vitro studies. In this experiment an in vivo technique for dynamic studies of pulmonary and liver neutrophil sequestration (PNT and LNT, respectively) is described. Autologous neutrophils from ten pigs were labelled with indium-111 oxine. The pigs were placed under a scintillation camera for continuous recording of the activity distribution in the pigs during 105 minutes. Following a steady-state period of 15 minutes seven pigs were subjected to a standardized soft-tissue trauma. Three pigs were used as controls and not traumatized. Within 1-3 minutes after trauma the radioactivity over the lungs increased dramatically, indicating PNT. This was followed by a fast decrease but 90 minutes after trauma PNT levels were still significantly elevated. LNT showed a similar pattern, although the immediate increase was less dramatic. This study shows that PNT and LNT occur immediately after soft-tissue trauma and can be studied dynamically in vivo.

  9. Effect of Grain Refinement on the Mechanical Behaviour of an Al6061 Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Valle, E.; Sabirov, I.; Murashkin, M. Yu.; Valiev, R. Z.; Bobruk, E. V.; Perez-Prado, M. T.

    2011-05-04

    A solution treated coarse grained (CG) Al6061 was subjected to high pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature resulting in the formation of a homogeneous ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure with an average grain size of 170 nm. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). The as-HPT UFG Al6061 alloy shows an increased strength at both RT and LNT. The decrease of testing temperature results in increased flow stress and in enhanced elongation to failure in both CG and UFG samples. The ratio {sigma}{sub y}{sup LNT}/{sigma}{sub y}{sup RT} was found to be larger for the CG Al6061 than for the UFG Al6061. Both surface relief and fracture surface observations were performed. The effect of the grain size and of the testing temperature on the mechanical behaviour of the Al6061 alloy is analyzed in detail. It is suggested that the solute atoms play an important role in the plastic deformation of the UFG Al6061 alloy.

  10. Freely drawn single lipid nanotube patterns.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Kaori; Rustom, Amin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-03-14

    LNTs are unique 3D structures made only of safe and abundant biomaterials by self-assembly. The current bottleneck for developing applications using LNTs is the lack of an easy technique to pattern them on substrates. We report a method to free-draw single lipid nanotube (LNT) patterns in any shape on surfaces with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) that takes an inverted hexagonal (HII) phase. We used pre-self-assembled LNTs or HII lipid blocks as a lipid reservoir from which new LNTs were pulled by applying a point load with a micromanipulator. The extreme simplicity of our technique originates from the fundamental nature of DOPE lipids that prefer a HII phase, while all the conventional approaches use PC lipids that form a lamellar phase. By adjusting the surface properties with polyelectrolyte multilayers, the created single LNT objects are able to remain adhered to the surface for over a week. Importantly, it could be shown that two vesicles loaded with caged fluorescent molecules were able to fuse well with a LNT, enabling diffusive transport of uncaged fluorescent molecules from one vesicle to the other.

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Speech Perception Skills and Device Characteristics of Adolescent Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elizabeth J.; Davidson, Lisa S.; Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Brenner, Christine M.; Geers, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Background For pediatric cochlear implant (CI) users, CI processor technology, map characteristics and fitting strategies are known to have a substantial impact on speech perception scores at young ages. It is unknown whether these benefits continue over time as these children reach adolescence. Purpose To document changes in CI technology, map characteristics, and speech perception scores in children between elementary grades and high school, and to describe relations between map characteristics and speech perception scores over time. Research Design A longitudinal design with participants 8–9 years old at session 1 and 15–18 years old at session 2. Study Sample Participants were 82 adolescents with unilateral CIs, who are a subset of a larger longitudinal study. Mean age at implantation was 3.4 years (range: 1.7 – 5.4), and mean duration of device use was 5.5 years (range: 3.8–7.5) at session 1 and 13.3 years (range: 10.9–15) at session 2. Data Collection and Analysis Speech perception tests at sessions 1 and 2 were the Lexical Neighborhood word Test (LNT-70) and Bamford-Kowal-Bench sentences in quiet (BKB-Q), presented at 70 dB SPL. At session 2, the LNT was also administered at 50 dB SPL (LNT-50) and BKB sentences were administered in noise with a +10 dB SNR (BKB-N). CI processor technology type and CI map characteristics (coding strategy, number of electrodes, map threshold levels [T levels], and map comfort levels [C levels]) were obtained at both sessions. Electrical dynamic range [EDR] was computed [C level – T level], and descriptive statistics, correlations, and repeated-measures ANOVAs were employed. Results Participants achieved significantly higher LNT and BKB scores, at 70 dB SPL, at ages 15-18 than at ages 8-9 years. Forty-two participants had 1-3 electrodes either activated or deactivated in their map between test sessions, and 40 had no change in number of active electrodes (mean change: -0.5; range: -3 to +2). After conversion from

  12. Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    THERE IS considerable disagreement in the scientific community regarding the carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation (LDR), with publications supporting opposing points of view. However, major flaws have been identified in many of the publications claiming increased cancer risk from LDR. The data generally recognized as the most important for assessing radiation effects in humans, the atomic bomb survivor data, are often cited to raise LDR cancer concerns. However, these data no longer support the linear no-threshold (LNT) model after the 2012 update but are consistent with radiation hormesis. Thus, a resolution of the controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of LDR appears to be imminent, with the rejection of the LNT model and acceptance of radiation hormesis. Hence, for setting radiation protection regulations, an alternative approach to the present one based on the LNT model is needed. One approach would be to determine the threshold dose for the carcinogenic effect of radiation from existing data and establish regulations to ensure radiation doses are kept well below the threshold dose. This can be done by setting dose guidelines specifying safe levels of radiation doses, with the requirement that these safe levels, referred to as guidance levels, not be exceeded significantly. Using this approach, a dose guidance level of 10 cGy for acute radiation exposures and 10 cGy y for exposures over extended periods of time are recommended. The concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, known as ALARA, would no longer be required for low-level radiation exposures not expected to exceed the dose guidance levels significantly. These regulations would facilitate studies using LDR for prevention and treatment of diseases. Results from such studies would be helpful in refining dose guidance levels. The dose guidance levels would be the same for the public and radiation workers to ensure everyone's safety.

  13. Dose-responses from multi-model inference for the non-cancer disease mortality of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Schöllnberger, H; Kaiser, J C; Jacob, P; Walsh, L

    2012-05-01

    The non-cancer mortality data for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular diseases from Report 13 on the atomic bomb survivors published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were analysed to investigate the dose-response for the influence of radiation on these detrimental health effects. Various parametric and categorical models (such as linear-no-threshold (LNT) and a number of threshold and step models) were analysed with a statistical selection protocol that rated the model description of the data. Instead of applying the usual approach of identifying one preferred model for each data set, a set of plausible models was applied, and a sub-set of non-nested models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. Subsequently, this sub-set of non-nested models was used to perform multi-model inference (MMI), an innovative method of mathematically combining different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. This procedure thereby produces more reliable risk estimates based on a more comprehensive appraisal of model uncertainties. For CVD, MMI yielded a weak dose-response (with a risk estimate of about one-third of the LNT model) below a step at 0.6 Gy and a stronger dose-response at higher doses. The calculated risk estimates are consistent with zero risk below this threshold-dose. For mortalities related to cardiovascular diseases, an LNT-type dose-response was found with risk estimates consistent with zero risk below 2.2 Gy based on 90% confidence intervals. The MMI approach described here resolves a dilemma in practical radiation protection when one is forced to select between models with profoundly different dose-responses for risk estimates.

  14. Controlled synthesis and photocatalytic investigation of different-shaped one-dimensional titanic acid nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiuye; Lu, Gongxuan

    Different-shaped one-dimensional (1D) titanic acid nanomaterials (TANs) were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. By changing the reaction temperature (120, 170 and 200 °C), three kinds of 1D TAN, short-nanotubes (SNT), long-nanotubes (LNT), and nanorods (NR), were obtained. The obtained TANs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and solid-stated diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra (UV-vis DRS) techniques. Based on these 1D TAN, Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded TAN were prepared by the in situ impregnation and photo-reduction method. Their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation was evaluated in triethanolamine (TEOA) aqueous solution under visible light irradiation (λ ≥ 420 nm). The results indicated that the morphology difference led to a significant variation of photocatalytic performance for hydrogen generation, with the activity order as follows: Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded LNT > Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded NR > Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded SNT. The experimental conditions for photocatalytic hydrogen generation such as Pt loading content, the mass ratio of Eosin Y to TAN, and so on, were optimized. As a result, the highest apparent quantum yields of hydrogen generation for Eosin Y-sensitized Pt-loaded SNT, LNT, and NR were 6.65, 17.36, and 15.04%, respectively. The stability of these photocatalysts and the reaction mechanism of the photocatalytic hydrogen generation are also discussed in detail.

  15. Investigation of the Effects of Biodiesel-based Na on Emissions Control Components

    SciTech Connect

    Brookshear, D. William; Nguyen, Ke; Toops, Todd J; Bunting, Bruce G; Howe, Janet E

    2012-01-01

    A single-cylinder diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of biodiesel-based Na on emissions control components using specially blended 20% biodiesel fuel (B20). The emissions control components investigated were a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a Cu-zeolite-based NH{sub 3}-SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst, and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both light-duty vehicle, DOC-SCR-DPF, and heavy-duty vehicle, DOC-DPF-SCR, emissions control configurations were employed. The accelerated Na aging is achieved by introducing elevated Na levels in the fuel, to represent full useful life exposure, and periodically increasing the exhaust temperature to replicate DPF regeneration. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated Na aging protocol, engine-aged lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs), DOCs and DPFs are also evaluated. To fully characterize the impact on the catalytic activity the LNT, DOC and SCR catalysts were evaluated using a bench flow reactor. The evaluation of the aged DOC samples and LNT show little to no deactivation as a result of Na contamination. However, the SCR in the light-duty configuration (DOC-SCR-DPF) was severely affected by Na contamination, especially when NO was the only fed NO{sub x} source. In the heavy-duty configuration (DOC-DPF-SCR), no impact is observed in the SCR NO{sub x} reduction activity. Electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) reveals that Na contamination on the LNT, DOC, and SCR samples is present throughout the length of the catalysts with a higher concentration on the washcoat surface. In both the long-term engine-aged DPF and the accelerated Na-aged DPFs, there is significant Na ash present in the upstream channels; however, in the engine-aged sample lube oil-based ash is the predominant constituent.

  16. Carbonates-based noble metal-free lean NOx trap catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) with superior catalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxia; You, Rui; Liu, Dongsheng; Liu, Cheng; Li, Xingang; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Zheng; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying; Zha, Yuqing; Meng, Ming

    2015-12-01

    A series of base metal-based lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts MOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 (M = Ce, Fe, Cu, Co) were synthesized by successive impregnations and employed for the storage and reduction of NOx in the emissions of lean-burn engines at 350 °C. The XRD and XANES/EXAFS results reveal that the active phases in the corresponding catalysts exist as CeO2, Fe2O3, CuO and Co3O4, respectively. Among all the catalysts, CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 exhibits the best performance, which cannot only trap the NOx quickly and completely at lean condition, giving the highest storage capacity (3.32 mmol/g) reported so far, but also reduce the NOx at rich condition, showing a NOx reduction percentage as high as 99.0%. Meanwhile, this catalyst displays an ultralow NOx to N2O selectivity (0.3%) during NOx reduction. The excellent performance of CoOx-K2CO3/K2Ti8O17 results from its largest amount of surface active oxygen species as revealed by XPS, O2-TPD and NO-TPD. HRTEM, FT-IR and CO2-TPD results illustrate that several kinds of K species such as sbnd OK groups, K2O, surface carbonates and bulk or bulk-like carbonates coexist in the catalysts. Based upon the in situ DRIFTS results, the participation of K2CO3 in NOx storage is confirmed, and the predominant NOx storage species is revealed as bidentate nitrites formed via multiple kinetic pathways. The low cost and high catalytic performance of the CoOx-based LNT catalyst make it most promising for the substitution of noble metal-based LNT catalysts.

  17. Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    THERE IS considerable disagreement in the scientific community regarding the carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation (LDR), with publications supporting opposing points of view. However, major flaws have been identified in many of the publications claiming increased cancer risk from LDR. The data generally recognized as the most important for assessing radiation effects in humans, the atomic bomb survivor data, are often cited to raise LDR cancer concerns. However, these data no longer support the linear no-threshold (LNT) model after the 2012 update but are consistent with radiation hormesis. Thus, a resolution of the controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of LDR appears to be imminent, with the rejection of the LNT model and acceptance of radiation hormesis. Hence, for setting radiation protection regulations, an alternative approach to the present one based on the LNT model is needed. One approach would be to determine the threshold dose for the carcinogenic effect of radiation from existing data and establish regulations to ensure radiation doses are kept well below the threshold dose. This can be done by setting dose guidelines specifying safe levels of radiation doses, with the requirement that these safe levels, referred to as guidance levels, not be exceeded significantly. Using this approach, a dose guidance level of 10 cGy for acute radiation exposures and 10 cGy y for exposures over extended periods of time are recommended. The concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, known as ALARA, would no longer be required for low-level radiation exposures not expected to exceed the dose guidance levels significantly. These regulations would facilitate studies using LDR for prevention and treatment of diseases. Results from such studies would be helpful in refining dose guidance levels. The dose guidance levels would be the same for the public and radiation workers to ensure everyone's safety. PMID:26808881

  18. Helical organization of blood coagulation factor VIII on lipid nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jaimy; Dalm, Daniela; Koyfman, Alexey Y; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)(1) is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment(2). Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)(3) is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting(4). Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete(5). Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa(6,7). In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution.

  19. Helical Organization of Blood Coagulation Factor VIII on Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Koyfman, Alexey Y.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM)1 is a powerful approach to investigate the functional structure of proteins and complexes in a hydrated state and membrane environment2. Coagulation Factor VIII (FVIII)3 is a multi-domain blood plasma glycoprotein. Defect or deficiency of FVIII is the cause for Hemophilia type A - a severe bleeding disorder. Upon proteolytic activation, FVIII binds to the serine protease Factor IXa on the negatively charged platelet membrane, which is critical for normal blood clotting4. Despite the pivotal role FVIII plays in coagulation, structural information for its membrane-bound state is incomplete5. Recombinant FVIII concentrate is the most effective drug against Hemophilia type A and commercially available FVIII can be expressed as human or porcine, both forming functional complexes with human Factor IXa6,7. In this study we present a combination of Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), lipid nanotechnology and structure analysis applied to resolve the membrane-bound structure of two highly homologous FVIII forms: human and porcine. The methodology developed in our laboratory to helically organize the two functional recombinant FVIII forms on negatively charged lipid nanotubes (LNT) is described. The representative results demonstrate that our approach is sufficiently sensitive to define the differences in the helical organization between the two highly homologous in sequence (86% sequence identity) proteins. Detailed protocols for the helical organization, Cryo-EM and electron tomography (ET) data acquisition are given. The two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure analysis applied to obtain the 3D reconstructions of human and porcine FVIII-LNT is discussed. The presented human and porcine FVIII-LNT structures show the potential of the proposed methodology to calculate the functional, membrane-bound organization of blood coagulation Factor VIII at high resolution. PMID:24961276

  20. Dose-responses from multi-model inference for the non-cancer disease mortality of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Schöllnberger, H; Kaiser, J C; Jacob, P; Walsh, L

    2012-05-01

    The non-cancer mortality data for cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular diseases from Report 13 on the atomic bomb survivors published by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation were analysed to investigate the dose-response for the influence of radiation on these detrimental health effects. Various parametric and categorical models (such as linear-no-threshold (LNT) and a number of threshold and step models) were analysed with a statistical selection protocol that rated the model description of the data. Instead of applying the usual approach of identifying one preferred model for each data set, a set of plausible models was applied, and a sub-set of non-nested models was identified that all fitted the data about equally well. Subsequently, this sub-set of non-nested models was used to perform multi-model inference (MMI), an innovative method of mathematically combining different models to allow risk estimates to be based on several plausible dose-response models rather than just relying on a single model of choice. This procedure thereby produces more reliable risk estimates based on a more comprehensive appraisal of model uncertainties. For CVD, MMI yielded a weak dose-response (with a risk estimate of about one-third of the LNT model) below a step at 0.6 Gy and a stronger dose-response at higher doses. The calculated risk estimates are consistent with zero risk below this threshold-dose. For mortalities related to cardiovascular diseases, an LNT-type dose-response was found with risk estimates consistent with zero risk below 2.2 Gy based on 90% confidence intervals. The MMI approach described here resolves a dilemma in practical radiation protection when one is forced to select between models with profoundly different dose-responses for risk estimates. PMID:22437350

  1. CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Muntean, George G.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Luo, Jin-Yong; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Szanyi, Janos; Tran, Diana N.; Howden, Ken

    2012-12-31

    CLEERS is a research and development focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY 2012, primary emphasis continued to be placed on the SCR activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies.

  2. CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Mark L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Gao, Feng; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Rappe, Kenneth G.; Szanyi, Janos; Howden, Ken

    2014-12-09

    CLEERS is an R&D focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. This report documents recent results obtained during FY14.

  3. Commentary on Inhaled 239PUO2 in Dogs — A Prophylaxis Against Lung Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Feinendegen, Ludwig E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies on the effect of inhaled plutonium-dioxide particulates and the incidence of lung tumors in dogs reveal beneficial effects when the cumulative alpha-radiation dose is low. There is a threshold at an exposure level of about 100 cGy for excess tumor incidence and reduced lifespan. The observations conform to the expectations of the radiation hormesis dose-response model and contradict the predictions of the LNT hypothesis. These studies suggest investigating the possibility of employing low-dose alpha-radiation, such as from 239PuO2 inhalation, as a prophylaxis against lung cancer. PMID:26675366

  4. Rare events in population genetics: stochastic tunneling in a two-locus model with recombination.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Fischer, Andrej; Krug, Joachim; Szendro, Ivan G

    2011-02-25

    We study the evolution of a population in a two-locus genotype space, in which the negative effects of two single mutations are overcompensated in a high-fitness double mutant. We discuss how the interplay of finite population size N and sexual recombination at rate r affects the escape times t(esc) to the double mutant. For small populations demographic noise generates massive fluctuations in t(esc). The mean escape time varies nonmonotonically with r, and grows exponentially as lnt(esc)∼N(r-r(*))(3/2) beyond a critical value r(*).

  5. Commentary on Inhaled 239PuO2 in Dogs — A Prophylaxis against Lung Cancer?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cuttler, Jerry M.; Feinendegen, Ludwig E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies on the effect of inhaled plutonium-dioxide particulates and the incidence of lung tumors in dogs reveal beneficial effects when the cumulative alpha-radiation dose is low. There is a threshold at an exposure level of about 100 cGy for excess tumor incidence and reduced lifespan. The observations conform to the expectations of the radiation hormesis dose-response model and contradict the predictions of the LNT hypothesis. These studies suggest investigating the possibility of employing low-dose alpha-radiation, such as from 239PuO2 inhalation, as a prophylaxis against lung cancer.

  6. Commentary on Inhaled 239PuO2 in Dogs — A Prophylaxis against Lung Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttler, Jerry M.; Feinendegen, Ludwig E.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies on the effect of inhaled plutonium-dioxide particulates and the incidence of lung tumors in dogs reveal beneficial effects when the cumulative alpha-radiation dose is low. There is a threshold at an exposure level of about 100 cGy for excess tumor incidence and reduced lifespan. The observations conform to the expectations of the radiation hormesis dose-response model and contradict the predictions of the LNT hypothesis. These studies suggest investigating the possibility of employing low-dose alpha-radiation, such as from 239PuO2 inhalation, as a prophylaxis against lung cancer.

  7. New materials for commutation elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Nickolaj; Zolotarjova, E.

    1993-02-01

    New materials for fiber optics based on KBF4-BPO4-LiF and KBF4-BPO4 glasses are present. Transition of fluor-ion from BF4 groups to phosphorous were investigated. New glasses have refractive index lower than 1.430. With these glasses construction of fiber tip was offered. This new tip has a mechanical resistance 2 - 3 larger than polymer analogs, is efficient at LNT and may collect a set of 500 W laser without being destroyed. Corrosion degree of SiO2-glass on several fluor-containing melts was determined under some conditions. These melts appear corrosion activity as under as above the melt.

  8. Residential Radon Appears to Prevent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2011-01-01

    Residential radon has been found to be associated with lung cancer in epidemiological/ecological studies and the researchers have inappropriately concluded that residential radon causes lung cancer. Their conclusion relates to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis-based, risk-assessment paradigm; however, the LNT hypothesis has been invalidated in numerous studies. It is shown in this paper that our hormetic relative risk (HRR) model is consistent with lung cancer data where detailed measurements of radon in each home were carried out. Based on the HRR model, low-level radon radioactive progeny is credited for activated natural protection (ANP) against lung cancer including smoking-related lung cancer. The proportion B(x) (benefit function) of ANP beneficiaries increases as the average radon level x increases to near the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 4 picocuries/L (approximately 150 Bq m−3). As the average level of radon increases to somewhat above the action level, ANP beneficiaries progressively decrease to zero (B(x) decreases to 0), facilitating the occurrence of smoking-related lung cancers as well as those related to other less important risk factors. Thus, residential radon does not appear to cause lung cancer but rather to protect, in an exposure-level-dependent manner, from its induction by other agents (e.g., cigarette-smoke-related carcinogens). PMID:22461755

  9. Simulating the Impact of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions of Particulates and NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Smith, David E

    2013-01-01

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models implemented in Matlab/Simulink to simulate the effect of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated engine is capable of both conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) over real transient driving cycles. Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results demonstrate that, in the simulated conventional vehicle, PCCI can significantly reduce fuel consumption and emissions by reducing the need for LNT and DPF regeneration. However, the opportunity for PCCI operation in the simulated HEV is limited because the engine typically experiences higher loads and multiple stop-start transients that are outside the allowable PCCI operating range. Thus developing ways of extending the PCCI operating range combined with improved control strategies for engine and emissions control management will be especially important for realizing the potential benefits of PCCI in HEVs.

  10. Simulating Study of Premixed Charge Compression Ignition on Light-Duty Diesel Fuel Economy and Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    We utilize the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) combined with transient engine and aftertreatment component models to simulate the impact of premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) on the fuel economy and emissions of light-duty (LD) diesel-powered conventional and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Our simulated aftertreatment train consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), lean NOx trap (LNT), and catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). The results indicate that utilizing PCCI combustion significantly reduces fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions for the conventional diesel-powered vehicle with NOx and particulate emissions controls. These benefits result from a favorable engine speed-load distribution over the cycle combined with a corresponding reduction in the need to regenerate the LNT and DPF. However, the current PCCI technology appears to offer less potential benefit for diesel HEVs equipped with similar emissions controls. This is because PCCI can only be activated over a relatively small part of the drive cycle. Thus we conclude that future utilization of PCCI in diesel HEVs will require significant extension of the available speed-load range for PCCI and revision of current HEV engine management strategies before significant benefits can be realized.

  11. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage in lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianqin; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Chong M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-01

    Lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and particle size, are known to be important factors in determining NOx uptake performance, since Pt provides active sites for NO oxidation to NO2 necessary for storing NOx as nitrates, and for the reduction of nitrates to N2. In this work, the physicochemical properties of Pt in Pt-BaO/Al2O3 LNT catalysts, such as the Pt accessible surface area and particle size, were investigated by using various tools, such as irreversible volumetric H2 chemisorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), following successive reductive treatments at elevated temperatures. NOx uptake activities were also measured to establish a relationship between the properties of Pt and NOx storage following identical high-temperature reductive treatments. We find that the reductive treatments of Pt-BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts at temperatures up to 500 ºC promote a significant increase in NOx uptake explained, in part, by an induced close interaction between Pt and BaO phases in the catalyst, thus enabling facilitation of the NOx storage process.

  12. Shifting the Paradigm in Radiation Safety

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The current radiation safety paradigm using the linear no-threshold (LNT) model is based on the premise that even the smallest amount of radiation may cause mutations increasing the risk of cancer. Autopsy studies have shown that the presence of cancer cells is not a decisive factor in the occurrence of clinical cancer. On the other hand, suppression of immune system more than doubles the cancer risk in organ transplant patients, indicating its key role in keeping occult cancers in check. Low dose radiation (LDR) elevates immune response, and so it may reduce rather than increase the risk of cancer. LNT model pays exclusive attention to DNA damage, which is not a decisive factor, and completely ignores immune system response, which is an important factor, and so is not scientifically justifiable. By not recognizing the importance of the immune system in cancer, and not exploring exercise intervention, the current paradigm may have missed an opportunity to reduce cancer deaths among atomic bomb survivors. Increased antioxidants from LDR may reduce aging-related non-cancer diseases since oxidative damage is implicated in these. A paradigm shift is warranted to reduce further casualties, reduce fear of LDR, and enable investigation of potential beneficial applications of LDR. PMID:23304105

  13. Advanced tensile testing methods for bulk superconductors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, K.; Teshima, H.; Hokari, T.; Sato, T.; Katagiri, K.; Shoji, Y.; Murakami, A.; Hirano, H.

    2006-10-01

    Tensile tests of bulk high Tc superconductors at room temperature have been generally performed by gluing the bulk specimens to Al-alloy rods. Because of the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal stresses were induced at cryogenic temperatures especially near the interface between the specimen and the rods. In this study, tensile testing methods with minimized effect of the thermal stress were tried by using specimens cut from Dy-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. These were: (1) The rod material of Al-alloy was replaced with Ti-alloy, which has the coefficient close to the bulk. (2) The interlayer made of the identical bulk superconductor was inserted between the specimen and the Ti-alloy rod. The nominal tensile strength at the liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) of the specimen glued to the Ti-alloy rods was significantly higher than that glued to the Al-alloy rods. The application of the interlayers increased the strength significantly. The FEM analysis showed that the thermal tensile stress component in the direction of loading axis within the specimen at LNT is markedly reduced by the method (1) and substantially eliminated in the method (2).

  14. Implications of Low Particulate Matter Emissions on System Fuel Efficiency for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y

    2009-01-01

    Advanced diesel combustion regimes such as High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) offer the benefits of reduced engine out NOX and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Lower PM emissions during advanced combustion reduce the demand on diesel particulate filters (DPFs) and can, thereby, reduce the fuel penalty associated with DPF regeneration. In this study, a SiC DPF was loaded and regenerated on a 1.7-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operated in conventional and advanced combustion modes at different speed and load conditions. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a lean NOX trap (LNT) were also installed in the exhaust stream. Five steady-state speed and load conditions were weighted to estimate Federal Test Procedure (FTP) fuel efficiency. The DPF was loaded using lean-rich cycling with frequencies that resulted in similar levels of NOX emissions downstream of the LNT. The pressure drop across the DPF was measured at a standard point (1500 rpm, 5.0 bar) before and after loading, and a P rise rate was determined for comparison between conventional and advanced combustion modes. Higher PM emissions in conventional combustion resulted in a higher rate of backpressure rise across the DPF at all of the load points leading to more frequent DPF regenerations and higher fuel penalty. The fuel penalty during conventional combustion was 4.2% compared with 3.1% for a mixture of conventional and advanced modes.

  15. Urgent Change Needed to Radiation Protection Policy.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M

    2016-03-01

    Although almost 120 y of medical experience and data exist on human exposure to ionizing radiation, advisory bodies and regulators claim there are still significant uncertainties about radiation health risks that require extreme precautions be taken. Decades of evidence led to recommendations in the 1920s for protecting radiologists by limiting their daily exposure. These were shown in later studies to decrease both their overall mortality and cancer mortality below those of unexposed groups. In the 1950s, without scientific evidence, the National Academy of Sciences Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee and the NCRP recommended that the linear no-threshold (LNT) model be used to assess the risk of radiation-induced mutations in germ cells and the risk of cancer in somatic cells. This policy change was accepted by the regulators of every country without a thorough review of its basis. Because use of the LNT model has created extreme public fear of radiation, which impairs vital medical applications of low-dose radiation in diagnostics and therapy and blocks nuclear energy projects, it is time to change radiation protection policy back into line with the data.

  16. Simulation of lean NOx trap performance with microkinetic chemistry and without mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Rich; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Chakravarthy, V. Kalyana

    2011-08-01

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, barium oxide (NO{sub x} storage), and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used in conjunction with a transient plug flow reactor code to simulate not only conventional storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a steady state code. The results show that NO{sub x} storage is not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all of the gas phase species involved. It is found that, with a few minor exceptions, all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with these purely kinetic simulations, i.e., without including mass-transfer limitations. In addition to accounting for normal cycling behavior, the final mechanism should provide a starting point for the description of further LNT phenomena such as desulfation and the role of alternative reductants.

  17. Evidence supporting radiation hormesis in atomic bomb survivor cancer mortality data.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2012-12-01

    A recent update on the atomic bomb survivor cancer mortality data has concluded that excess relative risk (ERR) for solid cancers increases linearly with dose and that zero dose is the best estimate for the threshold, apparently validating the present use of the linear no threshold (LNT) model for estimating the cancer risk from low dose radiation. A major flaw in the standard ERR formalism for estimating cancer risk from radiation (and other carcinogens) is that it ignores the potential for a large systematic bias in the measured baseline cancer mortality rate, which can have a major effect on the ERR values. Cancer rates are highly variable from year to year and between adjacent regions and so the likelihood of such a bias is high. Calculations show that a correction for such a bias can lower the ERRs in the atomic bomb survivor data to negative values for intermediate doses. This is consistent with the phenomenon of radiation hormesis, providing a rational explanation for the decreased risk of cancer observed at intermediate doses for which there is no explanation based on the LNT model. The recent atomic bomb survivor data provides additional evidence for radiation hormesis in humans.

  18. Locally nonlinear transformation for facial image superresolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao; Huang, Hua

    2013-02-01

    Reconstruction of a high-resolution face image, from a low-resolution observation based on a set of high- and low-resolution training image pairs, is an important problem for optical engineering applications. In this paper, we study this facial superresolution problem and propose a novel locally nonlinear transformation based approach. Multiple locally nonlinear transformation are utilized to approximate the global nonlinear connections between low resolution (LR)/high resolution (HR) images. LR/HR images are initially divided into multiple pairs of patches with the corresponding position information. As facial images are highly structured, patches at the same position spanned a subspace. Since the curse of dimensionality is avoided in these subspaces (patches in the same position), the Euclidean distance can express the intrinsic "radial" between samples in the same subspace. Therefore, multiple radial basis functions are utilized to approximate the nonlinear mapping between LR/HR pairs at each position from training examples. The proposed locally nonlinear transformation (LNT)-based reconstruction is achieved by applying the learned nonlinear transformation to each position patch of an LR input. The final SR results are obtained by refining the LNT reconstruction by the projection onto a convex sets algorithm using the consistency constraint. Extensive experiments on benchmark databases and real world images validate the superiority of the proposed method.

  19. Urgent Change Needed to Radiation Protection Policy.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M

    2016-03-01

    Although almost 120 y of medical experience and data exist on human exposure to ionizing radiation, advisory bodies and regulators claim there are still significant uncertainties about radiation health risks that require extreme precautions be taken. Decades of evidence led to recommendations in the 1920s for protecting radiologists by limiting their daily exposure. These were shown in later studies to decrease both their overall mortality and cancer mortality below those of unexposed groups. In the 1950s, without scientific evidence, the National Academy of Sciences Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee and the NCRP recommended that the linear no-threshold (LNT) model be used to assess the risk of radiation-induced mutations in germ cells and the risk of cancer in somatic cells. This policy change was accepted by the regulators of every country without a thorough review of its basis. Because use of the LNT model has created extreme public fear of radiation, which impairs vital medical applications of low-dose radiation in diagnostics and therapy and blocks nuclear energy projects, it is time to change radiation protection policy back into line with the data. PMID:26808879

  20. Resting metabolism and heat increment of feeding in mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi) and Chinese snakehead (Channa argus).

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Cui, Y; Liu, J

    2000-10-01

    Resting metabolism was measured in immature mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi weighing 42.1-510.2 g and Chinese snakehead Channa argus weighing 41.5-510.3 g at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 degrees C. Heat increment of feeding was measured in mandarin fish weighing 202.0 (+/-14.0) g and snakehead weighing 200.8 (+/-19.3) g fed swamp loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus at 1% body weight per day at 28 degrees C. In both species, weight exponent in the power relationship between resting metabolism and body weight was not affected by temperature. The relationship between resting metabolism and temperature could be described by a power function. The temperature exponent was 1.39 in mandarin fish and 2.10 in snakehead (P<0.05), indicating that resting metabolism in snakehead increased with temperature at a faster rate than in mandarin fish. Multiple regression models were used to describe the effects of body weight (W, g) and temperature (T, degrees C) on the resting metabolism (R(s), mg O(2)/h): lnR(s)=-5.343+0.772 lnW+1.387 lnT for the mandarin fish and lnR(s)=-7.863+0.801 lnW+2.104 lnT for the Chinese snakehead. The proportion of food energy channelled to heat increment was 8.7% in mandarin fish and 6.8% in snakehead.

  1. Oscillatory characteristics of metallic nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Reza; Darvizeh, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    This study is concerned with the oscillatory behavior of metallic nanoparticles, and in particular silver and gold nanoparticles, inside lipid nanotubes (LNTs) using the continuum approximation along with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function. The nanoparticle is modeled as a dense sphere and the LNT is assumed to be comprised of six layers including two head groups, two intermediate layers and two tail groups. To evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions, analytical expressions are first derived through undertaking surface and volume integrals which are then validated by a fully numerical scheme based on the differential quadrature (DQ) technique. Using the actual force distribution between the two interacting molecules, the equation of motion is directly solved utilizing the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of the inner core. Also, a semi-analytical expression incorporating both geometrical parameters and initial conditions is introduced for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. A comprehensive study is conducted to gain an insight into the influences of nanoparticle radius, LNT length, head and tail group thicknesses and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of the metallic nanoparticles inside LNTs. It is found that the escape velocity and oscillation frequency of silver nanoparticles are higher than those of gold ones. It is further shown that the oscillation frequency is less affected by the tail group thickness when compared to the head group thickness.

  2. Radon Treatment Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Strzelczyk, Jadwiga (Jodi)

    2006-01-01

    In spite of long traditions, treatments utilizing radon-rich air or water have not been unequivocally embraced by modern medicine. The objective of this work is to examine factors that contribute to this continuing controversy. While the exact mechanism of radon's effect on human body is not completely understood, recent advances in radiobiology offer new insights into biochemical processes occurring at low-level exposures to ionizing radiation. Medical evidence and patients' testimonials regarding effectiveness of radon spa treatments of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis are accumulating worldwide. They challenge the premise of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) theory that the dose-effect response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. Historically, such inference overshadowed scientific inquiries into the low-dose region and lead to a popular belief that no amount of radiation can be good. Fortunately, the LNT theory, which lacks any scientific basis, did not remain unchallenged. As the reviewed literature suggests, a paradigm shift, reflected in the consideration of hormetic effects at low-doses, is gaining momentum in the scientific community worldwide. The impetus comes from significant evidence of adaptive and stimulatory effects of low-levels of radiation on human immune system. PMID:18648641

  3. Assembly of single-stranded polydeoxyadenylic acid and β-glucan probed by the sensing platform of graphene oxide based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingye; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lina; Luo, Xudong; Liang, Yi

    2013-05-01

    Based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA), the present study reported proof-of-principle for a highly sensitive and rapid detection technique that can be precisely utilized for investigating the self-assembly of polydeoxyadenylic acid (poly(dA)) and β-glucan, and the interactions of the poly(dA)-β-glucan complex on the surface of graphene oxide (GO). Due to the noncovalent assembly of fluorescein amidite (FAM)-labeled poly(dA) and GO via π-π stacking, the fluorescence of (FAM)-labeled poly(dA) as a molecular aptamer beacon (MAB) was completely quenched by GO. Conversely, the addition of single-stranded lentinan (s-LNT) resulted in the significant restoration of fluorescence due to the formation of poly(dA)-s-LNT complexes with a stiff rod-like structure, which had a weak affinity to GO and kept the dyes away from GO. However, relatively weak fluorescence restoration was observed by adding another single-stranded curdlan (s-CUR) for positive control, indicative of complex formation with higher binding ability to GO. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) was also combined to confirm the occurrence with different increments of anisotropy relative to the free poly(dA), which could be conveniently extended for detecting the assembly of other biomolecules with higher sensitivity.

  4. The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Training on Speech in Noise Perception and Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Adults with Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Nathan; Purdy, Suzanne C; Sharma, Mridula; Giles, Ellen; Narne, Vijay

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether a short intensive psychophysical auditory training program is associated with speech perception benefits and changes in cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Ten adult implant recipients trained approximately 7 hours on psychophysical tasks (Gap-in-Noise Detection, Frequency Discrimination, Spectral Rippled Noise [SRN], Iterated Rippled Noise, Temporal Modulation). Speech performance was assessed before and after training using Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT) words in quiet and in eight-speaker babble. CAEPs evoked by a natural speech stimulus /baba/ with varying syllable stress were assessed pre- and post-training, in quiet and in noise. SRN psychophysical thresholds showed a significant improvement (78% on average) over the training period, but performance on other psychophysical tasks did not change. LNT scores in noise improved significantly post-training by 11% on average compared with three pretraining baseline measures. N1P2 amplitude changed post-training for /baba/ in quiet (p = 0.005, visit 3 pretraining versus visit 4 post-training). CAEP changes did not correlate with behavioral measures. CI recipients' clinical records indicated a plateau in speech perception performance prior to participation in the study. A short period of intensive psychophysical training produced small but significant gains in speech perception in noise and spectral discrimination ability. There remain questions about the most appropriate type of training and the duration or dosage of training that provides the most robust outcomes for adults with CIs. PMID:27587925

  5. Aminoacylation of the N-terminal cysteine is essential for Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes but does not depend on lipoprotein sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ayumu; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Hara, Takashi; Nakayama, Jiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-11-01

    Lipoproteins are present in a wide variety of bacteria and are anchored to membranes through lipids attached to the N-terminal cysteine. The Lol system of Escherichia coli mediates the membrane-specific localization of lipoproteins. Aspartate at position 2 functions as a Lol avoidance signal and causes the retention of lipoproteins in the inner membrane, whereas lipoproteins having residues other than aspartate at position 2 are released from the inner membrane and localized to the outer membrane by the Lol system. Phospholipid:apolipoprotein transacylase, Lnt, catalyzes the last step of lipoprotein modification, converting apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein. To reveal the importance of this aminoacylation for the Lol-dependent membrane localization, apolipoproteins were prepared by inhibiting lipoprotein maturation. Lnt was also purified and used to convert apolipoprotein into mature lipoprotein in vitro. The release of these lipoproteins was examined in proteoliposomes. We show here that the aminoacylation is essential for the Lol-dependent release of lipoproteins from membranes. Furthermore, lipoproteins with aspartate at position 2 were found to be aminoacylated both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that the lipoprotein-sorting signal does not affect lipid modification.

  6. Origin of the infrared to visible upconversion mechanisms in Nd 3+-doped potassium lead chloride crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendioroz, A.; Balda, R.; Al-Saleh, M.; Fernández, J.

    2005-10-01

    The infrared to visible upconversion mechanisms of Nd3+ ions in potassium lead chloride crystal have been investigated at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). We have observed upconversion luminescence when pumping into both 4F3/2 and 4F5/2 bands and off-resonance, at 851 and 856 nm. The main bands appearing in the emission spectra are two blue bands located at 420 and 435 nm, corresponding to transitions 4D3/2 → 4I13/2 and 2P1/2 → 4I9/2 respectively, and green, orange and red emissions, located at 535, 595 and 668 nm, corresponding to 4G7/2-4G9/2 → 4I9/2, 4I11/2, 4I13/2 transitions, respectively. The results show that, upon excitation of either the 4F3/2 or 4F5/2 band at LNT, two- and three-body energy transfer upconversion process are responsible for the emissions coming from levels 4G7/2-4G9/2 (535, 595, and 668 nm) and 4D3/2 (420 nm), respectively. However, the experimental data indicate that the mechanisms leading to the luminescence coming from level 2P1/2 depend on the pumping wavelength and sample temperature.

  7. Application of Low Dose Radiation Adaptive Response to Control Aging-Related Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative damage has been implicated in the pathogenesis of most aging-related diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Antioxidant supplementation has been found to be ineffective in reducing such diseases, but increased endogenous production of antioxidants from the adaptive response due to physical and cognitive exercises (which increase oxidative metabolism and oxidative stress) has been effective in reducing some of the diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR), which increases oxidative stress and results in adaptive response of increased antioxidants, may provide an alternative method of controlling the aging-related diseases. We have studied the effect of LDR on the induction of adaptive response in rat brains and the effectiveness of the LDR in reducing the oxidative damage caused by subsequent high dose radiation. We have also investigated the effect of LDR on apomorphine-induced rotations in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) unilaterally-lesioned rat model of Parkinson?s disease (PD). LDR was observed to initiate an adaptive response in the brain, and reduce the oxidative damage from subsequent high dose radiation exposure, confirming the effectiveness of LDR adaptive response in reducing the oxidative damage from the free radicals due to high dose radiation. LDR resulted in a slight improvement in Tyrosine hydroxylase expression on the lesioned side of substantia nigra (indicative of its protective effect on the dopaminergic neurons), and reduced the behavioral symptoms in the 6-OHDA rat model of PD. Translation of this concept to humans, if found to be applicable, may be a possible approach for controlling the progression of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Since any translation of the concept to humans would be hindered by the currently prevalent carcinogenic concerns regarding LDR based on the linear no-threshold (LNT) model, we have also studied the justifications for the use of the LNT model. One of the shortcomings of the LNT model is that it

  8. Nonlinear threshold effect in the Z-scan method of characterizing limiters for high-intensity laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, S. A.; Savelyev, M. S.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Selishchev, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    A threshold model is described which permits one to determine the properties of limiters for high-powered laser light. It takes into account the threshold characteristics of the nonlinear optical interaction between the laser beam and the limiter working material. The traditional non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model when the limiting threshold is zero. The nonlinear characteristics of carbon nanotubes in liquid and solid media are obtained from experimental Z-scan data. Specifically, the nonlinear threshold effect was observed for aqueous dispersions of nanotubes, but not for nanotubes in solid polymethylmethacrylate. The threshold model fits the experimental Z-scan data better than the non-threshold model. Output characteristics were obtained that integrally describe the nonlinear properties of the optical limiters.

  9. Effect of Aging on the NOx Storage and Regeneration Characteristics of Fully Formulated Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Easterling, Vencon; Graham, Uschi; Fisk, Courtney; Crocker, Mark; Choi, Jae-Soon

    2011-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of washcoat composition on lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) aging characteristics, fully formulated monolithic LNT catalysts containing varying amounts of Pt, Rh and BaO were subjected to accelerated aging on a bench reactor. Subsequent catalyst evaluation revealed that in all cases aging resulted in deterioration of the NO{sub x} conversion as a consequence of impaired NO{sub x} storage and NO{sub x} reduction functions, while increased selectivity to NH{sub 3} was observed in the temperature range 250--450 C. Elemental analysis, H{sub 2} chemisorption and TEM data revealed two main changes which account for the degradation in LNT performance. First, residual sulfur in the catalysts, associated with the Ba phase, decreased catalyst NO{sub x} storage capacity. Second, sintering of the precious metals in the washcoat occurred, resulting in decreased contact between the Pt and Ba, and hence in less efficient NO{sub x} spillover from Pt to Ba during NO{sub x} adsorption, as well as decreased rates of reductant spillover from Pt to Ba and reverse NO{sub x} spillover during catalyst regeneration. For the aged catalysts, halving the Pt loading from 100 to 50 g/ft{sup 3} was found to result in a significant decrease in overall NO{sub x} conversion, while for catalysts with the same 100 g/ft{sup 3} Pt loading, increasing the relative amount of Pt on the NO{sub x} storage components (BaO and La-stabilized CeO{sub 2}), as opposed to an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support material (where it was co-located with Rh), was found to be beneficial. The effect of Rh loading on aged catalyst performance was found to be marginal within the range studied (10--20 g/ft{sup 3}), as was the effect of BaO loading in the range 30--45 g/L.

  10. Observation of suppressed Auger mechanism in type-I quantum well structures with delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hassani Nia, Iman; Fathipour, Vala; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-15

    We report the first observation of non-threshold Auger mechanism for a quantum well structure with Type-I band alignment. Excitation-dependent photoluminescence measurements were used to extract the Auger recombination coefficients from 77 K up to room temperature. The results verify the role of interface mediated momentum exchange as well as suppression of Auger recombination for delocalized electron-hole wavefunctions.

  11. Ultrasonic disruption of fungal mycelia for efficient recovery of polysaccharide-protein complexes from viscous fermentation broth of a medicinal fungus.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yi-Ching; Liu, Xing-Xun; Wang, Wing-Qiang; Wu, Jian-Yong

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound (US) was applied to facilitate the extraction of intracellular and extracellular polysaccharide-protein complexes (PSPs) from the viscous mycelial fermentation broth of a medicinal fungus Cordyceps sinensis Cs-HK1. The US treatment caused the disruption of fungal mycelia, a dramatic reduction of the apparent broth viscosity, and the release of intracellular products into the liquid medium. The degree of mycelium disruption and the rate of intracellular product release were dependent on US power intensity, treatment period and biomass concentration of broth. The extraction or release kinetics of total water-soluble products and PSPs (yield Y versus time t) under the effect of US was fitted closely to the Elovich model Y=Yo+Y1 lnt and parabolic model Y=Yo+Y1t(½), respectively. Another interesting effect of the US treatment was a notable increase in the antioxidant cytoprotective activity of PSP against H2O2 induced cell death.

  12. A Perspective on the Scientific, Philosophical, and Policy Dimensions of Hormesis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, George R.

    2009-01-01

    The hormesis concept has broad implications for biology and the biomedical sciences. This perspective on hormesis concentrates on toxicology and toxicological risk assessment and secondarily explores observations from other fields. It considers the varied manifestations of hormesis in the context of a broad family of biological stress responses. Evidence for hormesis is reviewed, and the hormesis model is contrasted with more widely accepted dose-response models in toxicology: a linear nonthreshold (LNT) model for mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, and a threshold model for most other toxicologic effects. Scientific, philosophical, and political objections to the hormesis concept are explored, and complications in the hormesis concept are analyzed. The review concludes with a perspective on the current state of hormesis and challenges that the hormesis model poses for risk assessment. PMID:19343115

  13. Inkjet printing technology and conductive inks synthesis for microfabrication techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien Dang, Mau; Dung Dang, Thi My; Fribourg-Blanc, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Inkjet printing is an advanced technique which reliably reproduces text, images and photos on paper and some other substrates by desktop printers and is now used in the field of materials deposition. This interest in maskless materials deposition is coupled with the development of microfabrication techniques for the realization of circuits or patterns on flexible substrates for which printing techniques are of primary interest. This paper is a review of some results obtained in inkjet printing technology to develop microfabrication techniques at Laboratory for Nanotechnology (LNT). Ink development, in particular conductive ink, study of printed patterns, as well as application of these to the realization of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags on flexible substrates, are presented. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  14. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  15. Effect of Ceria on the Sulfation and Desulfation Characteristics of a Model Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yaying; Toops, Todd J; Crocker, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ceria addition on the sulfation and desulfation characteristics of a model Ba-based lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) catalyst was studied. According to DRIFTS and NO{sub x} storage capacity measurements, ceria is able to store sulfur during catalyst exposure to SO{sub 2}, thereby helping to limit sulfation of the main (Ba) NO{sub x} storage phase and maintain NO{sub x} storage capacity. Temperature programmed desulfation experiments revealed that desulfation of a model ceria-containing catalyst occurred in two stages, corresponding to sulfur elimination from the ceria phase at {approx}450 C, followed by sulfur loss from the Ba phase at {approx}650 C. Significantly, the ceria-containing catalyst displayed relatively lower sulfur evolution from the Ba phase than its non-ceria analog, confirming that the presence of ceria lessened the degree of sulfur accumulation on the Ba phase.

  16. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Engang; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Wang, Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Caro, Jose A.

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  17. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive.

  18. A Fast Method of Transforming Relaxation Functions Into the Frequency Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mopsik, Frederick I.

    1999-01-01

    The limits to the error due to truncation of the numeric integration of the one-sided Laplace transform of a relaxation function in the time domain into its equivalent frequency domain are established. Separate results are given for large and small ω. These results show that, for a given ω, only a restricted range of time samples is needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. These results are then combined with a known error estimate for integration by cubic splines to give a good estimate for the number of points needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. For a given data window between t1 and t2, the computation time is shown to be proportional to ln(t1/t2).

  19. Compliance of Royal Naval ships with nitrogen oxide emissions legislation.

    PubMed

    Blatcher, D J; Eames, I

    2013-09-15

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from marine diesel engines pose a hazard to human health and the environment. From 2021, demanding emissions limits are expected to be applied to sea areas that the Royal Navy (RN) accesses. We analyze how these future constraints affect the choice of NOx abatement systems for RN ships, which are subject to more design constraints than civilian ships. A weighted matrix approach is used to facilitate a quantitative assessment. For most warships to be built soon after 2021 Lean Nitrogen Traps (LNT) in conjunction with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) represents a relatively achievable option with fewer drawbacks than other system types. Urea-selective catalytic reduction is likely to be most appropriate for ships that are built to civilian standards. The future technologies that are at an early stage of development are discussed. PMID:23906471

  20. Defect Based Spin Mediation in Delta-Phase Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Wirth, B D; Wall, M; Felter, T E; Caturla, M J; Kubota, A; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2003-11-19

    We earlier reported the measured decrease of electrical resistivity during isochronal-annealing of ion irradiation damage that was accumulated at low-temperature (10 or 20K), and the temperature dependence of the resistance of defect-populations produced by low-temperature damage-accumulation and annealing in a stabilized {delta}-phase plutonium alloy, Pu(3.3 at%Ga)[1]. We noted that the temperature dependence of the resistance of defects resulting from low-temperature damage accumulation and subsequent annealing exhibits a -ln(T) temperature dependence suggestive of a Kondo impurity. A discussion of a possible ''structure-property'' effect, as it might relate to the nature of the {delta}-phase of Pu, is presented.

  1. THE NEGLECTED SIDE OF THE COIN: QUANTITATIVE BENEFIT-RISK ANALYSES IN MEDICAL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Zanzonico, Pat B.

    2016-01-01

    While it is implicitly recognized that the benefits of diagnostic imaging far outweigh any theoretical radiogenic risks, quantitative estimates of the benefits are rarely, if ever, juxtaposed with quantitative estimates of risk. This alone - expression of benefit in purely qualitative terms versus expression of risk in quantitative, and therefore seemingly more certain, terms - may well contribute to a skewed sense of the relative benefits and risks of diagnostic imaging among healthcare providers as well as patients. The current paper, therefore, briefly compares the benefits of diagnostic imaging in several cases, based on actual mortality or morbidity data if ionizing radiation were not employed, with theoretical estimates of radiogenic cancer mortality based on the “linear no-threshold” (LNT) dose-response model. PMID:26808890

  2. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data.

    PubMed

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Sanders, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Cohen's lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m(3). The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m(3).

  3. The Neglected Side of the Coin: Quantitative Benefit-risk Analyses in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zanzonico, Pat B

    2016-03-01

    While it is implicitly recognized that the benefits of diagnostic imaging far outweigh any theoretical radiogenic risks, quantitative estimates of the benefits are rarely, if ever, juxtaposed with quantitative estimates of risk. This alone - expression of benefit in purely qualitative terms versus expression of risk in quantitative, and therefore seemingly more certain, terms - may well contribute to a skewed sense of the relative benefits and risks of diagnostic imaging among healthcare providers as well as patients. The current paper, therefore, briefly compares the benefits of diagnostic imaging in several cases, based on actual mortality or morbidity data if ionizing radiation were not employed, with theoretical estimates of radiogenic cancer mortality based on the "linear no-threshold" (LNT) dose-response model. PMID:26808890

  4. Label-free detection of cell-contractile activity with lipid nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Kaori; Delai, Marco; Mahnna, Rami; Kusch, Justine; Poulikakos, Dimos; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Ferrari, Aldo

    2013-02-01

    Surface-bound self-assembled lipid nanotubes (LNTs) made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) were used to visualize the contractile activity of spreading cells. The interaction of cells with LNTs resulted in the nucleation of new nanotubes, directed toward the cell center, from existing ones. This process depended on cell generated forces and required acto-myosin mediated contractility. The dynamics of de novo generation of LNTs upon cell spreading was captured using optical microscopy on fluorescently labeled nanotubes and revealed characteristic fingerprints for different cell types such as fibroblasts, endothelial and melanoma cells. Additionally, the method was applied to detect the effect of a specific inhibitor on the generation of cellular forces. The mechanism of the LNT-cell interaction and the potential applications are discussed.

  5. Threshold for Radon-Induced Lung Cancer From Inhaled Plutonium Data

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Cohen’s lung cancer mortality data, from his test of the LNT theory, do not extend to the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) above which inhaled radon decay products begin to induce excess lung cancer mortality. Since there is concern about the level of radon in homes, it is important to set the radon limit near the NOAEL to avoid the risk of losing a health benefit. Assuming that dogs model humans, data from a study on inhaled plutonium dioxide particulates in dogs were assessed, and the NOAEL for radon-induced lung tumors was estimated to be about 2100 Bq/m3. The US Environmental Protection Agency should consider raising its radon action level from 150 to at least 1000 Bq/m3. PMID:26740812

  6. Correlation between structural and optical properties of GaN epi-layers by the cathodoluminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Nasr, F.; Guermazi, H.; Guermazi, S.

    2016-06-01

    Structural and optical properties of GaN epi-layers were investigated. The X-ray diffraction and the SEM observations show a predominant hexagonal structure with minor cubic GaN microcristallites. Experimental results of cathodoluminescence (CL) were reported at room temperature (RT) and low nitrogen temperature (LNT). CL signals show ultraviolet (UV) light emission arising from a large band gap (3 to 3.5eV), a yellow band (YB) around 2.2eV and a peak at 1.73eV due to porous silicon. Simulation CL profiles show good agreement with experimental results when we take into account the minor cubic phase contribution. Our attention was also focused on the study of the effects of temperature, electron beam energy, and residual strain on the individual CL signal from both h-GaN and c-GaN phases.

  7. Similarity of the leading contributions to the self-energy and the thermodynamics in two- and three-dimensional Fermi Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, D.; Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    We compare the self-energy and entropy of a two- and three-dimensional Fermi Liquids (FLs) using a model with a contact interaction between fermions. For a two-dimensional (2D) FL we find that there are T[sup 2] contributions to the entropy from interactions separate from those due to the collective modes. These T[sup 2] contributions arise from nonanalytic corrections to the real part of the self-energy and areanalogous to T[sup 3]lnT contributions present in the entropy of a three-dimensional (3D) FL. The difference between the 2D and 3D results arises solely from the different phase space factors.

  8. Similarity of the leading contributions to the self-energy and the thermodynamics in two- and three-dimensional Fermi Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, D.; Bedell, K.S.

    1993-05-01

    We compare the self-energy and entropy of a two- and three-dimensional Fermi Liquids (FLs) using a model with a contact interaction between fermions. For a two-dimensional (2D) FL we find that there are T{sup 2} contributions to the entropy from interactions separate from those due to the collective modes. These T{sup 2} contributions arise from nonanalytic corrections to the real part of the self-energy and areanalogous to T{sup 3}lnT contributions present in the entropy of a three-dimensional (3D) FL. The difference between the 2D and 3D results arises solely from the different phase space factors.

  9. Compliance of Royal Naval ships with nitrogen oxide emissions legislation.

    PubMed

    Blatcher, D J; Eames, I

    2013-09-15

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from marine diesel engines pose a hazard to human health and the environment. From 2021, demanding emissions limits are expected to be applied to sea areas that the Royal Navy (RN) accesses. We analyze how these future constraints affect the choice of NOx abatement systems for RN ships, which are subject to more design constraints than civilian ships. A weighted matrix approach is used to facilitate a quantitative assessment. For most warships to be built soon after 2021 Lean Nitrogen Traps (LNT) in conjunction with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) represents a relatively achievable option with fewer drawbacks than other system types. Urea-selective catalytic reduction is likely to be most appropriate for ships that are built to civilian standards. The future technologies that are at an early stage of development are discussed.

  10. Following fluctuating signs: Anomalous active superdiffusion of swimmers in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John; Löwen, Hartmut; Wensink, Henricus H.

    2016-06-01

    Active (i.e., self-propelled or swimming) particles moving through an isotropic fluid exhibit conventional diffusive behavior. We report anomalous diffusion of an active particle moving in an anisotropic nematic background. While the translational motion parallel to the nematic director shows ballistic behavior, the long-time transverse motion is superdiffusive, with an anomalous scaling proportional to t lnt of the mean-square displacement with time t . This behavior is predicted by an analytical theory that we present here and is corroborated by numerical simulation of active particle diffusion in a simple lattice model for a nematic liquid crystal. It is universal for any collection of self-propelled elements (e.g., bacteria or active rods) moving in a nematic background, provided only that the swimmers are sufficiently dilute that their interactions with each other can be neglected and that they do not perform hairpin turns.

  11. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior and spin fluctuations in doped UAl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, F.; Blanckenhagen, G.v.; Stewart, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Using the canonical spin-fluctuation system UAl{sub 2} as a starting point, via negative chemical pressure (doping with Y) we have expanded d{sub U-U} in a system known to be near the Hill limit of f-electron localization, and characterized the samples via resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and specific-heat measurements. All system parameters, including magnetic susceptibility, specific heat {gamma} ({equivalent_to}C/Tlim{sub T{r_arrow}0}), and spin-fluctuation temperature, behave monotonically. For U{sub 1{minus}x}Y{sub x}Al{sub 2}, 0.30{le}x{le}0.70, spin-glass behavior is found with T{sub f}{approx_equal};5.1{plus_minus}0.5 K. This spin-glass behavior weakens (T{sub f} sinks, smaller magnetic signature, no specific-heat anomaly) for x{ge}0.75 while, at the same time, the spin-fluctuation T{sup 3}lnT term also gradually disappears from the specific heat. For x{ge}0.875, a non-Fermi-liquid (nFl) lnT term is found in the low temperature C/T. This new, perhaps equilibrium, ground state persists upon further dilution of the U ions with Y. Thus, we report on the evolution of nFl behavior in the neighborhood of a spin-glass ground state but, indeed, directly out of a yet weaker form of magnetism than heretofore reported, that of spin fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Rad-by-Rad (Bit-by-Bit): Triumph of Evidence Over Activities Fostering Fear of Radiogenic Cancers at Low Doses

    PubMed Central

    Strzelczyk, J.; Potter, W.; Zdrojewicz, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Large segments of Western populations hold sciences in low esteem. This trend became particularly pervasive in the field of radiation sciences in recent decades. The resulting lack of knowledge, easily filled with fear that feeds on itself, makes people susceptible to prevailing dogmas. Decades-long moratorium on nuclear power in the US, resentment of “anything nuclear”, and delay/refusal to obtain medical radiation procedures are some of the societal consequences. The problem has been exacerbated by promulgation of the linear-no-threshold (LNT) dose response model by advisory bodies such as the ICRP, NCRP and others. This model assumes no safe level of radiation and implies that response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. The most recent (June 2005) report from the National Research Council, BEIR VII (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) continues this approach and quantifies potential cancer risks at low doses by linear extrapolation of risk values obtained from epidemiological observations of populations exposed to high doses, 0.2 Sv to 3 Sv. It minimizes the significance of a lack of evidence for adverse effects in populations exposed to low doses, and discounts documented beneficial effects of low dose exposures on the human immune system. The LNT doctrine is in direct conflict with current findings of radiobiology and important features of modern radiation oncology. Fortunately, these aspects are addressed in-depth in another major report—issued jointly in March 2005 by two French Academies, of Sciences and of Medicine. The latter report is much less publicized, and thus it is a responsibility of radiation professionals, physicists, nuclear engineers, and physicians to become familiar with its content and relevant studies, and to widely disseminate this information. To counteract biased media, we need to be creative in developing means of sharing good news about radiation with co-workers, patients, and the general public. PMID

  13. Collective dose: Dogma, tool, or trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.

    1996-12-31

    In Europe as well as in the United States, the argument continues in the radiation protection community between the {open_quotes}fundamentalists,{close_quotes} who firmly believe in the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis and the closely related concept of collective dose, and {open_quotes}pragmatists,{close_quotes} who have serious doubts about these concepts for both radiobiological and socioeconomic reasons. The latter view is reflected in many recent compilations in the scientific literature, in particular in the books by G. Walinder and S. Kondo. The fundamentalist view has been expressed in other recent publications. What has been described as the good old boys` network of the establishment threatens nonbelievers with excommunication: in his 1996 Sievert lecture, D. Beninson described doubts about the LNT hypothesis as {open_quotes}arrogant ignorance{close_quotes}; A. Gonzales, in a 1995 letter to the author, described them as {open_quotes}intellectual laziness{close_quotes}; and R. Clarke, chairman of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), during the 1996 IRPA Congress, described them as {open_quotes}seriously misguided.{close_quotes} Threshold or no threshold, that is the question - the most important one for this and the next generation of health physicists. Corrections of the current dogmas are needed soon and should be initiated not only by the nuclear community (which may be blamed by opinion makers for a biased view) but by those members of the radiation protection community, who are not only interested in order to `keep the hazard alive` for reasons of publicity, research funding, and sales of instruments and services. The International Atomic Energy Agency will devote a symposium to these questions next year. The results should be interesting.

  14. Autocrine VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 signaling promotes survival in human glioblastoma models in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Emese; Schneider, Hannah; Seystahl, Katharina; Rushing, Elisabeth Jane; Herting, Frank; Weidner, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) system has become a prime target for antiangiogenic treatment, its biological role in glioblastoma beyond angiogenesis has remained controversial. Methods Using neutralizing antibodies to VEGF or placental growth factor (PlGF) or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, cediranib, or lentiviral gene silencing, we delineated autocrine signaling in glioma cell lines. The in vivo effects of VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 depletion were evaluated in orthotopic glioma xenograft models. Results VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 modulated glioma cell clonogenicity, viability, and invasiveness in vitro in an autocrine, cell–line-specific manner. VEGFR1 silencing promoted mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling, whereas VEGFR2 silencing resulted in cell-type dependent activation of the protein kinase B (PKB)/AKT and MAPK/ERK pathways. These responses may represent specific escape mechanisms from VEGFR inhibition. The survival of orthotopic glioma-bearing mice was prolonged upon VEGFR1 silencing in the LNT-229, LN-308, and U87MG models and upon VEGFR2 silencing in LN-308 and U87MG. Disruption of VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 signaling was associated with decreased tumor size, increased tumor necrosis, or loss of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) immunoreactivity. Neutralizing VEGF and PlGF by specific antibodies was superior to either antibody treatment alone in the VEGFR1-dependent LNT-229 model. Conclusions Differential dependence on autocrine signaling through VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 suggests a need for biomarker–stratified VEGF(R)-based therapeutic approaches to glioblastoma. PMID:27009237

  15. Characteristics of Pt-K/MgAl2O4 lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu K.; Szanyi, Janos; Zhu, Haiyang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-04-30

    We report the various characteristics of Pt-K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts including the effect of K loading on nitrate formation/decomposition, NOx storage activity and durability. Upon the adsorption of NO{sub 2} on K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples, potassium nitrates formed on Mg-related sites in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} support are observed, in addition to the typical two potassium nitrates (ionic and bidentate) formed also on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported sample. Based on NO{sub 2} TPD and FTIR results, the Mg-bound KNO{sub 3} thermally decompose at higher temperature than Al-bound KNO{sub 3}, implying its superior thermal stability. At a potassium loading of 5wt%, the temperature of maximum NOx uptake (T{sub max}) is 300 C. Increasing the potassium loading from 5wt% to 10 wt%, the T{sub max} gradually shifted from 300 C to 450 C, indicating the dependence of T{sub max} on the potassium loading. However, increase in potassium loading above 10 wt% only gives rise to the reduction in the overall NOx storage capacity. This work also underlines the obstacles these materials have prior to their practical application (e.g., durability and sulfur poisoning/ removal). This work provides fundamental understanding of Pt-K/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-based lean NOx trap catalysts, which could be good candidates for high temperature LNT applications.

  16. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  17. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... often you receive iron sucrose injection and your total number of doses based on your condition and ... hands or feet; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. ...

  18. Sulfur and temperature effects on the spatial distribution of reactions inside a lean NOx trap and resulting changes in global performance

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P; Pihl, Josh A; Daw, C Stuart

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally studied the influence of temperature and sulfur loading on the axial distribution of reactions inside a commercial lean NOx trap (LNT) catalyst to better understand the global performance trends. Our measurements were made on a monolith core, bench-flow reactor under cycling conditions (60-s lean/5-s rich) at 200, 325, and 400 C with intra-catalyst and reactor-outlet gas speciation. Postmortem elemental and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analyses of the catalyst also supplemented our gas species measurements. For the unsulfated catalyst, the NOx storage/reduction (NSR) reactions were localized in the front (upstream) portion of the monolith, whereas oxygen storage/reduction reactions were distributed more evenly along the entire catalyst length. As a result, two axially distinct reaction zones were developed inside the working catalyst: an upstream 'NSR zone' where both NOx and oxygen storage/reduction took place and a downstream oxygen storage capacity (OSC)-only zone where the NSR reactions did not penetrate. The NSR zone involved less than half the LNT at 325 and 400 C, but it included almost the entire length at 200 C. Sulfation poisoned both the NSR and OSC reactions beginning at the catalyst upstream edge, with the NSR degradation occurring more rapidly and distinctly than the OSC. As sulfation proceeded, a third zone (the sulfated zone) developed and the NSR zone moved downstream, with a concomitant decrease in both the OSC-only zone and global NOx conversion. The sulfation impact on NOx conversion was greatest at 200 C, when the NSR zone was largest. Ammonia selectivity increased with sulfation, which we attributed to a shortened OSC-only zone and resultantly reduced consumption of NH{sub 3}, slipping from the NSR zone, by downstream OSC. Lower temperatures also increased NH{sub 3} selectivity. Nitrous oxide selectivity also increased with decreasing temperature but showed little dependence on

  19. [Effects of radiation exposure on human body].

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kenji; Sasatani, Megumi

    2012-03-01

    There are two types of radiation health effect; acute disorder and late on-set disorder. Acute disorder is a deterministic effect that the symptoms appear by exposure above a threshold. Tissues and cells that compose the human body have different radiation sensitivity respectively, and the symptoms appear in order, from highly radiosensitive tissues. The clinical symptoms of acute disorder begin with a decrease in lymphocytes, and then the symptoms appear such as alopecia, skin erythema, hematopoietic damage, gastrointestinal damage, central nervous system damage with increasing radiation dose. Regarding the late on-set disorder, a predominant health effect is the cancer among the symptoms of such as cancer, non-cancer disease and genetic effect. Cancer and genetic effect are recognized as stochastic effects without the threshold. When radiation dose is equal to or more than 100 mSv, it is observed that the cancer risk by radiation exposure increases linearly with an increase in dose. On the other hand, the risk of developing cancer through low-dose radiation exposure, less 100 mSv, has not yet been clarified scientifically. Although uncertainty still remains regarding low level risk estimation, ICRP propound LNT model and conduct radiation protection in accordance with LNT model in the low-dose and low-dose rate radiation from a position of radiation protection. Meanwhile, the mechanism of radiation damage has been gradually clarified. The initial event of radiation-induced diseases is thought to be the damage to genome such as radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Recently, it is clarified that our cells could recognize genome damage and induce the diverse cell response to maintain genome integrity. This phenomenon is called DNA damage response which induces the cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, cell senescence and so on. These responses act in the direction to maintain genome integrity against genome damage, however, the death of large number of

  20. An Examination of Radiation Hormesis Mechanisms Using a Multistage Carcinogenesis Model

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, H.; Stewart, R. D.; Mitchel, R. E. J.; Hofmann, W.

    2004-01-01

    A multistage cancer model that describes the putative rate-limiting steps in carcinogenesis is developed and used to investigate the potential impact on cumulative lung cancer incidence of the hormesis mechanisms suggested by Feinendegen and Pollycove. In the model, radiation and endogenous processes damage the DNA of target cells in the lung. Some fraction of the misrepaired or unrepaired DNA damage induces genomic instability and, ultimately, leads to the accumulation of malignant cells. The model explicitly accounts for cell birth and death processes, the clonal expansion of initiated cells, malignant conversion, and a lag period for tumor formation. Radioprotective mechanisms are incorporated into the model by postulating dose and dose-rate-dependent radical scavenging. The accuracy of DNA damage repair also depends on dose and dose rate. As currently formulated, the model is most applicable to low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation delivered at low dose rates. Sensitivity studies are conducted to identify critical model inputs and to help define the shapes of the cumulative lung cancer incidence curves that may arise when dose and dose-rate-dependent cellular defense mechanisms are incorporated into a multistage cancer model. For lung cancer, both linear no-threshold (LNT-), and non-LNT-shaped responses can be obtained. If experiments demonstrate that the effects of DNA damage repair and radical scavenging are enhanced at least three-fold under low-dose conditions, our studies would support the existence of U-shaped responses. The overall fidelity of the DNA damage repair process may have a large impact on the cumulative incidence of lung cancer. The reported studies also highlight the need to know whether or not (or to what extent) multiply damaged DNA sites are formed by endogenous processes. Model inputs that give rise to U-shaped responses are consistent with an effective cumulative lung cancer incidence threshold that may be as high as 300 mGy (4 m

  1. Effects of cobalt-60 exposure on health of Taiwan residents suggest new approach needed in radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Luan, Y C; Shieh, M C; Chen, S T; Kung, H T; Soong, K L; Yeh, Y C; Chou, T S; Mong, S H; Wu, J T; Sun, C P; Deng, W P; Wu, M F; Shen, M L

    2006-08-25

    The conventional approach for radiation protection is based on the ICRP's linear, no threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis, which implies that ionizing radiation is always harmful, no matter how small the dose. But a different approach can be derived from the observed health effects of the serendipitous contamination of 1700 apartments in Taiwan with cobalt-60 (T(1/2) = 5.3 y). This experience indicates that chronic exposure of the whole body to low-dose-rate radiation, even accumulated to a high annual dose, may be beneficial to human health. Approximately 10,000 people occupied these buildings and received an average radiation dose of 0.4 Sv, unknowingly, during a 9-20 year period. They did not suffer a higher incidence of cancer mortality, as the LNT theory would predict. On the contrary, the incidence of cancer deaths in this population was greatly reduced-to about 3 per cent of the incidence of spontaneous cancer death in the general Taiwan public. In addition, the incidence of congenital malformations was also reduced--to about 7 per cent of the incidence in the general public. These observations appear to be compatible with the radiation hormesis model. Information about this Taiwan experience should be communicated to the public worldwide to help allay its fear of radiation and create a positive impression about important radiation applications. Expenditures of many billions of dollars in nuclear reactor operation could be saved and expansion of nuclear electricity generation could be facilitated. In addition, this knowledge would encourage further investigation and implementation of very important applications of total-body, low-dose irradiation to treat and cure many illnesses, including cancer. The findings of this study are such a departure from expectations, based on ICRP criteria, that we believe that they ought to be carefully reviewed by other, independent organizations and that population data not available to the authors be provided

  2. Synthesis, spectral and electrochemical studies of binuclear Ru(III) complexes containing dithiosemicarbazone ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchana Devi, A.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of several new octahedral binuclear ruthenium(III) complexes of the general composition [(EPh3)2(X)Ru-L-Ru(X)(EPh3)2] containing benzene dithiosemicarbazone ligands (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = binucleating ligands) is presented. All the complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy together with magnetic susceptibility measurements. IR study shows that the dithiosemicarbazone ligands behave as dianionic tridentate ligands coordinating through the oxygen atom of the deprotonated phenolic group, nitrogen atom of the azomethine group and thiolate sulphur. In DMF solution, all the complexes exhibit intense d-d transition and ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transition in the visible region. The magnetic moment values of the complexes are in the range 1.78-1.82 BM, which reveals the presence of one unpaired electron on each metal ion. The EPR spectra of the liquid samples at LNT show the presence of three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) indicate a rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion. All the complexes exhibit two quasi-reversible one electron oxidation responses (RuIII-RuIII/RuIII-RuIV; RuIII-RuIV/RuIV-RuIV) within the E1/2 range of 0.61-0.74 V and 0.93-0.98 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl.

  3. Critical currents, magnetic relaxation, and pinning in NdBa2Cu3O7-delta films with BaZrO3-generated columnar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ijaduola, Anota O; Wee, Sung Hun; Goyal, Amit; Martin, Patrick M; Li, Jing; Thompson, J. R.; Christen, David K

    2012-01-01

    The critical current density Jc and the magnetic relaxation ( creep ) properties have been studied for a set of NdBa2Cu3O7- (NdBCO) films doped with BaZrO3 (BZO) nanoparticles to form columnar defects. The dependence of Jc on the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field Happ (0 6.5 T); and temperature T (5 K Tc) was investigated. The normalized flux-creep rate S = d ln(J ) / d ln(t) was determined as a function of T. The current dependence of the effective activation energy Ueff(J) was derived using the formalism developed by Maley. The results are well described by an inverse power-law type barrier of the form 0 0 ( ) ~ ( / ) eff U J U J J with fitted values for the pinning energy scale U0 and the glassy exponent . When comparing values for these parameters in the BZO-doped samples with those for their undoped control counterparts, the most striking difference is the larger scale of current density J0 in the doped samples (a factor of 2.4 higher), while the other pinning parameters do not differ strongly. In the BZO-doped materials, the pinning energy scale U0 increases with vortex density and J0 decreases, with both following simple power law dependencies on field.

  4. Thermal conductivity measurement in clay dominant consolidated material by Transient Hot-Wire method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J. P.; Gallier, J.; Mercx, B.; Dudoignon, P.; Milcent, D.

    2010-06-01

    The transient hot-wire (THW) technique is widely used for measurements of the thermal-conductivity of most fluids and some attempts have also been carried out for simultaneous measurements of the thermal-diffusivity with the same hot wire. This technique was also tried to determine thermal properties of soils by the mean of probes which can be considered as wire with some assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to validate the thermal conductivity measurement by the THW technique in geomaterials, composed of compacted sand + clay mineral that can be used for earth construction (Compacted Earth Brick). The thermal transfer behaviors are mainly governed by the texture and moisture of the geomaterials. Thus the investigations were performed (1) in media made of glass beads of different diameters in dry and saturated state in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation state on the wire temperature (Δt) measurements and (2) in the compacted clay-geomaterial at different moisture states. The Δt / ln(t) diagrams allow the calculation of two thermal conductivities. The first one, measured in the short time acquisition (< 1s), characterizes the microtexture of the material and its hydrated state. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean thermal conductivity of the material.

  5. Effects of hydrogen on film structure and pitting susceptibility of nickel and 310 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.M.; Chu, W.Y.; Qiao, L.J.; Yang, Q.; Luo, J.L.

    1998-12-31

    Effects of hydrogen on the pitting susceptibility of Ni and 310 stainless steel (SS) were investigated. The results showed that hydrogen changed p-type oxide of 310 SS to n-type while it did not change the p-type oxide of Ni. Hydrogen enhanced remarkably pitting susceptibility of 310 SS. No pitting occurred for over 6 days for the samples without precharged hydrogen in 6% FeCl{sub 3} solution at room temperature. For samples precharged with very small current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, pitting occurred within 80 minutes. The pitting even occurred within 2 minutes for the charged samples with current density of 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Hydrogen decreased pitting incubation time, increased pitting initiation density and growth rate. Average pit diameter D increased linearly with logarithm of immersion time t, i.e., D = {alpha} ln(t) + {beta}, where {alpha} and {beta} are constants. The value of constant {alpha} increased with the rise of charging current density. Effect of hydrogen on the pitting of Ni was not so obvious as on 310 SS. The hydrogen interactions with defects both in surface film and metal were used to explain the hydrogen deleterious effects on the resistance to pitting corrosion.

  6. Catalytic activity of acid and base with different concentration on sol-gel kinetics of silica by ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Das, R K; Das, M

    2015-09-01

    The effects of both acid (acetic acid) and base (ammonia) catalysts in varying on the sol-gel synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles using tetra ethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as a precursor was determined by ultrasonic method. The ultrasonic velocity was received by pulsar receiver. The ultrasonic velocity in the sol and the parameter ΔT (time difference between the original pulse and first back wall echo of the sol) was varied with time of gelation. The graphs of ln[ln1/ΔT] vs ln(t), indicate two region - nonlinear region and a linear region. The time corresponds to the point at which the non-linear region change to linear region is considered as gel time for the respective solutions. Gelation time is found to be dependent on the concentration and types of catalyst and is found from the graphs based on Avrami equation. The rate of condensation is found to be faster for base catalyst. The gelation process was also characterized by viscosity measurement. Normal sol-gel process was also carried out along with the ultrasonic one to compare the effectiveness of ultrasonic. The silica gel was calcined and the powdered sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectra, X-ray diffractogram, and FTIR spectroscopy.

  7. The Adaptive Response, Genetic Haplo-Insufficiency and Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Geard, Charles R.

    2014-12-12

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis is the driving force in the establishment of radiation protection standards. However, the scientific basis for linearity has been brought into question, particularly due to the concerns about induced radiation resistance as it pertains to oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated the observation that tumor hypoxia is associated with malignant progression, increased metastases, chemo- and radioresistance and poor prognosis. Experiments were conducted with non-malignant 3T3/NIH cells and normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) that were subjected to γ-irradiation under the levels of oxygen resembling those in growing tumors, and related our data to the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), which is a better indicator of the amounts of residual oxygen inside the cells cultured in the hypoxic or anoxic atmosphere. We found that at DO levels about 0.5 mg/L cells subjected to both short-term (17 hours) and prolonged (48-72 hours) hypoxia continued to proliferate, and that apoptotic events were decreased at the early hours of hypoxic treatment. We showed that the short-term hypoxia up-regulated p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and resulted in facilitated 53BP1 nuclear foci formation and disappearance, thus indicating the higher efficiency of DNA double strand breaks repair processes. The latter was confirmed by the lower micronuclei incidence in irradiated hypoxic cells.

  8. Axial length effects on lean NOx trap performance

    SciTech Connect

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Nguyen, Ke; Choi, Jae-Soon; Daw, C Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The effect of axial length on the NO{sub x} reduction performance of two different commercial Lean NO{sub x} Trap (LNT) monolithic catalysts was experimentally investigated in a bench flow reactor. The washcoat composition of one of the catalysts consisted of Pt and K on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; whereas the other catalyst contained a complex mixture of Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba, Ce, Zr, Mg, Al and others. The NO{sub x} removal characteristics of cylindrical monolith segments of constant diameter (2.22 cm) and axial lengths of 2.54, 5.08 and 7.62 cm were evaluated using a simulated lean engine exhaust containing water and carbon dioxide at a constant space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1}. No significant effects of length were observed when the catalysts were fully reduced with hydrogen between NO{sub x} capture phases. However when the catalysts were only partially regenerated NO{sub x} reduction efficiency increased with monolith length. Intra-catalyst H{sub 2} measurements at different axial locations indicated that at least some of the efficiency loss during partial regeneration occurred when back-mixed H{sub 2} was directly oxidized and became unavailable for nitrate reduction.

  9. Irradiation response and stability of nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Jose A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Bringa, E.; Nastasi, Mike; Baldwin, Jon K.

    2012-08-28

    Nanoporous materials consist of a regular organic or inorganic framework supporting a regular, porous structure. Pores are by definition roughly in the nanometre range, that is between 0.2 nm and 100 nm. Nanoporous materials can be subdivided into 3 categories (IUPAC): (1) Microporous materials - 0.2-2 nm; (2) Mesoporous materials - 2-50 nm; and (3) Macroporous materials - 50-1000 nm. np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process. np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa. Stacking Fault Tetrahedra (SFTs) were observed in RT irradiated np-Au foams under the highest and intermediate fluxes, but not under the lowest flux. SFTs were not observed in LNT irradiated np-Au foams under all fluxes. The vacancy diffusivity in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and then collapse to form SFTs. The high ion flux creates more damage per unit time; vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed at high ion fluxes.

  10. Europium-doped amorphous calcium phosphate porous nanospheres: preparation and application as luminescent drug carriers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate is the most important inorganic constituent of biological tissues, and synthetic calcium phosphate has been widely used as biomaterials. In this study, a facile method has been developed for the fabrication of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)/polylactide-block-monomethoxy(polyethyleneglycol) hybrid nanoparticles and ACP porous nanospheres. Europium-doping is performed to enable photoluminescence (PL) function of ACP porous nanospheres. A high specific surface area of the europium-doped ACP (Eu3+:ACP) porous nanospheres is achieved (126.7 m2/g). PL properties of Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are investigated, and the most intense peak at 612 nm is observed at 5 mol% Eu3+ doping. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments indicate that the as-prepared Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are biocompatible. In vitro drug release experiments indicate that the ibuprofen-loaded Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres show a slow and sustained drug release in simulated body fluid. We have found that the cumulative amount of released drug has a linear relationship with the natural logarithm of release time (ln(t)). The Eu3+:ACP porous nanospheres are bioactive, and can transform to hydroxyapatite during drug release. The PL properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers before and after drug release are also investigated. PMID:21711603

  11. Distribution and migration of nitrobenzene in water following a simulated spill.

    PubMed

    Li, Peijun; Yin, Wei; Li, Peng; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chungui; Stagnitti, Frank; Xiong, Xianzhe

    2010-10-15

    Releases of nitrobenzene into the aquatic environment pose a threat to human health and aquatic resources, and have attracted much attention world-wide. In order to find out the distribution and migration patterns of pooled nitrobenzene underwater in different conditions, laboratory column experiments were designed to simulate stagnant water, flowing water and rainfall disturbance events. The results showed that in stagnant water there was a slow diffusion of the nitrobenzene from the pool leading to higher concentrations of the chemical deeper in the water column. In flowing water, the removal of the substance was rapid and water concentrations were much lower and more uniform throughout the column. The disturbance event brought a substantial quantity of nitrobenzene into the water column which then dissipated according to the flow regime. Analysis of the data showed that distribution pattern of nitrobenzene in the stagnant water column followed a logarithmic equation C(NB) = a ln(t) + b, and in disturbed flowing water, the distribution pattern of nitrobenzene followed a negative exponential regression equation C(NB) = Ne(-Mt). These conclusions have practical significance in developing remediation technologies for water polluted by nitrobenzene. PMID:20667658

  12. Vortex Pinning and Slow Creep in High-Jc MgB2 Thin Films: A Magnetic and Transport Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, James R; Sorge, K. D.; Cantoni, Claudia; Kerchner, H R; Christen, David K; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the pinning of vortices in high-J{sub c} films of polycrystalline MgB{sub 2}, by studying the dependence of current density J on electric field E using both magnetic and transport methods. Precursor films of amorphous boron, deposited on sapphire substrates, were converted to 0.6 {mu}m thick MgB{sub 2} by post-annealing in the presence of Mg vapour at 890 {sup o}C for 1 h. In magnetic studies, a SQUID magnetometer was used conventionally to determine the induced current density by the Bean model. The decay of J with time t was determined unconventionally with the sample fixed in position, by monitoring the SQUID feedback voltage {proportional_to} J versus time. The logarithmic decay rate S = -d ln(J)/d ln(t) was found to be very low in the H-T phase space away from the irreversibility line. Complementary four-probe transport studies of E(J) were analysed as a power law dependence of the form E {proportional_to} J{sup {pi}} and used to obtain the corresponding creep rate S = 1/(n-1). Effective values for n approach and often significantly exceed 100. From these results, we estimate the effective energy U{sub 0} for vortex pinning, as a function of magnetizing field H.

  13. Spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with carboxymethyl dextran and dextran sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišić, S.; Nikolić, G.; Cakić, M.; Trutić, N.

    2015-07-01

    The copper(II) ion complexes with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and dextran sulfate (DS) were studied by different methods. Content of copper was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was found that copper : ligand mole ratio (Cu : CMD) is 1 : 2, and Cu : DS is 1 : 1 by mole ratio method. Spectrophotometric parameters of synthesized compounds are characteristic for Cu(II) ion in octahedral ( O h ) coordination. Analyzing of FTIR spectra in ν(C=O) vibration region has showed that -COOH group acts as bidentate ligand, while the compounds of Cu(II) with DS copper ions are in the region of four oxygen atoms of two adjacent sulfo groups. The presence of crystalline water was determined by isotopic substitution of H2O molecules with D2O molecules. Comparison of spectra recorded at room (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) has enabled detection bands of water molecules libration indicating that they are coordinated complementing coordination sphere of Cu(II) ions to six. The complexes are of Cu(II) · (CMD)2 · (H2O)2 or Cu(II) · DS · (H2O)2 type. The similarities of the γ(C-H) range in a part of FTIR spectra indicate that there is no difference in the conformation of the 4 C 1 glucopyranose (Glc) unit CMD and DS synthesized Cu(II) complexes.

  14. Response properties in the adsorption-desorption model on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šćepanović, J. R.; Stojiljković, D.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2016-06-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamical processes during the reversible random sequential adsorption (RSA) of objects of various shapes on a two-dimensional triangular lattice are studied numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We focused on the influence of the order of symmetry axis of the shape on the response of the reversible RSA model to sudden perturbations of the desorption probability Pd. We provide a detailed discussion of the significance of collective events for governing the time coverage behavior of shapes with different rotational symmetries. We calculate the two-time density-density correlation function C(t ,tw) for various waiting times tw and show that longer memory of the initial state persists for the more symmetrical shapes. Our model displays nonequilibrium dynamical effects such as aging. We find that the correlation function C(t ,tw) for all objects scales as a function of single variable ln(tw) / ln(t) . We also study the short-term memory effects in two-component mixtures of extended objects and give a detailed analysis of the contribution to the densification kinetics coming from each mixture component. We observe the weakening of correlation features for the deposition processes in multicomponent systems.

  15. Altered native stability is the dominant basis for susceptibility of α1-antitrypsin mutants to polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Irving, James A.; Haq, Imran; Dickens, Jennifer A.; Faull, Sarah V.; Lomas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are protease inhibitors whose most stable state is achieved upon transition of a central 5-stranded β-sheet to a 6-stranded form. Mutations, low pH, denaturants and elevated temperatures promote this transition, which can result in a growing polymer chain of inactive molecules. Different types of polymer are possible, but, experimentally only heat has been shown to generate polymers in vitro consistent with ex vivo pathological specimens. Many mutations that alter the rate of heat-induced polymerization have been described, but interpretation is problematic because discrimination is lacking between the effect of global changes in native stability and specific effects on structural mechanism. We show that the temperature midpoint (Tm) of thermal denaturation reflects the transition of α1-antitrypsin to the polymerization intermediate, and determine the relationship with fixed-temperature polymerization half-times (t0.5) in the presence of stabilizing additives [TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), sucrose and sodium sulfate], point mutations and disulfide bonds. Combined with a retrospective analysis of 31 mutants characterized in the literature, the results of the present study show that global changes to native state stability are the predominant basis for the effects of mutations and osmolytes on heat-induced polymerization, summarized by the equation: ln(t0.5,mutant/t0.5,wild-type)=0.34×ΔTm. It is deviations from this relationship that hold key information about the polymerization process. PMID:24552432

  16. The New Radiobiology: Returning to Our Roots

    PubMed Central

    Ulsh, Brant A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, two expert advisory bodies examined the evidence on the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The U.S. National Research Council concluded that current scientific evidence is consistent with the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship (NRCNA 2005) while the French National Academies of Science and Medicine concluded the opposite (Aurengo et al. 2005). These contradictory conclusions may stem in part from an emphasis on epidemiological data (a “top down” approach) versus an emphasis on biological mechanisms (a “bottom up” approach). In this paper, the strengths and limitations of the top down and bottom up approaches are discussed, and proposals for strengthening and reconciling them are suggested. The past seven years since these two reports were published have yielded increasing evidence of nonlinear responses of biological systems to low radiation doses delivered at low dose-rates. This growing body of evidence is casting ever more doubt on the extrapolation of risks observed at high doses and dose-rates to estimate risks associated with typical environmental and occupational exposures. This paper compares current evidence on low dose, low dose-rate effects against objective criteria of causation. Finally, some questions for a post-LNT world are posed. PMID:23304107

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of bridged trisbenzoato copper-zinc heterobinuclear complex of 2,2‧-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Angira; Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Suryabhan; Borthakur, Rosmita; Basumatary, Debajani; Lal, Ram A.; Shangpung, Sankey

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of the heterobinuclear copper-zinc complex [CuZn(bz)3(bpy)2]ClO4 (bz = benzoate) from benzoic acid and bipyridine is described. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the heterobinuclear complex reveals the geometry of the benzoato bridged Cu(II)-Zn(II) centre. The copper or zinc atom is pentacoordinate, with two oxygen atoms from bridging benzoato groups and two nitrogen atoms from one bipyridine forming an approximate plane and a bridging oxygen atom from a monodentate benzoate group. The Cu-Zn distance is 3.345 Å. The complex is normal paramagnetic having μeff value equal to 1.75 BM, ruling out the possibility of Cu-Cu interaction in the structural unit. The ESR spectrum of the complex in CH3CN at RT exhibit an isotropic four line spectrum centred at g = 2.142 and hyperfine coupling constants Aav = 63 × 10-4 cm-1, characteristic of a mononuclear square-pyramidal copper(II) complexes. At LNT, the complex shows an isotropic spectrum with g|| = 2.254 and g⊥ = 2.071 and A|| = 160 × 10-4 cm-1. The Hamiltonian parameters are characteristic of distorted square pyramidal geometry. Cyclic voltammetric studies of the complex have indicated quasi-reversible behaviour in acetonitrile solution.

  18. Catalytic activity of acid and base with different concentration on sol-gel kinetics of silica by ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Das, R K; Das, M

    2015-09-01

    The effects of both acid (acetic acid) and base (ammonia) catalysts in varying on the sol-gel synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles using tetra ethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as a precursor was determined by ultrasonic method. The ultrasonic velocity was received by pulsar receiver. The ultrasonic velocity in the sol and the parameter ΔT (time difference between the original pulse and first back wall echo of the sol) was varied with time of gelation. The graphs of ln[ln1/ΔT] vs ln(t), indicate two region - nonlinear region and a linear region. The time corresponds to the point at which the non-linear region change to linear region is considered as gel time for the respective solutions. Gelation time is found to be dependent on the concentration and types of catalyst and is found from the graphs based on Avrami equation. The rate of condensation is found to be faster for base catalyst. The gelation process was also characterized by viscosity measurement. Normal sol-gel process was also carried out along with the ultrasonic one to compare the effectiveness of ultrasonic. The silica gel was calcined and the powdered sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectra, X-ray diffractogram, and FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:25600993

  19. Coalescence of Liquid Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Wei-Jun

    2003-01-01

    When two liquid drops come into contact, a neck forms between them and grows rapidly. We are interested in the very early stage of the coalescence process, which can be characterized by the time dependence of the radius of the neck. The functional dependence of the size of the neck on time depends on the properties of the liquid. Experimentally, we are investigating a liquid in Stokes flow regime where the viscosity provides the principal retarding force to the surface tension. Recently, it has been predicted that the neck radius should change as t ln|t| in this regime. Theoretically, we have studied the situation when the velocity at each point on the surface is proportional to the local curvature and directed normal to the surface. This is the case that should be applicable to superfluid helium at low temperature when the mean free path of the thermal excitations are comparable to the size of liquid drops. For this system, the radius of the neck is found to be proportional to t(sup 1/3). We are able to find a simple expression for the shape of the interface in the vicinity of the neck.

  20. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    PubMed Central

    Groβ, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jacobus H.; Tuller, Harry L.; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release. PMID:23549366

  1. Radio-Adaptive Response to Environmental Exposures at Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Brenda E.; Holmes, Kristen M.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic consequences resulting from environmental exposure to ionizing radiation have a significant impact on both radiation regulatory policies and the comprehension of the human health risks associated with radiation exposure. The primary objectives of the study were to assess 1) genotoxicity of exposure to radiation as a function of absorbed dose and dose rate, and 2) induction of a radio-adaptive response following a priming dose at varying dose rates. Results demonstrated that sub-acute environmental exposures of 10cGy gamma radiation resulted in indistinguishable levels of chromosomal damage as compared to controls. A radio-adaptive response was observed in all experimental groups, exposed to a subsequent acute challenge dose of 1.5 Gy, demonstrating that low dose rates of low energy transfer (LET) radiation are effective in reducing genetic damage from a subsequent acute low-LET radiation exposure. Furthermore, the data presented herein demonstrate a potential beneficial effect of sub-chronic exposure to low levels of low-LET radiation in an environmental setting and do not support the Linear No Threshold (LNT) hypothesis. PMID:18648577

  2. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.

    2003-06-11

    Our Phase II research evaluated health risks associated with inhaled plutonium. Our research objectives were to: (1) extend our stochastic model for deposition of plutonium in the respiratory tract to include additional key variability and uncertainty; (2) generate and analyze risk distributions for deterministic effects in the lung from inhaled plutonium that reflect risk model uncertainty; (3) acquire an improved understanding of key physiological effects of inhaled plutonium, based on evaluations of clinical data (e.g., hematological, respiratory function, chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes) for Mayak workers in Russia who inhaled plutonium-239; (4) develop biological dosimetry for plutonium-239 that was inhaled by some Mayak workers (with unknown intake) based on clinical data for other workers with known plutonium-239 intake; (5) critically evaluate the validity of the linear no-threshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to cancer risks from inhaled plutonium-239 (base d on Mayak worker data); and (6) evaluate respirator filter penetration frequencies for airborne plutonium aerosols using surrogate high-density metals.

  3. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates to Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Tokarskaya, Zoya B.; Zhuntova, Galina V.

    2002-07-10

    Our phase-II research relates to evaluating health risks associated with inhaled plutonium (Pu). Our current research objectives are as follows: (1) to extend our stochastic model for deposition of plutonium (Pu) in the respiratory tract to include additional key variability and uncertainty; (2) to generate and analyze risk distributions for deterministic effects in the lung from inhaled Pu that reflect risk model uncertainty; (3) to acquire an improved understanding of key physiological effects of inhaled Pu, based on evaluations of clinical data (e.g., hematological, respiratory function, chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes) for Mayak workers in Russia that inhaled Pu- 239; (4) to develop biological dosimetry for Pu-239 that was inhaled by some Mayak workers (with unknown intake) based on clinical data for other workers with known Pu-239 intake; (5) to critically evaluate the validity of the linear no-threshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to cancer risks from inhaled Pu-239 (based on Mayak worker data); (6) to evaluate respirator filter penetration frequencies for airborne Pu aerosols using surrogate high density metals.

  4. Toxicological awakenings: the rebirth of hormesis as a central pillar of toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J. . E-mail: edwardc@schoolph.umass.edu

    2005-04-01

    This paper assesses historical reasons that may account for the marginalization of hormesis as a dose-response model in the biomedical sciences in general and toxicology in particular. The most significant and enduring explanatory factors are the early and close association of the concept of hormesis with the highly controversial medical practice of homeopathy and the difficulty in assessing hormesis with high-dose testing protocols which have dominated the discipline of toxicology, especially regulatory toxicology. The long-standing and intensely acrimonious conflict between homeopathy and 'traditional' medicine (allopathy) lead to the exclusion of the hormesis concept from a vast array of medical- and public health-related activities including research, teaching, grant funding, publishing, professional societal meetings, and regulatory initiatives of governmental agencies and their advisory bodies. Recent publications indicate that the hormetic dose-response is far more common and fundamental than the dose-response models [threshold/linear no threshold (LNT)] used in toxicology and risk assessment, and by governmental regulatory agencies in the establishment of exposure standards for workers and the general public. Acceptance of the possibility of hormesis has the potential to profoundly affect the practice of toxicology and risk assessment, especially with respect to carcinogen assessment.

  5. Bulk and shear viscosities of the two-dimensional electron liquid in a doped graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principi, Alessandro; Vignale, Giovanni; Carrega, Matteo; Polini, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic flow occurs in an electron liquid when the mean free path for electron-electron collisions is the shortest length scale in the problem. In this regime, transport is described by the Navier-Stokes equation, which contains two fundamental parameters, the bulk and shear viscosities. In this paper, we present extensive results for these transport coefficients in the case of the two-dimensional massless Dirac fermion liquid in a doped graphene sheet. Our approach relies on microscopic calculations of the viscosities up to second order in the strength of electron-electron interactions and in the high-frequency limit, where perturbation theory is applicable. We then use simple interpolation formulas that allow to reach the low-frequency hydrodynamic regime where perturbation theory is no longer directly applicable. The key ingredient for the interpolation formulas is the "viscosity transport time" τv, which we calculate in this paper. The transverse nature of the excitations contributing to τv leads to the suppression of scattering events with small momentum transfer, which are inherently longitudinal. Therefore, contrary to the quasiparticle lifetime, which goes as -1 /[T2ln(T /TF) ] , in the low-temperature limit we find τv˜1 /T2 .

  6. EPA’s Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rules (DBPR) and Northern Kentucky Water: An Economic and Scientific Review

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of EPA’s Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rules (DBPR) in Northern Kentucky will cause a water rate increase of over 25%. Hence a review was undertaken, considering both economics and science in the context of President Obama’s 2009 scientific integrity directive. The rules purport to avoid up to 0.49% of new bladder cancers by reducing the levels of DBPs in drinking water – a benefit so small that failure to implement will not cause unreasonable risk to health (URTH). It suggests at most one Northern Kentucky death avoided over 17 years for a cost of $136,000,000 ($1700 per household). Even this small benefit is probably overstated. EPA finds no “causal link” between DBPs and bladder cancer, and EPA acknowledges problems with the epidemiological data used in their calculation: the data appear contradictory and inconsistent, may be skewed toward “positive” results, and suggest different cancer sites than animal studies. Two similar international agencies disagree with EPA’s conclusions. The science is based on the Linear No Threshold (LNT) dose response model for DBPs, but this may not be the correct model. 83% of EPA’s epidemiological data show a statistical possibility that low levels of DBPs might be beneficial or have no effect. PMID:24298228

  7. Infrared and Raman studies of manganese dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate, Mn(H 2PO 4) 2·2H 2O. Part II: Region of the internal OH group vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, V.; Stefov, V.; Cahil, A.; Najdoski, M.; Šoptrajanov, B.; Engelen, B.; Lutz, H. D.

    2009-02-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of Mn(H 2PO 4) 2·2H 2O and of series of deuterated analogues recorded at room temperature (RT) and at the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen (LNT) have been presented and analyzed with respect to the OH vibrations. In the OH stretching mode region ABC bands behaviour is observed in accordance with the structural data for presence of a short hydrogen bond (2.609 Å). It is presumed that the A band of the ABC trio most probably originates from the stretching OH vibrations of strongly hydrogen bonded POH(1) group, but the contribution of the second POH(2) group and the water molecule should be also considered. The strength of the four hydrogen bonds as deduced from the infrared wavenumbers of the isotopically isolated OD groups has been discussed in terms of the respective O···O distances, the hydrogen bond acceptor capability of the oxygen atoms, the hydrogen bond donor strength of the H 2PO 4 ions and water molecules and the hydrogen bond acceptor angles. The influence of the cooperative effect has been also analyzed.

  8. Mesoscopic structure of neuronal tracts from time-dependent diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Burcaw, Lauren M.; Fieremans, Els; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting brain diffusion MRI measurements in terms of neuronal structure at a micrometer level is an exciting unresolved problem. Here we consider diffusion transverse to a bundle of fibers, and show theoretically, as well as using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements in a phantom made of parallel fibers mimicking axons, that the time dependent diffusion coefficient approaches its macroscopic limit slowly, in a (lnt)/t fashion. The logarithmic singularity arises due to short range disorder in the fiber packing. We identify short range disorder in axonal fibers based on histological data from the splenium, and argue that the time dependent contribution to the overall diffusion coefficient from the extra-axonal water dominates that of the intra-axonal water. This dominance may explain the bias in measuring axon diameters in clinical settings. The short range disorder is also reflected in the linear frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient measured with oscillating gradients, in agreement with recent experiments. Our results relate the measured diffusion to the mesoscopic structure of neuronal tissue, uncovering the sensitivity of diffusion metrics to axonal arrangement within a fiber tract, and providing an alternative interpretation of axonal diameter mapping techniques. PMID:25837598

  9. Searching and optimizing structure ensembles for complex flexible sugars.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junchao; Margulis, Claudio J; Case, David A

    2011-10-01

    NMR restrictions are suitable to specify the geometry of a molecule when a single well-defined global free energy minimum exists that is significantly lower than other local minima. Carbohydrates are quite flexible, and therefore, NMR observables do not always correlate with a single conformer but instead with an ensemble of low free energy conformers that can be accessed by thermal fluctuations. In this communication, we describe a novel procedure to identify and weight the contribution to the ensemble of local minima conformers based on comparison to residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) or other NMR observables, such as scalar couplings. A genetic algorithm is implemented to globally minimize the R factor comparing calculated RDCs to experiment. This is done by optimizing the weights of different conformers derived from the exhaustive local minima conformational search program, fast sugar structure prediction software (FSPS). We apply this framework to six human milk sugars, LND-1, LNF-1, LNF-2, LNF-3, LNnT, and LNT, and are able to determine corresponding population weights for the ensemble of conformers. Interestingly, our results indicate that in all cases the RDCs can be well represented by only a few most important conformers. This confirms that several, but not all of the glycosidic linkages in histo-blood group "epitopes" are quite rigid.

  10. Phase Evolution upon Aging of Air-Plasma Sprayed t'-Zirconia Coatings: I-Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, Don M; Krogstad, Jessica A; Gao, Yan; Johnson, Curtis A; Nelson, Warren A; Levi, Carlos G

    2012-10-08

    Phase evolution accompanying the isothermal aging of free-standing air-plasma sprayed (APS) 7–8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is described. Aging was carried out at temperatures ranging from 982°C to 1482°C in air. The high-temperature kinetics of the phase evolution from the metastable t' phase into a mixture of transformable Y-rich (cubic) and Y-lean (tetragonal) phases are documented through ambient temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization. A Hollomon–Jaffe parameter (HJP), T[27 + ln(t)], was used to satisfactorily normalize the extent of phase decomposition over the full range of times and temperatures. Comparison to vapor deposited TBCs reveal potential differences in the destabilization mechanism in APS coatings. Furthermore, the lattice parameters extracted from Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns were used to deduce the stabilizer concentrations of the respective phases, which suggest a retrograde tetragonal solvus over the temperature range studied. In concert with a complementary microstructural study presented in Part II, this effort offers new insights into the mechanisms governing the phase evolution and raises implications for the high-temperature use of 8YSZ ceramics.

  11. A Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) study of NOx and primary NO2 emissions from Euro 6 diesel passenger cars and comparison with COPERT emission factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Rosalind; ApSimon, Helen M.; Oxley, Tim; Molden, Nick; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Thiyagarajah, Aravinth

    2016-11-01

    Real world emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) often greatly exceed those achieved in the laboratory based type approval process. In this paper the real world emissions from a substantial sample of the latest Euro 6 diesel passenger cars are presented with a focus on NOx and primary NO2. Portable Emissions Measurement System (PEMS) data is analysed from 39 Euro 6 diesel passenger cars over a test route comprised of urban and motorway sections. The sample includes vehicles installed with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), lean NOx traps (LNT), or selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The results show wide variability in NOx emissions from 1 to 22 times the type approval limit. The average NOx emission, 0.36 (sd. 0.36) g km-1, is 4.5 times the Euro 6 limit. The average fraction primary NO2 (fNO2) is 44 (sd. 20) %. Higher emissions during the urban section of the route are attributed to an increased number of acceleration events. Comparisons between PEMS measurements and COPERT speed dependent emissions factors show PEMS measurements to be on average 1.6 times higher than COPERT estimates for NOx and 2.5 times for NO2. However, by removing the 5 most polluting vehicles average emissions were reduced considerably.

  12. Spectroscopy of the Schwarzschild black hole at arbitrary frequencies.

    PubMed

    Casals, Marc; Ottewill, Adrian

    2012-09-14

    Linear field perturbations of a black hole are described by the Green function of the wave equation that they obey. After Fourier decomposing the Green function, its two natural contributions are given by poles (quasinormal modes) and a largely unexplored branch cut in the complex frequency plane. We present new analytic methods for calculating the branch cut on a Schwarzschild black hole for arbitrary values of the frequency. The branch cut yields a power-law tail decay for late times in the response of a black hole to an initial perturbation. We determine explicitly the first three orders in the power-law and show that the branch cut also yields a new logarithmic behavior T(-2ℓ-5)lnT for late times. Before the tail sets in, the quasinormal modes dominate the black hole response. For electromagnetic perturbations, the quasinormal mode frequencies approach the branch cut at large overtone index n. We determine these frequencies up to n(-5/2) and, formally, to arbitrary order. Highly damped quasinormal modes are of particular interest in that they have been linked to quantum properties of black holes.

  13. Ergodic properties of fractional Brownian-Langevin motion.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weihua; Barkai, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the time average mean-square displacement delta;{2}[over ](x(t))=integral_{0};{t-Delta}[x(t;{'}+Delta)-x(t;{'})];{2}dt;{'}(t-Delta) for fractional Brownian-Langevin motion where x(t) is the stochastic trajectory and Delta is the lag time. Unlike the previously investigated continuous-time random-walk model, delta;{2}[over ] converges to the ensemble average x;{2} approximately t;{2H} in the long measurement time limit. The convergence to ergodic behavior is slow, however, and surprisingly the Hurst exponent H=3/4 marks the critical point of the speed of convergence. When H<3/4 , the ergodicity breaking parameter E_{B}=[[delta;{2}[over ](x(t))];{2}-delta;{2}[over ](x(t));{2}]/delta;{2}[over ](x(t));{2} approximately k(H)Deltat;{-1} , when H=3/4 , E_{B} approximately (9/16)(lnt)Deltat;{-1} , and when 3/41 ergodicity is broken and E_{B} approximately 2 . The critical point H=3/4 is marked by the divergence of the coefficient k(H) . Fractional Brownian motion as a model for recent experiments of subdiffusion of mRNA in the cell is briefly discussed, and a comparison with the continuous-time random-walk model is made. PMID:19257006

  14. Quantum critical response function in quasi-two-dimensional itinerant antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, C. M.; Zhu, Lijun; Schröder, Almut

    2015-10-01

    We reexamine the experimental results for the magnetic response function χ''(q ,E ,T ) for q around the antiferromagnetic vectors Q , in the quantum-critical region, obtained by inelastic neutron scattering, on an Fe-based superconductor and on a heavy-fermion compound. The motivation is to compare the results with a recent theory, which shows that the fluctuations in a generic antiferromagnetic model for itinerant fermions map to those in the universality class of the dissipative quantum-XY model. The quantum-critical fluctuations in this model, in a range of parameters, are given by the correlations of spatial and temporal topological defects. The theory predicts a χ''(q ,E ,T ) (i) which is a separable function of (q -Q ) and of (E ,T ) , (ii) at criticality, the energy-dependent part is ∝tanh(E /2 T ) below a cutoff energy, (iii) the correlation time departs from its infinite value at criticality on the disordered side by an essential singularity, and (iv) the correlation length depends logarithmically on the correlation time, so that the dynamical critical exponent z is ∞ . The limited existing experimental results are found to be consistent with the first two unusual predictions from which the linear dependence of the resistivity on T and the T lnT dependence of the entropy also follow. More experiments are suggested, especially to test the theory of variations on the correlation time and length on the departure from criticality.

  15. Fractionated elution using the TEKCIS technetium-99m generator.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Jonathan; De Mil, Rémy; Peyronnet, Damien; Hecquard, Claudine; Agostini, Denis; Lemonnier, Françoise

    2016-06-01

    The TEKCIS technetium-99m (Tc) generator was designed to allow dry column shipment and automatized conception. A high Tc radioactive concentration is required in a subset of radiopharmacy procedures. Fractionated elution can be a useful tool to meet this requirement, especially when current elution is close to the generator expiration date. The aim of our study was to assess TEKCIS generator elution kinetics and to determine the optimal fractionated elution time to fit with procedures requiring the highest Tc radioactive concentration in clinical use. After duplicate elution at several predetermined elution times, the volume and activity of each eluate were measured. Two optimal time points were selected to perform fractionated elution and repeatability (n=34 and 33) assessed on TEKCIS generators calibrated at 6 or 8 GBq. The complete eluate volume (5 ml) was collected after 60 s of elution. A logarithmic equation was established between eluate volume (v, ml) from elapsed elution time (t, s): v=1.8335ln(t)-2.5965. Using the reciprocal equation, elution times required to obtain some commonly eluted volumes were calculated. Fractionated elutions during 15 and 20 s were selected and an average elution volume from 2.74 to 3.27 ml was collected, with an average elution yield of approximately 90 and 100%, respectively. Our work provides a simple and reliable methodology for the use of fractionated elution with the new TEKCIS generator.

  16. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  17. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  18. 78 FR 41125 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... associated requirements for written directives to be source strength-based instead of dose-based. The..., ``Proposed Rule: Medical Use of Byproduct Material--Amendments/Medical Events Definitions'' (ADAMS Accession... Register on August 6, 2008 (73 FR 45635). The vast majority of commenters offered no objection...

  19. Radiation cancer analysis and low dose risk estimation: new developments and perspectives - conference to be held Feb 2002. Final technical report for period November 1, 2001--October 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brugmans, M.J.P.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    2002-10-01

    The Proceedings of the 20th LH Gray Conference on Radiation Cancer Analysis and Low Dose Risk Estimation: New Developments and Perspectives (17-21 February 2002, Ede, the Netherlands) comprises 32 peer-reviewed papers on invited and proffered contributions to the conference with a preface by the guest editors. The on-going discussion of low dose radiation risk; the issue of the linear, non-threshold extrapolation; and the anticipated new recommendations, e.g. from BEIR and ICRP, provided the back-drop for the conference. The meeting dealt with topics such as basic mechanisms and bystander effects, cancer modeling, cancer genetics, radon exposure and lung cancer risk, cancer after medical exposure, cancer risk estimation, dose-effect relationships, and application to radiation protection.

  20. Radiation risks from inhaled alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jack A.

    2001-06-01

    The alpha emitter that gives rise to the greatest concern over its link to the induction of lung cancer is radon. As noted by the ICRP, attempts to relate the risk of cancer induction to the dose delivered by the alpha particles result in a value for this risk which is unrealistically high. Instead, an estimate based on the epidemiology of radon in mines is preferred. The logical result, that the weighting factor for these alpha particles should be very much lesser than the recommended value of 20, appears to have been ignored. It will be shown that there are two fundamental reasons for this large discrepancy. The first is that the implied "linear non-threshold" hypothesis is not supported by recent investigations. The second is that the concept of "dose" is meaningless at the levels of exposure considered in this context. Alternative proposals in terms of fluence and the effect cross-section will be presented.

  1. Defect states and exceptional point splitting in the band gaps of one-dimensional parity-time lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2015-08-24

    We investigated defect states in band gaps of one-dimensional photonic lattices with delicate modulations of gain and loss that respect parity-time-symmetry (PT-symmetry), viz. n(z) = n*(-z). For the sake of generality, we employ not only periodic structures but also quasiperiodic structures, e.g. Fibonacci sequences, to construct aperiodic PT lattices. Differed from lossless systems for which the defect state is related to only one exceptional point (EP) of the S-matrix, we observed the splitting of one EP into a pair after the introduction of judiciously designed gain and loss in those PT systems, where the defect state enters a non-threshold broken symmetry phase bounded by the EP pair. Some interesting properties associated with defect states and EP splitting are demonstrated, such as enhanced spectral localization, double optical phase abrupt change, and wavelength sensitive reversion of unidirectional transparency. PMID:26368199

  2. How do we measure dose and estimate risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeschen, Christoph; Regulla, Dieter; Schlattl, Helmut; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Li, Wei Bo; Zankl, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Radiation exposure due to medical imaging is a topic of emerging importance. In Europe this topic has been dealt with for a long time and in other countries it is getting more and more important and it gets an aspect of public interest in the latest years. This is mainly true due to the fact that the average dose per person in developed countries is increasing rapidly since threedimensional imaging is getting more and more available and useful for diagnosis. This paper introduces the most common dose quantities used in medical radiation exposure characterization, discusses usual ways for determination of such quantities as well as some considerations how these values are linked to radiation risk estimation. For this last aspect the paper will refer to the linear non threshold theory for an imaging application.

  3. The Search for Non-Linear Exposure-Response Relationships at Ambient Levels in Environmental Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Morton

    2005-01-01

    Environmental exposures to ambient air particulate matter (PM), ozone (O3), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and to dioxin and related compounds are of considerable public health concern, and risk assessments for them have generally been based on linear, non-threshold models derived from epidemiological study data. While the epidemiological databases for PM, O3, and ETS have been sufficient to show that adverse health effects are occurring, the relative risks have been quite low, and it has not been possible, to date, to identify thresholds or non-linear relationships for them. For dioxin and related compounds, the evidence for excess cancer risks has been inadequate to establish causality, and there is suggestive evidence that hormesis may have occurred. PMID:19330159

  4. Removal of Brown Colour From Diamonds During Storage in the Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. M.; Helmstaedt, H. H.

    2009-05-01

    (T1, t1), the equation below shows the time required (t2) to produce the same reduction at a different temperature (T2): ln(t2) = ln(t1) + (Ea/k)(1/T2 - 1/T1) where Ea is activation energy, k is the Boltzmann constant, and temperatures are in kelvin. A relatively potent treatment of 1 hour at 2500 ° C is comparable to about 109 years at 1150 ° C. Most diamonds would lose any brown colour in this scenario. Modest colour reduction is detectable after 5 hours at 1800 ° C. This is comparable to about 109 years at 950 ° C, or about 105 years at 1150 ° C. The time required to destroy brown colour in the lithospheric mantle is significant at the scale of geological time. Brown diamonds should easily maintain their colour during cooler mantle storage at or below 1000 ° C. Warmer temperatures toward the base of the lithosphere may be able to reduce or eliminate brown colour within a reasonable geological time frame. The survival of brown colour in the lithospheric mantle does not require the colour to be formed late in the storage history nor does it require metastable storage in the graphite stability field.

  5. Survival of Brown Colour in Diamond During Storage in the Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; Helmstaedt, Herwart; Flemming, Roberta

    2010-05-01

    this reaction time varies with temperature. Thus, the activation energy can be used in conjunction with experimental HPHT data to extrapolate reaction times from HPHT temperatures to lithospheric mantle temperatures. For a certain reduction in brown colour produced by HPHT (T1, t1), the equation below shows the time required (t2) to produce the same reduction at a different temperature (T2): ln(t2) = ln(t1) + (Ea/k)(1/T2-1/T1) where Ea is activation energy, k is the Boltzmann constant, and temperatures are in kelvins. The error in activation energy causes large, increasing error as the temperature difference between T1 and T2increases. Nevertheless, the time required to destroy brown colour in the lithospheric mantle is significant at the scale of geological time. Brown diamonds should easily maintain brown colour during cooler mantle storage at or below 1000 ° C. Warmer temperatures toward the base of the lithosphere may be able to reduce or eliminate brown colour within a reasonable geological time frame. However, the survival of brown colour in the lithospheric mantle does not require the colour to be formed late in the storage history nor does it require metastable storage in the graphite stability field. Additionally, preliminary measurements of diamond crystal strain suggest that brown colour removal in the lithospheric mantle is, at least, not a common occurrence. Mosaic spreading was gauged in 18 untreated natural diamonds using micro-X-ray diffraction (?XRD) χ-dimension peak widths. None of the colourless diamonds examined have a large residual mosaic spread, as should be expected for a diamond that has been deformed and turned brown, but later lost its brown colour. Despite the limited sample size, the results support some capacity for the survival of brown colour in the mantle.

  6. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Crocker

    2010-03-31

    Lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs) represent a promising technology for the abatement of NO{sub x} under lean conditions. Although LNTs are starting to find commercial application, the issue of catalyst durability remains problematic. LNT susceptibility to sulfur poisoning is the single most important factor determining effective catalyst lifetime. The NO{sub x} storage element of the catalyst has a greater affinity for SO{sub 3} than it does for NO{sub 2}, and the resulting sulfate is more stable than the stored nitrate. Although this sulfate can be removed from the catalyst by means of high temperature treatment under rich conditions, the required conditions give rise to deactivation mechanisms such as precious metal sintering, total surface area loss, and solid state reactions between the various oxides present. The principle objective of this project was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of lean NO{sub x} trap aging, and to understand the effect of washcoat composition on catalyst aging characteristics. The approach utilized involved detailed characterization of model catalysts prior to and after aging, in tandem with measurement of catalyst performance in NO{sub x} storage and reduction. In this manner, NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics were correlated with the evolution of catalyst physico-chemical properties upon aging. Rather than using poorly characterized proprietary catalysts, or simple model catalysts of the Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} type (representing the first generation of LNTs), Pt/Rh/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were employed which also incorporated CeO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, representing a model system which more accurately reflects current LNT formulations. Catalysts were prepared in which the concentration of each of the main components was systematically varied: Pt (50, 75 or 100 g/ft{sup 3}), Rh (10 or 20 g/ft{sup 3}), BaO (15, 30 or 45 g/L), and either CeO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L) or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (0, 50

  7. Biological-Based Modeling of Low Dose Radiation Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R., Ph.D.

    2006-11-08

    The objective of this project was to refine a biological-based model (called NEOTRANS2) for low-dose, radiation-induced stochastic effects taking into consideration newly available data, including data on bystander effects (deleterious and protective). The initial refinement led to our NEOTRANS3 model which has undergone further refinement (e.g., to allow for differential DNA repair/apoptosis over different dose regions). The model has been successfully used to explain nonlinear dose-response curves for low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation-induced mutations (in vivo) and neoplastic transformation (in vitro). Relative risk dose-response functions developed for neoplastic transformation have been adapted for application to cancer relative risk evaluation for irradiated humans. Our low-dose research along with that conducted by others collectively demonstrate the following regarding induced protection associated with exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation: (1) protects against cell killing by high-LET alpha particles; (2) protects against spontaneous chromosomal damage; (3) protects against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations; (4) suppresses mutations induced by a large radiation dose even when the low dose is given after the large dose; (5) suppresses spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced cancers; (6) suppresses metastasis of existing cancer; (7) extends tumor latent period; (8) protects against diseases other than cancer; and (9) extends life expectancy. These forms of radiation-induced protection are called adapted protection as they relate to induced adaptive response. Thus, low doses and dose rates of low-LET radiation generally protect rather than harm us. These findings invalidate the linear not threshold (LNT) hypothesis which is based on the premise that any amount of radiation is harmful irrespective of its type. The hypothesis also implicates a linear dose-response curve for cancer induction that has a positive slope and no

  8. Fecal Microbiota Composition of Breast-fed Infants is Correlated with Human Milk Oligosaccharides Consumed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Li, Min; Wu, Shuai; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Ivanov, Ivan; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study tested the hypothesis that the fecal bacterial genera of breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants differ and that human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) modulate the microbiota of BF infants. Methods Fecal samples were obtained from BF (n = 16) or FF (n = 6) infants at 3-month postpartum. Human milk were collected on the same day when feces were collected. The microbiota was assessed by pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. HMO were measured by HPLC-Chip time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Results The overall microbiota of BF differed from that of FF (P = 0.005). Compared to FF, BF had higher relative abundances of Bacteroides, lower proportions of Clostridium XVIII, Lachnospiracea incertae sedis, Streptococcus, Enterococcus and Veillonella (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium predominated in both BF and FF infants, with no difference in abundance between the two groups. The most abundant HMO were lacto-N-tetraose + lacto-N-neotetraose (LNT + LNnT, 22.6%), followed by 2′-fucosyllactose (2′FL, 14.5%) and lacto-N-fucopentaose I (LNFP I, 9.5%). Partial least squares regression of HMO and microbiota showed several infant fecal bacterial genera could be predicted by their mothers’ HMO profiles and the important HMO for the prediction of bacterial genera were identified by variable importance in the projection scores. Conclusions These results strengthen the established relationship between HMO and the infant microbiota, identify statistical means whereby infant bacterial genera can be predicted by milk HMO. Future studies are needed to validate these findings and determine if supplementation of formula with defined HMO could selectively modify the gut microbiota. PMID:25651488

  9. Preparation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of baicalin-loaded liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumeng; Guo, Jianmin; Zheng, Xiaoli; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Yu, Yu; Ye, Yun; Zhang, Liangke; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal herb. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of BA showed its low oral bioavailability. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel BA-loaded liposome (BA-LP) to enhance oral bioavailability. BA-LP, composed of BA, Tween® 80, Phospholipon® 90H, and citric acid at weight ratio of 96/50/96/50, respectively, was prepared by the effervescent dispersion technique and characterized in terms of morphology, size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and the in vitro release. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies were carried out in rats after oral administration of BA-LP and a carboxymethyl cellulose suspension containing BA (BA-CMC) as a control. BA-LP exhibited a spherical shape by transmission electron microscopy observation. BA-LP had a mean particle size of 373±15.5 nm, zeta potential of −20.1±0.22 mV, and encapsulation efficiency of 82.7%±0.59%. The BA-LP showed a sustained-release behavior, and the in vitro drug-release kinetic model fit well with the Weibull distribution equation: lnln (1/(1−Q)) =0.609 lnt −1.230 (r=0.995). The oral bioavailability and the peak concentration of the BA-LP was threefold and 2.82-fold that of BA-CMC, respectively. The in vivo distribution results indicated that drug concentrations were significantly increased in the liver, kidney, and lung in the case of BA-LP, which were 5.59-fold, 2.33-fold, and 1.25-fold higher than those of BA-CMC, respectively. In conclusion, the study suggested that BA-LP might be a potential oral drug delivery system to improve bioavailability of BA. PMID:25120360

  10. Quark gluon bags as reggeons

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A.; Petrov, V. K.; Zinovjev, G. M.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of the medium-dependent finite width of quark gluon plasma (QGP) bags on their equation of state is analyzed within an exactly solvable model. It is argued that the large width of the QGP bags not only explains the observed deficit in the number of hadronic resonances but also clarifies the reason why the heavy QGP bags cannot be directly observed as metastable states in a hadronic phase. The model allows us to estimate the minimal value of the width of QGP bags being heavier than 2 GeV from a variety of the lattice QCD data and get that the minimal resonance width at zero temperature is about 600 MeV, whereas the minimal resonance width at the Hagedorn temperature is about 2000 MeV. As shown, these estimates are almost insensitive to the number of the elementary degrees of freedom. The recent lattice QCD data are analyzed and it is found that in addition to the {sigma}T{sup 4} term the lattice QCD pressure contains T-linear and T{sup 4}lnT terms in the range of temperatures between 240 and 420 MeV. The presence of the last term in the pressure bears almost no effect on the width estimates. Our analysis shows that at high temperatures the average mass and width of the QGP bags behave in accordance with the upper bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the linear asymptotics), whereas at low temperatures they obey the lower bound of the Regge trajectory asymptotics (the square root one). Since the model explicitly contains the Hagedorn mass spectrum, it allows us to remove an existing contradiction between the finite number of hadronic Regge families and the Hagedorn idea of the exponentially growing mass spectrum of hadronic bags.

  11. A hot-wire method based thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for teaching purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, S.; Marín, E.; Juárez, A. G.; Calderón, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-07-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and a high purity platinum wire). The wire, which is immersed in the investigated sample, is heated by passing a constant electrical current through it, and its temperature evolution, ΔT, is measured as a function of time, t, for several values of the current. A straightforward methodology is then used for data processing in order to obtain the liquid thermal conductivity. The start point is the well known linear relationship between ΔT and ln(t) predicted for long heating times by a model based on a solution of the heat conduction equation for an infinite lineal heat source embedded in an infinite medium into which heat is conducted without convective and radiative heat losses. A criterion is used to verify that the selected linear region is the one that matches the conditions imposed by the theoretical model. As a consequence the method involves least-squares fits in linear, semi-logarithmic (semi-log) and log-log graphs, so that it becomes attractive not only to teach about heat transfer and thermal properties measurement techniques, but also as a good exercise for students of undergraduate courses of physics and engineering learning about these kinds of mathematical functional relationships between variables. The functionality of the experiment was demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity in samples of liquids with well known thermal properties.

  12. Effects of Potassium loading and thermal aging on K/Pt/Al2O3 high-temperature lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinyong; Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-03-31

    The effects of K loading and thermal aging on the structural properties and high temperature performance of Pt/K/Al2O3 lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts were investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed decomposition/desorption of NOx (NOx-TPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), NO oxidation and NOx storage tests. In situ XRD results demonstrate that KNO3 becomes extremely mobile on the Al2O3 surface, and experiences complex transformations between orthorhombic and rhombohedral structures, accompanied by sintering, melting and thermal decomposition upon heating. NOx storage results show an optimum K loading around 10% for the best performance at high temperatures. At lower K loadings where the majority of KNO3 stays as a surface layer, the strong interaction between KNO3 and Al2O3 promotes KNO3 decomposition and deteriorates high-temperature performance. At K loadings higher than 10%, the performance drop is not caused by NOx diffusion limitations as for the case of barium-based LNTs, but rather from the blocking of Pt sites by K species, which adversely affects NO oxidation. Thermal aging at 800 ºC severely deactivates the Pt/K/Al2O3 catalysts due to Pt sintering. However, in the presence of potassium, some Pt remains in a dispersed and oxidized form. These Pt species interact strongly with K and, therefore, do not sinter. After a reduction treatment, these Pt species remain finely dispersed, contributing to a partial recovery of NOx storage performance.

  13. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism. PMID:26443779

  14. Temporal stability of chemical hormesis (CH): Is CH just a temporary stop on the road to thresholds and toxic responses?

    PubMed

    Mushak, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Chemical hormesis (CH) is currently described as a nonmonotonic, bidirectional dose-response relationship for chemicals, where a stimulatory, (beneficial?) response at low dose or exposure is followed by an inhibitory response at higher doses/exposures (or vice-versa). CH is depicted as U(J)-shaped or inverse U(J)-shaped curves, i.e., curve slopes change sign. Some describe CH as a homeostasis-preserving response; others view CH as adaptive or (pre)conditioning responses to chemical stress. One aspect of CH and stress hormesis in general that has not been researched is its temporal stability, i.e., persistence, particularly in experimental animals and humans having long-term chemical stressing. Once maximized, does the CH response remain operative over the entire time of chemical exposure? One possible reason for the question's neglect is that temporal stability, e.g., 'steady-state hormesis,' has been assumed. Another is that CH temporality is not well understood or has been under-appreciated as to its importance. Available data, mainly for simpler biological systems, describe cases of transitory CH. Other examples, in human and experimental animal studies, show transitory existence of CH and, in some specialized cases, persisting CH. Also, certain disease state-induced hormetic responses are transitory over time in humans. The question requires resolution if CH is to be considered (i) a stable and beneficial or adverse response, (ii) a stable dose-response model competitive with stable threshold and linear, nonthreshold (LNT) dose-response models, and (iii) a model having any impact on, or role in, regulatory and public health policies. PMID:27396315

  15. Lignin nanotubes as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells.

    PubMed

    Ten, Elena; Ling, Chen; Wang, Yuan; Srivastava, Arun; Dempere, Luisa Amelia; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2014-01-13

    Lignin nanotubes (LNTs) synthesized from the aromatic plant cell wall polymer lignin in a sacrificial alumina membrane template have as useful features their flexibility, ease of functionalization due to the availability of many functional groups, label-free detection by autofluorescence, and customizable optical properties. In this report we show that the physicochemical properties of LNTs can be varied over a wide range to match requirements for specific applications by using lignin with different subunit composition, a function of plant species and genotype, and by choosing the lignin isolation method (thioglycolic acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid (Klason), sodium hydroxide lignin), which influences the size and reactivity of the lignin fragments. Cytotoxicity studies with human HeLa cells showed that concentrations of up to 90 mg/mL are tolerated, which is a 10-fold higher concentration than observed for single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Confocal microscopy imaging revealed that all LNT formulations enter HeLa cells without auxiliary agents and that LNTs made from NaOH-lignin penetrate the cell nucleus. We further show that DNA can adsorb to LNTs. Consequently, exposure of HeLa cells to LNTs coated with DNA encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) leads to transfection and expression of GFP. The highest transfection efficiency was obtained with LNTs made from NaOH-lignin due to a combination of high DNA binding capacity and DNA delivery directly into the nucleus. These combined features of LNTs make LNTs attractive as smart delivery vehicles of DNA without the cytotoxicity associated with CNTs or the immunogenicity of viral vectors.

  16. Development of 3He insert for Magnetization Measurements down to T = 0.4 K with SQUID magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoshiaki; Hasuo, Tadahiko; Inagaki, Yuji; Kawae, Tatsuya

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a 9-mm-diameter 3He insert for precise magnetization measurements down to T = 0.4 K that is attachable to a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. The insert is made from a thin-walled stainless steel pipe with an inner diameter of 6.2 mm, which determines the maximum sample size. 3He gas is condensed in the pipe, which is liquefied by 4He gas at T = 1.8 K generated by the magnetometer via the heat exchanger of a Cu vacuum jacket with an outer diameter of 8.6mm soldered to the stainless steel pipe. The temperature of the insert is decreased to T = 0.5 K by evacuating liquid 3He using a rotary pump and then to T = 0.36 K with a sorption pump. From the diamagnetization signal of a superconducting Al chip with a mass below 0.1 mg, the magnetization resolution with the insert is confirmed to be less than 10-7 emu. We measure the temperature dependence of magnetization down to T = 0.5 K in PrxLa1-xPb3, which is a good candidate for the reality of the quadrupolar Kondo effect, using the 3He insert. Non-Fermi liquid behavior of the nonlinear susceptibility in χ3 with a -lnT dependence is detected in the [100] and [110] directions below T = 2.5 K, suggesting the screening of quadrupolar moments. In contrast, χ3 in the [111] direction becomes constant below T = 3 K. The observed features indicate that a low-lying Γ3 doublet plays a crucial role in the anomalous properties of PrxLa1-xPb3.

  17. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases.

  18. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases. PMID:25843303

  19. Detection of milk oligosaccharides in plasma of infants

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Stroble, Carol; Underwood, Mark A.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2014-01-01

    Human Milk Oligosaccharides (HMO) are one of the major components of human milk. HMO are non-digestible by the human gut, where they are known to play important functions as prebiotics and decoys for binding pathogens. Moreover, it has been proposed that HMO may provide sialic acids to the infant that are important in brain development, however this would require absorption of HMO into the bloodstream. HMO have consistently been found in the urine of humans and other mammals, suggesting systemic absorption. Here we present a procedure for the profiling of milk oligosaccharides (MO) in plasma samples obtained from 13 term infants hospitalized for surgery for congenital heart disease. The method comprises protein denaturation, oligosaccharide reduction and porous graphitized carbon solid phase extraction for purification followed by analysis using nHPLC-PGC-chip-TOF-MS. Approximately 15 free MO were typically observed in the plasma of human infants, including LNT, LDFP, LNFT, 3’SL, 6’SL, 3’SLN and 6’SLN, of which the presence was confirmed using fragmentation studies. A novel third isomer of SLN, not found in human or bovine milk was also consistently detected. Differences in the free MO profiles were observed between infants that were totally formula-fed and infants that received at least some part breast milk. Our results indicate that free MO similar in structure to those found in human milk and urine are present in the blood of infants. The method and results presented here will facilitate further research toward the possible roles of free MO in the development of the infant. PMID:25059723

  20. Radiation dose response estimation with emphasis on low dose range using restricted cubic splines: application to all solid cancer mortality data, 1950-2003, in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Eiji

    2015-07-01

    Using the all solid cancer mortality data set of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort from 1950 to 2003 (LSS Report 14) data among atomic bomb survivors, excess relative risk (ERR) statistical analyses were performed using the second degree polynomial and the threshold and restricted cubic spline (RCS) dose response models. For the RCS models with 3 to 7 knots of equally spaced percentiles with margins in the dose range greater than 50 mGy, the dose response was assumed to be linear at less than 70 to 90 mGy. Due to the skewed dose distribution of atomic bomb survivors, the current knot system for the RCS analysis results in a detailed depiction of the dose response as less than approximately 0.5 Gy. The 6 knot RCS models for the all-solid cancer mortality dose response of the whole dose or less than 2 Gy were selected with the AIC model selection criterion and fit significantly better (p < 0.05) than the linear (L) model. The usual RCS includes the L-global model but not the quadratic (Q) nor linear-quadratic (LQ) global models. The authors extended the RCS to include L or LQ global models by putting L or LQ constraints on the cubic spline in the lower and upper tails, and the best RCS model selected with AIC criterion was the usual RCS with L-constraints in both the lower and upper tails. The selected RCS had a linear dose-response model in the lower dose range (i.e., < 0.2-0.3 Gy) and was compatible with the linear no-threshold (LNT) model in this dose range. The proposed method is also useful in describing the dose response of a specific cancer or non-cancer disease incidence/mortality.

  1. Electro-optic properties of organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stoylov, Stoyl P; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2011-08-10

    In this review article the theoretical and experimental possibilities of applying EO-methods for estimation of the physico-chemical properties of the organic nanotubes (ONTs) are studied. The ONTs are highly organized nanostructures of strongly elongated, anysometric, and hollow cylinders with a size range of 1 nm to 10,000 nm, e.g. in aqueous solutions they could behave as colloid (disperse) particles. They have high interaction ability due to their extremely large curved, rolled-up external surfaces (bilayers of membrane walls) and unique properties because of their specific electric charge distribution and dynamics that make possible the functionalization of their surfaces. Thus they could template guestsubstances such as membrane proteins and protein complexes on the exterior surfaces and in the membrane. We performed our investigations for the case of ONT aqueous colloid suspension. Following our earlier proposition of the general expression for the electro-optic (EO) effect we derived equations for the evaluation of the electric properties of ONT particles such as mechanism of electric polarization and identification of their most important electric Dipole Moments (DM), permanent (pDM) and induced (iDMs). Further we recommend ways for the calculation of their magnitude and direction. Also we evaluated some geometrical properties such as length of the ONT particles and their polydispersity. The knowledge that we provided about the ONT properties may enable us to elucidate and predict their biological activity. Templating biological active ligands (such as membrane proteins and protein complexes) on the inner and outer surfaces as well as in the surface membrane creates their potential usefulness as carrier and deliverer of biopharmaceuticals in bio-nanodevices. The theoretical equations were compared with the experimental data for ONTs such as (lipid) LNT, Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and microtubules (MT). Comparison of EO methods with other methods used till

  2. Polaronic conduction and Anderson localization in reduced strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Yang, YiHsun; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2015-12-01

    Electron transport mechanisms in reduced Sr0.5Ba0.5Nb2O6 (SBN50) are investigated from ˜100 to 955 K through an analysis of the electrical conductivity (σ) and the Seebeck coefficient (S) with respect to temperature (T). Notably, experimental evidence is presented that supports a scenario of Anderson localization below 600 K and carrier excitation across a mobility edge at higher temperature. As a relaxor ferroelectric, stoichiometric SBN has intrinsic disorder associated with both the distribution of Sr/Ba vacancies and the formation of polarized nanoregions. The removal of oxygen through reduction generates conduction electrons in SBN. At the lowest temperatures measured (100-155 K), the electrical conductivity exhibits a temperature dependence characteristic of variable range hopping, followed by a transition to small polaron hopping at intermediate temperatures (250-545 K). In both the variable range and small polaron hopping regimes, a semiconductor-like temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity (dσ/dT > 0) was observed. However, above 615 K, dσ/dT decreases dramatically and eventually becomes metal-like (dσ/dT < 0). Concomitantly, the Seebeck coefficient exhibits a linear dependence on lnT from 615 to 955 K with the same slope (˜104 μ V/K) for both polycrystalline SBN50 and single crystalline SBN61 (both reduced), indicating a similar, constant density of states near the Fermi level for both compositions. The application of Seebeck coefficient theory to this inherently disordered material reveals that the excitation of carriers across a mobility edge is likely responsible for the change in dσ/dT at high temperature. Such findings may have a significant impact in the field of conductive ferroelectrics.

  3. Electro-optic properties of organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Stoylov, Stoyl P; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla

    2011-08-10

    In this review article the theoretical and experimental possibilities of applying EO-methods for estimation of the physico-chemical properties of the organic nanotubes (ONTs) are studied. The ONTs are highly organized nanostructures of strongly elongated, anysometric, and hollow cylinders with a size range of 1 nm to 10,000 nm, e.g. in aqueous solutions they could behave as colloid (disperse) particles. They have high interaction ability due to their extremely large curved, rolled-up external surfaces (bilayers of membrane walls) and unique properties because of their specific electric charge distribution and dynamics that make possible the functionalization of their surfaces. Thus they could template guestsubstances such as membrane proteins and protein complexes on the exterior surfaces and in the membrane. We performed our investigations for the case of ONT aqueous colloid suspension. Following our earlier proposition of the general expression for the electro-optic (EO) effect we derived equations for the evaluation of the electric properties of ONT particles such as mechanism of electric polarization and identification of their most important electric Dipole Moments (DM), permanent (pDM) and induced (iDMs). Further we recommend ways for the calculation of their magnitude and direction. Also we evaluated some geometrical properties such as length of the ONT particles and their polydispersity. The knowledge that we provided about the ONT properties may enable us to elucidate and predict their biological activity. Templating biological active ligands (such as membrane proteins and protein complexes) on the inner and outer surfaces as well as in the surface membrane creates their potential usefulness as carrier and deliverer of biopharmaceuticals in bio-nanodevices. The theoretical equations were compared with the experimental data for ONTs such as (lipid) LNT, Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and microtubules (MT). Comparison of EO methods with other methods used till

  4. Detection of milk oligosaccharides in plasma of infants.

    PubMed

    Ruhaak, L Renee; Stroble, Carol; Underwood, Mark A; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2014-09-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are one of the major components of human milk. HMO are non-digestible by the human gut, where they are known to play important functions as prebiotics and decoys for binding pathogens. Moreover, it has been proposed that HMO may provide sialic acids to the infant that are important in brain development, however this would require absorption of HMO into the bloodstream. HMO have consistently been found in the urine of humans and other mammals, suggesting systemic absorption. Here, we present a procedure for the profiling of milk oligosaccharides (MO) in plasma samples obtained from 13 term infants hospitalized for surgery for congenital heart disease. The method comprises protein denaturation, oligosaccharide reduction, and porous graphitized carbon solid phase extraction for purification followed by analysis using nHPLC-PGC-chip-TOF-MS. Approximately 15 free MO were typically observed in the plasma of human infants, including LNT, LDFP, LNFT, 3'SL, 6'SL, 3'SLN, and 6'SLN, of which the presence was confirmed using fragmentation studies. A novel third isomer of SLN, not found in human or bovine milk was also consistently detected. Differences in the free MO profiles were observed between infants that were totally formula-fed and infants that received at least some part breast milk. Our results indicate that free MO similar in structure to those found in human milk and urine are present in the blood of infants. The method and results presented here will facilitate further research toward the possible roles of free MO in the development of the infant.

  5. The Predominance of Type I Oligosaccharides Is a Feature Specific to Human Breast Milk123

    PubMed Central

    Urashima, Tadasu; Asakuma, Sadaki; Leo, Fiame; Fukuda, Kenji; Messer, Michael; Oftedal, Olav T.

    2012-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum contain ∼12–13 g/L and ∼22–24 g/L of oligosaccharides, respectively. The chemical structures of >100 human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) have been characterized to date. We determined the concentrations of 10 neutral and 9 acidic colostrum HMO collected during the first 3 d of lactation by using reverse phase HPLC after derivatization with 2-aminopyridine or 1-methyl-3-phenyl-5-pyrazolon. The predominant oligosaccharides were Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-4Glc (2′-FL), Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-3)GlcNAc(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (LNFP I), Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-3)[Fuc(α1-4)]GlcNAc(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (LNDFH I), and Gal(β1-3)GlcNAc(β1-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc (LNT), the concentration of each of which was ∼1–3 g/L. Because these HMO, other than 2′-FL, all contain the Lacto-N-biose type I structure [Gal(β1-3)GlcNAc], we conclude that HMO containing the type I structure predominate over those containing the N-acetyllactosamine type II structure [Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc]. This appears to be a feature that is specific to humans, because the milk and colostrum of other species, including apes and monkeys, either contain only type II oligosaccharides or type II predominate over type I. It is possible that type I HMO may have importance as substrates for beneficial bifidobacteria in breast-fed infants. The biological importance of type I HMO predominance warrants further study, both in relation to human health and to human evolution. PMID:22585927

  6. Infrared and Raman studies of manganese dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate, Mn(H 2PO 4) 2·2H 2O. I: Region of the vibrations of the phosphate ions and external modes of the water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, V.; Stefov, V.; Cahil, A.; Najdoski, M.; Šoptrajanov, B.; Engelen, B.; Lutz, H. D.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared and Raman spectra of Mn(H 2PO 4) 2·2H 2O and of series of deuterated analogues recorded at room temperature (RT) and the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen (LNT) have been presented and analyzed in detail in respect to the internal vibrations of the HPO4- ions and the external modes of the water molecules. Some vibrational couplings of the stretching and bending PO 4 modes have been discussed. The stretching PO 4 modes appear to be coupled with the in-plane δ(OH) and out-of-plane γ(OH) bending POH vibrations, while the bending PO 4 modes are coupled with the water librations. The mutual exclusion rule is obeyed for all vibrations under consideration. The large frequency separation between the γ(OH) modes of the two POH groups evidences for the considerable difference in the strength of the hydrogen bonds which they form. The observed A-B and g-u splittings for the γ(OH) vibrations show that both intra-chain and inter-chain interactions of the HPO4- ions are significant. Three bands of water librations are found in the IR and Raman spectra of Mn(H 2PO 4) 2·2H 2O and the observed g-u correlation splittings are smaller than 10 cm -1. Strong interactions of ν4 and ν2 modes of PO 4 with the librations of H 2O and D 2O molecules have been found.

  7. Combination of photocatalysis and HC/SCR for improved activity and durability of DeNOx catalysts.

    PubMed

    Heo, Iljeong; Kim, Mun Kyu; Sung, Samkyung; Nam, In-Sik; Cho, Byong K; Olson, Keith L; Li, Wei

    2013-04-16

    A photocatalytic HC/SCR system has been developed and its high deNOx performance (54.0-98.6% NOx conversion) at low temperatures (150-250 °C) demonstrated by using a representative diesel fuel hydrocarbon (dodecane) as the reductant over a hybrid SCR system of a photocatalytic reactor (PCR) and a dual-bed HC/SCR reactor. The PCR generates highly active oxidants such as O3 and NO2 from O2 and NO in the feed stream, followed by the subsequent formation of highly efficient reductants such as oxygenated hydrocarbon (OHC), NH3, and organo-nitrogen compounds. These reductants are the key components for enhancing the low temperature deNOx performance of the dual-bed HC/SCR system containing Ag/Al2O3 and CuCoY in the front and rear bed of the reactor, respectively. The OHCs are particularly effective for both NOx reduction and NH3 formation over the Ag/Al2O3 catalyst, while NH3 and organo-nitrogen compounds are effective for NOx reduction over the CuCoY catalyst. The hybrid HC/SCR system assisted by photocatalysis has shown an overall deNOx performance comparable to that of the NH3/SCR, demonstrating its potential as a promising alternative to the current urea/SCR and LNT technologies. Superior durability of HC/SCR catalysts against coking by HCs has also been demonstrated by a PCR-assisted regeneration scheme for deactivating catalysts.

  8. Biogenesis and Membrane Targeting of Lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Tokuda, Hajime

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins, which are anchored to membranes through triacyl chains attached to the amino-terminal cysteine. They are involved in various functions localized in cell envelope. Escherichia coli possesses more than 90 species of lipoproteins, most of which are localized in the outer membrane, with others being in the inner membrane. All lipoproteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm with an N-terminal signal peptide, translocated across the inner membrane by the Sec translocon to the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, and converted to mature lipoproteins through sequential reactions catalyzed by three lipoprotein-processing enzymes: Lgt, LspA, and Lnt. The sorting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane requires a system comprising five Lol proteins. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, LolCDE, initiates the sorting by mediating the detachment of lipoproteins from the inner membrane. Formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex is coupled to this LolCDE-dependent release reaction. LolA accommodates the amino-terminal acyl chain of lipoproteins in its hydrophobic cavity, thereby generating a hydrophilic complex that can traverse the periplasmic space by diffusion. Lipoproteins are then transferred to LolB on the outer membrane and anchored to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane by the action of LolB. In contrast, since LolCDE does not recognize lipoproteins possessing Asp at position +2, these lipoproteins remain anchored to the inner membrane. Genes for Lol proteins are widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, and Lol-mediated outer membrane targeting of lipoproteins is considered to be the general lipoprotein localization mechanism.

  9. Identification of heterogeneous aquifer transmissivity using an AE-based method.

    PubMed

    Janković, Igor; Fiori, Aldo; Suribhatla, Raghavendra; Dagan, Gedeon

    2006-01-01

    Determination of hydraulic head, H, as a function of spatial coordinates and time, in ground water flow is the basis for aquifer management and for prediction of contaminant transport. Several computer codes are available for this purpose. Spatial distribution of the transmissivity, T(x,y), is a required input to these codes. In most aquifers, T varies in an erratic manner, and it can be characterized statistically in terms of a few moments: the expected value, the variance, and the variogram. Knowledge of these moments, combined with a few measurements, permits one to estimate T at any point using geostatistical methods. In a review of transmissivity data from 19 unconsolidated aquifers, Hoeksema and Kitanidis (1985) identified two types of the logtransmissivity Y= ln(T) variations: correlated variations with variance sigma2Yc and correlation scale, I(Y), on the order of kilometers, and uncorrelated variations with variance sigma2Yn. Direct identification of the logtransmissivity variogram, Gamma(Y), from measurements is difficult because T data are generally scarce. However, many head measurements are commonly available. The aim of the paper is to introduce a methodology to identify the transmissivity variogram parameters (sigma2Yc, I(Y), and sigma2Yn) using head data in formations characterized by large logtransmissivity variance. The identification methodology uses a combination of precise numerical simulations (carried out using analytic element method) and a theoretical model. The main objective is to demonstrate the application of the methodology to a regional ground water flow in Eagle Valley basin in west-central Nevada for which abundant transmissivity and head measurements are available.

  10. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  11. Status report on the development of draft MCLGs for disinfectants and by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Maximum Contaminant level goals (MCLG) are set at concentration levels at which no known or anticipated adverse health effects occur, allowing for an adequate margin of safety. Establishment of an MCLG for each specific contaminant depends on the evidence of carcinogenicity from drinking water exposure or the Agency's oral reference dose based on noncarcinogenic data. The report discusses the status of the development of draft MCLG5 for disinfectants and disinfection by-products.

  12. [Development of physiological and hygienic principles of noise standardization in aerospace medicine].

    PubMed

    Krylov, Iu V

    1984-01-01

    The development of the physiologic and hygienic principles of noise standardization in aerospace medicine is described. The contribution of aerospace medicine to the theory of noise standardization is emphasized. Also discussed are principles of standardization with respect to noise equivalent levels, dose-based standardization, as well as noise tolerance related to the work load. Further studies are needed to assess the applicability of the above principles for the evaluation of noise effects onboard flying vehicles.

  13. Radiochromic film based transit dosimetry for verification of dose delivery with intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Lee, Kiho; Shin, Dongho; Kyung Lim, Young; Byeong Lee, Se; Yoon, Myonggeun; Son, Jaeman; Yong Park, Sung

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the transit dose based patient specific quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for verification of the accuracy of dose delivered to the patient. Methods: Five IMRT plans were selected and utilized to irradiate a homogeneous plastic water phantom and an inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The transit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film and was compared with the computed dose map on the same plane using a gamma index with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit. Results: While the average gamma index for comparisons of dose distributions was less than one for 98.9% of all pixels from the transit dose with the homogeneous phantom, the passing rate was reduced to 95.0% for the transit dose with the inhomogeneous phantom. Transit doses due to a 5 mm setup error may cause up to a 50% failure rate of the gamma index. Conclusions: Transit dose based IMRT QA may be superior to the traditional QA method since the former can show whether the inhomogeneity correction algorithm from TPS is accurate. In addition, transit dose based IMRT QA can be used to verify the accuracy of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment by revealing significant increases in the failure rate of the gamma index resulting from errors in patient positioning during treatment.

  14. Evaluation of potential human health effects associated with the agricultural uses of 1,3-D: Spatial and temporal stochastic risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Driver, Jeffrey H; Price, Paul S; Van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Ross, John H; Gehen, Sean; Holden, Larry R; Landenberger, Bryce; Hastings, Kerry; Yan, Zhongyu June; Rasoulpour, Reza

    2016-11-15

    Dow AgroSciences (DAS) markets and sells 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D), the active ingredient in Telone®, which is used as a pre-plant soil fumigant nematicide in economically important crops in California. 1,3-D has been regulated as a "probable human carcinogen" and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation limits use of 1,3-D based on human health risk assessments for bystanders. This paper presents a risk characterization for bystanders based on advances in the assessment of both exposure and hazard. The revised bystander risk assessment incorporates significant advances: 1) new data on residency duration and mobility in communities where 1,3-D is in high demand; 2) new information on spatial and temporal concentrations of 1,3-D in air based on multi-year modeling using a validated model; and 3) a new stochastic spatial and temporal model of long-term exposures. Predicted distributions of long-term, chronic exposures indicate that current, and anticipated uses of 1,3-D would result in lifetime average daily doses lower than 0.002mg/kg/d, a dose associated with theoretical lifetime excess cancer risk of <10(-5) to >95% of the local population based on a non-threshold risk assessment approach. Additionally, examination of 1,3-D toxicity studies including new chronic toxicity data and mechanism of action supports the use of a non-linear, threshold based risk assessment approach. The estimated maximum annual average daily dose of <0.0016mg/kg/d derived from the updated exposure assessment was then compared with a threshold point of departure. The calculated margin of exposure is >1000-fold, a clear indication of acceptable risk for human health. In summary, the best available science supports 1,3-D's threshold nature of hazard and the revised exposure assessment supports that current agricultural uses of 1,3-D are associated with reasonable certainty of no harm, i.e., estimated long-term exposures pose insignificant health risks to bystanders even when the

  15. Critical Masses for Unreflected Metal Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Robert Michael; Wright, Richard Q

    2009-01-01

    Calculated critical masses of bare metal spheres for 28 actinide isotopes, using the SCALE/XSDRNPM one-dimensional, discrete-ordinates system, are presented. ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, and JENDL-3.3 cross sections were used in the calculations. Results are given for isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, californium, and for one isotope of einsteinium. Calculated k values for these same nuclides are also given. We show that, for non-threshold or low-threshold fission nuclides, a good approximation for the nuclide k is the value of nubar at 1 MeV. A plot of the critical mass versus k values is given for 19 nuclides with A-numbers between 232 and 250. The peaks in the critical mass curve (for seven nuclides) correspond to dips in the k curve. For the seven cases with the largest critical mass, six are even-even nuclides. Neptunium-237, with a critical mass of about 62.7 kg (ENDF/B-VI calculation), has an odd number of protons and an even number of neutrons. However, two cases with quite small critical masses, 232U and 236Pu, are also even-even. These two nuclides do not exhibit threshold fission behavior like most other even-even nuclides. The largest critical mass is 208.8 kg for 243Am and the smallest is 2.44 kg for 251Cf. The calculated k values vary from 1.5022 for 234U to 4.4767 for 251Cf. A correlation between the calculated critical mass (kg) and the fission spectrum averaged value of is given for the elements U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Cf. For each of the five elements, a fit to the data for that element is provided. In each case the fit employs a negative exponential of the form mass = exp(A + B ~ ln( ) The values of A and B are element dependent and vary slightly for each of the five elements. The method described here is mainly applicable for non-threshold fission nuclides (15 of the 28 nuclides considered in this paper). There are three exceptions, 238Pu, 244Cm, and 250Cf, which all exhibit threshold fission behavior.

  16. Evaluation of potential human health effects associated with the agricultural uses of 1,3-D: Spatial and temporal stochastic risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Driver, Jeffrey H; Price, Paul S; Van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Ross, John H; Gehen, Sean; Holden, Larry R; Landenberger, Bryce; Hastings, Kerry; Yan, Zhongyu June; Rasoulpour, Reza

    2016-11-15

    Dow AgroSciences (DAS) markets and sells 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D), the active ingredient in Telone®, which is used as a pre-plant soil fumigant nematicide in economically important crops in California. 1,3-D has been regulated as a "probable human carcinogen" and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation limits use of 1,3-D based on human health risk assessments for bystanders. This paper presents a risk characterization for bystanders based on advances in the assessment of both exposure and hazard. The revised bystander risk assessment incorporates significant advances: 1) new data on residency duration and mobility in communities where 1,3-D is in high demand; 2) new information on spatial and temporal concentrations of 1,3-D in air based on multi-year modeling using a validated model; and 3) a new stochastic spatial and temporal model of long-term exposures. Predicted distributions of long-term, chronic exposures indicate that current, and anticipated uses of 1,3-D would result in lifetime average daily doses lower than 0.002mg/kg/d, a dose associated with theoretical lifetime excess cancer risk of <10(-5) to >95% of the local population based on a non-threshold risk assessment approach. Additionally, examination of 1,3-D toxicity studies including new chronic toxicity data and mechanism of action supports the use of a non-linear, threshold based risk assessment approach. The estimated maximum annual average daily dose of <0.0016mg/kg/d derived from the updated exposure assessment was then compared with a threshold point of departure. The calculated margin of exposure is >1000-fold, a clear indication of acceptable risk for human health. In summary, the best available science supports 1,3-D's threshold nature of hazard and the revised exposure assessment supports that current agricultural uses of 1,3-D are associated with reasonable certainty of no harm, i.e., estimated long-term exposures pose insignificant health risks to bystanders even when the

  17. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  18. Secretion of bacterial lipoproteins: through the cytoplasmic membrane, the periplasm and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zückert, Wolfram R

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are peripherally anchored membrane proteins that play a variety of roles in bacterial physiology and virulence in monoderm (single membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-positive) and diderm (double membrane-enveloped, e.g., gram-negative) bacteria. After export of prolipoproteins through the cytoplasmic membrane, which occurs predominantly but not exclusively via the general secretory or Sec pathway, the proteins are lipid-modified at the cytoplasmic membrane in a multistep process that involves sequential modification of a cysteine residue and cleavage of the signal peptide by the signal II peptidase Lsp. In both monoderms and diderms, signal peptide processing is preceded by acylation with a diacylglycerol through preprolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (Lgt). In diderms but also some monoderms, lipoproteins are further modified with a third acyl chain through lipoprotein N-acyl transferase (Lnt). Fully modified lipoproteins that are destined to be anchored in the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) are selected, transported and inserted by the Lol (lipoprotein outer membrane localization) pathway machinery, which consists of the inner-membrane (IM) ABC transporter-like LolCDE complex, the periplasmic LolA chaperone and the OM LolB lipoprotein receptor. Retention of lipoproteins in the cytoplasmic membrane results from Lol avoidance signals that were originally described as the "+2 rule". Surface localization of lipoproteins in diderms is rare in most bacteria, with the exception of several spirochetal species. Type 2 (T2SS) and type 5 (T5SS) secretion systems are involved in secretion of specific surface lipoproteins of γ-proteobacteria. In the model spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, surface lipoprotein secretion does not follow established sorting rules, but remains dependent on N-terminal peptide sequences. Secretion through the outer membrane requires maintenance of lipoproteins in a translocation-competent unfolded conformation

  19. SIMPOL.1: A simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.

    2007-08-01

    The SIMPOL.1 group contribution method is developed for predicting the liquid vapor pressure pLo (atm) and enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap (kJ mol-1) of organic compounds as functions of temperature (T). For each compound i, the method assumes log10pL,io(T)=Σkνk,ibk(T) where νk,i is the number of groups of type k, and bk(T) is the contribution to log10 pL,io(T) by each group of type k. A zeroeth group is included that uses b0(T) with ν0,i=1 for all i. A total of 30 structural groups are considered: molecular carbon, alkyl hydroxyl, aromatic hydroxyl, alkyl ether, alkyl ring ether, aromatic ether, aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic acid, ester, nitrate, nitro, alkyl amine (primary, secondary, and tertiary), aromatic amine, amide (primary, secondary, and tertiary), peroxide, hydroperoxide, peroxy acid, C=C, carbonylperoxynitrate, nitro-phenol, nitro-ester, aromatic rings, non-aromatic rings, C=C-C=O in a non-aromatic ring, and carbon on the acid-side of an amide. The T dependence in each of the bk(T) is assumed to follow b(T)=B1/T+B2+B3T+B4lnT. Values of the B coefficients are fit using an initial basis set of 272 compounds for which experimentally based functions pL,io=fi(T) are available. The range of vapor pressure considered spans fourteen orders of magnitude. The ability of the initially fitted B coefficients to predict pLo values is examined using a test set of 161 compounds and a T range that is as wide as 273.15 to 393.15 K for some compounds. σFIT is defined as the average over all points of the absolute value of the difference between experimental and predicted values of log10pL,io(T). After consideration of σFIT for the test set, the initial basis set and test set compounds are combined, and the B coefficients re-optimized. For all compounds and temperatures, σFIT=0.34: on average, pL,io(T) values are predicted to within a factor of 2. Because d(log10pL,io(T))/d(1/T) is related to the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap,i, the fitted B provide predictions of

  20. Discovery of an Afterglow Extension of the Prompt Phase of Two Gamma Ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Cusumano, G.; O'Brien, P.; Vaughan, S.; Zhang, B.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.

    2005-01-01

    Contemporaneous BAT and XRT observations of two recent well-covered GRBs observed by Swift, GRB 050315 and GRB 050319, show clearly a prompt component of the afterglow emission. The rapid slewing capability of the spacecraft enables X-ray observations immediately after the burst, typically approximately 100 s following the initiation of the prompt gamma-ray phase. By fitting a power law form to the gamma-ray spectrum, we extrapolate the time dependent fluxes measured by the BAT, in the energy band 15 - 350 keV, into the spectral regime observed by the XRT, 0.2 - 10 keV, and examine the functional form of the rate of decay of the two light curves. We find that the BAT and XRT light curves merge to form a unified curve. There is a period of steep decay up to approximately 300 s, followed by a flatter decay. The duration of the steep decay, approximately 100 s in the source frame after correcting for cosmological time dilation, agrees with a theoretical estimate for the deceleration time of the relativistic ejecta as it interacts with circumstellar material. For GRB 050315, the steep decay can be characterized by an exponential form, where T(sub e),(BAT)approximately equal to 24 plus or minus 2 s, and T(sub e)(XRT) approximately equal to 35 plus or minus 2 s. For GRB 050319 a power law decay -d lnf/d lnt = n, where n approximately equal to 3, provides a reasonable fit. The early time X-ray fluxes are consistent with representing the lower energy tail of the prompt emission, and provide our first quantitative measure of the decay of the prompt gamma-ray emission over a large dynamic range. The initial steep decay is expected from the high latitude emission from a curved shell of relativistic plasma illuminated only for a short interval. The overall conclusion is that the prompt phase of GRBs lasts for hundreds of seconds longer than previously thought.

  1. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  2. Environmental transcriptome analysis reveals physiological differences between biofilm and planktonic modes of life of the iron oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. in their natural microbial community

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Extreme acidic environments are characterized by their high metal content and lack of nutrients (oligotrophy). Macroscopic biofilms and filaments usually grow on the water-air interface or under the stream attached to solid substrates (streamers). In the Río Tinto (Spain), brown filaments develop under the water stream where the Gram-negative iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptospirillum spp. (L. ferrooxidans and L. ferriphilum) and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans are abundant. These microorganisms play a critical role in bioleaching processes for industrial (biominery) and environmental applications (acid mine drainage, bioremediation). The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological differences between the free living (planktonic) and the sessile (biofilm associated) lifestyles of Leptospirillum spp. as part of its natural extremely acidophilic community. Results Total RNA extracted from environmental samples was used to determine the composition of the metabolically active members of the microbial community and then to compare the biofilm and planktonic environmental transcriptomes by hybridizing to a genomic microarray of L. ferrooxidans. Genes up-regulated in the filamentous biofilm are involved in cellular functions related to biofilm formation and maintenance, such as: motility and quorum sensing (mqsR, cheAY, fliA, motAB), synthesis of cell wall structures (lnt, murA, murB), specific proteases (clpX/clpP), stress response chaperons (clpB, clpC, grpE-dnaKJ, groESL), etc. Additionally, genes involved in mixed acid fermentation (poxB, ackA) were up-regulated in the biofilm. This result, together with the presence of small organic acids like acetate and formate (1.36 mM and 0.06 mM respectively) in the acidic (pH 1.8) water stream, suggests that either L. ferrooxidans or other member of the microbial community are producing acetate in the acidophilic biofilm under microaerophilic conditions. Conclusions Our results indicate that the acidophilic

  3. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil; Pham, Christopher; Georgescu, Walter; Deschamps, Thomas; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2014-09-01

    are based on experimental RIF and are three times larger than the hypothetical LEM voxel used to fit survival curves. Our model is therefore an alternative to previous approaches that provides a testable biological mechanism (i.e., RIF). In addition, we propose that DSB pairing will help develop more accurate alternatives to the linear cancer risk model (LNT) currently used for regulating exposure to very low levels of ionizing radiation.

  4. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of 3,4,5-trimethoxytetraphenyl porphyrinoxovanadium (IV) complex.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swati; Kumar, Anil; Chand, Prem; Sharma, B K; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2006-03-01

    3,4,5-Trimetoxytetraphenylporphyrinoxovanadium (IV) complex (3,4,5-TMVOTPP) was synthesized by a new one pot synthetic method. The complex was studied in the form of single crystal, powder (polycrystalline state), solution and frozen solution (glassy state) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) between room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). Interestingly a well-resolved octet in the EPR spectrum at RT is observed in the pure paramagnetic state of the crystal. This observation is attributed to a greatly reduced dipolar interaction between paramagnetic vanadyl ions due to the large size of the molecule and the resultant stacking in the crystalline state. The line width of the EPR signals in single crystal at RT is approximately 3.3 mT which is more than the usual line width in diluted paramagnets ( approximately 1.5 mT) and is attributed to some kind of broadening effect akin to slow motion broadening. The line width in solvents is more than the crystal value but decreases appreciably at low temperatures. The decrease in line width at low temperature is attributed to the increase in spin-lattice-relaxation time and quenching of RT broadening motion. Only one octet is observed in the crystal EPR spectra which suggests only one formula unit per unit cell or a parallel/antiparallel ordering of V=O vectors in case the formula units per unit cell are more than one. This result needs verification by a detailed X-ray investigation. The crystalline field symmetry around the V(4+) metal ion is revealed to be axial by the observed angular dependence of the EPR spectrum and the powder EPR spectrum. No super hyperfine splitting of the hyperfine lines of the vanadyl ion is observed in solid state or diluted glass up to liquid nitrogen temperature. This suggests an expected weak in-plane pi-bonding with ligands. The spin Hamiltonian parameters for vanadyl ion in crystal, powder, diluted solutions and frozen glasses are evaluated and discussed.

  5. Ikaite solubility in seawater-derived brines at 1 atm and sub-zero temperatures to 265 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Stathys; Kennedy, Hilary; Kennedy, Paul; Thomas, David N.

    2013-05-01

    The concentration-based (stoichiometric) equilibrium solubility product of ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) in seawater and cryogenic seawater-derived brines was determined at 1 atm total pressure over the temperature range from -1.1 to -7.5 °C and the salinity range from 34 to 124 in temperature-salinity pairs representative of sea ice brines. The solubility measurements were obtained in solutions that were undersaturated and supersaturated with respect to ikaite by equilibration with CO2/N2 gas mixtures of known pCO2 (20-400 μatm). The solutions were then equilibrated with synthetic ikaite (seed) for up to 3 months in a closed system. Arrival of the solid-solution system at a long-term chemical equilibrium was indicated by attainment of constant chemical solution composition with respect to total dissolved calcium, total dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity. Using these measurements, the stoichiometric equilibrium solubility product of ikaite (Ksp,ikaite∗=[Ca][CO32-], in molkgsolution-2) was determined, with the carbonate ion concentration computed from the measured total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations. The computed carbonate ion concentration and, by extension, the Ksp,ikaite∗ are both contingent on solving the system of equations that describe the parameters of the CO2 system in seawater by extrapolation to the experimental salinity and temperature conditions. The results show that the pKsp,ikaite∗=-logKsp,ikaite∗ in seawater of salinity 34 at -1.1 °C was 5.362 ± 0.004 and that the pKsp,ikaite∗ in sea ice at the freezing point of brines of salinity greater than 34 can be described as a function of temperature (T, in K) by the equation, pKsp,ikaite∗=-15489.09608+623443.70216T-1+2355.14596lnT, in the temperature range of 265.15 K < T < 271.15 K (-8 °C < t < -2 °C). Brines of low pCO2 (20 μatm) yielded a much slower (>1 month) approach to chemical equilibrium when incubated without seeding ikaite crystals. Simple

  6. Wildfires in Chernobyl-contaminated forests and risks to the population and the environment: a new nuclear disaster about to happen?

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Cozic, Anne; Hao, Wei Min; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-12-01

    Radioactive contamination in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia after the Chernobyl accident left large rural and forest areas to their own fate. Forest succession in conjunction with lack of forest management started gradually transforming the landscape. During the last 28 years dead wood and litter have dramatically accumulated in these areas, whereas climate change has increased temperature and favored drought. The present situation in these forests suggests an increased risk of wildfires, especially after the pronounced forest fires of 2010, which remobilized Chernobyl-deposited radioactive materials transporting them thousand kilometers far. For the aforementioned reasons, we study the consequences of different forest fires on the redistribution of (137)Cs. Using the time frequency of the fires that occurred in the area during 2010, we study three scenarios assuming that 10%, 50% and 100% of the area are burnt. We aim to sensitize the scientific community and the European authorities for the foreseen risks from radioactivity redistribution over Europe. The global model LMDZORINCA that reads deposition density of radionuclides and burnt area from satellites was used, whereas risks for the human and animal population were calculated using the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model and the computerized software ERICA Tool, respectively. Depending on the scenario, whereas between 20 and 240 humans may suffer from solid cancers, of which 10-170 may be fatal. ERICA predicts insignificant changes in animal populations from the fires, whereas the already extreme radioactivity background plays a major role in their living quality. The resulting releases of (137)Cs after hypothetical wildfires in Chernobyl's forests are classified as high in the International Nuclear Events Scale (INES). The estimated cancer incidents and fatalities are expected to be comparable to those predicted for Fukushima. This is attributed to the fact that the distribution of radioactive fallout after the

  7. Final Report [The c-Abl signaling network in the radioadaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Chi-Min, Yuan

    2014-01-28

    The radioadaptive response, or radiation hormesis, i.e. a low dose of radiation can protect cells and organisms from the effects of a subsequent higher dose, is a widely recognized phenomenon. Mechanisms underlying such radiation hormesis, however, remain largely unclear. Preliminary studies indicate an important role of c-Abl signaling in mediating the radioadaptive response. We propose to investigate how c-Abl regulates the crosstalk between p53 and NFκB in response to low doses irradiation. We found in our recent study that low dose IR induces a reciprocal p53 suppression and NFκB activation, which induces HIF-a and subsequently a metabolic reprogramming resulting in a transition from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. Of importance is that this glycolytic switch is essential for the radioadaptive response. This low-dose radiationinduced HIF1α activation was in sharp contrast with the high-dose IR-induced p53 activation and HIF1α inhibition. HIF1α and p53 seem to play distinct roles in mediating the radiation dose-dependent metabolic response. The induction of HIF1α-mediated glycolysis is restricted to a low dose range of radiation, which may have important implications in assessing the level of radiation exposure and its potential health risk. Our results support a dose-dependent metabolic response to IR. When IR doses are below the threshold of causing detectable DNA damage (<0.2Gy) and thus little p53 activation, HIF1α is induced resulting in induction of glycolysis and increased radiation resistance. When the radiation dose reaches levels eliciting DNA damage, p53 is activated and diminishes the activity of HIF1α and glycolysis, leading to the induction of cell death. Our work challenges the LNT model of radiation exposure risk and provides a metabolic mechanism of radioadaptive response. The study supports a need for determining the p53 and HIF1α activity as a potential reliable biological readout of radiation exposure in humans. The

  8. Advantages of MgAlOx over gamma-Al2O3 as a support material for potassium-based high temperature lean NOx traps

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinyong; Gao, Feng; Karim, Ayman M.; Xu, Pinghong; Browning, Nigel D.; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-08-07

    MgAlOx mixed oxides were employed as supports for potassium-based lean NOx traps (LNTs) targeted for high temperature applications. Effects of support compositions, K/Pt loadings, thermal aging and catalyst regeneration on NOx storage capacity were systematically investigated. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, NOx-TPD, TEM, STEM-HAADF and in-situ XAFS. The results indicate that MgAlOx mixed oxides have significant advantages over conventional gamma-Al2O3-supports for LNT catalysts, in terms of high temperature NOx trapping capacity and thermal stability. First, as a basic support, MgAlOx stabilizes stored nitrates (in the form of KNO3) to much higher temperatures than mildly acidic gamma-Al2O3. Second, MgAlOx minimizes Pt sintering during thermal aging, which is not possible for gamma-Al2O3 supports. Notably, combined XRD, in-situ XAFS and STEM-HAADF results indicate that Pt species in the thermally aged Pt/MgAlOx samples are finely dispersed in the oxide matrix as isolated atoms. This strong metal-support interaction stabilizes Pt and minimizes the extent of sintering. However, such strong interactions result in Pt oxidation via coordination with the support so that NO oxidation activity can be adversely affected after aging which, in turn, decreases NOx trapping ability for these catalysts. Interestingly, a high-temperature reduction treatment regenerates essentially full NOx trapping performance. In fact, regenerated Pt/K/MgAlOx catalyst exhibits much better NOx trapping performance than fresh Pt/K/Al2O3 LNTs over the entire temperature range investigated here. In addition to thermal aging, Pt/K loading effects were systemically studied over the fresh samples. The results indicate that NOx trapping is kinetically limited at low temperatures, while thermodynamically limited at high temperatures. A simple conceptual model was developed to explain the Pt and K loading effects on NOx storage. An optimized K loading, which allows balancing between the

  9. Health risk assessment linked to filling coastal quarries with treated dredged seaport sediments.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Yves; Donguy, Gilles; Emmanuel, Evens; Winiarski, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    Dredged seaport sediments raise complex management problems since it is no longer possible to discharge them into the sea. Traditional waste treatments are poorly adapted for these materials in terms of absorbable volumes and cost. In this context, filling quarries with treated sediments appears interesting but its safety regarding human health must be demonstrated. To achieve this, a specific methodology for assessing health risks has been developed and tested on three seaport sediments. This methodology includes the development of a conceptual model of the global scenario studied and the definition of specific protocols for each of its major steps. The approach proposed includes in particular the use of metrological and experimental tools that are new in this context: (i) an experimental lysimeter for characterizing the deposit emissions, and (ii) a geological radar for identifying potential preferential pathways between the sediment deposit and the groundwater. The application of this approach on the three sediments tested for the scenario studied showed the absence of health risk associated with the consumption of groundwater for substances having a "threshold effect" (risk quotient <1), and an acceptable risk for substances having a "non-threshold effect", with the notable exception of arsenic (individual risk equal to 3.10(-6)).

  10. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Laura A; Howell, Rebecca M; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2012-11-01

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for three patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied.

  11. The effects of lead sources on oral bioaccessibility in soil and implications for contaminated land risk management.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sherry; McIlwaine, Rebekka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Cox, Siobhan F; McKinley, Jennifer M; Doherty, Rory; Wragg, Joanna; Cave, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a non-threshold toxin capable of inducing toxic effects at any blood level but availability of soil screening criteria for assessing potential health risks is limited. The oral bioaccessibility of Pb in 163 soil samples was attributed to sources through solubility estimation and domain identification. Samples were extracted following the Unified BARGE Method. Urban, mineralisation, peat and granite domains accounted for elevated Pb concentrations compared to rural samples. High Pb solubility explained moderate-high gastric (G) bioaccessible fractions throughout the study area. Higher maximum G concentrations were measured in urban (97.6 mg kg(-1)) and mineralisation (199.8 mg kg(-1)) domains. Higher average G concentrations occurred in mineralisation (36.4 mg kg(-1)) and granite (36.0 mg kg(-1)) domains. Findings suggest diffuse anthropogenic and widespread geogenic contamination could be capable of presenting health risks, having implications for land management decisions in jurisdictions where guidance advises these forms of pollution should not be regarded as contaminated land. PMID:25603155

  12. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J.Y.; Kwak, H.S.; Choi, J.S.; Ahn, H.K.; Oh, Y.J.; Velázquez-Armenta, E.Y.; Nava-Ocampo, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  13. The effects of lead sources on oral bioaccessibility in soil and implications for contaminated land risk management.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sherry; McIlwaine, Rebekka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Cox, Siobhan F; McKinley, Jennifer M; Doherty, Rory; Wragg, Joanna; Cave, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a non-threshold toxin capable of inducing toxic effects at any blood level but availability of soil screening criteria for assessing potential health risks is limited. The oral bioaccessibility of Pb in 163 soil samples was attributed to sources through solubility estimation and domain identification. Samples were extracted following the Unified BARGE Method. Urban, mineralisation, peat and granite domains accounted for elevated Pb concentrations compared to rural samples. High Pb solubility explained moderate-high gastric (G) bioaccessible fractions throughout the study area. Higher maximum G concentrations were measured in urban (97.6 mg kg(-1)) and mineralisation (199.8 mg kg(-1)) domains. Higher average G concentrations occurred in mineralisation (36.4 mg kg(-1)) and granite (36.0 mg kg(-1)) domains. Findings suggest diffuse anthropogenic and widespread geogenic contamination could be capable of presenting health risks, having implications for land management decisions in jurisdictions where guidance advises these forms of pollution should not be regarded as contaminated land.

  14. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops). PMID:27263113

  15. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops).

  16. ICRP Publication 131: Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge of stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is reviewed regarding haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. The identity of the target cells for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive and mostly quiescent stem cell population (able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy), and, in a few tissues, to daughter progenitor cells. Several biological processes could contribute to the protection of stem cells from mutation accumulation: (1) accurate DNA repair; (2) rapid induced death of injured stem cells; (3) retention of the intact parental strand during divisions in some tissues so that mutations are passed to the daughter differentiating cells; and (4) stem cell competition, whereby undamaged stem cells outcompete damaged stem cells for residence in the vital niche. DNA repair mainly operates within a few days of irradiation, while stem cell replications and competition require weeks or many months depending on the tissue type. This foundation is used to provide a biological insight to protection issues including the linear-non-threshold and relative risk models, differences in cancer risk between tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age.

  17. Extreme sensitivity and the practical implications of risk assessment thresholds.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, John; Nicolich, Mark; Lewis, R Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Traditional risk-assessment theory assumes the existence of a threshold for non-cancer health effects. However, a recent trend in environmental regulation rejects this assumption in favor of non-threshold linearity for these endpoints. This trend is driven largely by two related concepts: (1) a theoretical assumption of wide-ranging human sensitivity, and (2) inability to detect thresholds in epidemiologic models. Wide-ranging sensitivity assumes a subpopulation with extreme background vulnerability, so that even trivial environmental exposures are hazardous to someone somewhere. We use examples from the real world of clinical medicine to show that this theoretical assumption is inconsistent with the biology of mammalian systems and the realities of patient care. Using examples from particulate-matter air-pollution research, we further show that failure to reject linearity is usually driven by statistical rather than biological considerations, and that nonlinear/threshold models often have a similar or better fit than their linear counterparts. This evidence suggests the existence of practical, real-world thresholds for most chemical exposures.

  18. Health risk estimates for groundwater and soil contamination in the Slovak Republic: a convenient tool for identification and mapping of risk areas.

    PubMed

    Fajčíková, K; Cvečková, V; Stewart, A; Rapant, S

    2014-10-01

    We undertook a quantitative estimation of health risks to residents living in the Slovak Republic and exposed to contaminated groundwater (ingestion by adult population) and/or soils (ingestion by adult and child population). Potential risk areas were mapped to give a visual presentation at basic administrative units of the country (municipalities, districts, regions) for easy discussion with policy and decision-makers. The health risk estimates were calculated by US EPA methods, applying threshold values for chronic risk and non-threshold values for cancer risk. The potential health risk was evaluated for As, Ba, Cd, Cu, F, Hg, Mn, NO3 (-), Pb, Sb, Se and Zn for groundwater and As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Cu, F, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Zn for soils. An increased health risk was identified mainly in historical mining areas highly contaminated by geogenic-anthropogenic sources (ore deposit occurrence, mining, metallurgy). Arsenic and antimony were the most significant elements in relation to health risks from groundwater and soil contamination in the Slovak Republic contributing a significant part of total chronic risk levels. Health risk estimation for soil contamination has highlighted the significance of exposure through soil ingestion in children. Increased cancer risks from groundwater and soil contamination by arsenic were noted in several municipalities and districts throughout the country in areas with significantly high arsenic levels in the environment. This approach to health risk estimations and visualization represents a fast, clear and convenient tool for delineation of risk areas at national and local levels.

  19. Development of radiation protection standards

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Radiation protection standards are based on the best available knowledge, caution, and perception. Dose limits for occupational exposure have decreased as knowledge was gained about radiation effects: from 0.6 Sv (60 rem)/year for 1900-1930 to 50 mSv (5 rem)/year in 1958 (the level still used as of 1990). Current dose limits for public exposure range from 1 mSv to 5 mSv, depending on frequency of exposure. For the embryo and fetus, dose limits are 0.5 mSv/mo and 5 mSv for the entire gestation. In the 1970s, the concept of acceptable risk and that of a non-threshold dose-response relationship became the basis for setting dose limits. Three principles of radiation protection are that (a) dose levels should not exceed acceptable levels, (b) optimal dose levels should be as low as reasonably achievable, and (c) radiation should not be used unless it produces a positive net benefit. Although no dose limits have been set for patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures, such measures must provide a net benefit to patients at optimal dose levels.

  20. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Kwak, H S; Han, J Y; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Oh, Y J; Velázquez-Armenta, E Y; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week. PMID:26691866

  1. ICRP Publication 131: Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge of stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is reviewed regarding haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. The identity of the target cells for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive and mostly quiescent stem cell population (able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy), and, in a few tissues, to daughter progenitor cells. Several biological processes could contribute to the protection of stem cells from mutation accumulation: (1) accurate DNA repair; (2) rapid induced death of injured stem cells; (3) retention of the intact parental strand during divisions in some tissues so that mutations are passed to the daughter differentiating cells; and (4) stem cell competition, whereby undamaged stem cells outcompete damaged stem cells for residence in the vital niche. DNA repair mainly operates within a few days of irradiation, while stem cell replications and competition require weeks or many months depending on the tissue type. This foundation is used to provide a biological insight to protection issues including the linear-non-threshold and relative risk models, differences in cancer risk between tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age. PMID:26956677

  2. Linear Versus Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationship Between Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Meconium Concentration of Nine Different Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Kwak, H S; Han, J Y; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Oh, Y J; Velázquez-Armenta, E Y; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2015-01-01

    Presence of individual fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium is considered to be a reliable biomarker of prenatal alcohol exposure, and their concentration has been found to be linearly associated with poor postnatal development, supporting the widely extended idea that ethanol is a non-threshold teratogen. However, a growing number of epidemiological studies have consistently found a lack of adverse short- and long-term fetal outcomes at low exposure levels. We therefore aimed to investigate the relationship between the concentration of individual FAEEs and prenatal alcohol exposure in meconium samples collected within the first 6 to 12?h after birth from 182 babies born to abstainer mothers and from 54 babies born to women who self-reported either light or moderate alcohol ingestion in the second or third trimester of pregnancy. In most cases, the individual FAEE concentrations were negligible and not significantly different (P >0.05) between exposed and control babies. The concentrations appeared to increase linearly with the dose only in the few babies born to mothers who reported >3 drinks/week. These results provide evidence that the correlation between prenatal alcohol exposure and individual FAEE concentrations in meconium is non-linear shape, with a threshold probably at 3 drinks/week.

  3. Prediction of children's blood lead levels on the basis of household-specific soil lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, R.J.; Bain, R.P.

    1988-07-01

    To help guide policy decisions about removing lead-contaminated soils, the authors estimated a regression model for predicting a child's blood lead level on the basis of his or her household-specific soil lead level. The data analyzed were blood lead levels (1-45 micrograms/dl) and household-specific soil lead levels (53-20,700 ppm) of 596 children aged 1-5 years who lived in the Helena Valley of Montana and the Silver Valley of Idaho during August 1983. A non-threshold, multiple linear regression model indicated that the estimated mean natural log transformed blood lead level increased by 0.231 micrograms/dl for each unit increase in natural log transformed soil lead level (ppm), after adjusting for the average number of daily outdoor play hours and whether someone in the household smoked. The model predicted that, at a soil lead level of 1,000 ppm, a child who does not play outside and who does not live in a household where someone smokes would be at low risk of lead toxicity (blood lead level between 4 and 24 micrograms/dl).

  4. Evaluation and regulation of pesticides in drinking water: A Canadian approach.

    PubMed

    Ritter, L; Wood, G

    1989-01-01

    Pesticides are registered in Canada under the authority of the Pest Control Products Act, administered by the Department of Agriculture. Pre-market registration requirements include submission of extensive toxicology data in order to allow evaluation of potential human hazards which may be associated with exposure to pesticides. Drinking water guidelines in Canada, although under provincial jurisdiction, are generally recommended by the federal government with collaboration of provincial authorities. In 1987, 42 pesticides were selected for development of guidelines for drinking water. When complete, the 42 pesticides will represent approximately 80% of all agricultural pesticides utilized in Canada, based on active ingredient weight sold. As do many other regulatory agencies, the Department of National Health and Welfare uses two different approaches to derive health-based guidelines or maximum acceptable concentrations of pesticides in drinking water. The threshold approach assumes that there is a dose below which no adverse effect will occur. This threshold level is closely related to the experimentally determined no observed adverse effect level and, when divided by an appropriate uncertainty or safety factor, forms the basis for the establishment of the maximum acceptable concentration. The second approach is the non-threshold or risk assessment approach and this assumes that these is some probability of harm at any level of exposure. This latter approach is generally utilized for chemicals believed to be capable of causing cancer and has not been used for any of the existing 29 pesticide drinking water guidelines developed in Canada.

  5. When is a dose not a dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although an enormous amount of progress has been made in the fields of radiation protection and risk assessment, a number of significant problems remain. The one problem which transcends all the rest, and which has been subject to considerable misunderstanding, involves what has come to be known as the 'linear non-threshold hypothesis', or 'linear hypothesis'. Particularly troublesome has been the interpretation that any amount of radiation can cause an increase in the excess incidence of cancer. The linear hypothesis has dominated radiation protection philosophy for more than three decades, with enormous financial, societal and political impacts and has engendered an almost morbid fear of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation in large segments of the population. This document presents a different interpretation of the linear hypothesis. The basis for this view lies in the evolution of dose-response functions, particularly with respect to their use initially in the context of early acute effects, and then for the late effects, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. 11 refs., 4 figs. (MHB)

  6. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rechner, Laura A.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for 3 patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied. PMID:23051714

  7. Mixed integer programming improves comprehensibility and plan quality in inverse optimization of prostate HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Bram L; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L

    2013-02-21

    Current inverse treatment planning methods that optimize both catheter positions and dwell times in prostate HDR brachytherapy use surrogate linear or quadratic objective functions that have no direct interpretation in terms of dose-volume histogram (DVH) criteria, do not result in an optimum or have long solution times. We decrease the solution time of the existing linear and quadratic dose-based programming models (LP and QP, respectively) to allow optimizing over potential catheter positions using mixed integer programming. An additional average speed-up of 75% can be obtained by stopping the solver at an early stage, without deterioration of the plan quality. For a fixed catheter configuration, the dwell time optimization model LP solves to optimality in less than 15 s, which confirms earlier results. We propose an iterative procedure for QP that allows us to prescribe the target dose as an interval, while retaining independence between the solution time and the number of dose calculation points. This iterative procedure is comparable in speed to the LP model and produces better plans than the non-iterative QP. We formulate a new dose-volume-based model that maximizes V(100%) while satisfying pre-set DVH criteria. This model optimizes both catheter positions and dwell times within a few minutes depending on prostate volume and number of catheters, optimizes dwell times within 35 s and gives better DVH statistics than dose-based models. The solutions suggest that the correlation between the objective value and the clinical plan quality is weak in the existing dose-based models. PMID:23363622

  8. Novel lung IMRT planning algorithms with nonuniform dose delivery strategy to account for respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Gewanter, Richard; Kutcher, Gerald

    2006-09-01

    To effectively deliver radiation dose to lung tumors, respiratory motion has to be considered in treatment planning. In this paper we first present a new lung IMRT planning algorithm, referred as the dose shaping (DS) method, that shapes the dose distribution according to the probability distribution of the tumor over the breathing cycle to account for respiratory motion. In IMRT planning a dose-based convolution method was generally adopted to compensate for random organ motion by performing 4-D dose calculations using a tumor motion probability density function. We modified the CON-DOSE method to a dose volume histogram based convolution method (CON-DVH) that allows nonuniform dose distribution to account for respiratory motion. We implemented the two new planning algorithms on an in-house IMRT planning system that uses the Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) planning workstation as the dose calculation engine. The new algorithms were compared with (1) the conventional margin extension approach in which margin is generated based on the extreme positions of the tumor, (2) the dose-based convolution method, and (3) gating with 3 mm residual motion. Dose volume histogram, tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability, and mean lung dose were calculated and used to evaluate the relative performance of these approaches at the end-exhale phase of the respiratory cycle. We recruited six patients in our treatment planning study. The study demonstrated that the two new methods could significantly reduce the ipsilateral normal lung dose and outperformed the margin extension method and the dose-based convolution method. Compared with the gated approach that has the best performance in the low dose region, the two methods we proposed have similar potential to escalate tumor dose, but could be more efficient because dose is delivered continuously. PMID:17022235

  9. Improved Radiation Dosimetry/Risk Estimates To Facilitate Environmental Management of Plutonium Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Tokarskaya, Zoya, B.; Zhuntova, Galina, V.; Osovets, Sergey, V.; Syrchikov, Victor, A.; Pesternikova, Valentina, S.; Belyaeva, Zinaida, D.; Khokhryakov, Valentin, F; Vasilenko, Evgeny, K.; Okladnikova, Nadezhda D.

    2004-12-10

    for the relative risk (RR) for lung cancer induction in humans [Mayak Plutonium Facility Production Association (PA) workers in Russia] after combined exposure to alpha and gamma radiations. This is based on the published observation that RR for neoplastic transformation has a similar dependence on dose as for the RR of cancer induction. Based on our mechanistic model, low dose-rate exposure to low or moderate doses of gamma radiation is predicted to possibly protect adult humans from cancer occurrence, including cancer induction by low dose alpha-radiation and cigarette smoke. The gamma irradiation associated protection arises through gamma rays hitting many of the millions of normal cells in the irradiated tissue, which turns on intra- and intercellular signaling that leads to cleansing of tissue of neoplastically transformed and other genomically compromised cells (e.g., mutants, micronucleated cells, etc.) via a selective apoptosis mechanism. Using available cohort study data for Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to gamma rays in combination with alpha radiation from inhaled Pu-239, we can explain the hormetic-type, dose-response relationship for the RR for radiation-induced lung cancer seen in the workers as well as in tuberculosis patients receiving chronic X-ray irradiation. Based on currently available information, the linear nonthreshold (LNT) model appears to apply to chronic exposure to alpha radiation alone but, in adults, not to exposure to gamma radiation or combinations of gamma and alpha radiations. We found that linear extrapolation from high-dose data to low doses can introduce phantom (nonexistent) excess cancer risk in the case of combined exposure of adults to gamma and alpha radiations or exposure only to gamma rays. Because remediation of radionuclide-contaminated U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is driven by risk-based considerations, and risks are assumed to increase according to the LNT model, it is important to understand under what

  10. Genetic Control of the Trigger for the G2/M Checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Eric J.; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Young, Erik F.

    2013-10-01

    The work undertaken in this project addressed two seminal areas of low dose radiation biology that are poorly understood and controversial. These areas are the challenge to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) paradigm at low doses of radiation and, the fundamental elements of radiation bystander effect biology Genetic contributions to low dose checkpoint engagement: The LNT paradigm is an extrapolation of known, measured cancer induction endpoints. Importantly, data for lower doses is often not available. Debatably, radiation protection standards have been introduced which are prudently contingent on the adherence of cancer risk to the established trend seen at higher doses. Intriguing findings from other labs have hinted at separate DNA damage response programs that engage at low or high levels of radiation. Individual radiation sensitivity commensurate with hemizygosity for a radiation sensitivity gene has been estimated at 1-2% in the U.S.. Careful interrogation of the DNA damage response at low doses of radiation became important and served as the basis for this grant. Several genes were tested in combinations to determine if combined haploinsufficiency for multiple radiosensitizing genes could render a cell more sensitive to lower levels of acute radiation exposure. We measured a classical radiation response endpoint, cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts were used and provided a uniform, rapidly dividing and genetically manipulable population of study. Our system did not report checkpoint engagement at acute doses of gamma rays below 100 mGy. The system did report checkpoint engagement reproducibly at 500 mGy establishing a threshold for activation between 100 and 500 mGy. Engagement of the checkpoint was ablated in cells nullizygous for ATM but was otherwise unperturbed in cells combinatorially haploinsufficient for ATM and Rad9, ATM and PTEN or PTEN and Rad9. Taken together, these experiments tell us that, in a sensitive fibroblast culture

  11. Balanced anesthesia and constant-rate infusions in horses.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Balanced anesthetic techniques are commonly used in equine patients, and include the combination of a volatile anesthetic with at least one injectable anesthetic throughout the maintenance period. Injectable anesthetics used in balanced anesthesia include the α2-agonists, lidocaine, ketamine, and opioids, and those with muscle-relaxant properties such as benzodiazepines and guaifenesin. Administration of these injectable anesthetics is best using constant-rate infusions based on the pharmacokinetics of the drug, which allows steady-state concentrations and predictable pharmacodynamic actions. This review summarizes the different drug combinations used in horses, and provides calculated recommended doses based on the pharmacokinetics of individual drugs. PMID:23498047

  12. Development and evaluation of a technique for in vivo monitoring of 60Co in human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, J. Q.; Lucena, E. A.; Dantas, A. L. A.; Dantas, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    60Co is a fission product of 235U and represents a risk of internal exposure of workers in nuclear power plants, especially those involved in the maintenance of potentially contaminated parts and equipment. The control of 60Co intake by inhalation can be performed through in vivo monitoring. This work describes the evaluation of a technique through the minimum detectable activity and the corresponding minimum detectable effective doses, based on biokinetic and dosimetric models of 60Co in the human body. The results allow to state that the technique is suitable either for monitoring of occupational exposures or evaluation of accidental intake.

  13. Comparison of UV-B measurements performed with a Brewer spectrophotometer and a new UVB-1 broad band detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Meleti, Charicleia; Ziomas, Ioannis C.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the UV-B erythemal dose, based on solar spectra acquired with a Brewer spectrophotometer at Thessaloniki, Greece, are compared to measurements performed with the recently introduced, by the Yankee Environmental Systems, (Robertson type) broad band solar UV-B detector. The spectral response function of this detector, when applied to the Brewer spectral UV-B measurements, results in remarkably comparable estimates of the erythemal UV-B dose. The two instruments provide similar information on the UV-B dose when they are cross-examined under a variety of meteorological and atmospheric conditions and over the a large range of solar zenith angles and total ozone.

  14. The "OPTI-CLOT" trial. A randomised controlled trial on periOperative PharmacokineTIc-guided dosing of CLOTting factor concentrate in haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Hazendonk, Hendrika C A M; van Moort, Iris; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Kruip, Marieke J H A; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta A P; van der Meer, Felix J M; Meijer, Karina; Peters, Marjolein; Schutgens, Roger E G; Zwaan, Christian M; Driessens, Mariette H E; Polinder, Suzanne; Leebeek, Frank W G; Mathôt, Ron A A; Cnossen, Marjon H

    2015-08-31

    Haemophilia A is an X-linked inherited, rare bleeding disorder, caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Previous studies in prophylactic dosing have demonstrated that FVIII consumption can be significantly reduced by individualising dosing based on combined analysis of individual pharmacokinetic (PK) profiling and population PK data (Bayesian analysis). So far, no studies have been performed that address perioperative concentrate consumption using iterative PK-guided dosing based on a PK population model. The "OPTI-CLOT" trial is an open-label, prospective, multicentre randomised controlled superiority trial (RCT), aiming to detect a 25 % difference in perioperative FVIII concentrate consumption with iterative Bayesian PK-guided dosing in comparison to the standard dosing procedure. Sixty haemophilia A patients ≥ 12 years of age, with FVIII plasma levels ≤ 0.05 IUml(-1) will be included requiring FVIII replacement therapy administered either by continuous or bolus infusion for an elective, low or medium risk surgical procedure. The proposed study aims to investigate a novel perioperative iterative PK-guided dosing strategy, based on a recently constructed perioperative PK population model. This model will potentially decrease underdosing and overdosing of clotting factor concentrate and is expected to overall reduce FVIII consumption by minimally 25 %. Moreover, participating hospitals will gain experience with PK-guided dosing, facilitating future implementation of this intervention which is expected to optimise current care and reduce costs of treatment.

  15. Radiation biodosimetry: Applications for spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, W. F.; Miller, A. C.; Grace, M. B.; McLeland, C. B.; Luo, L.; Muderhwa, J. M.; Miner, V. L.; Prasanna, P. G. S.

    The multiparametric dosimetry system that we are developing for medical radiological defense applications could be adapted for spaceflight environments. The system complements the internationally accepted personnel dosimeters and cytogenetic analysis of chromosome aberrations, considered the best means of documenting radiation doses for health records. Our system consists of a portable hematology analyzer, molecular biodosimetry using nucleic acid and antigen-based diagnostic equipment, and a dose assessment management software application. A dry-capillary tube reagent-based centrifuge blood cell counter (QBC Autoread Plus, Beckon Dickinson Bioscience) measures peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes, which could determine radiation dose based on the kinetics of blood cell depletion. Molecular biomarkers for ionizing radiation exposure (gene expression changes, blood proteins) can be measured in real time using such diagnostic detection technologies as miniaturized nucleic acid sequences and antigen-based biosensors, but they require validation of dose-dependent targets and development of optimized protocols and analysis systems. The Biodosimetry Assessment Tool, a software application, calculates radiation dose based on a patient's physical signs and symptoms and blood cell count analysis. It also annotates location of personnel dosimeters, displays a summary of a patient's dosimetric information to healthcare professionals, and archives the data for further use. These radiation assessment diagnostic technologies can have dual-use applications supporting general medical-related care.

  16. Setting criteria and MCLGs for contaminants in ambient and drinking water based on carcinogenic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Du, J.T.; Orme-Zavaleta, J.

    1995-12-31

    For the protection of human health from contaminants in ambient and drinking water, EPA is required to set the Ambient Water Quality Criteria and Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGS) for contaminants in ambient and drinking water. The current method has been driven by the cancer effect via ingestion. For ambient water quality, the criteria were published in 1980; the risk (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}7}) for all carcinogens was estimated by the linearized multistage model. The method for setting the MCLGs is based on 1986 EPA Cancer Guidelines. These Cancer Guidelines classify chemicals into alpha-numerical groups. To estimate cancer risk, the practice has been to rely on the default linearized multistage model (LMS) for low-dose extrapolation. The LMS assumes non-threshold and gives a 95% upper bound on risk. Cancer biology has advanced substantially since 1986, EPA is in the midst of revising the existing cancer guidelines. In parallel, EPA`s Office of Water is proposing to revise the methodology for both ambient water quality criteria and MCLG, including cancer. This new approach will provide more narratives with rationale as to whether the agent is likely to be a human carcinogen. Risk assessment will integrate the whole database, including human and animal tumor data, mode of action, genotoxicity, pharmacokinetics, physical/chemical properties, structure-activity relationship and the route and level of exposure on the agent. Also, depending on biological and physical/chemical considerations, either linear, nonlinear or both approaches will be used for low dose extrapolation. Applications of the revised cancer guidelines to ambient water quality criteria and MCLG development will be presented.

  17. Communicating air pollution-related health risks to the public: an application of the Air Quality Health Index in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Wang, Xi; Meng, Xia; Hua, Jing; Zhou, Zhijun; Chen, Bingheng; Kan, Haidong

    2013-01-01

    The Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) was originally developed in Canada. However, little is known about its validity in communicating morbidity risks. We aimed to establish the AQHI in Shanghai, China, and to compare the associations of AQHI and existing Air Pollution Index (API) with daily mortality and morbidity. We constructed the AQHI as the sum of excess total mortality associated with individual air pollutants, and then adjusted it to an arbitrary scale (0-10), according to a time-series analysis of air pollution and mortality in Shanghai from 2001 to 2008. We examined the associations of AQHI with daily mortality and morbidity, and compared these associations with API from 2005 to 2008. The coefficients of short-term associations of total mortality with particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM(10)), PM(2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) were used in the establishment of AQHI. During 2005-2008, the AQHI showed linear non-threshold positive associations with daily mortality and morbidity. A unit increase of the PM(10)-AQHI was associated with a 0.90% [95% (confidence interval, CI), 0.43 to 1.37], 1.04% (95%CI, 0.04 to 2.04), 1.62% (95%CI, 0.39 to 2.85) and 0.51% (95%CI, 0.09 to 0.93) increase of current-day total mortality, hospital admissions, outpatient visits and emergency room visits, respectively. The PM(2.5)-AQHI showed quite similar effect estimates with the PM(10)-AQHI. In contrast, the associations for API were much weaker and generally statistically insignificant. The AQHI, compared with the existing API, provided a more effective tool to communicate the air pollution-related health risks to the public.

  18. Arsenic accumulation in native plants of West Bengal, India: prospects for phytoremediation but concerns with the use of medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Mishra, Aradhana; Kumar, Amit; Dave, Richa; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Shukla, Mridul Kumar; Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental and food chain contaminant and class I, non-threshold carcinogen. Plants accumulate As due to ionic mimicry that is of importance as a measure of phytoremediation but of concern due to the use of plants in alternative medicine. The present study investigated As accumulation in native plants including some medicinal plants, from three districts [Chinsurah (Hoogly), Porbosthali (Bardhman), and Birnagar (Nadia)] of West Bengal, India, having a history of As pollution. A site-specific response was observed for Specific Arsenic Uptake (SAU; mg kg(-1) dw) in total number of 13 (8 aquatic and 5 terrestrial) collected plants. SAU was higher in aquatic plants (5-60 mg kg(-1) dw) than in terrestrial species (4-19 mg kg(-1) dw). The level of As was lower in medicinal plants (MPs) than in non-medicinal plants, however it was still beyond the WHO permissible limit (1 mg kg(-1) dw). The concentration of other elements (Cu, Zn, Se, and Pb) was found to be within prescribed limits in medicinal plants (MP). Among the aquatic plants, Marsilea showed the highest SAU (avg. 45 mg kg(-1) dw), however, transfer factor (TF) of As was the maximum in Centella asiatica (MP, avg. 1). Among the terrestrial plants, the maximum SAU and TF were demonstrated by Alternanthera ficoidea (avg. 15) and Phyllanthus amarus (MP, avg. 1.27), respectively. In conclusion, the direct use of MP or their by products for humans should not be practiced without proper regulation. In other way, one fern species (Marsilea) and some aquatic plants (Eichhornia crassipes and Cyperus difformis) might be suitable candidates for As phytoremediation of paddy fields.

  19. Arsenic accumulation in native plants of West Bengal, India: prospects for phytoremediation but concerns with the use of medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Mishra, Aradhana; Kumar, Amit; Dave, Richa; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Shukla, Mridul Kumar; Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental and food chain contaminant and class I, non-threshold carcinogen. Plants accumulate As due to ionic mimicry that is of importance as a measure of phytoremediation but of concern due to the use of plants in alternative medicine. The present study investigated As accumulation in native plants including some medicinal plants, from three districts [Chinsurah (Hoogly), Porbosthali (Bardhman), and Birnagar (Nadia)] of West Bengal, India, having a history of As pollution. A site-specific response was observed for Specific Arsenic Uptake (SAU; mg kg(-1) dw) in total number of 13 (8 aquatic and 5 terrestrial) collected plants. SAU was higher in aquatic plants (5-60 mg kg(-1) dw) than in terrestrial species (4-19 mg kg(-1) dw). The level of As was lower in medicinal plants (MPs) than in non-medicinal plants, however it was still beyond the WHO permissible limit (1 mg kg(-1) dw). The concentration of other elements (Cu, Zn, Se, and Pb) was found to be within prescribed limits in medicinal plants (MP). Among the aquatic plants, Marsilea showed the highest SAU (avg. 45 mg kg(-1) dw), however, transfer factor (TF) of As was the maximum in Centella asiatica (MP, avg. 1). Among the terrestrial plants, the maximum SAU and TF were demonstrated by Alternanthera ficoidea (avg. 15) and Phyllanthus amarus (MP, avg. 1.27), respectively. In conclusion, the direct use of MP or their by products for humans should not be practiced without proper regulation. In other way, one fern species (Marsilea) and some aquatic plants (Eichhornia crassipes and Cyperus difformis) might be suitable candidates for As phytoremediation of paddy fields. PMID:21713498

  20. Important considerations in the development of public health advisories for arsenic and arsenic-containing compounds in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, P B; Wilson, B; Ishaque, A

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water contamination by arsenic remains a major public health problem. Acute and chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been reported in many countries of the world; especially in Argentina, Bangladesh, India, Mexico, Thailand, and Taiwan, where a large proportion of drinking water (ground water) is contaminated with a high concentration of arsenic. Research has also pointed out significantly higher standardized mortality ratios and cumulative mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, kidney, skin, liver, and colon in many areas of arsenic pollution. General health effects that are associated with arsenic exposure include cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease, developmental anomalies, neurologic and neurobehavioral disorders, diabetes, hearing loss, portal fibrosis of the liver, lung fibrosis, hematologic disorders (anemia, leukopenia, and eosinophilia), and carcinoma. Although, the clinical manifestations of arsenic poisoning appear similar, the toxicity of arsenic compounds depends largely u[on the chemical species and the form of arsenic involved. On the basis of its high degree of toxicity to humans, and the non-threshold dose-response assumption, a zero level exposure is recommended for arsenic, even though this level is practically non-attainable. In this review, we provide and discuss important information on the physical and chemical properties, production and use, fate and transport, toxicokinetics, systemic and carcinogenic health effects, regulatory and health guidelines, analytical methods, and treatment technologies that are applied to arsenic pollution. Such information is critical in assisting the federal, state and local officials who are responsible for protecting public health in dealing with the problem of drinking water contamination by arsenic and arsenic-containing compounds.

  1. [New drinking water reference values for monocyclic nitro compounds].

    PubMed

    Wollin, K-M; Dieter, H H

    2005-11-01

    Nitro compounds are important industrial chemicals with a broad range of applications. During their commercial production or practical use and through leaching from military waste sites they may be released into the environment and thus lead to a contamination of drinking water resources. In the last 15-20 years, the wider public first became aware of nitro compounds as contaminants in groundwater and drinking water resources that originated from manufacturing and processing of secondary explosives during World War II. In 1980, the former Bundesgesundheitsamt (BGA; Federal Health Office) had based its first risk assessment of monocyclic nitro compounds in drinking water on the known carcinogenicity of some aromatic amines in the working environment. On this basis, the BGA recommended for metabolites of aromatic nitro compounds a guide value of 0.1 mug/l for the sum of aromatic amines. From the beginning to the middle of the 1990s, the BGA established a more specific health-related assessment for the individual compounds, but not on the basis of tolerable or acceptable body doses but of dimensionless risk assessment scores ranking their combined toxic and carcinogenic potential on a scale from 1 to 100. In this contribution, we derived new health-based drinking water guide values for 19 nitro(aromatic) compounds and nitramines, including hexogen, octogen, and tetryl as well as the O-nitro compound PETN. All compounds under consideration have been detected within the last 15 years in Germany at contaminated sites close to or directly in groundwater resources for drinking water. For toxicological evaluation and derivation of guideline values for the nitro compounds of interest, the tolerable daily intake (TDI) approach was used for chemicals exhibiting a threshold for toxic effects. This was done by using established tolerable body doses for humans based on an identified NOAEL/LOAEL for the most sensitive toxic endpoint. In the case of non-threshold chemical

  2. Population dynamics and management of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) in China: the relative contributions of climate, natural enemies and cropping patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zalucki, M P; Yonow, T; Kriticos, D J; Bao, H; Chen, H; Hu, Z; Feng, X; Furlong, M J

    2016-04-01

    Diamondback moth or DBM is the major pest of Brassica vegetable production worldwide. Control has relied on insecticides, and DBM resistance to these compounds has evolved rapidly. We review and summarize data on DBM population dynamics across a large latitudinal gradient from southwest to northeast China: DBM is, on average, more common in southern locations than in northern locations. The species' phenology is consistent: in southern and central locations there is a decline during hot summer months, while in the north, the species can only exist in the summer following migrations from the south. A cohort-based discrete-time model, driven by daily maximum and minimum temperatures and rainfall, which was built using the DYMEX modelling software, captures the age-structured population dynamics of DBM at representative locations, with year round cropping and threshold-based insecticide applications. The scale of the simulated pest problem varies with cropping practices. Local production breaks and strict post-harvest crop hygiene are associated with lower DBM populations. Biological control appears to improve the management of DBM. Of the management strategies explored, non-threshold based applications of insecticides with reduced spray efficacy (due to poor application or resistance) appear the least effective. The model simulates the phenology and abundance patterns in the population dynamics across the climatic gradient in China reasonably well. With planned improvements, and backed by a system of field sampling and weather inputs, it should serve well as a platform for a local pest forecast system, spanning the range of DBM in China, and perhaps elsewhere. PMID:26693884

  3. Community health risk assessment after a fire with asbestos containing fallout

    PubMed Central

    Bridgman, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A factory fire in Tranmere, Merseyside, England, deposited asbestos containing fallout in an urban area. There was considerable community anxiety for months after the incident. Therefore an assessment of the long term health risks of this acute environmental incident were requested by the local health authority.
METHODS—The facts of the incident were gathered and appraised from unpublished and press reports, involved personnel, and further analysis of material collected at the time of the incident. The literature on the long term health risks of asbestos was reviewed, and combined with evidence on asbestos exposure to estimate community health risk.
RESULTS—Risk was almost entirely from exposure to fire fallout of chrysotile in asbestos bitumen paper covering the factory roof. Amosite was only detected in a few samples and in trace amounts. The number of people who lived in the area of fallout was 16 000 to 48 000. From a non-threshold model with assumptions likely to overestimate risk, the lung cancer risk is estimated to be undetectably small. Risk of mesothelioma from chrysotile exposure, and risks of lung cancer and mesothelioma from amosite exposure were based on observational studies and were estimated to be even lower than that of lung cancer risk from chrysotile exposure. Academically, there are assumptions that while reasonable cannot be proven, for example, the validity of extrapolating observed risk from much higher exposures to lower exposures, estimates of individual exposure, and that there is no threshold for asbestos to cause cancer.
CONCLUSIONS—The author is unaware of a similar study on long term health risks in a community exposed to asbestos in a fire. It is concluded that, using methods that do not underestimate risk, risk is undetectably small. Practical lessons from this methodology and approach to health risk assessment are discussed.


Keywords: asbestos; environmental pollutants; mesothelioma; health risk

  4. Effects of sleep deprivation on naval seamen: II. Short recovery sleep on performance.

    PubMed

    Foo, S C; How, J; Siew, M G; Wong, T M; Vijayan, A; Kanapathy, R

    1994-09-01

    Twenty male naval volunteers, aged 18 to 20 years, with 12 to 14 years of education, underwent a total sleep deprivation experiment on board a Republic of Singapore Navy landing ship in the South China Sea for a period of 42-102 hours. The sleep group comprised eight volunteers who dropped out at the 44th-46th h of the experiment and were randomly assigned to a 2 or 4 h sleep regime. The rest served as sleep-deprived controls. Neurobehavioural performance tests, profile of mood state and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale were applied 6 hourly starting from 6.00 am on the first experimental day. No thresholds were observed in the performance of tests related to manual tasks and subjective feeling, including naval tasks, mood and sleepiness scale during the sleep deprivation experiment. However, thresholds were observed in the performance of tests requiring cognitive and perceptive skills, including the grooved peg board, trail making, sea-shore rhythm, addition, digit span, digit symbol, flicker fusion and dynamometer tests. Performances in these tests were observed to deteriorate only after approximately 30 h of sleep deprivation. The Z score for the non-threshold tests (Z-N) deteriorated from -0.01 at the start of the experiment to 1.25 at the 42nd h of the experiment just before the imposed sleep and improved to 0.81 at the 48th h of the experiment just after the imposed sleep; and the Z score for the threshold tests (Z-T) varied from -0.07 at the start to 0.49 just before sleep (at the 42nd h) and to continuously deteriorate to 0.83 just after sleep (at the 48th h).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [Prevention of cancer and the dose-effect relationship: the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiations].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, M

    2009-07-01

    . Promoting factors are agents that either perturb intercellular signalling or stimulate cell proliferation (e.g. hormones) or increase cell mortality: mechanical or chemical irritation (e.g. alcohol, bacteria, viruses) thereby inducing compensatory cell proliferation. Thus, gradually precancerous cells become able to divide more rapidly with greater autonomy. This phase ends when a subclone of cells has acquired the capacity of autonomous proliferation. The third phase is that of progression during which cells proliferate regularly without any stimulation. In one of the cells of one of the precancerous lesions (e.g. polyps) a cell acquires the capacity of invading surrounding tissue or to metastasize. The whole carcinogenic process is very slow, extending over several decades, because the specific mutations seldom occur and the probability of an accumulation of several specific mutations in the same cell or cell lineage is very small. It can be accelerated by intense stimulation of cell proliferation or genetic instability. Ionizing radiations act firstly as a mutagen, however when the dose is high they also kill a significant proportion of cells and by a homeostatic mechanism they induce cell proliferation and clonal amplification. It has been claimed that even the smallest dose of radiation can induce a cancer. This concept is associated with the LNT model and it is not based on scientific evidence. It has fuelled a fear of radiation which had detrimental consequences. Conversely the high efficacy of defense mechanisms against radiocarcinogenesis, particularly when the tissue is not disorganized, can explain the lack of carcinogenic effect of contamination by small doses of radium or thorium which has been observed on radium dial painters or in patients injected with thorotrast. The study of second cancers in patients treated by radiotherapy could provide important information and should be actively pursued with two aims: reduce the incidence of second cancers; to better

  6. Comparison of Hemoglobin Levels Before and After Hemodialysis and Their Effects on Erythropoietin Dosing and Cost

    PubMed Central

    Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Moaref, Alireza; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Dormanesh, Banafshe

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin levels measured after hemodialysis, as compared to hemoglobin levels measured before hemodialysis, are suggested to be a more accurate reflection of the hemoglobin levels between hemodialysis sessions, and to be a better reference point for adjusting erythropoietin dosing. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the hemoglobin levels before and after hemodialysis, to calculate the required erythropoietin doses based on these levels, and to develop a model to predict effective erythropoietin dosing. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, the hemoglobin levels of 52 patients with end-stage renal disease were measured before and after hemodialysis. The required erythropoietin doses and the differences in cost were calculated based on the hemoglobin levels before and after hemodialysis. A model to predict the adjusted erythropoietin dosages based on post-hemodialysis hemoglobin levels was proposed. Results Hemoglobin levels measured after hemodialysis were significantly higher than the hemoglobin levels before hemodialysis (11.1 ± 1.1 vs. 11.9 ± 1.2 g/dL, P < 0.001, 7% increase). The mean required erythropoietin dose based on post-hemodialysis hemoglobin levels was significantly lower than the corresponding erythropoietin dose based on pre-hemodialysis hemoglobin levels (10947 ± 6820 vs. 12047 ± 7542 U/week, P < 0.001, 9% decrease). The cost of erythropoietin was also significantly lower when post-hemodialysis levels were used (15.96 ± 9.85 vs. 17.57 ± 11.00 dollars/patient/week, P < 0.001). This translated into 83.72 dollars/patient/year in cost reduction. The developed model for predicting the required dosage is: Erythropoietin (U/week) = 43540.8 + (-2734.8) × Post-hemodialysis Hb* (g/dL). [(R2) = 0.221; *P < 0.001]. Conclusions Using post-hemodialysis hemoglobin levels as a reference point for erythropoietin dosing can result in significant dose and cost reduction, and can protect hemodialysis patients from

  7. Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the old F- and H-Area Retention Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-04-18

    Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

  8. Guidelines for acceptable soil concentrations in the Old F- and H-Area Retention Basins. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-04-18

    Concentration guidelines for residual radionuclides in soil at the sites of the Old F- and a Retention Basins (281-3F, 281-3H) have been calculated using a dose-based approach. The guidelines also are being applied to areas around the F-Basin`s Process Line. Estimation of these soil guidelines was completed using RESRAD 5.0 in accordance with the DOE RESRAD methodology specified in DOE/CH/8901 (Gi89). Guidelines are provided for the nuclides known to be present in the soils at each basin (Sc87). Soil and hydrologic characteristics specific to each basin are defined for the areas above, within, and beneath the contaminated zones.

  9. Use of the nonavalent HPV vaccine in individuals previously fully or partially vaccinated with bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Bonanni, Paolo; Bosch, F Xavier; Joura, Elmar; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Meijer, Chris J L M; Petry, Karl-Ulrich; Soubeyrand, Benoit; Verstraeten, Thomas; Stanley, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    With the availability of the nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, vaccinees, parents and healthcare providers need guidance on how to complete an immunization course started with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine and whether to revaccinate individuals who have completed a full immunization course with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine. To answer these questions three parameters should be considered: age at the start of vaccination (9 to 14 years of age versus 15 years and older, the cut-off for 2 or 3 doses schedule), the number of doses already received and the time interval between doses. Based on a number of scenarios, we propose that the 9-valent vaccine can be used to complete an incomplete vaccination regimen or might be added to a previous completed schedule to extend protection.

  10. Use of the nonavalent HPV vaccine in individuals previously fully or partially vaccinated with bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Bonanni, Paolo; Bosch, F Xavier; Joura, Elmar; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Meijer, Chris J L M; Petry, Karl-Ulrich; Soubeyrand, Benoit; Verstraeten, Thomas; Stanley, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    With the availability of the nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, vaccinees, parents and healthcare providers need guidance on how to complete an immunization course started with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine and whether to revaccinate individuals who have completed a full immunization course with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine. To answer these questions three parameters should be considered: age at the start of vaccination (9 to 14 years of age versus 15 years and older, the cut-off for 2 or 3 doses schedule), the number of doses already received and the time interval between doses. Based on a number of scenarios, we propose that the 9-valent vaccine can be used to complete an incomplete vaccination regimen or might be added to a previous completed schedule to extend protection. PMID:26772631

  11. Resveratrol products resulting by free radical attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Yvonne; Quint, R. M.; Getoff, Nikola

    2008-06-01

    Trans-resveratrol ( trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RES), which is contained in red wine and many plants, is one of the most relevant and extensively investigated stilbenes with a broad spectrum of biological activities. Among other duties, RES has been reported to have anti-carcinogenetic activities, which could be attributed to its antioxidant properties. The degradation of RES was studied under various conditions. The products (aldehydes, carboxylic acids, etc.) generated from RES by the attack of free radicals were registered as a function of the radical concentration (absorbed radiation dose). Based on the obtained data it appears that the OH radicals are initiating the rather complicated process, which involves of the numerous consecutive reactions. A possible starting reaction mechanism is presented.

  12. Optimization of data collection taking radiation damage into account

    SciTech Connect

    Bourenkov, Gleb P.

    2010-04-01

    Software implementing a new method for the optimal choice of data-collection parameters, accounting for the effects of radiation damage, is presented. To take into account the effects of radiation damage, new algorithms for the optimization of data-collection strategies have been implemented in the software package BEST. The intensity variation related to radiation damage is approximated by log-linear functions of resolution and cumulative X-ray dose. Based on an accurate prediction of the basic characteristics of data yet to be collected, BEST establishes objective relationships between the accessible data completeness, resolution and signal-to-noise statistics that can be achieved in an experiment and designs an optimal plan for data collection.

  13. Prediction of multidimensional drug dose responses based on measurements of drug pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Anat; Katzir, Itay; Dekel, Erez; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Finding potent multidrug combinations against cancer and infections is a pressing therapeutic challenge; however, screening all combinations is difficult because the number of experiments grows exponentially with the number of drugs and doses. To address this, we present a mathematical model that predicts the effects of three or more antibiotics or anticancer drugs at all doses based only on measurements of drug pairs at a few doses, without need for mechanistic information. The model provides accurate predictions on available data for antibiotic combinations, and on experiments presented here on the response matrix of three cancer drugs at eight doses per drug. This approach offers a way to search for effective multidrug combinations using a small number of experiments. PMID:27562164

  14. Proposed changes for part N of suggested state regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, R.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses proposed changes for Part N regulations regarding naturally occuring radioactive materials. It describes the work of the Commission on NORM of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), toward adjusting the regulations. A set of questions was formulated and a review panel established to address these questions and come back with recommended actions. The panel recommended the distinction that the material being regulated is `Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material` (TENORM). By this they mean `naturally occurring radioactive material not regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) whose radionuclide concentrations have been increased by or as a result of human practices.` Recommendations also include: using a dose based instead of concentration based standard; refined definition of exemptions from regulations; exclusion of radon from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations; provide states flexibility in implementation; inclusion of prospective remedial and operations aspects for TENORM; provision of institutional controls.

  15. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  16. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  17. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  18. RESRAD for Radiological Risk Assessment. Comparison with EPA CERCLA Tools - PRG and DCC Calculators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J. -J.; Kamboj, S.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this report is two-fold. First, the risk assessment methodology for both RESRAD and the EPA’s tools is reviewed. This includes a review of the EPA’s justification for 2 using a dose-to-risk conversion factor to reduce the dose-based protective ARAR from 15 to 12 mrem/yr. Second, the models and parameters used in RESRAD and the EPA PRG and DCC Calculators are compared in detail, and the results are summarized and discussed. Although there are suites of software tools in the RESRAD family of codes and the EPA Calculators, the scope of this report is limited to the RESRAD (onsite) code for soil contamination and the EPA’s PRG and DCC Calculators also for soil contamination.

  19. GAMMA IRRADIATION TESTING OF MONTAN WAX FOR USE IN WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    SOO,P.; HEISER,J.; HART,A.

    1996-09-08

    A field demonstration was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to quantify the potential use of montan wax as a subsurface barrier material for nuclear waste management applications. As part of that demonstration, a study was completed to address some of the characteristics of the wax. Of particular interest is its resistance to chemical and structural changes that would influence its integrity as a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. Based on the data obtained to date the wax is extremely resistant to radiation-induced change. Coupled with low permeability, the material shows promise as a subsurface barrier material.

  20. Tampons, dioxins, and endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Scialli, A R

    2001-01-01

    Concern has been expressed that rayon tampons contain dioxins as a result of chlorine bleaching and, further, that the dioxins in tampons may increase the risk of endometriosis. Rayon tampons do not contain 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, the chemical commonly meant when the generic term "dioxin" is used. In addition, rayon tampons contain only trivial amounts of dioxin-like environmental contaminants, similar to the amounts contained in unbleached cotton tampons. The amount of dioxin-like material that is theoretically available from tampons is at least six orders of magnitude lower than estimated daily food exposure levels to these contaminants. The evidence for a causal relationship between environmental exposure to dioxins and endometriosis is inconsistent. Prediction of the effective dioxin dose based on the most suggestive of the primate studies on endometriosis does not raise concerns about typical human food exposures to these compounds, let alone the considerably lower levels that could be present in tampons.

  1. Haze defect control and containment in a high volume DRAM manufacturing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jerry X.; Nguyen, Maihan; Arasaki, Osamu; Maraquin, Tammy; Sawyer, Daniel; Morrison, Pedro

    2005-11-01

    Haze and other progressive reticle defects have been known in the semiconductor industry for more than a decade [1]. Extensive research and experiments have been carried out to determine the sources and origins of the progressive haze growth, but the true mechanisms of its cause are still under speculation. To minimize the wafer yield loss at Samsung Austin Semiconductor (SAS), we introduced a practical method to control the haze defects in a DRAM manufacturing environment that integrates reticle and wafer inspections, reticle cleaning, and a dose-based and time-based control forecast software system. This development has been proven to be very effective in controlling the haze defects and reducing the related yield loss while still supporting high volume wafer production.

  2. Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Sharon D.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) environmental surveillance is to characterize radiological and nonradiological conditions of the off-site environs and estimate public doses related to these conditions, confirm estimations of public dose based on effluent monitoring data, and, where appropriate, provide supplemental data to support compliance monitoring for applicable environmental regulations. This environmental monitoring plan (EMP) is intended to document the rationale, frequency, parameters, and analytical methods for the ORR environmental surveillance program and provides information on ORR site characteristics, environmental pathways, dose assessment methods, and quality management. ORR-wide environmental monitoring activities include a variety of media including air, surface water, vegetation, biota, and wildlife. In addition to these activities, site-specific effluent, groundwater, and best management monitoring programs are conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). This is revision 5.

  3. Consequences of meta-stable (177m)Lu admixture in (177)Lu for patient dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) is a rare earth metal in the lanthanides series which decays by beta emission with a half life of 6.647 days to three excited states and the ground state of (177)Hf. When (177)Lu is produced by neutron capture in (176)Lu, inevitably an admixture is formed of the long-lived isomer (177)mLu. As its half-life of 160.4 days is so much longer than that of (177)Lu, concerns are raised on its possible enhancement in radiation dose to the patient treated with (177)Lu-DOTA-octreotate. This report evaluates this possible enhancement of the absorbed dose, based on the published pharmacokinetic profile of (177)Lu-DOTA-octreotate and assuming an admixture of 1 kBq (177)mLu /MBq (177)Lu (0.1%).

  4. [Metabolic tailoring in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy based on functional imaging consists to deliver a heterogeneity dose based on biological proprieties. This approach is termed biologically conformal radiotherapy or dose painting with biological target volume inside the gross tumor volume. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can also be used to define a specific biological target volume. Three main tracers are used: ((18)F)-fluorodeoxyglucose to target the hypermetabolism, ((18)F)-fluoromizonidazole and ((18)F)- fluoroazomycin arabinoside to target areas of hypoxia. In this review, we give a practical approach to achieving a treatment-guided radiotherapy molecular and the main issues raised by this imaging technique. Despite the provision of all the technological tools to the radiotherapist, this new therapeutic approach is still evaluated in clinical studies to demonstrate a real clinical benefit compared to radiotherapy based on anatomic imaging.

  5. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  6. Active radiation hardening of Tm-doped silica fiber based on pump bleaching.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ying-bin; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Lei; Wang, Yi-bo; Li, Hai-qing; Peng, Jing-gang; Yang, Lv-yun; Dai, Neng-li; Li, Jin-yan

    2015-09-21

    Tm-doped fiber laser or amplifier can be applied in varied adverse environments. In this work, we demonstrate the pump bleaching of Tm-doped silica fiber with 793nm pump source under gamma-ray irradiation in the range 50Gy-675Gy. The recovery time, the fiber slope efficiency and the fiber cladding absorption spectra after irradiation and bleaching have been measured. It is found that the recovery time and radiation induce absorption are positively associated with doses, however, the fiber slope efficiency of irradiated TDF and bleached TDF are both negatively correlated with doses. Based on the simulation of the fiber core temperature, the probable mechanism of pump bleaching is also discussed.

  7. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    PubMed

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  8. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  9. Morbid Obesity Alters Both Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Propofol: Dosing Recommendation for Anesthesia Induction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dong; Peng, Xuemei; Liu, Jie; Qian, Hao; Li, Jiayang; Wu, Baojian

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity has markedly increased worldwide. Obese patients pose significant challenges to anesthesiologists with regard to accurate dosing of anesthetics due to potentially altered pharmacokinetics (PK). Here we determined the PK and pharmacodynamics (PD) of propofol for anesthesia induction in morbidly obese (MO) subjects (body mass index >35 kg/m(2)) at two dosing regimens: dosing based on total body weight and lean body weight (LBW), respectively. The propofol pharmacokinetic profile was well fitted with a two-compartment model. Both elimination clearance (223%-243% of controls, who had a body mass index <25 kg/m(2); P < 0.01) and peripheral compartment volume (156%-180% of controls; P < 0.01) were significantly increased in MO subjects, resulting in an equal or decreased propofol level in plasma (total body weight-based dosing). Furthermore, propofol PD (measured by the bispectral index) was adequately described by a PK/PD model that linked an effect compartment to the two-compartment PK model through a sigmoidal Emax model. All PD parameters except EC50 values (the half maximal effect concentration) were similar (P > 0.05) between MO subjects and controls. Morbid obesity led to a significant decrease (37.9%-38.6%; P < 0.01) in EC50 values, which suggests increased brain sensitivity to propofol in the MO population. Moreover, dose reduction (i.e., dosing based on LBW) generated identical anesthetic effects in MO subjects compared with controls. In conclusion, morbid obesity significantly altered both PK and PD of propofol. LBW was a better weight-based dosing scalar for anesthesia induction with propofol in MO subjects. PMID:27481855

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics of Busulfan in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplant: A Model-Based Dosing Algorithm for Personalized Therapy and Implementation into Routine Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Long-Boyle, Janel; Savic, Rada; Yan, Shirley; Bartelink, Imke; Musick, Lisa; French, Deborah; Law, Jason; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton J.; Dvorak, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of busulfan in children have shown that individualized model-based algorithms provide improved targeted busulfan therapy when compared to conventional dosing. The adoption of population PK models into routine clinical practice has been hampered by the tendency of pharmacologists to develop complex models too impractical for clinicians to use. The authors aimed to develop a population PK model for busulfan in children that can reliably achieve therapeutic exposure (concentration-at-steady-state, Css) and implement a simple, model-based tool for the initial dosing of busulfan in children undergoing HCT. Patients and Methods Model development was conducted using retrospective data available in 90 pediatric and young adult patients who had undergone HCT with busulfan conditioning. Busulfan drug levels and potential covariates influencing drug exposure were analyzed using the non-linear mixed effects modeling software, NONMEM. The final population PK model was implemented into a clinician-friendly, Microsoft Excel-based tool and used to recommend initial doses of busulfan in a group of 21 pediatric patients prospectively dosed based on the population PK model. Results Modeling of busulfan time-concentration data indicates busulfan CL displays non-linearity in children, decreasing up to approximately 20% between the concentrations of 250–2000 ng/mL. Important patient-specific covariates found to significantly impact busulfan CL were actual body weight and age. The percentage of individuals achieving a therapeutic Css was significantly higher in subjects receiving initial doses based on the population PK model (81%) versus historical controls dosed on conventional guidelines (52%) (p = 0.02). Conclusion When compared to the conventional dosing guidelines, the model-based algorithm demonstrates significant improvement for providing targeted busulfan therapy in children and young adults. PMID:25162216

  11. Precautionary principles: a jurisdiction-free framework for decision-making under risk.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Paolo F; Cox, Louis A; MacDonald, Thomas R

    2004-12-01

    relevance of new information, relative to the initial (and smaller) set of data on which the decision was based. We exemplify this seemingly simple situation using risk management of BSE. As an integral aspect of causal analysis under risk, the methods developed in this paper permit the addition of non-linear, hormetic dose-response models to the current set of regulatory defaults such as the linear, non-threshold models. This increase in the number of defaults is an important improvement because most of the variants of the precautionary principle require cost-benefit balancing. Specifically, increasing the set of causal defaults accounts for beneficial effects at very low doses. We also show and conclude that quantitative risk assessment dominates qualitative risk assessment, supporting the extension of the set of default causal models.

  12. The Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature on Mortality in Wuhan, China: A Time-Series Study Using a Distributed Lag Non-Linear Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunquan; Li, Cunlu; Feng, Renjie; Zhu, Yaohui; Wu, Kai; Tan, Xiaodong; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Less evidence concerning the association between ambient temperature and mortality is available in developing countries/regions, especially inland areas of China, and few previous studies have compared the predictive ability of different temperature indictors (minimum, mean, and maximum temperature) on mortality. We assessed the effects of temperature on daily mortality from 2003 to 2010 in Jiang'an District of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Quasi-Poisson generalized linear models combined with both non-threshold and double-threshold distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM) were used to examine the associations between different temperature indictors and cause-specific mortality. We found a U-shaped relationship between temperature and mortality in Wuhan. Double-threshold DLNM with mean temperature performed best in predicting temperature-mortality relationship. Cold effect was delayed, whereas hot effect was acute, both of which lasted for several days. For cold effects over lag 0-21 days, a 1 °C decrease in mean temperature below the cold thresholds was associated with a 2.39% (95% CI: 1.71, 3.08) increase in non-accidental mortality, 3.65% (95% CI: 2.62, 4.69) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 3.87% (95% CI: 1.57, 6.22) increase in respiratory mortality, 3.13% (95% CI: 1.88, 4.38) increase in stroke mortality, and 21.57% (95% CI: 12.59, 31.26) increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality. For hot effects over lag 0-7 days, a 1 °C increase in mean temperature above the hot thresholds was associated with a 25.18% (95% CI: 18.74, 31.96) increase in non-accidental mortality, 34.10% (95% CI: 25.63, 43.16) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 24.27% (95% CI: 7.55, 43.59) increase in respiratory mortality, 59.1% (95% CI: 41.81, 78.5) increase in stroke mortality, and 17.00% (95% CI: 7.91, 26.87) increase in IHD mortality. This study suggested that both low and high temperature were associated with increased mortality in Wuhan, and that mean

  13. The Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature on Mortality in Wuhan, China: A Time-Series Study Using a Distributed Lag Non-Linear Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunquan; Li, Cunlu; Feng, Renjie; Zhu, Yaohui; Wu, Kai; Tan, Xiaodong; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Less evidence concerning the association between ambient temperature and mortality is available in developing countries/regions, especially inland areas of China, and few previous studies have compared the predictive ability of different temperature indictors (minimum, mean, and maximum temperature) on mortality. We assessed the effects of temperature on daily mortality from 2003 to 2010 in Jiang’an District of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Quasi-Poisson generalized linear models combined with both non-threshold and double-threshold distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM) were used to examine the associations between different temperature indictors and cause-specific mortality. We found a U-shaped relationship between temperature and mortality in Wuhan. Double-threshold DLNM with mean temperature performed best in predicting temperature-mortality relationship. Cold effect was delayed, whereas hot effect was acute, both of which lasted for several days. For cold effects over lag 0–21 days, a 1 °C decrease in mean temperature below the cold thresholds was associated with a 2.39% (95% CI: 1.71, 3.08) increase in non-accidental mortality, 3.65% (95% CI: 2.62, 4.69) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 3.87% (95% CI: 1.57, 6.22) increase in respiratory mortality, 3.13% (95% CI: 1.88, 4.38) increase in stroke mortality, and 21.57% (95% CI: 12.59, 31.26) increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality. For hot effects over lag 0–7 days, a 1 °C increase in mean temperature above the hot thresholds was associated with a 25.18% (95% CI: 18.74, 31.96) increase in non-accidental mortality, 34.10% (95% CI: 25.63, 43.16) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 24.27% (95% CI: 7.55, 43.59) increase in respiratory mortality, 59.1% (95% CI: 41.81, 78.5) increase in stroke mortality, and 17.00% (95% CI: 7.91, 26.87) increase in IHD mortality. This study suggested that both low and high temperature were associated with increased mortality in Wuhan, and that

  14. Precautionary principles: a jurisdiction-free framework for decision-making under risk.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Paolo F; Cox, Louis A; MacDonald, Thomas R

    2004-12-01

    relevance of new information, relative to the initial (and smaller) set of data on which the decision was based. We exemplify this seemingly simple situation using risk management of BSE. As an integral aspect of causal analysis under risk, the methods developed in this paper permit the addition of non-linear, hormetic dose-response models to the current set of regulatory defaults such as the linear, non-threshold models. This increase in the number of defaults is an important improvement because most of the variants of the precautionary principle require cost-benefit balancing. Specifically, increasing the set of causal defaults accounts for beneficial effects at very low doses. We also show and conclude that quantitative risk assessment dominates qualitative risk assessment, supporting the extension of the set of default causal models. PMID:15688986

  15. Method for Implementing Subsurface Solid Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGL) - 12331

    SciTech Connect

    Lively, J.W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other federal agencies currently approve the Multi-Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) as guidance for licensees who are conducting final radiological status surveys in support of decommissioning. MARSSIM provides a method to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulation by comparing residual radioactivity in surface soils with derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs), but specifically discounts its applicability to subsurface soils. Many sites and facilities undergoing decommissioning contain subsurface soils that are potentially impacted by radiological constituents. In the absence of specific guidance designed to address the derivation of subsurface soil DCGLs and compliance demonstration, decommissioning facilities have attempted to apply DCGLs and final status survey techniques designed specifically for surface soils to subsurface soils. The decision to apply surface soil limits and surface soil compliance metrics to subsurface soils typically results in significant over-excavation with associated cost escalation. MACTEC, Inc. has developed the overarching concepts and principles found in recent NRC decommissioning guidance in NUREG 1757 to establish a functional method to derive dose-based subsurface soil DCGLs. The subsurface soil method developed by MACTEC also establishes a rigorous set of criterion-based data evaluation metrics (with analogs to the MARSSIM methodology) that can be used to demonstrate compliance with the developed subsurface soil DCGLs. The method establishes a continuum of volume factors that relate the size and depth of a volume of subsurface soil having elevated concentrations of residual radioactivity with its ability to produce dose. The method integrates the subsurface soil sampling regime with the derivation of the subsurface soil DCGL such that a self-regulating optimization is naturally sought by both the responsible party and regulator

  16. Web-based training related to NRC staff review of dose modeling aspects of license termination and decommissioning plans

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, D.; Arnish, J.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2007-07-01

    NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course is being developed in 2006 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The training course consists of the core and advanced modules tailored to specific NRC job functions. Topics for individual modules include identifying the characteristics of simple and complex sites, identifying when outside expertise or consultation is needed, demonstrating how to conduct acceptance and technical reviews of dose modeling, and providing details regarding the level of justification needed for realistic scenarios for both dose modeling and derivation of DCGLs. Various methods of applying probabilistic uncertainty analysis to demonstrate compliance with dose-based requirements are presented. These approaches include 1) modeling the pathways of radiological exposure and estimating doses to receptors from a combination of contaminated media and radionuclides, and 2) using probabilistic analysis to determine an appropriate set of input parameters to develop derived concentration guideline limits or DCGLs (DCGLs are media- and nuclide-specific concentration limits that will meet dose-based, license termination rule criteria found in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E). Calculation of operational (field) DCGL's from media- and nuclide-specific DCGLs and use of operational DCGLs in conducting

  17. Web-based training related to NRC staff review of dose modeling aspects of license termination and decommissioning plans.

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, D.; Arnish, J.; Cheng, J. J.; Kamboj, S.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S. Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.; Environmental Science Division; NRC

    2007-01-01

    NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course is being developed in 2006 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The training course consists of the core and advanced modules tailored to specific NRC job functions. Topics for individual modules include identifying the characteristics of simple and complex sites, identifying when outside expertise or consultation is needed, demonstrating how to conduct acceptance and technical reviews of dose modeling, and providing details regarding the level of justification needed for realistic scenarios for both dose modeling and derivation of DCGLs. Various methods of applying probabilistic uncertainty analysis to demonstrate compliance with dose-based requirements are presented. These approaches include: (1) modeling the pathways of radiological exposure and estimating doses to receptors from a combination of contaminated media and radionuclides, and (2) using probabilistic analysis to determine an appropriate set of input parameters to develop derived concentration guideline limits or DCGLs (DCGLs are media- and nuclide-specific concentration limits that will meet dose-based, license termination rule criteria found in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E). Calculation of operational (field) DCGL's from media- and nuclide-specific DCGLs and use of operational DCGLs in conducting

  18. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 3. Routine Releases, 1973 - 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Annual mean concentrations of tritium in air moisture, calculated from data obtained from an air tritium sampler near the LLNL Discovery Center, were compared with annual mean air moisture concentrations predicted from atmospheric releases of tritium for the years 1973 through 2005. The 95% confidence intervals on the predictions and observations usually overlapped. When the distributions of predictions and observations were different, predictions were higher. Using both the observed and predicted air concentrations as input to the tritium dose model, DCART, annual doses to a hypothetical adult, child (age 10) and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) assumed to be living at LLNL's Discovery Center were calculated. Although the doses based on predicted air concentrations tended to be higher, they were nevertheless indistinguishable from doses based on observed air concentrations when uncertainties were taken into account. Annual doses, calculated by DCART and based on observed and predicted air concentrations, were compared with historical tritium doses reported annually by LLNL. Although the historical doses were calculated using various assumptions over the years, their agreement with the DCART predictions is remarkable. The Discovery Center was not the location of the site-wide maximally exposed individual (SWMEI) from 1974 through 1978. However, doses at the location of the SW-MEI for those years were indistinguishable from those at the Discovery Center when uncertainties were taken into account. The upper confidence limits for all doses were always well below the current regulatory limit for dose to a member of the public (100 {micro}Sv or 10 mrem per year) from atmospheric releases (40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H). Based on observed air concentrations, the 97.5% confidence limit on the cumulative dose to the hypothetical person born in 1973 and living through 2005 at the Discovery Center was 150 {micro}Sv (15 mrem), while that of the hypothetical adult who spent his

  19. Assessment of normal tissue complications following prostate cancer irradiation: Comparison of radiation treatment modalities using NTCP models

    SciTech Connect

    Takam, Rungdham; Bezak, Eva; Yeoh, Eric E.; Marcu, Loredana

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads following several techniques for radiation treatment of prostate cancer were evaluated applying the relative seriality and Lyman models. Methods: Model parameters from literature were used in this evaluation. The treatment techniques included external (standard fractionated, hypofractionated, and dose-escalated) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy (I-125 seeds), and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (Ir-192 source). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum, bladder, and urethra retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to biological effective dose-based and equivalent dose-based DVHs, respectively, in order to account for differences in radiation treatment modality and fractionation schedule. Results: Results indicated that with hypofractionated 3D-CRT (20 fractions of 2.75 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 55 Gy), NTCP of the rectum, bladder, and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 3D-CRT using a four-field technique (32 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 3D-CRT. Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%, respectively) following the dose-escalated four-field 3D-CRT (2 Gy/fraction to total dose of 74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed treatment techniques. The average NTCP for the rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDR-BT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. Conclusions: Although brachytherapy techniques resulted in delivering larger equivalent doses to normal tissues, the corresponding NTCPs were lower than those of external beam techniques other than the urethra because of much smaller volumes irradiated to higher doses. Among analyzed normal tissues, the femoral heads were found to have the lowest probability of complications as most of their volume was irradiated to lower

  20. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  1. Some Geometric Methods for Constructing Decision Criteria Based On Two-Dimensional Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Thall, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews two types of geometric methods proposed in recent years for defining statistical decision rules based on 2-dimensional parameters that characterize treatment effect in a medical setting. A common example is that of making decisions, such as comparing treatments or selecting a best dose, based on both the probability of efficacy and the probability toxicity. In most applications, the 2-dimensional parameter is defined in terms of a model parameter of higher dimension including effects of treatment and possibly covariates. Each method uses a geometric construct in the 2-dimensional parameter space based on a set of elicited parameter pairs as a basis for defining decision rules. The first construct is a family of contours that partitions the parameter space, with the contours constructed so that all parameter pairs on a given contour are equally desirable. The partition is used to define statistical decision rules that discriminate between parameter pairs in term of their desirabilities. The second construct is a convex 2-dimensional set of desirable parameter pairs, with decisions based on posterior probabilities of this set for given combinations of treatments and covariates under a Bayesian formulation. A general framework for all of these methods is provided, and each method is illustrated by one or more applications. PMID:18617987

  2. A simplified technique for delivering total body irradiation (TBI) with improved dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Rui; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.; Sensakovic, William; Fung, Henry C.; Chu, James C. H.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) with megavoltage photon beams has been accepted as an important component of management for a number of hematologic malignancies, generally as part of bone marrow conditioning regimens. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the authors' TBI technique, which both simplifies the treatment process and improves the treatment quality. Methods: An AP/PA TBI treatment technique to produce uniform dose distributions using sequential collimator reductions during each fraction was implemented, and a sample calculation worksheet is presented. Using this methodology, the dosimetric characteristics of both 6 and 18 MV photon beams, including lung dose under cerrobend blocks was investigated. A method of estimating midplane lung doses based on measured entrance and exit doses was proposed, and the estimated results were compared with measurements. Results: Whole body midplane dose uniformity of {+-}10% was achieved with no more than two collimator-based beam modulations. The proposed model predicted midplane lung doses 5% to 10% higher than the measured doses for 6 and 18 MV beams. The estimated total midplane doses were within {+-}5% of the prescribed midplane dose on average except for the lungs where the doses were 6% to 10% lower than the prescribed dose on average. Conclusions: The proposed TBI technique can achieve dose uniformity within {+-}10%. This technique is easy to implement and does not require complicated dosimetry and/or compensators.

  3. A manual for applying the allowable residual contamination level method for decommissioning facilities on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Piepel, G.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1988-08-01

    This report describes the modifications that have been made to enhance the original Allowable Residual Contamination Level (ARCL) method to make it more applicable to site-specific analyses. This version considers the mixture of radionuclides present at the time of site characterization, the elapsed time after decommissioning when exposure to people could occur, and includes a calculation of the upper confidence limit of the potential dose based on sampling statistics that are developed during the site characterization efforts. The upper confidence limit of potential exposure can now be used for comparison against applicable radiation dose limits (i.e., 25 mrem/yr at Hanford). The level of confidence can be selected by the user. A wide range of exposure scenarios were evaluated; the rationale used to select the most limiting scenarios is explained. The radiation dose factors used for the inhalation and ingestion pathways were also updated to correspond with the radiation dosimetry methods utilized in the International Commission of Radiological Protection Publications 26 and 30 (ICRP 1977; 1979a,b, 1980, 1981, 1982a,b). This simplifies the calculations, since ''effective whole body'' doses are now calculated, and also brings the dosimetry methods used in the ARCL method in conformance with the rationale used by DOE in developing the 25 mrem/yr limit at Hanford. 46 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

  4. Assessment of Digoxin-Specific Fab Fragment Dosages in Digoxin Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Sean Patrick; Clark, Richard F; Machado, Carol; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    Digoxin poisoning still remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, digoxin-specific Fab fragments are commercially available as an antidote. However, these Fab fragments are several thousand dollars per vial. There is a standardized formula to calculate appropriate Fab fragment dosage based on the serum digoxin concentration. This can greatly reduce the amount of Fab fragment administered. There is also an empiric dosing guideline recommending 6-10 vials be given; however, this may result in higher amounts of Fab fragments being administered than required. We performed this study to assess the amounts of digoxin-specific Fab fragments administered in the treatment of digoxin poisonings recorded in a poison control system database from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2009, in which digoxin serum concentrations were available. This was a retrospective study of 278 patients, 107 with acute poisonings (group A) and 171 following chronic poisoning (group B). In group A, the calculated Fab dose was higher than the calculated dose based on available concentrations in 39 (36%) of group A and 15 (9%) of group B patients. The average wholesale price cost of the excessive dosages ranged from $4818 to as high as $50,589 per patient. Our data suggests that clinician education on digoxin poisoning and the use of the standardized formula to calculate the Fab dose may decrease over utilization and decrease costs associated with the administration of digoxin-specific Fab fragments in the treatment of digoxin poisonings.

  5. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  6. Efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrates for the emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Grottke, Oliver; Aisenberg, James; Bernstein, Richard; Goldstein, Patrick; Huisman, Menno V; Jamieson, Dara G; Levy, Jerrold H; Pollack, Charles V; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Steiner, Thorsten; Del Zoppo, Gregory J; Eikelboom, John

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran is effective in decreasing the risk of ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, like all anticoagulants, it is associated with a risk of bleeding. In cases of trauma or emergency surgery, emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation may be required. A specific reversal agent for dabigatran, idarucizumab, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Alternative reversal agents are available, such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) and activated PCCs (aPCCs). In this review we evaluate the role of PCCs and aPCCs in the reversal of dabigatran anticoagulation and consider which tests are appropriate for monitoring coagulation in this setting. Pre-clinical studies, small clinical studies and case reports indicate that PCCs and aPCCs may be able to reverse dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a dose-dependent manner. However, dosing based on coagulation parameters can be difficult because available assays may not provide adequate sensitivity and specificity for measuring anticoagulation induced by dabigatran or the countering effects of PCCs/aPCCs. In addition, PCCs or aPCCs can potentially provoke thromboembolic complications. Despite these limitations and the fact that PCCs and aPCCs are not yet licensed for dabigatran reversal, their use appears to be warranted in patients with life-threatening haemorrhage if idarucizumab is not available. PMID:27125504

  7. Radionuclide concentrations in soils and produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo Gardens

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Salazar, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) concentrations were determined in soils and produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens. All radionuclides in soils from Pueblo areas were within or just above regional statistical (natural and/or worldwide fallout) reference levels. Similarily, the average levels of radionuclides in produce collected from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso Pueblo gardens were not significantly different in produce collected from regional (background) locations. The effective (radiation) dose equivalent from consuming 352 lb of produce from Cochiti, Jemez, Taos, and San Ildefonso, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.036 ({+-}0.016), 0.072 ({+-}0.051), 0.012 ({+-}0.027), and 0.110 ({+-}0.102) mrem/yr, respectively. The highest calculated dose, based on the mean + 2 std dev (95% confidence level), was 0.314 mrem/yr; this was <0.4% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting members of the public.

  8. Oral exposure to inorganic arsenic: evaluation of its carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher-Wolz, Ulrike; Dieter, Hermann H; Klein, Dominik; Schneider, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic, which is extensively metabolised in humans into even more toxic methylated arsenicals, is a potent carcinogen, causing tumours of the skin, lung, urinary bladder, and other organs. It also induces a number of non-cancer effects. Consumption of drinking water highly contaminated by arsenic causes serious health problems in some countries in southeastern Asia, and arsenic poses problems for drinking-water safety world-wide. Existing risk assessments are based on epidemiological studies from regions with high exposure concentrations (in the mg/L range). It is a matter of debate whether these findings are useful at predicting arsenic-induced effects at low concentrations. In recent years numerous epidemiological studies on cancer and non-cancer effects of inorganic arsenic have been published. This work aims at reviewing recent toxicological and epidemiological data on inorganic arsenic with emphasis on effects at low exposure concentrations. Information obtained from epidemiological studies is supplemented with mechanistic data from in vitro and in vivo studies. Various modes of action for arsenic carcinogenicity are discussed. The information gathered was used to evaluate the reliability of existing cancer-risk assessments and to improve current assessments of non-cancer health effects. A tolerable daily dose, based on epidemiological studies on arsenic-induced skin disorders, is presented.

  9. Initial dose of vancomycin based on body weight and creatinine clearance to minimize inadequate trough levels in Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Maki, N; Ohkuchi, A; Tashiro, Y; Kim, M R; Le, M; Sakamoto, T; Matsubara, S; Hakamata, Y

    2012-10-01

    Our aims were to elucidate the factors that affected vancomycin (VCM) serum trough levels and to find the optimal initial dose based on creatinine clearance (CrCl) and body weight (BW) to minimize inadequate trough levels in a retrospective observational study among Japanese adults. One hundred and six inpatients, in whom VCM trough levels were measured after completing the third dosing, were consecutively recruited into our study in a tertiary hospital. We considered the frequency of <30% as low. In the generalized linear model, initial VCM total daily dose, CrCl, and BW were independent risk factors of VCM trough levels. In patients with CrCl ≥30 and <50 mL/min, 1 g/day yielded low frequencies of a trough level of ≥20 mcg/mL, regardless of BW. In patients with CrCl ≥50 mL/min, 2 g/day yielded low frequencies of a trough level of <10 mcg/mL in patients weighing <55 kg, but not in patients weighing ≥55 kg. Optimal VCM initial total daily dose may be 1 g/day in patients with CrCl ≥30 and <50 mL/min regardless of BW and 2 g/day in patients weighing <55 kg with CrCl ≥50 mL/min among Japanese adults.

  10. A radiation dose study based on analysis of primary color chrominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianyue; Li, Jianhong; Li, Jianwei; Jin, Jian; Li, Yu; Bao, Xiaolu; Chen, Zhilong

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of measuring radiation dose based on primary color chrominance in chemical solutions. Methods: We used an aqueous solution with different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. This was irradiated by 1.5-13.5 kGy 60Co γ radiation. Data were collected by an instrument that can detect information on the three primary colors. Data were analyzed and manipulated for each experiment. Results and conclusions: The result shows that three primary colors chrominance in the aqueous solutions change with different doses of 60Co γ-rays and different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. For Alphaurine A, the red chrominance is gradually reduced as a function of radiation dose. The blue chrominance gradually increases concurrently. The red and green chrominance changes obviously and inversely, but the green chrominance changes little. In Tracid Brilliant Red B solution, the red chrominance gradually decreases as the radiation dose increases. The green chrominance gradually increases concurrently. The red and green chrominance changes are obvious and inverted. The blue chrominance changes little. Our experiments demonstrate that radiation dose can be studied based on three primary colors chrominance. This may be a new tool to measure the radiation dose.

  11. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Swan, David A; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of median effective concentration (EC50) are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. Although pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be used to optimize dose selection in clinical practice.

  12. Glucagon sensitivity and clearance in type 1 diabetes: insights from in vivo and in silico experiments.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, Ling; Mallad, Ashwini; Dalla Man, Chiara; Basu, Rita; Cobelli, Claudio; Carter, Rickey E; Kudva, Yogish C; Basu, Ananda

    2015-09-01

    Glucagon use in artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is being explored for prevention and rescue from hypoglycemia. However, the relationship between glucagon stimulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) viz., hepatic glucagon sensitivity, and prevailing glucose concentrations has not been examined. To test the hypothesis that glucagon sensitivity is increased at hypoglycemia vs. euglycemia, we studied 29 subjects with T1D randomized to a hypoglycemia or euglycemia clamp. Each subject was studied at three glucagon doses at euglycemia or hypoglycemia, with EGP measured by isotope dilution technique. The peak EGP increments and the integrated EGP response increased with increasing glucagon dose during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. However, the difference in dose response based on glycemia was not significant despite higher catecholamine concentrations in the hypoglycemia group. Knowledge of glucagon's effects on EGP was used to develop an in silico glucagon action model. The model-derived output fitted the obtained data at both euglycemia and hypoglycemia for all glucagon doses tested. Glucagon clearance did not differ between glucagon doses studied in both groups. Therefore, the glucagon controller of a dual hormone control system may not need to adjust glucagon sensitivity, and hence glucagon dosing, based on glucose concentrations during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. PMID:26152766

  13. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  14. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  15. Captan fungicide exposures of strawberry harvesters using THPI as a urinary biomarker.

    PubMed

    Krieger, R I; Dinoff, T M

    2000-04-01

    Clothing affords harvesters considerable protection against the elements and can retain substantial amounts of pesticide residue from treated crops. Normal work clothing of female harvesters was supplemented with rubber latex gloves and facial scarves to determine whether those measures reduced exposure. Captan fungicide exposures in female strawberry harvesters were assessed by determining urine clearance rates of tetrahydrophalimide (THPI). Clean rubber gloves were supplied to the 41 harvesters for the 3 days of the study period in October 1995. The workers were divided into two groups consisting of either bare-handed or gloved workers, and 24-h urine specimens were collected each day. Female harvesters who worked bare-handed cleared 5.3 microg captan equivalents as THPI with a range of 0.4 to 13.8 microg/person/day. Harvesters who worked wearing rubber latex gloves cleared only 2.0 microg captan equivalents with a range of 0.9 to 4.3 microg/person/day. In this case clean rubber latex gloves reduced absorbed dose by 38%, compared to the dose absorbed by bare-handed workers. These results additionally indicate that when a pesticide is avidly retained by rubber latex gloves and not readily absorbed dermally as captan, estimates of absorbed dose based on passive dosimetry data may be less reliable than exposure estimates derived from urine biomonitoring.

  16. Genetic damage induced by a food coloring dye (sunset yellow) on meristematic cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny.

  17. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G; Sensen, Christoph W; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F; Schriemer, David C

    2016-08-02

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1.

  18. Dosing of Praziquantel by Height in Sub-Saharan African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Palha De Sousa, Chiquita A.; Brigham, Tracy; Chasekwa, Bernard; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Tielsch, James M.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Prendergast, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The cornerstone of schistosomiasis control is mass praziquantel treatment in high prevalence areas. Adults are an important target population, given increasing recognition of the burden of male and female genital schistosomiasis. However, use of weighing scales to calculate praziquantel dosing in rural areas can be challenging. For school-age children, the World Health Organization (WHO) has approved a dose pole to simplify praziquantel dosing based on height. We modified the pediatric dose pole by adding two height categories and incorporating a simple overweight/obesity adjustment, for simplified mass treatment of adults in sub-Saharan Africa. Using the rural Zimbabwean Demographic and Health Survey data, we show that the modified dose pole with body mass index adjustment would result in > 98% of adults receiving an acceptable dose (30–60 mg/kg), with only 1.4% and 0.3% receiving an inadequate dose (< 30 mg/kg) or high dose (> 60 mg/kg), respectively. An adult dose pole may provide a more feasible alternative to weighing scales in community-based praziquantel treatment programs. PMID:24591432

  19. Treatment of urban runoff at Lake Tahoe: low-intensity chemical dosing.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Gaytan, Julieta; Bachand, Philip; Darby, Jeannie

    2006-12-01

    A systematic investigation of the effect of coagulant type and dose and temperature, mixing, and water quality on subsequent charge neutralization and removal of phosphorus and fine particles from urban and/or stormwater runoff entering Lake Tahoe (Sierra Nevada mountains, western United States) was conducted. Dosing based on streaming current values resulted in turbidities of less than 10.9 +/- 0.35 NTU and filterable and total phosphorus concentrations of less than 9.83 +/- 0.54 and 25.6 +/- 5.71 microg/L, respectively. Inadequate slow mixing could be partially compensated for by increased settling time; however, such quiescent conditions are difficult to obtain in natural systems. For prehydrolyzed forms of aluminum, high intensity rapid mixing was counterproductive. Several classes of coagulants responded robustly to water quality and temperature changes. However, polyaluminum chlorides modified with silica or sulfate, with low to medium basicity, were consistently the best performers in these tests, in terms of simultaneously removing phosphorus and fine particles under a wide range of operating conditions with low doses. PMID:17243249

  20. Polyethylene glycol-polyvinyl alcohol grafted copolymer: study of the bioavailability after oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Heuschmid, Franziska F; Schuster, Paul; Lauer, Birthe; Fabian, Eric; Leibold, Edgar; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-07-01

    The absorption, urinary excretion, and the biliary excretion of a single oral dose of 10 or 1000 mg/kg bw of (14)C-polyethylene glycol-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-PVA) grafted copolymer were studied in adult male and female rats. In a balance/excretion experiment, the total excretion of ingested radioactivity was determined over a period of 168 h and residual radioactivity was detected in selected tissues and the carcass. In a biliary excretion experiment, excretion of radioactivity via the bile duct was determined over a period of 48 h after administration of the substance to cannulated rats. Most, if not all, of the radioactivity (>100%) was excreted within 48 h via the feces regardless of sex or dose. Urinary excretion was very limited: 0.45-0.50% of dose at the low dose and 0.22-0.27% of dose at the high dose. At both dose levels, residual radioactivity in the carcass and all organs and tissues after 168 h was ≤ 0.02% of dose. Biliary excretion was 0.01-0.02% of dose. Based on these findings, the bioavailability of PEG-PVA grafted copolymer was determined to be <1% demonstrating that absorption was virtually negligible following a single oral administration to male and female rats. PMID:23321424

  1. System for interstitial photodynamic therapy with online dosimetry: first clinical experiences of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Axelsson, Johan; Ahlgren, Göran; Kälkner, Karl Mikael; Nilsson, Sten; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    The first results from a clinical study for Temoporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of low-grade (T1c) primary prostate cancer using online dosimetry are presented. Dosimetric feedback in real time was applied, for the first time to our knowledge, in interstitial photodynamic therapy. The dosimetry software IDOSE provided dose plans, including optical fiber positions and light doses based on 3-D tissue models generated from ultrasound images. Tissue optical property measurements were obtained using the same fibers used for light delivery. Measurements were taken before, during, and after the treatment session. On the basis of these real-time measured optical properties, the light-dose plan was recalculated. The aim of the treatment was to ablate the entire prostate while minimizing exposure to surrounding organs. The results indicate that online dosimetry based on real-time tissue optical property measurements enabled the light dose to be adapted and optimized. However, histopathological analysis of tissue biopsies taken six months post-PDT treatment showed there were still residual viable cancer cells present in the prostate tissue sections. The authors propose that the incomplete treatment of the prostate tissue could be due to a too low light threshold dose, which was set to 5 J/cm2.

  2. Development of orally disintegrating tablets comprising controlled-release multiparticulate beads

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Melperone is an atypical antipsychotic agent that has shown a wide spectrum of neuroleptic properties, particularly effective in the treatment of senile dementia and Parkinson’s-associated psychosis, and is marketed in Europe as an immediate-release (IR) tablet and syrup. An orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) dosage form would be advantageous for patients who experience difficulty in swallowing large tablets or capsules or those who experience dysphagia. Controlled-release (CR) capsule and ODT formulations containing melperone HCl were developed with target in vitro release profiles suitable for a once-daily dosing regimen. Both dosage forms allow for the convenient production of dose-proportional multiple strengths. Two ODT formulations exhibiting fast and medium release profiles and one medium release profile capsule formulation (each 50 mg) were tested in vivo using IR syrup as the reference. The two medium release formulations were shown to be bioequivalent to each other and are suitable for once-daily dosing. Based on the analytical and organoleptic test results, as well as the blend uniformity and in-process compression data at various compression forces using coated beads produced at one-tenth (1/10) commercial scale, both formulations in the form of CR capsules and CR ODTs have shown suitability for progression into further clinical development. PMID:22356215

  3. DEPDOSE: An interactive, microcomputer based program to calculate doses from exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Beres, D.A.; Hull, A.P.

    1991-12-01

    DEPDOSE is an interactive, menu driven, microcomputer based program designed to rapidly calculate committed dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground. The program is designed to require little or no computer expertise on the part of the user. The program consisting of a dose calculation section and a library maintenance section. These selections are available to the user from the main menu. The dose calculation section provides the user with the ability to calculate committed doses, determine the decay time needed to reach a particular dose, cross compare deposition data from separate locations, and approximate a committed dose based on a measured exposure rate. The library maintenance section allows the user to review and update dose modifier data as well as to build and maintain libraries of radionuclide data, dose conversion factors, and default deposition data. The program is structured to provide the user easy access for reviewing data prior to running the calculation. Deposition data can either be entered by the user or imported from other databases. Results can either be displayed on the screen or sent to the printer.

  4. Information-theoretic model-averaged benchmark dose analysis in environmental risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Piegorsch, Walter W.; An, Lingling; Wickens, Alissa A.; West, R. Webster; Peña, Edsel A.; Wu, Wensong

    2013-01-01

    An important objective in environmental risk assessment is estimation of minimum exposure levels, called Benchmark Doses (BMDs), that induce a pre-specified Benchmark Response (BMR) in a dose-response experiment. In such settings, representations of the risk are traditionally based on a specified parametric model. It is a well-known concern, however, that existing parametric estimation techniques are sensitive to the form employed for modeling the dose response. If the chosen parametric model is in fact misspecified, this can lead to inaccurate low-dose inferences. Indeed, avoiding the impact of model selection was one early motivating issue behind development of the BMD technology. Here, we apply a frequentist model averaging approach for estimating benchmark doses, based on information-theoretic weights. We explore how the strategy can be used to build one-sided lower confidence limits on the BMD, and we study the confidence limits’ small-sample properties via a simulation study. An example from environmental carcinogenicity testing illustrates the calculations. It is seen that application of this information-theoretic, model averaging methodology to benchmark analysis can improve environmental health planning and risk regulation when dealing with low-level exposures to hazardous agents. PMID:24039461

  5. Glucagon sensitivity and clearance in type 1 diabetes: insights from in vivo and in silico experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Ling; Mallad, Ashwini; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Carter, Rickey E.; Kudva, Yogish C.; Basu, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon use in artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is being explored for prevention and rescue from hypoglycemia. However, the relationship between glucagon stimulation of endogenous glucose production (EGP) viz., hepatic glucagon sensitivity, and prevailing glucose concentrations has not been examined. To test the hypothesis that glucagon sensitivity is increased at hypoglycemia vs. euglycemia, we studied 29 subjects with T1D randomized to a hypoglycemia or euglycemia clamp. Each subject was studied at three glucagon doses at euglycemia or hypoglycemia, with EGP measured by isotope dilution technique. The peak EGP increments and the integrated EGP response increased with increasing glucagon dose during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. However, the difference in dose response based on glycemia was not significant despite higher catecholamine concentrations in the hypoglycemia group. Knowledge of glucagon's effects on EGP was used to develop an in silico glucagon action model. The model-derived output fitted the obtained data at both euglycemia and hypoglycemia for all glucagon doses tested. Glucagon clearance did not differ between glucagon doses studied in both groups. Therefore, the glucagon controller of a dual hormone control system may not need to adjust glucagon sensitivity, and hence glucagon dosing, based on glucose concentrations during euglycemia and hypoglycemia. PMID:26152766

  6. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, L. T. N.; Søyland, E.; Krogstad, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6-10.3 SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3-210.1 SED). The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  7. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  8. Acrocomia aculeata prevents toxicogenetic damage caused by the antitumor agent cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Magosso, M F; Carvalho, P C; Shneider, B U C; Pessatto, L R; Pesarini, J R; Silva, P V B; Correa, W A; Kassuya, C A L; Muzzi, R M; Oliveira, R J

    2016-01-01

    Acrocomia aculeata is a plant rich in antioxidant compounds. Studies suggest that this plant has anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and diuretic potential. We assessed the antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, immunomodulation, and apoptotic potentials of A. aculeata alone and in combination with an antitumor agent, cyclophosphamide. Swiss male mice (N = 140) were used. The animals were divided into 14 experimental groups as follows: a negative group, a positive group (100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide), groups that only received the oil extracted from the almond (AO) and from the pulp (PO) of A. aculeata at doses of 3, 15, and 30 mg/kg, and the associated treatment groups (oils combined with cyclophosphamide) involving pretreatment, simultaneous, and post-treatment protocols. Data suggest that both oils were chemopreventive at all doses, based on the tested protocols. The highest damage reduction percentages, observed for AO and PO were 88.19 and 90.03%, respectively, for the comet assay and 69.73 and 70.93%, respectively, for the micronucleus assay. Both AO and PO demonstrated immunomodulatory activity. The oils reduced the capacity of cyclophosphamide to trigger apoptosis in the liver, spleen, and kidney cells. These results suggest that A. aculeate AO and PO can be classified as a functional food and also enrich other functional foods and nutraceuticals with chemopreventive features. However, they are not appropriate sources for chemotherapeutic adjuvants, in particular for those used in combination with cyclophosphamide. PMID:27173316

  9. Estimation of parameters for the elimination of an orally administered test substance with unknown absorption.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Josef A; Denzer, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the elimination of an oral test dose based on plasma concentration values requires correction for the effect of gastric release and absorption. Irregular uptake processes should be described 'model independently', which requires estimation of a large number of absorption parameters. To limit the associated computational effort a new approach is developed with a reduced number of unknown parameters. A marginalized and regularized absorption approach (MRA) is defined, which uses for the uptake just one parameter to control rigidity of the uptake curve. For validation, elimination and absorption were reproduced using published IVIVC data and a synthetic data set for comparison with approaches using a 'model-free'--staircase function or mechanistic models to describe absorption. MRA performed almost as accurate as well specified mechanistic models, which gave the best reproduction. MRA demonstrated a 50fold increase in computational efficiency compared to other approaches. The absorption estimated for the IVIVC study demonstrated an in vivo-in vitro correlation comparable to published values. The newly developed MRA approach can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate elimination and absorption with a restricted number of adaptive parameters and with automatic adjustment of the complexity of the uptake.

  10. Kevlar® as a Potential Accident Radiation Dosimeter for First Responders, Law Enforcement and Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Benevides, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    Today the armed forces and law enforcement personnel wear body armor, helmets, and flak jackets composed substantially of Kevlar® fiber to prevent bodily injury or death resulting from physical, ballistic, stab, and slash attacks. Therefore, there is a high probability that during a radiation accident or its aftermath, the Kevlar®-composed body armor will be irradiated. Preliminary study with samples of Kevlar® foundation fabric obtained from body armor used by the U.S. Marine Corps has shown that all samples evaluated demonstrated an EPR signal, and this signal increased with radiation dose. Based on these results, the authors predict that, with individual calibration, exposure at dose above 1 Gy can be reliably detected in Kevlar® samples obtained from body armor. As a result of these measurements, a post-event reconstruction of exposure dose can be obtained by taking various samples throughout the armor body and helmet worn by the same irradiated individual. The doses can be used to create a whole-body dose map that would be of vital importance in a case of a partial body or heterogeneous exposure.

  11. Evaluation of exposure pathways to man from disposal of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Aaberg, R.L.; Rhoads, K.C.; Hill, R.L.; Martin, J.B.

    1992-05-01

    In accordance with 10 CFR 20, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates licensees` discharges of small quantities of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems. This generic study was initiated to examine the potential radiological hazard to the public resulting from exposure to radionuclides in sewage sludge during its treatment and disposal. Eleven scenarios were developed to characterize potential exposures to radioactive materials during sewer system operations and sewage sludge treatment and disposal activities and during the extended time frame following sewage sludge disposal. Two sets of deterministic dose calculations were performed; one to evaluate potential doses based on the radionuclides and quantities associated with documented case histories of sewer system contamination and a second, somewhat more conservative set, based on theoretical discharges at the maximum allowable levels for a more comprehensive list of 63 radionuclides. The results of the stochastic uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were also used to develop a collective dose estimate. The collective doses for the various radionuclides and scenarios range from 0.4 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 5 (sludge incinerator effluent) to 420 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 3 (sewage treatment plant liquid effluent). None of the 22 scenario/radionuclide combinations considered have collective doses greater than 1000 person-rem/yr. However, the total collective dose from these 22 combinations was found to be about 2100 person-rem.

  12. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  13. Radioactive waste management complex low-level waste radiological composite analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.M.; Becker, B.H.; Magnuson, S.O.; Keck, K.N.; Honeycutt, T.K.

    1998-05-01

    The composite analysis estimates the projected cumulative impacts to future members of the public from the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and all other sources of radioactive contamination at the INEEL that could interact with the LLW disposal facility to affect the radiological dose. Based upon the composite analysis evaluation, waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the RWMC is the only source at the INEEL that will significantly interact with the LLW facility. The source term used in the composite analysis consists of all historical SDA subsurface disposals of radionuclides as well as the authorized LLW subsurface disposal inventory and projected LLW subsurface disposal inventory. Exposure scenarios evaluated in the composite analysis include all the all-pathways and groundwater protection scenarios. The projected dose of 58 mrem/yr exceeds the composite analysis guidance dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr; therefore, an options analysis was conducted to determine the feasibility of reducing the projected annual dose. Three options for creating such a reduction were considered: (1) lowering infiltration of precipitation through the waste by providing a better cover, (2) maintaining control over the RWMC and portions of the INEEL indefinitely, and (3) extending the period of institutional control beyond the 100 years assumed in the composite analysis. Of the three options investigated, maintaining control over the RWMC and a small part of the present INEEL appears to be feasible and cost effective.

  14. Risk assessment of soils identified on firefighter turnout gear.

    PubMed

    Easter, Elizabeth; Lander, Deborah; Huston, Tabitha

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the composition of soils on firefighter turnout gear and to determine the dermal exposure risks associated with the soils. Nine used Nomex hoods from the Philadelphia fire department were analyzed for the presence of trace metals and seven sets of used turnout gear were analyzed for semi-volatile organics. Turnout gear samples were removed from areas of the gear known to have high levels of dermal absorption including the collar, armpit, wrist, and crotch areas, from either the outer shell or thermal liner layers. The following compounds were detected: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate plasticizers, and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs). A screening risk assessment was conducted by converting the measured concentrations to an estimated dermally absorbed dose based on estimates for the permeation coefficient (Kp) and an assumed firefighting exposure scenario. Benzo(a) pyrene had the highest dermal exposure risk based on carcinogenic effects and PBDE-99 had the highest dermal exposure risk based on non-carcinogenic effects. For the metals, arsenic had the highest dermal exposure risk for the use hoods. PMID:27027971

  15. Improved Normal Tissue Sparing in Head and Neck Radiotherapy Using Biological Cost Function Based-IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, N.; Lawford, C.; Khoo, V.; Rolfo, M.; Joon, D. Lim; Wada, M.

    2011-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50 Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry. PMID:22066597

  16. Improved normal tissue sparing in head and neck radiotherapy using biological cost function based-IMRT.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N; Lawford, C; Khoo, V; Rolfo, M; Joon, D L; Wada, M

    2011-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has reduced the impact of acute and late toxicities associated with head and neck radiotherapy. Treatment planning system (TPS) advances in biological cost function based optimization (BBO) and improved segmentation techniques have increased organ at risk (OAR) sparing compared to conventional dose-based optimization (DBO). A planning study was undertaken to compare OAR avoidance in DBO and BBO treatment planning. Simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were produced for 10 head and neck patients using both planning systems. Plans were compared for tar get coverage and OAR avoidance. Comparisons were made using the BBO TPS Monte Carlo dose engine to eliminate differences due to inherent algorithms. Target coverage (V95%) was maintained for both solutions. BBO produced lower OAR doses, with statistically significant improvement to left (12.3%, p = 0.005) and right parotid mean dose (16.9%, p = 0.004), larynx V50_Gy (71.0%, p = 0.005), spinal cord (21.9%, p < 0.001) and brain stem dose maximums (31.5%, p = 0.002). This study observed improved OAR avoidance with BBO planning. Further investigations will be undertaken to review any clinical benefit of this improved planned dosimetry.

  17. Investigation on reticle heating effect induced overlay error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Mijung; Kim, Geunhak; Kim, SeoMin; Lee, Byounghoon; Kim, Seokkyun; Lim, Chang-moon; Kim, Myoungsoo; Park, Sungki

    2014-04-01

    As design rule of semiconductor decreases continuously, overlay error control gets more and more important and challenging. It is also true that On Product Overlay (OPO) of leading edge memory device shows unprecedented level of accuracy, owing to the development of precision optics, mechanic stage and alignment system with active compensation method. However, the heating of reticle and lens acts as a dominant detriment against further improvement of overlay. Reticle heating is more critical than lens heating in current advanced scanners because lens heating can be mostly compensated by feed-forward control algorithm. In recent years, the tools and technical ideas for reticle heating control are proposed and thought to reduce the reticle heating effect. Nevertheless, it is not still simple to predict the accurate heating amount and overlay. And it is required to investigate the parameters affecting reticle heating quantitatively. In this paper, the reticle pattern density and exposure dose are considered as the main contributors, and the effects are investigated through experiments. Mask set of various transmittance are prepared by changing pattern density. After exposure with various doses, overlay are measured and analyzed by comparing with reference marks exposed in heating free condition. As a result, it is discovered that even in the case of low dose and high transmittance, reticle heating is hardly avoidable. It is also shown that there is a simple relationship among reticle heating, transmittance and exposure dose. Based on this relationship, the reticle heating is thought to be predicted if the transmittance and dose are fixed.

  18. Polyethylene glycol-polyvinyl alcohol grafted copolymer: study of the bioavailability after oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Heuschmid, Franziska F; Schuster, Paul; Lauer, Birthe; Fabian, Eric; Leibold, Edgar; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2013-07-01

    The absorption, urinary excretion, and the biliary excretion of a single oral dose of 10 or 1000 mg/kg bw of (14)C-polyethylene glycol-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-PVA) grafted copolymer were studied in adult male and female rats. In a balance/excretion experiment, the total excretion of ingested radioactivity was determined over a period of 168 h and residual radioactivity was detected in selected tissues and the carcass. In a biliary excretion experiment, excretion of radioactivity via the bile duct was determined over a period of 48 h after administration of the substance to cannulated rats. Most, if not all, of the radioactivity (>100%) was excreted within 48 h via the feces regardless of sex or dose. Urinary excretion was very limited: 0.45-0.50% of dose at the low dose and 0.22-0.27% of dose at the high dose. At both dose levels, residual radioactivity in the carcass and all organs and tissues after 168 h was ≤ 0.02% of dose. Biliary excretion was 0.01-0.02% of dose. Based on these findings, the bioavailability of PEG-PVA grafted copolymer was determined to be <1% demonstrating that absorption was virtually negligible following a single oral administration to male and female rats.

  19. A Combined Tissue Kinetics and Dosimetric Model of Respiratory Tissue Exposed to Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Ford

    2005-11-01

    Existing dosimetric models of the radiation response of tissues are essentially static. Consideration of changes in the cell populations over time has not been addressed realistically. For a single acute dose this is not a concern, but for modeling chronic exposures or fractionated acute exposures, the natural turnover and progression of cells could have a significant impact on a variety of endpoints. This proposal addresses the shortcomings of current methods by combining current dose-based calculation techniques with information on the cell turnover for a model tissue. The proposed model will examine effects at the single-cell level for an exposure of a section of human bronchiole. The cell model will be combined with Monte Carlo calculations of doses to cells and cell nuclei due to varying dose-rates of different radiation qualities. Predictions from the model of effects on survival, apoptosis rates, and changes in the number of cycling and differentiating cells will be tested experimentally. The availability of dynamic dosimetric models of tissues at the single-cell level will be useful for analysis of low-level radiation exposures and in the development of new radiotherapy protocols.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance: consideration as an adverse drug event.

    PubMed

    Martin, Steven J; Micek, Scott T; Wood, G Christopher

    2010-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has increased dramatically in the past 15 to 20 yrs and presents a patient safety concern unlike any other in the intensive care unit. Antimicrobial resistance in critically ill patients increases morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Some organisms may have intrinsically high levels of resistance or may be spread between patients by poor infection control practices. However, a major driver of antimicrobial resistance is antibiotic use. As such, the development of antimicrobial resistance can often be thought of as an adverse drug event. This article explores the link between drug use, drug dosing, other selective pressures and resistance, and describes concepts to minimize the negative impact of antimicrobial therapy. Two broad themes of these concepts are minimizing the use of antibiotics whenever possible and optimizing antibiotic usage when they are needed. Strategies for minimizing the use of antimicrobials include using optimal diagnostic procedures to ensure the need for antimicrobials, streamlining or discontinuing therapy when possible based on culture results, and using the shortest duration of therapy needed for documented infections. Strategies for optimizing antimicrobial use include using optimal dosing based on the manufacturer's instructions and current pharmacodynamic data, guiding better prescribing based on local susceptibility patterns and formulary restriction, and avoiding drugs with more propensity to foster resistance.

  1. Evaluation of phosphate fertilizers for the stabilization of cadmium in highly contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Thawornchaisit, Usarat; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2009-06-15

    The efficiency of three phosphate fertilizers including triple superphosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), and phosphate rock (PR) as stabilizing agents of cadmium-contaminated soils has been assessed in this study. Two types of assessment criteria, (a) the reduction of leachable cadmium concentration; and (b) the changes in Cd association with specific operational soil fraction based on the sequential extraction data, are used in the evaluation of stabilization performance of each fertilizer. Results of the study showed that after the 60-day stabilization, the leachable concentrations of Cd in PR-, DAP- and TSP- treated soils reduced from 306 mg/kg (the control) to 140, 34, and 12 mg/kg with the stabilization efficiency as TSP>DAP>PR. Results from the assessment of Cd speciation via sequential extraction procedure revealed that the soluble-exchangeable fraction and the surface adsorption fraction of Cd in the soils treated with PO(4) fertilizers, especially with TSP, have been reduced considerably. In addition, it is found that the reduction was correspondingly related with the increase of more stable forms of cadmium: the metal bound to manganese oxides and the metal bound to crystalline iron oxides. Treatment efficiency increased as the phosphate dose (based on the molar ratio of PO(4)/Cd) increased. In addition, it was observed that stabilization was most effective when using the molar ratio of PO(4)/Cd at 2:1 and at least 21-day and 28-day stabilization time for TSP and DAP, respectively. PMID:19118949

  2. Effects of the GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Dulaglutide on the Structure of the Exocrine Pancreas of Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Vahle, John L; Byrd, Richard A; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Martin, Jennifer A; Sorden, Steven D; Ryan, Thomas; Pienkowski, Thomas; Rosol, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Klöppel, Günter

    2015-10-01

    Clinical and nonclinical studies have implicated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist therapy as a risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effect that dulaglutide, an approved GLP-1 receptor agonist, has on the exocrine pancreas. Dulaglutide 8.15 mg/kg (approximately 500 times the maximum recommended human dose based on plasma exposure) was administered twice weekly for 12 months to cynomolgus monkeys. Serum amylase and lipase activities were measured and 6 sections of each pancreas were examined microscopically. Ductal epithelial cell proliferation was estimated using Ki67 labeling. Dulaglutide administration did not alter serum amylase or lipase activities measured at the end of treatment compared to control values. An extensive histologic evaluation of the pancreas revealed no changes in the acinar or endocrine portions and no evidence of pancreatitis, necrosis, or pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. An increase in goblet cells noted in 4 of the 19 treated monkeys was considered an effect of dulaglutide but was not associated with dilation, blockage, or accumulation of mucin in the pancreatic duct. There was no difference in cell proliferation in ductal epithelium between control and dulaglutide-treated monkeys. These data reveal that chronic dosing of nondiabetic primates with dulaglutide does not induce inflammatory or preneoplastic changes in exocrine pancreas.

  3. Estimation of radiation doses for atomic-bomb survivors in the Hiroshima University Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, M.; Matsuura, M.; Hayakawa, N.; Kamada, N.; Ito, C.

    1996-05-01

    The present study presents the Hiroshima University Registry of atomic bomb survivors, of which the total number is about 270,000, and application of absorbed doses. From this registry, we picked up 49,102 survivors and applied organ doses based on the dosimetry system 1986 (DS86), which is named the Atomic Bomb Survivor 1993 Dose (ABS93D). The applied dose data are based on the tables listed in the DS86 final report such as the free-in-air kermas, the house shielding factors, and organ dose factors for the active bone marrow and the breast. Calculations for the 13 other organs provided in DS86 are possible. To obtained the organ doses for each survivor, it is necessary to obtain information concerning (1) place exposed, (2) whether they were shielded or not, and (3) age. ABS93D body transmission factors for active bone marrow for neutrons and gamma rays agreed with DS 86 to within a few percent. Of the survivors studied, 35, 123 of them were used for the relative risk estimation of leukemia mortality, adopting the same method as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) for comparison. For the observation period from 1968 to 1989, the analyzed relative risks for leukemia mortality at 1 Gy by shielded kerm and by active bone marrow dose are 2.01 and 2.37, respectively, which are consistent with the RERF results. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Assessment of MLC tracking performance during hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using real-time dose reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fast, M F; Kamerling, C P; Ziegenhein, P; Menten, M J; Bedford, J L; Nill, S; Oelfke, U

    2016-02-21

    By adapting to the actual patient anatomy during treatment, tracked multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatment deliveries offer an opportunity for margin reduction and healthy tissue sparing. This is assumed to be especially relevant for hypofractionated protocols in which intrafractional motion does not easily average out. In order to confidently deliver tracked treatments with potentially reduced margins, it is necessary to monitor not only the patient anatomy but also the actually delivered dose during irradiation. In this study, we present a novel real-time online dose reconstruction tool which calculates actually delivered dose based on pre-calculated dose influence data in less than 10 ms at a rate of 25 Hz. Using this tool we investigate the impact of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins on CTV coverage and organ-at-risk dose. On our research linear accelerator, a set of four different CTV-to-PTV margins were tested for three patient cases subject to four different motion conditions. Based on this data, we can conclude that tracking eliminates dose cold spots which can occur in the CTV during conventional deliveries even for the smallest CTV-to-PTV margin of 1 mm. Changes of organ-at-risk dose do occur frequently during MLC tracking and are not negligible in some cases. Intrafractional dose reconstruction is expected to become an important element in any attempt of re-planning the treatment plan during the delivery based on the observed anatomy of the day.

  5. Assessment of MLC tracking performance during hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using real-time dose reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, M. F.; Kamerling, C. P.; Ziegenhein, P.; Menten, M. J.; Bedford, J. L.; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.

    2016-02-01

    By adapting to the actual patient anatomy during treatment, tracked multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatment deliveries offer an opportunity for margin reduction and healthy tissue sparing. This is assumed to be especially relevant for hypofractionated protocols in which intrafractional motion does not easily average out. In order to confidently deliver tracked treatments with potentially reduced margins, it is necessary to monitor not only the patient anatomy but also the actually delivered dose during irradiation. In this study, we present a novel real-time online dose reconstruction tool which calculates actually delivered dose based on pre-calculated dose influence data in less than 10 ms at a rate of 25 Hz. Using this tool we investigate the impact of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins on CTV coverage and organ-at-risk dose. On our research linear accelerator, a set of four different CTV-to-PTV margins were tested for three patient cases subject to four different motion conditions. Based on this data, we can conclude that tracking eliminates dose cold spots which can occur in the CTV during conventional deliveries even for the smallest CTV-to-PTV margin of 1 mm. Changes of organ-at-risk dose do occur frequently during MLC tracking and are not negligible in some cases. Intrafractional dose reconstruction is expected to become an important element in any attempt of re-planning the treatment plan during the delivery based on the observed anatomy of the day.

  6. Renal function in atrial fibrillation patients switched from warfarin to a direct oral anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Anum S; Jiang, Qingmei; Gu, Xiaokui; Haymart, Brian; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Almany, Steve; Kozlowski, Jay; Krol, Gregory D; Kaatz, Scott; Froehlich, James B; Barnes, Geoffrey D

    2016-11-01

    All available direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are at least partially eliminated by the kidneys. These agents are increasingly being used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to identify changes in renal function and associated DOAC dosing implications in a multicenter cohort of atrial fibrillation patients switched from warfarin to DOAC treatment. We included all patients in the Michigan Anticoagulation Quality Improvement Initiative cohort who switched from warfarin to a DOAC with atrial fibrillation as their anticoagulant indication between 2009 and 2014, and who had at least two creatinine values. Compliance with FDA-recommended dosing based on renal function was assessed. Of the 189 patients switched from warfarin to a DOAC, 34 (18.0 %) had a baseline creatinine clearance <50 mL/min and 23 (12.2 %) experienced important fluctuations in renal function. Of these 23 patients, 6 (26.1 %) should have impacted the DOAC dosing, but only 1 patient actually received an appropriate dose adjustment. Additionally, 15 (7.9 %) of patients on DOACs had a dose change performed, but only one patient demonstrated a change in renal function to justify the dose adjustment. Most atrial fibrillation patients who switched from warfarin to a DOAC had stable renal function. However, the majority of patients who had a change in renal function did not receive the indicated dose change. As the use of DOACs expands, monitoring of renal function and appropriate dose adjustments are critical.

  7. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients.

  8. Unsaturated flow modeling for performance assessment of a radioactive waste disposal facility in Andrews County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Singh, A.; Holt, R. M.; grisak, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitifying infiltration rates is a key component of the performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal facilities. In arid regions with scarce infiltration data, this is a challenging problem because of the computational limitations of available numerical implementations to solve water flow and transport equations. This work summarizes methodology and analysis performed to overcome some of these challenges and to generate infiltration scenarios for a low level waste disposal site in Andrews County, Texas. The work presented here includes preparation of a two dimensional finite element model in HYDRUS that includes the cover system and adjacent geologic units, calibration of hydraulic properties and root water uptake parameters based on soft information, preparation of atmospheric forcings based on current and hypothesized future climatic conditions, evaluation of impacts related to temporal and spatial discretization of forcings and model domain, and definition of scenarios for cover degradation and wetter climate conditions. Results of this work include a sensitivity analysis of infiltration rates to changes in boundary conditions under quasi-steady state, evaluation of the impact of temporal discretization of the atmospheric forcings in terms of water balance error and computational efficiency, and the estimation of infiltration rates under different scenarios. Infiltration rates from this work are being incorporated into a transport model to estimate potential radiological doses based on performance assessment modeling analyses. Findings from this work seek to contribute towards robust approaches to estimate infiltration in arid regions.

  9. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G; Sensen, Christoph W; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F; Schriemer, David C

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  10. Radiocesium concentrations in wild mushrooms collected in Kawauchi Village after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Kanami; Orita, Makiko; Fukuda, Naoko; Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Matsuda, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    It is well known from the experience after the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant that radiocesium tends to concentrate in wild mushrooms. In this study, we collected wild mushrooms from the Kawauchi Village of Fukushima Prefecture, located within 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and evaluated their radiocesium concentrations to estimate the risk of internal radiation exposure in local residents. We found that radioactive cesium exceeding 100 Bq/kg was detected in 125 of 154 mushrooms (81.2%). We calculated committed effective doses based on 6,278 g per year (age > 20 years, 17.2 g/day), the average intake of Japanese citizens, ranging from doses of 0.11–1.60 mSv, respectively. Although committed effective doses are limited even if residents eat contaminated foods several times, we believe that comprehensive risk-communication based on the results of the radiocesium measurements of food, water, and soil is necessary for the recovery of Fukushima after this nuclear disaster. PMID:26623189

  11. 210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

    PubMed

    Gwynn, Justin P; Nalbandyan, Anna; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2013-02-01

    This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.

  12. An Extrusion Spheronization Approach to Enable a High Drug Load Formulation of a Poorly Soluble Drug with a Low Melting Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Tatavarti, Aditya; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin E tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) is a non-ionic surface active agent, known to enhance the bioavailability of lipophilic compounds via wettability, solubility, and in some cases permeability enhancement. MK-0536 is an anti-retroviral drug with poor wettability and solubility and a high dose. Based on pharmacokinetic studies in dogs and humans, use of vitamin E TPGS in oral solid formulations of MK-0536 provides desired PK characteristics. The use of vitamin E TPGS, however, in solid dosage forms is limited because of the processing challenges resulting from its waxy nature and low melting temperature (∼37°C). The current study, for the first time, demonstrates the use of an alternative low pressure extrusion and spheronization approach to enable high loadings of the poorly soluble, poorly compactable drug and relatively high levels of vitamin E TPGS. This approach not only aided in mitigating processing challenges arising from most high energy process steps such as milling, compression, and coating, but also enabled a higher drug load formulation that provided superior bioperformance relative to a conventional high shear wet granulated formulation. An encapsulated dosage form consisting of pellets prepared by extrusion spheronization with 75% (w/w) MK-0536 and 10% (w/w) vitamin E TPGS was developed.

  13. Reflex cardiopulmonary responses by stimulation to type J receptors in rats exposed to NO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubone, H.; Suzuki, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    To examine the role of the vagal pathway on the cardiopulmonary functions in NO/sub 2/-exposed rats, phenyl diguanide, which stimulates type J receptors in the lungs, was injected to control and exposed rats at a constant dose. Based on a statistcal test, a decrease in the heart rate (HR) after the injection was observed in the groups exposed to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 1.5 h and 3 h, and 10 ppm for 24 h. On the other hand, an increase in respiratory rate (RR) was observed in the groups exposed to 10 ppm for 3 h and 4 ppm for 1 wk. No change in HR and RR was found in the group exposed to 0.4 ppm for 4 wk. These results suggest that the augmentation of the reflex cardiopulmonary responses due to stimulation to the type J receptors was produced by exposures with a higher concentration of NO/sub 2/. 24 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  14. MARSSIM vs. DOE Order 5400.5: the Final Status Survey plan at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sarah J; Stevens, Jeff

    2003-06-01

    A challenge unique to the decommissioning of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involves the compromise between the existing and newly recommended standards for the unrestricted release of property and materials. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is currently decommissioning numerous plutonium contaminated facilities. The default DOE standard for unrestricted release, Order 5400.5, defines surface activity guidelines as averaged over a 1-square-meter area with a maximum value defined for any given 100-square-centimeter area. While the Order was initially developed to release property and materials from an operating site, it is restrictive in its use when performing Final Status Survey and, to date, no new complex wide standard has been developed. However, the RFETS stakeholders selected the MARSSIM, which provides a progressive method to demonstrate compliance with the defined "dose-based" limits for a specific site, as the governing document in developing a final survey method. The end result is a hybrid final status survey plan that incorporates the requirements of both documents. This plan represents several years of development and negotiation between the contractor, the DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Rocky Flats stakeholders, and other interested parties. PMID:12792399

  15. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G.; Sensen, Christoph W.; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F.; Schriemer, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  16. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk-benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk-benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  17. Galactic and solar radiation exposure to aircrew during a solar cycle.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Green, A R; McCall, M J; Ellaschuk, B; Butler, A; Pierre, M

    2002-01-01

    An on-going investigation using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) has been carried out to measure the ambient dose equivalent rate of the cosmic radiation exposure of aircrew during a solar cycle. A semi-empirical model has been derived from these data to allow for the interpolation of the dose rate for any global position. The model has been extended to an altitude of up to 32 km with further measurements made on board aircraft and several balloon flights. The effects of changing solar modulation during the solar cycle are characterised by correlating the dose rate data to different solar potential models. Through integration of the dose-rate function over a great circle flight path or between given waypoints, a Predictive Code for Aircrew Radiation Exposure (PCAIRE) has been further developed for estimation of the route dose from galactic cosmic radiation exposure. This estimate is provided in units of ambient dose equivalent as well as effective dose, based on E/H x (10) scaling functions as determined from transport code calculations with LUIN and FLUKA. This experimentally based treatment has also been compared with the CARI-6 and EPCARD codes that are derived solely from theoretical transport calculations. Using TEPC measurements taken aboard the International Space Station, ground based neutron monitoring, GOES satellite data and transport code analysis, an empirical model has been further proposed for estimation of aircrew exposure during solar particle events. This model has been compared to results obtained during recent solar flare events.

  18. Assessing exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft.

    PubMed

    Bottollier-Depois, J F; Chau, Q; Bouisset, P; Kerlau, G; Plawinski, L; Lebaron-Jacobs, L

    2003-01-01

    The assessment of exposure to cosmic radiation on board aircraft is one of the preoccupations of organizations responsible for radiation protection. The cosmic radiation particle flux increases with altitude and latitude and depends on the solar activity. The radiation exposure has been estimated on several airlines using transatlantic, Siberian and transequatorial routes on board subsonic and supersonic aircraft, to illustrate the effect of these parameters. Measurements have been obtained with a tissue equivalent proportional counter using the microdosimetric technique. Data have been collected at maximum solar activity in 1991-92 and at minimum in 1996-98. The lowest mean dose rate measured was 3 microSv/h during a Paris-Buenos Aires flight in 1991; the highest was 6.6 microSv/h during a Paris-Tokyo flight using a Siberian route and 9.7 microSv/h on Concorde in 1996-97. The mean quality factor is around 1.8. The corresponding annual effective dose, based on 700 hours of flight for subsonic aircraft and 300 hours for Concorde, can be estimated between 2 mSv for least-exposed routes and 5 mSv for more exposed routes.

  19. Hematologic parameters in the adjustment of chemotherapy doses in combined modality treatments involving radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byfield, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The differential white blood cell count of a group of patients with Stages I and II infiltrating ductal carcinoma who underwent treatment in the preadjuvant chemotherapy era have been evaluated. All patients received a modified radical mastectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy to the chest wall and draining regional lymph node chains (ipsilateral internal mammary, axillary,and supraclavicular regions). When the levels of circulating neutrophils, band cells, and lymphocytes were compared for the period beginning prior to surgery and ending 1 year after the completion of radiotherapy, it was found that radiation induced a significant lymphopenia. However, all patients maintained a neutrophil count at least twice that needed for full-dose conventional chemotherapy. Based on these observations and related preclinical and clinical information, it is proposed that future clinical trials utilizing even local radiotherapy as a component of therapy must have their chemotherapy doses based on appropriate hematologic parameters (neutrophil + band count) in order to avoid spurious and quite possibly erroneous results.

  20. Paraplegia following intrathecal methotrexate: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, R G; Costanzi, J J

    1976-04-01

    A patient who developed paraplegia following the intrathecal instillation of methotrexate is discribed. The ten previously reported cases of this unusual complication are reviewed. The following factors appear to predispose to the development of this complication: abnormal cerebrospinal dynamics related to the presence of central nervous system leukemia, and epidural cerebrospinal leakage; elevated cerebrospinal fluid methothexate concentration related to abnormal cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and to inappropriately high methotrexate doses based on body surface area calculations in older children and adults; the presence of neurotoxic preservatives in commercially available methotrexate preparations and diluents; and the use of methotrexate diluents of unphysiologic pH, ionic content and osmolarity. The role of methotrexate contaminants, local folate deficiency, and cranial irradiation in the pathogenesis of intrathecal methotrexate toxicity is unclear. The incidence of neurotoxicity may be reduced by employing lower doses of methotrexate in the presence of central nervous system leukemia, in older children and adults, and in the presence of epidural leakage. Only preservative-free methotrexate in Elliott's B Solution at a concentration of not more than 1 mg/ml should be used for intrathecal administration. Periodic monitoring of cerebruspinal fluid methotrexate levels may be predictive of the development of serious neurotoxicity. PMID:946593

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Morphine and Its Metabolites in Infants and Young Children After Congenital Heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elkomy, Mohammed H; Drover, David R; Glotzbach, Kristi L; Galinkin, Jeffery L; Frymoyer, Adam; Su, Felice; Hammer, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize morphine glucuronidation in infants and children following cardiac surgery for possible treatment individualization in this population. Twenty children aged 3 days to 6 years, admitted to the cardiovascular intensive care unit after congenital heart surgery, received an intravenous (IV) loading dose of morphine (0.15 mg/kg) followed by subsequent intermittent IV bolus doses based on a validated pain scale. Plasma samples were collected over 6 h after the loading dose and randomly after follow-up doses to measure morphine and its major metabolite concentrations. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with the non-linear mixed effects software NONMEM. Parent disposition was adequately described by a linear two-compartment model. Effect of growth (size and maturation) on morphine parameters was accounted for by allometric body weight-based models. An intermediate compartment with Emax model best characterized glucuronide concentrations. Glomerular filtration rate was identified as a significant predictor of glucuronide formation time delay and maximum concentrations. Clearance of morphine in children with congenital heart disease is comparable to that reported in children without cardiac abnormalities of similar age. Children 1-6 months of age need higher morphine doses per kilogram to achieve an area under concentration-time curve comparable to that in older children. Pediatric patients with renal failure receiving morphine therapy are at increased risk of developing opioid toxicity due to accumulation of morphine metabolites.

  2. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, David A.; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of EC50 are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. While pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be employed to optimize dose selection in clinical practice. PMID:26843190

  3. A Brachytherapy Plan Evaluation Tool for Interstitial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nambiraj, N. Arunai; Dayalan, Sridhar; Ganesh, Kalaivany; Anchineyan, Pichandi; Bilimagga, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Radiobiological metrics such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) help in assessing the quality of brachytherapy plans. Application of such metrics in clinics as well as research is still inadequate. This study presents the implementation of two indigenously designed plan evaluation modules: Brachy_TCP and Brachy_NTCP. Evaluation tools were constructed to compute TCP and NTCP from dose volume histograms (DVHs) of any interstitial brachytherapy treatment plan. The computation module was employed to estimate probabilities of tumor control and normal tissue complications in ten cervical cancer patients based on biologically effective equivalent uniform dose (BEEUD). The tumor control and normal tissue morbidity were assessed with clinical followup and were scored. The acute toxicity was graded using common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Outcome score was found to be correlated with the TCP/NTCP estimates. Thus, the predictive ability of the estimates was quantified with the clinical outcomes. Biologically effective equivalent uniform dose-based formalism was found to be effective in predicting the complexities and disease control. PMID:24665263

  4. Application of Adaptive Design Methodology in Development of a Long-Acting Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog (Dulaglutide): Statistical Design and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanek, Zachary; Berry, Scott; Berry, Don; Chien, Jenny; Geiger, Mary Jane; Anderson, James H.; Gaydos, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265), a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is being developed to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods To foster the development of dula, we designed a two-stage adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study. The Bayesian theoretical framework is used to adaptively randomize patients in stage 1 to 7 dula doses and, at the decision point, to either stop for futility or to select up to 2 dula doses for stage 2. After dose selection, patients continue to be randomized to the selected dula doses or comparator arms. Data from patients assigned the selected doses will be pooled across both stages and analyzed with an analysis of covariance model, using baseline hemoglobin A1c and country as covariates. The operating characteristics of the trial were assessed by extensive simulation studies. Results Simulations demonstrated that the adaptive design would identify the correct doses 88% of the time, compared to as low as 6% for a fixed-dose design (the latter value based on frequentist decision rules analogous to the Bayesian decision rules for adaptive design). Conclusions This article discusses the decision rules used to select the dula dose(s); the mathematical details of the adaptive algorithm—including a description of the clinical utility index used to mathematically quantify the desirability of a dose based on safety and efficacy measurements; and a description of the simulation process and results that quantify the operating characteristics of the design. PMID:23294775

  5. Genetic Damage Induced by a Food Coloring Dye (Sunset Yellow) on Meristematic Cells of Brassica campestris L.

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Kshama; Kumar, Girjesh

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the present piece of work to evaluate the effect of synthetic food coloring azo dye (sunset yellow) on actively dividing root tip cells of Brassica campestris L. Three doses of azo dye were administered for the treatment of actively dividing root tip cells, namely, 1%, 3%, and 5%, for 6-hour duration along with control. Mitotic analysis clearly revealed the azo dye induced endpoint deviation like reduction in the frequency of normal divisions in a dose dependent manner. Mitotic divisions in the control sets were found to be perfectly normal while dose based reduction in MI was registered in the treated sets. Azo dye has induced several chromosomal aberrations (genotoxic effect) at various stages of cell cycle such as stickiness of chromosomes, micronuclei formation, precocious migration of chromosome, unorientation, forward movement of chromosome, laggards, and chromatin bridge. Among all, stickiness of chromosomes was present in the highest frequency followed by partial genome elimination as micronuclei. The present study suggests that extensive use of synthetic dye should be forbidden due to genotoxic and cytotoxic impacts on living cells. Thus, there is an urgent need to assess potential hazardous effects of these dyes on other test systems like human and nonhuman biota for better scrutiny. PMID:25954313

  6. Amine modification of nonporous silica nanoparticles reduces inflammatory response following intratracheal instillation in murine lungs.

    PubMed

    Morris, Angie S; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehman, Sean E; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Thorne, Peter S; Larsen, Sarah C; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-22

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) possess unique material properties that make them ideal for many different applications. However, the impact of these materials on human and environmental health needs to be established. We investigated nonporous silica NPs both bare and modified with amine functional groups (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)) in order to evaluate the effect of surface chemistry on biocompatibility. In vitro data showed there to be little to no cytotoxicity in a human lung cancer epithelial cell line (A549) for bare silica NPs and amine-functionalized NPs using doses based on both mass concentration (below 200μg/mL) and exposed total surface area (below 14m(2)/L). To assess lung inflammation, C57BL/6 mice were administered bare or amine-functionalized silica NPs via intra-tracheal instillation. Two doses (0.1 and 0.5mg NPs/mouse) were tested using the in vivo model. At the higher dose used, bare silica NPs elicited a significantly higher inflammatory response, as evidence by increased neutrophils and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared to amine-functionalized NPs. From this study, we conclude that functionalization of nonporous silica NPs with APTES molecules reduces murine lung inflammation and improves the overall biocompatibility of the nanomaterial. PMID:26562768

  7. Radiation-associated lung cancer: a comparison of the histology of lung cancers in uranium miners and survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Land, C E; Shimosato, Y; Saccomanno, G; Tokuoka, S; Auerbach, O; Tateishi, R; Greenberg, S D; Nambu, S; Carter, D; Akiba, S

    1993-05-01

    A binational panel of Japanese and American pulmonary pathologists reviewed tissue slides of lung cancer cases diagnosed among Japanese A-bomb survivors and American uranium miners and classified the cases according to histological subtype. Blind reviews were completed on slides from 92 uranium miners and 108 A-bomb survivors, without knowledge of population, sex, age, smoking history, or level of radiation exposure. Consensus diagnoses were obtained with respect to principal subtype, including squamous-cell cancer, small-cell cancer, adenocarcinoma, and less frequent subtypes. The results were analyzed in terms of population, radiation dose, and smoking history. As expected, the proportion of squamous-cell cancer was positively related to smoking history in both populations. The relative frequencies of small-cell cancer and adenocarcinoma were very different in the two populations, but this difference was accounted for adequately by differences in radiation dose or, more specifically, dose-based relative risk estimates based on published data. Radiation-induced cancers appeared more likely to be of the small-cell subtype, and less likely to be adenocarcinomas, in both populations. The data appeared to require no additional explanation in terms of radiation quality (alpha particles vs gamma rays), uniform or local irradiation, inhaled vs external radiation source, or other population difference. PMID:8387679

  8. Dose-related effect of fly ash on edaphic properties in laterite cropland soil.

    PubMed

    Roy, Gourab; Joy, Vadakepuram Chacko

    2011-05-01

    Short-term laboratory and field studies showed dose-based effect of coal fly ash on chemical and microbial properties of laterite cropland soil. Sandy loam soil mixed with farmyard manure (10% w/w) and amended with fly ash at 5%, 10%, 20%, 40% w/w (50-400 t ha(-1)) was incubated in the laboratory and added to field plots. The pH, EC, PO(4), Ca and Na of soil increased with dose and time, but OC, NO(3) and K decreased. There was temporary inhibition of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes populations at 5% and 10% doses, but 20% and 40% were harmful. Activities of major soil enzymes declined at higher doses. Amylase, cellulase and invertase recovered in 5% and 10%, these doses did not affect dehydrogenase but benefited phosphatase and arylsulphatase activities. The above assessments showed that up to 100 t ha(-1) fly ash is apparently safe to microbial characteristics of tropical red laterite soil. PMID:21106242

  9. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Tenuta, Livia M. A.; Cury, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children’s toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p < 0.05), no difference between types of toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used. PMID:24189183

  10. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  11. Production, PET performance and dosimetric considerations of 134Ce/134La, an Auger electron and positron-emitting generator for radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubberink, Mark; Lundqvist, Hans; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2002-02-01

    We propose the use of the Auger electron and positron-emitting generator 134Ce/134La (half-lives 3.16 d and 6.45 min) for radionuclide therapy. It combines emission of high-energy beta particles with Auger electrons. The high-energy beta particles have similar energies as those emitted by 90Y. Many cancer patients receiving radionuclide therapy have both bulk tumours, which are best treated with high-energy beta particles, and single spread cells or micrometastasis, which are preferably treated with low-energy electrons such as Auger and conversion electrons. Furthermore, the positron-emitting 134La can be used to study kinetics and dosimetry using PET. Production and PET performance were investigated and theoretical dosimetry calculations were made. PET resolution, recovery and quantitative accuracy were slightly degraded for 134La compared to 18F. 134Ce/134La absorbed doses to single cells were higher than absorbed doses from 90Y and 111In. Absorbed doses to spheres representing bulk tumours were almost as high as for 90Y, and a factor 10 higher than for 111In. Whole-body absorbed doses, based on kinetics of the somatostatin analogue octreotide, were higher for 134Ce/134La than for 90Y because of the 134La annihilation photons. This initial study of the therapeutic possibilities of 134Ce/134La is encouraging and justifies further investigations.

  12. Biodosimetry of heavy ions by interphase chromosome painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kawata, T.; Nakano, T.; Yamada, S.; Tsujii, H.

    1998-11-01

    We report measurements of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes from cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. Patients with cervix or esophageal cancer were treated with 10 MV X-rays produced at a LINAC accelerator, or high-energy carbon ions produced at the HIMAC accelerator at the National Institute for Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Chiba. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after the radiation treatment. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by incubation in calyculin A. Aberrations in chromosomes 2 and 4 were scored after fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole-chromosome probes. Pre-treatment samples were exposed in vitro to X-rays, individual dose-response curves for the induction of chromosomal aberrations were determined, and used as calibration curves to calculate the effective whole-body dose absorbed during the treatment. This calculated dose, based on the calibration curve relative to the induction of reciprocal exchanges, has a sharp increase after the first few fractions of the treatment, then saturates at high doses. Although carbon ions are 2-3 times more effective than X-rays in tumor sterilization, the effective dose was similar to that of X-ray treatment. However, the frequency of complex-type chromosomal exchanges was much higher for patients treated with carbon ions than X-ray.

  13. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients. PMID:27211083

  14. Risk assessment of soils identified on firefighter turnout gear.

    PubMed

    Easter, Elizabeth; Lander, Deborah; Huston, Tabitha

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the composition of soils on firefighter turnout gear and to determine the dermal exposure risks associated with the soils. Nine used Nomex hoods from the Philadelphia fire department were analyzed for the presence of trace metals and seven sets of used turnout gear were analyzed for semi-volatile organics. Turnout gear samples were removed from areas of the gear known to have high levels of dermal absorption including the collar, armpit, wrist, and crotch areas, from either the outer shell or thermal liner layers. The following compounds were detected: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalate plasticizers, and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants (PBDEs). A screening risk assessment was conducted by converting the measured concentrations to an estimated dermally absorbed dose based on estimates for the permeation coefficient (Kp) and an assumed firefighting exposure scenario. Benzo(a) pyrene had the highest dermal exposure risk based on carcinogenic effects and PBDE-99 had the highest dermal exposure risk based on non-carcinogenic effects. For the metals, arsenic had the highest dermal exposure risk for the use hoods.

  15. Proteomics analysis of MKN45 cell line before and after treatment with Lavender aqueous extract

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Heydari-Kashal, Saeid; Kalantari, Shiva; Dailian, Sona; Zali, Hakimeh

    2012-01-01

    Aim In this study the anticancer activity of Lavender aqueous extract against MKN45 cell line was evaluated. Background Plant-based drugs are regarded as promising therapies. Lavender is a plant that has been cultivated from ancient times. An aqueous extract of Lavender has shown therapeutic effects on the nervous system in the high doses based on in-vivo studies. Gastric cancer is one of the frequent cancers in Iranian population. We therefore assessed the effect of Lavender upon a gastric cancer cell line. Patients and methods The MKN45 cancer cell line was selected for treatment with aqueous extract of Lavender. Survival of MKN45 cell line was studied in the presence of various concentrations of Lavender extract by MTT assay method. Morphological studies were performed via microscopic analyses. Flow cytometry and proteomics techniques were applied to determining pharmaceutical mechanism of lavender cytotoxic effects. Results The survival and morphological studies revealed anticancer characteristics of extract. Flow cytometry findings indicate that Lavender extract had a cytotoxic effect upon the cell line. Proteomics analysis identified a significant alternation in gastric cellular proteome expression after treating with the extract. Among 1000 spots, more than 700 spots showed changes in protein expression levels by informatics analysis. Of these proteins, expression of three cancer biomarkers, Annexin1, Anolase1 and HSP70 were suppressed by extract. Conclusion This study suggests that Lavender extract is cytotoxic and alter protein expression in a gastric cancer cell line. PMID:24834196

  16. HEMODOSE: A Biodosimetry Tool Based on Multi-type Blood Cell Counts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaowen; Blakely, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral blood cell counts are important biomarkers of radiation exposure. In this work, a simplified compartmental modeling approach is applied to simulate the perturbation of the hematopoiesis system in humans after radiation exposure, and HemoDose software is reported to estimate individuals’ absorbed doses based on multi-type blood cell counts. Testing with patient data in some historical accidents indicates that either single or serial granulocyte, lymphocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts after exposure can be robust indicators of the absorbed doses. In addition, such correlation exists not only in the early time window (1 or 2 d) but also in the late phase (up to 4 wk) after exposure, when the four types of cell counts are combined for analysis. These demonstrate the capability of HemoDose as a rapid point-of-care diagnostic or centralized high-throughput assay system for personnel exposed to unintended high doses of radiation, especially in large-scale nuclear/radiological disaster scenarios involving mass casualties. PMID:26011498

  17. Radiation-induced alternative transcription and splicing events and their applicability to practical biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macaeva, Ellina; Saeys, Yvan; Tabury, Kevin; Janssen, Ann; Michaux, Arlette; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; De Vos, Winnok H.; Baatout, Sarah; Quintens, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the individual exposure dose based on easily accessible samples (e.g. blood) immediately following a radiological accident is crucial. We aimed at developing a robust transcription-based signature for biodosimetry from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated with different doses of X-rays (0.1 and 1.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.26 Gy/min. Genome-wide radiation-induced changes in mRNA expression were evaluated at both gene and exon level. Using exon-specific qRT-PCR, we confirmed that several biomarker genes are alternatively spliced or transcribed after irradiation and that different exons of these genes exhibit significantly different levels of induction. Moreover, a significant number of radiation-responsive genes were found to be genomic neighbors. Using three different classification models we found that gene and exon signatures performed equally well on dose prediction, as long as more than 10 features are included. Together, our results highlight the necessity of evaluating gene expression at the level of single exons for radiation biodosimetry in particular and transcriptional biomarker research in general. This approach is especially advisable for practical gene expression-based biodosimetry, for which primer- or probe-based techniques would be the method of choice. PMID:26763932

  18. Radiocesium concentrations in wild mushrooms collected in Kawauchi Village after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kanami; Orita, Makiko; Fukuda, Naoko; Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Matsuda, Naoki; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    It is well known from the experience after the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant that radiocesium tends to concentrate in wild mushrooms. In this study, we collected wild mushrooms from the Kawauchi Village of Fukushima Prefecture, located within 30 km of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, and evaluated their radiocesium concentrations to estimate the risk of internal radiation exposure in local residents. We found that radioactive cesium exceeding 100 Bq/kg was detected in 125 of 154 mushrooms (81.2%). We calculated committed effective doses based on 6,278 g per year (age > 20 years, 17.2 g/day), the average intake of Japanese citizens, ranging from doses of 0.11-1.60 mSv, respectively. Although committed effective doses are limited even if residents eat contaminated foods several times, we believe that comprehensive risk-communication based on the results of the radiocesium measurements of food, water, and soil is necessary for the recovery of Fukushima after this nuclear disaster. PMID:26623189

  19. Novel Parameter Predicting Grade 2 Rectal Bleeding After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Hanada, Takashi; Ohashi, Toshio; Yorozu, Atsunori; Toya, Kazuhito; Saito, Shiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel parameter predicting rectal bleeding on the basis of generalized equivalent uniform doses (gEUD) after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy and to assess the predictive value of this parameter. Methods and Materials: To account for differences among radiation treatment modalities and fractionation schedules, rectal dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of 369 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing combined therapy retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to equivalent dose-based DVHs. The gEUDs for the rectum were calculated from these converted DVHs. The total gEUD (gEUD{sub sum}) was determined by a summation of the brachytherapy and external-beam radiation therapy components. Results: Thirty-eight patients (10.3%) developed grade 2+ rectal bleeding. The grade 2+ rectal bleeding rate increased as the gEUD{sub sum} increased: 2.0% (2 of 102 patients) for <70 Gy, 10.3% (15 of 145 patients) for 70-80 Gy, 15.8% (12 of 76 patients) for 80-90 Gy, and 19.6% (9 of 46 patients) for >90 Gy (P=.002). Multivariate analysis identified age (P=.024) and gEUD{sub sum} (P=.000) as risk factors for grade 2+ rectal bleeding. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate gEUD to be a potential predictive factor for grade 2+ late rectal bleeding after combined therapy for prostate cancer.

  20. Online dosimetry for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy using the canine prostate as model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Höglund, Odd V.; Hansson, Kerstin; Södersten, Fredrik; Axelsson, Johan; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Online light dosimetry with real-time feedback was applied for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) of dog prostate. The aim was to investigate the performance of online dosimetry by studying the correlation between light dose plans and the tissue response, i.e., extent of induced tissue necrosis and damage to surrounding organs at risk. Light-dose planning software provided dose plans, including light source positions and light doses, based on ultrasound images. A laser instrument provided therapeutic light and dosimetric measurements. The procedure was designed to closely emulate the procedure for whole-prostate PDT in humans with prostate cancer. Nine healthy dogs were subjected to the procedure according to a light-dose escalation plan. About 0.15 mg/kg temoporfin was administered 72 h before the procedure. The results of the procedure were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and gross pathology and histopathology of excised tissue. Light dose planning and online dosimetry clearly resulted in more focused effect and less damage to surrounding tissue than interstitial PDT without dosimetry. A light energy dose-response relationship was established where the threshold dose to induce prostate gland necrosis was estimated from 20 to 30 J/cm2.

  1. Repeated and chronic administration of Vardenafil or Sildenafil differentially affects emotional and socio-sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Dadomo, H; Parmigiani, S; Nicolini, Y; Freschini, S; Gioiosa, L; Patrelli, T S; Palanza, P; Volpi, R

    2013-09-15

    Selective phosphodiesterases (PDEs) inhibitors have been widely studied as therapeutic agents for treatment of various human diseases, including cardiotonics, vasodilators, smooth muscle relaxants, antidepressants, antithrombotics, antiasthmatics, and agents for improving learning and memory. Although Sildenafil(®) and Vardenafil(®) have similar chemical formulae, the same target and interact with many of the same residues at the active site of phosphodiesterse-5 (PDE-5), they exhibit both in vitro and in vivo some important functional differences that could differentially affect behavior. Therefore we assessed whether repeated and chronic administration of Vardenafil and Sildenafil at a dose based upon human treatment can differentially affect aggressive, social, emotional and sexual behavior. To this aim, the effects of Sildenafil (10mg/kg) or Vardenafil (2mg/kg) (t.i.w., for 5 weeks) were observed in CD1 subordinate male mice in a low aggression and social subordination context. The results show that Sildenafil increased competitive aggression, environmental and social exploration, and reduced anxiety like behaviors as compared to controls, whereas Vardenafil had a significant major effect on appetitive and consummatory aspect of sexual behavior. This demonstrates that Sildenafil and Vardenafil, although being structurally and functionally similar, are characterized by different neuro-behavioral actions and can have differential therapeutic potentials. PMID:23850358

  2. Pharmacogenetic biomarkers: cytochrome P450 3A5.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, Iain A M

    2012-09-01

    The immunosuppressive drugs used for solid organ transplantation all have a narrow therapeutic index with wide variation between individuals in the blood concentration achieved by a given dose. Therapeutic drug monitoring is employed routinely but may not allow optimisation of drug exposure during the critical period two to three days following transplantation. A key factor in the inter-individual variability for tacrolimus, and probably sirolimus, is whether an individual is genetically predicted to express the drug metabolising enzyme cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5). Individuals predicted to express CYP3A5 by possession of at least one wild-type CYP3A5*1 allele require 1.5-2 times higher doses of tacrolimus to achieve target blood concentrations than individuals homozygous for the CYP3A5*3 allele who are functional non-expressers of CYP3A5. Planning the initial tacrolimus dose based on the CYP3A5 genotype has been shown to allow more rapid achievement of target blood concentrations after transplantation than a standard dose given to all patients. However, it remains to be demonstrated that use of this approach as an adjunct to therapeutic drug monitoring can reduce either efficacy failure (transplant rejection) or toxicity. Use of a pharmacogenetic approach to dosing sirolimus awaits testing and it is unlikely to be useful for ciclosporin or everolimus.

  3. Influence of naproxen on the healing of open excision wound in rats.

    PubMed

    Margaret, I; Jamil, K

    1997-01-01

    Excision wounds were made on the paravertebral area on the dorsal side of rat under light ether anaesthesia. The wound was a full thickness wound with removal of the skin upto the fascia. Animals were fed the drug naproxen in a gum acacia suspension with low, median and high doses based on the LD50 value of the drug. The animals were dosed upto the time eschar separated and no raw wound was left. Healing was assessed by planimetric measurement of the wound, periodically, thereby following wound closure by contraction. Granulation tissue formation and wound strength was assessed by using the granuloma model. Epithelialization was also determined. The cellular activity was assessed histologically and the biochemical indices on day of wounding and after the complete healing of the wound. Granulation tissue was used in assessing tensile strength and contraction. Histological sections of the wound on different days were assessed for connective tissue formation by the Mallory-Heidenhan stain. The closure of wounds were represented as percent contraction of original wound size and epithelialization as complete formation of epithelial layer with no rawness of the wound. The scar shape was noted and measured. The results of this study will be discussed.

  4. Methylmercury Concentration in Fish and Risk-Benefit Assessment of Fish Intake among Pregnant versus Infertile Women in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, You-Wen; Chang, Tien-Chin; Chien, Ling-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, the daily MeHg exposure dose, and the risk–benefit of MeHg, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) related to fish intake among pregnant and infertile women in Taiwan. The measured MeHg concentrations in fish did not exceed the Codex guideline level of 1 mg/kg. Swordfish (0.28 ± 0.23 mg/kg) and tuna (0.14 ± 0.13 mg/kg) had the highest MeHg concentrations. The MeHg concentration in the hair of infertile women (1.82 ± 0.14 mg/kg) was significantly greater than that of pregnant women (1.24 ± 0.18 mg/kg). In addition, 80% of infertile women and 68% of pregnant women had MeHg concentrations in hair that exceeded the USEPA reference dose (1 mg/kg). The MeHg concentrations in hair were significantly and positively correlated with the estimated daily MeHg exposure dose. Based on the risk–benefit evaluation results, this paper recommends consumption of fish species with a low MeHg concentration and high concentrations of DHA + EPA and ω-3 PUFA (e.g., salmon, mackerel, and greater amberjack). PMID:27187161

  5. Evaluation of phosphate fertilizers for the stabilization of cadmium in highly contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Thawornchaisit, Usarat; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2009-06-15

    The efficiency of three phosphate fertilizers including triple superphosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), and phosphate rock (PR) as stabilizing agents of cadmium-contaminated soils has been assessed in this study. Two types of assessment criteria, (a) the reduction of leachable cadmium concentration; and (b) the changes in Cd association with specific operational soil fraction based on the sequential extraction data, are used in the evaluation of stabilization performance of each fertilizer. Results of the study showed that after the 60-day stabilization, the leachable concentrations of Cd in PR-, DAP- and TSP- treated soils reduced from 306 mg/kg (the control) to 140, 34, and 12 mg/kg with the stabilization efficiency as TSP>DAP>PR. Results from the assessment of Cd speciation via sequential extraction procedure revealed that the soluble-exchangeable fraction and the surface adsorption fraction of Cd in the soils treated with PO(4) fertilizers, especially with TSP, have been reduced considerably. In addition, it is found that the reduction was correspondingly related with the increase of more stable forms of cadmium: the metal bound to manganese oxides and the metal bound to crystalline iron oxides. Treatment efficiency increased as the phosphate dose (based on the molar ratio of PO(4)/Cd) increased. In addition, it was observed that stabilization was most effective when using the molar ratio of PO(4)/Cd at 2:1 and at least 21-day and 28-day stabilization time for TSP and DAP, respectively.

  6. [Companion Diagnostics for Thrombotic Disease].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuya; Matsuno, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Chikara

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, thrombotic disease, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, has rapidly increased in Japan. To treat and prevent thromboembolism, warfarin has been commonly prescribed for a long period as an oral anticoagulant. However, it is difficult to define an appropriate warfarin dose because of large inter-individual variability in dose requirements and the narrow therapeutic range. Recent pharmacogenomic (PGx) studies have shown that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP2C9 (warfarin metabolic enzyme) and VKORC1 (warfarin target enzyme) are responsible for an individual's warfarin sensitivity. In order to realize personalized warfarin treatment, algorithms to estimate the required warfarin dose based on PGx are under consideration, including the cost-effectiveness. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have become available as well as alternatives to warfarin treatment for the prevention of ischemic stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Although NOACs are prescribed at a fixed-dose without frequent monitoring of blood coagulability, it has been reported that there is inter-individual variability in the blood concentration of dabigatran caused by gene polymorphisms. Further studies are needed to perform more effective and safer anticoagulant therapy using NOACs. Progress in PGx studies and the realization of personalized anticoagulant therapy are expected in the future. [Review]. PMID:26995878

  7. Acrocomia aculeata prevents toxicogenetic damage caused by the antitumor agent cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Magosso, M F; Carvalho, P C; Shneider, B U C; Pessatto, L R; Pesarini, J R; Silva, P V B; Correa, W A; Kassuya, C A L; Muzzi, R M; Oliveira, R J

    2016-05-06

    Acrocomia aculeata is a plant rich in antioxidant compounds. Studies suggest that this plant has anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and diuretic potential. We assessed the antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, immunomodulation, and apoptotic potentials of A. aculeata alone and in combination with an antitumor agent, cyclophosphamide. Swiss male mice (N = 140) were used. The animals were divided into 14 experimental groups as follows: a negative group, a positive group (100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide), groups that only received the oil extracted from the almond (AO) and from the pulp (PO) of A. aculeata at doses of 3, 15, and 30 mg/kg, and the associated treatment groups (oils combined with cyclophosphamide) involving pretreatment, simultaneous, and post-treatment protocols. Data suggest that both oils were chemopreventive at all doses, based on the tested protocols. The highest damage reduction percentages, observed for AO and PO were 88.19 and 90.03%, respectively, for the comet assay and 69.73 and 70.93%, respectively, for the micronucleus assay. Both AO and PO demonstrated immunomodulatory activity. The oils reduced the capacity of cyclophosphamide to trigger apoptosis in the liver, spleen, and kidney cells. These results suggest that A. aculeate AO and PO can be classified as a functional food and also enrich other functional foods and nutraceuticals with chemopreventive features. However, they are not appropriate sources for chemotherapeutic adjuvants, in particular for those used in combination with cyclophosphamide.

  8. Removal of pharmaceutical residues using ozonation as intermediate process step at Linköping WWTP, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Baresel, Christian; Malmborg, Jonas; Ek, Mats; Sehlén, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Pilot tests as basis for the design, implementation and operation of a future full-scale oxidation plant completing the existing sewage treatment in Linköping, Sweden, were performed. Using an ozonation step between bio-sedimentation and post-denitrification processes, the primary goal was the removal of the highest priority substances to effluent water levels that will not cause adverse effects in the recipient considering the natural dilution. The study included initial emission screenings, dose control trials, treatment performance studies and eco-toxicity studies. At an ozone dose of 5 mg O3/L, most substances could be removed. Ecotoxicological tests showed no negative effect for the tested ozone doses. High levels of oxygen into the denitrification could be rapidly reduced in the biology. The number of bacteria in the treated water could be significantly reduced even at relatively low ozone doses. Based on these results, the planning for the full-scale implementation of the treatment system was initiated in 2015. PMID:27120656

  9. Dose-related effect of fly ash on edaphic properties in laterite cropland soil.

    PubMed

    Roy, Gourab; Joy, Vadakepuram Chacko

    2011-05-01

    Short-term laboratory and field studies showed dose-based effect of coal fly ash on chemical and microbial properties of laterite cropland soil. Sandy loam soil mixed with farmyard manure (10% w/w) and amended with fly ash at 5%, 10%, 20%, 40% w/w (50-400 t ha(-1)) was incubated in the laboratory and added to field plots. The pH, EC, PO(4), Ca and Na of soil increased with dose and time, but OC, NO(3) and K decreased. There was temporary inhibition of bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes populations at 5% and 10% doses, but 20% and 40% were harmful. Activities of major soil enzymes declined at higher doses. Amylase, cellulase and invertase recovered in 5% and 10%, these doses did not affect dehydrogenase but benefited phosphatase and arylsulphatase activities. The above assessments showed that up to 100 t ha(-1) fly ash is apparently safe to microbial characteristics of tropical red laterite soil.

  10. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors: pharmacokinetics, efficacy, tolerability and safety in renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Davis, T M E

    2014-10-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a new class of blood glucose-lowering therapy with proven efficacy, tolerability and safety. Four of the five commercially available DPP-4 inhibitors are subject to significant renal clearance, and pharmacokinetic studies in people with renal impairment have led to lower recommended doses based on creatinine clearance in order to prevent drug accumulation. Data from these pharmacokinetic studies and from supratherapeutic doses in healthy individuals and people with uncomplicated diabetes during development suggest, however, that there is a wide therapeutic margin. This should protect against toxicity if people with renal impairment are inadvertently prescribed higher doses than recommended. Doses appropriate to renal function are associated with reductions in HbA1c that are equivalent to those observed in people with type 2 diabetes who do not have renal impairment. Recent large-scale cardiovascular safety trials of saxagliptin and alogliptin have identified heart failure as a potential concern and renal impairment may increase the risk of this complication. Although the incidence of pancreatitis does not appear to be significantly increased by DPP-4 inhibitor therapy, renal impairment is also an independent risk factor. Additional data from other ongoing DPP-4 inhibitor cardiovascular safety trials should provide a more precise assessment of the risks of these uncommon complications, including in people with renal impairment. PMID:24684351

  11. Patient-Specific Thresholds and Doses of Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, Christos; Smielewski, Peter; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Based on continuous monitoring of the pressure reactivity index (PRx), we defined individualized intracranial pressure (ICP) thresholds by graphing the relationship between ICP and PRx. We hypothesized that an "ICP dose" based on individually assessed ICP thresholds might correlate more closely with 6-month outcome compared with ICP doses derived from the recommended universal thresholds of 20 and 25 mmHg. Data from 327 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were analyzed. ICP doses were computed as the cumulative area under the curve above the defined thresholds in graphing ICP versus time. The term Dose 20 (D20) was used to refer to an ICP threshold of 20 mm Hg. The markers D25 and DPRx were calculated similarly. The discriminative ability of each dose with regard to mortality was assessed by receiver operating characteristics analysis using fivefold cross-validation (CV). DPRx was found to be the best discriminator of mortality, despite the fact that D20 was twice as large as DPRx. Individualized doses of intracranial hypertension were stronger predictors of mortality than doses derived from the universal thresholds of 20 and 25 mm Hg. The PRx could offer a method of individualizing the ICP threshold. PMID:27165889

  12. Re-evaluation of the Big Blue® mouse assay of propiconazole suggests lack of mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Shane, Barbara S; Zeiger, Errol; Piegorsch, Walter W; Booth, Ewan D; Goodman, Jay I; Peffer, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Propiconazole (PPZ) is a conazole fungicide that is not mutagenic, clastogenic, or DNA damaging in standard in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicity tests for gene mutations, chromosome aberrations, DNA damage, and cell transformation. However, it was demonstrated to be a male mouse liver carcinogen when administered in food for 24 months only at a concentration of 2,500 ppm that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose based on increased mortality, decreased body weight gain, and the presence of liver necrosis. PPZ was subsequently tested for mutagenicity in the Big Blue® transgenic mouse assay at the 2,500 ppm dose, and the result was reported as positive by Ross et al. ([2009]: Mutagenesis 24:149-152). Subsets of the mutants from the control and PPZ-exposed groups were sequenced to determine the mutation spectra and a multivariate clustering analysis method purportedly substantiated the increase in mutant frequency with PPZ (Ross and Leavitt. [2010]: Mutagenesis 25:231-234). However, as reported here, the results of the analysis of the mutation spectra using a conventional method indicated no treatment-related differences in the spectra. In this article, we re-examine the Big Blue® mouse findings with PPZ and conclude that the compound does not act as a mutagen in vivo.

  13. Probability Estimates of Solar Particle Event Doses During a Period of Low Sunspot Number for Thinly-Shielded Spacecraft and Short Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier paper (Atwell, et al., 2015), we investigated solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposures (absorbed dose) to small, thinly-shielded spacecraft during a period when the sunspot number (SSN) was less than 30. These SPEs contain Ground Level Events (GLE), sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs (Tylka and Dietrich, 2009, Tylka and Dietrich, 2008, and Atwell, et al., 2008). GLEs are extremely energetic solar particle events having proton energies extending into the several GeV range and producing secondary particles in the atmosphere, mostly neutrons, observed with ground station neutron monitors. Sub-GLE events are less energetic, extending into the several hundred MeV range, but do not produce secondary atmospheric particles. Sub-sub GLEs are even less energetic with an observable increase in protons at energies greater than 30 MeV, but no observable proton flux above 300 MeV. In this paper, we consider those SPEs that occurred during 1973-2010 when the SSN was greater than 30 but less than 50. In addition, we provide probability estimates of absorbed dose based on mission duration with a 95% confidence level (CL). We also discuss the implications of these data and provide some recommendations that may be useful to spacecraft designers of these smaller spacecraft.

  14. Human Health and the Biological Effects of Tritium in Drinking Water: Prudent Policy Through Science – Addressing the ODWAC New Recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, S.; Mills, C.E.; Phan, N.; Taylor, K.; Boreham, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen and is a by-product of energy production in Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The release of this radioisotope into the environment is carefully managed at CANDU facilities in order to minimize radiation exposure to the public. However, under some circumstances, small accidental releases to the environment can occur. The radiation doses to humans and non-human biota from these releases are low and orders of magnitude less than doses received from naturally occurring radioisotopes or from manmade activities, such as medical imaging and air travel. There is however a renewed interest in the biological consequences of low dose tritium exposures and a new limit for tritium levels in Ontario drinking water has been proposed. The Ontario Drinking Water Advisory Council (ODWAC) issued a formal report in May 2009 in response to a request by the Minister of the Environment, concluding that the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard for tritium should be revised from the current 7,000 Bq/L level to a new, lower 20 Bq/L level. In response to this recommendation, an international scientific symposium was held at McMaster University to address the issues surrounding this change in direction and the validity of a new policy. Scientists, regulators, government officials, and industrial stakeholders were present to discuss the potential health risks associated with low level radiation exposure from tritium. The regulatory, economic, and social implications of the new proposed limit were also considered. The new recommendation assumed a linear-no-threshold model to calculate carcinogenic risk associated with tritium exposure, and considered tritium as a non-threshold chemical carcinogen. Both of these assumptions are highly controversial given that recent research suggests that low dose exposures have thresholds below which there are no observable detrimental effects. Furthermore, mutagenic and carcinogenic risk calculated from

  15. Human Health and the Biological Effects of Tritium in Drinking Water: Prudent Policy Through Science - Addressing the ODWAC New Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, S; Mills, C E; Phan, N; Taylor, K; Boreham, D R

    2011-02-22

    Tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen and is a by-product of energy production in Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The release of this radioisotope into the environment is carefully managed at CANDU facilities in order to minimize radiation exposure to the public. However, under some circumstances, small accidental releases to the environment can occur. The radiation doses to humans and non-human biota from these releases are low and orders of magnitude less than doses received from naturally occurring radioisotopes or from manmade activities, such as medical imaging and air travel. There is however a renewed interest in the biological consequences of low dose tritium exposures and a new limit for tritium levels in Ontario drinking water has been proposed. The Ontario Drinking Water Advisory Council (ODWAC) issued a formal report in May 2009 in response to a request by the Minister of the Environment, concluding that the Ontario Drinking Water Quality Standard for tritium should be revised from the current 7,000 Bq/L level to a new, lower 20 Bq/L level. In response to this recommendation, an international scientific symposium was held at McMaster University to address the issues surrounding this change in direction and the validity of a new policy. Scientists, regulators, government officials, and industrial stakeholders were present to discuss the potential health risks associated with low level radiation exposure from tritium. The regulatory, economic, and social implications of the new proposed limit were also considered.The new recommendation assumed a linear-no-threshold model to calculate carcinogenic risk associated with tritium exposure, and considered tritium as a non-threshold chemical carcinogen. Both of these assumptions are highly controversial given that recent research suggests that low dose exposures have thresholds below which there are no observable detrimental effects. Furthermore, mutagenic and carcinogenic risk calculated from

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  17. Measuring and Modeling Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material: Interpreting the Relationship Between the Natural Radionuclides Present

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, A.J.; Mucha, A.F.

    2008-07-01

    decay series radionuclides, the resulting TENORM source term may contain several smaller decay chains, each headed by a different longer lived member of the original series. This paper presents the anatomy of common TENORM source terms and the pitfalls of measuring, interpreting and modeling these source terms. Modeling TENORM with common software such as RESRAD is discussed. In summary: RESRAD modeling (dose assessments) to derive single radionuclide, dose based acceptance criteria, requires a good understanding of the physical, chemical and biological factors/input parameters applicable to the selected exposure scenario(s). When NORM or TENORM source terms are modeled, an additional understanding of the status of equilibrium, is necessary to accurately perform a dose assessment in support of dose based acceptance criteria. Historical information about the site processes/ores, selection of appropriate analytical analyses to identify key decay series radionuclide and a comprehensive review of the characterization data are needed to understand the equilibrium status of the decay series present. Once the source term has been characterized (in regards to relative activities of the radionuclides within a decay series) the source term must be input into RESRAD to reflect that status of equilibrium at time zero, or at the time since placement, if the characterization data reflects the equilibrium status of dated material. When the RESRAD output file is reviewed, depending on the time of maximum dose, DCGL values may be artificially high in value. Sum of fraction calculations, based on the status of equilibrium of each decay series, can also be used to assess the RESRAD results and develop an appropriate MARSSIM final status survey protocol. (authors)

  18. Web-Based Training on Reviewing Dose Modeling Aspects of NRC Decommissioning and License Termination Plans

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, D.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2008-01-15

    NRC licensees at decommissioning nuclear facilities submit License Termination Plans (LTP) or Decommissioning Plans (DP) to NRC for review and approval. To facilitate a uniform and consistent review of these plans, the NRC developed training for its staff. A live classroom course was first developed in 2005, which targeted specific aspects of the LTP and DP review process related to dose-based compliance demonstrations or modeling. A web-based training (WBT) course was developed in 2006 and 2007 to replace the classroom-based course. The advantage of the WBT is that it will allow for staff training or refreshers at any time, while the advantage of a classroom-based course is that it provides a forum for lively discussion and the sharing of experience of classroom participants. The objective of this course is to train NRC headquarters and regional office staff on how to review sections of a licensee's DP or LTP that pertain to dose modeling. The DP generally refers to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, while the LTP refers specifically to the decommissioning of reactors. This review is part of the NRC's licensing process, in which the NRC determines if a licensee has provided a suitable technical basis to support derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs)1 or dose modeling analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with dose-based license termination rule criteria. This type of training is one component of an organizational management system. These systems 'use a range of practices to identify, create, represent, and distribute knowledge for reuse, awareness and learning'. This is especially important in an organization undergoing rapid change or staff turnover to retain organizational information and processes. NRC is committed to maintaining a dynamic program of training, development, and knowledge transfer to ensure that the NRC acquires and maintains the competencies needed to accomplish its mission. This paper discusses one specific project

  19. Characterization of the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation in breast imaging dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bliznakova, Kristina; Qin Xulei; Fei Baowei; Feng, Steve Si Jia

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the estimate of normalized glandular dose in mammography and breast CT imaging obtained using the actual glandular tissue distribution in the breast to that obtained using the homogeneous tissue mixture approximation. Methods: Twenty volumetric images of patient breasts were acquired with a dedicated breast CT prototype system and the voxels in the breast CT images were automatically classified into skin, adipose, and glandular tissue. The breasts in the classified images underwent simulated mechanical compression to mimic the conditions present during mammographic acquisition. The compressed thickness for each breast was set to that achieved during each patient's last screening cranio-caudal (CC) acquisition. The volumetric glandular density of each breast was computed using both the compressed and uncompressed classified images, and additional images were created in which all voxels representing adipose and glandular tissue were replaced by a homogeneous mixture of these two tissues in a proportion corresponding to each breast's volumetric glandular density. All four breast images (compressed and uncompressed; heterogeneous and homogeneous tissue) were input into Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the normalized glandular dose during mammography (compressed breasts) and dedicated breast CT (uncompressed breasts). For the mammography simulations the x-ray spectra used was that used during each patient's last screening CC acquisition. For the breast CT simulations, two x-ray spectra were used, corresponding to the x-ray spectra with the lowest and highest energies currently being used in dedicated breast CT prototype systems under clinical investigation. The resulting normalized glandular dose for the heterogeneous and homogeneous versions of each breast for each modality was compared. Results: For mammography, the normalized glandular dose based on the homogeneous tissue approximation was, on average, 27% higher than that estimated using the

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 366 comprises the six corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1; (2) 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2; (3) 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A; (4) 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B; (5) 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C; and (6) 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 366. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 366 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated by summing the estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on historical documentation of the releases

  1. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Moteabbed, M. Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  2. Evaluation of Exposure to Radon Levels in Relation to Climatic Conditions at a Superfund Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Elaine Alice

    1995-11-01

    Workers at a Superfund site have expressed concern that they may be exposed to elevated levels of radon gas, especially when meteorology is suitable. The site, formally a uranium processing site, stores the world's largest quantity of Ra-226 in two concrete silos. A layer of bentonite foam was placed over the contents of the silos in 1991 as a means to reduce the amount of radon emissions. Hourly real-time outdoor and indoor site radon data covering an entire year was statistically evaluated in relation to meteorological data covering the same time period. The hourly data was found to be lognormally distributed. Radon levels were highest during the early morning hours and during the summer months. Both outdoor and indoor concentrations were found to significantly vary with temporal and climatic factors, namely wind direction and relative humidity. Radon levels in the work areas were not found to be statistically different from off-site levels. Only radon levels in the vicinity of the storage silos, which is an exclusion zone, were significantly higher than levels off-site. Hence, the protective bentonite covering seems to be effective in reducing radon emissions. Two methods were used to calculate a hypothetical dose, based upon the annual average concentrations of radon in the work areas onsite, the BEIR IV method and the NCRP method, respectively. The BEIR IV method, which accounts for the activity ratio of radon and its daughter products, resulted in a slightly higher dose than the NCRP method. As expected, based on the mean concentrations, the hypothetical annual exposures from radon in the work areas of the site were below recommended exposure limits.

  3. SU-E-T-596: P3DVHStats - a Novel, Automatic, Institution Customizable Program to Compute and Report DVH Quantities On Philips Pinnacle TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a novel, automatic, institutional customizable DVH quantities evaluation and PDF report tool on Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) Methods: An add-on program (P3DVHStats) is developed by us to enable automatic DVH quantities evaluation (including both volume and dose based quantities, such as V98, V100, D2), and automatic PDF format report generation, for EMR convenience. The implementation is based on a combination of Philips Pinnacle scripting tool and Java language pre-installed on each Pinnacle Sun Solaris workstation. A single Pinnacle script provide user a convenient access to the program when needed. The activated script will first export DVH data for user selected ROIs from current Pinnacle plan trial; a Java program then provides a simple GUI interface, utilizes the data to compute any user requested DVH quantities, compare with preset institutional DVH planning goals; if accepted by users, the program will also generate a PDF report of the results and export it from Pinnacle to EMR import folder via FTP. Results: The program was tested thoroughly and has been released for clinical use at our institution (Pinnacle Enterprise server with both thin clients and P3PC access), for all dosimetry and physics staff, with excellent feedback. It used to take a few minutes to use MS-Excel worksheet to calculate these DVH quantities for IMRT/VMAT plans, and manually save them as PDF report; with the new program, it literally takes a few mouse clicks in less than 30 seconds to complete the same tasks. Conclusion: A Pinnacle scripting and Java language based program is successfully implemented, customized to our institutional needs. It is shown to dramatically reduce time and effort needed for DVH quantities computing and EMR reporting.

  4. Acute Alpha-Naphthylisothiocyanate-induced Liver Toxicity in Germfree and Conventional Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Cullen, John M; Faiola, Brenda; Melich, David H; Peterson, Richard A; Jordan, Holly L; Kimbrough, Carie L; Miller, Richard T

    2016-10-01

    Differences in the responses of conventional and germfree male Sprague-Dawley rats to acute injury induced by alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), a well-characterized biliary epithelial toxicant, were evaluated. Conventional and germfree rats were dosed once orally with 50 mg/kg of ANIT or corn oil alone and serially sacrificed daily for the next 3 days. Germfree rats treated with ANIT tended to have greater increases in virtually all liver and biliary-related analytes compared with conventional rats treated with ANIT; however, significant differences were found only in a few of these analytes including increased bile acids on day 3, total bilirubin on day 4, glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) on day 3, and reduced paraoxonase 1 (PON1) on days 2 and 3. Histologic differences between the conventional and germfree rats were modest, but most pronounced on day 2 (24-hr post dosing). Based on subjective scoring, biliary necrosis, neutrophilic cholangitis, and portal tract edema were more severe in germfree rats at 24 hr post dosing compared with conventional rats. Biliary epithelial replication did not differ between treated groups, however. Overall, germfree rats had a modestly greater level of biliary tract injury based on subjective histologic scoring and clinical chemistry measurements following an acute exposure to the well-characterized biliary toxin, ANIT; however, the difference between the ANIT-treated germfree and conventional groups was modest and most evident only within the first day following exposure. These findings suggest that the microbiome did not significantly affect ANIT-induced acute biliary tract injury in the conditions of this study. PMID:27519817

  5. Methyl bromide as a quarantine treatment for Chlorophorus annularis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in raw bamboo poles.

    PubMed

    Barak, Alan V; Weidong, Yang; Daojian, Yu; Yi, Jiao; Lin, Kang; Zhilin, Chen; Xingyuan, Ling; Guoping, Zhan

    2009-06-01

    At least 26 different species of insects of quarantine significance were intercepted from 1985 to 2005 on bamboo (Bambusa spp.) garden stakes from China. Three fifths of the live insects were cerambycids in nine genera, including Chlorophorus annularis F., the bamboo borer. The current APHIS-PPQ treatment is fumigation schedule T404-d, which requires high doses of methyl bromide (MeBr) for 24 h. No specific fumigation data exist for C. annularis. Chinese and American quarantine scientists cooperated in testing to determine whether this schedule, or lower doses, would be effective as a quarantine treatment for C. annularis infesting dried bamboo poles. A lower dose based on APHIS tests for solid wood packing (SWP) failed (3/511 survivors) at 56 g/m3 for 24 h at 10.0 degrees C. We therefore tested five progressive doses at five temperatures intermediate between the lower SWP schedule and the much higher applied doses (e.g., 120 g/m3 for 24 h at 10.0 degrees C) of schedule T404-d. Fumigations of infested bamboo poles conducted in 403.2-liter chambers with 52% vol:vol loading at doses of 48, 64, 80, 96, and 112 g/m3 at 26.7, 21.1, 15.6, 10.0, and 4.4 degrees C, respectively (20 total replicates, with 4 replicates per dose), had no survivors among 2,847 larvae, 140 pupae, and 122 adults. Control replicates (three) had a total of 455 live stages (397 larvae, 31 pupae, and 27 adults). Tests conducted with a sea/land cargo container loaded to 80% capacity with bamboo poles verified the ability of the schedule to maintain effective concentrations over 24 h in commercial-sized fumigations. We propose a new bamboo quarantine treatment schedule at reduced rates of applied MeBr. PMID:19610402

  6. Dabigatran versus warfarin major bleeding in practice: an observational comparison of patient characteristics, management and outcomes in atrial fibrillation patients.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Maureen A; Forman, Michael J; Bertran, Elizabeth A; Hoffman, Janet L; Priziola, Jennifer L; Koerber, John M

    2015-10-01

    Data comparing the patient characteristics, management and outcomes for dabigatran versus warfarin major bleeding in the practice setting are limited. We performed a retrospective single health system study of atrial fibrillation patients with dabigatran or warfarin major bleeding from October 2010 through September 2012. Patient identification occurred through both an internal adverse event reporting system and a structured stepwise data filtering approach using the International Classification of Diseases diagnosis codes. Thirty-five dabigatran major bleeding patients were identified and compared to 70 warfarin major bleeding patients. Intracranial bleed occurred in 4.3 % of warfarin patients and 8.6 % of dabigatran patients. Dabigatran patients tended to be older (79.9 vs. 76 years) and were more likely to have a creatinine clearance of 15-30 mL/min (40 vs. 18.6 %, p = 0.02). Over one-third of dabigatran patients had an excessive dose based on renal function. More dabigatran patients required a procedure for bleed management (37.1 vs. 17.1 %, p = 0.03) and received a hemostatic agent for reversal (11.4 vs. 1.4 %, p = 0.04). Dabigatran patients were twice as likely to spend time in an ICU (45.7 vs. 27.1 %, p = 0.06), be placed in hospice/comfort care (14.3 vs. 7.1 %, p = 0.24), expire during hospitalization (14.3 vs. 7.1 %, p = 0.24), and expire within 30-days (22.9 vs. 11.4 %, p = 0.28). In a single hospital center practice setting, as compared to warfarin, patients with dabigatran major bleeding were more likely to be older, have renal impairment, require a procedure for bleed management and receive a hemostatic agent. Patients with dabigatran major bleeding had an excessive dose for renal function in more than one-third of cases.

  7. Magnetic hyperthermia dosimetry by biomechanical properties revealed in magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in magnetic hyperthermia to treat solid tumors. Under an appropriate AC magnetic field, energy can be transferred to the MNPs to heat up the intended tissue target while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of MNP thermal therapy is desirable in order to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. Typical hyperthermia dosimetry often relies on changes in imaging properties or temperature measurements based on the thermal distribution. Alternative dosimetric indicators can include the biomechanical properties of the tissue, reflecting the changes due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration during hyperthermia treatments. Tissue stiffness can be probed by elastography modalities including MRI, ultrasound imaging, and optical coherence elastography (OCE), with OCE showing the highest displacement sensitivity (tens of nanometers). Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) is one type of OCE that utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the tissue stiffness. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of evaluating the hyperthermia dose based on the elasticity changes revealed by MM-OCE. Superparamagnetic MNPs were applied to ex vivo tissue specimens for both magnetic hyperthermia and MM-OCE experiments, where temperature and elastic modulus were obtained. A correlation between temperature rise and measured stiffness was observed. In addition, we found that with repetitive sequential treatments, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results potentially suggest that MM-OCE could indicate the irreversible changes the tissue undergoes during thermal therapy, which supports the idea for MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosage control in future applications.

  8. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Devaraj; Laínez-Aguirre, José; Rundell, Ann; Vik, Terry; Hannemann, Robert; Reklaitis, Gintaras; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2015-01-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype) plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach. PMID:26226448

  9. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D90 of 34Gy in 8.5Gy per fraction, and 145Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2Gy per fraction, EQD2) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The Dmean (EQD2) of rectum decreased 22.36Gy in HDR and 17.01Gy in LDR from 30.24Gy in VMAT, respectively. The Dmean (EQD2) of bladder decreased 6.91Gy in HDR and 2.53Gy in LDR from 13.46Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD2) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR.

  10. Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Pediatric Approval and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Nitin; Bhattaram, Atul; Earp, Justin C; Florian, Jeffry; Krudys, Kevin; Lee, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Liu, Jiang; Mulugeta, Yeruk; Yu, Jingyu; Zhao, Ping; Sinha, Vikram

    2016-07-01

    Dose selection is one of the key decisions made during drug development in pediatrics. There are regulatory initiatives that promote the use of model-based drug development in pediatrics. Pharmacometrics or quantitative clinical pharmacology enables development of models that can describe factors affecting pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics in pediatric patients. This manuscript describes some examples in which pharmacometric analysis was used to support approval and labeling in pediatrics. In particular, the role of pharmacokinetic (PK) comparison of pediatric PK to adults and utilization of dose/exposure-response analysis for dose selection are highlighted. Dose selection for esomeprazole in pediatrics was based on PK matching to adults, whereas for adalimumab, exposure-response, PK, efficacy, and safety data together were useful to recommend doses for pediatric Crohn's disease. For vigabatrin, demonstration of similar dose-response between pediatrics and adults allowed for selection of a pediatric dose. Based on model-based pharmacokinetic simulations and safety data from darunavir pediatric clinical studies with a twice-daily regimen, different once-daily dosing regimens for treatment-naïve human immunodeficiency virus 1-infected pediatric subjects 3 to <12 years of age were evaluated. The role of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling (PBPK) in predicting pediatric PK is rapidly evolving. However, regulatory review experiences and an understanding of the state of science indicate that there is a lack of established predictive performance of PBPK in pediatric PK prediction. Moving forward, pharmacometrics will continue to play a key role in pediatric drug development contributing toward decisions pertaining to dose selection, trial designs, and assessing disease similarity to adults to support extrapolation of efficacy. PMID:27079249

  11. Studies of the toxicological potential of capsinoids: II. A 26-week daily gavage dosing toxicity study of CH-19 Sweet extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Terutaka; Watanabe, Eri; Masuyama, Takeshi; Tsubuku, Shoji; Otabe, Akira; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Bernard, Bruce K

    2008-01-01

    A 26-week oral toxicity study of capsinoids-containing CH-19 Sweet extract was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats (20 males and 20 females per group) at 6 weeks of age. The test substance was administered by gavage for 26 weeks at dose levels of 0 (vehicle), 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 ml/kg/day. The concentration of capsinoids in the CH-19 Sweet extract employed was 71.25 to 73.15 mg/ml, resulting in dose levels of capsinoids of 89.06 to 91.44, 178.13 to 182.88, and 356.25 to 365.75 mg/kg, respectively. Adverse test article-related changes were only observed in males, not in females, and within the males, only at the high dose (5.0 ml/kg). Within that group (high-dose males), increases were observed in the numbers of segmented neutrophils, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, liver weights, and in the incidence and severity of hepatocellular focal necrosis. No test substance-related changes were detected in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, water intake, ophthalmology, or urinalysis. No adverse test article-related changes were observed in low- or mid-dose males or in females at any dose. Based on the results of this chronic gavage study, the target organ was the liver and the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for CH-19 Sweet extract in the rat was 2.5 ml/kg/day in males and 5.0 ml/kg/day in females (178.13 to 182.88 mg/kg and 356.25 to 365.75 mg/kg as capsinoids, respectively). PMID:19037796

  12. Five-year follow-up study on individual doses of Korean radiation workers based on ICRP 103 (2006-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Ryu, Young-Hwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Kang, Seong-Jin; Choi, Eun-Jin; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cha, Jang-Gyu

    2012-11-01

    This study examined individual doses of Korean radiation workers divided into deep and surface doses based on the dose limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) or ICRP 103 (approved on March 2007) for 5 years from 2006 to 2010. In addition, the exposure doses were compared according to occupation, departments and scale of the medical institutions (primary, secondary and tertiary) as well as between dental hospitals and hospitals, which is currently an issue, using 116,220 sets of data on the quarterly and yearly exposure doses of 5811 Korean radiation workers measured over a 5-year period (January 2006 to December 2010). For the mean exposure doses according to occupation, both deep and surface doses were higher in radiological technicians than in the other occupations and there was a significant difference between radiological technicians and others (researchers and assistants) (p<0.05). The results showed that none of the Korean radiation workers were exposed to radiation doses exceeding the maximum tolerant dose or 20 mSv/year recommended by the ICRP. When the mean exposure doses were compared according to the departments, both deep and surface doses were significantly higher (p<0.05) in the department of nuclear medicine than in the other departments (the department of biomedical engineering and the management team). For the mean exposure doses according to the scale of the medical institutions, the doses were highest in tertiary medical institutions followed in order by secondary and primary medical institutions (p<0.05). A comparison of the mean exposure doses in dental hospitals and hospitals revealed both deep and surface doses to be higher in hospitals than in dental hospitals (p<0.05). This study is considered to be used as basic data to establish a system for exposure dose management of radiation workers and more accurate studies on the radiation exposure are necessary in the future.

  13. Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.

    1995-03-15

    The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

  14. HPV vaccination among adolescent males: results from the National Immunization Survey-Teen.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Paul L; Gilkey, Melissa B; Brewer, Noel T

    2013-06-10

    US guidelines provided a permissive recommendation for HPV vaccine for males in 2009, with an updated recommendation for routine vaccination in 2011. Data on vaccine uptake among males, however, remain sparse. We analyzed 2010-2011 data (collected mostly prior to the recommendation for routine vaccination) from the National Immunization Survey-Teen for a nationally representative sample of adolescent males ages 13-17 (n=22,365). We examined HPV vaccine initiation (receipt of at least one dose based on healthcare provider records) as the primary outcome. Analyses used weighted logistic regression. HPV vaccine initiation increased from 1.4% in 2010 to 8.3% in 2011. Parents who reported receiving a healthcare provider recommendation to get their sons HPV vaccine were much more likely to have vaccinated sons (OR=19.02, 95% CI: 14.36-25.19). Initiation was also higher among sons who were Hispanic (OR=1.83, 95% CI: 1.24-2.71) or who were eligible for the Vaccines for Children program (OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.01-2.31). Only 31.0% of parents with unvaccinated sons indicated their sons were "somewhat likely" or "very likely" to receive HPV vaccine in the next year. The most common main reasons for parents not intending to vaccinate were believing vaccination is not needed or not necessary (24.5%), not having received a provider recommendation (22.1%), and lack of knowledge (15.9%). HPV vaccination is low among adolescent males in the US, and provider recommendation for vaccination is likely key to improving vaccine uptake. Given the updated recommendation for routine vaccination and the changes in health insurance coverage that are likely to follow, continued efforts are needed to monitor HPV vaccination among males.

  15. Management of venous thrombo-embolism: an update.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, Stavros; Torbicki, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Venous thrombo-embolism is the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome after myocardial infarction and stroke. Recently published landmark trials paved the way for significant progress in the management of the disease and provided the evidence for the ESC Pulmonary Embolism (PE) Guidelines 2014 update. Risk stratification strategies for non-high-risk PE continue to evolve, with an increasing emphasis on clinical prediction rules and right ventricular (RV) assessment on computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. In the field of anticoagulation treatment, pharmacogenetic testing for vitamin K antagonists on top of clinical parameters was not found to offer a significant benefit during the initiation phase; on the other hand, dosing based on the patient's clinical data seems superior to fixed loading regimens. The phase 3 trial programme of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thrombo-embolism has been completed, and the results indicate that these agents are at least as effective and probably cause less major bleeding than currently standard treatment. A multicentre prospective phase 4 trial will determine whether early discharge and out-of-hospital treatment of low-risk PE with the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban is feasible, effective, and safe. For intermediate-risk PE defined on the basis of imaging tests and laboratory biomarkers, the bleeding risks of full-dose thrombolytic treatment appear too high to justify its use, unless clinical signs of haemodynamic decompensation appear. Patients in whom PE has resulted in chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension and who are not suitable for pulmonary endarterectomy, may be expected to benefit from emerging pharmaceutical and interventional treatment options. PMID:25179762

  16. Intensive Insulin Therapy in Critically Ill Hospitalized Patients: Making It Safe and Effective

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C

    2011-01-01

    Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) for hyperglycemia in critically ill patients has become a standard practice. Target levels for glycemia have fluctuated since 2000, as evidence initially indicated that tight glycemic control to so-called normoglycemia (80–110 mg/dl) leads to the lowest morbidity and mortality without hypoglycemic complications. Subsequent studies have demonstrated minimal clinical benefit combined with greater hypoglycemic morbidity and mortality with tight glycemic control in this population. The consensus glycemic targets were then liberalized to the mid 100s (mg/dl). Handheld POC blood glucose (BG) monitors have migrated from the outpatient setting to the hospital environment because they save time and money for managing critically ill patients who require IIT. These devices are less accurate than hospital-grade POC blood analyzers or central laboratory analyzers. Three questions must be answered to understand the role of IIT for defined populations of critically ill patients: (1) How safe is IIT, with various glycemic targets, from the risk of hypoglycemia? (2) How tightly must BG be controlled for this approach to be effective? (3) What role does the accuracy of BG measurements play in affecting the safety of this method? For each state of impaired glucose regulation seen in the hospital, such as hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, or glucose variability, the benefits, risks, and goals of treatment, including IIT, might differ. With improved accuracy of BG monitors, IIT might be rendered even more intensive than at present, because patients will be less likely to receive inadvertent overdosages of insulin. Greater doses of insulin, but with dosing based on more accurate glucose levels, might result in less hypoglycemia, less hyperglycemia, and less glycemic variability. PMID:21722591

  17. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L.

    1997-07-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from {sup 137}Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y{sup -1}. The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} to 4.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. VORICONAZOLE TOXICITY IN MULTIPLE PENGUIN SPECIES.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Michael W; Georoff, Timothy A; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wells, Rebecca L; Clauss, Tonya M; Ialeggio, Donna M; Harms, Craig A; Wack, Allison N

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in penguins managed under human care. Triazole antifungal drugs, including itraconazole, are most commonly used for treatment; however, itraconazole treatment failures from drug resistance are becoming more common, requiring newer treatment options. Voriconazole, a newer triazole, is being used more often. Until recently, no voriconazole pharmacokinetic studies had been performed in penguins, leading to empiric dosing based on other avian studies. This has led to increased anecdotal reporting of apparent voriconazole toxicity in penguins. This report describes 18 probable and 6 suspected cases of voriconazole toxicity in six penguin species from nine institutions: 12 African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), 5 Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), 3 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), 2 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua papua), 1 macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and 1 emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). Observed clinical signs of toxicity included anorexia, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, paresis, apparent vision changes, seizure-like activity, and generalized seizures. Similar signs of toxicity have also been reported in humans, in whom voriconazole therapeutic plasma concentration for Aspergillus spp. infections is 2-6 μg/ml. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured in 18 samples from penguins showing clinical signs suggestive of voriconazole toxicity. The concentrations ranged from 8.12 to 64.17 μg/ml, with penguins having plasma concentrations above 30 μg/ml exhibiting moderate to severe neurologic signs, including ataxia, paresis, and seizures. These concentrations were well above those known to result in central nervous system toxicity, including encephalopathy, in humans. This case series highlights the importance of species-specific dosing of voriconazole in penguins and plasma therapeutic drug monitoring. Further investigation, including pharmacokinetic studies, is

  19. Evaluation ecological risks using receptor-specific toxicity reference values and USEPA`s wildlife exposure factors handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, E.K.; Brenzikofer, A.M.; Schmeising, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment was performed for a site at a closing US Air Force Base in Colorado; contaminated abiotic media included shallow soil, surface water, and sediment. To evaluate the potential for impacts on wildlife species exposed to contaminants in these media, a two-phased approach was used. First, dietary Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) were developed to represent No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) for each chemical of potential concern for the selected wildlife indicator species, red fox (Vulpes vulpes), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and mallard (Anasplatyrhynchos). TRVs were determined by applying a series of Uncertainty Factors (UFs) to dietary toxic effects data obtained from the literature for each chemical. UFs were assigned for three uncertainty categories (intertaxon, study duration, and study endpoint). Dietary TRVs were then compared to the site exposure-point concentrations for contaminants in each medium. If a TRV exceeded the site concentration for a given chemical, then that chemical was retained for the second phase of the evaluation, the exposure assessment. Exposure was evaluated for each species using predictive models for ingestion of soil/sediment, and water, as provided in the USEPA Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook (1993). These models estimate the potential Average Daily Dose (ADD{sub pot}) received by wildlife species exposed to contaminants in abiotic media. The ADD{sub pot}s were then compared to the TRVs on a dose basis. If an ADD{sub pot} exceeded the dose-based TRV for a given chemical, it was assumed that the predicted amount of contaminant ingested was potentially capable of causing adverse effects to the wildlife indicator species. ADD{sub pot}s for each ingestion route were summed for species exposed to contaminants in multiple media to determine the total average daily dose received via all direct routes.

  20. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, K; Aldoohan, S; Collier, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality.

  1. SU-E-I-57: Estimating the Occupational Eye Lens Dose in Interventional Radiology Using Active Personal Dosimeters Worn On the Chest

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A; Marteinsdottir, M; Kadesjo, N; Fransson, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a general formalism for determination of occupational eye lens dose based on the response of an active personal dosimeter (APD) worn at chest level above the radiation protection apron. Methods: The formalism consists of three factors: (1) APD conversion factor converting the reading at chest level (APDchest) to the corresponding personal dose equivalent at eye level, (2) Dose conversion factor transferring the measured dose quantity, Hp(10), into a dose quantity relevant for the eye lens dose, (3) Correction factor accounting for differences in exposure of the eye(s) compared to the exposure at chest level (e.g., due to protective lead glasses).The different factors were investigated and evaluated based on phantom and clinical measurements performed in an x-ray angiography suite for interventional cardiology. Results: The eye lens dose can be conservatively estimated by assigning an appropriate numerical value to each factor entering the formalism that in most circumstances overestimates the dose. Doing so, the eye lens dose to the primary operator and assisting staff was estimated in this work as D-eye,primary = 2.0 APDchest and D-eye,assisting = 1.0 APDchest, respectively.The annual eye lens dose to three nurses and one cardiologist was estimated to be 2, 2, 2, and 13 mSv (Hp(0.07)), respectively, using a TLD dosimeter worn at eye level. In comparison, using the formalism and APDchest measurements, the respective doses were 2, 2, 2, and 16 mSv (Hp(3)). Conclusion: The formalism outlined in this work can be used to estimate the occupational eye lens dose from the response of an APD worn on the chest. The formalism is general and could be applied also to other types of dosimeters. However, the numerical value of the different factors may differ from those obtained with the APD’s used in this work due to differences in dosimeter properties.

  2. The Safety Evaluation of Salvianolic Acid B and Ginsenoside Rg1 Combination on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Yang, Min; Deng, Yanping; Yu, Haitao; Wang, Linlin; Teng, Fukang; Cho, Kenka; Ma, Hongmei; Wu, Peng; Li, Xue; Wu, Wanying; Liu, Xuan; Xu, Feng; Jiang, Baohong; Guo, De-An

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that the combination of salvianolic acid B (SalB) and ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), the main components of Salvia miltiorrhizae and Panax notoginseng, improves myocardium structure and ventricular function in rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. The present study aimed to determine the safety of the combined SalB and Rg1 (SalB-Rg1) in mice. The safety of SalB-Rg1 was evaluated through acute toxicity and repeated-dose toxicity. In the acute toxicity study, the up and down procedure was carried out firstly, and then, the Bliss method was applied. In the toxicity study for seven-day repeated treatment of SalB-Rg1, forty Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. The intravenous median lethal dose (LD50) of the SalB-Rg1 combination was 1747 mg/kg using the Bliss method. For both the acute toxicity study and the seven-day repeated toxicity study, SalB-Rg1 did not induce significant abnormality on brain, heart, kidney, liver and lung structure at any dose based on H&E stain. There were no significant changes related to the SalB-Rg1 toxicity detected on biochemical parameters for two kinds of toxicity studies. The LD50 in mice was 1747 mg/kg, which was more than one hundred times higher than the effective dose. Both studies of acute toxicity and seven-day repeated dose toxicity indicated the safety of the SalB-Rg1 combination. PMID:26690140

  3. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  4. SU-E-J-204: Radiation Dose to Patients Resulting From Image Guidance Procedures and AAPM TG-180 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the new paradigm for patient positioning and target localization in radiotherapy. Daily imaging procedures add additional dose to the patient's treatment volume and normal tissues and may expose the organs at risk to unaccounted doses. This presentation is to update the progress of AAPM TG-180 which aims to provide strategies to quantify and account the dose from both MV and kV imaging in patient treatment planning. Methods: Our current knowledge on image guidance dose is presented. A summary of doses from image guidance procedures delivered to patients in relationship with therapeutic doses is given. Different techniques in reducing the image guidance dose are summarized. Typical organ doses resulting from different image acquisition procedures used in IGRT are tabulated. Results: Many techniques to reduce the imaging doses are available in clinical applications. There are large variations between dose to bone and dose to soft tissues for x-rays at kilovoltage energy range. Methods for clinical implementation of accounting for the imaging dose from an imaging procedure are available. Beam data from imaging systems can be generated by combining Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements for commissioning imaging beams in the treatment planning. Conclusion: The current treatment planning systems are not yet equipped to perform patient specific dose calculations resulting from kV imaging procedures. The imaging dose from current kV image devices has been significantly reduced and is generally much less than that resulting from MV. Because the magnitude of kV imaging dose is significantly low and the variation between patients is modest, it is feasible to estimate dose based on imaging producers or protocols using tabulated values which provides an alternative to accomplish the task of accounting and reporting imaging doses.

  5. In vivo measurement of 241Am in the lungs confounded by activity deposited in other organs.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Megan L; Spitz, Henry B; Glover, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive material deposited in multiple organs of the body is likely to confound a result of an in vivo measurement performed over the lungs, the most frequently monitored organ for occupational exposure. The significance of this interference was evaluated by measuring anthropometric torso phantoms containing lungs, liver, skeleton, and axillary lymph nodes, each with a precisely known quantity of 241Am uniformly distributed in the organs. Arrays of multiple high-resolution germanium detectors were positioned over organs within the torso phantom containing 241Am or over proximal organs without activity to determine the degree of measurement confounding due to photons emitted from other source organs. A set of four mathematical response functions describes the measured count rate with detectors positioned over each of the relevant organs and 241Am contained in the measured organ or one of the other organs selected as a confounder. Simultaneous solution of these equations by matrix algebra, where the diagonal terms of the matrix are calibration factors for a direct measurement of activity in an organ and the off-diagonal terms reflect the contribution (i.e., interference or cross-talk) produced by 241Am in a confounding organ, yields the activity deposited in each of the relevant organs. The matrix solution described in this paper represents a method for adjusting a result of 241Am measured directly in one organ for interferences that may arise from 241Am deposited elsewhere and represents a technically valid procedure to aid in evaluating internal dose based upon in vivo measurements for those radioactive materials known to deposit in multiple organs.

  6. Assessment of MLC tracking performance during hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using real-time dose reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fast, M F; Kamerling, C P; Ziegenhein, P; Menten, M J; Bedford, J L; Nill, S; Oelfke, U

    2016-02-21

    By adapting to the actual patient anatomy during treatment, tracked multi-leaf collimator (MLC) treatment deliveries offer an opportunity for margin reduction and healthy tissue sparing. This is assumed to be especially relevant for hypofractionated protocols in which intrafractional motion does not easily average out. In order to confidently deliver tracked treatments with potentially reduced margins, it is necessary to monitor not only the patient anatomy but also the actually delivered dose during irradiation. In this study, we present a novel real-time online dose reconstruction tool which calculates actually delivered dose based on pre-calculated dose influence data in less than 10 ms at a rate of 25 Hz. Using this tool we investigate the impact of clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins on CTV coverage and organ-at-risk dose. On our research linear accelerator, a set of four different CTV-to-PTV margins were tested for three patient cases subject to four different motion conditions. Based on this data, we can conclude that tracking eliminates dose cold spots which can occur in the CTV during conventional deliveries even for the smallest CTV-to-PTV margin of 1 mm. Changes of organ-at-risk dose do occur frequently during MLC tracking and are not negligible in some cases. Intrafractional dose reconstruction is expected to become an important element in any attempt of re-planning the treatment plan during the delivery based on the observed anatomy of the day. PMID:26816273

  7. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput. PMID:26520383

  8. A study of the effects of exposure on cleanup workers at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident using multiple end points.

    PubMed

    Moore, D H; Tucker, J D; Jones, I M; Langlois, R G; Pleshanov, P; Vorobtsova, I; Jensen, R

    1997-11-01

    Blood samples were collected from 192 exposed workers who participated in the cleanup after the April 26, 1986, nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl, Ukraine. These samples, together with samples from 73 individuals living in Russia but not involved in Chernobyl cleanup activities, were collected during September 1991 to May 1996 and shipped to the U.S. for evaluation by three bioassays: cytogenetic analysis based on chromosome painting, HPRT mutation analysis and glycophorin A (GPA) variant analysis. Univariate statistical analyses of the results of each bioassay (including adjustments for age, smoking status and estimated precision of the bioassay) found greater frequencies of chromosome translocations and HPRT mutant T lymphocytes among the exposed individuals compared to the controls (P < or = 0.01). GPA analyses showed no significant difference for exposed compared to controls for either hemizygous, N/O, or homozygous, N/N, variant cell frequency. Multivariate analysis of variance of the subset of 44 exposed and 14 unexposed individuals with measurements from all three bioassays found elevated frequencies of chromosomal translocations and HPRT mutants, and reduced frequencies for both GPA end points among the exposed persons compared to the controls. However, none of these differences, considered singly or in combination, was statistically significant (although statistical power is low due to small sample sizes). Mean estimated dose, based on cytogenetic response, for those exposed was 9 cGy (range 0 to 51 cGy) and was less than that estimated by physical dosimetry (25 cGy). Correlation between the end points of the bioassays and estimated physical dosimetry was low (r < 0.2); the only significant correlation found was for physical dose estimate and dates worked at Chernobyl (r = 0.4, P < 0.01), with those working soon after the accident receiving greater estimated doses.

  9. Folate receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with a diacid metabolite of norcantharidin enhance antitumor potency for H22 hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min-Chen; Liu, Lin; Wang, Xia-Rong; Shuai, Wu-Ping; Hu, Ying; Han, Min; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The diacid metabolite of norcantharidin (DM-NCTD) is clinically effective against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but is limited by its short half-life and high incidence of adverse effects at high doses. We developed a DM-NCTD-loaded, folic acid (FA)-modified, polyethylene glycolated (DM-NCTD/FA-PEG) liposome system to enhance the targeting effect and antitumor potency for HCC at a moderate dose based on our previous study. The DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposome system produced liposomes with regular spherical morphology, with mean particle size approximately 200 nm, and an encapsulation efficiency >80%. MTT cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes showed significantly stronger cytotoxicity effects on the H22 hepatoma cell line than did PEG liposomes without the FA modification (P<0.01). We used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for determination of DM-NCTD in tissues and tumors, and found it to be sensitive, rapid, and reliable. In addition, the biodistribution study showed that DM-NCTD liposomes improved tumor-targeting efficiency, and DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes exhibited the highest efficiency of the treatments (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the results indicated that although the active liposome group had an apparently increased tumor-targeting efficiency of DM-NCTD, the risk to the kidney was higher than in the normal liposome group. With regard to in vivo antitumor activity, DM-NCTD/FA-PEG liposomes inhibited tumors in H22 tumor-bearing mice better than either free DM-NCTD or DM-NCTD/PEG liposomes (P<0.01), and induced considerably more significant cellular apoptosis in the tumors, with no obvious toxicity to the tissues of model mice or the liver tissue of normal mice, as shown by histopathological examination. All these results demonstrate that DM-NCTD-loaded FA-modified liposomes might have potential application for HCC-targeting therapy. PMID:27110110

  10. In vivo measurement of 241Am in the lungs confounded by activity deposited in other organs.

    PubMed

    Lobaugh, Megan L; Spitz, Henry B; Glover, Samuel E

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive material deposited in multiple organs of the body is likely to confound a result of an in vivo measurement performed over the lungs, the most frequently monitored organ for occupational exposure. The significance of this interference was evaluated by measuring anthropometric torso phantoms containing lungs, liver, skeleton, and axillary lymph nodes, each with a precisely known quantity of 241Am uniformly distributed in the organs. Arrays of multiple high-resolution germanium detectors were positioned over organs within the torso phantom containing 241Am or over proximal organs without activity to determine the degree of measurement confounding due to photons emitted from other source organs. A set of four mathematical response functions describes the measured count rate with detectors positioned over each of the relevant organs and 241Am contained in the measured organ or one of the other organs selected as a confounder. Simultaneous solution of these equations by matrix algebra, where the diagonal terms of the matrix are calibration factors for a direct measurement of activity in an organ and the off-diagonal terms reflect the contribution (i.e., interference or cross-talk) produced by 241Am in a confounding organ, yields the activity deposited in each of the relevant organs. The matrix solution described in this paper represents a method for adjusting a result of 241Am measured directly in one organ for interferences that may arise from 241Am deposited elsewhere and represents a technically valid procedure to aid in evaluating internal dose based upon in vivo measurements for those radioactive materials known to deposit in multiple organs. PMID:25437522

  11. Dose reduction of edoxaban preserves efficacy and safety for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the randomised, double-blind HOKUSAI VTE trial.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Segers, Annelise; Ageno, Walter; Brekelmans, Marjolein P A; Cohen, Alexander T; Meyer, Guy; Grosso, Michael A; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Zhang, George; Buller, Harry

    2016-09-27

    Direct oral anticoagulants simplify venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment by obviating the need for coagulation monitoring. Nonetheless, renal function, body weight and P-glycoprotein inhibitors influence drug levels. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether reduction in edoxaban dose based on clinical criteria avoids excess drug exposure and preserves efficacy and safety in the Hokusai-VTE study. After initial heparin, patients received edoxaban or warfarin for 3-12 months. Edoxaban was given once daily at a dose of 60 mg, which was reduced to 30 mg in patients with a creatinine clearance of 30-50 ml/minute, body weight ≤60 kg or receiving certain P-glycoprotein inhibitors. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrent VTE and the principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding. A total of 8292 patients with acute VTE were randomised, 733 and 719 patients in the edoxaban and warfarin groups met the criteria for dose reduction. These patients were older, more often female or Asian and had more extensive VTE. Edoxaban levels were lower in the 30 mg edoxaban group. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding with the 30 mg and 60 mg edoxaban dose were comparable: VTE rates were 3.0 % and 3.2 % and clinically relevant bleeding rates were 7.9 % and 8.6 %, respectively. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding in the warfarin-treated patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction were 4.2 % and 12.8 %, respectively. The reduced dose edoxaban regimen maintained efficacy and safety compared with the 60 mg dose but was safer than warfarin in patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction.

  12. Prospective pilot trial of PerMIT versus standard anticoagulation service management of patients initiating oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Mark P; Pendleton, Robert C; McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Reynolds, Kristen K; Vazquez, Sara; Freeman, Andrew; Wilson, Andrew; Valdes, Roland; Linder, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    We performed a randomised pilot trial of PerMIT, a novel decision support tool for genotype-based warfarin initiation and maintenance dosing, to assess its efficacy for improving warfarin management. We prospectively studied 26 subjects to compare PerMIT-guided management with routine anticoagulation service management. CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype results for 13 subjects randomly assigned to the PerMIT arm were recorded within 24 hours of enrolment. To aid in INR interpretation, PerMIT calculates estimated loading and maintenance doses based on a patient's genetic and clinical characteristics and displays calculated S-warfarin plasma concentrations based on planned or administered dosages. In comparison to control subjects, patients in the PerMIT study arm demonstrated a 3.6-day decrease in the time to reach a stabilised INR within the target therapeutic range (4.7 vs. 8.3 days, p = 0.015); a 12.8% increase in time spent within the therapeutic interval over the first 25 days of therapy (64.3% vs. 55.3%, p = 0.180); and a 32.9% decrease in the frequency of warfarin dose adjustments per INR measurement (38.3% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.007). Serial measurements of plasma S-warfarin concentrations were also obtained to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of the pharmacokinetic model during induction therapy. The PerMIT S-warfarin plasma concentration model estimated 62.8% of concentrations within 0.15 mg/l. These pilot data suggest that the PerMIT method and its incorporation of genotype/phenotype information may help practitioners increase the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of warfarin therapeutic management. PMID:22836303

  13. Radiation Leukemogenesis: Applying Basic Science of Epidemiological Estimates of Low Dose Risks and Dose-Rate Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D. G.

    1998-11-01

    The next stage of work has been to examine more closely the A-bomb leukemia data which provides the underpinnings of the risk estimation of CML in the above mentioned manuscript. The paper by Hoel and Li (Health Physics 75:241-50) shows how the linear-quadratic model has basic non-linearities at the low dose region for the leukemias including CML. Pierce et. al., (Radiation Research 123:275-84) have developed distributions for the uncertainty in the estimated exposures of the A-bomb cohort. Kellerer, et. al., (Radiation and Environmental Biophysics 36:73-83) has further considered possible errors in the estimated neutron values and with changing RBE values with dose and has hypothesized that the tumor response due to gamma may not be linear. We have incorporated his neutron model and have constricted new A-bomb doses based on his model adjustments. The Hoel and Li dose response analysis has also been applied using the Kellerer neutron dose adjustments for the leukemias. Finally, both Pierce's dose uncertainties and Kellerer neutron adjustments are combined as well as the varying RBE with dose as suggested by Rossi and Zaider and used for leukemia dose-response analysis. First the results of Hoel and Li showing a significantly improved fit of the linear-quadratic dose response by the inclusion of a threshold (i.e. low-dose nonlinearity) persisted. This work has been complete for both solid tumor as well as leukemia for both mortality as well as incidence data. The results are given in the manuscript described below which has been submitted to Health Physics.

  14. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  15. Tailoring iron chelation by iron intake and serum ferritin: the prospective EPIC study of deferasirox in 1744 patients with transfusion-dependent anemias

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Porter, John; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Li, Chi-Kong; Seymour, John F.; Elalfy, Mohsen; Gattermann, Norbert; Giraudier, Stéphane; Lee, Jong-Wook; Chan, Lee Lee; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Rose, Christian; Taher, Ali; Thein, Swee Lay; Viprakasit, Vip; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Kattamis, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Background Following a clinical evaluation of deferasirox (Exjade®) it was concluded that, in addition to baseline body iron burden, ongoing transfusional iron intake should be considered when selecting doses. The 1-year EPIC study, the largest ever investigation conducted for an iron chelator, is the first to evaluate whether fixed starting doses of deferasirox, based on transfusional iron intake, with dose titration guided by serum ferritin trends and safety markers, provides clinically acceptable chelation in patients (aged ≥2 years) with transfusional hemosiderosis from various types of anemia. Design and Methods The recommended initial dose was 20 mg/kg/day for patients receiving 2–4 packed red blood cell units/month and 10 or 30 mg/kg/day was recommended for patients receiving less or more frequent transfusions, respectively. Dose adjustments were based on 3-month serum ferritin trends and continuous assessment of safety markers. The primary efficacy end-point was change in serum ferritin after 52 weeks compared with baseline. Results The 1744 patients enrolled had the following conditions; thalassemia (n=1115), myelodysplastic syndromes (n=341), aplastic anemia (n=116), sickle cell disease (n=80), rare anemias (n=43) and other transfused anemias (n=49). Overall, there was a significant reduction in serum ferritin from baseline (−264 ng/mL; P<0.0001), reflecting dosage adjustments and ongoing iron intake. The most common (>5%) adverse events were gastrointestinal disturbances (28%) and skin rash (10%). Conclusions Analysis of this large, prospectively collected data set confirms the response to chelation therapy across various anemias, supporting initial deferasirox doses based on transfusional iron intake, with subsequent dose titration guided by trends in serum ferritin and safety markers (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00171821). PMID:19951979

  16. A phase 2 study of eliglustat tartrate (Genz-112638), an oral substrate reduction therapy for Gaucher disease type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lukina, Elena; Watman, Nora; Arreguin, Elsa Avila; Banikazemi, Maryam; Dragosky, Marta; Iastrebner, Marcelo; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Phillips, Mici; Pastores, Gregory M.; Rosenthal, Daniel I.; Kaper, Mathilde; Singh, Tejdip; Puga, Ana Cristina; Bonate, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Eliglustat tartrate (Genz-112638), a specific inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase, is under development as an oral substrate reduction therapy for Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1). A multinational, open-label, single-arm phase 2 study of 26 GD1 patients (16 female, 10 male; mean age, 34 years) evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of eliglustat tartrate administered twice daily by mouth at 50- or 100-mg doses based on plasma drug concentrations. Entry criteria required splenomegaly with thrombocytopenia and/or anemia. The composite primary efficacy end point required improvement after 52 weeks in at least 2 of these 3 disease manifestations and was met by 77% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 58%-89%) of all patients and 91% (95% CI = 72%-98%) of the 22 patients completing 52 weeks. Statistically significant improvements occurred in mean hemoglobin level (1.62 g/dL; 95% CI =1.05-2.18 g/dL), platelet count (40.3%; 95% CI = 23.7-57.0 g/dL), spleen volume (−38.5%; 95% CI = −43.5%-−33.5%), liver volume (−17.0%; 95% CI = −21.6%-12.3%), and lumbar spine bone mineral density (0.31 Z-score; 95% CI = 0.09-0.53). Elevated biomarkers (chitotriosidase; chemokine CCL18; angiotensin-converting enzyme; tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) decreased by 35% to 50%. Plasma glucosylceramide and ganglioside GM3 normalized. Eliglustat tartrate was well tolerated: 7 mild, transient adverse events in 6 patients were considered treatment-related. Individual pharmacokinetics varied; mean time to maximal observed concentration was 2.3 hours and mean half-life was 6.8 hours. Eliglustat tartrate appears to be a promising oral treatment for GD1. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00358150. PMID:20439622

  17. NUNDO: a numerical model of a human torso phantom and its application to effective dose equivalent calculations for astronauts at the ISS.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Bilski, Pawel; Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Horwacik, Tomasz; Körner, Christine; Olko, Pawel; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Reitz, Günther

    2014-11-01

    The health effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts need to be precisely quantified and controlled. This task is important not only in perspective of the increasing human presence at the International Space Station (ISS), but also for the preparation of safe human missions beyond low earth orbit. From a radiation protection point of view, the baseline quantity for radiation risk assessment in space is the effective dose equivalent. The present work reports the first successful attempt of the experimental determination of the effective dose equivalent in space, both for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and intra-vehicular activity (IVA). This was achieved using the anthropomorphic torso phantom RANDO(®) equipped with more than 6,000 passive thermoluminescent detectors and plastic nuclear track detectors, which have been exposed to cosmic radiation inside the European Space Agency MATROSHKA facility both outside and inside the ISS. In order to calculate the effective dose equivalent, a numerical model of the RANDO(®) phantom, based on computer tomography scans of the actual phantom, was developed. It was found that the effective dose equivalent rate during an EVA approaches 700 μSv/d, while during an IVA about 20 % lower values were observed. It is shown that the individual dose based on a personal dosimeter reading for an astronaut during IVA results in an overestimate of the effective dose equivalent of about 15 %, whereas under an EVA conditions the overestimate is more than 200 %. A personal dosemeter can therefore deliver quite good exposure records during IVA, but may overestimate the effective dose equivalent received during an EVA considerably. PMID:25119442

  18. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  19. A Cholera Conjugate Vaccine Containing O-specific Polysaccharide (OSP) of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and Recombinant Fragment of Tetanus Toxin Heavy Chain (OSP:rTTHc) Induces Serum, Memory and Lamina Proprial Responses against OSP and Is Protective in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Grace; Charles, Richelle C.; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md. Rasheduzzaman; Berger, Amanda; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Mandlik, Anjali; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Leung, Daniel T.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W. F.; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vibrio cholerae is the cause of cholera, a severe watery diarrhea. Protection against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity is defined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methodology Here we describe a conjugate vaccine for cholera prepared via squaric acid chemistry from the OSP of V. cholerae O1 Inaba strain PIC018 and a recombinant heavy chain fragment of tetanus toxin (OSP:rTTHc). We assessed a range of vaccine doses based on the OSP content of the vaccine (10-50 μg), vaccine compositions varying by molar loading ratio of OSP to rTTHc (3:1, 5:1, 10:1), effect of an adjuvant, and route of immunization. Principle Findings Immunized mice developed prominent anti-OSP and anti-TT serum IgG responses, as well as vibriocidal antibody and memory B cell responses following intramuscular or intradermal vaccination. Mice did not develop anti-squarate responses. Intestinal lamina proprial IgA responses targeting OSP occurred following intradermal vaccination. In general, we found comparable immune responses in mice immunized with these variations, although memory B cell and vibriocidal responses were blunted in mice receiving the highest dose of vaccine (50 μg). We found no appreciable change in immune responses when the conjugate vaccine was administered in the presence or absence of immunoadjuvant alum. Administration of OSP:rTTHc resulted in 55% protective efficacy in a mouse survival cholera challenge model. Conclusion We report development of an Inaba OSP:rTTHc conjugate vaccine that induces memory responses and protection against cholera in mice. Development of an effective cholera conjugate vaccine that induces high level and long-term immune responses against OSP would be beneficial, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens. PMID:26154421

  20. Carnosic Acid-combined Arsenic Trioxide Antileukaemia Cells in the Establishment of NB4/SCID Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li; Ran, Wang; Xiang-Xin, Li; Lu-Qun, Wang; Xiao-Ning, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Despite great improvement in the treatment outcome of APL, treatment failure still sometimes occurs due to the toxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO). Damage to the heart and liver often occurs even when the dose is lower than the therapeutic dose. Based on the results of cell experiments in vitro in this study, we investigated the synergistic activity of carnosic acid (CA) combined with ATO in the SCID mouse model of human promyelocytic leukaemia in vivo. A NB4/SCID mouse model was established in this study. The NB4/SCID mice were randomly divided into three treatment groups (CA alone, ATO alone and CA combined with ATO) and a control group based on factorial design. The evaluation indicators of the curative effect of the drugs included expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. The survival time was compared between the four groups. The results indicated that verification of the NB4/SCID mouse model was confirmed by histopathological examination. Compared with mice treated by CA or ATO alone, the mice in the combination of CA and ATO group had a higher rate of apoptosis, which was linked with expressions of cleaved caspase-3, PTEN, p27 gene mRNA and proteins. Also, the mice with the longest survival time were those treated with the combination of CA and ATO. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that CA and ATO in combination have strong synergistic antileukaemic effects on cell activity.

  1. Dose reduction of edoxaban preserves efficacy and safety for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the randomised, double-blind HOKUSAI VTE trial.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Segers, Annelise; Ageno, Walter; Brekelmans, Marjolein P A; Cohen, Alexander T; Meyer, Guy; Grosso, Michael A; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Zhang, George; Buller, Harry

    2016-09-27

    Direct oral anticoagulants simplify venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment by obviating the need for coagulation monitoring. Nonetheless, renal function, body weight and P-glycoprotein inhibitors influence drug levels. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether reduction in edoxaban dose based on clinical criteria avoids excess drug exposure and preserves efficacy and safety in the Hokusai-VTE study. After initial heparin, patients received edoxaban or warfarin for 3-12 months. Edoxaban was given once daily at a dose of 60 mg, which was reduced to 30 mg in patients with a creatinine clearance of 30-50 ml/minute, body weight ≤60 kg or receiving certain P-glycoprotein inhibitors. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrent VTE and the principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding. A total of 8292 patients with acute VTE were randomised, 733 and 719 patients in the edoxaban and warfarin groups met the criteria for dose reduction. These patients were older, more often female or Asian and had more extensive VTE. Edoxaban levels were lower in the 30 mg edoxaban group. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding with the 30 mg and 60 mg edoxaban dose were comparable: VTE rates were 3.0 % and 3.2 % and clinically relevant bleeding rates were 7.9 % and 8.6 %, respectively. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding in the warfarin-treated patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction were 4.2 % and 12.8 %, respectively. The reduced dose edoxaban regimen maintained efficacy and safety compared with the 60 mg dose but was safer than warfarin in patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction. PMID:27440518

  2. Impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the bacterial communities of biological activated carbon filter intended for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhiyuan, Liu; Shuili, Yu; Heedeung, Park; Qingbin, Yuan; Guicai, Liu; Qi, Li

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are inevitably present in the aquatic environment owing to their increasing production and use. However, knowledge of the potential effects of TiO2 NPs on the treatment of drinking water is scarce. Herein, the effects of two types of anatase TiO2 NPs (TP1, 25 nm; TP2, 100 nm) on the bacterial community in a biological activated carbon (BAC) filter were investigated via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) analysis, ATP quantification, and 454 pyrosequencing analysis. Both TP1 and TP2 significantly inhibited the bacterial ATP level (p < 0.01) and induced a decrease in the abundance of bacterial 16S rDNA gene copies at doses of 0.1 and 100 mg L(-1). Simultaneously, the diversity and evenness of the bacterial communities were considerably reduced. The relative abundances of bacteria annotated to OTUs from Nitrospira class and Betaproteobacteria class decreased upon TiO2 NP treatment, whereas those of Bacilli class and Gammaproteobacteria class increased. TiO2 NP size showed a greater effect on the bacterial composition than did the dose based on Bray-Curtis distances. These findings identified negative effects of TiO2 NPs on the bacterial community in the BAC filter. Given the fact that BAC filters are used widely in drinking water treatment plants, these results suggested a potential threat by TiO2 NP to drinking water treatment system.

  3. [Coagulation disorders in the intensive care unit - what is new?].

    PubMed

    Hart, Christina; Schmid, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    The phase III non-vitamin K dependent oral anticoagulants (NOAC) studies and recently published real world data on the use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban have shown that the bleeding profile in particular of intracranial and other life-threatening bleeding of NOAC is more favourable than that of warfarin. In case of a bleeding complication in a patient treated with a NOAC the recently updated EHRA practical guide offers management strategies. Idarucizumab, the specific antidot for dabigatran is approved to reverse the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran-treated patients who have serious bleeding and require an urgent procedure. Andexanet alfa, a specific antidot for direct and indirect factor Xa-inhibitors will be available in the future. The frequency of thrombocytopenia in ICU patients is high whereas the heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) only counts for a small minority of patients with thrombocytopenia. To avoid an overdiagnosis of HIT a reliable and complete clinical and laboratory workup has to be performed. New immunoassays have been developed to provide results within a short period of time. These tests appear to have improved diagnostic accuracy compared with ELISAs in patients with suspected HIT and may reduce misdiagnosis and overtreatment. Acquired haemophilia (AH) is a rare and often life threatening bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII. Susoctocog alfa is a B-domain deleted recombinant factor VIII porcine sequence that has recently been approved to treat severe bleeding in patients with AH. Susoctocog alfa offers the ability to effectively titrate and monitor dosing based on factor VIII activity levels. PMID:27254626

  4. Development of a Smartphone Application to Capture Carbohydrate, Lipid, and Protein Contents of Daily Food

    PubMed Central

    Diouri, Omar; Place, Jerome; Traverso, Magali; Georgescu, Vera; Picot, Marie-Christine; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meal lipids (LIP) and proteins (PRO) may influence the effect of insulin doses based on carbohydrate (CHO) counting in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We developed a smartphone application for CHO, LIP, and PRO counting in daily food and assessed its usability in real-life conditions and potential usefulness. Methods: Ten T1D patients used the android application for 1 week to collect their food intakes. Data included meal composition, premeal and 2-hour postmeal blood glucose, corrections for hypo- or hyperglycemia after meals, and time for entering meals in the application. Meal insulin doses were based on patients’ CHO counting (application in blinded mode). Linear mixed models were used to assess the statistical differences. Results: In all, 187 meals were analyzed. Average computed CHO amount was 74.37 ± 31.78 grams; LIP amount: 20.26 ± 14.28 grams and PRO amount: 25.68 ± 16.68 grams. Average CHO, LIP, and PRO contents were significantly different between breakfast and lunch/dinner. The average time for meal entry in the application moved from 3-4 minutes to 2.5 minutes during the week. No significant impact of LIP and PRO was found on available blood glucose values. Conclusion: Our study shows CHO, LIP, and PRO intakes can be easily captured by an application on smartphone for meal entry used by T1D patients. Although LIP and PRO meal contents did not influence glucose levels when insulin doses were based on CHO in this pilot study, this application could be used for further investigation of this topic, including in closed-loop conditions. PMID:26424241

  5. Dosimetric effect of respiratory motion on volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by TrueBeam machine with flattening filter-free beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Fallon, Kevin; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interplay effect between dynamic MLC movement and tumor respiratory motion in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by the flattening filter-free (FFF) beam of a Varian TrueBeam machine. Six lung cancer patients with tumor motions ranging between 0.5-1.6 cm were recruited in this study. All patients underwent 4D-CT scan with audiocoaching. A two-arc VMAT plan was retrospectively generated using Varian's Eclipse planning system for each patient. To explicitly describe the interplay effect, the contributions of each control point in the original static VMAT plans to each respiratory phase were calculated, and then ten new VMAT plans corresponding to different respiratory phases were generated and imported back into Eclipse planning system to calculate the radiation dose based on the CT images of related respiratory phase. An in-house 4D dose calculation program with deformable registration capacity was used to calculate the accumulative 4D dose distribution of the targets. For all patients, the PTV coverage dropped significantly with increased respiratory motion amplitude. However, V100 and D90 of the GTV and GTV + 5 mm, which mimic the target with setup error of less than 5 mm, were either unchanged or slightly increased up to 1.2%, and the variations of their minimum doses were less than 3.2%. Our results indicated that for VMAT-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by FFF beam of TrueBeam machine, the impact of interplay effects on target coverage is insignificant, as long as a sufficient margin was given.

  6. NUNDO: a numerical model of a human torso phantom and its application to effective dose equivalent calculations for astronauts at the ISS.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Bilski, Pawel; Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Horwacik, Tomasz; Körner, Christine; Olko, Pawel; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Reitz, Günther

    2014-11-01

    The health effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts need to be precisely quantified and controlled. This task is important not only in perspective of the increasing human presence at the International Space Station (ISS), but also for the preparation of safe human missions beyond low earth orbit. From a radiation protection point of view, the baseline quantity for radiation risk assessment in space is the effective dose equivalent. The present work reports the first successful attempt of the experimental determination of the effective dose equivalent in space, both for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and intra-vehicular activity (IVA). This was achieved using the anthropomorphic torso phantom RANDO(®) equipped with more than 6,000 passive thermoluminescent detectors and plastic nuclear track detectors, which have been exposed to cosmic radiation inside the European Space Agency MATROSHKA facility both outside and inside the ISS. In order to calculate the effective dose equivalent, a numerical model of the RANDO(®) phantom, based on computer tomography scans of the actual phantom, was developed. It was found that the effective dose equivalent rate during an EVA approaches 700 μSv/d, while during an IVA about 20 % lower values were observed. It is shown that the individual dose based on a personal dosimeter reading for an astronaut during IVA results in an overestimate of the effective dose equivalent of about 15 %, whereas under an EVA conditions the overestimate is more than 200 %. A personal dosemeter can therefore deliver quite good exposure records during IVA, but may overestimate the effective dose equivalent received during an EVA considerably.

  7. Impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the bacterial communities of biological activated carbon filter intended for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhiyuan, Liu; Shuili, Yu; Heedeung, Park; Qingbin, Yuan; Guicai, Liu; Qi, Li

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are inevitably present in the aquatic environment owing to their increasing production and use. However, knowledge of the potential effects of TiO2 NPs on the treatment of drinking water is scarce. Herein, the effects of two types of anatase TiO2 NPs (TP1, 25 nm; TP2, 100 nm) on the bacterial community in a biological activated carbon (BAC) filter were investigated via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) analysis, ATP quantification, and 454 pyrosequencing analysis. Both TP1 and TP2 significantly inhibited the bacterial ATP level (p < 0.01) and induced a decrease in the abundance of bacterial 16S rDNA gene copies at doses of 0.1 and 100 mg L(-1). Simultaneously, the diversity and evenness of the bacterial communities were considerably reduced. The relative abundances of bacteria annotated to OTUs from Nitrospira class and Betaproteobacteria class decreased upon TiO2 NP treatment, whereas those of Bacilli class and Gammaproteobacteria class increased. TiO2 NP size showed a greater effect on the bacterial composition than did the dose based on Bray-Curtis distances. These findings identified negative effects of TiO2 NPs on the bacterial community in the BAC filter. Given the fact that BAC filters are used widely in drinking water treatment plants, these results suggested a potential threat by TiO2 NP to drinking water treatment system. PMID:27126871

  8. Variation in RNAi efficacy among insect species is attributable to dsRNA degradation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangxu; Peng, Yingchuan; Pu, Jian; Fu, Wenxi; Wang, Jiale; Han, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technique in entomology research. However, RNAi efficiency appears to vary significantly among insect species. Here, the sensitivity of four insect species from different orders to RNAi was compared to understand the reason for this variation. A previously reported method was modified to monitor trace amounts of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). After the administration of dsRNA, the dynamics of its content was determined in the hemolymph, in addition to the capability of its degradation in both the hemolymph and the midgut juice. The results showed that injection of dsRNA targeting the homologous chitinase gene in Periplaneta americana, Zophobas atratus, Locusta migratoria, and Spodoptera litura, with doses (1.0, 2.3, 11.5, and 33.0 μg, respectively) resulting in the same initial hemolymph concentration, caused 82%, 78%, 76%, and 20% depletion, respectively, whereas feeding doses based on body weight (24, 24, 36, and 30 μg) accounted for 47%, 28%, 5%, and 1% depletion. The sensitivity of insects to RNAi was observed to be as follows: P. americana > Z. atratus >L. migratoria >S. litura. In vivo monitoring revealed that RNAi effects among these insect species were highly correlated with the hemolymph dsRNA contents. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated that the hemolymph contents after dsRNA injection were dependent on hemolymph degradation capacities, and on the degradation capabilities in the midgut juice, when dsRNA was fed. In conclusion, the RNAi efficacy in different insect species was observed to depend on the enzymatic degradation of dsRNA, which functions as the key factor determining the inner target exposure dosages. Thus, enzymatic degradation in vivo should be taken into consideration for efficient use of RNAi in insects. PMID:27449967

  9. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R; Mirro, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.

  10. VORICONAZOLE TOXICITY IN MULTIPLE PENGUIN SPECIES.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Michael W; Georoff, Timothy A; Nollens, Hendrik H; Wells, Rebecca L; Clauss, Tonya M; Ialeggio, Donna M; Harms, Craig A; Wack, Allison N

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in penguins managed under human care. Triazole antifungal drugs, including itraconazole, are most commonly used for treatment; however, itraconazole treatment failures from drug resistance are becoming more common, requiring newer treatment options. Voriconazole, a newer triazole, is being used more often. Until recently, no voriconazole pharmacokinetic studies had been performed in penguins, leading to empiric dosing based on other avian studies. This has led to increased anecdotal reporting of apparent voriconazole toxicity in penguins. This report describes 18 probable and 6 suspected cases of voriconazole toxicity in six penguin species from nine institutions: 12 African penguins (Spheniscus demersus), 5 Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti), 3 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus), 2 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua papua), 1 macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and 1 emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). Observed clinical signs of toxicity included anorexia, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, paresis, apparent vision changes, seizure-like activity, and generalized seizures. Similar signs of toxicity have also been reported in humans, in whom voriconazole therapeutic plasma concentration for Aspergillus spp. infections is 2-6 μg/ml. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured in 18 samples from penguins showing clinical signs suggestive of voriconazole toxicity. The concentrations ranged from 8.12 to 64.17 μg/ml, with penguins having plasma concentrations above 30 μg/ml exhibiting moderate to severe neurologic signs, including ataxia, paresis, and seizures. These concentrations were well above those known to result in central nervous system toxicity, including encephalopathy, in humans. This case series highlights the importance of species-specific dosing of voriconazole in penguins and plasma therapeutic drug monitoring. Further investigation, including pharmacokinetic studies, is

  11. High-throughput sample processing and sample management; the functional evolution of classical cytogenetic assay towards automation.

    PubMed

    Ramakumar, Adarsh; Subramanian, Uma; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2015-11-01

    High-throughput individual diagnostic dose assessment is essential for medical management of radiation-exposed subjects after a mass casualty. Cytogenetic assays such as the Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) are recognized as the gold standard by international regulatory authorities. DCA is a multi-step and multi-day bioassay. DCA, as described in the IAEA manual, can be used to assess dose up to 4-6 weeks post-exposure quite accurately but throughput is still a major issue and automation is very essential. The throughput is limited, both in terms of sample preparation as well as analysis of chromosome aberrations. Thus, there is a need to design and develop novel solutions that could utilize extensive laboratory automation for sample preparation, and bioinformatics approaches for chromosome-aberration analysis to overcome throughput issues. We have transitioned the bench-based cytogenetic DCA to a coherent process performing high-throughput automated biodosimetry for individual dose assessment ensuring quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) aspects in accordance with international harmonized protocols. A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is designed, implemented and adapted to manage increased sample processing capacity, develop and maintain standard operating procedures (SOP) for robotic instruments, avoid data transcription errors during processing, and automate analysis of chromosome-aberrations using an image analysis platform. Our efforts described in this paper intend to bridge the current technological gaps and enhance the potential application of DCA for a dose-based stratification of subjects following a mass casualty. This paper describes one such potential integrated automated laboratory system and functional evolution of the classical DCA towards increasing critically needed throughput.

  12. Weldon Spring Site environmental report for calendar year 1993. Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations from environmental monitoring program. In 1993, the maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the chemical plant site perimeter was 0.03 mrem (0.0003 mSv). The maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the boundary of the Weldon Spring Quarry was 1.9 mrem (0.019 mSv). These scenarios assume an individual walking along the perimeter of the site-once a day at the chemical plant/raffinate pits and twice a day at the quarry-250 days per year. This hypothetical individual also consumes fish, sediment, and water from lakes and other bodies of water in the area. The collective dose, based on an effected population of 112,000 was 0.12 person-rem (0.0012 person-Sv). This calculation is based on recreational use of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and the Missouri Department of Conservation recreational trail (the Katy Trail) near the quarry. These estimates are below the U.S. Department of Energy requirement of 100 mrem (I mSv) annual committed effective dose equivalent for all exposure pathways. Results from air mon