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  1. Fatty liver - nonalcoholic

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight Eat a healthy diet Exercise regularly Limit alcohol consumption Use medicines properly Alternative Names Fatty liver; Steatosis; Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis; NASH Images Liver References ...

  2. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Molly A; Subbarao, Girish; Molleston, Jean P

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the pediatric population. Increased recognition of this form of liver disease parallels the dramatic rise in childhood and adolescent obesity over the past 2 decades. Like adults, most children with NAFLD are obese, and comorbidities include insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Unfortunately, pediatric NAFLD is not always a benign condition, with some children progressing to hepatic fibrosis and even cirrhosis in severe cases. The etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is not yet fully understood; however, hepatic steatosis in the context of insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress may lead to progressive disease. Although physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and radiographic findings provide clues to the potential presence of fatty liver disease, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Lifestyle modification, including slow and steady weight loss, improved dietary habits, and increased daily, aerobic physical activity, remains the first-line approach in treating pediatric fatty liver disease. Antioxidant pharmacologic therapy such as use of vitamin E has shown some benefit in patients with biopsy-proven steatohepatitis. Nutrition plays an essential role not only in the development of fatty liver disease but also potentially in the treatment and prevention of progression to more severe disease.

  3. CKD and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Targher, Giovanni; Chonchol, Michel B; Byrne, Christopher D

    2014-10-01

    The possible link between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD) recently has attracted considerable scientific interest. Accumulating clinical evidence indicates that the presence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated significantly with CKD (defined as decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria) and that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease predicts the development and progression of CKD, independently of traditional cardiorenal risk factors. Experimental evidence also suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease itself may exacerbate systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, cause atherogenic dyslipidemia, and release a variety of proinflammatory, procoagulant, pro-oxidant, and profibrogenic mediators that play important roles in the development and progression of CKD. However, despite the growing evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD, it has not been definitively established whether a causal association exists. The clinical implication for these findings is that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may benefit from more intensive surveillance or early treatment interventions to decrease the risk of CKD. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD and the putative mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease contributes to kidney damage. We also briefly discuss current treatment options for this increasingly prevalent disease that is likely to have an important future impact on the global burden of disease.

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Thad; Tadkod, Altaf; Hepburn, Iryna; Schade, Robert R

    2013-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (hepatic steatosis). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by steatosis, liver cell injury, and inflammation. The mechanism of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is unknown but involves the development of insulin resistance, steatosis, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with physical inactivity, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Screening is not recommended in the general population. The diagnosis is usually made after an incidental discovery of unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels or when steatosis is noted on imaging (e.g., ultrasonography). Patients are often asymptomatic and the physical examination is often unremarkable. No single laboratory test is diagnostic, but tests of liver function, tests for metabolic syndrome, and tests to exclude other causes of abnormal liver enzyme levels are routinely performed. Imaging studies, such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, can assess hepatic fat, measure liver and spleen size, and exclude other diseases. Liver biopsy remains the criterion standard for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Noninvasive tests are available and may reduce the need for liver biopsy. A healthy diet, weight loss, and exercise are first-line therapeutic measures to reduce insulin resistance. There is insufficient evidence to support bariatric surgery, metformin, thiazolidinediones, bile acids, or antioxidant supplements for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The long-term prognosis is not associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, cancer, or liver disease.

  5. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K.; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N.; Rao, Padaki N.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed. PMID:26155043

  6. The Riddle of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Progression From Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mithun; Mitnala, Shasikala; Vishnubhotla, Ravi K; Mukherjee, Rathin; Reddy, Duvvur N; Rao, Padaki N

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is an emerging global epidemic which progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis in a subset of subjects. Various reviews have focused on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. This review highlights specifically the triggers implicated in disease progression from NAFL to NASH. The integrating role of genes, dietary factors, innate immunity, cytokines and gut microbiome have been discussed.

  7. Pediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Delvin, Edgard; Patey, Natasha; Dubois, Josée; Henderson, Melanie; Lévy, Émile

    2015-01-01

    Summary The rapidly increasing prevalence of childhood obesity and its associated co-morbidities such as hypertriglyceridemia, hyper-insulinemia, hypertension, early atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are major public health concerns in many countries. Therefore the trends in child and adolescent obesity should be closely monitored over time, as in the near future, we may anticipate a major increase of young adults with the stigmata of the metabolic syndrome, and of the related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), that may lead to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:28356817

  8. Genetics Home Reference: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions NAFLD non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease ( NAFLD ) is a buildup of excessive fat ...

  9. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)].

    PubMed

    Rau, Monika; Weiss, Johannes; Geier, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in Europe and in the USA with rising prevalence. Patients with a metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia) are patients at risk with the highest prevalence for NAFLD. Progression from a non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) occurs in 5-20% of patients with the potential to develop a liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. NASH patients and NAFLD patients with higher fibrosis should be identified because they are at risk of a higher mortality. A specific treatment for NASH is not available at the moment. Therefore, the treatment of risk factors and metabolic syndrome has high priority.

  10. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Vikas; Mansoor, Sana; Furuya, Katryn N

    2016-05-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and by 2012, more than one third of American children were overweight or obese. As a result, increasingly, children are developing complications of obesity including liver disease. In fact, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common form of chronic liver disease seen in children today. Recently, there has been a burgeoning literature examining the pathogenesis, genetic markers, and role of the microbiome in this disease. On the clinical front, new modalities of diagnosing hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis are being developed to provide non-invasive methods of surveillance in children. Lastly, the mainstay of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been largely through lifestyle interventions, namely, dieting and exercise. Currently, there are a number of clinical trials examining novel lifestyle and drug therapies for NAFLD that are registered with the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov website.

  11. The Differentiation of Intestinal-Failure-Associated Liver Disease from Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Alan L; Naini, Bita V; Spilker, Bert

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD), formerly known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease has often been listed in textbooks as an example of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, histology, and progression differ substantially between the conditions defined as NAFLD and the disease, IFALD. Therefore, IFALD should not be defined or considered as a type or a cause of nonalcoholic fatty liver or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, but rather as a distinct disease.

  12. Probiotics in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis, and Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Amir A

    2015-01-01

    With the growing epidemic of obesity, the incidence of both nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing. The intestinal microbiota differs between individuals who are obese or have normal body mass indices. Animal studies have shown increased intestinal permeability in NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. This increases the risk of oxidative and inflammatory injury to the liver from intestinal microbacteria. It may also increase the risk of fatty acid injury and fatty deposition. Bacterial translocation is associated with increased portal hypertension and hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhosis. By preventing bacterial adhesion and translocation, probiotics may have a role in the management of patients with NAFL, NASH, and cirrhosis. Multiple small studies have suggested that probiotics improve some of the clinical markers of activity in patients with NAFL and NASH. Controlled studies have also shown improved outcomes in patients with cirrhosis who were treated with probiotics.

  13. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanliang; Ni, Yinhua; Nagata, Naoto; Xu, Liang; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin. PMID:27563875

  14. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Martin; Zong, Wenjing; Biank, Vincent F; Hageman, Joseph R

    2016-02-01

    A 16-year-old Hispanic girl with an elevated body mass index in an otherwise normal state of health presented for her well-child examination. She had signs of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance including increased waist circumference and acanthosis nigricans. Laboratory results revealed elevated transaminases with otherwise normal hepatic function. Based on the physical examination and laboratory results, she was diagnosed with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). After further evaluation, she eventually underwent a liver biopsy. The biopsy revealed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with stage 2 fibrosis. This article reviews the definition of NAFLD and NASH, an increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric chronic liver disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The article also outlines the epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history of NAFLD, which may help identify and prevent high-risk pediatric patients from progressing to irreversible liver disease. Understanding the diagnostic and treatment options offers the best chance at preventing and reversing the early stages of this disease.

  15. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  16. Heritability of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Celedon, Manuel A.; Lavine, Joel E.; Salem, Rany; Campbell, Nzali; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shiehmorteza, Masoud; Yokoo, Takeshi; Chavez, Alyssa; Middleton, Michael S.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States. The etiology is believed to be multi-factorial with a substantial genetic component; however, the heritability of NAFLD is undetermined. Therefore, a familial aggregation study was performed to test the hypothesis that NAFLD is highly heritable. Methods Overweight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and overweight children without NAFLD served as probands. Family members were studied including magnetic resonance imaging to quantify liver fat fraction. Fatty liver was defined as a liver fat fraction ≥ 5%. Etiologies for fatty liver other than NAFLD were excluded. Narrow-sense heritability estimates for fatty liver (dichotomous) and fat fraction (continuous) were calculated using variance components analysis adjusted for covariate effects. Results Fatty liver was present in 17% of siblings and 37% of parents of overweight children without NAFLD. Fatty liver was significantly more common in siblings (59%) and parents (78%) of children with NAFLD. Liver fat fraction was correlated with body mass index (BMI), although the correlation was significantly stronger for families of children with NAFLD than those without NAFLD. Adjusted for age, sex, race, and BMI, heritability of fatty liver was 1.000 and of liver fat fraction 0.386. Conclusion Family members of children with NAFLD should be considered at high risk for NAFLD. These data suggest that familial factors are a major determinant of whether an individual has NAFLD. Studies examining the complex relations between genes and environment in the development and progression of NAFLD are warranted. PMID:19208353

  17. Advances in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States. A two- to three-fold rise in the rates of obesity and overweight in children over the last 2 decades is probably responsible for the epidemic of NAFLD. Emerging data suggest that children with NASH progress to cirrhosis which may ultimately increase liver-related mortality. More worrisome is the recognition that cardiovascular risk and morbidity in children and adolescents is associated with fatty liver. Pediatric fatty liver disease often displays a histologic pattern distinct from that found in adults. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of NASH. Non-invasive biomarkers are needed to identify individuals with progressive liver injury. Targeted therapies to improve liver histology and metabolic abnormalities associated with fatty liver are needed. Currently, randomized-controlled trials are underway in the pediatric population to define pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD. Public health awareness and intervention are needed to promote healthy diet, exercise, and lifestyle modifications to prevent and reduce the burden of disease in the community. PMID:19637286

  18. Lipoprotein metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Robson, Simon C.; Yao, Zemin

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an escalating health problem worldwide, covers a spectrum of pathologies characterized by fatty accumulation in hepatocytes in early stages, with potential progression to liver inflammation, fibrosis, and failure. A close, yet poorly understood link exists between NAFLD and dyslipidemia, a constellation of abnormalities in plasma lipoproteins including triglyceride-rich very low density lipoproteins. Apolipoproteins are a group of primarily liver-derived proteins found in serum lipoproteins; they not only play an extracellular role in lipid transport between vital organs through circulation, but also play an important intracellular role in hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion. The liver functions as the central hub for lipoprotein metabolism, as it dictates lipoprotein production and to a significant extent modulates lipoprotein clearance. Lipoprotein metabolism is an integral component of hepatocellular lipid homeostasis and is implicated in the pathogenesis, potential diagnosis, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:23554788

  19. Animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Soejima, Yurie; Fukusato, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which excess fat accumulates in the liver of a patient without a history of alcohol abuse. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of NAFLD, can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and incidence has been increasing worldwide in line with the increased prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipemia. Animal models of NAFLD/NASH give crucial information, not only in elucidating pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH but also in examining therapeutic effects of various agents. An ideal model of NAFLD/NASH should correctly reflect both hepatic histopathology and pathophysiology of human NAFLD/NASH. Animal models of NAFLD/NASH are divided into genetic, dietary, and combination models. In this paper, we review commonly used animal models of NAFLD/NASH referring to their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:22654421

  20. Animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Soejima, Yurie; Fukusato, Toshio

    2012-05-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which excess fat accumulates in the liver of a patient without a history of alcohol abuse. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of NAFLD, can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and incidence has been increasing worldwide in line with the increased prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hyperlipemia. Animal models of NAFLD/NASH give crucial information, not only in elucidating pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH but also in examining therapeutic effects of various agents. An ideal model of NAFLD/NASH should correctly reflect both hepatic histopathology and pathophysiology of human NAFLD/NASH. Animal models of NAFLD/NASH are divided into genetic, dietary, and combination models. In this paper, we review commonly used animal models of NAFLD/NASH referring to their advantages and disadvantages.

  1. Genetic predisposition in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J.

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease whose prevalence has reached global epidemic proportions. Although the disease is relatively benign in the early stages, when severe clinical forms, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma, occur, they result in worsening the long-term prognosis. A growing body of evidence indicates that NAFLD develops from a complex process in which many factors, including genetic susceptibility and environmental insults, are involved. In this review, we focused on the genetic component of NAFLD, with special emphasis on the role of genetics in the disease pathogenesis and natural history. Insights into the topic of the genetic susceptibility in lean individuals with NAFLD and the potential use of genetic tests in identifying individuals at risk are also discussed. PMID:28268262

  2. Role of bioactive fatty acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Uribe, Misael; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J

    2016-08-02

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by fat deposition in hepatocytes, and a strong association with nutritional factors. Dietary fatty acids are classified according to their biochemical properties, which confer their bioactive roles. Monounsaturated fatty acids have a dual role in various human and murine models. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids exhibit antiobesity, anti steatosic and anti-inflammatory effects. The combination of these forms of fatty acids-according to dietary type, daily intake and the proportion of n-6 to n-3 fats-can compromise hepatic lipid metabolism. A chemosensory rather than a nutritional role makes bioactive fatty acids possible biomarkers for NAFLD. Bioactive fatty acids provide health benefits through modification of fatty acid composition and modulating the activity of liver cells during liver fibrosis. More and better evidence is necessary to elucidate the role of bioactive fatty acids in nutritional and clinical treatment strategies for patients with NAFLD.

  3. [Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Fukusato, Toshio; Inui, Ayano; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2012-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a hepatic disease associated with metabolic syndrome. In recent years, pediatric NAFLD has increased in line with the increased prevalence of pediatric obesity. The estimated prevalence of pediatric NAFLD is 2.6-9.6%. With regard to the pathogenesis of NAFLD/ NASH, the "two-hit" or "multiple-hit" hypothesis is widely accepted, and many genetic and environmental factors are associated with the development of NAFLD/NASH. Liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD/NASH. Pediatric NAFLD has different histopathological characteristics from those of adult NAFLD. Although pharmacotherapy has been studied in clinical trials, lifestyle modification by diet and exercise remains the mainstay of treatment for NAFLD/NASH.

  4. Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  5. Biomarkers in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G; Cohen, Lawrence B; Nanau, Radu M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver condition characterized by insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and fat accumulation in the liver that may cause hepatic inflammation and progressive scarring leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and irreversible liver damage (cirrhosis). As a result, there has been increased recognition of the need to assess and closely monitor individuals for risk factors of components of NAFLD and NASH, as well as the severity of these conditions using biomarkers. AIM: To review the biomarkers used to diagnose and define the severity of NAFLD and NASH. METHODS: A comprehensive PubMed and Google Scholar literature search was performed using the terms “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease”, “non-alcoholic steatohepatitis”, as well as the name of each biomarker known to be used. Articles indexed between 2004 and 2014 were used. Each author read the publications separately and the results were discussed. RESULTS: Biomarkers offer a potential prognostic or diagnostic indicator for disease manifestation, progression or both. Serum biomarkers, including total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin resistance and C-peptide, have been used for many years. Emerging biomarkers, such as apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, leptin, adiponectin, free fatty acids, ghrelin and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, have been proposed as tools that could provide valuable complementary information to that obtained from traditional biomarkers. Moreover, markers of cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction (cytokeratins) represent powerful predictors of risk. For biomarkers to be clinically useful in accurately diagnosing and treating disorders, age-specific reference intervals that account for differences in sex and ethnic origin are a necessity. CONCLUSIONS: The present review attempts to provide a comprehensive analysis of the emerging risk biomarkers of NAFLD and NASH, and to use the clinical significance and analytical

  6. Developmental origins of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, David E; Friedman, Jacob E

    2014-01-01

    Obese pregnant women may transmit their metabolic phenotype to offspring, leading to a cycle of obesity and diabetes over generations. Early childhood obesity predicts nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common chronic human liver disease. The fetus may be vulnerable to steatosis because immature fetal adipose depots are not available to buffer the excess transplacental lipid delivery in maternal obesity. In animal models, in utero high-fat diet exposure results in an increase in the accumulation of liver triglycerides in offspring and increased hepatic oxidative stress and apoptosis, perhaps priming the liver for later development of NAFLD. Innate immune dysfunction and necroinflammatory changes have been observed in postnatal offspring liver of animals born to high-fat-fed dams. Postweaning, livers of offspring exposed to maternal high-fat feeding in utero share pathophysiologic features with human NAFLD, including increased de novo lipogenesis and decreased free fatty acid oxidation. Human studies using magnetic resonance imaging have shown that maternal BMI predicts infant intrahepatocellular lipid storage, as seen in animal models. The generational transfer of NAFLD may occur via epigenetic changes in offspring liver. Transmission of microbiota from mother to infant may impact energy retention and immune function that contribute to a predisposition to NAFLD.

  7. Treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Siebler, Juergen; Galle, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause for elevated liver enzymes in the developed nations. Beyond prevention programs which are of particular interest because of the increasing number of overweight children, treatment should be focussed on the most important risk factors, obesity and insulin resistance. As a consequence of elucidating the pathomechanisms of NAFLD, the number of potential therapeutic options increased. However, many studies investigating the therapeutic effect show shortcomings in at least one of the following points: lack of a serial liver biopsy, short term of treatment and limited number of included patients. The second generation insulin sensitizer pioglitazone and rosiglitazone show the most promising improvements in NAFLD, but weight gain and potential hepatotoxicity calls for attention. In conclusion, a general recommendation for the application of specific drugs cannot be given. Besides controlled clinical trials, weight reduction and physical activity to improve insulin sensitivity in obese patients should be the priority objective. PMID:16610015

  8. Nonmedicinal interventions in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Manuela G; Nanau, Radu M; Cohen, Lawrence B

    2015-01-01

    Unhealthy diet and lack of physical exercise are responsible for fat accumulation in the liver, which may lead to liver disease. Histologically, the severity of the disease has two stages: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is defined by the presence of steatosis with no evidence of cellular injury such as hepatocyte ballooning. NASH is a distinct entity from NAFLD, and is characterized by the presence of inflammation with hepatocytes damage, with or without fibrosis. While several therapeutic strategies have been proposed to improve this condition, the present review aims to discuss nonmedicinal interventions used to reduce liver involvement or to prevent the disease altogether. The authors investigated dietary patterns and vitamin deficiencies associated with NAFLD, and their role in enhancing disease severity. Additionally, they reviewed the role of exercise and the use of interventions, such as as intragastric balloon and bariatric surgery, for improving disease progression. The authors propose monitoring disease progression or repair by following changes in cytoadipokine levels. PMID:26076224

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a precursor of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lonardo, Amedeo; Ballestri, Stefano; Marchesini, Giulio; Angulo, Paul; Loria, Paola

    2015-03-01

    The conventional paradigm of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease representing the "hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome" is outdated. We identified and summarized longitudinal studies that, supporting the association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with either type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome, suggest that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease precedes the development of both conditions. Online Medical databases were searched, relevant articles were identified, their references were further assessed and tabulated data were checked. Although several cross-sectional studies linked nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to either diabetes and other components of the metabolic syndrome, we focused on 28 longitudinal studies which provided evidence for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a risk factor for the future development of diabetes. Moreover, additional 19 longitudinal reported that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease precedes and is a risk factor for the future development of the metabolic syndrome. Finally, molecular and genetic studies are discussed supporting the view that aetiology of steatosis and lipid intra-hepatocytic compartmentation are a major determinant of whether fatty liver is/is not associated with insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Data support the novel paradigm of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a strong determinant for the development of the metabolic syndrome, which has potentially relevant clinical implications for diagnosing, preventing and treating metabolic syndrome.

  10. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kanupriya; Vohra, Pankaj

    2012-09-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted in 100 children, aged 5 to 12 years, to find the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD), at New Delhi. Those with fatty liver on ultrasonography with no apparent etiology, were labeled as NAFLD. Three (3%) children had evidence of fatty liver on ultrasonography.

  11. Radiologic evaluation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Soo; Park, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent cause of chronic liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver cirrhosis. Although liver biopsy is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD, especially for the diagnosis of NASH, imaging methods have been increasingly accepted as noninvasive alternatives to liver biopsy. Ultrasonography is a well-established and cost-effective imaging technique for the diagnosis of hepatic steatosis, especially for screening a large population at risk of NAFLD. Ultrasonography has a reasonable accuracy in detecting moderate-to-severe hepatic steatosis although it is less accurate for detecting mild hepatic steatosis, operator-dependent, and rather qualitative. Computed tomography is not appropriate for general population assessment of hepatic steatosis given its inaccuracy in detecting mild hepatic steatosis and potential radiation hazard. However, computed tomography may be effective in specific clinical situations, such as evaluation of donor candidates for hepatic transplantation. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging are now regarded as the most accurate practical methods of measuring liver fat in clinical practice, especially for longitudinal follow-up of patients with NAFLD. Ultrasound elastography and magnetic resonance elastography are increasingly used to evaluate the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD and to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. This article will review current imaging methods used to evaluate hepatic steatosis, including the diagnostic accuracy, limitations, and practical applicability of each method. It will also briefly describe the potential role of elastography techniques in the evaluation of patients with NAFLD. PMID:24966609

  12. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-08-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future.

  13. Herbal medicines and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Qiao, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Ya-Li; Tao, Xu-Feng; Xu, Li-Na; Yin, Lian-Hong; Qi, Yan; Peng, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver of patients who consume little or no alcohol, becomes increasingly common with rapid economic development. Long-term excess fat accumulation leads to NAFLD and represents a global health problem with no effective therapeutic approach. NAFLD is considered to be a series of complex, multifaceted pathological processes involving oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Over the past decades, herbal medicines have garnered growing attention as potential therapeutic agents to prevent and treat NAFLD, due to their high efficacy and low risk of side effects. In this review, we evaluate the use of herbal medicines (including traditional Chinese herbal formulas, crude extracts from medicinal plants, and pure natural products) to treat NAFLD. These herbal medicines are natural resources that can inform innovative drug research and the development of treatments for NAFLD in the future. PMID:27570425

  14. [Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children].

    PubMed

    Bojórquez-Ramos, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States of America (USA) and probably in the entire western hemisphere, due to the increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity. Steatosis can progress to inflammation, fibrosis and even cirrhosis, which increases the morbidity and mortality associated to liver disease. In every overweight and obese child a thorough analysis should be performed including liver function tests and liver ultrasound, in order to establish a timely diagnosis. The liver biopsy is the most specific study to rule out other potentially treatable entities. It is necessary to count on non-invasive methods to detect children with NAFLD and identify those in risk of progression. Biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and fibrosis have been reported. The main goal of the treatment is to modify the life style, starting with a healthy diet and an increase of physical activity. Regarding pharmacological treatment, there is evidence of histological improvement with vitamin E use, as opposed to metformin, but more conclusive studies regarding this subject are needed.

  15. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Fukusato, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, is the most common chronic liver disease, and the prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD, can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although noninvasive clinical scores and image-based diagnosis for NAFLD have improved, histopathological evaluation of biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD/NASH. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning are all necessary components for the diagnosis of NASH; fibrosis is also typically observed. Other histopathological abnormalities commonly observed in NASH include hepatocellular glycogenated nuclei, lipogranulomas, and acidophil bodies. The characteristics of pediatric NAFLD/NASH differ from adult NAFLD/NASH. Specifically, steatosis and portal inflammation are more severe in pediatric NAFLD, while intralobular inflammation and perisinusoidal fibrosis are milder. Although interobserver agreement for evaluating the extent of steatosis and fibrosis is high, agreement is low for intralobular and portal inflammation. A recently reported histological variant of HCC, steatohepatitic HCC (SH-HCC), shows features that resemble non-neoplastic steatohepatitis, and is thought to be strongly associated with underlying NASH. In this report, we review the histopathological features of NAFLD/NASH. PMID:25400438

  16. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Fukusato, Toshio

    2014-11-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, is the most common chronic liver disease, and the prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the severe form of NAFLD, can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although noninvasive clinical scores and image-based diagnosis for NAFLD have improved, histopathological evaluation of biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD/NASH. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning are all necessary components for the diagnosis of NASH; fibrosis is also typically observed. Other histopathological abnormalities commonly observed in NASH include hepatocellular glycogenated nuclei, lipogranulomas, and acidophil bodies. The characteristics of pediatric NAFLD/NASH differ from adult NAFLD/NASH. Specifically, steatosis and portal inflammation are more severe in pediatric NAFLD, while intralobular inflammation and perisinusoidal fibrosis are milder. Although interobserver agreement for evaluating the extent of steatosis and fibrosis is high, agreement is low for intralobular and portal inflammation. A recently reported histological variant of HCC, steatohepatitic HCC (SH-HCC), shows features that resemble non-neoplastic steatohepatitis, and is thought to be strongly associated with underlying NASH. In this report, we review the histopathological features of NAFLD/NASH.

  17. Rodent models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Imajo, Kento; Yoneda, Masato; Kessoku, Takaomi; Ogawa, Yuji; Maeda, Shin; Sumida, Yoshio; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Wada, Koichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2013-11-04

    Research in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), has been limited by the availability of suitable models for this disease. A number of rodent models have been described in which the relevant liver pathology develops in an appropriate metabolic context. These models are promising tools for researchers investigating one of the key issues of NASH: not so much why steatosis occurs, but what causes the transition from simple steatosis to the inflammatory, progressive fibrosing condition of steatohepatitis. The different rodent models can be classified into two large groups. The first includes models in which the disease is acquired after dietary or pharmacological manipulation, and the second, genetically modified models in which liver disease develops spontaneously. To date, no single rodent model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression, but individual models can imitate particular characteristics of human disease. Therefore, it is important that researchers choose the appropriate rodent models. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the metabolic abnormalities present in the currently available rodent models of NAFLD, summarizing the strengths and weaknesses of the established models and the key findings that have furthered our understanding of the disease's pathogenesis.

  18. Thyroid dysfunction and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Efstathiadou, Zoe A; Kita, Marina D; Polyzos, Stergios A

    2017-02-09

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a very common and potentially serious disease of modern society, shares common clinical features with hypothyroidism, such as obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, in certain studies, increased prevalence of hypothyroidism was observed in patients with NAFLD. However, whether there is a linear relationship between thyroid hormone levels and NAFLD incidence and severity, including values within or in proximity to the reference range remains a contradictory subject in the literature. On the other hand, attempts to treat NAFLD with thyromimetic drugs remain at an early stage. In this review, data derived from observational studies along with evidence on possible treatment with thyroid hormone analogues are presented.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - A multisystem disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mikolasevic, Ivana; Milic, Sandra; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Grgic, Ivana; Jakopcic, Ivan; Stimac, Davor; Wensveen, Felix; Orlic, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common comorbidities associated with overweight and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Importantly, NAFLD is one of its most dangerous complications because it can lead to severe liver pathologies, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatic cellular carcinoma. Given the increasing worldwide prevalence of obesity, NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease and therefore is a major global health problem. Currently, NAFLD is predominantly regarded as a hepatic manifestation of MetS. However, accumulating evidence indicates that the effects of NAFLD extend beyond the liver and are negatively associated with a range of chronic diseases, most notably cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is becoming increasingly clear that these diseases are the result of the same underlying pathophysiological processes associated with MetS, such as insulin resistance, chronic systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia. As a result, they have been shown to be independent reciprocal risk factors. In addition, recent data have shown that NAFLD actively contributes to aggravation of the pathophysiology of CVD, T2DM, and CKD, as well as several other pathologies. Thus, NAFLD is a direct cause of many chronic diseases associated with MetS, and better detection and treatment of fatty liver disease is therefore urgently needed. As non-invasive screening methods for liver disease become increasingly available, detection and treatment of NAFLD in patients with MetS should therefore be considered by both (sub-) specialists and primary care physicians. PMID:27920470

  20. Psoriasis and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, J M; Bonanad, C; Dauden, E; Botella, R; Olveira-Martín, A

    2017-03-16

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver condition in the West. The prevalence and severity of NAFLD is higher and the prognosis worse in patients with psoriasis. The pathogenic link between psoriasis and NAFLD is chronic inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance, a common finding in diseases associated with psoriasis. NAFLD should therefore be ruled out during the initial evaluation of patients with psoriasis, in particular if they show signs of metabolic syndrome and require systemic treatment. Concomitant psoriasis and NAFLD and the likelihood of synergy between them place limitations on general recommendations and treatment for these patients given the potential for liver toxicity. As hepatotoxic risk is associated with some of the conventional drugs used in this setting (e.g., acitretin, methotrexate, and ciclosporin), patients prescribed these treatments should be monitored as appropriate. Anti-tumor necrosis factor agents hold the promise of potential benefits based on their effects on the inflammatory process and improving peripheral insulin resistance. However, cases of liver toxicity have also been reported in relation to these biologics. No evidence has emerged to suggest that anti-p40 or anti-interleukin 17 agents provide benefits or have adverse effects.

  1. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ur Rahman, Zia; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to study nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a relevant risk factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with and without cirrhosis. HCC is a common cancer worldwide that predominantly involves patients with hepatic cirrhosis. HCC has recently been linked to NAFLD, the hepatic manifestation of obesity and related metabolic disorders. This association is alarming due to the high prevalence of NAFLD globally, which may contribute to the rising incidence of HCC. A 31-year-old female with a history of dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus presented with abdominal pain that persisted for six months. The pain was associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and weight loss. She was drug-free and a nonalcoholic and a nonsmoker. The physical examination was unremarkable. The abdominal exam showed a soft and non-tender abdomen, with no organomegaly or ascites. The laboratory evaluation was unremarkable. The imaging studies showed a hypodense lesion in the right hepatic lobe with strong arterial enhancement. Subsequently, the patient underwent a liver biopsy. The histopathology results were consistent with HCC. The patient underwent an uneventful segment VI liver resection and tumor-free margins were achieved. In our patient, NAFLD was designated as an independent etiology for HCC, without cirrhosis. Our patient recovered well and has been disease free for over a year. HCC may complicate non-cirrhotic NAFLD with mild or absent fibrosis, greatly expanding the population potentially at higher risk of HCC. These results provide new targets for surveillance, prevention, early recognition, and effective treatment of HCC associated with NAFLD. PMID:27733959

  2. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  3. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  4. Sirtuins and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nassir, Fatiha; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sirtuins are seven members belonging to the silent information regulator 2 family, a group of Class III histone/protein deacetylases. Sirtuins (SIRT 1-7) have different subcellular localization and function and they regulate cellular protein function through various posttranslational modifications. SIRT1 and 3, the most studied sirtuins, use the product of cellular metabolism nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor to post-translationally deacetylate cellular proteins and consequently link the metabolic status of the cell to protein function. Sirtuins have been shown to play a key role in the development and rescue of various metabolic diseases including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is currently the most chronic liver disease due mainly to high-calorie consumption and lower physical activity. No pharmacological approach is available to treat NAFLD, the current recommended treatment are lifestyle modification such as weight loss through calorie restriction and exercise. Recent studies have shown downregulation of sirtuins in human as well as animal models of NAFLD indicating an important role of sirtuins in the dynamic pathophysiology of NAFLD. In this review, we highlight the recent knowledge on sirtuins, their role in NAFLD and their unique potential role as novel therapeutic target for NAFLD treatment. PMID:28028356

  5. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-03-25

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD.

  6. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis].

    PubMed

    Pár, Gabriella; Horváth, Gábor; Pár, Alajos

    2013-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome with close association with inzulin resistance and obesity, are the most common liver diseases, affecting up to a third of the population worldwide. They confer increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma as well as cardiovascular diseases. The review aims to summarize advances in epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Besides liver biopsy and biomarkers, a novel non-invasive diagnostic tool the called "controlled attenuation parameter" measuring the attenuation of ultrasound generated by the transient elastography transducer, can quantitatively assess the hepatic fat content and differentiate between steatosis grades. At the same time, liver stiffness (fibrosis) can also be evaluated. The authors present their own results obtained with the latter procedure. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the lifestyle intervention, weight loss, diet and exercise supported by cognitive behavioural therapy represent the basis of management. Components of metabolic syndrome (obesity, dyslipidaemia, diabetes and arterial hypertension) have to be treated. Although there is no approved pharmacological therapy for NASH, it seems that long lasting administration of vitamin E in association with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid may be beneficial. In addition, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid substitution can also decrease liver fat, however, the optimal dose is not known yet. Further controlled clinical studies are warranted to establish the real value of any suggested treatment modalities for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, although these are in experimental phase yet.

  7. NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE BRAZILIAN SOCIETY OF HEPATOLOGY CONSENSUS.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Helma P; Parise, Edison R; Figueiredo-Mendes, Cláudio; Galizzi-Filho, João; Porta, Gilda; Oliveira, Claudia P

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related metabolic syndrome has rapidly increased in Brazil, resulting in a high frequency of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, that didn't receive much attention in the past. However, it has received increased attention since this disease was identified to progress to end-stage liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease have not been established in Brazil. The Brazilian Society of Hepatology held an event with specialists' members from all over Brazil with the purpose of producing guideline for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease based on a systematic approach that reflects evidence-based medicine and expert opinions. The guideline discussed the following subjects: 1-Concepts and recommendations; 2-Diagnosis; 3-Non-medical treatment; 4-Medical treatment; 5-Pediatrics - Diagnosis; 6-Pediatrics - Non-medical treatment; 7-Pediatrics - Medical treatment; 8-Surgical treatment.

  8. Role of liver biopsy in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as abnormal accumulation (> 5%) of hepatic triglyceride without excess alcohol intake, is the most common form of chronic liver disease in adults and children in the United States. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of histologic findings including uncomplicated steatosis, steatosis with inflammation and steatohepatitis [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]; the latter can advance to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NASH is currently accepted as the hepatic manifestation of the set of cardiovascular risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome. In 1999 a system for histologic grading and staging for NASH was proposed; this was revised by the NASH Clinical Research Network in 2005 for the entire spectrum of lesions in NAFLD, including the lesions and patterns of pediatric NAFLD, and for application in clinical research trials. Diagnosis remains distinct from grade and stage. A recent European proposal separates steatosis from activity to derive a numeric diagnosis of NASH. Even though there have been promising advancements in non-invasive testing, these tests are not yet detailed enough to replace the full range of findings provided by liver biopsy evaluation. Limitations of biopsy are acknowledged, but liver biopsy remains the “gold standard” for diagnosis and determination of amounts of necroinflammatory activity, and location of fibrosis, as well as remodeling of the parenchyma in NASH. This review focuses on the specific histologic lesions of NAFLD and NASH, grading and staging, differential diagnoses to be considered, and the continuing role of the liver biopsy in this important liver disease. PMID:25083076

  9. Therapeutic potential of green tea in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Masterjohn, Christopher; Bruno, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a constellation of progressive liver disorders that are closely related to obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance and may afflict over 70 million Americans. NAFLD may occur as relatively benign, nonprogressive liver steatosis, but in many individuals it may progress in severity to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. No validated treatments currently exist for NAFLD except for weight loss, which has a poor long-term success rate. Thus, dietary strategies that prevent the development of liver steatosis or its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis are critically needed. Green tea is rich in polyphenolic catechins that have hypolipidemic, thermogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities that may mitigate the occurrence and progression of NAFLD. This review presents the experimental evidence demonstrating the hepatoprotective properties of green tea and its catechins and the proposed mechanisms by which these targeted dietary agents protect against NAFLD.

  10. Current treatment options for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Melanie D

    2012-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the leading cause of liver disease in western society. It is a cause of end-stage liver disease, with increased mortality secondary to cirrhosis and its complications. It is also recognized that cardiovascular disease is a significant cause of death in these patients. Significant work evaluating various treatments has been performed in recent years; however, to date, no ideal therapy exists. Lifestyle modification remains the cornerstone of management. The present article reviews the current status of various treatment modalities evaluated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. Recommendations for Diagnosis, Referral for Liver Biopsy, and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Erin K; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the primary cause of chronic liver disease in the United States, afflicting an estimated 80 to 100 million Americans. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a spectrum of liver diseases composed of nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although nonalcoholic fatty liver has a negligible risk of progression, patients with NASH often develop cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Although liver biopsy is required to diagnose NASH, only patients with a high risk of NASH or advanced fibrosis require this evaluation. Despite the high prevalence of NAFLD, well-defined screening recommendations are currently lacking. In this review, suggestions for screening, diagnosis, and initial work-up of NAFLD are given on the basis of established guidelines and recent publications. Proposed drug treatments of NASH are also discussed, highlighting the study outcomes, as well as proposed uses and limitations of these drugs. The literature was searched in PubMed using search terms nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, with filters of "English language." A date range of January 1, 2000, to May 1, 2015, was used for the search. The bibliographies of key references were also searched manually, and seminal publications before the year 2000 were included.

  12. Low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Bing; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Shi, Chang-E; Hu, Kai-Feng; Zhou, Ju; Xu, De-Xiang; Chen, Xi

    2017-02-01

    Several studies explored the association between vitamin D status and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with contradictory results. We aimed to investigate the association between vitamin D status, inflammatory cytokines and liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Two hundred nineteen nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients and 166 age- and gender- matched healthy controls were recruited for this study. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum interleukin-8 and transforming growth factor-β1 were measured using ELISA. Serum 25(OH)D was only marginally decreased in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interestingly, serum 25(OH)D was markedly reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced liver fibrosis compared to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with indeterminate liver fibrosis and no advanced fibrosis. Logistic regression analysis showed that there was an inverse association between serum 25(OH)D and severity of liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Further analysis showed that serum interleukin-8 was elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, the highest interleukin-8 in patients with advanced fibrosis. An inverse correlation between serum 25(OH)D and interleukin-8 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with and without liver fibrosis. Although serum transforming growth factor-β1 was slightly elevated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients, serum transforming growth factor-β1 was reduced in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. Unexpectedly, a positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and transforming growth factor-β1 was observed in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with advanced fibrosis. In conclusion, low vitamin D status is associated with advanced liver fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Interleukin-8 may be an important mediator for hepatic fibrosis in nonalcoholic

  13. Non-alcoholic Fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Singer, Cristina; Stancu, Polixenia; Coşoveanu, Simona; Botu, Alina

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, there has been extremely much information which reveals an alarming increase of obesity in children and, at the same time, an increase of the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD implies a wide range of affections starting from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); the latter can evolve to cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma. All these affections were noticed in children, too. The article presents data on the epidemiology, pathogeny, clinical and paraclinical findings, and treatment of NAFLD in children.

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    SINGER, CRISTINA; STANCU, POLIXENIA; COŞOVEANU, SIMONA; BOTU, ALINA

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, there has been extremely much information which reveals an alarming increase of obesity in children and, at the same time, an increase of the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD implies a wide range of affections starting from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH); the latter can evolve to cirrhosis and hepatic carcinoma. All these affections were noticed in children, too. The article presents data on the epidemiology, pathogeny, clinical and paraclinical findings, and treatment of NAFLD in children. PMID:25729601

  15. Current Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Swaytha; Rustgi, Vinod K

    2016-05-01

    Weight loss, regular exercise, and diet composition modification seem to improve biochemical and histologic abnormalities. Other therapies directed at insulin resistance, oxidative stress, cytoprotection, and fibrosis may also offer benefits. Insulin sensitizers and vitamin E seem to be the most promising; however, they cause side effects. A multifaceted approach of lifestyle modifications, weight loss, and pharmacotherapy can be used in combination, but no single treatment approach has proved universally applicable to the general population with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Continuous clinical and preclinical studies on existing and potential drugs are needed to improve treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/NASH.

  16. Olive oil consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Assy, Nimer; Nassar, Faris; Nasser, Gattas; Grosovski, Maria

    2009-04-21

    The clinical implications of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) derive from their potential to progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress results in increased free fatty acid delivery to the liver and increased hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation. An olive oil-rich diet decreases accumulation of TGs in the liver, improves postprandial TGs, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 responses in insulin-resistant subjects, and upregulates glucose transporter-2 expression in the liver. The principal mechanisms include: decreased nuclear factor-kappaB activation, decreased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and improved insulin resistance by reduced production of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6) and improvement of jun N-terminal kinase-mediated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1. The beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet is derived from monounsaturated fatty acids, mainly from olive oil. In this review, we describe the dietary sources of the monounsaturated fatty acids, the composition of olive oil, dietary fats and their relationship to insulin resistance and postprandial lipid and glucose responses in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, clinical and experimental studies that assess the relationship between olive oil and NAFLD, and the mechanism by which olive oil ameliorates fatty liver, and we discuss future perspectives.

  17. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Review: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aijaz; Wong, Robert J; Harrison, Stephen A

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of abnormal serum aminotransferase levels in both developed and developing countries. Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a subset of NAFLD, are at risk for progressive liver disease and in need of effective treatment options. A practical approach may be pursued by identifying patients with NAFLD with the highest likelihood for histologic evidence of NASH. Despite decades of clinical trials, no single treatment can be recommended to all patients with NASH. Importantly, there is no evidence that pioglitazone or vitamin E improves fibrosis. Bariatric surgeries may improve hepatic histology in morbidly obese patients with NASH, although randomized clinical trials are lacking. Currently, NASH is the second leading etiology of liver disease among adults awaiting liver transplantation in the United States. The primary and secondary prevention of NAFLD may require aggressive strategies for managing obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neel; Beaton, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    There is no single pharmacologic therapy that has been approved to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the general population. The backbone of therapy currently includes intensive lifestyle modification with established targets for diet and weight loss. The use of unsweetened, unfiltered coffee along with limiting high fructose corn syrup have emerged as beneficial dietary recommendations. The use of empiric oral hypoglycemic agents and vitamin E, however, has not been widely accepted. Developing bariatric surgical techniques are promising, but additional studies with long-term follow up are needed before it can be widely recommended. Finally, liver transplantation is an increasingly frequent consideration once complications of end-stage disease have developed. The future treatment of those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will likely involve a personalized approach. The importance of the gut microbiome in mediating hepatocyte inflammation and intestinal permeability is emerging and may offer avenues for novel treatment. The study of anti-fibrotic agents such as pentoxifylline and FXR agonists hold promise and new pathways, such as hepatocyte cannabinoid receptor antagonists are being studied. With the incidence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome increasing throughout the developed world, the future will continue to focus on finding novel agents and new applications of existing therapies to help prevent and to mediate the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26730275

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular pathways and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Along with rising numbers of patients with metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased in proportion with the obesity epidemic. While there are no established treatments for NAFLD, current research is targeting new molecular mechanisms that underlie NAFLD and associated metabolic disorders. This review discusses some of these emerging molecular mechanisms and their therapeutic implications for the treatment of NAFLD. The basic research that has identified potential molecular targets for pharmacotherapy will be outlined. PMID:24209497

  20. Histology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, David E; Makhlouf, Hala R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Although steatosis is a key histologic feature, liver biopsies of patients with NAFLD can show a wide range of findings. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive subtype of NAFLD first defined by analogy to alcoholic hepatitis. Young children may have an alternate pattern of progressive NAFLD characterized by a zone 1 distribution of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Several grading and staging systems exist, but all require adequate biopsies. Although NASH generally shows fibrosis progression over time, some patients show regression of disease.

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Janczyk, Wojciech; Socha, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is increasingly prevalent in children, together with obesity. Transaminases, tests for insulin resistance, ultrasonography and MRI are variably used as surrogates markers of steatosis. Other liver diseases, such as Wilson disease, should be excluded. A liver biopsy is performed in selected cases: young children, familial history of severe disease, inconclusive tests for other pathologies, suspected advanced fibrosis, hypertransaminasemia despite weight loss and in clinical trials. Weight reduction, and changes in lifestyle, are the front-line treatment. Drug therapy is under evaluation.

  2. Clinical Presentation and Patient Evaluation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaishali; Sanyal, Arun J; Sterling, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a diagnosis of exclusion. Most patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally. Most patients remain undiagnosed. A high index of suspicion and serologic work-up to rule out alternative causes of liver disease is required. In NALFD, fibrosis correlates with outcomes, including mortality. To diagnose, assess severity, and monitor fibrosis, 2 noninvasive methods can be used. However, noninvasive tests are more helpful at extremes of fibrosis: excluding it or diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Liver biopsy is usually reserved for cases whereby noninvasive tests fail to accurately determine the degree of fibrosis or the diagnosis is unclear.

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Prashant; Das, Manoja K; Arora, Narendra K

    2007-04-01

    Obesity has emerged as a significant global health problem in the pediatric population. Pediatric liver disease is a serious complication of childhood obesity. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity in the spectrum of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) ranges from fat in the liver--simple steatosis, NASH/ steatohepatitis--fat with in.ammation and/or fibrosis to advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis when fat may no longer be present. NASH is associated with obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance (IR), and hypertriglyceridemia. Children get NAFLD, and the incidence of this pediatric liver disease is rising as childhood obesity becomes increasingly prevalent. Although much remains to be learned about pediatric NAFLD, it is already evident that children with NASH risk progressive liver damage, including cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is required for definitive diagnosis, and other causes of fatty liver in childhood must be excluded. Gradual weight loss through increased regular exercise and a low-fat, low-refined carbohydrate diet appears to be effective. Drug treatments are being developed. The important message is that childhood obesity poses important health problems, including but not limited to potentially severe chronic liver disease. Early diagnosis of children who are only overweight is a worthy goal so that strategies to limit obesity can be instituted as early as possible. Identification of genetic risks is important, but management will invariably require changes in environmental factors. In addition to individual treatment, a multifaceted, societal initiative is required for solving the childhood obesity epidemic.

  4. Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)--A Review.

    PubMed

    Karim, M F; Al-Mahtab, M; Rahman, S; Debnath, C R

    2015-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging problem in Hepatology clinics. It is closely related to the increased frequency of overweight or obesity. It has recognised association with metabolic syndrome. Central obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia are commonest risk factors. Association with hepatitis C genotype 3 is also recognised. NAFLD is an important cause of cyptogenic cirrhosis of liver. It affects all populations and all age groups. Most patients with NAFLD are asymptomatic or vague upper abdominal pain. Liver function tests are mostly normal or mild elevation of aminotranferases. Histological features almost identical to those of alcohol-induced liver damage and can range from mild steatosis to cirrhosis. Two hit hypothesis is prevailing theory for the development of NAFLD. Diagnosis is usually made by imaging tools like ultrasonogram which reveal a bright liver while liver biopsy is gold standard for diagnosis as well as differentiating simple fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Prognosis is variable. Simple hepatic steatosis generally has a benign long-term prognosis. However, one to two third of NASH progress to fibrosis or cirrhosis and may have a similar prognosis as cirrhosis from other liver diseases. Treatment is mostly control of underlying disorders and dietary advice, exercise, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, or cytoprotective agents. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing. So it needs more research to address this problem.

  5. Management of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuy-Anh; Loomba, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of abnormal liver enzymes and chronic liver disease in the US with expected rise in incidence paralleling the epidemic of obesity. A subset of patients with NAFLD have the progressive form of NAFLD that is termed non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by specific features on liver histology including hepatocellular ballooning degeneration, lobular inflammation, and zone-3 steatosis with or without peri-sinusoidal fibrosis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and result in liver-related death. Insulin resistance is commonly seen in patients with NASH and often co-exists with other features of the metabolic syndrome including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Although weight loss through lifestyle modifications including dietary changes and increased physical exercise remains the backbone of management of NASH, it has proved challenging for patients to achieve and maintain weight loss goals. Thus, it is often necessary to couple lifestyle changes with another pharmacologic treatment for NASH. Insulin sensitizers including the biguanides (metformin), thiazolidinediones (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (exenatide) are large groups of medications that have been studied for the treatment of NASH. Other agents with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, or anti-fibrotic properties which have been studied in NASH include vitamin E, pentoxifylline, betaine, and ursodeoxycholic acid. This review will provide a detailed summary on the clinical data behind the full spectrum of treatments that exist for NASH and suggest management recommendations. PMID:25755424

  6. Pharmacologic therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Scott S; Byrd, Jennifer S; Bell, Allison M; Wofford, Marion R; Riche, Daniel M

    2013-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes in the absence of excessive alcohol intake, ranging in severity from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis can ultimately progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and is the most common chronic liver disease among adults in the Western Hemisphere. Although simple steatosis is generally considered a self-limiting disease, evidence suggests an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and, less conclusively, mortality, among individuals with NAFLD and/or NASH. The current standard of care for the treatment of patients with NAFLD focuses on lifestyle interventions, particularly diet and exercise. There is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective and appropriate pharmacologic therapy. A PubMed search was conducted using the medical subject heading terms "fatty liver" and "steatohepatitis." This review focuses on the current pharmacologic options available for treating adults with NAFLD and/or NASH. Continued investigation of drugs or combinations that improve NAFLD progression is crucial. Clinicians, particularly pharmacists, must take an active role in identification and appropriate selection of pharmacotherapy for NAFLD.

  7. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) /non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kiyo-aki; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the form of triglycerides in the hepatocytes. A more severe form of NAFLD with necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis is called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The liver is located in the center of the body's organ network and acts as a coordinator of glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, it is important to perform nutritional therapy of patients with NAFLD/NASH while maintaining the energy balance in the entire body.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio H; Bruno, Anderson S; Nahas-Neto, Jorge; Santos, Maria Emilia S; Nahas, Eliana A P

    2014-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western countries. NAFLD includes a spectrum ranging from a simple steatosis to a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which is defined by the presence of inflammatory infiltrate, cellular necrosis, hepatocyte ballooning, and fibrosis and cirrhosis that can eventually develop into hepatocellular carcinoma. Studies emphasize the role of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines, adipokines in the development and progression of NAFLD. It seems to be independently associated with type II diabetes mellitus, increased triglycerides, decreased HDL-cholesterol, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. These findings are in accordance with the criteria used in the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Here, we will discuss the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of NAFLD and the association of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

  9. Statins in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis: updated review.

    PubMed

    Nseir, William; Mahamid, Mahmud

    2013-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that refers to the presence of hepatic steatosis without significant intake of alcohol. NAFLD is an asymptomatic disease that can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The most common cause of mortality in patients with NAFLD or NASH is cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, the treatment of NAFLD focuses on gradual weight loss and life style modifications. However, multifactorial treatment of NAFLD or NASH risk factors may be needed to reduce the likelihood of these patients developing CVD. This review discusses the mechanisms that link hyperlipidemia and NAFLD. In addition, the review focuses on the safety and efficacy of statins in patients with NAFLD or NASH, and their effect on the extent of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis based on human studies.

  10. A comparison of the fibrotic potential of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Charlotte, Fréderic; Le Naour, Gilles; Bernhardt, Carole; Poynard, Thierry; Ratziu, Vlad

    2010-08-01

    In nonalcoholic fatty liver disease the amount of fibrosis for individual histologic stages is unknown. To better understand the fibrotic potential of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, we compared the amount of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease versus chronic hepatitis C virus patients. The area of fibrosis for equivalent fibrosis stages was measured by micromorphometry in 70 nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and 70 matched, untreated, chronic hepatitis C virus controls. The area of fibrosis correlated with Brunt stage (r = 0.71; P < .001) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and METAVIR stage (r = 0.58; P < .001) in chronic hepatitis C virus. Mean area of fibrosis was similar in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C virus patients (7.77% versus 7.70%). Although chronic hepatitis C virus patients displayed higher area of fibrosis in early disease (no or mild fibrosis), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis C virus patients had similar area of fibrosis in more advanced disease (7.83% versus 8.06%, respectively; P = .86 for bridging fibrosis; and 16.62% versus 12.98%, respectively; P = .29 for cirrhosis). The area of fibrosis was similar in Brunt stage 3 nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and METAVIR stage 2 chronic hepatitis C virus, the usual threshold for initiating therapy. The area of steatosis declined with increasing fibrosis stages confirming the early loss of liver fat with progressive fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Fibrosis is as abundant in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as in chronic hepatitis C virus, especially in the advanced stages of the disease. The fibrotic potential of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is as severe as that of chronic hepatitis C virus.

  11. Vitamin E reduces liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Aiko; Kawabe, Naoto; Hashimoto, Senju; Murao, Michihito; Nakano, Takuji; Shimazaki, Hiroaki; Kan, Toshiki; Nakaoka, Kazunori; Ohki, Masashi; Takagawa, Yuka; Takamura, Tomoki; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of vitamin E treatment on liver stiffness in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: Thirty-eight NAFLD patients were administered vitamin E for > 1 year. The doses of vitamin E were 150, 300, or 600 mg; three times per day after each meal. Responses were assessed by liver enzyme levels [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotranferease (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP)], noninvasive scoring systems of hepatic fibrosis-4 [FIB-4 index and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet index (APRI)], and liver stiffness [velocity of shear wave (Vs)] measured by acoustic radiation force impulse elastography. Vs measurements were performed at baseline and 12 mo after baseline. The patients were genotyped for the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3) polymorphisms and then divided into either the CC/CG or GG group to examine each group’s responses to vitamin E treatment. RESULTS: We found marked differences in the platelet count, serum albumin levels, alkaline phosphatase levels, FIB-4 index, APRI, and Vs at baseline depending on the PNPLA3 polymorphism. AST, ALT, and γ-GTP levels (all P < 0.001); FIB-4 index (P = 0.035); APRI (P < 0.001); and Vs (P < 0.001) significantly decreased from baseline to 12 mo in the analysis of all patients. In the subset analyses of PNPLA3 genotypes, AST levels (P = 0.011), ALT levels (P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.005), APRI (P = 0.036), and Vs (P = 0.029) in genotype GG patients significantly improved, and AST and ALT levels (both P < 0.001), γ-GTP levels (P = 0.003), FIB-4 index (P = 0.017), and APRI (P < 0.001) in genotype CC/CG patients. CONCLUSION: One year of vitamin E treatment improved noninvasive fibrosis scores and liver stiffness in NAFLD patients. The responses were similar between different PNPLA3 genotypes. PMID:26644818

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2015-01-01

    There is worldwide epidemic of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a clinical entity related to metabolic syndrome. Majority of the patients are obese but the disease can affect non-obese individuals as well. Metabolic factors and genetics play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disorder. The spectrum of disorders included in NAFLD are benign macrovesicular hepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the disease remains asymptomatic most of the time, it can slowly progress to end stage liver disease. It will be the most common indication of liver transplantation in the future. It is diagnosed by abnormal liver chemistry, imaging studies and liver biopsy. As there are risks of potential complications during liver biopsy, many patients do not opt for liver biopsy. There are some noninvasive scoring systems to find out whether patients have advanced hepatic fibrosis. At the present time, there are limited treatment options which include lifestyle modification to loose weight, vitamin E and thioglitazones. Different therapeutic agents are being investigated for optimal management of this entity. There are some studies done on incretin based therapies in patients with NAFLD. Other potential agents will be silent information regulator protein Sirtuin and antifibrotic monoclonal antibody Simtuzumab against lysyl oxidase like molecule 2. But they are still in the investigational phase. PMID:26085906

  13. The Natural Course of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Calzadilla Bertot, Luis; Adams, Leon Anton

    2016-05-20

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease in the world, paralleling the epidemic of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). NAFLD exhibits a histological spectrum, ranging from "bland steatosis" to the more aggressive necro-inflammatory form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which may accumulate fibrosis to result in cirrhosis. Emerging data suggests fibrosis, rather than NASH per se, to be the most important histological predictor of liver and non-liver related death. Nevertheless, only a small proportion of individuals develop cirrhosis, however the large proportion of the population affected by NAFLD has led to predictions that NAFLD will become a leading cause of end stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and indication for liver transplantation. HCC may arise in non-cirrhotic liver in the setting of NAFLD and is associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and male gender. The MetS and its components also play a key role in the histological progression of NAFLD, however other genetic and environmental factors may also influence the natural history. The importance of NAFLD in terms of overall survival extends beyond the liver where cardiovascular disease and malignancy represents additional important causes of death.

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the concept and confusion.

    PubMed

    Sanal, M G

    2011-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is generally considered as a disease associated with diabetes mellitus type 2. But on a closer evaluation we realize a host of confusion associated with this from the nomenclature, diagnosis to pathogenesis. The term refers to a spectrum ranging from steatosis to steatosis with inflammation (NASH) to cirrhosis in the absence of alcohol abuse. But in fact NAFLD is a vague term for a spectrum of diseases which differ not only in the clinical presentation but also in the etiology. NAFLD is loose to incorporate so many etiologies excluding alcoholism and few other "known" etiologies, presenting as fat in liver. Considering the diverse etiologies there is a need for personalized management in NAFLD, which at present is difficult. Currently fatty liver disease could be considered as an added Hepato-cardiovascular-renal and cancer risk factor rather than a specific diagnosis.

  15. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  17. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L’Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development. PMID:25621497

  18. Translational approaches: From fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Natalia; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Tiribelli, Claudio; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one, if not the most common, cause of chronic liver disease affecting both adults and children. The increasing number of cases at an early age is the most worrying aspect of this pathology, since it provides more time for its evolution. The spectrum of this disease ranges from liver steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and in some cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD may not always be considered a benign disease and hepatologists must be cautious in the presence of fatty liver. This should prompt the use of the available experimental models to understand better the pathogenesis and to develop a rational treatment of a disease that is dangerously increasing. In spite of the growing efforts, the pathogenesis of NAFLD is still poorly understood. In the present article we review the most relevant hypotheses and evidence that account for the progression of NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. The available in vitro and in vivo experimental models of NASH are discussed and revised in terms of their validity in translational studies. These studies must be aimed at the discovery of the still unknown triggers or mediators that induce the progression of hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis. PMID:25083077

  19. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: The diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; El-Den Ashmawy, Eman M Salah

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most frequent chronic liver disease that occurs across all age groups and is recognized to occur in 14%-30% of the general population, representing a serious and growing clinical problem due to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight. Histologically, it resembles alcoholic liver injury but occurs in patients who deny significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of conditions, ranging from benign hepatocellular steatosis to inflammatory nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The majority of hepatocellular lipids are stored as triglycerides, but other lipid metabolites, such as free fatty acids, cholesterol, and phospholipids, may also be present and play a role in disease progression. NAFLD is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and visceral adiposity. Confirmation of the diagnosis of NAFLD can usually be achieved by imaging studies; however, staging the disease requires a liver biopsy. Current treatment relies on weight loss and exercise, although various insulin-sensitizing agents, antioxidants and medications appear promising. The aim of this review is to highlight the current information regarding epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of NAFLD as well as new information about pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of this disease. PMID:25937862

  20. Translational approaches: from fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Natalia; Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Tiribelli, Claudio; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-07-21

    Over the past few decades, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one, if not the most common, cause of chronic liver disease affecting both adults and children. The increasing number of cases at an early age is the most worrying aspect of this pathology, since it provides more time for its evolution. The spectrum of this disease ranges from liver steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and in some cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD may not always be considered a benign disease and hepatologists must be cautious in the presence of fatty liver. This should prompt the use of the available experimental models to understand better the pathogenesis and to develop a rational treatment of a disease that is dangerously increasing. In spite of the growing efforts, the pathogenesis of NAFLD is still poorly understood. In the present article we review the most relevant hypotheses and evidence that account for the progression of NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. The available in vitro and in vivo experimental models of NASH are discussed and revised in terms of their validity in translational studies. These studies must be aimed at the discovery of the still unknown triggers or mediators that induce the progression of hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis.

  1. [Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease and treatment (II). The treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-09-27

    Disease nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage same. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in our Western societies, from the point of view liver in its progressive evolution from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This updated January 2016 revision consists of two parts. In this second part, the treatment of NAFLD and its influence on cardiovascular disease and drugs used in the control of cardiovascular risk factors showing a beneficial effect on the liver disease will be reviewed.

  2. Intrauterine Growth Retardation and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Alisi, Anna; Panera, Nadia; Agostoni, Carlo; Nobili, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), the most important cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity, is defined as a foetal growth less than normal for the population, often used as synonym of small for gestational age (SGA). Studies demonstrated the relationships between metabolic syndrome (MS) and birthweight. This study suggested that, in children, adolescents, and adults born SGA, insulin resistance could lead to other metabolic disorders: type 2 diabetes (DM2), dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD may evolve to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and it is related to the development of MS. Lifestyle intervention, physical activity, and weight reduction represent the mainstay of NAFLD therapy. In particular, a catch-up growth reduction could decrease the risk to develop MS and NAFLD. In this paper, we outline clinical and experimental evidences of the association between IUGR, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and NAFLD and discuss on a possible management to avoid the risk of MS in adulthood. PMID:22190925

  3. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Song, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD. PMID:23843872

  4. Multidisciplinary Pharmacotherapeutic Options for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are multidisciplinary liver diseases that often accompany type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome, which are characterized by insulin resistance. Therefore, effective treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome should target not only the cardiometabolic abnormalities, but also the associated liver disorders. In the last decade, it has been shown that metformin, thiazolidinediones, vitamin E, ezetimibe, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers, and antiobesity drugs may improve hepatic pathophysiological disorders as well as clinical parameters. Accordingly, insulin sensitizers, antioxidative agents, Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) inhibitors, RAS blockers, and drugs that target the central nervous system may represent candidate pharmacotherapies for NAFLD and possibly NASH. However, the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of long-term treatment (potentially for many years) with these drugs have not been fully established. Furthermore, clinical trials have not comprehensively examined the efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (i.e., statins, fibrates, and NPC1L1 inhibitors) for the treatment of NAFLD. Although clinical evidence for RAS blockers and incretin-based agents (GLP-1 analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors) is also lacking, these agents are promising in terms of their insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory effects without causing weight gain. PMID:23304532

  5. Immunological and molecular basis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Radwan, Basil M; Nandipati, Kalyana C; Hunter, William J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2013-08-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is rising worldwide with the increasing incidence of obesity, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. NASH is currently one of the most common indications of liver transplantation in the United States. The immune system plays a major role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH. The metabolic changes, associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, induce immunological responses resulting in NAFLD and further aggravation of the metabolic derangement in a feed-forward loop. Genetic and endocrine factors modulate the immunological and metabolic responses and determine the pathophysiological features of NAFLD. Histologically, NAFLD is a spectrum that ranges from simple hepatic steatosis to severe steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are responsible for the morbidity and mortality of the disease. This article is a critical evaluation of our current knowledge of the immunological and molecular basis of the disease.

  6. Non-invasive diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Leon A; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2011-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the USA and many other parts of the world. Its prevalence continues to rise; currently affecting about one in four adults and 10% of children in the USA. NAFLD represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign, no-progressive clinical course, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Currently, the diagnosis of NASH requires an invasive liver biopsy with drawbacks of sampling and interpretation error. Clinical risk factors for NASH include diabetes and the metabolic syndrome; however, these are not sufficiently predictive of the condition by themselves. Routine liver enzyme levels are not reliable; however, novel plasma hepatocyte cell death markers either alone or in combination with clinical risk factors are potential non-invasive diagnostic tools for the future. This review provides a concise overview of the role non-invasive diagnostic tools for the differentiation of fatty liver from NASH as well as for the determination of presence and extent of fibrosis.

  7. Circulating microRNAs in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Johanna K; Gerhard, Glenn S

    2016-01-01

    Liver biopsy is currently recognized as the most accurate method for diagnosing and staging nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, this procedure is typically performed when disease has progressed to clinically significant stages, thereby limiting early diagnosis of patients who are at high risk for development of liver- and cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), short, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, have been associated with histological features of NAFLD and are readily detected in the circulation. As such, miRNAs are emerging as potentially useful noninvasive markers with which to follow the progression of NAFLD. In this article, we present the evidence linking circulating miRNAs with NAFLD and discuss the potential value of circulating miRNA profiles in the development of improved methods for NAFLD diagnosis and clinical monitoring of disease progression.

  8. Circulating microRNAs in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Liver biopsy is currently recognized as the most accurate method for diagnosing and staging nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, this procedure is typically performed when disease has progressed to clinically significant stages, thereby limiting early diagnosis of patients who are at high risk for development of liver- and cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), short, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, have been associated with histological features of NAFLD and are readily detected in the circulation. As such, miRNAs are emerging as potentially useful noninvasive markers with which to follow the progression of NAFLD. In this article, we present the evidence linking circulating miRNAs with NAFLD and discuss the potential value of circulating miRNA profiles in the development of improved methods for NAFLD diagnosis and clinical monitoring of disease progression. PMID:26606259

  9. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--new view].

    PubMed

    Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Marlicz, Wojciech; Miezyńska-Kurtycz, Joanna; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2008-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology--from steatosis alone, through the necroinflammatory disorder of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to cirrhosis and liver cancer. NAFLD/NASH is mostly related with visceral adiposity, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus (DM t.2) and metabolic syndrome. Pathogenetic concepts of NAFLD include overnutrition and underactivity, insulin resistance (IR) and genetic factor. The prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated to be 17-33% in some countries, NASH may be present in about 1/3 of such cases, while 20-25% of NASH cases could progress to cirrhosis. NAFLD is now recognized as one of the most frequent reason of liver tests elevation without clinical symptoms. Insulin resistance is considering as having a central role in NAFLD pathogenesis. In hepatocytes, IR is related to hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, formation of advanced glycation end-products, increased free fatty acids and their metabolites, oxidative stress and altered profiles of adipocytokines. Early stages of fatty liver are clinically silent and include elevation of ALT and GGTP, hyperechogenic liver in USG and/or hepatomegaly. Among clinical symptoms, abdominal discomfort is relatively common as well as chronic fatigue. NAFLD/NASH is not a benign disease, progressive liver biopsy have shown histological progression of fibrosis in 32%, the estimated rate of cirrhosis development is 20% and a liver--related death is 12% over 10 years. No treatment has scientifically proved to ameliorate NAFLD or to avoid its progression. The various therapeutic alternatives are aimed at interfering with the risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder in order to prevent the progression to end-stage liver disease. The most important therapeutic measure is increasing insulin sensitivity by an attempt to change a lifestyle mostly by dieting and physical activity in order to loose weight. The most used agent is metformin, the others

  10. Autophagy and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lavallard, Vanessa J; Gual, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, or cellular self-digestion, is a catabolic process that targets cell constituents including damaged organelles, unfolded proteins, and intracellular pathogens to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy is crucial for development, differentiation, survival, and homeostasis. Important links between the regulation of autophagy and liver complications associated with obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), have been reported. The spectrum of these hepatic abnormalities extends from isolated steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), steatofibrosis, which sometimes leads to cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is one of the three main causes of cirrhosis and increases the risk of liver-related death and hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathophysiological mechanisms of the progression of a normal liver to steatosis and then more severe disease are complex and still unclear. The regulation of the autophagic flux, a dynamic response, and the knowledge of the role of autophagy in specific cells including hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, immune cells, and hepatic cancer cells have been extensively studied these last years. This review will provide insight into the current understanding of autophagy and its role in the evolution of the hepatic complications associated with obesity, from steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11.  Most overweight and obese Indian children have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sunil V; Zanwar, Vinay G; Choksey, Ajay S; Mohite, Ashok R; Jain, Samit S; Surude, Ravindra G; Contractor, Qais Q; Rathi, Pravin M; Verma, Ravi U; Varthakavi, Premlata K

     Background and rationale. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of pediatric liver disease in western countries. Its prevalence in Indian subcontinent is not well studied.

  12. Epidemiology and risk factors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Duseja, Ajay; Chalasani, Naga

    2013-12-01

    The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the presence of hepatic steatosis, determined by either imaging or histology, in the absence of secondary causes of hepatic fat accumulation. Nonalcoholic fatty liver is defined as the presence of hepatic steatosis with no evidence of hepatocellular injury in the form of ballooning of the hepatocytes or fibrosis. NASH is defined as the presence of hepatic steatosis and inflammation with hepatocyte injury (ballooning) with or without fibrosis. Although initial epidemiological studies have focused on its prevalence in the Western countries, it is becoming increasingly clear that NAFLD is highly prevalent in the Asia Pacific region, and there may be important distinctions in its phenotype between Asia Pacific and Western countries. Of particular interest are "lean NAFLD" and the "urban-rural divide," which will be discussed in this review article. Obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome are established risk factors for developing NAFLD. Many other risk factors (e.g., hypothyroidism, polycystic ovary syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, hypopituitarism and hypogonadism) for NAFLD have been described in the Western countries, but these associations are yet to be investigated adequately in the Asia Pacific region.

  13. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Synopsis of current developments.

    PubMed

    Onyekwere, C A; Ogbera, A O; Samaila, A A; Balogun, B O; Abdulkareem, F B

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which is defined as the accumulation of fat>5% of liver weight is increasingly becoming an important cause of chronic liver disease. This article tries to chronicle advances that have occurred in the understanding of the pathogenesis, pathology as well as the management of this disease. We have done a Medline search on published work on the subject and reviewed major conference proceedings in the preceding years. The Pathogenesis involves a multi-hit process in which increased accumulation of triglycerides in face of insulin resistance results in increased susceptibility to inflammatory damage mediated by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and gut derived endotoxemia. An interplay of multiple metabolic genetic expression and environmental factors however determine which patient with NAFLD will progress from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and liver cirrhosis. The minimum criteria for diagnosis of NASH are steatosis, ballooning and lobular inflammation; fibrosis is not required. The NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN), histological scoring system is used to grade and stage the disease for standardization. The management of NAFLD consists of treating liver disease as well as associated metabolic co-morbidities such as obesity, hyperlipidaemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patient education is important as their insight and commitment is pivotal, and lifestyle modification is the first line of treatment. Improvement in liver histology in non-diabetic NASH patients has been reported with use of Vitamin E. Other liver-related therapies under investigations include pentoxyfiylins, Caspar inhibitors, Resveratrol as well as probiotics. The prognosis (both overall and liver-related mortality) for simple steatosis is not different from that of the general population however.

  14. Soft drinks consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, William; Nassar, Fares; Assy, Nimer

    2010-06-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common clinical condition which is associated with metabolic syndrome in 70% of cases. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress combine to increase free fatty acid delivery to the liver, and increased hepatic triglyceride accumulation contributes to fatty liver. Regular soft drinks have high fructose corn syrup which contains basic sugar building blocks, fructose 55% and glucose 45%. Soft drinks are the leading source of added sugar worldwide, and have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. The consumption of soft drinks can increase the prevalence of NAFLD independently of metabolic syndrome. During regular soft drinks consumption, fat accumulates in the liver by the primary effect of fructose which increases lipogenesis, and in the case of diet soft drinks, by the additional contribution of aspartame sweetener and caramel colorant which are rich in advanced glycation end products that potentially increase insulin resistance and inflammation. This review emphasizes some hard facts about soft drinks, reviews fructose metabolism, and explains how fructose contributes to the development of obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD.

  15. Soft drinks consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nseir, William; Nassar, Fares; Assy, Nimer

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common clinical condition which is associated with metabolic syndrome in 70% of cases. Inappropriate dietary fat intake, excessive intake of soft drinks, insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress combine to increase free fatty acid delivery to the liver, and increased hepatic triglyceride accumulation contributes to fatty liver. Regular soft drinks have high fructose corn syrup which contains basic sugar building blocks, fructose 55% and glucose 45%. Soft drinks are the leading source of added sugar worldwide, and have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. The consumption of soft drinks can increase the prevalence of NAFLD independently of metabolic syndrome. During regular soft drinks consumption, fat accumulates in the liver by the primary effect of fructose which increases lipogenesis, and in the case of diet soft drinks, by the additional contribution of aspartame sweetener and caramel colorant which are rich in advanced glycation end products that potentially increase insulin resistance and inflammation. This review emphasizes some hard facts about soft drinks, reviews fructose metabolism, and explains how fructose contributes to the development of obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and NAFLD. PMID:20518077

  16. Th17 involvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chackelevicius, Carla Melisa; Gambaro, Sabrina Eliana; Tiribelli, Claudio; Rosso, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD encompasses a wide histological spectrum ranging from benign simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sustained inflammation in the liver is critical in this process. Hepatic macrophages, including liver resident macropaghes (Kupffer cells), monocytes infiltrating the injured liver, as well as specific lymphocytes subsets play a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of the inflammatory response, with a major deleterious impact on the progression of fatty liver to fibrosis. During the last years, Th17 cells have been involved in the development of inflammation not only in liver but also in other organs, such as adipose tissue or lung. Differentiation of a naïve T cell into a Th17 cell leads to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production with subsequent myeloid cell recruitment to the inflamed tissue. Th17 response can be mitigated by T regulatory cells that secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. Both T cell subsets need TGF-β for their differentiation and a characteristic plasticity in their phenotype may render them new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the role of the Th17 pathway in NAFLD progression to NASH and to liver fibrosis analyzing different animal models of liver injury and human studies. PMID:27895397

  17. Th17 involvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chackelevicius, Carla Melisa; Gambaro, Sabrina Eliana; Tiribelli, Claudio; Rosso, Natalia

    2016-11-07

    The nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD encompasses a wide histological spectrum ranging from benign simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Sustained inflammation in the liver is critical in this process. Hepatic macrophages, including liver resident macropaghes (Kupffer cells), monocytes infiltrating the injured liver, as well as specific lymphocytes subsets play a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of the inflammatory response, with a major deleterious impact on the progression of fatty liver to fibrosis. During the last years, Th17 cells have been involved in the development of inflammation not only in liver but also in other organs, such as adipose tissue or lung. Differentiation of a naïve T cell into a Th17 cell leads to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production with subsequent myeloid cell recruitment to the inflamed tissue. Th17 response can be mitigated by T regulatory cells that secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. Both T cell subsets need TGF-β for their differentiation and a characteristic plasticity in their phenotype may render them new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the role of the Th17 pathway in NAFLD progression to NASH and to liver fibrosis analyzing different animal models of liver injury and human studies.

  18. Altered Arsenic Disposition in Experimental Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Canet, Mark J.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Lake, April D.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Scheffer, George L.; Klimecki, Walter T.; Gandolfi, A. Jay

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is represented by a spectrum of liver pathologies ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver damage sustained in the progressive stages of NAFLD may alter the ability of the liver to properly metabolize and eliminate xenobiotics. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether NAFLD alters the disposition of the environmental toxicant arsenic. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a high-fat or a methionine-choline-deficient diet to model simple steatosis and NASH, respectively. At the conclusion of the dietary regimen, all mice were given a single oral dose of either sodium arsenate or arsenic trioxide. Mice with NASH excreted significantly higher levels of total arsenic in urine (24 h) compared with controls. Total arsenic in the liver and kidneys of NASH mice was not altered; however, NASH liver retained significantly higher levels of the monomethyl arsenic metabolite, whereas dimethyl arsenic was retained significantly less in the kidneys of NASH mice. NASH mice had significantly higher levels of the more toxic trivalent form in their urine, whereas the pentavalent form was preferentially retained in the liver of NASH mice. Moreover, hepatic protein expression of the arsenic biotransformation enzyme arsenic (3+ oxidation state) methyltransferase was not altered in NASH animals, whereas protein expression of the membrane transporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 was increased, implicating cellular transport rather than biotransformation as a possible mechanism. These results suggest that NASH alters the disposition of arsenical species, which may have significant implications on the overall toxicity associated with arsenic in NASH. PMID:22699396

  19. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Bambha, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and other features of the metabolic syndrome in United States, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitably become a very prevalent chronic liver disease and is now emerging as one of the leading indications for liver transplantation. Insulin resistance and derangement of lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, are essential pathways in the development of the more clinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances in the functional characterization of bile acid receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have provided further insight in the pathophysiology of NASH and have led to the development of potential therapeutic targets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bile acid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipid metabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increase energy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation. These intriguing features have been exploited to develop bile acid analogues to target pathways in NAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review provides a brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH, and then delves into the biological functions of bile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASH pathogenesis, with a description of the associated experimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospects of bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:26668692

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cholesterol gallstones: which comes first?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Ali, Asif

    2014-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and gallstone disease (GD) are both highly prevalent in the general population and are associated with obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and high dietary cholesterol intake. Insulin resistance is a key feature of both NAFLD and GD. Hepatic insulin resistance provides a crucial link between the metabolic syndrome, NAFLD, and increased cholesterol gallstone susceptibility. Hepatic insulin resistance is not only associated with accumulation of hepatic fat but also has a crucial role in supersaturation and excessive production of bile salts. It is not yet clear whether NAFLD is a precursor of GD or whether the presence of GD possibly indicates the presence of long-standing features of metabolic syndrome that accelerates the progression of NAFLD. Recent reports suggested the association between gallstones and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis. Importantly, both NAFLD and GD are both associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Emerging evidence suggests a potential benefit of statin therapy in NAFLD and GD. Further research is needed to determine (i) how the presence of NAFLD and GD is associated with CVD (ii) and whether the presence of GD in association with NAFLD increases the risk of liver fibrosis, and (iii) the impact of therapy of NAFLD in the incidence of GD.

  1. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized. PMID:26937136

  2. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudia P.; de Lima Sanches, Priscila; de Abreu-Silva, Erlon Oliveira; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD. PMID:26770987

  3. Glycosyltransferases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu-Tao; Su, Hai-Ying; An, Wei

    2016-02-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are a diverse class of enzymes involved in catalyzing the transfer of one or multiple sugar residues to a wide range of acceptor molecules. GTs mediate a wide range of functions from structure and storage to signaling, and play a key role in many fundamental biological processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that GTs have a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this article, we present an overview of the basic information on NAFLD, particularly GTs and glycosylation modification of certain molecules and their association with NAFLD pathogenesis. In addition, the effects and mechanisms of some GTs in the development of NAFLD are summarized.

  4. Function of Autophagy in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that functions to promote cell survival by supplying energy in times of stress or by removing damaged organelles and proteins after injury. The involvement of autophagy in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was first suggested by the finding that this pathway mediates the breakdown of intracellular lipids in hepatocytes and therefore may regulate the development of hepatic steatosis. Subsequent studies have demonstrated additional critical functions for autophagy in hepatocytes and other hepatic cell types such as macrophages and stellate cells that regulate insulin sensitivity, hepatocellular injury, innate immunity, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. These findings suggest a number of possible mechanistic roles for autophagy in the development of NAFLD and progression to NASH and its complications. The functions of autophagy in the liver, together with findings of decreased hepatic autophagy in association with conditions that predispose to NAFLD such as obesity and aging, suggest that autophagy may be a novel therapeutic target in this disease.

  5. Glucocorticoids and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Conor P; Hazlehurst, Jonathon M; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the global obesity and metabolic disease epidemic and is rapidly becoming the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and indication for liver transplantation worldwide. The hallmark pathological finding in NAFLD is excess lipid accumulation within hepatocytes, but it is a spectrum of disease ranging from benign hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis through to fibrosis, cirrhosis and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The exact pathophysiology remains unclear with a multi-hit hypothesis generally accepted as being required for inflammation and fibrosis to develop after initial steatosis. Glucocorticoids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD across all stages. They have a diverse array of metabolic functions that have the potential to drive NAFLD acting on both liver and adipose tissue. In the fasting state, they are able to mobilize lipid, increasing fatty acid delivery and in the fed state can promote lipid accumulation. Their action is controlled at multiple levels and in this review will outline the evidence base for the role of GCs in the pathogenesis of NAFLD from cell systems, rodent models and clinical studies and describe interventional strategies that have been employed to modulate glucocorticoid action as a potential therapeutic strategy.

  6. The association of vitamin D deficiency with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Küçükazman, Metin; Ata, Naim; Dal, Kürşat; Yeniova, Abdullah Özgür; Kefeli, Ayşe; Basyigit, Sebahat; Aktas, Bora; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Ağladioğlu, Kadir; Üre, Öznur Sari; Topal, Firdes; Nazligül, Yaşar; Beyan, Esin; Ertugrul, Derun Taner

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vitamin D deficiency has been related to diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and peripheral vascular disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of vitamin D status in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. METHODS: We included 211 consecutive subjects to examine the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Of these subjects, 57 did not have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and 154 had non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. RESULTS: The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease group had significantly higher fasting blood glucose (p = 0.005), uric acid (p = 0.001), aspartate aminotransferase (p<0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p<0.001), γ-glutamyltransferase (p<0.0001), alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.028), HbA1c (p<0.001), ferritin (p<0.001), insulin (p = 0.016), C-peptide (p = 0.001), HOMA-IR (p = 0.003), total cholesterol (p = 0.001), triglyceride (p = 0.001) and white blood cell (p = 0.04) levels. In contrast, the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease group had significantly lower 25(OH)D levels (12.3±8.9 ng/dl, p<0.001) compared with those of the control group (20±13.6 ng/dl). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found lower serum 25(OH)D levels in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease than in subjects without non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. To establish causality between vitamin D and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, further interventional studies with a long-term follow-up are needed. PMID:25141113

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, diet and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a severe liver disease that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity and its related insulin-resistance state. Evidence for the role of the gut microbiota in energy storage and the subsequent development of obesity and some of its related diseases is now well established. More recently, a new role of gut microbiota has emerged in NAFLD. The gut microbiota is involved in gut permeability, low-grade inflammation and immune balance, it modulates dietary choline metabolism, regulates bile acid metabolism and produces endogenous ethanol. All of these factors are molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota can induce NAFLD or its progression toward overt non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Modification of the gut microbiota composition and/or its biochemical capacity by specific dietary or pharmacological interventions may advantageously affect host metabolism. Large-scale intervention trials, investigating the potential benefit of prebiotics and probiotics in improving cardiometabolic health in high-risk populations, are fervently awaited. PMID:26417275

  8. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research.

    PubMed

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da Silva, Tereza Cristina; de Oliveira, Cláudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and '-omics'-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed.

  9. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  10. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A clinical and laboratory challenge

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Cantisani, Vito; Menichini, Guendalina; Ricci, Paolo; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The true prevalence of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Challenges in determining the population prevalence of NAFLD include the type of test (and the reference intervals used to define normal and abnormal), the type of population (general population, hospital series), the demographic characteristics of the population sampled, and the nature of the study design. The natural history of pediatric NAFLD remains uncertain. The issue of when to perform a liver biopsy in children with suspected NAFLD remains controversial. Children with NAFLD but normal alanine aminotransferase are rarely investigated. However, evidence of alterations in glucose metabolism parameters should prompt a better understanding of the natural history of pediatric NAFLD not only in terms of the progression of liver disease but also regarding its potential relationship with other health outcomes such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. This evidence could make liver biopsy mandatory in the majority of cases at risk of progressive and severe hepatic and extrahepatic disease. This conclusion, however, raises the question of the feasibility of liver biopsy assessment in an extremely large at risk population, and of the cost/effectiveness of this policy. There is a considerable, continuous interest in reliable, noninvasive alternatives that will allow the prognosis of pediatric NAFLD to be followed in large community or population-based studies. PMID:21161009

  11. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Management: Dietary and Lifestyle Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vi; George, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of abnormalities that can range from bland liver fat (steatosis), to hepatic inflammation and liver injury (steatohepatitis). It is estimated that NAFLD will become the principal cause of liver disease in Western nations and the leading indication for liver transplantation. Advancements in disease recognition and management are therefore paramount. Although the development of new, reliable drug therapies is vital, lifestyle interventions remain the most effective treatment modality. In addition to weight loss as a primary measure of treatment success, there is growing recognition that other endpoints, including the prevention or delay of diabetes onset, reduced cardiovascular events, prevention of cancer, and improved overall mortality, are equally important outcomes that can be independently modified by lifestyle change. Moreover, NAFLD is inextricably part of a complex, systemic disease process that is linked with deeply entrenched maladaptive lifestyle behaviors. Thus, a holistic, multidisciplinary, and individualized approach to disease management will be the key to achieving any realistic population-level change.

  12. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-10-21

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease.

  13. Genetic background in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Maida, Marcello; Petta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the Western world, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered as one of the most significant liver diseases of the twenty-first century. Its development is certainly driven by environmental factors, but it is also regulated by genetic background. The role of heritability has been widely demonstrated by several epidemiological, familial, and twin studies and case series, and likely reflects the wide inter-individual and inter-ethnic genetic variability in systemic metabolism and wound healing response processes. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide association studies have clearly identified Patatin-like phosholipase domain-containing 3 gene variant I148M as a major player in the development and progression of NAFLD. More recently, the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 E167K variant emerged as a relevant contributor in both NAFLD pathogenesis and cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, numerous case-control studies have been performed to elucidate the potential role of candidate genes in the pathogenesis and progression of fatty liver, although findings are sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we performed a comprehensive literature search and review on the role of genetics in NAFLD. We emphasize the strengths and weaknesses of the available literature and outline the putative role of each genetic variant in influencing susceptibility and/or progression of the disease. PMID:26494964

  14. Mitochondrial genome architecture in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Flichman, Diego; Scian, Romina; Rohr, Cristian; Dopazo, Hernán; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Martino, Julio San; Castaño, Gustavo O; Pirola, Carlos J

    2016-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, a decreased liver mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and impaired energy metabolism. To understand the clinical implications of mtDNA diversity in the biology of NAFLD, we applied deep-coverage whole sequencing of the liver mitochondrial genomes. We used a multistage study design, including a discovery phase, a phenotype-oriented study to assess the mutational burden in patients with steatohepatitis at different stages of liver fibrosis, and a replication study to validate findings in loci of interest. We also assessed the potential protein-level impact of the observed mutations. To determine whether the observed changes are tissue-specific, we compared the liver and the corresponding peripheral blood entire mitochondrial genomes. The nuclear genes POLG and POLG2 (mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ) were also sequenced. We observed that the liver mtDNA of patients with NAFLD harbours complex genomes with a significantly higher mutational (1.28-fold) rate and degree of heteroplasmy than in controls. The analysis of liver mitochondrial genomes of patients with different degrees of fibrosis revealed that the disease severity is associated with an overall 1.4-fold increase in mutation rate, including mutations in genes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) chain. Significant differences in gene and protein expression patterns were observed in association with the cumulative number of OXPHOS polymorphic sites. We observed a high degree of homology (∼98%) between the blood and liver mitochondrial genomes. A missense POLG p.Gln1236His variant was associated with liver mtDNA copy number. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that OXPHOS genes contain the highest number of hotspot positions associated with a more severe phenotype. The variability of the mitochondrial genomes probably originates from a common germline source; hence, it may explain a fraction of the 'missing heritability

  15. Current pharmacological therapies for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Keiichiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Fukusato, Toshio

    2015-04-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is considered to be a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and its incidence is rapidly increasing worldwide. It is currently the most common chronic liver disease. NASH can progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and may result in liver-related death. Currently, the principal treatment for NAFLD/NASH is lifestyle modification by diet and exercise. However, pharmacological therapy is indispensable because obese patients with NAFLD often have difficulty maintaining improved lifestyles. The pathogenesis of NAFLD/NASH has not been completely elucidated. However, insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress are thought to be important in the development and/or progression of the disease. Currently, insulin sensitizers (thiazolidinediones) and antioxidants (vitamin E) seem to be the most promising therapeutic agents for NAFLD/NASH, and lipid-lowering drugs, pentoxifylline, angiotensin receptor blockers, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids also have promise. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective and appropriate pharmacotherapy for NAFLD/NASH. Animal experiments suggest that herbal medicines and natural products may be promising therapeutic agents for NAFLD/NASH, but their efficacy and safety are yet to be investigated in human studies. In this paper, we review the existing and potential pharmacological therapies for NAFLD/NASH.

  16. Epidemiology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in the United States and the Rest of the World.

    PubMed

    Sayiner, Mehmet; Koenig, Aaron; Henry, Linda; Younossi, Zobair M

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic liver disease with increasing prevalence, which can progress to cirrhosis and liver failure. Because of the obesity epidemic and increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome, NAFLD and its progressive form, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, are seen more commonly in different parts of the world. This article reviews the worldwide epidemiology of NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The PubMed database was used to identify studies related to epidemiology of NAFLD in the adult population. It is estimated that the epidemic of obesity will continue to fuel the burden of NAFLD and its long-term complications.

  17. Current Status of Therapy in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    McNear, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has now spread worldwide. With increase in weight, there is an increase in dysregulated energy metabolism ultimately leading to dysfunction of multiple organ systems recognized as the metabolic syndrome. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of chronic liver disease worldwide, and is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. It is a nondiscriminating disease affecting both children and adults and no socioeconomic class is spared. There is a well-defined increase in both liver-related and all-cause mortality. Current projections foresee a continued worsening in prevalence, especially with the increased rate of childhood obesity. Prevention would be the ultimate goal, but with continued trends in obesity, therapeutic options are needed to manage this chronic liver disease and prevent its complications of cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Therapies will need to be affordable, tolerable, and safe to be useful on such a large scale. This article will discuss some of the basic understanding of NAFLD, as well as review the currently tested therapies, some novel therapies, and potential future therapeutic options. PMID:21180532

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and aging: Epidemiology to management

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotti, Marco; Lonardo, Amedeo; Mussi, Chiara; Baldelli, Enrica; Pellegrini, Elisa; Ballestri, Stefano; Romagnoli, Dante; Loria, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is common in the elderly, in whom it carries a more substantial burden of hepatic (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma) and extra-hepatic manifestations and complications (cardiovascular disease, extrahepatic neoplasms) than in younger age groups. Therefore, proper identification and management of this condition is a major task for clinical geriatricians and geriatric hepatologists. In this paper, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of this condition are reviewed, and a full discussion of the link between NAFLD and the aspects that are peculiar to elderly individuals is provided; these aspects include frailty, multimorbidity, polypharmacy and dementia. The proper treatment strategy will have to consider the peculiarities of geriatric patients, so a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory. Non-pharmacological treatment (diet and physical exercise) has to be tailored individually considering the physical limitations of most elderly people and the need for an adequate caloric supply. Similarly, the choice of drug treatment must carefully balance the benefits and risks in terms of adverse events and pharmacological interactions in the common context of both multiple health conditions and polypharmacy. In conclusion, further epidemiological and pathophysiological insight is warranted. More accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of geriatric NAFLD will help in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach for individual elderly patients. PMID:25339806

  19. [Retinal and carotid changes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Baloşeanu, Cristina; Rogoveanu, I; Mocanu, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on 85 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We evaluate the retinal vascular changes using retinal photography and carotid vascular changes, by ultrasounds, occured in this group of patients.

  20. The relationship between oxidative stress and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Its effects on the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Fatma; Sezer, Sevilay; Erdogan, Serpil; Akyol, Sumeyya; Armutcu, Ferah; Akyol, Omer

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are the most common underlying causes of chronic liver injury. They are associated with a wide spectrum of hepatic disorders including basic steatosis, steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying hepatic injury in NAFLD and NASH are still unknown. This review describes the roles of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and its progression to NASH.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children: a novel approach?

    PubMed

    Verduci, Elvira; Lassandro, Carlotta; Radaelli, Giovanni; Soldati, Laura

    2015-04-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents the most common chronic liver disease in obese children of industrialized countries. Nowadays the first line of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is based on dietary and lifestyle intervention; however compliance to these interventions is very difficult to maintain in long term period. This editorial discusses about docosahexaenoic acid treatment as possible novel approach for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children. Docosahexaenoic acid may modulate the inflammatory response, improve insulin sensitivity and could be effective in enhancing intestinal barrier integrity, essential to protect a healthy gut-liver axis. Indeed alteration of gut microbiota composition and increased intestinal permeability may rise the exposure of liver to gut-derived bacterial products, causing activation of signalling pathways implicated in liver inflammation and fibrogenesis. This mechanism has been observed in vitro and animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease but also in a clinical study in adults. While evidence suggests that n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation may decrease liver fat in adults, in pediatric population only a study examined this topic. In obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease well designed randomized controlled trials are needed to better clarify the possible efficacy of docosahexaenoic acid treatment, and underlying mechanisms, to identify the optimal required dose and to evaluate if the docosahexaenoic acid effect is limited to the duration of the treatment or it may continue after the end of treatment.

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sumio; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Ikejima, Kenichi; Uto, Hirofumi; Ono, Masafumi; Sumida, Yoshio; Seike, Masataka; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takehara, Tetsuo; Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Yoneda, Masashi; Saibara, Toshiji; Shiota, Goshi; Sakaida, Isao; Nakamuta, Makoto; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common cause of chronic liver disease in industrialized countries worldwide, and has become a serious public health issue not only in Western countries but also in many Asian countries including Japan. Within the wide spectrum of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive form of disease, which often develops into liver cirrhosis and increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In turn, a large proportion of NAFLD/NASH is the liver manifestation of metabolic syndrome, suggesting that NAFLD/NASH plays a key role in the pathogenesis of systemic atherosclerotic diseases. Currently, a definite diagnosis of NASH requires liver biopsy, though various noninvasive measures are under development. The mainstays of prevention and treatment of NAFLD/NASH include dietary restriction and exercise; however, pharmacological approaches are often necessary. Currently, vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are the most evidence-based therapeutic options, although the clinical evidence for long-term efficacy and safety is limited. This practice guideline for NAFLD/NASH, established by the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology in cooperation with The Japan Society of Hepatology, covers lines of clinical evidence reported internationally in the period starting from 1983 to January 2012, and each clinical question was evaluated using the GRADE system. Based on the primary release of the full version in Japanese, this English summary provides the core essentials of this clinical practice guideline comprising the definition, diagnosis, and current therapeutic recommendations for NAFLD/NASH in Japan.

  3. The efficacy and safety of statins for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pani, Arianna; Del Ben, Maria; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is an emerging liver disease in Western countries and the most frequent cause of incidental elevation of serum liver enzymes. Dyslipidaemia is frequently observed in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and treatment of dyslipidaemia plays a critical role in the overall management of these patients. Moreover, coronary artery disease remains the most common cause of death. Statins are effective lipid-lowering agents, associated with a lowering the risk of cardiovascular events in several interventional randomized clinical trials. However, statins are often underused in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and many physicians are concerned about the prescription of statins to patients with unexplained persistent elevation of liver enzymes or active liver disease. Based on currently available data, statin therapy, at low-to-moderate doses, seems to be safe and has low liver toxicity. Treatment of dyslipidaemia in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is recommended and may also improve liver function tests. In these patients, the risks of not taking statins could outweigh the risks of taking the drug. Conversely, the usefulness of statins for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is still a matter of debate and randomized clinical trials of adequate size and duration are required.

  4. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  5. Insights from Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kahali, Bratati; Halligan, Brian; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by hepatic steatosis, which can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of excessive alcohol consumption. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease will become the number one cause of liver disease worldwide by 2020. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is correlated albeit imperfectly with obesity and other metabolic diseases such as diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cardiovascular disease, but exactly how having one of these diseases contributes to the development of other metabolic diseases is only now being elucidated. Development of NAFLD and related metabolic diseases is genetically influenced in the population, and recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered genetic variants that associate with these diseases. These GWAS-associated variants cannot only help us to identify individuals at high risk of developing NAFLD, but also to better understand its pathophysiology so that we can develop more effective treatments for this disease and related metabolic diseases in the future. PMID:26676813

  6. The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the Americas.

    PubMed

    López-Velázquez, Jorge A; Silva-Vidal, Karen V; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Arrese, Marco; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an alarming public health problem. The disease is one of the main causes of chronic liver disease worldwide and is directly linked to the increased prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the general population. The worldwide prevalence of NAFLD has been estimated at 20-30%, but the prevalence is unknown in the Americas because of a lack of epidemiological studies. However, given the trends in the prevalence of diabetes and obesity, the prevalence of NAFLD and its consequences are expected to increase in the near future. The aim of the present study is to present the current data on the prevalence of NAFLD in the Americas. We performed an electronic search of the main databases from January 2000 to September 2013 and identified 356 reports that were reviewed. We focused on the epidemiology and prevalence of known NAFLD risk factors including obesity, T2DM, and the metabolic syndrome (MS). The prevalence of the MS was highest in the United States, Mexico, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Chile, and Venezuela. In addition, Puerto Rico, Guyana, and Mexico have the highest prevalence of T2DM in the Americas, while USA has the most people with T2DM. In conclusion, the prevalence rates of NAFLD and obesity were highest in the United States, Belize, Barbados, and Mexico.

  7. MicroRNAs in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baffy, György

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder. Strongly linked to obesity and diabetes, NAFLD has the characteristics of complex diseases with substantial heterogeneity. Accordingly, our ability to predict the risk of advanced NAFLD and provide efficient treatment may improve by a better understanding of the relationship between genotype and phenotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major role in the fine-tuning of gene expression and they have recently emerged as novel biomarkers and therapeutic tools in the management of NAFLD. These short non-coding RNA sequences act by partial repression or degradation of targeted mRNAs. Deregulation of miRNAs has been associated with different stages of NAFLD, while their biological role in the pathogenesis remains to be fully understood. Systems biology analyses based on predicted target genes have associated hepatic miRNAs with molecular pathways involved in NAFLD progression such as cholesterol and lipid metabolism, insulin signaling, oxidative stress, inflammation, and pathways of cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, circulating miRNAs have been identified as promising noninvasive biomarkers of NAFLD and linked to disease severity. This rapidly growing field is likely to result in major advances in the pathomechanism, prognostication, and treatment of NAFLD. PMID:26690233

  8. Autophagy: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuqing; Yu, Fujun; Wang, Jianbo; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has gained importance in recent decades due to drastic changes in diet, especially in Western countries. NAFLD occurs as a spectrum from simple hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD have been intensively investigated, many issues remain to be resolved. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism for disposing of excess or defective organelles, and has become a hot spot for research. Recent studies have revealed that autophagy is linked to the development of NAFLD and regulation of autophagy has therapeutic potential. Autophagy reduces intracellular lipid droplets by enclosing them and fusing with lysosomes for degradation. Furthermore, autophagy is involved in attenuating inflammation and liver injury. However, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword, as it may also affect adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether autophagy protects the body from injury or causes diseases and even death, and the association between autophagy and NAFLD remains controversial. This review is intended to discuss, comment, and outline the progress made in this field and establish the possible molecular mechanism involved. PMID:27099536

  9. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  10. Autophagy: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuqing; Yu, Fujun; Wang, Jianbo; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has gained importance in recent decades due to drastic changes in diet, especially in Western countries. NAFLD occurs as a spectrum from simple hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis to cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of NAFLD have been intensively investigated, many issues remain to be resolved. Autophagy is a cell survival mechanism for disposing of excess or defective organelles, and has become a hot spot for research. Recent studies have revealed that autophagy is linked to the development of NAFLD and regulation of autophagy has therapeutic potential. Autophagy reduces intracellular lipid droplets by enclosing them and fusing with lysosomes for degradation. Furthermore, autophagy is involved in attenuating inflammation and liver injury. However, autophagy is regarded as a double-edged sword, as it may also affect adipogenesis and adipocyte differentiation. Moreover, it is unclear as to whether autophagy protects the body from injury or causes diseases and even death, and the association between autophagy and NAFLD remains controversial. This review is intended to discuss, comment, and outline the progress made in this field and establish the possible molecular mechanism involved.

  11. Systematic review of genetic association studies involving histologically confirmed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kayleigh L; Miller, Michael H; Dillon, John F

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has an increasing prevalence in Western countries, affecting up to 20% of the population. Objective The aim of this project was to systematically review and summarise the genetic association studies that investigate possible genetic influences that confer susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Design The MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched to identify candidate gene studies on histologically diagnosed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Results A total of 85 articles have been summarised and categorised on the basis of the general pathway each candidate gene is involved in, including lipid metabolism, lipoprotein processing, cholesterol synthesis, glucose homoeostasis, inflammatory response, protection against oxidative stress and whole body metabolism. Conclusions The main findings demonstrate a small but consistent association of PNPLA3 with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Genetic association studies have investigated general disease susceptibility, histological characteristics, severity and progression. However, further study is required to better elucidate the genetic factors influencing fatty liver disease. PMID:26462272

  12. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenxia; Li, Sainan; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Rong; Zhou, Yuqing; Yin, Qin; Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (n-3 PUFAs) in lowering liver fat, liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels), and blood lipids (triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL)) in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Science Citation Index (ISI Web of Science), Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in patients with NAFLD from inception to May 2015. Ten studies were included in this meta-analysis. Results. 577 cases of NAFLD/NASH in ten randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that benefit changes in liver fat favored PUFA treatment, and it was also beneficial for GGT, but it was not significant on ALT, AST, TC, and LDL. Conclusions. In this meta-analysis, omega-3 PUFAs improved liver fat, GGT, TG, and HDL in patients with NAFLD/NASH. Therefore, n-3 PUFAs may be a new treatment option for NAFLD. PMID:27651787

  13. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mavidi Sunil; Singh, Akanksha; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Ranjan, Piyush; Deepak, K. K.; Sharma, Sanjay; Pandey, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The present study was designed to evaluate the heart rate variability (HRV) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to assess the effect of grade of NAFLD and diabetic status on HRV. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 75 subjects (25 NAFLD without diabetes, 25 NAFLD with diabetes, and 25 controls). Measurements included anthropometry, body composition analysis, estimation of plasma glucose, serum lipids, hsCRP, and serum insulin. HRV analysis was performed in both time and frequency domains. Results. The time and frequency domain indices of overall variability (SDNN, total power) were significantly lower in NAFLD with diabetes as compared to the controls. However, the LF : HF ratio did not differ among the three groups. The variables related to obesity, lipid profile, and glucose metabolism were also higher in NAFLD with diabetes and those with Grade II NAFLD without diabetes, as compared to controls. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis showed a negative correlation between HRV and total cholesterol and fat percentage. Conclusion. The grade of NAFLD as well as diabetic status contributes to the decrease in the cardiovascular autonomic function, with diabetic status rather than grade of NAFLD playing a critical role. Serum lipids and adiposity may also contribute to cardiac autonomic dysfunction. PMID:28053786

  14. Telomere Dysfunction in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Cryptogenic Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Laish, Ido; Mannasse-Green, Batya; Hadary, Ruth; Biron-Shental, Tal; Konikoff, Fred M; Amiel, Aliza; Kitay-Cohen, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cryptogenic cirrhosis (CC) are considered preneoplastic conditions that might progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. We evaluated parameters of telomere dysfunction in these patient groups to study the correlation between telomere length and the progression of NAFLD. We analyzed peripheral lymphocytes from 22 patients with NAFLD, 20 patients with CC, and 20 healthy, age-matched controls. Telomere length was analyzed using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, and cellular senescence was evaluated by the percentage of cells with senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. The expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA was measured using polymerase chain reaction, and telomere capture (TC) was assessed with 2 Cytocell probes, 15qter and 13qter. Shorter telomere length and increased cellular senescence was demonstrated in patients with NAFLD, compared to the CC patients and healthy controls. While hTERT mRNA was significantly decreased, TC was increased in CC patients, compared to the NAFLD group and healthy individuals. Thus, there is a correlation between hTERT mRNA expression and telomere length in patients with NAFLD, which might be related to associated metabolic disorders and the risk of malignant transformation. Patients with CC, on the contrary, elongate their telomeres through the TC mechanism.

  15. Comparative efficacy of interventions on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Sawangjit, Ratree; Chongmelaxme, Bunchai; Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Saokaew, Surasak; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Kowdley, Kris V.; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has significantly increased over the last decades. Despite existence of several interventions, there remains unclear which interventions work the best. Methods: A systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing efficacy of all treatment options in NAFLD were performed to determine comparative efficacy and safety of interventions in the management of NAFLD. Several electronic databases were searched up to Nov 15, 2015. Outcomes include liver histological outcomes (i.e., fibrosis), all-cause mortality, cirrhosis, and safety. A network meta-analysis was applied to estimate pooled risk ratios (RR). Quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE criteria. Results: A total of 44 studies (n = 3802) were eligible. When compared with placebo, obeticholic acid (OCA) was the only intervention that significantly improved fibrosis with RR (95% CI) of 1.91 (1.15, 3.16), while pentoxyfylline (PTX) demonstrated improved fibrosis without statistical significance with RR (95% CI) of 2.27 (0.81, 6.36). Only thiazolidinedione (TZD) and vitamin E use resulted in significant increase in resolution of NASH, while OCA, TZD, and vitamin E significantly improved other outcomes including NAS, steatosis, ballooning, and inflammation outcomes. Quality of evidence varied from very low (i.e., metformin, PTX on mean change of ballooning grade) to high (OCA, TZD, vitamin E on improving histological outcomes). Limitations of this study were lack of relevant long-term outcomes (e.g., cirrhosis, death, safety), possible small study effect, and few head-to-head studies. Conclusions: Our study suggests potential efficacy of OCA, TZD, and vitamin E in improving histologic endpoints in NAFLD. These findings are however based on a small number of studies. Additional studies are awaited to strengthen this network meta-analysis. PMID:27512874

  16. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  17. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  18. The effects of bariatric surgeries on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Aldoheyan, Tamadar; Hassanain, Mazen; Al-Mulhim, Amnah; Al-Sabhan, Atheer; Al-Amro, Shaden; Bamehriz, Fahad; Al-Khalidi, Hisham

    2017-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease and is associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method for weight reduction. However, no conclusive data exists on the effects of weight reduction surgery on NAFLD. This study aimed to characterize liver histology, metabolic status, and liver function changes in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, before and after the weight-reduction procedure. This is a phase 1 report of a prospective cohort study of patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Biopsies were obtained at baseline (intraoperatively) and 3 months postoperatively. Clinical characteristics, biochemical profile, and histopathological data [steatosis, NAFLD activity score (NAS), hepatocyte ballooning, lobular inflammation, and degree of fibrosis] were obtained at each time point. Twenty-seven patients were included (9 men and 18 women), and the median age was 35 ± 8 years old. At baseline, 3 patients had dyslipidemia, 4 had diabetes, and 5 patients had hypertension, which did not change at follow-up. The average body mass index decreased from 44.6 ± 7.8 to 34.2 ± 6.3 kg/m(2) at follow-up (P < 0.001). On histopathology, 12 of the 18 patients with preoperative steatosis (median score 2) had reduced steatosis scores postoperatively (P = 0.025); fibrosis (median score 1) was also reduced in 17 patients (P = 0.012), and NAS was decreased from 4 (3-5) to 2 (1-3) (P = 0.004). The changes in lobular inflammation and hepatocyte ballooning were not statistically significant on follow-up. The phase 1 results of this study described the histopathological changes following weight reduction surgery and suggested that hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and NAFLD activity score were reduced 3 months after surgery. This clinical trial is financially supported by the National Plan for Science, Technology and Innovation Program grant number (11-MED1910-02).

  19. The Effects of Metabolic Surgery on Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Clanton, Jesse; Subichin, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an under-recognized but increasingly important manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery, both through direct weight loss and more indirect effects on insulin resistance and improvements in inflammatory proteins, can have a profound effect on NAFLD, resulting in improvement or resolution of even high-grade liver disease.

  20. FGF21 ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shenglong; Wu, Yunzhou; Ye, Xianlong; Ma, Lei; Qi, Jianying; Yu, Dan; Wei, Yuquan; Lin, Guangxiao; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and seek to determine if its therapeutic effect is through induction of autophagy. In this research, Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese mice or normal lean mice were treated with vehicle, Fenofibrate, and recombinant murine FGF21, respectively. After 5 weeks of treatment, metabolic parameters including body weight, blood glucose and lipid levels, hepatic and fat gene expression levels were monitored and analyzed. Also, fat-loaded HepG2 cells were treated with vehicle or recombinant murine FGF21. The expression levels of proteins associated with autophagy were detected by western blot, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Autophagic flux was monitored by laser confocal microscopy and western blot. Results showed that FGF21 significantly reduced body weight (P < 0.01) and serum triglyceride, improved insulin sensitivity, and reversed hepatic steatosis in the MSG model mice. In addition, FGF21 significantly increased the expression of several proteins related to autophagy both in MSG mice and fat-loaded HepG2 cells, such as microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3, Bcl-2-interacting myosin-like coiled-coil protein-1 (Beclin-1), and autophagy-related gene 5. Furthermore, the evidence of TEM revealed an increased number of autophagosomes and lysosomes in the model cells treated with FGF21. In vitro experimental results also showed that FGF21 remarkably increased autophagic flux. Taken together, FGF21 corrects multiple metabolic parameters on NAFLD in vitro and in vivo by inducing autophagy.

  1. Epigenetic Modifications in the Biology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pirola, Carlos J.; Scian, Romina; Gianotti, Tomas Fernández; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Martino, Julio San; Castaño, Gustavo O.; Sookoian, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is an epigenetic modification whose role in the pathogenesis of metabolic-related complex diseases remains unexplored; 5-hmC appears to be prevalent in the mitochondrial genome. The Ten-Eleven-Translocation (TET) family of proteins is responsible for catalyzing the conversion of 5-methylcytosine to 5-hmC. We hypothesized that epigenetic editing by 5-hmC might be a novel mechanism through which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-associated molecular traits could be explained. Hence, we performed an observational study to explore global levels of 5-hmC in fresh liver samples of patients with NAFLD and controls (n = 90) using an enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay and immunohistochemistry. We also screened for genetic variation in TET 1–3 loci by next generation sequencing to explore its contribution to the disease biology. The study was conducted in 2 stages (discovery and replication) and included 476 participants. We observed that the amount of 5-hmC in the liver of both NAFLD patients and controls was relatively low (up to 0.1%); a significant association was found with liver mitochondrial DNA copy number (R = 0.50, P = 0.000382) and PPARGC1A-mRNA levels (R = −0.57, P = 0.04). We did not observe any significant difference in the 5-hmC nuclear immunostaining score between NAFLD patients and controls; nevertheless, we found that patients with NAFLD (0.4 ± 0.5) had significantly lower nonnuclear-5-hmC staining compared with controls (1.8 ± 0.8), means ± standard deviation, P = 0.028. The missense p.Ile1123Met variant (TET1-rs3998860) was significantly associated with serum levels of caspase-generated CK-18 fragment-cell death biomarker in the discovery and replication stage, and the disease severity (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–1.97; P = 0.005). The p.Ile1762Val substitution (TET2-rs2454206) was associated with liver PPARGC1A-methylation and

  2. Treatment of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hoteit, Maarouf A; Anania, Frank A

    2007-03-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is one of the most common liver disorders in North America. The mechanism of liver injury in NASH involves insulin resistance and oxidative stress as well as cytokine release. Therapeutic interventions aimed at enhancing insulin sensitivity or reducing oxidative stress have been studied. The role of peptide hormones secreted by adipose tissue--adipocytokines--in the potential pathogenesis of NASH is an area of intense research. As the function of adipokines in modulating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis is elucidated, the potential for novel treatment strategies in patients with NASH is likely to be realized.

  3. Nutritional Modulation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFL increases the risk of liver fibrosis. If the liver is fatty due to causes of insulin resistance such as obesity and physical inactivity, it overproduces glucose and triglycerides leading to hyperinsulinemia and a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration. The latter features predispose to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the impact of nutritional modulation of liver fat content and insulin resistance is therefore of interest for prevention and treatment of NAFLD. Hypocaloric, especially low carbohydrate ketogenic diets rapidly decrease liver fat content and associated metabolic abnormalities. However, any type of caloric restriction seems effective long-term. Isocaloric diets containing 16%–23% fat and 57%–65% carbohydrate lower liver fat compared to diets with 43%–55% fat and 27%–38% carbohydrate. Diets rich in saturated (SFA) as compared to monounsaturated (MUFA) or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids appear particularly harmful as they increase both liver fat and insulin resistance. Overfeeding either saturated fat or carbohydrate increases liver fat content. Vitamin E supplementation decreases liver fat content as well as fibrosis but has no effect on features of insulin resistance. PMID:26556368

  4. Nutritional Modulation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2015-11-05

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple steatosis (non-alcoholic fatty liver, NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFL increases the risk of liver fibrosis. If the liver is fatty due to causes of insulin resistance such as obesity and physical inactivity, it overproduces glucose and triglycerides leading to hyperinsulinemia and a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration. The latter features predispose to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the impact of nutritional modulation of liver fat content and insulin resistance is therefore of interest for prevention and treatment of NAFLD. Hypocaloric, especially low carbohydrate ketogenic diets rapidly decrease liver fat content and associated metabolic abnormalities. However, any type of caloric restriction seems effective long-term. Isocaloric diets containing 16%-23% fat and 57%-65% carbohydrate lower liver fat compared to diets with 43%-55% fat and 27%-38% carbohydrate. Diets rich in saturated (SFA) as compared to monounsaturated (MUFA) or polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids appear particularly harmful as they increase both liver fat and insulin resistance. Overfeeding either saturated fat or carbohydrate increases liver fat content. Vitamin E supplementation decreases liver fat content as well as fibrosis but has no effect on features of insulin resistance.

  5. Liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - diagnostic challenge with prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Stål, Per

    2015-10-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world, with a prevalence of 20%. In a subgroup of patients, inflammation, ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes and a varying degree of fibrosis may develop, a condition named non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Advanced liver fibrosis (stage F3) and cirrhosis (stage F4) are histologic features that most accurately predict increased mortality in both liver-related and cardiovascular diseases. Patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis are at risk for complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and esophageal varices and should therefore be included in surveillance programs. However, liver disease and fibrosis are often unrecognized in patients with NAFLD, possibly leading to a delayed diagnosis of complications. The early diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD is therefore crucial, and it can be accomplished using serum biomarkers (e.g., the NAFLD Fibrosis Score, Fib-4 Index or BARD) or non-invasive imaging techniques (transient elastography or acoustic radiation force impulse imaging). The screening of risk groups, such as patients with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus, for NAFLD development with these non-invasive methods may detect advanced fibrosis at an early stage. Additionally, patients with a low risk for advanced fibrosis can be identified, and the need for liver biopsies can be minimized. This review focuses on the diagnostic challenge and prognostic impact of advanced liver fibrosis in NAFLD.

  6. Fractionation of gamma-glutamyltransferase in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Shigeo; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Seimiya, Masanori; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Fukumura, Atsushi; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro; Nomura, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess how serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) fractions vary in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS Serum samples were obtained from 14 patients with biopsy-proven alcoholic liver diseases and 9 patients with biopsy proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In addition to these biopsy-proven cases, 16 obese (body mass index > 25) patients without any history of alcohol consumption but with a fatty liver on ultrasound examination and with elevated GGT were included for an additional analysis. Serum GGT fractionation was conducted by high-performance gel filtration liquid chromatography and was separated into the four fractions, big-GGT, medium-GGT, small-GGT (s-GGT), and free-GGT (f-GGT). RESULTS The results were expressed as a ratio of each fraction including the total GGT (t-GGT). The s-GGT/t-GGT ratios were lowest for the control group and highest for the ALD group. The differences between the control and NAFLD groups and also between the NAFLD and ALD groups were statistically significant. In contrast, the f-GGT/t-GGT ratios were highest in the control group and lowest in the ALD group, with the differences being statistically significant. As a result, the s-GGT/f-GGT ratios were markedly increased in the NAFLD group as compared with the control group. The increase of the s-GGT/t-GGT ratios, the decrease of the f-GGT/t-GGT ratios, and the increase of s-GGT/F-GGT ratios as compared with the control group subjects were also found in obese patients with clinically diagnosed fatty change of the liver. CONCLUSION Serum GGT fractionation by high-performance gel filtration liquid chromatography is potentially useful for the differential diagnosis of ALD and NAFLD. PMID:28083083

  7. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children and adolescents - Relationship with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, Giselle Adriana; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) within hepatocytes exceeding 5 % of liver weight. NAFLD is a spectrum of pathological processes from nonalcoholic fatty liver or simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. As NAFLD induces metabolic syndrome (MS), then, NAFLD is associated with insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension and even Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Because it is well established that patients carrying gene mutations also develop NAFLD in the absence of IR, the genetic predisposition to NAFLD is also discussed. Little is known about the diagnosis and treatment of NAFLD in children and adolescents and the lack of non-invasive diagnostic tools in these populations is a major problem faced by physicians. The present review aims to discuss recent findings of NAFLD in children and adolescents and, considering the features in common with PCOS, we also discuss their relationship.

  8. Innate immune signaling and gut-liver interactions in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and covers a disease spectrum ranging from steatosis to inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The innate immune response in the liver plays an important role during NAFLD progression. In addition, changes in the intestinal microbial balance and bacterial translocation can further affect disease progression. Immune cells in the liver recognize cell damage or pathogen invasion with intracellular or surface-expressed pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), subsequently initiating signaling cascades that trigger the release of factors promoting the inflammatory response during NAFLD progression. Therefore, mechanisms by which cells of the immune system are activated and recruited into the liver and how these cells cause injury and stress are important for understanding the inflammatory response during NAFLD. PMID:25568861

  9. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a new epidemic in children.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Ramonet, Margarita; Álvarez, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is considered one of the most common causes of liver disease in adults and children, consistent with the increased prevalence of obesity in both populations worldwide. It is a multifactorial condition involving a broad spectrum of liver diseases than range from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, and characterized by histological findings of inflammation and fibrosis. Its pathogenesis and progression are not fully understood yet, and a more complete understanding of liver disease may aid in developing new therapies and noninvasive diagnostic tools. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for disease staging. Although lifestyle and diet modifications are the keys in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease treatment, the development of new drugs may be promising for patients failing first-line therapy.

  10. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  11. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  12. Discrimination of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Using Transient Elastography in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Up; Jang, Jae Young; Park, Hana; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Chun Kyon; Chon, Young Eun; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The accuracy of noninvasive markers to discriminate nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unsatisfactory. We investigated whether transient elastography (TE) could discriminate patients with NASH from those with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods The patients suspected of NAFLD who underwent liver biopsy and concomitant TE were recruited from five tertiary centers between November 2011 and December 2013. Results The study population (n = 183) exhibited a mean age of 40.6 years and male predominance (n = 111, 60.7%). Of the study participants, 89 (48.6%) had non-NASH and 94 (51.4%) had NASH. The controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and liver stiffness (LS) were significantly correlated with the degrees of steatosis (r = 0.656, P<0.001) and fibrosis (r = 0.714, P<0.001), respectively. The optimal cut-off values for steatosis were 247 dB/m for S1, 280 dB/m for S2, and 300 dB/m for S3. Based on the independent predictors derived from multivariate analysis [P = 0.044, odds ratio (OR) 4.133, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.037–16.470 for CAP>250 dB/m; P = 0.013, OR 3.399, 95% CI 1.295–8.291 for LS>7.0 kPa; and P<0.001, OR 7.557, 95% CI 2.997–19.059 for Alanine aminotransferase>60 IU/L], we developed a novel CLA model for discriminating patients with NASH. The CLA model showed good discriminatory capability, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.812 (95% CI 0.724–0.880). To assess discriminatory power, the AUROCs, as determined by the bootstrap method, remained largely unchanged between iterations, with an average value of 0.833 (95% CI 0.740–0.893). Conclusion This novel TE-based CLA model showed acceptable accuracy in discriminating NASH from simple steatosis. However, further studies are required for external validation. PMID:27284700

  13. Liver transplantation for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: new challenges and new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mina; Tabbaa, Adam; Albeldawi, Mazen; Alkhouri, Naim

    2014-05-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming rapidly one of the most common indications for orthotopic liver transplantation in the world. Development of graft steatosis is a significant problem during the post-transplant course, which may happen as a recurrence of pre-existing disease or de novo NAFLD. There are different risk factors that might play a role in development of graft steatosis including post-transplant metabolic syndrome, immune-suppressive medications, genetics and others. There are few studies that assessed the effects of NAFLD on graft and patient survival; most of them were limited by the duration of follow up or by the number of patients. With this review article we will try to shed light on post-liver transplantation NAFLD, significance of the disease, how it develops, risk factors, clinical course and treatment options.

  14. The Genetics of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Spotlight on PNPLA3 and TM6SF2.

    PubMed

    Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum that spans simple steatosis, through nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by substantial interpatient variation in rate of progression and disease outcome: Although up to 25% of the general population are at risk of progressive disease, only a minority experience associated liver-related morbidity. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is considered a complex disease trait that occurs when environmental exposures act upon a susceptible polygenic background composed of multiple independent modifiers. Recent advances include the identification of PNPLA3 as a modifier of disease outcome across the full spectrum of NAFLD from steatosis to advanced fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the discovery of TM6SF2 as a potential "master regulator" of metabolic syndrome outcome, determining not only risk of advanced liver disease, but also cardiovascular disease outcomes. In this article, the authors will review the field, discussing in detail the current status of research into these important genetic modifiers of NAFLD progression.

  15. Modern approach to the clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Angelico, Francesco

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common and emerging form of chronic liver disease worldwide. It includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple fatty liver to steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver mortality. Common metabolic diseases, which are well established cardiovascular risk factors, have been associated to NAFLD and cardiovascular disease is the single most important cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The pathogenesis of NAFLD appears multifactorial and many mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes of fatty liver infiltration. Management of fatty liver has become a major challenge to healthcare systems as the consequence of the increasing rates of obesity worldwide. First-line management focuses on lifestyle modifications. Moderate weight reduction either by dietary restriction or by increased habitual physical activity is safe and highly recommended. Several therapeutic interventions have been proposed. These include insulin sensitizer agents, lipid lowering drugs, antioxidants such as vitamin E and supplementation of vitamin D3. However, therapeutic strategies have been largely empirical so far, and experimental trials have mostly been carried out in uncontrolled settings with small sample sizes. Metabolic conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, should be strongly considered and a multidisciplinary approach should be personalized for individual patients. Treatment of co-morbidities should be regarded as of paramount importance in the management of these patients. The purpose of this review is to examine different approaches for the clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  16. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Key Considerations Before and After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yuval A.; Berg, Carl L.

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common etiology of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is on trajectory to become the leading indication for liver transplantation in the USA and much of the world. Patients with NAFLD cirrhosis awaiting liver transplant face unique challenges and increased risk for waiting list stagnation and dropout due to burdensome comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Thus far, patients transplanted for NAFLD cirrhosis have excellent mid- and long-term patient and graft survival, but concerns regarding short-term morbidity and mortality continue to exist. Post-liver transplantation, NAFLD occurs as both a recurrent and de novo manifestation, each with unique outcomes. NAFLD in the donor population is of concern given the growing demand for liver transplantation and mounting pressure to expand the donor pool. This review addresses key issues surrounding NAFLD as an indication for transplantation, including its increasing prevalence, unique patient demographics, outcomes related to liver transplantation, development of post-liver transplantation NAFLD, and NAFLD in the liver donor population. It also highlights exciting areas where further research is needed, such as the role of bariatric surgery and preconditioning of marginal donor grafts. PMID:26815171

  17. The benefits of exercise for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Keating, Shelley E; George, Jacob; Johnson, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    As exercise is now an established therapy for the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), recent investigations have sought to identify the optimal dose (type, intensity and amount) of exercise for hepatic benefit. Here, the authors discuss the following: the role of aerobic exercise for the modulation of hepatic steatosis; the limited evidence for the role of resistance training in reducing liver fat; the lack of evidence from clinical trials on the role of exercise in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; and the benefits of exercise for patients with NAFLD, beyond steatosis. Based on current evidence, the authors provide recommendations for exercise prescription for patients with NAFLD.

  18. Accumulation of NKT cells in Progressive Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Syn, Wing-Kin; Oo, Ye Htun; Pereira, Thiago A; Karaca, Gamze F; Jung, Youngmi; Omenetti, Alessia; Witek, Rafal P; Choi, Steve S; Guy, Cynthia D; Fearing, Caitlin M; Teaberry, Vanessa; Pereira, Fausto E L; Adams, David H; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2010-01-01

    Liver inflammation is greater in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) than steatosis, suggesting that immune responses contribute to NAFLD progression. Livers normally contain many natural killer T (NKT) cells which produce factors that modulate inflammatory and fibrogenic responses. Such cells are relatively depleted in steatosis, but their status in more advanced NAFLD is uncertain. We hypothesized that NKT cells accumulate and promote fibrosis progression in NASH. We aimed to determine if livers become enriched with NKT cells during NASH-related fibrosis; identify responsible mechanisms; and assess if NKT cells stimulate fibrogenesis. NKT cells were analyzed in wild type mice and Ptc+/-mice with an overly-active Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, before and after feeding methionine choline deficient (MCD) diets to induce NASH-related fibrosis; effects of NKT cell-derived factors on hepatic stellate cells (HSC) were examined and fibrogenesis was evaluated in CD1d-deficient mice which lack NKT cells; NKT cells were quantified in human cirrhotic and non-diseased livers. During NASH-related fibrogenesis in wild-type mice, Hh pathway activation occurred, leading to induction of factors that promoted NKT cell recruitment, retention and viability, plus liver enrichment with NKT cells. Ptc+/- mice accumulated more NKT cells and developed worse liver fibrosis; CD1d-deficient mice which lack NKT cells were protected from fibrosis. NKT cell-conditioned medium stimulated HSC to become myofibroblastic. Liver explants were 2-fold enriched with NKT cells in patients with non-NASH cirrhosis, and 4-fold enriched in patients with NASH-cirrhosis. In conclusion, Hh pathway activation leads to hepatic enrichment with NKT cells that contribute to fibrosis progression in NASH. PMID:20512988

  19. Investigating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in a Liver-on-a-Chip Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Maria Chiara; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Businaro, Luca; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, eventually leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally, requiring an early diagnosis of NAFLD as a potential risk factor. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NAFLD are still under investigation. So far, many in vitro studies on NAFLD have been hampered by the limitations of 2D culture systems, in which cells rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. The present liver-on-a-chip approach aims at filling the gap between conventional in vitro models, often scarcely predictive of in vivo conditions, and animal models, potentially biased by their xenogeneic nature. Methods HepG2 cells were cultured into a microfluidically perfused device under free fatty acid (FFA) supplementation, namely palmitic and oleic acid, for 24h and 48h. The device mimicked the endothelial-parenchymal interface of a liver sinusoid, allowing the diffusion of nutrients and removal of waste products similar to the hepatic microvasculature. Assessment of intracellular lipid accumulation, cell viability/cytotoxicity and oxidative stress due to the FFA overload, was performed by high-content analysis methodologies using fluorescence-based functional probes. Results The chip enables gradual and lower intracellular lipid accumulation, higher hepatic cell viability and minimal oxidative stress in microfluidic dynamic vs. 2D static cultures, thus mimicking the chronic condition of steatosis observed in vivo more closely. Conclusions Overall, the liver-on-a-chip system provides a suitable culture microenvironment, representing a more reliable model compared to 2D cultures for investigating NAFLD pathogenesis. Hence, our system is amongst the first in vitro models of human NAFLD developed within a microfluidic device in a sinusoid

  20. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation.

  1. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation. PMID:25755423

  2. Fatty acid composition in serum correlates with that in the liver and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-He; Li, Chun-Yan; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Zhang, Xiu-Ying

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the correlation between the serum fatty acid composition and hepatic steatosis, inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning scores, and liver fatty acids composition in mice fed a high-fat diet. Livers were collected for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease score analysis. Fatty acid compositions were analysed by gas chromatography. Correlations were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient. Exposed to a high-fat diet, mice developed fatty liver disease with varying severity without fibrosis. The serum fatty acid variation became more severe with prolonged exposure to a high-fat diet. This variation also correlated significantly with the variation in livers, with the types of fatty acids corresponding to liver steatosis, inflammation, and hepatocellular ballooning scores. Results of this study lead to the following hypothesis: the extent of serum fatty acid variation may be a preliminary biomarker of fatty liver disease caused by high-fat intake.

  3. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels are independently associated with procollagen III N-terminal peptide in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Maeda, Sayaka; Fukami, Kei; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Nakahara, Takashi; Kimura, Yuki; Ishitobi, Tomokazu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Although impaired synthesis and/or bioavailability of nitric oxide are considered to contribute to insulin resistance and the progression of liver disease in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, role of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, has not been examined. We examined retrospectively which anthropometric and metabolic parameters were independently associated with serum levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A total of 194 consecutive biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with or without type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients were significantly higher, irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, than those in healthy control. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that decreased total protein and procollagen N-terminal peptide levels, markers of advanced liver disease and hepatic fibrosis, respectively, were independently associated with asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease subjects without diabetes, whereas soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products and density ratio of liver to spleen in computed tomography were independent correlates of asymmetric dimethylarginine in diabetic patients. The present study suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine may be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, especially subjects without diabetes.

  4. Evolution of inflammation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the multiple parallel hits hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tilg, Herbert; Moschen, Alexander R

    2010-11-01

    Whereas in most cases a fatty liver remains free of inflammation, 10%-20% of patients who have fatty liver develop inflammation and fibrosis (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Inflammation may precede steatosis in certain instances. Therefore, NASH could reflect a disease where inflammation is followed by steatosis. In contrast, NASH subsequent to simple steatosis may be the consequence of a failure of antilipotoxic protection. In both situations, many parallel hits derived from the gut and/or the adipose tissue may promote liver inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and related signaling networks, (adipo)cytokines, and innate immunity are emerging as central pathways that regulate key features of NASH.

  5. Plasma phospholipids and fatty acid composition differ between liver biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D W L; Arendt, B M; Hillyer, L M; Fung, S K; McGilvray, I; Guindi, M; Allard, J P

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with perturbations in liver lipid metabolism. Liver phospholipid and fatty acid composition have been shown to be altered in NAFLD. However, detailed profiles of circulating lipids in the pathogenesis of NAFLD are lacking. Objective: Therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine circulating lipids and potential mechanisms related to hepatic gene expression between liver biopsy-proven simple steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy subjects. Subjects: Plasma phospholipid and fatty acid composition were determined in 31 healthy living liver donors as healthy controls (HC), 26 patients with simple hepatic steatosis (SS) and 20 with progressive NASH. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed by Illumina microarray in a subset of 22 HC, 16 SS and 14 NASH. Results: Concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) increased relative to disease progression, HCFatty acid composition of phospholipids was also remodeled. In particular, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid were higher (P<0.05) in SS and NASH relative to HC in PS. Differentially expressed hepatic genes included ETNK1 and PLSCR1 that are involved in PE synthesis and PS transport, respectively. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that there is a disruption in phospholipid metabolism that is present in SS, but more pronounced in NASH. Intervention studies targeted at lipid metabolism could benefit SS and NASH. PMID:27428872

  6. Gut-liver axis, nutrition, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kirpich, Irina A; Marsano, Luis S; McClain, Craig J

    2015-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases involving hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation with the potential progression to fibrosis and cirrhosis over time. NAFLD is often associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. The interactions between the liver and the gut, the so-called "gut-liver axis", play a critical role in NAFLD onset and progression. Compelling evidence links the gut microbiome, intestinal barrier integrity, and NAFLD. The dietary factors may alter the gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function, favoring the occurrence of metabolic endotoxemia and low grade inflammation, thereby contributing to the development of obesity and obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Therapeutic manipulations with prebiotics and probiotics to modulate the gut microbiota and maintain intestinal barrier integrity are potential agents for NAFLD management. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the complex interplay between the gut microbiota, intestinal barrier, and dietary factors in NAFLD pathogenesis. The concepts addressed in this review have important clinical implications, although more work needs to be done to understand how dietary factors affect the gut barrier and microbiota, and to comprehend how microbe-derived components may interfere with the host's metabolism contributing to NAFLD development.

  7. Nutritional Management of Insulin Resistance in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Beth A.; Beasley, Jeannette M.; Aebersold, Karin; Jhangiani, Sunil S.; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging global health concern. It is the most common form of chronic liver disease in Western countries, affecting both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses a broad spectrum of fatty liver disease, ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. First-line therapy for NAFLD includes weight loss achieved through diet and physical activity. However, there is a lack of evidenced-based dietary recommendations. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) recommendations that aim to reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease may also be applicable to the NAFLD population. The objectives of this review are to: (1) provide an overview of NAFLD in the context of insulin resistance, and (2) provide a rationale for applying relevant aspects of the ADA recommendations to the nutritional management of NAFLD. PMID:24152749

  8. Nutritional management of insulin resistance in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Conlon, Beth A; Beasley, Jeannette M; Aebersold, Karin; Jhangiani, Sunil S; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2013-10-11

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging global health concern. It is the most common form of chronic liver disease in Western countries, affecting both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses a broad spectrum of fatty liver disease, ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. First-line therapy for NAFLD includes weight loss achieved through diet and physical activity. However, there is a lack of evidenced-based dietary recommendations. The American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommendations that aim to reduce the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease may also be applicable to the NAFLD population. The objectives of this review are to: (1) provide an overview of NAFLD in the context of insulin resistance, and (2) provide a rationale for applying relevant aspects of the ADA recommendations to the nutritional management of NAFLD.

  9. Metabolomic analysis of human cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis diseases

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Akram; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Peyvandi, Maryam; Okhovatian, Farshad; Zamanian-Azodi, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Metabolome analysis is used to evaluate the characteristics and interactions of low molecular weight metabolites under a specific set of conditions. In cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatotic hepatitis (NASH) the liver does not function thoroughly due to long-term damage. Unfortunately the early detection of cirrhosis, HCC, NAFLD and NASH is a clinical problem and determining a sensitive, specific and predictive novel method based on biomarker discovery is an important task. On the other hand, metabolomics has been reported as a new and powerful technology in biomarker discovery and dynamic field that cause global comprehension of system biology. In this review, it has been collected a heterogeneous set of metabolomics published studies to discovery of biomarkers in researches to introduce diagnostic biomarkers for early detection and the choice of patient-specific therapies. PMID:27458508

  10. [Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, association with cardiovascular disease snd treatment. (I). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its association with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Brea, Ángel; Pintó, Xavier; Ascaso, Juan F; Blasco, Mariano; Díaz, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández Mijares, Antonio; Mantilla, Teresa; Millán, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2016-09-27

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a series of histologically lesions similar to those induced by alcohol consumption in people with very little or no liver damage. The importance of NAFLD is its high prevalence in the Western world and, from the point of view of the liver, in its gradual progression from steatosis to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. During the last decade it has been observed that NAFLD leads to an increased cardiovascular risk with acceleration of arteriosclerosis and events related to it, being the main cause of its morbidity and mortality. This review, updated to January 2016, consists of two parts, with the first part analysing the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease.

  11. Effects of Phlebotomy on Liver Enzymes and Histology of Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khodadoostan, Mahsa; Zamanidoost, Maryam; Shavakhi, Ahmad; Sanei, Hosein; Shahbazi, Masood; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as excessive liver fat deposition and one of end-stage liver disease causes. Increased ferritin levels are associated with insulin resistance and a higher hepatic iron and fat content. Hyperferritinemia has been associated with severity of liver damage in NAFLD. The study aimed to evaluate the effects of phlebotomy on liver enzymes and histology in such patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two eligible patients who had NAFLD and after 6 months of lifestyle modification still had NAFLD, and whose ferritin serum was above 250 mg/dl, were enrolled in this clinical trial study. After written informed consent was obtained, each patient's blood serum was taken for aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P), complete blood count (CBC), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), iron, and ferritin. Then the patients underwent liver biopsy. After that patients underwent phlebotomy, giving 350 cc blood monthly. Before every phlebotomy, hemoglobin and ferritin were checked. If they were in the goal range, phlebotomy was discontinued and the patient underwent liver biopsy. A serum sample was taken for testing at the beginning of the study. The results before and after phlebotomy were compared. The maximum duration of the study was 6 months. Results: Thirty-two patients (26 males and 6 females) were enrolled, and the mean average age was 33.7 ± 6.74 years. Phlebotomy improved liver enzymes and histology of liver significantly (P < 0.001) and induced reduction of ferritin. Conclusion: Phlebotomy is effective for the improvement of liver enzymes and histology in patients with NAFLD and hyperferritinemia. PMID:28299304

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic cirrhosis: Comparison with viral hepatitis-associated steatosis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yuki; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-12-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is globally increasing and has become a world-wide health problem. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with hepatic steatosis. Viral hepatitis-associated hepatic steatosis is often caused by metabolic syndrome including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or dyslipidemia. It has been reported that HCV genotype 3 exerts direct metabolic effects that lead to hepatic steatosis. In this review, the differences between NAFLD/NASH and viral hepatitis-associated steatosis are discussed.

  13. From the liver to the heart: Cardiac dysfunction in obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Sessa, Anna; Umano, Giuseppina Rosaria; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Santoro, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased as a consequence of the childhood obesity world epidemic. The liver damage occurring in NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recent findings reported that fatty liver disease is related to early atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction even in the pediatric population. Moreover, some authors have shown an association between liver steatosis and cardiac abnormalities, including rise in left ventricular mass, systolic and diastolic dysfunction and epicardial adipose tissue thickness. In this editorial, we provide a brief overview of the current knowledge concerning the association between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction. PMID:28144387

  14. Fimasartan Ameliorates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease through PPARδ Regulation in Hyperlipidemic and Hypertensive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yoo-Na; Han, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Hyun-Min; Jeong, Jong-Min

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of fimasartan on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperlipidemic and hypertensive conditions, the levels of biomarkers related to fatty acid metabolism were determined in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells treated by high fatty acid and liver and visceral fat tissue samples of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) given high-fat diet. In HepG2 cells and liver tissues, fimasartan was shown to increase the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), phosphorylated 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK), phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (p-ACC), malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD), medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and it led to a decrease in the protein levels of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSDH1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Fimasartan decreased lipid contents in HepG2 and differentiated 3T3-L1 cells and liver tissues. In addition, fimasartan increased the adiponectin level in visceral fat tissues. The antiadipogenic effects of fimasartan were offset by PPARδ antagonist (GSK0660). Consequently, fimasartan ameliorates nonalcoholic fatty liver disease mainly through the activation of oxidative metabolism represented by PPARδ-AMPK-PGC-1α pathway. PMID:28386270

  15. NHE1 deficiency in liver: implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E

    2014-07-25

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  16. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: Their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a “low bacterial richness” may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier (“leaky gut”), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy. PMID:25400436

  17. Gut-liver axis and probiotics: their role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Giulia; Mandato, Claudia; Pierri, Luca; Poeta, Marco; Di Stasi, Martina; Vajro, Pietro

    2014-11-14

    The incidence of obesity and its related conditions, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), has dramatically increased in all age groups worldwide. Given the health consequences of these conditions, and the subsequent economic burden on healthcare systems, their prevention and treatment have become major priorities. Because standard dietary and lifestyle changes and pathogenically-oriented therapies (e.g., antioxidants, oral hypoglycemic agents, and lipid-lowering agents) often fail due to poor compliance and/or lack of efficacy, novel approaches directed toward other pathomechanisms are needed. Here we present several lines of evidence indicating that, by increasing energy extraction in some dysbiosis conditions or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, specific gut microbiota and/or a "low bacterial richness" may play a role in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver. Under conditions involving a damaged intestinal barrier ("leaky gut"), the gut-liver axis may enhance the natural interactions between intestinal bacteria/bacterial products and hepatic receptors (e.g., toll-like receptors), thus promoting the following cascade of events: oxidative stress, insulin-resistance, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. We also discuss the possible modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics, as attempted in NAFLD animal model studies and in several pilot pediatric and adult human studies. Globally, this approach appears to be a promising and innovative add-on therapeutic tool for NAFLD in the context of multi-target therapy.

  18. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Denzer, C

    2013-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in children and adolescents in industrialized countries. Recent studies have demonstrated a prevalence rate of NAFLD in overweight and obese children and adolescents in Germany of up to 30%. The spectrum of NAFLD ranges from pure fatty infiltration (simple steatosis) to inflammation (steatohepatitis, synonymous NASH) to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Age, gender, ethnicity, insulin resistance, and sex steroids are implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD in childhood and adolescence. Moreover, NAFLD in the pediatric age group is associated with marked cardiovascular comorbidities. This review focuses on current data regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidities, and treatment of NAFLD in children and adolescents.

  19. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  20. Genetic Factors in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver and Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Romeo, Stefano; Valenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Liver fat accumulation generally related to systemic insulin resistance characterizes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which in the presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can progress towards cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to the epidemic of obesity, NAFLD is now the most frequent liver disease in Western countries. Epidemiological, familial, and twin studies provide evidence for a strong genetic component of NAFLD susceptibility. Recently, genome-wide association studies led to the identification of the major inherited determinants of hepatic fat accumulation: patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) I148M gene and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K gene variants, involved in lipid droplets remodelling and very low-density lipoproteins secretion, are the major determinants of interindividual differences in liver steatosis, and susceptibility to progressive NASH. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of recent insights into the genetics of hepatic fat accumulation and steatohepatitis. PMID:26273621

  1. Genetic Factors in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver and Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Romeo, Stefano; Valenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Liver fat accumulation generally related to systemic insulin resistance characterizes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which in the presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can progress towards cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Due to the epidemic of obesity, NAFLD is now the most frequent liver disease in Western countries. Epidemiological, familial, and twin studies provide evidence for a strong genetic component of NAFLD susceptibility. Recently, genome-wide association studies led to the identification of the major inherited determinants of hepatic fat accumulation: patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) I148M gene and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K gene variants, involved in lipid droplets remodelling and very low-density lipoproteins secretion, are the major determinants of interindividual differences in liver steatosis, and susceptibility to progressive NASH. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of recent insights into the genetics of hepatic fat accumulation and steatohepatitis.

  2. Gene-metabolite network analysis in different nonalcoholic fatty liver disease phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Ming, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Zeng, Min-De; Mao, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    We sought to identify common key regulators and build a gene-metabolite network in different nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) phenotypes. We used a high-fat diet (HFD), a methionine-choline-deficient diet (MCDD) and streptozocin (STZ) to establish nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and NAFL+type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rat models, respectively. Transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses were performed in rat livers and serum. A functional network-based regulation model was constructed using Cytoscape with information derived from transcriptomics and metabolomics. The results revealed that 96 genes, 17 liver metabolites and 4 serum metabolites consistently changed in different NAFLD phenotypes (>2-fold, P<0.05). Gene-metabolite network analysis identified ccl2 and jun as hubs with the largest connections to other genes, which were mainly involved in tumor necrosis factor, P53, nuclear factor-kappa B, chemokine, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. The specifically regulated genes and metabolites in different NAFLD phenotypes constructed their own networks, which were mainly involved in the lipid and fatty acid metabolism in HFD models, the inflammatory and immune response in MCDD models, and the AMPK signaling pathway and response to insulin in HFD+STZ models. Our study identified networks showing the general and specific characteristics in different NAFLD phenotypes, complementing the genetic and metabolic features in NAFLD with hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. PMID:28082742

  3. Effects of emodin on treating murine nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high caloric laboratory chaw

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Lu, Fu-Er; Gao, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Li-Jun; Wang, Kai-Fu; Zou, Xin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of emodin on the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats induced by high caloric laboratory chaw. METHODS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver model was successfully established by feeding with high caloric laboratory chaw for 12 wk. Then the model rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely model control group, emodin group and dietary treatment group. The rats in emodin group were given emodin at dose of 40 mg/(kg·d) while animals in other groups were given distilled water of the same volume. The rats in model control group were fed with high caloric laboratory chaw while animals in other groups were fed with normal diet. Four weeks later, liver index (liver/body weight ratio), serum activities of liver-associated enzymes, blood lipid, fasting blood glucose, fasting plasma insulin, HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), hepatic triglyceride content and histology features of all groups were assayed. The expression of hepatic peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma was determined by RT-PCR. RESULTS: The body weight, liver index, serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), blood lipid, hepatic triglyceride content of model control group were significantly elevated, with moderate to severe hepatocyte steatosis. The expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was obviously reduced in model control group. Compared with model control group, the body weight, liver index, serum activities of ALT, blood lipids and hepatic triglyceride of emodin group significantly decreased and hepatic histology display was also greatly improved. Meanwhile, the expression of hepatic PPAR gamma mRNA was elevated. However, high serum activities of ALT and hyperlipidemia were persisted in dietary treatment group although liver index was decreased and liver histology was somewhat improved. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that emodin might be effective in the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver in rats. Its therapeutic mechanism could be

  4. Metabolic syndrome in childhood from impaired carbohydrate metabolism to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Manco, Melania

    2011-10-01

    Compelling evidence supports the concept that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the hepatic component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Intrahepatic fat seems to predict more strongly than does visceral adiposity an individual's cardiovascular risk and the likelihood that metabolic abnormalities are present in youth. Young individuals with fatty liver are more insulin resistant and present with a higher prevalence of metabolic abnormalities than do individuals without intrahepatic fat accumulation. They also present with a certain endothelial dysfunction and greater carotid intima-media thickness. Conversely, youth with MetS seem to have an increased risk of developing liver inflammation, a condition termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and fibrosis. In the context of MetS, the liver is central in that it can drive both hepatic and systemic insulin resistance, trigger low-grade inflammation, and promote atherogenic processes. In the context of MetS, NAFLD and altered carbohydrate metabolism track from childhood to adulthood. Thus, prevention, recognition, and effective treatment of these two abnormalities may limit the burden of morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and may delay onset of cardiovascular disease in early adulthood. The present review aims at systematically presenting evidence of the critical interplay of fatty liver and altered glucose metabolism in youth. It attempts to provide pathogenetic explanations for such an association and the rationale for its treatment, with particular regard to nutritional interventions. Key teaching points: Overweight and obese youth should be screened for fatty liver disease once after puberty by liver function tests and ultrasonography. Screening for fatty liver should be accurately performed in young patients with features of metabolic syndrome. Obese patients with fatty liver are at increased risk for altered glucose metabolism, thus they should undergo an oral glucose tolerance test

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/steatohepatitis: epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Milić, Sandra; Stimac, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic hepatic disorder in Western countries, with a prevalence of 20-30%. NAFLD comprises 'silent liver disease', in which simple steatosis is the only histological finding and which is benign in course, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which is characterized by hepatocellular injury and inflammation with or without fibrosis. NAFLD is clinically important, because even benign fatty liver can progress to steatohepatitis in many patients, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and its complications and hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; it is closely related to other clinical features of metabolic syndrome, and thus to cardiovascular morbidity. There are several different noninvasive techniques for formal diagnosis and follow-up, but liver biopsy remains the gold standard. The most important therapeutic strategies include lifestyle changes, including changes in dietary habits aimed at weight loss and blood pressure regulation, with a consequent decrease in insulin resistance. For some patients with NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, pharmacological treatment is the best option, although further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and tolerability.

  6. Intervening TNF-α via PPARγ with Gegenqinlian Decoction in Experimental Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-liang; Liu, Li-juan; Zhao, Wei-han; Li, Jun-xiang

    2015-01-01

    This paper is to explore the effect and mechanism of Gegenqinlian decoction on experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in vivo and in vitro. The final aim is to make clear whether Gegenqinlian decoction would impact NAFLD through improving PPARγ to suppress inflammation and regulate lipid. The data in this research suggested that Gegenqinlian decoction is a potent way to manage NAFLD through improving PPARγ to regulate lipid and suppress inflammation. PMID:26221176

  7. Developmental programming of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: redefining the"first hit".

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael S; Heerwagen, Margaret J R; Friedman, Jacob E

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has increased dramatically, and growing evidence indicates that the pathophysiology may be unique from the adult form, suggesting a role for early-life events. Recent radiologic techniques have now demonstrated that maternal obesity contributes to hepatic fat storage in newborn infants. In this review, we will explore how maternal obesity and a hyperlipidemic environment can initiate liver histopathogenesis in utero, including steatosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory priming. Thus, early exposure to excess lipids may represent the "first hit" for the fetal liver, placing it on a trajectory toward future metabolic disease.

  8. Increased accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in female GSTA4/PPAR alpha double knockout mice enhance steatosis and inflammation in a model of pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatocellular injury resulting from increased lipid peroxidation products and oxidative stress is considered a potential mechanism driving the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitsis (NASH). To test the significance of lipid peroxidation and protein...

  9. Simple Resistance Exercise helps Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Abe, K; Usami, K; Imaizumi, H; Hayashi, M; Okai, K; Kanno, Y; Tanji, N; Watanabe, H; Ohira, H

    2015-10-01

    To date, only limited evidence has supported the notion that resistance exercise positively impacts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We evaluated the effects of resistance exercise on the metabolic parameters of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 53 patients who were assigned to either a group that performed push-ups and squats 3 times weekly for 12 weeks (exercise group; n=31) or a group that did not (control; n=22). Patients in the control group proceeded with regular physical activities under a restricted diet throughout the study. The effects of the exercise were compared between the 2 groups after 12 weeks. Fat-free mass and muscle mass significantly increased, whereas hepatic steatosis grade, mean insulin and ferritin levels, and the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index were significantly decreased in the exercise group. Compliance with the resistance exercise program did not significantly correlate with patient background characteristics such as age, sex, BMI and metabolic complications. These findings show that resistance exercise comprising squats and push-ups helps to improve the characteristics of metabolic syndrome in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  10. Modern approach to the clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Angelico, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common and emerging form of chronic liver disease worldwide. It includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple fatty liver to steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver mortality. Common metabolic diseases, which are well established cardiovascular risk factors, have been associated to NAFLD and cardiovascular disease is the single most important cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The pathogenesis of NAFLD appears multifactorial and many mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes of fatty liver infiltration. Management of fatty liver has become a major challenge to healthcare systems as the consequence of the increasing rates of obesity worldwide. First-line management focuses on lifestyle modifications. Moderate weight reduction either by dietary restriction or by increased habitual physical activity is safe and highly recommended. Several therapeutic interventions have been proposed. These include insulin sensitizer agents, lipid lowering drugs, antioxidants such as vitamin E and supplementation of vitamin D3. However, therapeutic strategies have been largely empirical so far, and experimental trials have mostly been carried out in uncontrolled settings with small sample sizes. Metabolic conditions such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, should be strongly considered and a multidisciplinary approach should be personalized for individual patients. Treatment of co-morbidities should be regarded as of paramount importance in the management of these patients. The purpose of this review is to examine different approaches for the clinical management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:25024593

  11. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Vikram; Chirra, Shivani; Kohli, Rohit; Shull, Gary E.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  12. Oxidative stress: New insights on the association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Licia; Del Ben, Maria; Baratta, Francesco; Perri, Ludovica; Albanese, Fabiana; Pastori, Daniele; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-06-08

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common and emerging chronic liver disease worldwide. It includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to fibrosis and more severe liver complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver mortality. NAFLD is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, and is now regarded as the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The increased mortality of patients with NAFLD is primarily a result of cardiovascular disease and, to a lesser extent, to liver related diseases. Increased oxidative stress has been reported in both patients with NAFLD and patient with cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, oxidative stress represents a shared pathophysiological disorder between the two conditions. Several therapeutic strategies targeting oxidative stress reduction in patients with NAFLD have been proposed, with conflicting results. In particular, vitamin E supplementation has been suggested for the treatment of non-diabetic, non-cirrhotic adults with active NASH, although this recommendation is based only on the results of a single randomized controlled trial. Other antioxidant treatments suggested are resveratrol, silybin, L-carnitine and pentoxiphylline. No trial so far, has evaluated the cardiovascular effects of antioxidant treatment in patients with NAFLD. New, large-scale studies including as end-point also the assessment of the atherosclerosis markers are needed.

  13. Oxidative stress: New insights on the association of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Polimeni, Licia; Del Ben, Maria; Baratta, Francesco; Perri, Ludovica; Albanese, Fabiana; Pastori, Daniele; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common and emerging chronic liver disease worldwide. It includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple fatty liver to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to fibrosis and more severe liver complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver mortality. NAFLD is strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, and is now regarded as the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The increased mortality of patients with NAFLD is primarily a result of cardiovascular disease and, to a lesser extent, to liver related diseases. Increased oxidative stress has been reported in both patients with NAFLD and patient with cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, oxidative stress represents a shared pathophysiological disorder between the two conditions. Several therapeutic strategies targeting oxidative stress reduction in patients with NAFLD have been proposed, with conflicting results. In particular, vitamin E supplementation has been suggested for the treatment of non-diabetic, non-cirrhotic adults with active NASH, although this recommendation is based only on the results of a single randomized controlled trial. Other antioxidant treatments suggested are resveratrol, silybin, L-carnitine and pentoxiphylline. No trial so far, has evaluated the cardiovascular effects of antioxidant treatment in patients with NAFLD. New, large-scale studies including as end-point also the assessment of the atherosclerosis markers are needed. PMID:26052378

  14. Republished: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a practical approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, J K; Anstee, Q M; McPherson, S

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to a third of the population in many developed countries. Between 10% and 30% of patients with NAFLD have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that can progress to cirrhosis. There are metabolic risk factors common to both NAFLD and cardiovascular disease, so patients with NASH have an increased risk of liver-related and cardiovascular death. Management of patients with NAFLD depends largely on the stage of disease, emphasising the importance of careful risk stratification. There are four main areas to focus on when thinking about management strategies in NAFLD: lifestyle modification, targeting the components of the metabolic syndrome, liver-directed pharmacotherapy for high risk patients and managing the complications of cirrhosis. PMID:25655252

  15. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a practical approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, J K; Anstee, Q M; McPherson, S

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to a third of the population in many developed countries. Between 10% and 30% of patients with NAFLD have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that can progress to cirrhosis. There are metabolic risk factors common to both NAFLD and cardiovascular disease, so patients with NASH have an increased risk of liver-related and cardiovascular death. Management of patients with NAFLD depends largely on the stage of disease, emphasising the importance of careful risk stratification. There are four main areas to focus on when thinking about management strategies in NAFLD: lifestyle modification, targeting the components of the metabolic syndrome, liver-directed pharmacotherapy for high risk patients and managing the complications of cirrhosis. PMID:25285192

  16. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Connie; Rountree, Carl B.; Methratta, Sosamma; LaRusso, Salvatore; Kunselman, Allen R.; Spanier, Adam J.

    2014-07-15

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed the ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor.

  17. Association between endotoxemia and histological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitabatake, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Naoki; Fujimori, Naoyuki; Komatsu, Michiharu; Okubo, Ayaka; Kakegawa, Kyogo; Kimura, Takefumi; Sugiura, Ayumi; Yamazaki, Tomoo; Shibata, Soichiro; Ichikawa, Yuki; Joshita, Satoru; Umemura, Takeji; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Koinuma, Masayoshi; Sano, Kenji; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess whether surrogate biomarkers of endotoxemia were correlated with the histological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS One hundred twenty-six NAFLD patients who had undergone percutaneous liver biopsy were enrolled. Serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and anti-endotoxin core immunoglobulin G (EndoCab IgG) antibody concentrations at the time of liver biopsy were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to examine for relationships between biomarker levels and histological scores. RESULTS Serum LBP concentration was significantly increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients as compared with nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) subjects and was correlated with steatosis (r = 0.38, P < 0.0001) and ballooning scores (r = 0.23, P = 0.01), but not with the severity of lobular inflammation or fibrosis. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that LBP was associated with steatosis score and circulating C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, and fibrinogen levels. Serum EndoCab IgG concentration was comparable between NASH and NAFL patients. No meaningful correlations were detected between EndoCab IgG and histological findings. CONCLUSION LBP/EndoCab IgG were not correlated with lobular inflammation or fibrosis. More accurate LPS biomarkers are required to stringently assess the contribution of endotoxemia to conventional NASH. PMID:28216979

  18. [A Future Perspective on the Involvement of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid in the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Obata, Tokio; Hirasawa, Akira; Kim, Ke Ih; Kim, Soo Ryang; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the pathological accumulation of fat in the liver in the absence of any other disease related to liver steatosis, which includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from mild asymptomatic fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. Recently, it was reported that NAFLD is characterized by the impaired bioavailability of liver n-6 and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). That is, compared with healthy individuals, steatosis and steatohepatitis patients have higher n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios. Furthermore, per recent research, decreasing the intake of total fats and increasing the intake of n-3 PUFAs may be beneficial in the treatment of NAFLD. In contrast, some reports describe that NASH patients have more metabolic abnormalities than NAFLD patients; however, these are not influenced by dietary fatty acids. Thus, at present, various opinions exist regarding the efficacy of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of NAFLD. In this review, we discuss the considerable interest n-3 PUFA has attracted as a potential treatment for NAFLD.

  19. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: focus on nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-10-28

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  20. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD. PMID:25353664

  1. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation: Outcomes and advances

    PubMed Central

    Said, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last decade it has become the third most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population also poses a risk to organ donation, as allograft steatosis can be associated with non-function of the graft. Post-transplant survival is comparable between NAFLD and non-NAFLD causes of liver disease, although long term outcomes beyond 10 year are lacking. NAFLD can recur in the allograft frequently although thus far post transplant survival has not been impacted. De novo NAFLD can also occur in the allograft of patients transplanted for non-NAFLD liver disease. Predictors for NAFLD post-transplant recurrence include obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes as well as steroid dose after liver transplantation. A polymorphism in PNPLA3 that mediates triglyceride hydrolysis and is linked to pre-transplant risk of obesity and NAFLD has also been linked to post transplant NAFLD risk. Although immunosuppression side effects potentiate obesity and the metabolic syndrome, studies of immunosuppression modulation and trials of specific immunosuppression regimens post-transplant are lacking in this patient population. Based on pre-transplant data, sustained weight loss through diet and exercise is the most effective therapy for NAFLD. Other agents occasionally utilized in NAFLD prior to transplantation include vitamin E and insulin-sensitizing agents. Studies of these therapies are lacking in the post-transplant population. A multimodality and multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be utilized in management of post-transplant NAFLD. PMID:24409043

  2. Impact of physical activity on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in people with nonalcoholic simple fatty liver: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kenji; Kai, Yuko; Kitano, Naruki; Uchida, Ken; Kuchiki, Tsutomu; Nagamatsu, Toshiya

    2016-07-01

    Preventing nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NASFL) from progressing to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a key to avoiding cirrhosis. Physical activity (PA) may help manage fatty liver; however, there is a lack of prospective studies showing an association between PA and NASH. Our current prospective study investigated whether PA prevents NASFL from progressing to NASH. Study data were obtained from the health check-up program of Meiji Yasuda Shinjuku Medical Center in Tokyo, Japan. From a baseline survey between 2005 and 2007, 1149 people with NASFL met eligibility criteria including low alcohol consumption. We followed participants until 2014 assessing liver status via ultrasound and liver enzyme levels, including alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). We classified participants with fatty liver and higher levels of either ALT or AST as having NASH. Through a self-reported questionnaire, we classified PA into three intensities: moderate low-intensity PA (MLPA, 3-5 METs), moderate high-intensity PA (MHPA, 5-7 METs), and vigorous-intensity PA (VPA, ≥7 METs). During a mean follow-up of 4.2years (4804person-years), 318 of the 1149 participants (27.7%) progressed from NASFL to NASH. A multivariate-adjusted Cox model showed a significant preventive effect of VPA on progression to NASH (HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.32-0.94) and no significant associations between MLPA (HR=1.01, 95% CI=0.79-1.30) or MHPA (HR=0.97, 95% CI=0.66-1.42) and progression to NASH. Only VPA prevented NASFL from progressing to NASH; MLPA and MHPA had no preventive effect on NASH. Higher intensity PA may be needed to manage NASH.

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and obesity: biochemical, metabolic and clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Milić, Sandra; Lulić, Davorka; Štimac, Davor

    2014-07-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world. Presentation of the disease ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that includes central abdominal obesity along with other components. Up to 80% of patients with NAFLD are obese, defined as a body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2). However, the distribution of fat tissue plays a greater role in insulin resistance than the BMI. The large amount of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in morbidly obese (BMI > 40 kg/m(2)) individuals contributes to a high prevalence of NAFLD. Free fatty acids derived from VAT tissue, as well as from dietary sources and de novo lipogenesis, are released to the portal venous system. Excess free fatty acids and chronic low-grade inflammation from VAT are considered to be two of the most important factors contributing to liver injury progression in NAFLD. In addition, secretion of adipokines from VAT as well as lipid accumulation in the liver further promotes inflammation through nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, which are also activated by free fatty acids, and contribute to insulin resistance. Most NAFLD patients are asymptomatic on clinical presentation, even though some may present with fatigue, dyspepsia, dull pain in the liver and hepatosplenomegaly. Treatment for NAFLD and NASH involves weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, anti-obesity medication and bariatric surgery. This article reviews the available information on the biochemical and metabolic phenotypes associated with obesity and fatty liver disease. The relative contribution of visceral and liver fat to insulin resistance is discussed, and recommendations for clinical evaluation of affected individuals is provided.

  4. Costaining for keratins 8/18 plus ubiquitin improves detection of hepatocyte injury in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guy, Cynthia D; Suzuki, Ayako; Burchette, James L; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Cardona, Diana; McCall, Shannon J; Ünalp, Aynur; Belt, Patricia; Ferrell, Linda D; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2012-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a global health dilemma. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy. Ballooned hepatocytes are histologic manifestations of hepatocellular injury and are characteristic of steatohepatitis, the more severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Definitive histologic identification of ballooned hepatocytes on routine stains, however, can be difficult. Immunohistochemical evidence for loss of the normal hepatocytic keratin 8/18 can serve as an objective marker of ballooned hepatocytes. We sought to explore the utility of a keratin 8/18 plus ubiquitin double immunohistochemical stain for the histologic evaluation of adult nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Double immunohistochemical staining for keratin 8/18 and ubiquitin was analyzed using 40 adult human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease core liver biopsies. Ballooned hepatocytes lack keratin 8/18 staining as previously shown by others, but normal-size hepatocytes with keratin loss are approximately 5 times greater in number than keratin-negative ballooned hepatocytes. Keratin-negative ballooned hepatocytes, normal-size hepatocytes with keratin loss, and ubiquitin deposits show a zonal distribution, are positively associated with each other, and are frequently found adjacent to or intermixed with fibrous matrix. All 3 lesions correlate with fibrosis stage and the hematoxylin and eosin diagnosis of steatohepatitis (all P < .05). Compared with hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining improves the receiver operating characteristics curve for advanced fibrosis (0.77 versus 0.83, 0.89, and 0.89 for keratin-negative ballooned hepatocytes, normal-size hepatocytes with keratin loss, and ubiquitin, respectively) because immunohistochemistry is more sensitive and specific for fibrogenic hepatocellular injury than hematoxylin and eosin staining. Keratin 8/18 plus ubiquitin double immunohistochemical stain improves detection of hepatocyte injury in nonalcoholic fatty

  5. A Review of Western and Traditional Chinese Medical Approaches to Managing Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Lee-Yan; Lin, Hung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a disease of attention because of increase in prevalence from 20% to 41%. The clinical and pathological conditions in patients with NAFLD range from steatosis alone to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with or without fibrosis to hepatic cancer. In the United States, NAFLD was the second-leading indication for liver transplant between 2004 and 2013. Although imaging studies such as magnetic resonance elastography and the use of diagnostic panels and scoring systems can provide a fairly accurate diagnosis of NAFLD, there are few treatment options for patients with mild to moderate disease other than lifestyle modification. Many of the currently used medical treatments have been shown to cause severe side effects and some have been shown to be associated with increased risk for certain types of cancer. In recent years, a number of traditional Chinese herbal treatments have been examined for their potential uses as treatment for NAFLD. In this review, we provide a general overview of NAFLD and a survey of Western pharmacologic drugs currently used to treat the disease as well as the results of recent studies on the effectiveness of traditional Chinese herbal remedies for managing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27872651

  6. A novel cause for abnormal liver function tests in pregnancy and the puerperium: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Page, L M; Girling, J C

    2011-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest liver disease in the western world, but has never been reported in pregnancy before. We suggest that NAFLD should also be considered as a cause for abnormal liver function tests during pregnancy. As NAFLD is driven by insulin resistance, it is biologically plausible that pregnancy may reveal previously subclinical disease. Obstetricians have a vital role in optimising maternal health during and after pregnancy and therefore we need to include NAFLD in the differential diagnosis for abnormal liver function tests and recommend lifestyle modifications that may prevent progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Bile Acid Nuclear Receptor Farnesoid X Receptor: Therapeutic Target for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Gi; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Kyumin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the causes of fatty liver, occurring when fat is accumulated in the liver without alcohol consumption. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in advanced countries. NAFLD is a spectrum of pathology involving hepatic steatosis with/without inflammation and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with accumulation of hepatocyte damage and hepatic fibrosis. Recent studies have revealed that NAFLD results in the progression of cryptogenic cirrhosis that leads to hepatocarcinoma and cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure. The main causes of NAFLD have not been revealed yet, metabolic syndromes including obesity and insulin resistance are widely accepted for the critical risk factors for the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are transcriptional factors that sense environmental or hormonal signals and regulate expression of genes, involved in cellular growth, development, and metabolism. Several NRs have been reported to regulate genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Among various NRs, farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is abundantly expressed in the liver and a key regulator to control various metabolic processes in the liver. Recent studies have shown that NAFLD is associated with inappropriate function of FXR. The impact of FXR transcriptional activity in NAFLD is likely to be potential therapeutic strategy, but still requires to elucidate underlying potent therapeutic mechanisms of FXR for the treatment of NAFLD. This article will focus the physiological roles of FXR and establish the correlation between FXR transcriptional activity and the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:28029021

  8. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kanth, Vishnubhotla Venkata; Sasikala, Mitnala; Sharma, Mithun; Rao, Padaki Nagaraja; Reddy, Duvvuru Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD. PMID:27458502

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A comprehensive review of a growing epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kareem; Bhalla, Varun; Ezz El Regal, Mohammed; A-Kader, H Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is quickly becoming one of the most prominent causes of liver disease worldwide. The increasing incidence of NAFLD is tied to the obesity epidemic and the subsequent metabolic derangements brought along with it. Current efforts to elucidate the mechanism and causes of the disease have answered some questions, but much remains unknown about NAFLD. The aim of this article is to discuss the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as the current and future diagnostic, preventative, and therapeutic options available to clinicians for the management of NAFLD. PMID:25232245

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: The New Complication of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bril, Fernando; Cusi, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with an estimated prevalence of 60% to 80%. The relationship of NAFLD and T2DM is complex, with each condition negatively affecting the other. Although NAFLD is associated with more metabolic and cardiovascular complications and worse hyperglycemia, T2DM accelerates the progression of liver disease in NAFLD. Despite the high prevalence and serious clinical implications, NAFLD is usually overlooked in clinical practice. This article focuses on understanding the relationship between NAFLD and T2DM, to provide better care for these complex patients.

  11. Effect of Weight Loss, Diet, Exercise, and Bariatric Surgery on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hannah, William N; Harrison, Stephen A

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is the most common liver disease in developed countries. Weight reduction of 3% to 5% is associated with improved steatosis; reductions of 5% to 7% are necessary for decreased inflammation; with 7% to 10%, individuals may experience NAFLD/NASH remission and regression of fibrosis. No specific dietary intervention has proven beneficial beyond calorie restriction. Physical activity without weight loss seems to decrease hepatic steatosis. Bariatric surgery is associated with decreased cardiovascular risk and improved overall mortality in addition to reduction in hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis.

  12. Oily fish, coffee and walnuts: Dietary treatment for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vikas; Mah, Xian-Jun; Garcia, Maria Carmela; Antonypillai, Christina; van der Poorten, David

    2015-01-01

    Rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are increasing worldwide in tandem with the metabolic syndrome, with the progressive form of disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) likely to become the most common cause of end stage liver disease in the not too distant future. Lifestyle modification and weight loss remain the main focus of management in NAFLD and NASH, however, there has been growing interest in the benefit of specific foods and dietary components on disease progression, with some foods showing protective properties. This article provides an overview of the foods that show the most promise and their potential benefits in NAFLD/NASH, specifically; oily fish/ fish oil, coffee, nuts, tea, red wine, avocado and olive oil. Furthermore, it summarises results from animal and human trials and highlights potential areas for future research. PMID:26457022

  13. The Role of Intestinal Bacteria Overgrowth in Obesity-Related Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia M.; Armiliato, Geyza N. A.; Couto, Cláudia A.; Ferrari, Teresa C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. It is a progressive disorder involving a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes, which may be followed by lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species and consequent inflammation. Recent studies suggest that the characteristics of the gut microbiota are altered in NAFLD, and also, that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) contributes to the pathogenesis of this condition. This review presents the chief findings from all the controlled studies that evaluated SIBO, gut permeability and endotoxemia in human NAFLD. We also discuss the possible mechanisms involving SIBO, lipid accumulation and development of NASH. The understanding of these mechanisms may allow the development of new targets for NASH treatment in the future. PMID:25479248

  14. Effects of resveratrol in experimental and clinical non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Heebøll, Sara; Thomsen, Karen Louise; Pedersen, Steen B; Vilstrup, Hendrik; George, Jacob; Grønbæk, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related conditions like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing worldwide and therapeutic options are limited. Alternative treatment options are therefore intensively sought after. An interesting candidate is the natural polyphenol resveratrol (RSV) that activates adenosinmonophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and silent information regulation-2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). In addition, RSV has known anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we review the current evidence for RSV-mediated effects on NAFLD and address the different aspects of NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) pathogenesis with respect to free fatty acid (FFA) flux from adipose tissue, hepatic de novo lipogenesis, inadequate FFA β-oxidation and additional intra- and extrahepatic inflammatory and oxidant hits. We review the in vivo evidence from animal studies and clinical trials. The abundance of animal studies reports a decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation, liver weight and a general improvement in histological fatty liver changes, along with a reduction in circulating insulin, glucose and lipid levels. Some studies document AMPK or SIRT1 activation, and modulation of relevant markers of hepatic lipogenesis, inflammation and oxidation status. However, AMPK/SIRT1-independent actions are also likely. Clinical trials are scarce and have primarily been performed with a focus on overweight/obese participants without a focus on NAFLD/NASH and histological liver changes. Future clinical studies with appropriate design are needed to clarify the true impact of RSV treatment in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:24799987

  15. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Maria-Vasiliki; Hadziyannis, Emilia; Tiniakos, Dina; Georgiou, Anastasia; Margariti, Aikaterini; Kostas, Athanasios; Papatheodoridis, George V.

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess the significance of serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods Sixty-seven consecutive NAFLD patients and 47 healthy controls who visited our liver clinics between May 2008 and December 2010 were included. The NAFLD diagnosis required elevated alanine aminotransferase and/or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase levels, evidence of hepatic steatosis on ultrasound and/or liver histology, and exclusion of other causes of liver injury. Serum VEGF levels were determined by an enzyme immunoassay. Liver biopsy was obtained in 34 NAFLD patients. Histological lesions were scored by a liver histopathologist. Results Serum VEGF levels tended to be lower in matched NAFLD patients than in healthy controls (296±146 vs. 365±186 pg/mL, P=0.092); levels in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) also tended to be lower than in those with simple fatty liver (FL) (279±149 vs. 359±190 pg/mL, P=0.095); while VEGF levels were significantly lower in NASH patients than in healthy controls (279±149 vs. 365±186 pg/mL, P=0.041). VEGF levels offered poor predictability for the differentiation between NAFLD patients and controls or between NASH and FL patients. However, patients with high VEGF levels (≥300 pg/mL) were significantly more likely to have FL, either in the total NAFLD population (67% vs. 35%, P=0.019) or in the 34 NAFLD patients with liver biopsy (57% vs. 15%, P=0.023), while those with high VEGF levels also had a significantly lower mean fibrosis score (0.7±0.9 vs. 1.6±1.0, P=0.017). Conclusion Our data suggest that serum VEGF levels are equally high in healthy controls and in patients with simple fatty liver, but tend to decrease when NASH develops. PMID:28243042

  16. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: what the clinician needs to know.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2014-09-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the Western world. Furthermore, it is increasing worldwide, paralleling the obesity pandemic. Though highly frequent, only about one fifth of affected subjects are at risk of developing the progressive form of the disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis. Even in the latter, liver disease is slowly progressive, though, since it is so prevalent, it is already the third cause of liver transplantation in the United States, and it is predicted to get to the top of the ranking in few years. Of relevance, fatty liver is also associated with increased overall mortality and particularly increased cardiovascular mortality. The literature and amount of published papers on NAFLD is increasing as fast as its prevalence, which makes it difficult to keep updated in this topic. This review aims to summarize the latest knowledge on NAFLD, in order to help clinicians understanding its pathogenesis and advances on diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: What the clinician needs to know

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the Western world. Furthermore, it is increasing worldwide, paralleling the obesity pandemic. Though highly frequent, only about one fifth of affected subjects are at risk of developing the progressive form of the disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fibrosis. Even in the latter, liver disease is slowly progressive, though, since it is so prevalent, it is already the third cause of liver transplantation in the United States, and it is predicted to get to the top of the ranking in few years. Of relevance, fatty liver is also associated with increased overall mortality and particularly increased cardiovascular mortality. The literature and amount of published papers on NAFLD is increasing as fast as its prevalence, which makes it difficult to keep updated in this topic. This review aims to summarize the latest knowledge on NAFLD, in order to help clinicians understanding its pathogenesis and advances on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25278691

  19. Effect of metformin on ballooning degeneration in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH): when to use metformin in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Doycheva, Iliana; Loomba, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    The key histologic feature of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is hepatocellular ballooning (HB). It plays an important role in NASH progression and is an independent predictor of liver mortality. In this review, we identified all studies using metformin in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that included pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies. We specifically reviewed the effects of metformin on HB. Improved HB was noted in pediatric populations and in those adult patients who were able to lose weight and improve or normalize transaminases during therapy. Previous studies have supported the beneficial effects of metformin in reduction of body weight, improvement of insulin resistance, prevention of complications related to diabetes and chemo-preventive benefits in reducing hepatocellular carcinoma. All these effects make it an attractive treatment consideration for patients with diabetes, and prediabetes who have co-existing NAFLD. Future studies are warranted in order to confirm this effect of metformin on HB and its association with improving long-term outcomes in patients with NAFLD.

  20. Blood redox status is associated with the likelihood of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease irrespectively of diet's total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Georgoulis, Michael; Fragopoulou, Elisabeth; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Margariti, Aikaterini; Boulamatsi, Olga; Detopoulou, Paraskeui; Tiniakos, Dina; Zafiropoulou, Rodessa; Papatheodoridis, George

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress is implicated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease pathogenesis, whereas the dietary intake of antioxidants has been reported to be low in patients with the disease. We hypothesized that blood redox status measurements would be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease presence and severity, and that diet's total antioxidant capacity could moderate the aforementioned association. The study sample consisted of 73 patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, of which 58 were matched by age, sex, and body mass index with 58 controls. Diet's total antioxidant capacity was estimated through the ferric-reducing antioxidant power, the total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter, and the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity scores, whereas blood redox status was assessed by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels, the enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase, and serum resistance to oxidation. Diet's total antioxidant capacity scores and glutathione peroxidase activity were not significantly associated with the disease presence or severity. Both thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and serum resistance to oxidation were significantly associated with the likelihood of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (odds ratios [ORs], 7.769 [P= .007] and 0.936 [P= .033], respectively), independently of abdominal fat level, degree of insulin resistance, blood lipid levels, markers of subclinical inflammation, and diet's total antioxidant capacity, but not with the disease histologic severity or stage. Our results support the association between blood redox status and the likelihood of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease regardless of diet's total antioxidant capacity.

  1. Validation of the BARD scoring system in Polish patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abtract Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from pure steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and eventually to liver cirrhosis with its complications. Identifying advanced fibrosis in patients is crucial to evaluating prognosis and possible therapeutic intervention. A novel, simple, and highly accurate scoring system called BARD, which identifies patients with NAFLD and without significant fibrosis, has been recently introduced and validated in North America..The aim of this study is to validate the BARD scoring system in a Polish cohort with NAFLD. Methods A group of 104 Caucasians with biopsy-proven NAFLD were included in this study. Fibrosis in liver biopsies was evaluated according to the Histological Scoring System for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. The BARD scoring system was assessed according to Harrison et al.: BMI ≥ 28 = 1 point, AST/ALT ratio (AAR) ≥ 0.8 = 2 points, type 2 diabetes mellitus = 1point. Results Age over 50 and AAR over 0.8 showed, respectively, a moderate and strong association with advanced fibrosis. A BARD score of 2-4 points was associated with F3 or F4 stages of fibrosis with an odds ratio of 17.333 (95% Cl; 3,639 - 82.558) and negative predictive value of 97%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the BARD scoring system has value in the non-invasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD patients. The vast majority of patients with NAFLD would avoid liver biopsy if BARD was broadly introduced into the clinic. PMID:20584330

  2. Current biochemical studies of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis suggest a new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2003-09-01

    The study population in this report by Lin et al. was ob/ob mice that have an inherited genetic deficiency of the appetite-suppressing hormone leptin. These mice develop hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fatty livers. Compared with their lean littermates and wild-type C57BL-6 mice, ob/ob mice have hepatomegaly. In this study, the authors compared three different groups of adult mice (aged 8-10 wk), including male ob/ob C57BL-6 mice, their lean littermates, and wild-type C57BL-6 mice of the same age and sex. The primary purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of metformin for treatment of fatty liver disease in obese, ob/ob mice that develop hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance and fatty livers. Metformin therapy was found to eliminate fatty liver disease in this model. The potential mechanisms of the action of metformin were the inhibition of hepatic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha and several TNF-inducible responses, which are likely to promote hepatic steatosis and necrosis. In these experiments, ob/ob mice were divided into three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted of eight mice that were treated with metformin and permitted to consume a nutritiously replete liquid mouse diet ad libitum. Mice in group 2 (n = 8) did not receive metformin but were pair-fed the same volume of liquid diet that the mice in the metformin-treated group had consumed on the previous day. Obese ob/ob mice in group 3 (n = 4) and lean mice received no metformin, as with the mice in group 2, but were permitted to consume the liquid diet ad libitum. Liquid diet was given to facilitate accurate daily comparison of food intake among the various treatment groups. All mice were weighed at the beginning of the study and weekly thereafter until killed and then sera, fat, and liver tissues were collected. Tissues were either fixed in buffered formalin and processed from the deceased mice for histology or snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored until RNA and proteins were isolated

  3. Micro RNAs in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Glenn S; DiStefano, Johanna K

    2015-02-27

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to a group of disorders that arise from the accrual of fat in hepatocytes. Although various factors have been associated with the development of NAFLD, including genetic predisposition and environmental exposures, little is known about the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. Research efforts are ongoing to identify biological targets and signaling pathways that mediate NAFLD. Emerging evidence has implicated a role for micro RNAs (miRNAs), short single-stranded molecules that regulate gene expression either transcriptionally, through targeting of promoter regions, or post-transcriptionally, by blocking translation or promoting cleavage of specific target mRNAs. Several miRNAs have been associated with NAFLD, although our understanding of the biology underlying their role is still emerging. The goal of this review is to present an overview of the current state of knowledge of miRNAs involved in the development of NAFLD across a range of in vitro and in vivo models, including miRNAs that contribute to pathological mechanisms related to fatty liver in humans. Much less is known about the specific targets of miRNAs in cells, nor the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression NAFLD and related outcomes. More recently, the identification and validation of miRNA signatures in serum may facilitate the development of improved methods for diagnosis and clinical monitoring of disease progression.

  4. Micro RNAs in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Glenn S; DiStefano, Johanna K

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to a group of disorders that arise from the accrual of fat in hepatocytes. Although various factors have been associated with the development of NAFLD, including genetic predisposition and environmental exposures, little is known about the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. Research efforts are ongoing to identify biological targets and signaling pathways that mediate NAFLD. Emerging evidence has implicated a role for micro RNAs (miRNAs), short single-stranded molecules that regulate gene expression either transcriptionally, through targeting of promoter regions, or post-transcriptionally, by blocking translation or promoting cleavage of specific target mRNAs. Several miRNAs have been associated with NAFLD, although our understanding of the biology underlying their role is still emerging. The goal of this review is to present an overview of the current state of knowledge of miRNAs involved in the development of NAFLD across a range of in vitro and in vivo models, including miRNAs that contribute to pathological mechanisms related to fatty liver in humans. Much less is known about the specific targets of miRNAs in cells, nor the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression NAFLD and related outcomes. More recently, the identification and validation of miRNA signatures in serum may facilitate the development of improved methods for diagnosis and clinical monitoring of disease progression. PMID:25729477

  5. Experimental models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Otto; Cervinkova, Zuzana

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and it persists at a high prevalence. NAFLD is characterised by the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and includes a spectrum of histopathological findings, ranging from simple fatty liver through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is closely related to the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAFLD in humans has currently been limited by the lack of satisfactory animal models. The ideal animal model for NAFLD should reflect all aspects of the intricate etiopathogenesis of human NAFLD and the typical histological findings of its different stages. Within the past several years, great emphasis has been placed on the development of an appropriate model for human NASH. This paper reviews the widely used experimental models of NAFLD in rats. We discuss nutritional, genetic and combined models of NAFLD and their pros and cons. The choice of a suitable animal model for this disease while respecting its limitations may help to improve the understanding of its complex pathogenesis and to discover appropriate therapeutic strategies. Considering the legislative, ethical, economical and health factors of NAFLD, animal models are essential tools for the research of this disease.

  6. Schisandrin B: A Double-Edged Sword in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of liver lesions ranging from hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The high global prevalence of NAFLD has underlined the important public health implications of this disease. The pathogenesis of NAFLD involves the abnormal accumulation of free fatty acids, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and a proinflammatory state in the liver. Schisandrin B (Sch B), an active dibenzooctadiene lignan isolated from the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (a traditional Chinese herb), was found to possess antihyperlipidemic, antioxidant, anti-ER stress, and anti-inflammatory activities in cultured hepatocytes in vitro and in rodent livers in vivo. Whereas a long-term, low dose regimen of Sch B induces an antihyperlipidemic response in obese mice fed a high fat diet, a single bolus high dose of Sch B increases serum/hepatic lipid levels in mice. This differential action of Sch B is likely related to a dose/time-dependent biphasic response on lipid metabolism in mice. The hepatoprotection afforded by Sch B against oxidative stress, ER stress, and inflammation has been widely reported. The ensemble of results suggests that Sch B may offer potential as a therapeutic agent for NAFLD. The optimal dose and duration of Sch B treatment need to be established in order to ensure maximal efficacy and safety when used in humans. PMID:27847552

  7. Experimental models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Otto; Cervinkova, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the Western world, and it persists at a high prevalence. NAFLD is characterised by the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver and includes a spectrum of histopathological findings, ranging from simple fatty liver through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis, which may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. The pathogenesis of NAFLD is closely related to the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of NAFLD in humans has currently been limited by the lack of satisfactory animal models. The ideal animal model for NAFLD should reflect all aspects of the intricate etiopathogenesis of human NAFLD and the typical histological findings of its different stages. Within the past several years, great emphasis has been placed on the development of an appropriate model for human NASH. This paper reviews the widely used experimental models of NAFLD in rats. We discuss nutritional, genetic and combined models of NAFLD and their pros and cons. The choice of a suitable animal model for this disease while respecting its limitations may help to improve the understanding of its complex pathogenesis and to discover appropriate therapeutic strategies. Considering the legislative, ethical, economical and health factors of NAFLD, animal models are essential tools for the research of this disease. PMID:25024595

  8. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and psoriasis: So far, so near

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Giulia; Campanati, Anna; Offidani, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immune-mediated skin diseases which is frequently associated to comorbidities. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is defined as an excessive accumulation of triglycerides in hepatocytes and includes a wide spectrum of liver conditions ranging from relatively benign steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with fatty infiltration and lobular inflammation and to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Actually, psoriasis is considered a systemic diseases associated to comorbidities, as metabolic syndrome and NAFLD is seen the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The possible link between psoriasis, obesity and metabolic syndrome, which are known risk factors for NAFLD has been recently documented focusing in the crucial role of the adipose tissue in the development of the inflammatory background sharing by the above entities. According to recent data, patients with psoriasis show a greater prevalence of NAFLD and metabolic syndrome than the general population. Moreover, patients with NAFLD and psoriasis are at higher risk of severe liver fibrosis than those with NAFLD and without psoriasis. The link between these pathological conditions appears to be a chronic low-grade inflammatory status. The aim of this review is to focus on the multiple aspects linking NAFLD and psoriasis, only apparently far diseases. PMID:25848461

  9. The economic and clinical burden of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; Blissett, Deirdre; Blissett, Robert; Henry, Linda; Stepanova, Maria; Younossi, Youssef; Racila, Andrei; Hunt, Sharon; Beckerman, Rachel

    2016-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease. There is uncertainty around the economic burden of NAFLD. We constructed a steady-state prevalence model to quantify this burden in the United States and Europe. Five models were constructed to estimate the burden of NAFLD in the United States and four European countries. Models were built using a series of interlinked Markov chains, each representing age increments of the NAFLD and the general populations. Incidence and remission rates were calculated by calibrating against real-world prevalence rates. The data were validated using a computerized disease model called DisMod II. NAFLD patients transitioned between nine health states (nonalcoholic fatty liver, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], NASH-fibrosis, NASH-compensated cirrhosis, NASH-decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, post-liver transplant, and death). Transition probabilities were sourced from the literature and calibrated against real-world data. Utilities were obtained from NAFLD patients using the Short Form-6D. Costs were sourced from the literature and local fee schedules. In the United States, over 64 million people are projected to have NAFLD, with annual direct medical costs of about $103 billion ($1,613 per patient). In the Europe-4 countries (Germany, France, Italy, and United Kingdom), there are ∼52 million people with NAFLD with an annual cost of about €35 billion (from €354 to €1,163 per patient). Costs are highest in patients aged 45-65. The burden is significantly higher when societal costs are included.

  10. Induction of CYP2E1 in non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aljomah, Ghanim; Baker, Susan S.; Liu, Wensheng; Kozielski, Rafal; Oluwole, Janet; Lupu, Benita; Baker, Robert D.; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports a contribution of endogenous alcohol metabolism in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, it is not known whether the expression of alcohol metabolism genes is altered in the livers of simple steatosis. There is also a current debate on whether fatty acids induce CYP2E1 in fatty livers. In this study, expression of alcohol metabolizing genes in the liver biopsies of simple steatosis patients was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), in comparison to biopsies of NASH livers and normal controls. Induction of alcohol metabolizing genes was also examined in cultured HepG2 cells treated with ethanol or oleic acid, by qRT-PCR and Western blots. We found that the mRNA expression of alcohol metabolizing genes including ADH1C, ADH4, ADH6, catalase and CYP2E1 were elevated in the livers of simple steatosis, to similar levels found in NASH livers. In cultured HepG2 cells, ethanol induced the expression of CYP2E1 mRNA and protein, but not ADH4 or ADH6; oleic acid did not induce any of these genes. These results suggest that elevated alcohol metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD at the stage of simple steatosis as well as more severe stages. Our in vitro data support that CYP2E1 is induced by endogenous alcohol but not by fatty acids. PMID:26551085

  11. Gut Microbiota and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Insights on Mechanism and Application of Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuyun; Ji, Guang; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota are intricately involved in the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), type 2 diabetes, and insulin resistance. In the current review, we discuss the role of gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD by focusing on the mechanisms of gut microbiota-mediated host energy metabolism, insulin resistance, regulation of bile acids and choline metabolism, as well as gut microbiota-targeted therapy. We also discuss the application of a metabolomic approach to characterize gut microbial metabotypes in NAFLD. PMID:26999104

  12. Influence of gut bacteria on development and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hai, Ali; Abdallah, Ali; Malnick, Stephen DH

    2015-01-01

    The intestine of the human contains a dynamic population of microbes that have a symbiotic relationship with the host. In addition, there is an effect of the intestinal microbiota on metabolism and digestion. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause worldwide of hepatic pathology and is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. In this review we examine the effect of the human microbiome on the components and pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. We are now on the threshold of therapeutic interventions on the human microbiome in order to effect human disease including NAFLD. PMID:26140087

  13. Have guidelines addressing physical activity been established in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to highlight, in relation to the currently accepted pathophysiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the known exercise habits of patients with NAFLD and to detail the benefits of lifestyle modification with exercise (and/or physical activity) on parameters of metabolic syndrome. More rigorous, controlled studies of longer duration and defined histopathological end-points comparing exercise alone and other treatment are needed before better, evidence-based physical activity modification guidelines can be established, since several questions remain unanswered. PMID:23239917

  14. Role of exercise in optimizing the functional status of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lynn H; Weinstein, Ali; Pawloski, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently concomitant with obesity. This article discusses factors that influence health and functional outcomes of people who develop NAFLD, including increased burden of illness, whole body function, performance, and perception of self-efficacy. Changes in macronutrients, amount of calories consumed, and decreased physical activity all negatively influence patient outcome. The benefits of exercise in this population are also discussed. To be effective, exercise must be performed, regularly and in conjunction with dietary and other behavioral change. Therefore, a lifelong commitment to exercise, activity, and diet are needed if NAFLD is to be successfully treated.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes in obese children.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Lior; Weiss, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is commonly found in adults and adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The cause-effect relations of these 2 conditions are complex and it is difficult to decipher whether one drives the other or vice versa. Genetic predispositions, along with obesity, are probably shared culprits of both. NAFLD may precede the diagnosis of diabetes and play a critical role of driving its development by way of increasing hepatic and whole body insulin resistance. On the other hand, T2DM is associated with hyperinsulinemia, a resistance to some of the effects of gut derived peptides and increased systemic free fatty acids, that can all promote hepatic lipid deposition. Thus, each condition may promote the development of the other and their mutual presence creates a vicious cycle. Upon studying this complex interplay from another angle, reduction of liver fat significantly improves glucose metabolism in patients with T2DM highlighting the tight pathophysiological link between them.

  16. Role of cytokines and chemokines in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Braunersreuther, Vincent; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a variety of histological conditions (ranging from liver steatosis and steatohepatitis, to fibrosis and hepatocarcinoma) that are characterized by an increased fat content within the liver. The accumulation/deposition of fat within the liver is essential for diagnosis of NAFLD and might be associated with alterations in the hepatic and systemic inflammatory state. Although it is still unclear if each histological entity represents a different disease or rather steps of the same disease, inflammatory processes in NAFLD might influence its pathophysiology and prognosis. In particular, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (the most inflamed condition in NAFLDs, which more frequently evolves towards chronic and serious liver diseases) is characterized by a marked activation of inflammatory cells and the upregulation of several soluble inflammatory mediators. Among several mediators, cytokines and chemokines might play a pivotal active role in NAFLD and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we will update evidence from both basic research and clinical studies on the potential role of cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of NAFLD. PMID:22371632

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adults: clinical aspects and current management strategies.

    PubMed

    Pallayova, M; Taheri, S

    2014-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disorder whose prevalence is strongly linked to the current epidemic of obesity in many western countries. The prevalence of NAFLD is two to four times higher in populations with pre-existing metabolic comorbidities than in the general population. The diagnosis of primary NAFLD involves establishing the presence of hepatic steatosis or steatohepatitis by imaging or histology, along with establishing the non-alcoholic nature of the disease process and excluding competing aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. Among the indirect serum biomarkers, the NAFLD fibrosis score can help to identify patients with NAFLD and with higher likelihood of having fibrosis or cirrhosis. A liver biopsy should be considered in NAFLD patients at increased risk for steatohepatitis/advanced fibrosis and in cases where a liver biopsy is necessary to exclude co-existing chronic liver diseases and other aetiologies for hepatic steatosis. The treatment and management recommendations for obesity-associated NAFLD are aimed towards weight reduction. The currently available interventions employed to promote weight loss and improve the metabolic responses in NAFLD include lifestyle modification, pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery.

  18. New evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Inzaugarat, María Eugenia; De Matteo, Elena; Baz, Placida; Lucero, Diego; García, Cecilia Claudia; Gonzalez Ballerga, Esteban; Daruich, Jorge; Sorda, Juan Antonio; Wald, Miriam Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The immune system acts on different metabolic tissues that are implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Leptin and linoleic acid have the ability to potentially affect immune cells, whereas curcumin is a known natural polyphenol with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Aims This study was designed to evaluate the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects of leptin and linoleic acid on immune cells from patients with NAFLD and to corroborate the modulatory effects of curcumin and its preventive properties against the progression of NAFLD using a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model. Results The ex vivo experiments showed that linoleic acid increased the production of reactive oxygen species in monocytes and liver macrophages, whereas leptin enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production in monocytes and interferon-γ production in circulating CD4+ cells. Conversely, oral administration of curcumin prevented HFD-induced liver injury, metabolic alterations, intrahepatic CD4+ cell accumulation and the linoleic acid- and leptin- induced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects on mouse liver macrophages. Conclusion Our findings provide new evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat human NAFLD. However, the development of a preventive treatment targeting human circulating monocytes and liver macrophages as well as peripheral and hepatic CD4+ cells requires additional research. PMID:28257515

  19. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pros and Cons of Histologic Systems of Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-13

    The diagnostic phenotype of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--in particular, the most significant form in terms of prognosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)--continues to rely on liver tissue evaluation, in spite of remarkable advances in non-invasive algorithms developed from serum-based tests and imaging-based or sonographically-based tests for fibrosis or liver stiffness. The most common tissue evaluation remains percutaneous liver biopsy; considerations given to the needle size and the location of the biopsy have the potential to yield the most representative tissue for evaluation. The pathologist's efforts are directed to not only global diagnosis, but also assessment of severity of injury. Just as in other forms of chronic liver disease, these assessments can be divided into necroinflammatory activity, and fibrosis with parenchymal remodeling, in order to separately analyze potentially reversible (grade) and non-reversible (stage) lesions. These concepts formed the bases for current methods of evaluating the lesions that collectively comprise the phenotypic spectra of NAFLD. Four extant methods have specific applications; there are pros and cons to each, and this forms the basis of the review.

  20. Increased expression of Zinc finger protein 267 in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Schnabl, Bernd; Czech, Barbara; Valletta, Daniela; Weiss, Thomas S; Kirovski, Georgi; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular lipid accumulation is a hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and ultimately cirrhosis. Zinc finger protein 267 (ZNF267) belongs to the family of Kruppel-like transcription factors, which regulate diverse biological processes that include development, proliferation, and differentiation. We have previously demonstrated that ZNF267 expression is up-regulated in liver cirrhosis and is further increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we analyzed the expression of ZNF267 in tissue specimens of NAFLD patients and found a significant up-regulation compared to normal liver tissue. Noteworthy, ZNF267 mRNA was already significantly increased in steatotic liver tissue without inflammation. In line with this, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with palmitic acid induced a dose-dependent lipid accumulation and corresponding dose-dependent ZNF267 induction in vitro. Furthermore, hepatocellular lipid accumulation induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and also chemically induced ROS formation increased ZNF267 mRNA expression. In summary with previous findings, which revealed ZNF267 as pro-fibrogenic and pro-cancerogenic factor in chronic liver disease, the present study further suggests ZNF267 as promising therapeutic target particularly for NAFLD patients. In addition, it further indicates that hepatic steatosis per se has pathophysiological relevance and should not be considered as benign. PMID:22076166

  1. Relevant Aspects of Nutritional and Dietary Interventions in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Rodas, Maria Catalina; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Videla, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is linked to circumstances such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Since the obesity figures and related comorbidities are increasing, NAFLD has turned into a liver problem that has become progressively more common. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy for NAFLD; therefore, interventions in lifestyles remain the first line of treatment. Bearing in mind that adherence rates to this type of treatment are poor, great efforts are currently focused on finding novel therapeutic agents for the prevention in the development of hepatic steatosis and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. This review presents a compilation of the scientific evidence found in the last years showing the results of interventions in lifestyle, diet, and behavioral therapies and research results in human, animal and cell models. Possible therapeutic agents ranging from supplementation with vitamins, amino acids, prebiotics, probiotics, symbiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to interventions with medicinal plants are analyzed. PMID:26512643

  2. Identification of Lipid Species Linked to the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Saito, Masaya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is histologically characterized by the aberrant accumulation of lipid droplets in the liver, which is positively correlated with insulin resistance. Within the spectrum of this disease, patients can develop hepatitis and cirrhosis; i.e., non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The mechanisms responsible for the progression of NAFLD are not fully understood. Triacylglycerol (TAG), which is mainly found in lipid droplets, is currently considered to act as a buffer against the accumulation of non-TAG toxic lipid species. In line with this, recent studies have revealed that insulin resistance is driven by the accumulation of phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol in hepatocytes and that cholesterol-overloaded stellate cells are associated with fibrosis in the liver. Therefore, it is important to identify the toxic lipid species that contribute to NAFLD progression in order to clarify the pathogenesis of NASH and find novel targets for its treatment. In this review, we divided lipids into five classes; i.e., into fatty acyls, glycerophospholipids, glycerolipids, sphingolipids, and sterol lipids, and described their molecular structures, distributions, and metabolism under physiological conditions, as well as the contributions they make to the progression of NAFLD.

  3. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  4. Steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis are predicted by the characteristics of very low density lipoprotein in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui G.; Tapper, Elliot B.; Connelly, Margery A.; Pimentel, Carolina F. M. G.; Feldbrügge, Linda; Kim, Misung; Krawczyk, Sarah; Afdhal, Nezam; Robson, Simon C.; Herman, Mark A.; Otvos, James D.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Lai, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims A major challenge in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is to identify patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and early liver fibrosis. The progression of NAFLD is accompanied by distinctive changes in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), a lipoprotein particle produced exclusively in the liver. Herein, we sought to determine the characteristics of VLDL profiles associated with NASH and liver fibrosis. Methods We evaluated VLDL profiles of 128 patients from a single centre NAFLD registry, and examined VLDL size, total and subclass VLDL concentrations in relation to NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis as determined by liver biopsy. Results A near linear relationship was observed between mean VLDL particle size and NAFLD activity score (NAS). In multivariate models, VLDL particle size was significantly associated with both NAS and NASH, after adjustment for BMI and diabetes. A decrease in small VLDL particle concentration was associated with more advanced liver fibrosis. In receiver operative characteristic analyses, mean VLDL size performed similarly to cytokeratin 18 in predicting NASH, whereas small VLDL particle concentration had similar performance to NAFLD fibrosis score in predicting stage 2 or above liver fibrosis. Conclusions The increase in mean VLDL size in NASH and decrease in small VLDL particle concentration in liver fibrosis likely reflect changes in the number and state of hepatocytes associated with NASH and fibrosis. In addition to its value in risk stratification of cardiovascular diseases, circulating VLDL profile may provide information for the staging of NAFLD disease severity. PMID:26815314

  5. Clinical Study of Serum Homocysteine and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Euglycemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanjin; Liu, Jia; Dong, Xuejie; Xu, Yuan; Leng, Song; Wang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease. NAFLD includes a spectrum of hepatic pathologies: simple fatty liver, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Insulin resistance may contribute to NAFLD. The liver plays an important role in the production and metabolism of homocysteine (HCY), which is known to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High HCY level can aggravate NAFLD by increasing the reactive oxygen species and activating oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HCY and NAFLD in euglycemic patients. Material/Methods A total of 1143 euglycemic patients were recruited: 519 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and 624 sex and age-matched controls without NAFLD. Results The NAFLD group had significantly higher HCY level (13.78±5.84 vs. 11.96±3.58 mmol/L, p<0.001), as well as higher body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT), glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (AST), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B), and lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). HCY level was positively correlated with HOMA-IR (r=0.239, p<0.001), TG (r=0.356, p<0.001) and negatively correlated with HDL-C (r=−0.161, p<0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, BMI (beta=0.345, p<0.001), HOMA-IR (beta=0.654, p<0.01), TG (beta=0.881, p<0.001), and HCY (beta=0.04, p=0.044) were the predictors of NAFLD. Conclusions Higher HCY level existed in NAFLD patients and was correlated with the severity of insulin resistance. HCY is an independent risk factor for NAFLD. PMID:27803497

  6. The adaptive endoplasmic reticulum stress response to lipotoxicity in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Flores-Keown, Brieanna; Zhao, Fei; Klimecki, Walter T; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may progress from simple steatosis to severe, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in 7%-14% of the U.S. population through a second "hit" in the form of increased oxidative stress and inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are triggered when high levels of lipids and misfolded proteins alter ER homeostasis creating a lipotoxic environment within NAFLD livers. The objective of this study was to determine the coordinate regulation of ER stress-associated genes in the progressive stages of human NAFLD. Human liver samples categorized as normal, steatosis, NASH (Fatty), and NASH (Not Fatty) were analyzed by individual Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0 ST microarrays, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. A gene set enrichment analysis was performed on autophagy, apoptosis, lipogenesis, and ER stress/UPR gene categories. An enrichment of downregulated genes in the ER stress-associated lipogenesis and ER stress/UPR gene categories was observed in NASH. Conversely, an enrichment of upregulated ER stress-associated genes for autophagy and apoptosis gene categories was observed in NASH. Protein expression of the adaptive liver response protein STC2 and the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP-1s) were significantly elevated among NASH samples, whereas other downstream ER stress proteins including CHOP, ATF4, and phosphorylated JNK and eIF2α were not significantly changed in disease progression. Increased nuclear accumulation of total XBP-1 protein was observed in steatosis and NASH livers. The findings reveal the presence of a coordinated, adaptive transcriptional response to hepatic ER stress in human NAFLD.

  7. Neglected features of lifestyle: Their relevance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Francesca M; Martines, Giuseppe Fabio; Brischetto, Daniela; Trovato, Guglielmo; Catalano, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigated in non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease (NAFLD), with ultrasound (US)-detected fatty liver, and in a group of non-alcoholic and otherwise healthy subjects, relationship of neglected features of lifestyle with NAFLD and obesity. METHODS Five hundred and thirty-two NAFLD and 667 non-NAFLD healthy subjects, age 21-60 years were studied. Severity of liver steatosis was assessed by US bright liver score. The adherence to mediterranean diet score (AMDS) was assessed on the basis of a 1-wk recall computerized questionnaire which included a detailed physical activity reports (Baecke questionnaire). The western dietary profile score, as a simplified paradigm of unhealthy diet, a questionnaire quantifying sun exposure score and a sleep habits questionnaires provided a further comprehensive lifestyle assessment. RESULTS Body mass index (BMI), insulin resistance (HOMA), and triglycerides, poorer adherence to a mediterranean diet profile, sedentary habits, minor sun exposure and use of “western diet” foods are greater in NAFLD. Multiple linear regression analysis, weighted by years of age, displays BMI, HOMA and AMDS as the most powerful independent predictors of fatty liver severity; however, also the physical activity score, the western diet habit and the sun exposure score are acting inside the model with significant independent effects. CONCLUSION Articulated clinical intervention, according to our results, are justified in NAFLD and can be pursued addressing by focused intervention nutritional profile, physical exercise mainly in open-air subsets for enhancing sun exposure and healthier sleep duration and rhythm. PMID:27957244

  8. Role of Gut Barrier Function in the Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Wang, Bangmao

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common forms of chronic liver disease, and its incidence is increasing year by year. Many efforts have been made to investigate the pathogenesis of this disease. Since 1998 when Marshall proposed the conception of “gut-liver axis,” more and more researchers have paid close attention to the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The four aspects of gut barrier function, including physical, chemical, biological, and immunological barriers, are interrelated closely and related to NAFLD. In this paper, we present a summary of research findings on the relationship between gut barrier dysfunction and the development of NAFLD, aiming at illustrating the role of gut barrier function in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25945084

  9. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the liver disease of our age?

    PubMed

    Firneisz, Gábor

    2014-07-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease that might affect up to one-third of the adult population in industrialised countries. NAFLD incorporates histologically and clinically different non-alcoholic entities; fatty liver (NAFL, steatosis hepatis) and steatohepatitis (NASH-characterised by hepatocyte ballooning and lobular inflammation ± fibrosis) might progress to cirrhosis and rarely to hepatocellular cancer. NAFL increasingly affects children (paediatric prevalence is 4.2%-9.6%). Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin resistance (IR), obesity, metabolic syndrome and NAFLD are particularly closely related. Increased hepatic lipid storage is an early abnormality in insulin resistant women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. The accumulation of triacylglycerols in hepatocytes is predominantly derived from the plasma nonesterified fatty acid pool supplied largely by the adipose tissue. A few NAFLD susceptibility gene variants are associated with progressive liver disease, IR, T2DM and a higher risk for hepatocellular carcinoma. Although not approved, pharmacological approaches might be considered in NASH patients.

  10. Phosphatase and tensin homolog is a differential diagnostic marker between nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Clément, Sophie; Peyrou, Marion; Spahr, Laurent; Negro, Francesco; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Foti, Michelangelo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protein expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in human liver biopsies of patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease. METHODS: PTEN protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver sections of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 44) or alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 25). Liver resections obtained from 3 healthy subjects candidate for partial liver donation served as controls. Histological evaluations were performed by two experienced pathologists, and diagnoses established based on international criteria. The intensity of the PTEN staining in nuclei was compared between steatotic and non-steatotic areas of each liver fragment analyzed. For each liver specimen, the antibody-stained sections were examined and scored blindly by three independent observers, who were unaware of the patients’ clinical history. RESULTS: In healthy individuals, PTEN immunostaining was intense in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of all hepatocytes. However, PTEN was strongly downregulated in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from steatotic areas in patients with NAFLD, independently of the disease stage. In contrast, no changes in PTEN protein expression were observed in patients with ALD, regardless of the presence of steatosis or the stage of the disease. The degree of PTEN downregulation in hepatocytes of patients with NAFLD correlated with the percentage of steatosis (r = 0.3061, P = 0.0459) and the BMI (r = 0.4268, P = 0.0043). Hovewer, in patients with ALD, PTEN expression was not correlated with the percentage of steatosis with or without obesity as a confounding factor (P = 0.5574). Finally, PTEN expression level in steatotic areas of ALD patients was significantly different from that seen in steatotic areas of NAFLD patients (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: PTEN protein expression is downregulated early in NAFLD, but not in ALD. PTEN

  11. Limitations of liver biopsy and non-invasive diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Yoshio; Nakajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Yoshito

    2014-01-14

    It is estimated that 30% of the adult population in Japan is affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Fatty changes of the liver are generally diagnosed using imaging methods such as abdominal ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT), but the sensitivity of these imaging techniques is low in cases of mild steatosis. Alanine aminotransferase levels may be normal in some of these patients, warranting the necessity to establish a set of parameters useful for detecting NAFLD, and the more severe form of the disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although liver biopsy is currently the gold standard for diagnosing progressive NASH, it has many drawbacks, such as sampling error, cost, and risk of complications. Furthermore, it is not realistic to perform liver biopsies on all NAFLD patients. Diagnosis of NASH using various biomarkers, scoring systems and imaging methods, such as elastography, has recently been attempted. The NAFIC score, calculated from the levels of ferritin, fasting insulin, and type IV collagen 7S, is useful for the diagnosis of NASH, while the NAFLD fibrosis score and the FIB-4 index are useful for excluding NASH in cases of advanced fibrosis. This article reviews the limitations and merits of liver biopsy and noninvasive diagnostic tests in the diagnosis of NAFLD/NASH.

  12. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-04-27

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis.

  13. PNPLA3 Expression Is Related to Liver Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Armengol, Sandra; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Aguilar, Carmen; Martínez, Salomé; Sabench, Fátima; Porras, José Antonio; Ruiz, Maikel Daniel; Hernández, Mercé; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest a role for the Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3) in the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lipid deposition in the liver seems to be a critical process in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the association between the liver PNPLA3 expression, key genes of lipid metabolism, and the presence of NAFLD in morbidly obese women. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to analyze the hepatic expression of PNPLA3 and lipid metabolism-related genes in 55 morbidly obese subjects with normal liver histology (NL, n = 18), simple steatosis (SS, n = 20), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 17). Liver biopsies were collected during bariatric surgery. We observed that liver PNPLA3 expression was increased in NAFLD than in NL. It was also upregulated in SS than in NL. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PNPLA3 was significantly higher in severe than mild SS group. In addition, the expression of the transcription factors LXRα, PPARα, and SREBP2 was positively correlated with PNPLA3 liver expression. Regarding rs738409 polymorphism, GG genotype was positive correlated with the presence of NASH. In conclusion, our results show that PNPLA3 could be related to lipid accumulation in liver, mainly in the development and progression of simple steatosis. PMID:27128907

  14. Epidemiology and Natural History of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Alita; Younossi, Zobair M

    2012-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an important cause of liver disease burden across the world. By definition, although the histopathologic features of NAFLD are identical to that of alcoholic liver disease, its diagnosis requires absence of significant alcohol use and absence of other causes of chronic liver disease. We now know that NAFLD is not simply a disease of the Western world. It is manifested across the world, in varying rates, across gender, across varying ethnicities, and in its association with other host factors. In this review article, the definition of NAFLD, its spectrum, ranging from mild steatosis to hepatocellular injury and inflammation defined as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is discussed. Mild steatosis is generally a stable disease whereas NASH can be progressive. Based on current published literature, current incidence and prevalence of NAFLD and NASH are discussed. It is also accepted that these processes will continue to increase in prevalence with the rise of obesity, type II diabetes, and associated metabolic syndrome. Some of the risk factors have been well-established and are discussed. In addition, this review also presents emerging associations with other risk factors for NAFLD. Natural history of NAFLD is variable depending upon the histologic subtypes and other underlying comorbidities and is discussed in this review as well.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children: recent practice guidelines, where do they take us?

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ashish; Puri, Kanika; Thangada, Suraj; Zein, Nizar; Alkhouri, Naim

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States. It is strongly associated with childhood obesity, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. Although some children with NAFLD may remain asymptomatic, progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and to advanced stages of fibrosis and cirrhosis is well recognized. Unfortunately, despite the increase in awareness of this disease, there are still no reliable non-invasive diagnostic tests and liver biopsy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of NASH and staging of fibrosis. In addition, there are no approved pharmacological treatments currently. Lifestyle modification remains the cornerstone of treatment. Team based multidisciplinary approach involving hepatologists, endocrinologists, exercise physiologist, dieticians, and cardiologists may lead to better outcomes. Recently, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) committees have made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of NAFLD in pediatric patients. This review focuses on current literature on epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis along with summarizing the recent guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of pediatric NAFLD.

  16. Recent advances in dietary supplementation, in treating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Eslamparast, Tannaz; Eghtesad, Sareh; Poustchi, Hossein; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently known as the most common liver problem, characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, which may progress to other liver diseases such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, hepatic tissue fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, and failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. Since NAFLD is positively associated with the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and ultimately type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is often regarded as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. No pharmacologic treatment has yet been proven for this disease. For most patients with presumed or confirmed NAFLD, the only proven strategy is to offer lifestyle advice that can lead to sustained weight loss. Since insulin resistance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and necro-apoptosis are involved in NAFLD pathogenesis, it seems that every potential therapeutic agent should target one or some of these pathologic events. There are many well known anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, and insulin sensitizer dietary supplements which have shown beneficial effects on NAFLD improvement in animal and human studies. The purpose of this review is to explore the existing evidences on dietary supplements considered to have hepatoprotective properties, and to present some proposed mechanisms by which they may protect against NAFLD. PMID:25729475

  17. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--clues in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production.

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An overview of current insights in pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, Tim CMA; Verwer, Bart J; van Nieuwkerk, Carin MJ; Mulder, Chris JJ

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of people suffering from overweight (one billion) and obesity (300 million) are increasing. The accumulation of triglycerides in the liver, in the absence of excess alcohol intake, has been described in the early sixties. It was not until 1980, however, that Ludwig et al named this condition nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Subsequently, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been used as a general name for conditions ranging from simple steatosis through steatohepatitis to end-stage liver disease (cirrhosis). Many studies have demonstrated the significant correlation with obesity and insulin resistance. Other studies have revealed a significant correlation between hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease and increased intima-media thickness. WHO estimated that at least two million patients will develop cirrhosis due to hepatic steatosis in the years to come. Longitudinal cohort studies have demonstrated that those patients with cirrhosis have a similar risk to develop hepatocellular carcinoma as those with other causes of cirrhosis. Taken all together, NAFLD has become the third most important indication for liver transplantation. Therefore, training programmes in internal medicine, gastroenterology and hepatology should stress the importance of diagnosing this entity and treat properly those at risk for developing complications of portal hypertension and concomittant cardiovascular disease. This review will focus on the clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, imaging techniques and the readily available therapeutic options. PMID:18442193

  19. [UDCA in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, I N

    2011-01-01

    As a signaling molecule with system endocrine function, UDCA improves insulin sensitivity by activating the nuclear farnezoid X-receptor; as a ligand for the TGR5/Gpbar-1 receptor, UDCA is able to stimulate the secretion of GLP-1. UDCA ameliorate of the anti-oxidative defenses in NAFLD, normalizes NAD+/NADH ratio, beta-oxidation. UDCA improves the liver biochemical and histological picture in NASH, also reduces hepatocytes apoptosis and restores adiponectin levels; in other studies, these data are not confirmed. In the experiment, UDCA prevents the development of steatosis in the liver. UDCA may increase efficiency in combination with statins, thiazolidinediones, vitamin E. Further controlled prospective trials are needed for research of the UDCA effect in NAFLD.

  20. Biomarkers in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-the emperor has no clothes?

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver is present in over ten percentage of the world population and it is a growing public health problem. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not a single disease, but encompasses a spectrum of diseases of different etiologies. It is difficult to find highly specific and sensitive diagnostic biomarkers when a disease is very complex. Therefore, we should aim to find relevant prognostic markers rather than accurate diagnostic markers which will help to minimize the frequency of liver biopsies to evaluate disease progression. There are several biomarker panels commercially available, however, there is no clear evidence that more sophisticated panels are better compared to simple criteria such as, presence of diabetes over five years, metabolic syndrome, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, aspartate transaminase/alanine transaminase (ALT) ratio > 0.8 or ferritin levels > 1.5 times normal in patients with over six month history of raised ALT and/or ultrasonological evidence of fat in the liver. Currently the biomarker panels are not a replacement for a liver biopsy. However the need and benefit of liver biopsy in NAFLD is questionable because there is no convincing evidence that biopsy and detailed staging of NAFLD improves the management of NAFLD and benefits the patient. After all there is no evidence based treatment for NAFLD other than management of lifestyle and components of “metabolic syndrome”. PMID:25805928

  1. Biomarkers in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-the emperor has no clothes?

    PubMed

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2015-03-21

    Fatty liver is present in over ten percentage of the world population and it is a growing public health problem. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is not a single disease, but encompasses a spectrum of diseases of different etiologies. It is difficult to find highly specific and sensitive diagnostic biomarkers when a disease is very complex. Therefore, we should aim to find relevant prognostic markers rather than accurate diagnostic markers which will help to minimize the frequency of liver biopsies to evaluate disease progression. There are several biomarker panels commercially available, however, there is no clear evidence that more sophisticated panels are better compared to simple criteria such as, presence of diabetes over five years, metabolic syndrome, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, aspartate transaminase/alanine transaminase (ALT) ratio > 0.8 or ferritin levels > 1.5 times normal in patients with over six month history of raised ALT and/or ultrasonological evidence of fat in the liver. Currently the biomarker panels are not a replacement for a liver biopsy. However the need and benefit of liver biopsy in NAFLD is questionable because there is no convincing evidence that biopsy and detailed staging of NAFLD improves the management of NAFLD and benefits the patient. After all there is no evidence based treatment for NAFLD other than management of lifestyle and components of "metabolic syndrome".

  2. Prediction of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Via a Novel Panel of Serum Adipokines.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Raika; Arj, Abbas; Razavizade, Mohsen; Aarabi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-02-01

    Considering limitations of liver biopsy for diagnosis of nonalcoholic liver disease (NAFLD), biomarkers' panels were proposed. The aims of this study were to establish models based on serum adipokines for discriminating NAFLD from healthy individuals and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) from simple steatosis.This case-control study was conducted in patients with persistent elevated serum aminotransferase levels and fatty liver on ultrasound. Individuals with evidence of alcohol consumption, hepatotoxic medication, viral hepatitis, and known liver disease were excluded. Liver biopsy was performed in the remaining patients to distinguish NAFLD/NASH. Histologic findings were interpreted using "nonalcoholic fatty liver activity score." Control group consisted of healthy volunteers with normal physical examination, liver function tests, and liver ultrasound. Binary logistic regression analysis was applied to ascertain the effects of independent variables on the likelihood that participants have NAFLD/NASH.Decreased serum adiponectin and elevated serum visfatin, IL-6, TNF-a were associated with an increased likelihood of exhibiting NAFLD. NAFLD discriminant score was developed as the following: [(-0.298 × adiponectin) + (0.022 × TNF-a) + (1.021 × Log visfatin) + (0.709 × Log IL-6) + 1.154]. In NAFLD discriminant score, 86.4% of original grouped cases were correctly classified. Discriminant score threshold value of (-0.29) yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 83% respectively, for discriminating NAFLD from healthy controls. Decreased serum adiponectin and elevated serum visfatin, IL-8, TNF-a were correlated with an increased probability of NASH. NASH discriminant score was proposed as the following: [(-0.091 × adiponectin) + (0.044 × TNF-a) + (1.017 × Log visfatin) + (0.028 × Log IL-8) - 1.787] In NASH model, 84% of original cases were correctly classified. Discriminant score threshold value of (-0.22) yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 90

  3. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis. PMID:26602919

  4. Does Lysosomial Acid Lipase Reduction Play a Role in Adult Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

    PubMed

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco; Del Ben, Maria

    2015-11-25

    Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, responsible for hydrolysing the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Wolman Disease represents the early onset phenotype of LAL deficiency rapidly leading to death. Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is a late onset phenotype that occurs with fatty liver, elevated aminotransferase levels, hepatomegaly and dyslipidaemia, the latter characterized by elevated LDL-C and low HDL-C. The natural history and the clinical manifestations of the LAL deficiency in adults are not well defined, and the diagnosis is often incidental. LAL deficiency has been suggested as an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and fatty liver. Therefore, LAL activity may be reduced also in non-obese patients presenting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), unexplained persistently elevated liver transaminases or with elevation in LDL cholesterol. In these patients, it could be indicated to test LAL activity. So far, very few studies have been performed to assess LAL activity in representative samples of normal subjects or patients with NAFLD. Moreover, no large study has been carried out in adult subjects with NAFLD or cryptogenic cirrhosis.

  5. Novel antidiabetic medications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Yoshio; Seko, Yuya; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-12-26

    Liver-related diseases are the leading causes of death in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Japan. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is closely associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is the most prevalent chronic liver disease worldwide. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of NAFLD, can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic failure. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis can be called "diabetic hepatopathy". There are no established pharmacotherapies for NAFLD/NASH patients with T2DM. Although metformin is established as the first-line therapy for T2DM, given its relative safety and beneficial effects on glycosylated hemoglobin, weight, and cardiovascular mortality, this agent is not recommended as specific therapy for NASH/NAFLD due to lack of clinical evidence. The effects of pioglitazone on NASH histology with T2DM have been extensively proved, but several concerns exist, such as body weight gain, fluid retention, cancer incidence, and bone fracture. In recent years, novel antidiabetic medications have been approved for T2DM, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. A key clinical question for hepatologists is what kinds of antidiabetic medications are the most appropriate for the treatment of NAFLD accompanied by T2DM, to prevent progression of hepatic fibrosis resulting in HCC/liver-related mortality without increased risk of cardiovascular events. This review focuses on novel antidiabetic agents and future perspectives on the treatment of NAFLD/NASH with T2DM.

  6. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Fibrosis Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almeda-Valdes, Paloma; Aguilar Olivos, Nancy E.; Barranco-Fragoso, Beatriz; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of pathologies, from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation to fibrosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD progression has not been completely elucidated, and different liver cells could be implicated. This review focuses on the current evidence of the role of liver dendritic cells (DCs) in the progression from NAFLD to fibrosis. Liver DCs are a heterogeneous population of hepatic antigen-presenting cells; their main function is to induce T-cell mediated immunity by antigen processing and presentation to T cells. During the steady state liver DCs are immature and tolerogenic. However, in an environment of chronic inflammation, DCs are transformed to potent inducers of immune responses. There is evidence about the role of DC in liver fibrosis, but it is not clearly understood. Interestingly, there might be a link between lipid metabolism and DC function, suggesting that immunogenic DCs are associated with liver lipid storage, representing a possible pathophysiological mechanism in NAFLD development. A better understanding of the interaction between inflammatory pathways and the different cell types and the effect on the progression of NAFLD is of great relevance. PMID:26339640

  7. Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandsma, Robert; Comelli, Elena M.; Arendt, Bianca M.; Zhang, Ling; Fung, Scott; Fischer, Sandra E.; McGilvray, Ian G.; Allard, Johane P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by dysbiosis. The bidirectional effects between intestinal microbiota (IM) and bile acids (BA) suggest that dysbiosis may be accompanied by an altered bile acid (BA) homeostasis, which in turn can contribute to the metabolic dysregulation seen in NAFLD. This study sought to examine BA homeostasis in patients with NAFLD and to relate that with IM data. Methods This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of adults with biopsy-confirmed NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver: NAFL or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: NASH) and healthy controls (HC). Clinical and laboratory data, stool samples and 7-day food records were collected. Fecal BA profiles, serum markers of BA synthesis 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and intestinal BA signalling, as well as IM composition were assessed. Results 53 subjects were included: 25 HC, 12 NAFL and 16 NASH. Levels of total fecal BA, cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and BA synthesis were higher in patients with NASH compared to HC (p<0.05 for all comparisons). The primary to secondary BA ratio was higher in NASH compared to HC (p = 0.004), but ratio of conjugated to unconjugated BAs was not different between the groups. Bacteroidetes and Clostridium leptum counts were decreased in in a subset of 16 patients with NASH compared to 25 HC, after adjusting for body mass index and weight-adjusted calorie intake (p = 0.028 and p = 0.030, respectively). C. leptum was positively correlated with fecal unconjugated lithocholic acid (LCA) (r = 0.526, p = 0.003) and inversely with unconjugated CA (r = -0.669, p<0.0001) and unconjugated CDCA (r = - 0.630, p<0.0001). FGF19 levels were not different between the groups (p = 0.114). Conclusions In adults with NAFLD, dysbiosis is associated with altered BA homeostasis, which renders them at increased risk of hepatic injury. PMID:27203081

  8. GADD34-deficient mice develop obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatic carcinoma and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Naomi; Isobe, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing in parallel with the prevalence of obesity. DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34/Ppp1r15a), originally isolated from UV-inducible transcripts in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, dephosphorylates several kinases that function in important signaling cascades, including dephosphorylation of eIF2α. We examined the effects of GADD34 on natural life span by using GADD34-deficient mice. Here we observed for the first time that with age GADD34-deficient mice become obese, developing fatty liver followed by liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and insulin resistance. We found that myofibroblasts and immune cells infiltrated the portal veins of aged GADD34-deficient mouse livers. A high-fat diet (HFD) induced a higher level of steatosis in young GADD34-deficient mice compared with WT mice. Differentiation into fat is dependent on insulin signaling. Insulin signaling in young GADD34-deficient mice was higher than that in WT mice, which explained the higher fat differentiation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) observed in GADD34-deficient mice. Through aging or a HFD, insulin signaling in GADD34-deficient liver converted to be down regulated compared with WT mice. We found that a HFD or palmitate treatment converted insulin signaling by up-regulating TNF-α and JNK. PMID:26316333

  9. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with lower hepatic and erythrocyte ratios of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Bianca M; Ma, David W L; Simons, Brigitte; Noureldin, Seham A; Therapondos, George; Guindi, Maha; Sherman, Morris; Allard, Johane P

    2013-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with altered hepatic lipid composition. Animal studies suggest that the hepatic ratio of phosphatidylcholine (PC) to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) contributes to steatogenesis and inflammation. This ratio may be influenced by dysregulation of the PE N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway or by a low-choline diet. Alterations in the liver may also influence lipid composition in circulation such as in erythrocytes, which therefore may have utility as a biomarker of hepatic disease. Currently, no study has assessed both liver and erythrocyte PC/PE ratios in NAFLD. The aim of this study was to compare the PC/PE ratio in the liver and erythrocytes of patients with simple steatosis (SS) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with that of healthy controls. PC and PE were measured by mass spectrometry in 28 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD (14 SS, 14 NASH) and 9 healthy living liver donors as controls. The hepatic PC/PE ratio was lower in SS patients (median [range]) (1.23 [0.27-3.40]) and NASH patients (1.29 [0.77-3.22]) compared with controls (3.14 [2.20-3.73]); both p < 0.001) but it was not different between SS and NASH. PC was lower and PE higher in the liver of SS patients compared with controls, whereas in NASH patients only PE was higher. The PC/PE ratio in erythrocytes was also lower in SS and NASH patients compared with controls because of lower PC in both patient groups. PE in erythrocytes was not different among the groups. In conclusion, NAFLD patients have a lower PC/PE ratio in the liver and erythrocytes than do healthy controls, which may play a role in the pathogenesis. The underlying mechanisms require further investigation.

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and vascular disease: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Fargion, Silvia; Porzio, Marianna; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2014-10-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common of chronic liver disease in Western Country, is closely related to insulin resistance and oxidative stress and includes a wide spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis alone, usually a benign and non-progressive condition, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome with which shares several characteristics, however recent data suggest that NAFLD is linked to increased cardiovascular risk independently of the broad spectrum of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that the clinical burden of NAFLD is not restricted to liver-related morbidity and mortality, with the majority of deaths in NAFLD patients related to cardiovascular disease and cancer and not to the progression of liver disease. Retrospective and prospective studies provide evidence of a strong association between NAFLD and subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis (increased intima-media thickness, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, impaired left ventricular function and coronary calcification). A general agreement emerging from these studies indicates that patients with NASH are at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases than those with simple steatosis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis of these patients. It is very likely that the different mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD have a different relevance in the patients according to individual genetic background. In conclusion, in the presence of NAFLD patients should undergo a complete cardiovascular evaluation to prevent future atherosclerotic complications. Specific life-style modification and aggressive pharmaceutical modification will not only reduce the progression of liver disease, but also reduce morbidity for cardiovascular

  11. Pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Recent solutions, unresolved issues, and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Mandato, Claudia; Poeta, Marco; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-09-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children is becoming a major health concern. A "multiple-hit" pathogenetic model has been suggested to explain the progressive liver damage that occurs among children with NAFLD. In addition to the accumulation of fat in the liver, insulin resistance (IR) and oxidative stress due to genetic/epigenetic background, unfavorable lifestyles, gut microbiota and gut-liver axis dysfunction, and perturbations of trace element homeostasis have been shown to be critical for disease progression and the development of more severe inflammatory and fibrotic stages [non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]. Simple clinical and laboratory parameters, such as age, history, anthropometrical data (BMI and waist circumference percentiles), blood pressure, surrogate clinical markers of IR (acanthosis nigricans), abdominal ultrasounds, and serum transaminases, lipids and glucose/insulin profiles, allow a clinician to identify children with obesity and obesity-related conditions, including NAFLD and cardiovascular and metabolic risks. A liver biopsy (the "imperfect" gold standard) is required for a definitive NAFLD/NASH diagnosis, particularly to exclude other treatable conditions or when advanced liver disease is expected on clinical and laboratory grounds and preferably prior to any controlled trial of pharmacological/surgical treatments. However, a biopsy clearly cannot represent a screening procedure. Advancements in diagnostic serum and imaging tools, especially for the non-invasive differentiation between NAFLD and NASH, have shown promising results, e.g., magnetic resonance elastography. Weight loss and physical activity should be the first option of intervention. Effective pharmacological treatments are still under development; however, drugs targeting IR, oxidative stress, proinflammatory pathways, dyslipidemia, gut microbiota and gut liver axis dysfunction are an option for patients who are unable to comply with the recommended lifestyle

  12. Pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Recent solutions, unresolved issues, and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Mandato, Claudia; Poeta, Marco; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children is becoming a major health concern. A “multiple-hit” pathogenetic model has been suggested to explain the progressive liver damage that occurs among children with NAFLD. In addition to the accumulation of fat in the liver, insulin resistance (IR) and oxidative stress due to genetic/epigenetic background, unfavorable lifestyles, gut microbiota and gut-liver axis dysfunction, and perturbations of trace element homeostasis have been shown to be critical for disease progression and the development of more severe inflammatory and fibrotic stages [non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]. Simple clinical and laboratory parameters, such as age, history, anthropometrical data (BMI and waist circumference percentiles), blood pressure, surrogate clinical markers of IR (acanthosis nigricans), abdominal ultrasounds, and serum transaminases, lipids and glucose/insulin profiles, allow a clinician to identify children with obesity and obesity-related conditions, including NAFLD and cardiovascular and metabolic risks. A liver biopsy (the “imperfect” gold standard) is required for a definitive NAFLD/NASH diagnosis, particularly to exclude other treatable conditions or when advanced liver disease is expected on clinical and laboratory grounds and preferably prior to any controlled trial of pharmacological/surgical treatments. However, a biopsy clearly cannot represent a screening procedure. Advancements in diagnostic serum and imaging tools, especially for the non-invasive differentiation between NAFLD and NASH, have shown promising results, e.g., magnetic resonance elastography. Weight loss and physical activity should be the first option of intervention. Effective pharmacological treatments are still under development; however, drugs targeting IR, oxidative stress, proinflammatory pathways, dyslipidemia, gut microbiota and gut liver axis dysfunction are an option for patients who are unable to comply with the recommended

  13. Association between Noninvasive Fibrosis Markers and Chronic Kidney Disease among Adults with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sesti, Giorgio; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Arturi, Franco; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we aimed to evaluate whether the severity of liver fibrosis estimated by NAFLD fibrosis score is associated with higher prevalence of CKD in individuals with NAFLD. To this end NAFLD fibrosis score and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed in 570 White individuals with ultrasonography-diagnosed NAFLD. As compared with subjects at low probability of liver fibrosis, individuals at high and intermediate probability showed an unfavorable cardio-metabolic risk profile having significantly higher values of waist circumference, insulin resistance, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, uric acid and lower insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. Individuals at high and intermediate probability of liver fibrosis have lower eGFR after adjustment for gender, smoking, glucose tolerance status, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index), diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, statin therapy, anti-diabetes and anti-hypertensive treatments (P = 0.001). Individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 5.1-fold increased risk of having CKD (OR 5.13, 95%CI 1.13–23.28; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI. After adjustment for glucose tolerance status, statin therapy, and anti-hypertensive treatment in addition to gender, individuals at high probability of liver fibrosis had a 3.9-fold increased risk of CKD (OR 3.94, 95%CI 1.11–14.05; P = 0.03) as compared with individuals at low probability. In conclusion, advanced liver fibrosis, determined by noninvasive fibrosis markers, is associated with CKD independently from other known factors. PMID:24520400

  14. An Animal Model for the Juvenile Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Marin, Veronica; Rosso, Natalia; Dal Ben, Matteo; Raseni, Alan; Boschelle, Manuela; Degrassi, Cristina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr; Avellini, Claudio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) are the hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome; worrisome is the booming increase in pediatric age. To recreate the full spectrum of juvenile liver pathology and investigate the gender impact, male and female C57Bl/6 mice were fed with high fat diet plus fructose in the drinking water (HFHC) immediately after weaning (equal to 3-years old human), and disease progression followed for 16 weeks, until adults (equal to 30-years old human). 100% of subjects of both genders on HFHC diet developed steatosis in 4weeks, and some degree of fibrosis in 8weeks, with the 86% of males and 15% of females presenting a stage 2 fibrosis at 16weeks. Despite a similar final liver damage both groups, a sex difference in the pathology progression was observed. Alterations in glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, hepatomegaly and obese phenotype were evident from the very beginning in males with an increased hepatic inflammatory activity. Conversely, such alterations were present in females only at the end of the HFHC diet (with the exception of insulin resistance and the hepatic inflammatory state). Interestingly, only females showed an altered hepatic redox state. This juvenile model appears a good platform to unravel the underlying gender dependent mechanisms in the progression from NAFLD to NASH, and to characterize novel therapeutic approaches.

  15. An Animal Model for the Juvenile Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Veronica; Rosso, Natalia; Dal Ben, Matteo; Raseni, Alan; Boschelle, Manuela; Degrassi, Cristina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr; Avellini, Claudio; Tiribelli, Claudio; Gazzin, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) are the hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome; worrisome is the booming increase in pediatric age. To recreate the full spectrum of juvenile liver pathology and investigate the gender impact, male and female C57Bl/6 mice were fed with high fat diet plus fructose in the drinking water (HFHC) immediately after weaning (equal to 3-years old human), and disease progression followed for 16 weeks, until adults (equal to 30-years old human). 100% of subjects of both genders on HFHC diet developed steatosis in 4weeks, and some degree of fibrosis in 8weeks, with the 86% of males and 15% of females presenting a stage 2 fibrosis at 16weeks. Despite a similar final liver damage both groups, a sex difference in the pathology progression was observed. Alterations in glucose homeostasis, dyslipidemia, hepatomegaly and obese phenotype were evident from the very beginning in males with an increased hepatic inflammatory activity. Conversely, such alterations were present in females only at the end of the HFHC diet (with the exception of insulin resistance and the hepatic inflammatory state). Interestingly, only females showed an altered hepatic redox state. This juvenile model appears a good platform to unravel the underlying gender dependent mechanisms in the progression from NAFLD to NASH, and to characterize novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27391242

  16. Emerging role of obeticholic acid in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Makri, Evangelia; Cholongitas, Evangelos; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest chronic liver disease and its prevalence is increasing driven by the pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD can progress to cirrhosis and is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and hepatocellular cancer. Diet and exercise are limited by suboptimal long-term adherence in patients with NAFLD. On the other hand, current pharmacological treatment of NAFLD has limited efficacy and unfavorable safety profile. In this context, obeticholic acid (OCA), a selective agonist of the farnesoid X receptors, might represent a useful option in these patients. Preclinical studies suggest that OCA improves hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. A proof-of-concept study and the randomized, placebo-controlled Farnesoid X Receptor Ligand Obeticholic Acid in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis Treatment (FLINT) trial also showed improvements in liver histology in patients with NAFLD who received OCA. Weight loss and reduction in blood pressure were also observed. However, the effects of OCA on insulin resistance are conflicting and the lipid profile is adversely affected by this agent. In addition, pruritus is frequently observed during treatment with OCA and might lead to treatment discontinuation. However, given the limitations of existing treatments for NAFLD, OCA might represent a useful therapeutic option in selected patients with NAFLD. PMID:27895393

  17. Transitions of histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease during the last three decades.

    PubMed

    Ikura, Yoshihiro

    2014-12-27

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and is the most common type of chronic liver diseases in the majority of developed countries. NAFLD shows a wide spectrum of disorders including simple steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and cirrhosis. While simple steatosis is recognized to be benign and stable, NASH is considered to be an aggressive form of the disease progressing to cirrhosis. Currently, differentiation between NASH and simple steatosis can be done only by liver biopsy. Despite many proposals and revisions, the histological criteria for the differentiation have not been perfected yet. In this review article, the changes in the histopathologic criteria of NAFLD during the last three decades are summarized, and perspectives of the future changes are demonstrated. The discussion focuses on how pathologists have been dealing with "hepatocellular ballooning". Loose criteria, in which hepatocellular ballooning was not required for the diagnosis of NASH, were applied in many clinical studies published in around 2000's, whereas a strict criterion based on the presence/absence of hepatocellular ballooning was approved recently. Hence, simple and reliable methods of identifying ballooned hepatocytes are being sought. Clinical and pathological predictors of NAFLD-related hepatocarcinogenesis will also be sought in the future.

  18. Adipokines and proinflammatory cytokines, the key mediators in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Stojsavljević, Sanja; Gomerčić Palčić, Marija; Virović Jukić, Lucija; Smirčić Duvnjak, Lea; Duvnjak, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition in which excess fat accumulates in the liver of a patient with no history of alcohol abuse or other causes for secondary hepatic steatosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has not been fully elucidated. The “two-hit“ hypothesis is probably a too simplified model to elaborate complex pathogenetic events occurring in patients with NASH. It should be better regarded as a multiple step process, with accumulation of liver fat being the first step, followed by the development of necroinflammation and fibrosis. Adipose tissue, which has emerged as an endocrine organ with a key role in energy homeostasis, is responsive to both central and peripheral metabolic signals and is itself capable of secreting a number of proteins. These adipocyte-specific or enriched proteins, termed adipokines, have been shown to have a variety of local, peripheral, and central effects. In the current review, we explore the role of adipocytokines and proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We particularly focus on adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin, with a brief mention of resistin, visfatin and retinol-binding protein 4 among adipokines, and tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, and briefly IL-18 among proinflammatory cytokines. We update their role in NAFLD, as elucidated in experimental models and clinical practice. PMID:25561778

  19. Impaired SUMOylation of nuclear receptor LRH-1 promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Stein, Sokrates; Lemos, Vera; Xu, Pan; Demagny, Hadrien; Wang, Xu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Jimenez, Veronica; Bosch, Fatima; Lüscher, Thomas F; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Schoonjans, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is caused by metabolic imbalances that could be explained in part by an increase in de novo lipogenesis that results from increased sterol element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) activity. The nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1) is an important regulator of intermediary metabolism in the liver, but its role in regulating lipogenesis is not well understood. Here, we have assessed the contribution of LRH-1 SUMOylation to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice expressing a SUMOylation-defective mutant of LRH-1 (LRH-1 K289R mice) developed NAFLD and early signs of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) when challenged with a lipogenic, high-fat, high-sucrose diet. Moreover, we observed that the LRH-1 K289R mutation induced the expression of oxysterol binding protein-like 3 (OSBPL3), enhanced SREBP-1 processing, and promoted de novo lipogenesis. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of OSBPL3 facilitates SREBP-1 processing in WT mice, while silencing hepatic Osbpl3 reverses the lipogenic phenotype of LRH-1 K289R mice. These findings suggest that compromised SUMOylation of LRH-1 promotes the development of NAFLD under lipogenic conditions through regulation of OSBPL3.

  20. Review of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Carly E; Brown, Ann J; Diehl, Anna Mae; Setji, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS frequently have metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), early diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between PCOS and another metabolic complication: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD occurs as a result of abnormal lipid handling by the liver, which sensitizes the liver to injury and inflammation. It can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by hepatocyte injury and apoptosis. With time and further inflammation, NASH can progress to cirrhosis. Thus, given the young age at which NAFLD may occur in PCOS, these women may be at significant risk for progressive hepatic injury over the course of their lives. Many potential links between PCOS and NAFLD have been proposed, most notably IR and hyperandrogenemia. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between PCOS and NAFLD. In the interim, clinicians should be aware of this connection and consider screening for NAFLD in PCOS patients who have other metabolic risk factors. The optimal method of screening is unknown. However, measuring alanine aminotransferase and/or obtaining ultrasound on high-risk patients can be considered. First line treatment consists of lifestyle interventions and weight loss, with possible pharmacologic interventions in some cases. PMID:25339805

  1. Review of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Carly E; Brown, Ann J; Diehl, Anna Mae; Setji, Tracy L

    2014-10-21

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS frequently have metabolic complications including insulin resistance (IR), early diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between PCOS and another metabolic complication: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD occurs as a result of abnormal lipid handling by the liver, which sensitizes the liver to injury and inflammation. It can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by hepatocyte injury and apoptosis. With time and further inflammation, NASH can progress to cirrhosis. Thus, given the young age at which NAFLD may occur in PCOS, these women may be at significant risk for progressive hepatic injury over the course of their lives. Many potential links between PCOS and NAFLD have been proposed, most notably IR and hyperandrogenemia. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between PCOS and NAFLD. In the interim, clinicians should be aware of this connection and consider screening for NAFLD in PCOS patients who have other metabolic risk factors. The optimal method of screening is unknown. However, measuring alanine aminotransferase and/or obtaining ultrasound on high-risk patients can be considered. First line treatment consists of lifestyle interventions and weight loss, with possible pharmacologic interventions in some cases.

  2. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K.; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2─/─ mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  3. Alimentary regimen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Peta, Valentina; Alfieri, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-12-07

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are awaiting clarification. Insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation status, among other possible genetic, dietary, and lifestyle factors, are thought to play the key role. There is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. However, the dietary nutritional management to achieve weight loss is an essential component of any treatment strategy. On the basis of its components, the literature reports on the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular risk and in preventing major chronic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. New evidence supports the idea that the Mediterranean diet, associated with physical activity and cognitive behaviour therapy, may have an important role in the prevention and the treatment of NAFLD.

  4. Dietary supplements and pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Rahimlou, Mehran; Ahmadnia, Hoda; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in children. High prevalence of pediatric obesity and sedentary lifestyle has augmented the incidence of NAFLD in children. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD through various mechanisms such as intensification of insulin resistance and increased levels of inflammatory markers. There is no approved medical intervention for treatment of pediatric NAFLD; the only proven strategy in management of pediatric NAFLD is lifestyle modification. Recently, the effects of nutritional supplements have been examined in the management of pediatric NAFLD. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies evaluating the effects of nutritional supplements on pediatric NAFLD and explain the future direction in this field. PMID:26557952

  5. Alimentary regimen in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Mediterranean diet

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Peta, Valentina; Alfieri, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Antonino; Bellentani, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are awaiting clarification. Insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation status, among other possible genetic, dietary, and lifestyle factors, are thought to play the key role. There is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. However, the dietary nutritional management to achieve weight loss is an essential component of any treatment strategy. On the basis of its components, the literature reports on the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular risk and in preventing major chronic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. New evidence supports the idea that the Mediterranean diet, associated with physical activity and cognitive behaviour therapy, may have an important role in the prevention and the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:25492997

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus: the hidden epidemic.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mona H

    2011-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly recognized cause of liver disease worldwide. With obesity being a universally important risk factor, NAFLD is now receiving greater attention as a public health issue, and the burden of NAFLD is expected to increase in years to come. The prevalence of NAFLD among subjects with diabetes and with severe obesity is on the rise around the world, including in Saudi Arabia. Efforts in developing new strategies for its prevention, diagnosis and management are needed to alter the course of this disease. The purpose of this review is to enhance awareness about the close interrelationship between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes mellitus and recent diagnostic and treatment advances in the field.

  7. Out of the frying pan: dietary saturated fat influences nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Parks, Elizabeth; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Hawkins, Meredith

    2017-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excess accumulation of fat in the liver. In some cases, NAFLD is also accompanied by insulin resistance, resulting in metabolic dysfunction. Dietary fat content probably influences both NAFLD and insulin resistance; however, the immediate effects of fat consumption have not been fully explored. In this issue of the JCI, Hernández et al. evaluated hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in humans and mice following a single oral dose of saturated fat. This one bolus of fat resulted in a measurable increase in insulin resistance, hepatic triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis. In mice, the saturated fat bolus resulted in the induction of several NAFLD-associated genes. Together, the results of this study indicate that saturated fat intake has immediate effects on metabolic function.

  8. Vitamin D: a new player in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed

    Eliades, Myrto; Spyrou, Elias

    2015-02-14

    Vitamin D through its active form 1a-25-dihydroxyvtamin D [1,25(OH)2D] is a secosteroid hormone that plays a key role in mineral metabolism. Recent years have witnessed a significant scientific interest on vitamin D and expanded its actions to include immune modulation, cell differentiation and proliferation and inflammation regulation. As our understanding of the many functions of vitamin D has grown, the presence of vitamin D deficiency has become one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies worldwide. Concomitantly, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common form of chronic liver disease in western countries. NAFLD and vitamin D deficiency often coexist and epidemiologic evidence has shown that both of these conditions share several cardiometabolic risk factors. In this article we provide an overview of the epidemiology and pathophysiology linking NAFLD and vitamin D deficiency, as well as the available evidence on the clinical utility of vitamin D supplementation in NAFLD.

  9. The role of diet and nutrient composition in nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Erin Marie; Rinella, Mary E

    2012-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the developed world. NAFLD is tightly linked to insulin resistance and considered to be the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of any treatment regimen for patients with NAFLD is lifestyle modification focused on weight loss, exercise, and improving insulin sensitivity. Here we review the literature and discuss the role of diet and nutrient composition in the management of NAFLD. Because there are currently no specific dietary guidelines for NAFLD, this review proposes a dietary framework for patients with NAFLD based on the available evidence and extrapolates from dietary guidelines aimed at reducing insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk.

  10. Vitamin D: A new player in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Eliades, Myrto; Spyrou, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D through its active form 1a-25-dihydroxyvtamin D [1,25(OH)2D] is a secosteroid hormone that plays a key role in mineral metabolism. Recent years have witnessed a significant scientific interest on vitamin D and expanded its actions to include immune modulation, cell differentiation and proliferation and inflammation regulation. As our understanding of the many functions of vitamin D has grown, the presence of vitamin D deficiency has become one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies worldwide. Concomitantly, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common form of chronic liver disease in western countries. NAFLD and vitamin D deficiency often coexist and epidemiologic evidence has shown that both of these conditions share several cardiometabolic risk factors. In this article we provide an overview of the epidemiology and pathophysiology linking NAFLD and vitamin D deficiency, as well as the available evidence on the clinical utility of vitamin D supplementation in NAFLD. PMID:25684936

  11. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - the heart of the matter

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Haneen; Malnick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common forms of chronic liver disease in the Western world. There is a close association with the metabolic syndrome and NAFLD is considered to be the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The components of the metabolic syndrome include hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance which are well established cardiovascular risk factors. The mortality rate of NAFLD patients from myocardial infarction is higher than that in the general United States population and there is also an increased risk of non-fatal cardiovascular events. This article reviews the cardiovascular complications associated with NAFLD. In order to provide comprehensive care of NAFLD patients, physicians need to be aware of, and search for, the cardiac morbidity associated with NAFLD. PMID:26052382

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: An early mediator predicting metabolic syndrome in obese children?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun-Fen; Shi, Hong-Bo; Liu, Li-Rui; Jiang, Ping; Liang, Li; Wang, Chun-Lin; Liu, Xi-Yong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an early mediator for prediction of metabolic syndrome, and if liver B-ultrasound can be used for its diagnosis. METHODS: We classified 861 obese children (6-16 years old) into three subgroups: group 0 (normal liver in ultrasound and normal transaminases); group 1 (fatty liver in ultrasound and normal transaminases); and group 2 (fatty liver in ultrasound and elevated transaminases). We measured the body mass index, waist and hip circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), whole-body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI), lipid profile and transaminases in all the participants. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MS) was assessed according to the degree of liver fatty infiltration based on the B-ultrasound examination. RESULTS: Among the 861 obese children, 587 (68.18%) were classified as having NAFLD, and 221 (25.67%) as having MS. The prevalence of MS in NAFLD children (groups 1 and 2) was 37.64% (221/587), which was much higher than that in non-NAFLD group (group 0, 12.04%) (P < 0.01). There were significantly higher incidences concerning every component of MS in group 2 compared with group 0 (P < 0.05). The incidence of NAFLD in MS patients was 84.61% (187/221), which was significantly higher than that of hypertension (57.46%, 127/221) and glucose metabolic anomalies (22.62%, 50/221), and almost equal to the prevalence of dyslipidemia (89.14%, 197/221). Based on the B-ultrasound scales, the presence of moderate and severe liver fatty infiltration carried a high risk of hypertension [odds ratio (OR): 2.18, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.27-3.75], dyslipidemia (OR: 7.99, 95% CI: 4.34-14.73), impaired fasting glucose (OR: 3.65, 95% CI: 1.04-12.85), and whole MS (OR: 3.77; 95% CI: 1.90-7.47, P < 0.01). The state of insulin resistance (calculated by HOMA-IR and WBISI) deteriorated as the degree of fatty

  13. Ameliorative Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract against Dietary-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaaibi, Siham N. K.; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Subhi, Lyutha; Tageldin, Mohamed H.; Al-Balushi, Nada M.; Rahman, Mohammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by fat accumulation and is associated with oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel extract (PPE) against oxidative stress in the liver of rats with NAFLD. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD), 20% corn oil, or palm oil for 8 weeks in the presence or absence of PPE. The control group was fed a basal diet. The progression of NAFLD was evaluated histologically and by measuring liver enzymes (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase), serum lipids (triglycerides and total cholesterol), and oxidative stress markers. The HFD feeding increased the body weight and caused NAFLD, liver steatosis, hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress, and elevated liver enzymes. Administration of PPE ameliorated the hepatic morphology, reduced body weight, improved liver enzymes, and inhibited lipogenesis. Furthermore, PPE enhanced the cellular redox status in the liver tissue of rats with NAFLD. Our findings suggest that PPE could improve HFD-induced NAFLD via abolishment of hepatic oxidative damage and hyperlipidemia. PPE might be considered as a potential lead material in the treatment of NAFLD and obesity through the modulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:27069901

  14. Pentoxifylline and melatonin in combination with pioglitazone ameliorate experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zaitone, Sawsan; Hassan, Neven; El-Orabi, Naglaa; El-Awady, El-Sayed

    2011-07-15

    Insulin resistance, oxidative stress and cytokine imbalance are key pathophysiological mechanisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed at evaluating the effect of treatment with the insulin sensitizer, pioglitazone, the tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor, pentoxifylline, and the antioxidant, melatonin and their combinations in rats with NAFLD. Rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for eight weeks to induce NAFLD. For an additional eight weeks, rats were fed the HFD along with pioglitazone, pentoxifylline, melatonin alone or in combination. Liver index and insulin resistance index were calculated. Serum liver enzyme activities, total cholesterol, triglycerides and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined. Tissue triglycerides, malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione were measured and liver injury was evaluated by histopathological examination. HFD induced severe hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis. In addition, liver index, insulin resistance index, activities of liver enzymes and serum level of total cholesterol, triglycerides and TNF-α were elevated. This was coupled with an increase in tissue triglycerides, malondialdehyde and depletion of reduced glutathione. Pioglitazone, pentoxifylline and melatonin, alone or in combination; reduced the insulin resistance index, activities of liver enzymes, hepatic malondialdehyde and increased hepatic reduced glutathione level. Pentoxifylline led to a decrease in serum TNF-α level, however, pioglitazone and melatonin reduced serum total cholesterol and triglycerides. In conclusion, data in this study indicate that pentoxifylline and melatonin can be used as promising adjuvant therapies to pioglitazone in the clinical management of NAFLD.

  15. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-04-02

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  16. Increasing Whole Grain Intake as Part of Prevention and Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alastair B.; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Minehira, Kaori; Kirwan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    In conjunction with the rise in rates of obesity, there has been an increase in the rate of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). While NAFLD at least partially originates from poor diet, there is a lack of nutritional recommendations for patients with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of NAFLD, beyond eating a healthy diet, increasing physical activity, and emphasising weight loss. The limited current literature suggests that there may be opportunities to provide more tailored dietary advice for people diagnosed with or at risk of NAFLD. Epidemiological studies consistently find associations between whole grain intake and a reduced risk of obesity and related diseases, yet no work has been done on the potential of whole grains to prevent and/or be a part of the treatment for fatty liver diseases. In this review, we examine the potential and the current evidence for whole grains having an impact on NAFLD. Due to their nutrient and phytochemical composition, switching from consuming mainly refined grains to whole grains should be considered as part of the nutritional guidelines for patients diagnosed with or at risk for fatty liver disease. PMID:23762052

  17. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Pengtao; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Hong; Wei, Taotao

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Free fatty acids exposure induces elevated autophagy. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits autophagic flux through impairing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. •Inhibition of autophagy potentiates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TNF-α, two typical “second hit” factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  18. The role of nutraceuticals for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Angelico, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to liver fibrosis and to cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome but mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still under investigation. The traditional 'two hit hypothesis' has been developed within a more complex 'multiple parallel hit hypothesis' which comprises a wide spectrum of parallel hits. Many therapeutic approaches have been proposed so far and several types of nutraceuticals have been suggested for the treatment of NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the most promising of which are those with antioxidant effects. In particular, vitamin E appears to be effective for the treatment of nondiabetic subjects with more advanced NASH, although the high suggested daily dosages are a matter of concern. Moreover, polyphenols reduce liver fat accumulation, mainly by inhibiting lipogenesis. At present, there are insufficient data to support the use of vitamin C supplements in patients with NAFLD. Data on polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation are heterogeneous, and no well-designed randomized controlled studies (RCTs) of adequate size, with histological assessment of steatosis, have been conducted. Based on the available data, silymarin supplementation for the treatment of NAFLD seems to have a favourable effect. The results with anti-inflammatory agents, such as vitamin D and carnitine are uncertain. In conclusion, there are insufficient data either to support or refute the use of nutraceuticals for subjects with NAFLD. Further RTCs, with histological changes as an outcome measure, are needed.

  19. Cross-talk between the thyroid and liver: a new target for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue-Ye; Gusdon, Aaron M; Qu, Shen

    2013-12-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been recognized as the most common liver metabolic disease, and it is also a burgeoning health problem that affects one-third of adults and is associated with obesity and insulin resistance now. Thyroid hormone (TH) and its receptors play a fundamental role in lipid metabolism and lipid accumulation in the liver. It is found that thyroid receptor and its isoforms exhibit tissue-specific expression with a variety of functions. TRβ1 is predominantly expressed in the brain and adipose tissue and TRβ2 is the major isoform in the liver, kidney and fat. They have different functions and play important roles in lipid metabolism. Recently, there are many studies on the treatment of NAFLD with TH and its analogues. We review here that thyroid hormone and TR are a potential target for pharmacologic treatments. Lipid metabolism and lipid accumulation can be regulated and reversed by TH and its analogues.

  20. Pathogenesis and management issues for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Marko; Lerotić, Ivan; Baršić, Neven; Tomašić, Vedran; Jukić, Lucija Virović; Velagić, Vedran

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has, although it is a very common disorder, only relatively recently gained broader interest among physicians and scientists. Fatty liver has been documented in up to 10 to 15 percent of normal individuals and 70 to 80 percent of obese individuals. Although the pathophysiology of NAFLD is still subject to intensive research, several players and mechanisms have been suggested based on the substantial evidence. Excessive hepatocyte triglyceride accumulation resulting from insulin resistance is the first step in the proposed ‘two hit’ model of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial fatty acids oxidation, NF-κB-dependent inflammatory cytokine expression and adipocytokines are all considered to be the potential factors causing second hits which lead to hepatocyte injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Although it was initially believed that NAFLD is a completely benign disorder, histologic follow-up studies have showed that fibrosis progression occurs in about a third of patients. A small number of patients with NAFLD eventually ends up with end-stage liver disease and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although liver biopsy is currently the only way to confirm the NAFLD diagnosis and distinguish between fatty liver alone and NASH, no guidelines or firm recommendations can still be made as for when and in whom it is necessary. Increased physical activity, gradual weight reduction and in selected cases bariatric surgery remain the mainstay of NAFLD therapy. Studies with pharmacologic agents are showing promising results, but available data are still insufficient to make specific recommendations; their use therefore remains highly individual. PMID:17729403

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the heart in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Lucia; Chiesa, Claudio; Anania, Caterina; De Merulis, Antonio; Osborn, John Frederick; Romaggioli, Sara; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2014-07-21

    Over the last two decades, the rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity explains the emergence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. As described in adults, children and adolescents with fatty liver display insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. Thus NAFLD has emerged as the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and a strong cardiovascular risk factor even at a very early age. Several studies, including pediatric populations, have reported independent associations between NAFLD and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis including impaired flow-mediated vasodilation, increased carotid artery intima-media thickness, and arterial stiffness, after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Also, it has been shown that NAFLD is associated with cardiac alterations, including abnormal left ventricular structure and impaired diastolic function. The duration of these subclinical abnormalities may be important, because treatment to reverse the process is most likely to be effective earlier in the disease. In the present review, we examine the current evidence on the association between NAFLD and atherosclerosis as well as between NAFLD and cardiac dysfunction in the pediatric population, and discuss briefly the possible biological mechanisms linking NAFLD and cardiovascular changes. We also address the approach to treatment for this increasingly prevalent disease, which is likely to have an important future global impact on the burden of ill health, to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also cardiovascular disease.

  2. Effect of intracellular lipid accumulation in a new model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In vitro exposure of liver cells to high concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA) results in fat overload which promotes inflammatory and fibrogenic response similar to those observed in patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH). Since the mechanisms of this event have not been fully characterized, we aimed to analyze the fibrogenic stimuli in a new in vitro model of NASH. Methods HuH7 cells were cultured for 24 h in an enriched medium containing bovine serum albumin and increasing concentrations of palmitic and oleic acid at a molar ratio of 1:2 (palmitic and oleic acid, respectively). Cytotoxic effect, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and production of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines were measured. Results FFA induces a significant increment in the intracellular content of lipid droplets. The gene expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha was significantly increased. The protein level of interleukin-8 was also increased. Intracellular lipid accumulation was associated to a significant up-regulation in the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta 1, alpha 2 macroglobulin, vascular endothelial growth factor A, connective tissue growth factor, insulin-like growth factor 2, thrombospondin 1. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated a significant increment of early apoptosis and production of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions The exposure of hepatocytes to fatty acids elicits inflammation, increase of oxidative stress, apoptosis and production of fibrogenic cytokines. These data support a primary role of FFA in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:22380754

  3. Impaired Gallbladder Motility and Increased Gallbladder Wall Thickness in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Yasar; Bozbey, Gulcin; Erim, Tolga; Caklili, Ozge Telci; Ulasoglu, Celal; Senates, Ebubekir; Mutlu, Hasan Huseyin; Mesci, Banu; Doğan, Mehmet Sait; Tasan, Guralp; Enc, Feruze Yilmaz; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Along with the increase in the incidence of NAFLD and associated obesity, an increase in gallbladder disease (GD) has been noted. This has led to the identification of a new disease entity called fatty GD. There is a gap in the literature on the dynamics of gallbladder function in patients with NAFLD. Methods An observational case-control study, a total of 50 patients with biopsy proven NAFLD without gallbladder stone/sludge and 38 healthy comparison subjects were enrolled. Fasting, postprandial gallbladder volumes (PGV), gallbladder ejection fraction (GEF), and fasting gallbladder wall thickness (FGWT) were measured by real-time 2-dimensional ultrasonography. Results Fasting gallbladder wall thickness, fasting gallbladder volumes and PGV were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than control subjects (P < 0.001, P = 0.006, and P < 0.001, respectively). Gallbladder ejection fraction was significantly lower in the NAFLD group than the controls (P = 0.008). The presence of NAFLD was an independent predictor for GEF, PGV, and FGWT. Also, steatosis grade was an independent predictor for GEF, and GEF was significantly lower in the nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) subgroup than the controls. Conclusions Gallbladder dysfunction and increase in gallbladder wall thickness exists in asymptomatic (without stone/sludge and related symptoms) patients with NAFLD and are useful in identifying fatty GD. Measurement of these variables in NAFLD patients may be useful in identifying those at higher risk for GD. PMID:26932908

  4. Ghrelin-ghrelin O-acyltransferase system in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Ren; Fan, Xiao-Ming

    2015-03-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently considered as the most common liver disease in Western countries, and is rapidly becoming a serious threat to public health worldwide. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of NAFLD are still not fully understood. The ghrelin-ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) system has recently been found to play a crucial role in both the development of steatosis and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Ghrelin, the natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is a 28-amino acid peptide possessing a unique acylation on the serine in position 3 catalyzed by GOAT. The ghrelin-GOAT system is involved in insulin resistance, lipid metabolism dysfunction, and inflammation, all of which play important roles in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. A better understanding of ghrelin-GOAT system biology led to the identification of its potential roles in NAFLD. Molecular targets modulating ghrelin-GOAT levels and the biologic effects are being studied, which provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of NAFLD. This review probes into the possible relationship between the ghrelin-GOAT system and NAFLD, and considers the potential mechanisms by which the ghrelin-GOAT system brings about insulin resistance and other aspects concerning NAFLD.

  5. Systems biology approaches for studying the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ciarán P; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Plant, Nick J; Moore, J Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a progressive disease of increasing public health concern. In western populations the disease has an estimated prevalence of 20%-40%, rising to 70%-90% in obese and type II diabetic individuals. Simplistically, NAFLD is the macroscopic accumulation of lipid in the liver, and is viewed as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating both the initial development of steatosis and its progression through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis to debilitating and potentially fatal fibrosis and cirrhosis are only partially understood. Despite increased research in this field, the development of non-invasive clinical diagnostic tools and the discovery of novel therapeutic targets has been frustratingly slow. We note that, to date, NAFLD research has been dominated by in vivo experiments in animal models and human clinical studies. Systems biology tools and novel computational simulation techniques allow the study of large-scale metabolic networks and the impact of their dysregulation on health. Here we review current systems biology tools and discuss the benefits to their application to the study of NAFLD. We propose that a systems approach utilising novel in silico modelling and simulation techniques is key to a more comprehensive, better targeted NAFLD research strategy. Such an approach will accelerate the progress of research and vital translation into clinic. PMID:25386055

  6. Systems biology approaches for studying the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ciarán P; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Plant, Nick J; Moore, J Bernadette

    2014-11-07

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a progressive disease of increasing public health concern. In western populations the disease has an estimated prevalence of 20%-40%, rising to 70%-90% in obese and type II diabetic individuals. Simplistically, NAFLD is the macroscopic accumulation of lipid in the liver, and is viewed as the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating both the initial development of steatosis and its progression through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis to debilitating and potentially fatal fibrosis and cirrhosis are only partially understood. Despite increased research in this field, the development of non-invasive clinical diagnostic tools and the discovery of novel therapeutic targets has been frustratingly slow. We note that, to date, NAFLD research has been dominated by in vivo experiments in animal models and human clinical studies. Systems biology tools and novel computational simulation techniques allow the study of large-scale metabolic networks and the impact of their dysregulation on health. Here we review current systems biology tools and discuss the benefits to their application to the study of NAFLD. We propose that a systems approach utilising novel in silico modelling and simulation techniques is key to a more comprehensive, better targeted NAFLD research strategy. Such an approach will accelerate the progress of research and vital translation into clinic.

  7. MicroRNAs as controlled systems and controllers in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Panera, Nadia; Gnani, Daniela; Crudele, Annalisa; Ceccarelli, Sara; Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna

    2014-11-07

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multi-faceted condition including simple steatosis alone or associated with inflammation and ballooning (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) and eventually fibrosis. The NAFLD incidence has increased over the last twenty years becoming the most frequent chronic liver disease in industrialized countries. Obesity, visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, and many other disorders that characterize metabolic syndrome are the major predisposing risk factors for NAFLD. Furthermore, different factors, including genetic background, epigenetic mechanisms and environmental factors, such as diet and physical exercise, contribute to NAFLD development and progression. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that specific microRNAs expression profiles are strongly associated with several pathological conditions including NAFLD. In NAFLD, microRNA deregulation in response to intrinsic genetic or epigenetic factors or environmental factors contributes to metabolic dysfunction. In this review we focused on microRNAs role both as controlled and controllers molecules in NAFLD development and/or their eventual value as non-invasive biomarkers of disease.

  8. The generation of carcinogenic etheno-DNA adducts in the liver of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, Kirsten-Berit; Glassen, Katharina; Peccerella, Teresa; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Linhart, Heinz; Bartsch, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in particular its more aggressive form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasingly observed as a cause of end stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important factor in the pathogenesis of HCC. ROS can react with polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from membrane phospholipids resulting in the production of reactive aldehydes as lipid oxidation (LPO) byproducts, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (4 HNE). 4 HNE can react with DNA to form mutagenic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts. ROS is induced by inflammatory processes, but also by induction of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), as seen with chronic alcohol consumption. Methods Immunohistochemical detection of CYP2E1, 4 HNE and hepatic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts was performed on liver sections from 39 patients with NFLD. Spearman rank correlation was calculated to examine possible correlations. Results Exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts were detected and correlated significantly with 4 HNE, but not with CYP2E1. Conclusions This is the first description of highly carcinogenic exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts in NAFLD patients. We could show that exocyclic etheno-DNA adducts significantly correlated with lipid peroxidation product 4 HNE, but not with CYP2E1, implying that in NAFLD ROS generation with consecutive DNA damage is rather inflammation driven through various cytokines than by induction of CYP2E1. PMID:26005678

  9. Role of gut microbiota and Toll-like receptors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kouichi; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    Emerging data have shown a close association between compositional changes in gut microbiota and the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The change in gut microbiota may alter nutritional absorption and storage. In addition, gut microbiota are a source of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and their compositional change can also increase the amount of TLR ligands delivered to the liver. TLR ligands can stimulate liver cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, the gut-liver axis has attracted much interest, particularly regarding the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The abundance of the major gut microbiota, including Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, has been considered a potential underlying mechanism of obesity and NAFLD, but the role of these microbiota in NAFLD remains unknown. Several reports have demonstrated that certain gut microbiota are associated with the development of obesity and NAFLD. For instance, a decrease in Akkermansia muciniphila causes a thinner intestinal mucus layer and promotes gut permeability, which allows the leakage of bacterial components. Interventions to increase Akkermansia muciniphila improve the metabolic parameters in obesity and NAFLD. In children, the levels of Escherichia were significantly increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with those in obese control. Escherichia can produce ethanol, which promotes gut permeability. Thus, normalization of gut microbiota using probiotics or prebiotics is a promising treatment option for NAFLD. In addition, TLR signaling in the liver is activated, and its downstream molecules, such as proinflammatory cytokines, are increased in NAFLD. To data, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Therefore, gut microbiota and TLRs are targets for NAFLD treatment. PMID:24966608

  10. Dietary fructose as a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Glucose is a major energy source for the entire body, while fructose metabolism occurs mainly in the liver. Fructose consumption has increased over the last decade globally and is suspected to contribute to the increased incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is a manifestation of metabolic syndrome affecting about one-third of the population worldwide and has progressive pathological potential for liver cirrhosis and cancer through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Here we have reviewed the possible contribution of fructose to the pathophysiology of NAFLD. We critically summarize the current findings about several regulators, and their potential mechanisms, that have been studied in humans and animal models in response to fructose exposure. A novel hypothesis on fructose-dependent perturbation of liver regeneration and metabolism is advanced. Fructose intake could affect inflammatory and metabolic processes, liver function, gut microbiota, and portal endotoxin influx. The role of the brain in controlling fructose ingestion and the subsequent development of NAFLD is highlighted. Although the importance for fructose (over)consumption for NAFLD in humans is still debated and comprehensive intervention studies are invited, understanding of how fructose intake can favor these pathological processes is crucial for the development of appropriate noninvasive diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to detect and treat these metabolic effects. Still, lifestyle modification, to lessen the consumption of fructose-containing products, and physical exercise are major measures against NAFLD. Finally, promising drugs against fructose-induced insulin resistance and hepatic dysfunction that are emerging from studies in rodents are reviewed, but need further validation in human patients.

  11. Role of gut microbiota and Toll-like receptors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kouichi; Ohnishi, Hirohide

    2014-06-21

    Emerging data have shown a close association between compositional changes in gut microbiota and the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The change in gut microbiota may alter nutritional absorption and storage. In addition, gut microbiota are a source of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, and their compositional change can also increase the amount of TLR ligands delivered to the liver. TLR ligands can stimulate liver cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, the gut-liver axis has attracted much interest, particularly regarding the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The abundance of the major gut microbiota, including Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, has been considered a potential underlying mechanism of obesity and NAFLD, but the role of these microbiota in NAFLD remains unknown. Several reports have demonstrated that certain gut microbiota are associated with the development of obesity and NAFLD. For instance, a decrease in Akkermansia muciniphila causes a thinner intestinal mucus layer and promotes gut permeability, which allows the leakage of bacterial components. Interventions to increase Akkermansia muciniphila improve the metabolic parameters in obesity and NAFLD. In children, the levels of Escherichia were significantly increased in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with those in obese control. Escherichia can produce ethanol, which promotes gut permeability. Thus, normalization of gut microbiota using probiotics or prebiotics is a promising treatment option for NAFLD. In addition, TLR signaling in the liver is activated, and its downstream molecules, such as proinflammatory cytokines, are increased in NAFLD. To data, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 have been shown to be associated with the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Therefore, gut microbiota and TLRs are targets for NAFLD treatment.

  12. Reduced Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity in Adult Patients With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Di Santo, Serena; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by intra-hepatic fat accumulation and mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis are not fully explained. Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. We investigated its activity in patients with fatty liver. LAL activity (nmol/spot/h) was measured in 100 adult healthy subjects (HS) and in 240 NAFLD patients. A sub-analysis on 35 patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was performed. Median LAL activity was 1.15 (0.95–1.72) in HS. It was significantly reduced in NAFLD [0.78 (0.61–1.01), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. A further reduction was observed in the subgroup of NASH [0.67 (0.51–0.77), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. Patients with LAL activity below median had higher values of serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and LDL-c (p < 0.05), and increased serum liver enzymes (ALT, p < 0.001; AST, p < 0.01; GGT, p < 0.01). At multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with LAL activity below median were ALT (OR: 1.018, 95% CI 1.004–1.032, p = 0.011) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.551, 95% CI 1.241–5.245, p = 0.011), whilst statin use predicted a better LAL function (OR: 0.464, 95% CI 0.248–0.866, p = 0.016). Our findings suggest a strong association between impaired LAL activity and NAFLD. A better knowledge of the role of LAL may provide new insights in NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26288848

  13. Reduced Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity in Adult Patients With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Francesco; Pastori, Daniele; Del Ben, Maria; Polimeni, Licia; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Di Santo, Serena; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Violi, Francesco; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by intra-hepatic fat accumulation and mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis are not fully explained. Lysosomal Acid Lipase (LAL) is a key enzyme in lipid metabolism. We investigated its activity in patients with fatty liver. LAL activity (nmol/spot/h) was measured in 100 adult healthy subjects (HS) and in 240 NAFLD patients. A sub-analysis on 35 patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was performed. Median LAL activity was 1.15 (0.95-1.72) in HS. It was significantly reduced in NAFLD [0.78 (0.61-1.01), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. A further reduction was observed in the subgroup of NASH [0.67 (0.51-0.77), p < 0.001 vs. HS]. Patients with LAL activity below median had higher values of serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and LDL-c (p < 0.05), and increased serum liver enzymes (ALT, p < 0.001; AST, p < 0.01; GGT, p < 0.01). At multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with LAL activity below median were ALT (OR: 1.018, 95% CI 1.004-1.032, p = 0.011) and metabolic syndrome (OR: 2.551, 95% CI 1.241-5.245, p = 0.011), whilst statin use predicted a better LAL function (OR: 0.464, 95% CI 0.248-0.866, p = 0.016). Our findings suggest a strong association between impaired LAL activity and NAFLD. A better knowledge of the role of LAL may provide new insights in NAFLD pathogenesis.

  14. Three-dimensional perfused human in vitro model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kostrzewski, Tomasz; Cornforth, Terri; Snow, Sophie A; Ouro-Gnao, Larissa; Rowe, Cliff; Large, Emma M; Hughes, David J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To develop a human in vitro model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), utilising primary hepatocytes cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) perfused platform. METHODS Fat and lean culture media were developed to directly investigate the effects of fat loading on primary hepatocytes cultured in a 3D perfused culture system. Oil Red O staining was used to measure fat loading in the hepatocytes and the consumption of free fatty acids (FFA) from culture medium was monitored. Hepatic functions, gene expression profiles and adipokine release were compared for cells cultured in fat and lean conditions. To determine if fat loading in the system could be modulated hepatocytes were treated with known anti-steatotic compounds. RESULTS Hepatocytes cultured in fat medium were found to accumulate three times more fat than lean cells and fat uptake was continuous over a 14-d culture. Fat loading of hepatocytes did not cause any hepatotoxicity and significantly increased albumin production. Numerous adipokines were expressed by fatty cells and genes associated with NAFLD and liver disease were upregulated including: Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1, fatty acid-binding protein 3 and CYP7A1. The metabolic activity of hepatocytes cultured in fatty conditions was found to be impaired and the activities of CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 were significantly reduced, similar to observations made in NAFLD patients. The utility of the model for drug screening was demonstrated by measuring the effects of known anti-steatotic compounds. Hepatocytes, cultured under fatty conditions and treated with metformin, had a reduced cellular fat content compared to untreated controls and consumed less FFA from cell culture medium. CONCLUSION The 3D in vitro NAFLD model recapitulates many features of clinical NAFLD and is an ideal tool for analysing the efficacy of anti-steatotic compounds. PMID:28127194

  15. Role of adipokines and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Giby, Vettickattuparambil George; Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic fat deposition has been demonstrated in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Genetic and environmental factors are important for the development of NAFLD. Diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension have been found to be closely associated with the incidence of NAFLD. Evidence suggests that obesity and insulin resistance are the major factors that contribute to the development of NAFLD. In comparing the factors that contribute to the buildup of excess calories in obesity, an imbalance of energy homeostasis can be considered as the basis. Among the peripheral signals that are generated to regulate the uptake of food, signals from adipose tissue are of major relevance and involve the maintenance of energy homeostasis through processes such as lipogenesis, lipolysis, and oxidation of fatty acids. Advances in research on adipose tissue suggest an integral role played by adipokines in NAFLD. Cytokines secreted by adipocytes, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β, and interleukin-6, are implicated in NAFLD. Other adipokines, such as leptin and adiponectin and, to a lesser extent, resistin and retinol binding protein-4 are also involved. Leptin and adiponectin can augment the oxidation of fatty acid in liver by activating the nuclear receptor super-family of transcription factors, namely peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α. Recent studies have proposed downregulation of PPAR-α in cases of hepatic steatosis. This review discusses the role of adipokines and PPARs with regard to hepatic energy metabolism and progression of NAFLD. PMID:25232450

  16. Methodologies for investigating natural medicines for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Sun; Kung, Sidney; Grewal, Thomas; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2012-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is emerging as a prominent condition in Western countries. In this review we describe the characteristics and current treatments of NAFLD and discuss opportunities for developing new therapeutic management approaches, with a particular emphasis on development of animal studies and in vitro assays for identification of components of natural product medicines. The main manifestation of NAFLD is hepatic lipid accumulation in the form of lipid droplets (LDs), known as hepatic steatosis (fatty liver). Current treatments for NAFLD generally aim to reduce triglyceride (TG) accumulation, often utilizing thiazolidinedines (TZDs) and fibrates, which are known to lower TG levels in hyperlipidemia, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Both of these compounds act through activation of nuclear receptors of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) family, thereby activating genes involved in triglyceride metabolism. Thus treatment using natural PPAR α and PPAR γ ligands, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), has also been considered. Alternatively, natural medicines for the treatment of NAFLD have a long and successful history of controlling disease without prominent side effects. However, active compounds in natural medicine responsible for lowering hepatic TG levels are yet poorly characterized. This points to the need for medium-high throughput screening assays to identify active components within natural herbs. As outlined in this review, the quantification of the size and number of lipid droplets could provide an opportunity to screen compound libraries derived from natural medicine for their potential to reduce NAFLD.

  17. The common marmoset as a model for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, J A; Grindley, J; Crowell, A M; Makaron, L; Kohli, R; Kirby, M; Mansfield, K G; Wachtman, L M

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The more clinically concerning form of the disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is characterized by steatosis, lobular inflammation, and ballooning degeneration. Here we describe a naturally occurring syndrome in the common marmoset that recapitulates the pathologic findings associated with NAFLD/NASH in humans. Hepatomegaly determined to result from NAFLD was observed in 33 of 183 marmosets. A comprehensive histopathologic assessment performed in 31 marmosets demonstrated that NAFLD was characterized by variably sized, Oil Red O staining cytoplasmic vacuoles and observed primarily in animals with evidence of obesity and insulin resistance. A subset of marmosets (16 of 31) also demonstrated evidence of NASH characterized by multifocal inflammation combined with ballooning hepatocellular degeneration. Marmosets with NASH demonstrated an increase in immunostaining with an antibody targeted against the human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR compared with marmosets without NASH (38.89 cells/10× field vs 12.05 cells/10× field, P = .05). In addition, marmosets with NASH demonstrated increased Ki-67 immunopositive cellular proliferation compared with those without (5.95 cells/10× field vs 1.53 cells/10× field, P = .0002). Finally, animals with NASH demonstrated significantly increased mean circulating serum iron levels (160.47 μg/dl, P = .008) and an increase in numbers of Prussian blue-positive Kupffer cells (9.28 cells/40× field, P = .005) relative to marmosets without NASH (97.75 μg/dl and 1.87 cells/40×, respectively). This study further characterizes the histopathology of NAFLD/NASH and suggests that the marmoset may be a valuable animal model with which to investigate the host and environmental factors contributing to the progression of NAFLD/ NASH.

  18. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Childhood: Endocrine-Metabolic “Mal-Programming”

    PubMed Central

    Manti, Sara; Romano, Claudio; Chirico, Valeria; Filippelli, Martina; Cuppari, Caterina; Loddo, Italia; Salpietro, Carmelo; Arrigo, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the major chronic liver disease in the pediatric population. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of abnormalities (inflammation, fibrosis and cirrhosis), ranging from accumulation of fat (also known as steatosis) towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The development of NAFLD in children is significantly increased. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for the major studies published from 1998 to today. The databases searched were: PubMed, EMBASE, Orphanet, Midline and Cochrane Library. We used the key words: "non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, children, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fatty liver". Results: NAFLD/NASH is probably promoted by “multiple parallel hits”: environmental and genetic factors, systemic immunological disorders (oxidative stress, persistent-low grade of inflammation) as well as obesity and metabolic alterations (insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome). However its exact cause still underdiagnosed and unknown. Conclusions: Pediatric NAFLD/NASH is emerging problem. Longitudinal follow-up studies, unfortunately still insufficient, are needed to better understand the natural history and outcome of NAFLD in children. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, environmental, genetic and metabolic factors of disease. The review also highlights the importance of studying the underlying mechanisms of pediatric NAFLD and the need for complete and personalized approach in the management of NAFLD/NASH. PMID:24829591

  19. Use of a Diabetes Self-Assessment Score to Predict Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-Ho; Park, Young Min; Kim, Jungghi; Kim, Heesuk; Lee, Byung-Wan; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are strongly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. We recently developed and validated a self-assessment score in the Korean population to identify people at high risk for diabetes. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the self-assessment risk score for diabetes can also be used to screen for the presence of NAFLD or NASH.The study population included 15,676 subjects (8313 men and 7363 women) over 20 years old who visited the National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital in Korea between 2008 and 2010. Anthropometric, clinical, and laboratory data were analyzed during regular health checkups. Fatty liver disease was diagnosed using ultrasound, discrimination capability was assessed based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and evaluation measures, including sensitivity and specificity, were calculated. Multiple logistic analyses were also performed.We calculated a self-assessed risk score for diabetes (range: 0-11), and a cutoff of ≥5 identified 60% (50%) of men (women) at high risk for NAFLD, reflecting a sensitivity of 79% (85%), a specificity of 60% (66%), a positive predictive value (PPV) of 68% (51%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 73% (91%), with an AUC of 0.75 (0.82) for men (women). A cutoff point of ≥6 identified 43% (31%) of men (women) at high risk for NASH, reflecting a sensitivity of 80% (86%), a specificity of 64% (75%), a PPV of 30% (28%), and a NPV of 94% (98%), with an AUC of 0.77 (0.86) for men (women). The odds ratios that a 1-point increase in the diabetes risk scores would be associated with an increased risk for NAFLD and NASH were 1.20 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-1.25] and 1.57 (95% CI: 1.49-1.65), respectively, in men, and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.21-1.34) and 1.89 (95% CI: 1.73-2.07), respectively, in women.The present study indicates that our self-assessment risk score

  20. Resveratrol supplementation improves inflammatory biomarkers in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Faghihzadeh, Forouzan; Adibi, Peyman; Rafiei, Rahmatollah; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2014-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with antioxidant capacity that shows beneficial effects on down-regulation of inflammatory mediators and metabolic disorders. We hypothesized that supplementation with resveratrol can further improve the efficacy of lifestyle modifications in the management of NAFLD. In this randomized, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial, 50 NAFLD patients were supplemented with either a 500-mg resveratrol capsule or a placebo capsule for 12 weeks. Both groups were advised to follow an energy-balanced diet and received physical activity recommendations. Serum liver enzymes, inflammatory markers, hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, dietary intake, anthropometric measurements, and physical activity were assessed at both baseline and the end of the study. In both groups, anthropometric measurements (weight, body mass index, waist circumference), liver enzymes, and steatosis grade improved (P < 005). Resveratrol supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase, inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor κB activity, serum cytokeratin-18, and hepatic steatosis grade, as compared with placebo supplementation (P < .05). For the treatment of NAFLD, our results showed that 12 weeks of supplementation of 500 mg resveratrol, along with lifestyle modification, is superior to lifestyle modification alone. This is at least partially due to the attenuation of inflammatory markers and hepatocellular apoptosis. More studies are needed to confirm and increase the clinical application of the present results.

  1. A Guide to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Childhood and Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Temple, Jonathan L; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-15

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease, affecting 10%-20% of the general paediatric population. Within the next 10 years it is expected to become the leading cause of liver pathology, liver failure and indication for liver transplantation in childhood and adolescence in the Western world. While our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease remains limited, it is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of more widespread metabolic dysfunction and is strongly associated with a number of metabolic risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease and, most significantly, obesity. Despite this, "paediatric" NAFLD remains under-studied, under-recognised and, potentially, undermanaged. This article will explore and evaluate our current understanding of NAFLD in childhood and adolescence and how it differs from adult NAFLD, in terms of its epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, diagnosis and clinical management. Given the current absence of definitive radiological and histopathological diagnostic tests, maintenance of a high clinical suspicion by all members of the multidisciplinary team in primary and specialist care settings remains the most potent of diagnostic tools, enabling early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  2. A Guide to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Jonathan L.; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Oben, Jude A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent form of chronic liver disease, affecting 10%–20% of the general paediatric population. Within the next 10 years it is expected to become the leading cause of liver pathology, liver failure and indication for liver transplantation in childhood and adolescence in the Western world. While our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease remains limited, it is thought to be the hepatic manifestation of more widespread metabolic dysfunction and is strongly associated with a number of metabolic risk factors, including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, cardiovascular disease and, most significantly, obesity. Despite this, ”paediatric” NAFLD remains under-studied, under-recognised and, potentially, undermanaged. This article will explore and evaluate our current understanding of NAFLD in childhood and adolescence and how it differs from adult NAFLD, in terms of its epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, diagnosis and clinical management. Given the current absence of definitive radiological and histopathological diagnostic tests, maintenance of a high clinical suspicion by all members of the multidisciplinary team in primary and specialist care settings remains the most potent of diagnostic tools, enabling early diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic intervention. PMID:27314342

  3. Phospholipase D1 deficiency in mice causes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via an autophagy defect

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jang Ho; Park, Shi-Young; Dall’Armi, Claudia; Lee, Jae Sung; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Hui-Young; Yoon, Mee-Sup; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides (TG) as lipid droplets in the liver. Although lipid-metabolizing enzymes are considered important in NAFLD, the involvement of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has not yet been studied. Here, we show that the genetic ablation of PLD1 in mice induces NAFLD due to an autophagy defect. PLD1 expression was decreased in high-fat diet-induced NAFLD. Subsequently, PLD1 deficiency led to an increase in hepatic TGs and liver weight. Autophagic flux was blocked in Pld1−/− hepatocytes, with decreased β-oxidation rate, reduced oxidation-related gene expression, and swollen mitochondria. The dynamics of autophagy was restored by treatment with the PLD product, phosphatidic acid (PA) or adenoviral PLD1 expression in Pld1−/− hepatocytes, confirming that lysosomal PA produced by PLD1 regulates autophagy. Notably, PLD1 expression in Pld1−/− liver significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, compared with Pld1−/− liver. Thus, PLD1 plays an important role in hepatic steatosis via the regulation of autophagy. PMID:27976696

  4. Phospholipase D1 deficiency in mice causes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via an autophagy defect.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jang Ho; Park, Shi-Young; Dall'Armi, Claudia; Lee, Jae Sung; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Hui-Young; Yoon, Mee-Sup; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2016-12-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides (TG) as lipid droplets in the liver. Although lipid-metabolizing enzymes are considered important in NAFLD, the involvement of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) has not yet been studied. Here, we show that the genetic ablation of PLD1 in mice induces NAFLD due to an autophagy defect. PLD1 expression was decreased in high-fat diet-induced NAFLD. Subsequently, PLD1 deficiency led to an increase in hepatic TGs and liver weight. Autophagic flux was blocked in Pld1(-/-) hepatocytes, with decreased β-oxidation rate, reduced oxidation-related gene expression, and swollen mitochondria. The dynamics of autophagy was restored by treatment with the PLD product, phosphatidic acid (PA) or adenoviral PLD1 expression in Pld1(-/-) hepatocytes, confirming that lysosomal PA produced by PLD1 regulates autophagy. Notably, PLD1 expression in Pld1(-/-) liver significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, compared with Pld1(-/-) liver. Thus, PLD1 plays an important role in hepatic steatosis via the regulation of autophagy.

  5. Protective effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf polysaccharide on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhengui; Fan, Ruifeng; Yin, Shaojie; Zhao, Xiaona; Liu, Jianzhu; Li, Liuhui; Zhang, Wenqi; Ge, Lijiang

    2015-09-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide fraction extracted from the leaf of Ginkgo biloba was named GBLP. The protective effect of GBLP on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was observed and underlying mechanism was explored. Wistar male rats were randomly divided into five groups, namely, normal control group, model control group and GBLP groups (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/d). A rat model of NAFLD was established in male Wistar rats by feeding with high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. On day 57, the intragastric administration of GBLP started once daily for 4 weeks. The results showed that GBLP supplementation significantly and dose-dependently lowered the weight gain of body, liver index and serum lipid parameters in HFD-fed rat. Meanwhile, GBLP attenuated HFD-induced liver injury through reducing hepatic steatosis, TG accumulation, serum ALT, AST and ALP levels. GBLP had a positive effect on obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR) via reducing serum glucose and insulin levels. Furthermore, GBLP enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced MDA levels in serum and liver. These results indicate that GBLP can play a certain protective role against HFD-induced NAFLD, and the protective effects may be associated with attenuating IR, preserving liver function, enhancing antioxidant defense system, and reducing lipid peroxidation.

  6. CCN1 expression in hepatocytes contributes to macrophage infiltration in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaolian; Peng, Yanshen; You, Zhengrui; Wang, Qixia; Miao, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Han, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Dekai; Li, Zhiping; Ma, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the potential roles of CCN1 in the inflammation and macrophage infiltration of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The regulation of hepatic CCN1 expression was investigated in vitro with murine primary hepatocytes treated with free fatty acids or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo with high-fat (HF) diet-fed mice or ob/ob mice. CCN1 protein and a liver-specific CCN1 expression plasmid were administered to mice fed a normal diet (ND) or HF diet. Myeloid-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells were also treated with CCN1 in vitro to determine the chemotactic effects of CCN1 on macrophages. LPS treatment significantly increased hepatic CCN1 expression in HF diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice. LPS and FFAs induced CCN1 expression in primary murine hepatocytes in vitro through the TLR4/MyD88/AP-1 pathway. CCN1 protein and overexpression of CCN1 in the liver induced more severe hepatic inflammation and macrophage infiltrates in HF mice than in ND mice. CCN1 recruited macrophages through activation of the Mek/Erk signaling pathway in myeloid-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Endotoxin and FFA-induced CCN1 expression in hepatocytes is involved in the hepatic proinflammatory response and macrophage infiltration in murine NAFLD.

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children now: lifestyle changes and pharmacologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alisi, Anna; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of most common chronic liver diseases in children. A greater understanding about the risk factors and molecular pathogenesis of NAFLD suggests that lifestyle interventions aiming to decrease obesity/body mass index and metabolic derangement are the first line of treatments adopted in children affected by this disease. However, because these therapeutic options are often at the beginning misjudged by the patients and their parents, the use of pharmacologic agents may help to protect the liver and other organs from further irreversible tissue damage. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress) also might slow the progression of this increasingly prevalent pediatric disorder. On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of the dietary approaches, possibly coupled with regular exercise, on decreasing the metabolic and histologic damage in pediatric NAFLD. We also emphasize several advantages of the pharmacologic treatments adopted or adoptable in combination with lifestyle interventions in children with NAFLD.

  8. Antioxidant vitamins in the context of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ued, Fábio da Veiga; Weffort, Virgínia Resende S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on the importance of antioxidant vitamins, analyzed in the context of dietary intake, its plasma levels, and its current use as a supplementation treatment in obese children and adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. DATA SOURCES: The articles were identified in Lilacs, Ibecs, SciELO, PubMed/Medline, and Scopus databases. To conduct the survey, the "fatty liver" descriptor was associated to the following words: "children", "antioxidants" and "vitamins". The search was limited to articles written in Portuguese, Spanish and English, with publication date until December, 2012. DATA SYNTHESIS: Six studies were selected. The survey revealed a low dietary intake and low antioxidant vitamins serum levels in this population. The changes in lifestyle, with adequate dietary intake of vitamins, and the increase in physical activity were associated with a significant improvement in liver histology and in laboratory tests. Vitamin supplementation also improved the disease progression markers, as the alanine aminotransferase serum levels and the histological characteristics of lobular inflammation and hepatocellular damage. However, these improvements were not statistically significant in all studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to recommend or to refute antioxidant supplementation in patients with simple steatosis or steatohepatitis. The changes in lifestyle seem to be, at the present time, the more advisable therapy. PMID:24473959

  9. Insulin resistance in development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shahinul; Mustafa, Golam; Alam, Mahabubul; Ahmad, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Although insulin resistance (IR) is strongly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the association of IR and NAFLD is not universal and correlation between IR and severity of NAFLD is still controversial. In this review, we summarize recent evidence that partially dissociates insulin resistance from NAFLD. It has also been reported that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the diacylglycerol acyltransferase gene, rather than IR, account for the variability in liver fat content. Polymorphisms of the patatin-like phospholipase 3 gene have also been reported to be associated with NAFLD without metabolic syndrome, which suggests that genetic conditions that promote the development of fatty changes in the liver may occur independently of IR. Moreover, environmental factors such as nutrition and physical activity as well as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth have been linked to the pathogenesis of NAFLD, although some of the data are conflicting. Therefore, findings from both genetically engineered animal models and humans with genetic conditions, as well as recent studies that have explored the role of environmental factors, have confirmed the view that NAFLD is a polygenic disease process caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Therefore, IR is not the sole predictor of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:27190693

  10. Toll-like receptor 7 affects the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sokho; Park, Surim; Kim, Bumseok; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-06-09

    Recently, a possible link between toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and liver disease was suggested, although it was limited to fibrosis. Based on this report, we investigated whether TLR7 has a pivotal role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The TLR7 signaling pathway, which is activated by imiquimod (TLR7 ligand) naturally, induced autophagy and released insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) into medium from hepatocytes. Lipid accumulation induced by unsaturated fatty acid (UFA; arachidonic acid:oleic acid = 1:1) in hepatocytes, was attenuated in TLR7 and autophagy activation. Interestingly, TLR7 activation attenuated UFA-induced lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (4-HNE). To clarify a possible pathway between TLR7 and lipid peroxidation, we treated hepatocytes with MDA and 4-HNE. MDA and 4-HNE induced 2-folds lipid accumulation in UFA-treated hepatocytes via blockade of the TLR7 signaling pathway's IGF-1 release compared to only UFA-treated hepatocytes. In vivo experiments carried out with TLR7 knockout mice produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. In conclusion, TLR7 prevents progression of NAFLD via induced autophagy and released IGF-1 from liver. These findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD.

  11. Toll-like receptor 7 affects the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sokho; Park, Surim; Kim, Bumseok; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a possible link between toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and liver disease was suggested, although it was limited to fibrosis. Based on this report, we investigated whether TLR7 has a pivotal role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The TLR7 signaling pathway, which is activated by imiquimod (TLR7 ligand) naturally, induced autophagy and released insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) into medium from hepatocytes. Lipid accumulation induced by unsaturated fatty acid (UFA; arachidonic acid:oleic acid = 1:1) in hepatocytes, was attenuated in TLR7 and autophagy activation. Interestingly, TLR7 activation attenuated UFA-induced lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (4-HNE). To clarify a possible pathway between TLR7 and lipid peroxidation, we treated hepatocytes with MDA and 4-HNE. MDA and 4-HNE induced 2-folds lipid accumulation in UFA-treated hepatocytes via blockade of the TLR7 signaling pathway’s IGF-1 release compared to only UFA-treated hepatocytes. In vivo experiments carried out with TLR7 knockout mice produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. In conclusion, TLR7 prevents progression of NAFLD via induced autophagy and released IGF-1 from liver. These findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:27279075

  12. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pengtao; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Hong; Wei, Taotao

    2013-04-19

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H2O2 and TNF-α, two typical "second hit" factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  13. The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tendler, David; Lin, Sauyu; Yancy, William S; Mavropoulos, John; Sylvestre, Pam; Rockey, Don C; Westman, Eric C

    2007-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is an increasingly common condition that may progress to hepatic cirrhosis. This pilot study evaluated the effects of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet on obesity-associated fatty liver disease. Five patients with a mean body mass index of 36.4 kg/m(2) and biopsy evidence of fatty liver disease were instructed to follow the diet (<20 g/d of carbohydrate) with nutritional supplementation for 6 months. Patients returned for group meetings biweekly for 3 months, then monthly for the second 3 months. The mean weight change was -12.8 kg (range 0 to -25.9 kg). Four of 5 posttreatment liver biopsies showed histologic improvements in steatosis (P=.02) inflammatory grade (P=.02), and fibrosis (P=.07). Six months of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet led to significant weight loss and histologic improvement of fatty liver disease. Further research is into this approach is warranted.

  14. Burn after feeding. An old uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation is redesigned for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fromenty, B

    2014-10-01

    Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in brown adipose tissue can be used by hibernating animals to produce heat at the expense of their fat mass. In a recent work, Dr Shulman et al. generated a liver-targeted derivative of the prototypical OXPHOS uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol that alleviated steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in several models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Interleukin-34 as a fibroblast-derived marker of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Mano, Yohei; Kumagai, Erina; Sugiyama, Masaya; Korenaga, Masaaki; Arai, Taeang; Itokawa, Norio; Atsukawa, Masanori; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Ito, Kiyoaki; Yoneda, Masashi; Nozaki, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Torimura, Takuji; Abe, Masanori; Hiasa, Yoichi; Fukai, Moto; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Taketomi, Akinobu; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic non-viral liver disease. Activation of macrophages and hepatic stellate cells is a critical step that promotes liver fibrosis. We aimed to explore the feasibility of interleukin-34 (IL-34), a key regulator of macrophages, as a fibrosis marker in patients with NAFLD. We enrolled 197 liver biopsy-proven NAFLD patients. We evaluated the serum levels of IL-34, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), soluble CD163 (sCD163), 40 cytokines/chemokines, hyaluronic acid, type IV collagen 7s, and clinically-approved fibrosis scores. IL-34 increased with the progression of fibrosis and was an independent marker for liver fibrosis. Immunostaining experiments, using resected liver specimens from NAFLD patients, revealed that IL-34 was mainly expressed on liver fibroblasts. IL-34 based fibrosis score (0.0387*IL-34 (pg/ml) + 0.3623*type IV collagen 7s (ng/ml) + 0.0184*age (year)-1.1850) was a practical predictive model of liver fibrosis. Using receiver-operating characteristic analyses, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of IL-34 based fibrosis score were superior or comparable to the other fibrosis biomarkers and scores. In conclusion, the IL-34 based fibrosis score, including serum IL-34, type IV collagen 7s and age, is a feasible diagnostic marker of liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients.

  16. What does irritable bowel syndrome share with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed

    Scalera, Antonella; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2013-09-07

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very common diseases in the general population. To date, there are no studies that highlight a direct link between NAFLD and IBS, but some recent reports have found an interesting correlation between obesity and IBS. A systematic PubMed database search was conducted highlighting that common mechanisms are involved in many of the local and systemic manifestations of NAFLD, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk, and IBS, leading to microbial dysbiosis, impaired intestinal barrier and altered intestinal motility. It is not known when considering local and systemic inflammation/immune system activation, which one has greater importance in NAFLD and IBS pathogenesis. Also, the nervous system is implicated. In fact, inflammation participates in the development of mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, characteristics of obesity and consequently of NAFLD and, on the other hand, in intestinal hypersensitivity and dysmotility.

  17. Correlation between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Krishan, Saini

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver means the presence of hepatosteatosis without significant alcohol consumption; it is strongly associated with obesity and metabolic disorder like type 2 diabetes and dyslipideamia. NASH may progress to advanced stages of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. Increased body mass index and viral genotype contribute to steatosis in chronic hepatitis. The sonographic features of NAFLD include the presence of bright hepatic echotexture deep attenuation, and vascular blurring either singly or in combination. Dyslipidemia in patients with NAFLD is atherogenic in nature and it is characterized by increased levels of serum triglycerides and decreased levels of HDL cholesterol. Statins are potent lipid-lowering agents which decrease LDL cholesterol by 20-60%, decrease triglycerides by 10-33% and increase HDL cholesterol by 5-10% for the patients with NAFLD.

  18. Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hekmatdoost, Azita; Shamsipour, Ali; Meibodi, Mohammad; Gheibizadeh, Newsha; Eslamparast, Tannaz; Poustchi, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    This case-control study was conducted to examine the association between adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) development in 102 patients with newly diagnosed NAFLD and 204 controls. Adherence to DASH-style diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and a DASH diet score based on food and nutrients emphasized or minimized in the DASH diet. Participants in the top quartile of DASH diet score were 30% less likely to have NAFLD (OR: 0.0.70; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.80); however, more adjustment for dyslipidemia and body mass index changed the association to non-significant (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.12). In conclusion, we found an inverse relationship between the DASH-style diet and risk of NAFLD. Prospective studies are needed to confirm this association.

  19. The relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome for colonoscopy colorectal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shuang; Hong, Wandong; Wu, Wenzhi; Chen, Qinfen; Zhao, Qian; Wu, Jiansheng; Jin, Yin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal neoplasm is considered to have a strong association with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome (MetS), respectively. The relationship among NAFLD, MetS, and colorectal neoplasm was assessed in 1793 participants. Participants were divided into 4 groups based on the status of NAFLD and MetS. Relative excess risks of interaction (RERI), attributable proportion (AP), and synergy index (SI) were applied to evaluate the additive interaction. NAFLD and MetS were significantly correlated with colorectal neoplasm and colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. The incidence of CRC in NAFLD (+) MetS (+) group was significantly higher than other 3 groups. The result of RERI, AP, and SI indicated the significant additive interaction of NAFLD and MetS on the development of CRC. NAFLD and MetS are risk factors for colorectal neoplasm and CRC, respectively. And NAFLD and MetS have an additive effect on the development of CRC. PMID:28079806

  20. Sarcopenia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Is there a relationship? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tovo, Cristiane V; Fernandes, Sabrina A; Buss, Caroline; de Mattos, Angelo A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To perform a systematic review to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adult patients with sarcopenia. METHODS Randomized clinical trials, cross-sectional or cohort studies including adult patients (over 18 years) with sarcopenia were selected. The primary outcomes of interest were the prevalence or incidence of NAFLD in sarcopenic patients. In the screening process, 44 full-text articles were included in the review and 41 studies were excluded. RESULTS Three cross-sectional studies were included. The authors attempted to perform a systematic review, but due to the differences between the studies, a qualitative synthesis was provided. The diagnosis of NAFLD was made by non-invasive methods (image methods or any surrogate markers) in all three evaluated studies. All the studies suggested that there was an independent association between sarcopenia and NAFLD. CONCLUSION Sarcopenia is independently associated with NAFLD and possibly to an advanced fibrosis. PMID:28293382

  1. Role of autophagy in the pathophysiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a controversial issue.

    PubMed

    Kwanten, Wilhelmus J; Martinet, Wim; Michielsen, Peter P; Francque, Sven M

    2014-06-21

    Autophagy is a mechanism involved in cellular homeostasis under basal and stressed conditions delivering cytoplasmic content to the lysosomes for degradation to macronutrients. The potential role of autophagy in disease is increasingly recognised and investigated in the last decade. Nowadays it is commonly accepted that autophagy plays a role in the hepatic lipid metabolism. Hence, dysfunction of autophagy may be an underlying cause of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, controversy of the exact role of autophagy in the lipid metabolism exists: some publications report a lipolytic function of autophagy, whereas others claim a lipogenic function. This review aims to give an update of the present knowledge on autophagy in the hepatic lipid metabolism, hepatic insulin resistance, steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrogenesis.

  2. Liver ergothioneine accumulation in a guinea pig model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A possible mechanism of defence?

    PubMed

    Cheah, Irwin K; Tang, Richard; Ye, Peng; Yew, Terry S Z; Lim, Keith H S; Halliwell, Barry

    2016-01-01

    L-ergothioneine (ET), a putative antioxidant compound acquired by animals through dietary sources, has been suggested to accumulate in certain cells and tissues in the body that are predisposed to high oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified an elevation of ET in the liver of a guinea pig model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), elucidated a possible mechanism for the increased uptake and investigated the possible role for this accumulation. This increase in liver ET levels correlated with cholesterol accumulation and disease severity. We identified an increase in the transcriptional factor, RUNX1, which has been shown to upregulate the expression of the ET-specific transporter OCTN1, and could consequently lead to the observable elevation in ET. An increase was also seen in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) which seemingly corresponds to ET elevation. No significant increase was observed in oxidative damage markers, F2-isoprostanes, and protein carbonyls, which could possibly be attributed to the increase in liver ET through direct antioxidant action, induction of HSP70, or by chelation of Fe(2+), preventing redox chemistry. The data suggest a novel mechanism by which the guinea pig fatty liver accumulates ET via upregulation of its transporter, as a possible stress response by the damaged liver to further suppress oxidative damage and delay tissue injury. Similar events may happen in other animal models of disease, and researchers should be aware of the possibility.

  3. Metformin in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Lei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) related to insulin resistance (IR) is a growing global health concern. Recent studies have indicated that metformin could improve IR and may be beneficial in the treatment of NAFLD. This study aimed to assess the beneficial or harmful effects of metformin in NAFLD. We searched Medline and four other databases during April 2012. Selection criteria were randomized clinical trials comparing metformin with placebo or other interventions for treating NAFLD patients. The primary outcome was histological response. The secondary outcomes included alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), body mass index (BMI) and adverse events. Dichotomous data were reported as odds ratio (OR), while continuous data were calculated as the mean difference (MD), both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Random and fixed effects meta-analyses were performed. Nine studies were included, involving 417 participants, and conducted for a time period ranging from 4 to 12 months. In the treated participants, improvements were observed in ALT (MD, -8.12 U/l; P=0.03), AST (MD, -4.52 U/l; P=0.04), HOMA-IR (MD, -0.61; P=0.005) and BMI (MD, -0.82 kg/m(2); P=0.04), but not in histological response: steatosis (P=0.66), inflammation (P=0.91), hepatocellular ballooning (P= 0.25) and fibrosis (P= 0.90). Sub-analysis of non-alcoholic fatty steatohepatitis showed that metformin failed to improve any pooled outcome. Adverse events were poorly reported. Current information indicates that metformin improves liver function, HOMA-IR and BMI to some extent, but not histological response in NAFLD patients. This finding could serve as a stimulus for future studies investigating issues such as dose-responsiveness, safety and patient tolerance to metformin therapy.

  4. Probiotics as a Novel Treatment for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease; A Systematic Review on the Current Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Roya; Farajian, Sanam; Mirlohi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Context Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease, with 5-10% of liver having extra fat. Increase in its prevalence in all age groups is linked with obesity and Type II diabetes. The treatment of NAFLD remains controversial. A growing body of evidence suggests a relation between overgrowth of gut microbiota with NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this review is to provide an overview on experimental and clinical studies assessing all positive and negative effects of probiotics. Evidence Acquisition We made a critical appraisal on various types of documents published from 1999 to March 2012 in journals, electronic books, seminars, and symposium contexts including Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We used the key words: “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, probiotics, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver disease, and fatty liver”. Results Probiotics, as biological factors, control the gut microbiota and result in its progression. It is in this sense that they are suggestive of a new and a natural way of promoting liver function. Correspondingly, limited evidence suggests that probiotics could be considered as a new way of treatment for NAFLD. Conclusions Various experimental studies and clinical trials revealed promising effects of probiotics in improving NAFLD; however given the limited experience in this field, generalization of probiotics as treatment of NAFLD needs substantiation through more trials with a larger sample sizes and with longer-term follow up. PMID:23885277

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome in obese children.

    PubMed

    Atabek, Mehmet Emre

    2011-10-21

    I read with great interest the article of Fu et al who investigated whether non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an early mediator for prediction of metabolic syndrome, and whether liver B-ultrasound could be used for its diagnosis, in a study involving 861 obese children (6-16 years old). In this study, it was reported that NAFLD is not only a liver disease, but also an early mediator that reflects metabolic disorder, and that liver B-ultrasound can be a useful tool for metabolic syndrome (MS) screening. The authors reported that NAFLD and MS were present in 68.18% and 25.67% of obese children, respectively. Moreover, they observed that the prevalence of MS in NAFLD children was 37.64%, which was much higher than that in the non-NAFLD group. Criteria analogous to those of the Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ definition for MS were used for children in this study. The reported prevalence data on MS in the young has varied markedly, in large part because of disagreement among the variously proposed definitions of MS. Therefore, in my opinion, a study aiming to assess the association between MS components and NAFLD in obese children has to take into account a simple, easy-to-apply clinical definition proposed by the international diabetes federation for MS. Interpretation of the results of the Fu et al study are limited by another major caveat: that the diagnosis or exclusion of NAFLD was based on liver enzymes and ultrasound imaging, but was not confirmed by liver biopsy. Indeed, it is known that liver enzymes may be within the reference interval in up to 70% of patients with diagnosed NAFLD and that the full histopathological spectrum of NAFLD may be present in patients with normal liver enzymes, which therefore cannot be reliably used to exclude the presence of NAFLD.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome in obese children

    PubMed Central

    Atabek, Mehmet Emre

    2011-01-01

    I read with great interest the article of Fu et al who investigated whether non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an early mediator for prediction of metabolic syndrome, and whether liver B-ultrasound could be used for its diagnosis, in a study involving 861 obese children (6-16 years old). In this study, it was reported that NAFLD is not only a liver disease, but also an early mediator that reflects metabolic disorder, and that liver B-ultrasound can be a useful tool for metabolic syndrome (MS) screening. The authors reported that NAFLD and MS were present in 68.18% and 25.67% of obese children, respectively. Moreover, they observed that the prevalence of MS in NAFLD children was 37.64%, which was much higher than that in the non-NAFLD group. Criteria analogous to those of the Adult Treatment Panel III definition for MS were used for children in this study. The reported prevalence data on MS in the young has varied markedly, in large part because of disagreement among the variously proposed definitions of MS. Therefore, in my opinion, a study aiming to assess the association between MS components and NAFLD in obese children has to take into account a simple, easy-to-apply clinical definition proposed by the international diabetes federation for MS. Interpretation of the results of the Fu et al study are limited by another major caveat: that the diagnosis or exclusion of NAFLD was based on liver enzymes and ultrasound imaging, but was not confirmed by liver biopsy. Indeed, it is known that liver enzymes may be within the reference interval in up to 70% of patients with diagnosed NAFLD and that the full histopathological spectrum of NAFLD may be present in patients with normal liver enzymes, which therefore cannot be reliably used to exclude the presence of NAFLD. PMID:22110273

  7. Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases: update on the challenge of diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyunwoo; Jun, Dae Won; Saeed, Waqar K; Nguyen, Mindie H

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is estimated to be 25-30% of the population, and is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes in Korea. NAFLD is a “hot potato” for pharmaceutical companies. Many clinical trials are underway to develop a first-in-class drug to treat NAFLD. However, there are several challenging issues regarding the diagnosis of NAFLD. Currently, liver biopsy is the gold standard method for the diagnosis of NAFLD and steatohepatitis. Ideally, globally recognized standards for histological diagnosis and methods to optimize observer agreement on biopsy interpretation should be developed. Liver biopsy is the best method rather than a perfect one. Recently, multi-parametric magnetic resonance imagery can estimate the amount of intrahepatic fat successfully and is widely used in clinical trials. But no diagnostic method can discriminate between steatohepatitis and simple steatosis. The other unresolved issue in regard to NAFLD is the absence of satisfactory treatment options. Vitamin E and obeticholic acid have shown protective effects in randomized controlled trials, but this drug has not been approved for use in Korea. This study will provide a description of diagnostic methods and treatments that are currently recommended for NAFLD. PMID:27729634

  8. Outcome of Phlebotomy for Treating Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Sanguankeo, Anawin; Upala, Sikarin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: No medications have been approved for managing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Lifestyle intervention is the mainstay for its treatment. Hyperferritinemia, which appears to be associated with the severity of liver injury and insulin resistance, is frequently observed in patients with NAFLD. Patients and Methods: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the outcomes of four interventional trials regarding the effect of phlebotomy in patients with NAFLD versus the outcomes of NAFLD patients who did not undergo phlebotomy. Primary outcome was the pooled mean difference (MD) of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The secondary outcomes were the changes in liver enzymes and the lipid profile. Results: Four interventional studies involving 438 participants were included in the meta-analysis. HOMA-IR was lower in patients who underwent phlebotomy, with an MD of 0.84 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 1.67, I2 = 72%]. Phlebotomy also significantly reduced the alanine aminotransferase (MD = 10.05, 95% CI 7.19–12.92, I2 = 34%) and triglyceride (MD = 9.89, 95% CI 4.96–14.83, I2 = 22%) levels and increased the high-density cholesterol level (MD = 3.48, 95% CI 2.03–4.92, I2 = 18%). Conclusion: Phlebotomy decreased insulin resistance and liver transaminase levels in patients with NAFLD. In addition, it improved their lipid profile. PMID:27976635

  9. Relationship of Serum Betatrophin with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hairong; Zhang, Yong; Xia, Mingfeng; Gong, Yingyun; Zhou, Hongwen; Fan, Yunqing; Yu, Weinan

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the association of serum betatrophin with the status and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods A total of 249 subjects who received ultrasonic examination of liver fat content (LFC) were recruited. Anthropometric and biochemical examinations were performed. Serum betatrophin was measured by ELISA. Results Compared with control group, serum betatrophin significantly increased in NAFLD group (P < 0.05). There was significant difference in serum betatrophin among control, low liver fat content (LLFC), and high liver fat content (HLFC) groups (P < 0.01). After adjustment for gender, age, BMI, FPG and HbA1c, the betatrophin positively correlated with LFC (r = 0.185, P < 0.01) and TG (r = 0.195, P < 0.01). Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated serum betatrophin was independently related to LFC (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed subjects in the highest tertile of serum betatrophin had higher odds of having NAFLD after adjustment for traditional NAFLD risk factors (OR = 2.88, 95%CI: 1.15–7.19) (P<0.05). Conclusion Serum betatrophin is an independent risk factor for NAFLD and potential non-invasive marker for its progression. Serum betatrophin may be helpful for the early diagnosis of NAFLD and improvement of its prognosis. PMID:28125672

  10. The Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Interplay between Diet, Gut Microbiota, and Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Sharon; Hu, Junbo; Feng, Wenke

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the world, and it comprises a spectrum of hepatic abnormalities from simple hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. While the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains incompletely understood, a multihit model has been proposed that accommodates causal factors from a variety of sources, including intestinal and adipose proinflammatory stimuli acting on the liver simultaneously. Prior cellular and molecular studies of patient and animal models have characterized several common pathogenic mechanisms of NAFLD, including proinflammation cytokines, lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. In recent years, gut microbiota has gained much attention, and dysbiosis is recognized as a crucial factor in NAFLD. Moreover, several genetic variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies, particularly rs738409 (Ile748Met) in PNPLA3 and rs58542926 (Glu167Lys) in TM6SF2, which are critical risk alleles of the disease. Although a high-fat diet and inactive lifestyles are typical risk factors for NAFLD, the interplay between diet, gut microbiota, and genetic background is believed to be more important in the development and progression of NAFLD. This review summarizes the common pathogenic mechanisms, the gut microbiota relevant mechanisms, and the major genetic variants leading to NAFLD and its progression. PMID:27247565

  11. Plasma selenium levels and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese adults: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Yan, Chonghuai; Liu, Gang; Niu, Yixin; Zhang, Weiwei; Lu, Shuai; Li, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Hongmei; Ning, Guang; Fan, Jiangao; Qin, Li; Su, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Selenium exposure can induce liver insulin resistance and increased liver triglyceride concentrations in animals, which may link to an increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, epidemiological studies investigating the association between elevated plasma selenium levels and NAFLD were not available. We aimed to investigate the association of selenium levels with the prevalence of NAFLD in Chinese adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 8550 Chinese adults aged 40 yr or older in Shanghai, China. A questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory tests were conducted. NAFLD was diagnosed by hepatic ultrasound after the exclusion of alcohol abuse and other liver diseases. Plasma selenium concentration was assessed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The median concentration of plasma selenium was 213.0 μg/L. Elevated plasma selenium levels were associated with higher triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, post-loading plasma glucose, A1c, HOMA-IR, as well as ALT, AST and γ-GT (all P < 0.05). The odds ratios were substantially higher for NAFLD (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.13–2.18) in the highest selenium quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile, after adjustment for potential cofounder. The results of this study provided epidemiological evidence that increased plasma selenium level is associated with elevated prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27853246

  12. Multifeature analysis of an ultrasound quantitative diagnostic index for classifying nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yin-Yin; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Lee, Ming-Ju; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chen, Jin-De; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease related to metabolic syndrome. This study applied an integrated analysis based on texture, backscattering, and attenuation features in ultrasound imaging with the aim of assessing the severity of NAFLD. Ultrasound radiofrequency data obtained from 394 clinical cases were analyzed to extract three texture features (autocorrelation, sum average, and sum variance), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the slope of the center-frequency downshift (CFDS slope). The texture, SNR, and CFDS slope were combined to produce a quantitative diagnostic index (QDI) that ranged from 0 to 6. We trained the QDI using training data and then applied it to test data to assess its utility. In training data, the areas (AUCs) under the receiver operating characteristic curves for NAFLD and severe NAFLD were 0.81 and 0.84, respectively. In test data, the AUCs were 0.73 and 0.81 for NAFLD and severe NAFLD, respectively. The QDI was able to distinguish severe NAFLD and a normal liver from mild NAFLD, and it was significantly correlated with metabolic factors. This study explored the potential of using the QDI to supply information on different physical characteristics of liver tissues for advancing the ability to grade NAFLD. PMID:27734972

  13. Oxidative stress, cardiolipin and mitochondrial dysfunction in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is today considered the most common form of chronic liver disease, affecting a high proportion of the population worldwide. NAFLD encompasses a large spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Obesity, hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia are the most important risk factors. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and its progression to fibrosis and chronic liver disease is still unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of NAFLD, although the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are still unclear. Oxidative stress is considered an important factor in producing lethal hepatocyte injury associated with NAFLD. Mitochondrial respiratory chain is the main subcellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may damage mitochondrial proteins, lipids and mitochondrial DNA. Cardiolipin, a phospholipid located at the level of the inner mitochondrial membrane, plays an important role in several reactions and processes involved in mitochondrial bioenergetics as well as in mitochondrial dependent steps of apoptosis. This phospholipid is particularly susceptible to ROS attack. Cardiolipin peroxidation has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple tissues in several physiopathological conditions, including NAFLD. In this review, we focus on the potential roles played by oxidative stress and cardiolipin alterations in mitochondrial dysfunction associated with NAFLD. PMID:25339807

  14. Mouse models in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis research

    PubMed Central

    Anstee, Quentin M; Goldin, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a histological spectrum of liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. As well as being a potential cause of progressive liver disease in its own right, steatosis has been shown to be an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of many other liver diseases. Animal models of NAFLD may be divided into two broad categories: those caused by genetic mutation and those with an acquired phenotype produced by dietary or pharmacological manipulation. The literature contains numerous different mouse models that exhibit histological evidence of hepatic steatosis or, more variably, steatohepatitis; however, few replicate the entire human phenotype. The genetic leptin-deficient (ob/ob) or leptin-resistant (db/db) mouse and the dietary methionine/choline-deficient model are used in the majority of published research. More recently, targeted gene disruption and the use of supra-nutritional diets to induce NAFLD have gained greater prominence as researchers have attempted to bridge the phenotype gap between the available models and the human disease. Using the physiological processes that underlie the pathogenesis and progression of NAFLD as a framework, we review the literature describing currently available mouse models of NAFLD, highlight the strengths and weaknesses of established models and describe the key findings that have furthered the understanding of disease pathogenesis. PMID:16436109

  15. Oxidative stress, cardiolipin and mitochondrial dysfunction in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2014-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is today considered the most common form of chronic liver disease, affecting a high proportion of the population worldwide. NAFLD encompasses a large spectrum of liver damage, ranging from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis. Obesity, hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia are the most important risk factors. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and its progression to fibrosis and chronic liver disease is still unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of NAFLD, although the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are still unclear. Oxidative stress is considered an important factor in producing lethal hepatocyte injury associated with NAFLD. Mitochondrial respiratory chain is the main subcellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may damage mitochondrial proteins, lipids and mitochondrial DNA. Cardiolipin, a phospholipid located at the level of the inner mitochondrial membrane, plays an important role in several reactions and processes involved in mitochondrial bioenergetics as well as in mitochondrial dependent steps of apoptosis. This phospholipid is particularly susceptible to ROS attack. Cardiolipin peroxidation has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple tissues in several physiopathological conditions, including NAFLD. In this review, we focus on the potential roles played by oxidative stress and cardiolipin alterations in mitochondrial dysfunction associated with NAFLD.

  16. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with metformin versus lifestyle intervention in insulin-resistant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Kristen J; Ehlers, Lindsay B; Zeitler, Philip S; Love-Osborne, Kathy

    2009-02-01

    The presence of fatty liver per ultrasound and liver-associated enzymes were measured in a select cohort of youth with both obesity and insulin resistance, and the effect of metformin on these parameters evaluated. Fifty obese, multiethnic, insulin-resistant adolescents (mean age 15.1 yr, mean body mass index 39.8 kg/m2) were randomized to receive lifestyle recommendations plus either twice per day doses of 850 mg of metformin or placebo. Fasting and post-glucose challenge biochemistries and liver ultrasounds were compared at baseline and 6 months. The prevalence of fatty liver was 74%, elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) 14%, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14%, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) 17%. Fatty liver was mild in 23%, moderate in 31%, and severe in 46%. Fatty liver was more common in male and Hispanic subjects and elevated ALT more common in Hispanic subjects. Subjects with fatty liver appeared more insulin resistant (higher fasting insulin and triglycerides, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and had higher ALT and AST. At 6 months, mean ALT, GGT, and fasting insulin improved significantly in all subjects. Fatty liver prevalence (p < 0.04), severity (p < 0.04), and fasting insulin (p < 0.025) improved significantly with metformin compared to placebo. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) occurs with a high prevalence and severity in obese, insulin-resistant adolescents. While metformin plus lifestyle intervention appears promising, defining NAFLD therapies capable of preventing fibrosis and cirrhosis requires further study.

  17. Bile acids and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Molecular insights and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P.; Karpen, Saul J.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a burgeoning health problem worldwide and an important risk factor for both hepatic and cardiometabolic mortality. The rapidly increasing prevalence of this disease and of its aggressive form nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) will require novel therapeutic approaches to prevent disease progression to advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis and cancer. In recent years, bile acids have emerged as relevant signaling molecules that act at both hepatic and extrahepatic tissues to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolic pathways as well as energy homeostasis. Activation or modulation of bile acid receptors, such as the farnesoid X receptor and TGR5, and transporters, such as the ileal apical sodium‐dependent bile acid transporter, appear to affect both insulin sensitivity and NAFLD/NASH pathogenesis at multiple levels, and these approaches hold promise as novel therapies. In the present review, we summarize current available data on the relationships of bile acids to NAFLD and the potential for therapeutically targeting bile‐acid‐related pathways to address this growing world‐wide disease. (Hepatology 2017;65:350‐362) PMID:27358174

  18. Interleukin-18-deficient mice develop dyslipidemia resulting in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Maeda, Seishi; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Watanabe, Yuko; Yoshida, Momoko; Ikubo, Kaoru; Okuzaki, Daisuke; El-Darawish, Yosif; Li, Wen; Nakasho, Keiji; Nojima, Hiroshi; Yamanishi, Hiromichi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Okamura, Haruki; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential pathophysiological relationships between interleukin 18 (IL-18) and dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Compared with Il18(+/+) mice, IL-18 knockout (Il18(-/-)) mice developed hypercholesterolemia and hyper-high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterolemia as well as hypertriglyceridemia as they aged, and these disorders occurred before the manifestation of obesity and might cause secondary NASH. The analyses of molecular mechanisms involved in the onset of dyslipidemia, NAFLD, and NASH in Il18(-/-) mice identified a number of genes associated with these metabolic diseases. In addition, molecules related to circadian rhythm might affect these extracted genes. The intravenous administration of recombinant IL-18 significantly improved dyslipidemia, inhibited the body weight gain of Il18(+/+) mice, and prevented the onset of NASH. The expression of genes related to these dysfunctions was also affected by recombinant IL-18 administration. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the critical function of IL-18 in lipid metabolism and these findings might contribute to the progress of novel treatments for NAFLD or NASH.

  19. A diet-induced animal model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asgharpour, Amon; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Pacana, Tommy; Seneshaw, Mulugeta; Vincent, Robert; Banini, Bubu A.; Kumar, Divya Prasanna; Daita, Kalyani; Min, Hae-Ki; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Bedossa, Pierre; Sun, Xiaochen; Hoshida, Yujin; Koduru, Srinivas V.; Contaifer, Daniel; Warncke, Urszula Osinska; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The lack of a preclinical model of progressive non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that recapitulates human disease is a barrier to therapeutic development. Methods A stable isogenic cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S1/SvImJ (S129) mice were fed a high fat diet with ad libitum consumption of glucose and fructose in physiologically relevant concentrations and compared to mice fed a chow diet and also to both parent strains. Results Following initiation of the obesogenic diet, B6/129 mice developed obesity, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and increased LDL-cholesterol. They sequentially also developed steatosis (4–8 weeks), steatohepatitis (16–24 weeks), progressive fibrosis (16 weeks onwards) and spontaneous hepatocellular cancer (HCC). There was a strong concordance between the pattern of pathway activation at a transcriptomic level between humans and mice with similar histological phenotypes (FDR 0.02 for early and 0.08 for late time points). Lipogenic, inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathways activated in human NASH were also activated in these mice. The HCC gene signature resembled the S1 and S2 human subclasses of HCC (FDR 0.01 for both). Only the B6/129 mouse but not the parent strains recapitulated all of these aspects of human NAFLD. Conclusions We here describe a diet-induced animal model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (DIAMOND) that recapitulates the key physiological, metabolic, histologic, transcriptomic and cell-signaling changes seen in humans with progressive NASH. Lay summary We have developed a diet-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic cancers in a cross between two mouse strains (129S1/SvImJ and C57Bl/6J). This model mimics all the physiological, metabolic, histological, transcriptomic gene signature and clinical endpoints of human NASH and can facilitate preclinical development of therapeutic targets for NASH. PMID:27261415

  20. Polyphenols and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: impact and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ramiro, I; Vauzour, D; Minihane, A M

    2016-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered to be the hepatic component of the metabolic syndrome and its prevalence is rapidly increasing due to its strong association with insulin resistance and obesity. At present, given that NAFLD is highly prevalent and therapies are limited, much attention is focused on identifying effective dietary strategies for the prevention and treatment of the disease. Polyphenols are a group of plant bioactive compounds whose regular consumption have been associated with a reduction in the risk of a number of metabolic disorders associated with NAFLD. Here we review the emerging and relatively consistent evidence from cell culture and rodent studies showing that select polyphenols positively modulate a variety of contributors to the NAFLD phenotype, through diverse and complementary mechanisms of action. In particular, the reduction of de novo lipogenesis (via sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c) and increased fatty acid β-oxidation, presumably involving AMP-activated protein kinase activation, will be discussed. The indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of polyphenols which have been reported to contribute to the amelioration of NAFLD will also be addressed. In addition to a direct study of the liver, rodent studies have provided insight into the impact of polyphenols on adipose tissue function and whole body insulin sensitivity, which are likely to in part modulate their impact on NAFLD development. Finally an overview of the limited data from clinical trials will be given along with a discussion of the dose extrapolation from animal studies to human subjects.

  1. Altered gut microbial energy and metabolism in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Michail, Sonia; Lin, Malinda; Frey, Mark R; Fanter, Rob; Paliy, Oleg; Hilbush, Brian; Reo, Nicholas V

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is becoming the new pediatric epidemic. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with obesity and has become the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. The gut microbiome is the major metabolic organ and determines how calories are processed, serving as a caloric gate and contributing towards the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The goal of this study is to examine gut microbial profiles in children with NAFLD using phylogenetic, metabolomic, metagenomic and proteomic approaches. Fecal samples were obtained from obese children with or without NAFLD and healthy lean children. Stool specimens were subjected to 16S rRNA gene microarray, shotgun sequencing, mass spectroscopy for proteomics and NMR spectroscopy for metabolite analysis. Children with NAFLD had more abundant Gammaproteobacteria and Prevotella and significantly higher levels of ethanol, with differential effects on short chain fatty acids. This group also had increased genomic and protein abundance for energy production with a reduction in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and urea cycle and urea transport systems. The metaproteome and metagenome showed similar findings. The gut microbiome in pediatric NAFLD is distinct from lean healthy children with more alcohol production and pathways allocated to energy metabolism over carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, which would contribute to development of disease.

  2. Effects of Natural Products on Fructose-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Wang, Tingting; Li, Jian; Wang, Sijian; Qiu, Feng; Yu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    As a sugar additive, fructose is widely used in processed foods and beverages. Excessive fructose consumption can cause hepatic steatosis and dyslipidemia, leading to the development of metabolic syndrome. Recent research revealed that fructose-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is related to several pathological processes, including: (1) augmenting lipogenesis; (2) leading to mitochondrial dysfunction; (3) stimulating the activation of inflammatory pathways; and (4) causing insulin resistance. Cellular signaling research indicated that partial factors play significant roles in fructose-induced NAFLD, involving liver X receptor (LXR)α, sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1/1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α (PPARα), leptin nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Until now, a series of natural products have been reported as regulators of NAFLD in vivo and in vitro. This paper reviews the natural products (e.g., curcumin, resveratrol, and (−)-epicatechin) and their mechanisms of ameliorating fructose-induced NAFLD over the past years. Although, as lead compounds, natural products usually have fewer activities compared with synthesized compounds, it will shed light on studies aiming to discover new drugs for NAFLD. PMID:28146130

  3. Swimming training beneficial effects in a mice model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Alini; Mendonca, Leonardo S; Aguila, Marcia B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A

    2012-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effect of swimming training in reducing the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and associated comorbidities, including the hepatic expression of fatty acid synthesis and peroxisome proliferator receptor activity-alpha. Male C57BL/6 mice were separated into two major groups according to their nutrition and studied during 22 weeks: standard chow (10% fat, SC) or high-fat chow (60% fat, HF), characterizing the sedentary groups SC-Sed and HF-Sed. In the last 10 weeks of the experiment, half of the sedentary groups were submitted to a swimming training with a progressive increase in duration, characterizing the exercised groups: SC-Ex and HF-Ex. At the end of the experiment, considering the findings in the SC-Sed group, HF-Sed group had significantly higher body mass, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia with insulin resistance, hypertrophy of the adipocytes (with inflammatory infiltrate), hypertrophy of the pancreatic islets, dyslipidemia, altered liver enzymes and inflammatory cytokines, and NAFLD with changes in gene expression of hepatic lipogenic and oxidative proteins. The swimming program, even concomitant with the high-fat diet, reduced overweight and all the other worst findings, especially NAFLD. In conclusion, the swimming training can attenuate the morbid effects of a high-fat diet combined with sedentary lifestyle in mice. These data reinforce the notion that swimming exercise can be considered an efficient nonpharmacologic therapy in the treatment of NAFLD, obesity and insulin resistance.

  4. Altered gut microbial energy and metabolism in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia; Lin, Malinda; Frey, Mark R.; Fanter, Rob; Paliy, Oleg; Hilbush, Brian; Reo, Nicholas V.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is becoming the new pediatric epidemic. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with obesity and has become the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. The gut microbiome is the major metabolic organ and determines how calories are processed, serving as a caloric gate and contributing towards the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The goal of this study is to examine gut microbial profiles in children with NAFLD using phylogenetic, metabolomic, metagenomic and proteomic approaches. Fecal samples were obtained from obese children with or without NAFLD and healthy lean children. Stool specimens were subjected to 16S rRNA gene microarray, shotgun sequencing, mass spectroscopy for proteomics and NMR spectroscopy for metabolite analysis. Children with NAFLD had more abundant Gammaproteobacteria and Prevotella and significantly higher levels of ethanol, with differential effects on short chain fatty acids. This group also had increased genomic and protein abundance for energy production with a reduction in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and urea cycle and urea transport systems. The metaproteome and metagenome showed similar findings. The gut microbiome in pediatric NAFLD is distinct from lean healthy children with more alcohol production and pathways allocated to energy metabolism over carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, which would contribute to development of disease. PMID:25764541

  5. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Therapeutics from a Mitochondria-Centric Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gusdon, Aaron M.; Song, Ke-xiu; Qu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) describes a spectrum of disorders characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides within the liver. The global prevalence of NAFLD has been increasing as the obesity epidemic shows no sign of relenting. Mitochondria play a central role in hepatic lipid metabolism and also are affected by upstream signaling pathways involved in hepatic metabolism. This review will focus on the role of mitochondria in the pathophysiology of NAFLD and touch on some of the therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondria as well as metabolically important signaling pathways. Mitochondria are able to adapt to lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by increasing rates of beta-oxidation; however increased substrate delivery to the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) leads to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and eventually ETC dysfunction. Decreased ETC function combined with increased rates of fatty acid beta-oxidation leads to the accumulation of incomplete products of beta-oxidation, which combined with increased levels of ROS contribute to insulin resistance. Several related signaling pathways, nuclear receptors, and transcription factors also regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, many of which are redox sensitive and regulated by ROS. PMID:25371775

  6. Cassia tora (Leguminosae) seed extract alleviates high-fat diet-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Lu, Hung-Jen; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju; Liu, I-Min

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Cassia tora seeds on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis, and elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind its effects. After being fed a HFD for two weeks, rats were orally dosed with Cassia seed ethanol extract (CSEE) (100, 200, or 300mg/kg) once daily for 8weeks. CSEE induced dose-dependent reductions in plasma lipid levels, as well as decreased the over hepatic lipid accumulation. Furthermore, CSEE treatment improved HFD-induced hepatic histological lesions. CSEE enhanced the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its primary downstream targeting enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, up-regulated the gene expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1, and down-regulated sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and fatty acid synthase protein levels in the livers of HFD-fed rats. AMPK inhibition by compound C retarded CSEE-induced reduction in triglyceride accumulation in HepG2 cells stimulated by insulin. Our findings suggest that CSEE may regulate hepatic lipid homeostasis related with an AMPK-dependent signaling pathway. Targeting AMPK activation with CSEE may represent a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  7. Phenotyping the effect of diet on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Nicole J W; Afman, Lydia A; Mensink, Marco; Müller, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with the growing incidence of metabolic syndrome. Diet is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In this review, we focused on recent publications reporting on the effect of macro- and micronutrients on development and progression of NAFLD. In general, saturated fat and fructose seem to stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and progression into NASH, whereas unsaturated fat, choline, antioxidants, and high-protein diets rich in isoflavones seem to have a more preventive effect. Knowledge of the underlying mechanisms by which diet affects NAFLD is expanding, not in the least due to innovative techniques, such as genomics tools that provide detailed comprehensive information on a large high-throughput scale. Although most nutrients seem to interfere with the balance between hepatic de novo lipogenesis (endogenous synthesis of fatty acids) and lipid oxidation (burning fat for energy), there are also indications that diet can trigger or prevent hepatic lipid accumulation by influencing the interaction between liver, gut, and adipose tissue. This review now gives a current detailed overview of diet-mediated mechanisms underlying NAFLD development and progression and summarizes recent results of genomics (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) studies that contribute to improved staging, monitoring and understanding of NAFLD pathophysiology.

  8. Protective Effects and Mechanism of Meretrix meretrix Oligopeptides against Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fangfang; Zhao, Shasha; Yu, Fangmiao; Yang, Zuisu; Ding, Guofang

    2017-01-01

    Meretrix meretrix oligopeptides (MMO) derived from shellfish have important medicinal properties. We previously obtained MMO from alcalase by hydrolysis processes. Here we examine the protective effects of MMO against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and explored the underlying mechanism. Human Chang liver cells were used in our experiments after exposure to palmitic acid at a final concentration of 15 μg/mL for 48 h to induce an overload of fatty acid as NAFLD model cells. Treatment with MMO for 24 h increased the viability of the NAFLD model cells by inhibiting apoptosis. MMO alleviated oxidative stress in the NAFLD model cells by preserving reactive oxygen species activity and increasing malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity. MMO improved mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing the activities of Na+/K+-ATPase and Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase. In addition, MMO inhibited the activation of cell death-related pathways, based on reduced p-JNK, Bax expression, tumor necrosis factor-α, caspase-9, and caspase-3 activity in the NAFLD model cells, and Bcl-2 expression was enhanced in the NAFLD model cells compared with the control group. These findings indicate that MMO have antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects on NAFLD model cells and may thus exert protective effects against NAFLD. PMID:28216552

  9. Increased circulating zonulin in children with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Bonci, Enea; Marandola, Lidia; Romaggioli, Sara; Bascetta, Stefano; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential association of circulating zonulin with the stage of liver disease in obese children with biopsy-confirmed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: A case-control study was performed. Cases were 40 obese children with NAFLD. The diagnosis of NAFLD was based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high hepatic fat fraction (HFF ≥ 5%), and confirmed by liver biopsy with ≥ 5% of hepatocytes containing macrovesicular fat. Controls were selected from obese children with normal levels of aminotransferases, and without MRI evidence of fatty liver as well as of other causes of chronic liver diseases. Controls were matched (1-to 1) with the cases on age, gender, pubertal stage and as closely as possible on body mass index- standard deviation score. All participants underwent clinical examination, laboratory tests including zonulin, inflammatory and metabolic parameters, and MRI for measurement of HFF and visceral adipose tissue. RESULTS: Zonulin values were significantly greater in obese subjects with NAFLD than in those without NAFLD [median (interquartile range), 4.23 (3.18-5.89) vs 3.31 (2.05-4.63), P < 0.01]. In patients with NAFLD, zonulin concentrations increased significantly with the severity of steatosis and the Spearman’s coefficient revealed a positive correlation between zonulin values and steatosis (r = 0.372, P < 0.05); however, we did not find a significant correlation between zonulin and lobular inflammation (P = 0.23), ballooning (P = 0.10), fibrosis score (P = 0.18), or presence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (P = 0.17). Within the entire study population, zonulin levels were positively associated with gamma-glutamyl transferase, 2-h insulin, HFF, and negatively associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI), after adjustment for age, gender and pubertal status. When the associations were restricted to the group of NAFLD patients, 2-h insulin, hepatic fat, and WBISI retained statistical

  10. Hepatoprotective effects of Spirulina maxima in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases range from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The "two hits" hypothesis is widely accepted for its pathogenesis: the first hit is an increased fat flux to the liver, which predisposes our patient to a second hit where increasing free fatty acid oxidation into the mitochondria leads to oxidative stress, lipoperoxidation and a chain reaction with increased ROS. Clinical indications include abdominal cramps, meteorism and fatigue. Most patients, however, are asymptomatic, and diagnosis is based on aminotransferase elevation and ultrasonography (or "brilliant liver"). Spirulina maxima has been experimentally proven to possess in vivo and in vitro hepatoprotective properties by maintaining the liver lipid profile. This case report evaluates the hepatoprotective effects of orally supplied Spirulina maxima. Case presentation Three Hispanic Mexican patients (a 43-year-old man, a 77-year-old man and a 44-year-old woman) underwent ultrasonography and were treated with 4.5 g/day of Spirulina maxima for three months. Their blood samples before and after the treatment determined triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The results were assessed using ultrasound. Conclusion Treatment had therapeutic effects as evidenced by ultrasonography and the aminotransferase data. Hypolipidemic effects were also shown. We conclude that Spirulina maxima may be considered an alternative treatment for patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases and dyslipidemic disorder. PMID:20370930

  11. Effects of Eating Fast and Eating Before Bedtime on the Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Takumi; Babazono, Akira; Maeda, Toshiki; Imatoh, Takuya; Une, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have evaluated the effects of lifestyle habits, such as eating behaviors, on the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). It is known that NAFLD increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Therefore, a retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effect of eating behaviors and interactions between these behaviors on the development of NAFLD among health insurance beneficiaries without NAFLD. Study subjects were 2254 male and female insurance beneficiaries without NAFLD who had attended specific health checkups during fiscal years 2009 and 2012 among health insurance societies located in Fukuoka and Shizuoka Prefectures (Japan). The incidence of NAFLD was defined as Fatty Liver Index scores ≥60 or visiting medical organizations for fatty liver disease treatment according to claims data. Eating behaviors, including eating speed and eating before bedtime, were evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire. During the study period, 52 (2.3%) subjects progressed to NAFLD. Subjects who ate before bedtime but did not eat fast had a higher risk of NAFLD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.15; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-4.46). Those with both negative eating habits had a significantly higher risk of NAFLD (AOR = 2.48; 95% CI: 1.09-5.63). Subjects who habitually ate before bedtime, and those who ate fast and before bedtime, tended to have an increased risk of NAFLD. Earlier intervention to modify these poor eating behaviors could be useful to prevent NAFLD. (Population Health Management 2016;19:279-283).

  12. PNPLA3, the triacylglycerol synthesis/hydrolysis/storage dilemma, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sookoian, Silvia; Pirola, Carlos J

    2012-11-14

    Genome-wide and candidate gene association studies have identified several variants that predispose individuals to developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the gene that has been consistently involved in the genetic susceptibility of NAFLD in humans is patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3, also known as adiponutrin). A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in PNPLA3 (rs738409 C/G, a coding variant that encodes an amino acid substitution  I148M) is significantly associated with fatty liver and histological disease severity, not only in adults but also in children. Nevertheless, how PNPLA3 influences the biology of fatty liver disease is still an open question. A recent article describes new aspects about PNPLA3 gene/protein function and suggests that the  I148M variant promotes hepatic lipid synthesis due to a gain of function. We revise here the published data about the role of the  I148M variant in lipogenesis/lipolysis, and suggest putative areas of future research. For instance we explored in silico whether the rs738409 C or G alleles have the ability to modify miRNA binding sites and miRNA gene regulation, and we found that prediction of PNPLA3 target miRNAs shows two miRNAs potentially interacting in the 3'UTR region (hsa-miR-769-3p and hsa-miR-516a-3p). In addition, interesting unanswered questions remain to be explored. For example, PNPLA3 lies between two CCCTC-binding factor-bound sites that could be tested for insulator activity, and an intronic histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation peak predicts an enhancer element, corroborated by the DNase I hypersensitivity site peak. Finally, an interaction between PNPLA3 and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 2 is suggested by data miming.

  13. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH): diagnosis and clinical course.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Camilo, Maria Ermelinda

    2004-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent syndrome encompassing fatty liver alone and steatohepatitis (NASH). Often asymptomatic, the suspicion arises because of abnormal aminotransferases or a bright liver on abdominal ultrasound. It should be suspected during evaluation of associated conditions as obesity, diabetes or dyslipidaemia. The diagnostic evaluation must exclude other potential causes of liver disease and may include a liver biopsy, the only method able to confirm features of necroinflammation and fibrosis that define NASH and its prognostic implications. Indeed, the presence of necroinflammation has been associated with a significant risk of progression to cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Age >45 years, obesity and diabetes have also been associated with an increased risk of liver fibrosis and progression to cirrhosis. Given the high prevalence of NAFLD, general measures of life-style changes, focusing on exercise, diet, and total alcohol abstinence, should be implemented before a liver biopsy is considered.

  14. Cannabinoid receptor type 2 functional variant influences liver damage in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Alisi, Anna; Alterio, Arianna; Maione, Sabatino; Perrone, Laura; Locatelli, Franco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis to inflammatory steatohepatitis (NASH) with different degrees of fibrosis that can ultimately progress to cirrhosis. Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of the endocannabinoid-system in liver disease and related complications. In particular, hepatoprotective properties for Cannabinoid Receptor type 2 (CB2) have been shown both through experimental murine models of liver injury and association study between a CB2 functional variant, Q63R, and liver enzymes in Italian obese children with steatosis.Here, in order to clarify the role of CB2 in severity of childhood NAFLD, we have investigated the association of the CB2 Q63R variant, with histological parameters of liver disease severity in 118 Italian children with histologically-proven NAFLD.CB2 Q63R genotype was assigned performing a TaqMan assay and a general linear model analysis was used to evaluate the association between the polymorphism and the histological parameters of liver damage.We have found that whereas CB2 Q63R variant is not associated with steatosis or fibrosis, it is associated with the severity of the inflammation (p = 0.002) and the presence of NASH (p = 0.02).Our findings suggest a critical role for CB2 Q63R variant in modulating hepatic inflammation state in obese children and in the consequent increased predisposition of these patients to liver damage.

  15. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Functional Variant Influences Liver Damage in Children with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Alisi, Anna; Alterio, Arianna; Maione, Sabatino; Perrone, Laura; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis to inflammatory steatohepatitis (NASH) with different degrees of fibrosis that can ultimately progress to cirrhosis. Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of the endocannabinoid-system in liver disease and related complications. In particular, hepatoprotective properties for Cannabinoid Receptor type 2 (CB2) have been shown both through experimental murine models of liver injury and association study between a CB2 functional variant, Q63R, and liver enzymes in Italian obese children with steatosis. Here, in order to clarify the role of CB2 in severity of childhood NAFLD, we have investigated the association of the CB2 Q63R variant, with histological parameters of liver disease severity in 118 Italian children with histologically-proven NAFLD. CB2 Q63R genotype was assigned performing a TaqMan assay and a general linear model analysis was used to evaluate the association between the polymorphism and the histological parameters of liver damage. We have found that whereas CB2 Q63R variant is not associated with steatosis or fibrosis, it is associated with the severity of the inflammation (p = 0.002) and the presence of NASH (p = 0.02). Our findings suggest a critical role for CB2 Q63R variant in modulating hepatic inflammation state in obese children and in the consequent increased predisposition of these patients to liver damage. PMID:22927922

  16. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Baumgardner, January N; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Ferguson, Matthew; Tong, Yudong; Wu, Xianli; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been shown to protect against steatosis and alcoholic liver injury. The current study was designed to determine if a similar beneficial effect of MCT occurs in a rat model of NAFLD. Groups of male rats were isocalorically overfed diets containing 10%, 35% or 70% total energy as corn oil or a 70% fat diet in which corn oil was replaced with increasing concentrations of saturated fat (18:82, beef tallow:MCT oil) from 20% to 65% for 21 days using total enteral nutrition (TEN). As dietary content of corn oil increased, hepatic steatosis and serum alanine amino transferases were elevated (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by greater expression of cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2E1 (P < 0.05) and higher concentrations of polyunsaturated 18:2 and 20:4 fatty acids (FA) in the hepatic lipid fractions (P < 0.05). Keeping the total dietary fat at 70%, but increasing the proportion of MCT-enriched saturated fat resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steatosis and necrosis without affecting CYP2E1 induction. There was no incorporation of C8-C10 FAs into liver lipids, but increasing the ratio of MCT to corn oil: reduced liver lipid 18:2 and 20:4 concentrations; reduced membrane susceptibility to radical attack; stimulated FA β- and ω-oxidation as a result of activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α, and appeared to increase mitochondrial respiration through complex III. These data suggest that replacing unsaturated fats like corn oil with MCT oil in the diet could be utilized as a potential treatment for NAFLD.

  17. Pentoxifylline ameliorates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jia-Hung; Chao, Jung; Chang, Ming-Ling; Peng, Wen-Huang; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, is characterised by abnormal fat accumulation in the liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake. In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), concurrent NAFLD might increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and the mortality rate. Although several studies have examined the effectiveness of pentoxifylline (PTX) in NAFLD treatment, no results are available to verify the effectiveness of PTX in treating T2D associated with NAFLD. In this study, we developed a combined high-fat diet-induced obesity and low-dose streptozocin-induced hyperglycaemia mouse model to mimic the concurrent NAFLD and T2D pathological condition. By combining physiological assessments, pathological examinations, metabolomics studies on blood, urine, and liver, and measurements of gene and protein expression, we elucidated the effectiveness and the underlying mechanism of action of PTX in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice. Our results revealed that PTX ameliorated NAFLD in the hyperglycaemic and dyslipidaemic mice by upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Furthermore, the glycolysis pathway and branched-chain amino acid-related pathways in these mice were restored by PTX. PMID:27612024

  18. Altered fatty acid metabolism-related gene expression in liver from morbidly obese women with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-12-02

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: for better or worse, blame the gut microbiota?

    PubMed

    Li, Ding-You; Yang, Min; Edwards, Sarah; Ye, Shui-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major clinical consequence for people with obesity and metabolic syndrome and is also associated with enteral and parenteral nutrition. Early studies suggested that altered gut microbiota might contribute to obesity by affecting energy harvest from the diet and energy storage in the host. Recent evidence in humans as well as in animal models has linked gut microbiota to the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. With bacterial overgrowth and increased intestinal permeability observed in patients with NAFLD and in animal models, gut-derived bacterial products such as endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) and bacterial DNA are being delivered to the liver through the portal vein and then activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs), mainly TLR4 and TLR9, and their downstream cytokines and chemokines, leading to the development and progression of NAFLD. Given the limited data in humans, the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is still open to discussion. Prebiotics and probiotics have been attempted to modify the microbiota as preventive or therapeutic strategies on this pathological condition. Their beneficial effects on NALFD have been demonstrated in animal models and limited human studies. However, prospective, appropriately powered, randomized, controlled clinical trials are needed to determine whether prebiotics and probiotics and other integrated strategies to modify intestinal microbiota are efficacious therapeutic modalities to treat NALFD.

  20. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Where do we Stand? An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Asad; AbuHammour, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common liver disease worldwide, the prevalence of which had progressively increased over the past 10 years where other liver diseases remained at the same prevalence rates or are expected to decrease as in the case of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The treatment of NAFLD is of prime concern to health care professionals and patients due to the significant mortality and morbidity it implies; the problem is further escalated by the fact that standard of care medications targeting NAFLD remain experimental and without evidence base. Treatment nowadays is focused on lifestyle modification and managing the comorbid associated diseases, with a possible role for some hepatic protective agents. This review presents all the medications that had been proposed and used for the treatment of NAFLD with or without scientific rationale and includes agents for weight loss, insulin sensitizers, drugs that reduce blood lipids, glucagon-mimetics, drugs that may reduce fibrosis, angiotensin receptor blockers, and medicines believed to reduce endoplasmic reticular stress such as vitamin E, ursodeoxycholic acid, and S-adenosyl methionine. A quick review of the newer agents that proved to be promising such as obeticholic acid and GFT505 and the medicines that are still in the pipeline is also presented. PMID:26997214

  1. Recent Advances in the Herbal Treatment of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jia; Fai So, Kwok; Liong, Emily C.; Tipoe, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the leading causes of chronic liver injury across the world. It is also strongly related to other pathological conditions, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Pathogenesis of NAFLD remains not fully characterized but is generally attributed to the occurrence of insulin resistance, lipid metabolism dysfunction,0 oxidative stress, inflammation, and necro-apoptosis. Every potential therapeutic strategy should target one or some of these pathological events in the liver. Over the past decades, application of herbal treatment for NAFLD has received increasing attention due to its wide availability, low side effects, and proven therapeutic mechanisms and benefits. In recent years, some monomers and certain functional mixtures of herbs have been extensively examined for their potential uses in NAFLD treatment. In the present review, we selected several herbal derivatives under intense basic and/or clinical investigations by carrying out a PubMed search of English language articles relevant to herbal derivatives and NAFLD, such as polysaccharide portion of wolfberry, garlic-derived monomers, red grape–derived resveratrol, and milk thistle–derived substances. They have been shown to target the pathological events during NAFLD initiation and progression both in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials. Although more detailed mechanistic researches and long-term clinical evaluations are needed for their future applications, they offer unanticipated and great health benefits without obvious adverse effects in NAFLD therapy. PMID:24716162

  2. Probiotics as a complementary therapeutic approach in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Armiliato, Geyza Nogueira de Almeida; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently recognized as one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease. It involves a spectrum of conditions that include pure steatosis without inflammation, steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. The key factor in the pathophysiology of NAFLD is insulin resistance that determines lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes and, thus, oxidative stress, which is followed by inflammatory response. However, NAFLD pathogenesis is still largely unknown and has been extensively investigated. Although life style modification with the aim of losing weight has been advocated to treat this disorder, its effectiveness is limited; additionally, there is no specific pharmacologic treatment until nowadays. Recent evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may play a role in the development of insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis. Differences in gut microbiota between NAFLD patients and lean individuals as well as presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in NAFLD subjects have been demonstrated. Furthermore, some data indicate that the immunoregulatory effects of probiotics may be beneficial in NAFLD treatment as they modulate the intestinal microbiota; improve epithelial barrier function and strengthen the intestinal wall decreasing its permeability; reduce bacterial translocation and endotoxemia; improve intestinal inflammation; and reduce oxidative and inflammatory liver damage. In this article, we review the clinical trials on the use of probiotics in the treatment of NAFLD and discuss the effects of these agents and their efficacy as an emerging therapeutic resource to treat NAFLD patients. PMID:25848479

  3. Effect of diet/atorvastatin on atherosclerotic lesions associated to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, Maria T; Castells, María T; García-Pérez, Bartolomé; Martín, Antonia; Adánez, Gracia; Ayala, Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Comparative histological examination of both liver and the supra-aortic arteries have not previously examined the consequences of atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and their response to diet and atorvastatin therapy. This study evaluates the effects of diet alone or in combination with atorvastatin therapy on the progression/regression of atherosclerosis and its correlation with NAFLD. This research was performed on a cohort of chickens on standard (SD) or hyperlipidemic diets (HD), either with or without atorvastatin therapy. The development of atherosclerotic lesions was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative image analysis and correlated with liver histology. The lowest levels of atherosclerotic lesions were found in animals on the HD for 3 months, followed by 3 months of SD in combination with oral atorvastatin. There was a strong association between the histologic findings of atherosclerosis and those of NAFLD. These studies show that standard diet and atorvastatin therapy can positively affect both arterial and hepatic lesions, influencing the regression of the changes. These results support the hypothesis that NAFLD and atherosclerosis may be actually two aspects of a shared disease and suggest the possibility of regression of both disorders with dietary and pharmacologic manipulations.

  4. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Cause or Effect of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grander, Christoph; Grabherr, Felix; Moschen, Alexander R; Tilg, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease throughout the world. Pathophysiological insights into this disease have recently illustrated that various factors such as insulin resistance, innate immunity, metabolic inflammation, and the microbiota are of relevance. NAFLD, metabolic syndrome (MS), and type 2 diabetes (T2D) share many pathophysiological aspects, and inflammatory processes in the adipose tissue, gut, and liver have evolved to be of exceptional importance. Most of NAFLD patients are obese and encounter a high risk of developing MS and T2D. NAFLD, however, is also highly common in subjects with MS and T2D. Furthermore, reflecting its nature of a multisystem disease, NAFLD is associated with a high prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. These facts require screening strategies for MS/T2D in NAFLD patients and vice versa. Thus, the question of cause or effect cannot be answered as MS and NAFLD share many pathomechanisms, and at the time of either diagnosis both frequently coexist. This is also reflected by a global prevalence rate of 25% for both NAFLD and MS. For this reason, it is crucial that physicians are aware of the 'unholy liaison' between MS, T2D, and NAFLD.

  5. GLP-1 receptor agonists: effects on the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Guang; Jia, Yumei; Xu, Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and its incidence has been increasing recently. In addition to hepatic complications, NAFLD is also recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, the current therapies for NAFLD display variable efficacy; a novel and effective drug is urgently needed. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a receptor agonist is a new drug approved for treating type 2 diabetes. Recently, these types of agents have shown a novel therapeutic effect on NAFLD. However, the mechanisms of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the treatment of NAFLD have not yet been explained precisely. Recent studies have demonstrated that GLP-1 reverses the progression of NAFLD not only indirectly through an incretin effect that improves key parameters involved in NAFLD, but also a direct effect on lipid metabolism of hepatocytes and inflammation in liver. In this review, we provided an overview of the role and mechanisms of GLP-1 in the therapy of NAFLD.

  6. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Chronic Hepatitis B and C Patients from Western Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, A. C. M.; Maia, D. R.; Neto, S. M.; Lima, E. M.; Twycross, M.; Baquette, R. F.; Lobato, C. M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a wide spectrum of histological conditions, extending from simple steatosis to end-stage liver failure. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of NAFLD and its associations in chronic hepatitis B and C patients. Methods. We included all patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B and C who underwent a liver biopsy between January 2010 and October 2011 (n = 104). Parameters studied included hepatitis type, anthropometric data, histologic, hepatic, metabolic and lipid assessments, presence of hypertension and viral load. Results. Hepatitis B was presented in 28.8% (n = 30) of patients, while hepatitis C was presented in 71.2% (n = 74). In addition, hepatic steatosis was present in 25% (n = 26) of the patients. Steatosis was frequently found in hepatitis C patients (31.1%; 25% n = 23), but infrequently in hepatitis B patients (10%; n = 3) (P = 0.024). It was also found that steatosis was frequently present in hepatitis C patients with intense fibrosis (52.94%) (P = 0.025). Discussion. Our results suggest that steatosis is a common feature in patients with viral chronic hepatitis, and that it plays a different role in each type of hepatitis. PMID:22934189

  7. FT3/FT4 ratio predicts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease independent of metabolic parameters in patients with euthyroidism and hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Gökmen, Fatma Yahyaoğlu; Ahbab, Süleyman; Ataoğlu, Hayriye Esra; Türker, Betül Çavuşoğlu; Çetin, Faik; Türker, Fatih; Mamaç, Rabia Yahyaoğlu; Yenigün, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to evaluate the effects of metabolic parameters and thyroid dysfunction on the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). METHODS: The current study evaluated a total of 115 patients, 75 female and 40 male. Physical examination and anthropometric measurements were applied to all participants. Hypothyroidism was considered at a thyroid stimulating hormone level ≥ 4.1 mIU/L. Patients with euthyroidism and patients with hypothyroidism were compared. Abdominal ultrasonography was used to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The participants were further compared with regard to the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Logistic regression modeling was performed to identify the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and independent variables, such as metabolic parameters and insulin resistance. RESULTS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was identified in 69 patients. The mean waist circumference, body mass index, fasting plasma insulin, HOMA-IR (p<0.001) and FT3/FT4 ratio (p=0.01) values were significantly higher in the patients with NAFLD compared to those without it. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that FT3/FT4 ratio, waist circumference and insulin resistance were independent risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION: Insulin resistance, enlarged waist circumference, elevated body mass index, higher FT3/FT4 ratio and hypertriglyceridemia are independent risk factors for NADLF, whereas hypothyroidism is not directly related to the condition. PMID:27166773

  8. Mutation of miR-21 targets endogenous lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Ping; Li, Hong-Jue; Nie, Jiao; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Xian

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disorder characterized by hepatic fat accumulation and abnormal lipid metabolism. Although miR-21 has been implicated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, it is unknown whether miR-21 could function as a therapeutic target. Here, we perform transfection analysis of miR-21 mimic or control mimic to evaluate the effects of miR-21 expression levels on human HepG2 nonalcoholic fatty liver cells. We used siRNA techniques to knock down miR-21 in HepG2 and control 293T cell lines, and then monitored lipid production and the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The effects of miR-21 expression levels on LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) expression were evaluated using qRT-PCR and western blot analyses. Luciferase reporter assays were conducted to confirm the effects of miR-21 expression levels on LRP6. The results indicated that transfection of miR-21 mimic induced changes in the expression levels of lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), stearoyl CoA desaturase (1SCD1), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). Transfection of miR-21 mimic suppressed the transcription and translation of LRP6 at the mRNA and protein levels, whereas miR-21 knockdown increased the expression levels of LRP6. Transfection of miR-21 mimic in HepG2 cells also induced lipid production and triggered the expression of critical lipid metabolic enzymes. These data suggest that mutation of miR-21 may be a new therapeutic strategy to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases by targeting endogenous LRP6.

  9. Mutation of miR-21 targets endogenous lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Ping; Li, Hong-Jue; Nie, Jiao; Chen, Xia; Zhou, Xian

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disorder characterized by hepatic fat accumulation and abnormal lipid metabolism. Although miR-21 has been implicated in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, it is unknown whether miR-21 could function as a therapeutic target. Here, we perform transfection analysis of miR-21 mimic or control mimic to evaluate the effects of miR-21 expression levels on human HepG2 nonalcoholic fatty liver cells. We used siRNA techniques to knock down miR-21 in HepG2 and control 293T cell lines, and then monitored lipid production and the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism. The effects of miR-21 expression levels on LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) expression were evaluated using qRT-PCR and western blot analyses. Luciferase reporter assays were conducted to confirm the effects of miR-21 expression levels on LRP6. The results indicated that transfection of miR-21 mimic induced changes in the expression levels of lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), stearoyl CoA desaturase (1SCD1), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). Transfection of miR-21 mimic suppressed the transcription and translation of LRP6 at the mRNA and protein levels, whereas miR-21 knockdown increased the expression levels of LRP6. Transfection of miR-21 mimic in HepG2 cells also induced lipid production and triggered the expression of critical lipid metabolic enzymes. These data suggest that mutation of miR-21 may be a new therapeutic strategy to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases by targeting endogenous LRP6. PMID:28337300

  10. NOX2-generated oxidative stress is associated with severity of ultrasound liver steatosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms responsible for disease progression in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. However, so far, few studies reported increased circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver and no study has been performed with newer markers of systemic oxidative stress. The aim was to assess the relationship between urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α and serum soluble NOX2-derived peptide and the severity of liver steatosis in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver. Methods The study was performed in 264 consecutive patients referred for suspected metabolic disease. Steatosis was defined according to Hamaguchi ultrasonographic criteria. Oxidative stress was assessed by urinary 8-iso- prostaglandin F2α and serum soluble NOX2-derived peptide levels. Results Patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver had higher (p < 0.001) mean values of urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and of serum soluble NOX2-derived peptide, alanine aminotransferase, Cytokeratin-18 and homeostasis model of insulin resistance and lower values of serum adiponectin as compared to those without. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and of its clinical features was significantly higher in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver. Same findings were also observed after the exclusion of obese subjects, or subjects with diabetes or with metabolic syndrome and in those not taking statin medication. In addition, the levels of urinary 8-iso-PGF2α were independent predictors of non-alcoholic fatty liver and a strong association of urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and of serum soluble NOX2-derived peptide with the severity of steatosis at ultrasound was also observed. Conclusions We demonstrated increased markers of oxidative stress in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver. Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and serum soluble NOX2-derived peptide levels were independent from obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome and increased with the severity of liver

  11. Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Obese Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whether nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is related to vitamin D and bone health in obese children is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate vitamin D status and bone mineral density (BMD) in obese children according to their condition within the NAFLD spectrum. Anthropometric data, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were obtained from 94 obese children. The subjects were divided into three groups according to NAFLD spectrum: normal liver, simple steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although there were no differences in vitamin D levels between the three groups, these groups showed significant differences in highly sensitive C-reactive protein (P=0.044), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P=0.02), hepatic fibrosis scores (P<0.05), and trunk fat percentage (P=0.025). Although there were significant differences in BMDs, the age-matched BMD z-scores were not significantly different between the three groups. Serum vitamin D levels were negatively correlated with age (r=-0.368, P=0.023), serum uric acid levels (r=-0.371, P=0.022), fibrosis 4 (FIB4) (r=-0.406, P=0.011), and HOMA-IR (r=-0.530, P=0.001) in obese children with NASH. Multiple regression analysis for vitamin D in the NASH group revealed age and HOMA-IR as significant factors. In conclusion, inflammatory markers, hepatic fibrosis scores, trunk fat, and insulin resistance may reflect the spectrum of NAFLD in obese children, whereas vitamin D levels and BMD may not. In patients with NASH, however, low serum vitamin D is associated with hepatic fibrosis and insulin resistance, but not with bone health status. PMID:26713058

  12. The Relationship between Vitamin D Status and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hourigan, Suchitra K.; Abrams, Stephanie; Yates, Katherine; Pfeifer, Kim; Torbenson, Michael; Murray, Karen; Roth, Christian L.; Kowdley, Kris; Scheimann, Ann O.

    2014-01-01

    Background In adults, vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and has been associated with the severity of histology. There are known differences between adult and pediatric NAFLD, with little data regarding the relationship between vitamin D and pediatric NAFLD. Aim To examine the relationship between vitamin D levels and NAFLD in children. Methods Clinical and histological data was utilized from children aged 2–18 years with biopsy proven NAFLD enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network studies. 25(OH) vitamin D levels were measured from serum. Data examined included demographics, anthropometrics, laboratory markers and liver histology. Data were analyzed using 3 categories of vitamin D level: deficient (≤ 20 ng/mL), insufficient (21–29 ng/mL), and sufficient (≥ 30 ng/mL). Results 102 children were studied. There was a high prevalence (80/102, 78%) of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. However, there were no significant associations between vitamin D level and the histological characteristics or severity of NAFLD. Significantly higher levels of triglycerides were found in those with vitamin D deficiency (p=0.004), but there was no association with other features of the metabolic syndrome. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in children with biopsy-proven NAFLD, however no association was found between vitamin D deficiency and the severity of disease on biopsies. This differs from adult NAFLD studies where vitamin D deficiency correlates with histological severity, potentially suggesting differences in the risk factors for or consequences of pediatric NAFLD. PMID:25710716

  13. Vitamin D Status and Bone Mineral Density in Obese Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Jae; Yi, Dae Yong; Yang, Hye Ran

    2015-12-01

    Whether nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is related to vitamin D and bone health in obese children is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate vitamin D status and bone mineral density (BMD) in obese children according to their condition within the NAFLD spectrum. Anthropometric data, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were obtained from 94 obese children. The subjects were divided into three groups according to NAFLD spectrum: normal liver, simple steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Although there were no differences in vitamin D levels between the three groups, these groups showed significant differences in highly sensitive C-reactive protein (P=0.044), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P=0.02), hepatic fibrosis scores (P<0.05), and trunk fat percentage (P=0.025). Although there were significant differences in BMDs, the age-matched BMD z-scores were not significantly different between the three groups. Serum vitamin D levels were negatively correlated with age (r=-0.368, P=0.023), serum uric acid levels (r=-0.371, P=0.022), fibrosis 4 (FIB4) (r=-0.406, P=0.011), and HOMA-IR (r=-0.530, P=0.001) in obese children with NASH. Multiple regression analysis for vitamin D in the NASH group revealed age and HOMA-IR as significant factors. In conclusion, inflammatory markers, hepatic fibrosis scores, trunk fat, and insulin resistance may reflect the spectrum of NAFLD in obese children, whereas vitamin D levels and BMD may not. In patients with NASH, however, low serum vitamin D is associated with hepatic fibrosis and insulin resistance, but not with bone health status.

  14. Management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: An evidence-based clinical practice review

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Juan P; Candia, Roberto; Zapata, Rodrigo; Muñoz, Cristián; Arancibia, Juan P; Poniachik, Jaime; Soza, Alejandro; Fuster, Francisco; Brahm, Javier; Sanhueza, Edgar; Contreras, Jorge; Cuellar, M Carolina; Arrese, Marco; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To build a consensus among Chilean specialists on the appropriate management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in clinical practice. METHODS: NAFLD has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The optimal treatment for NAFLD has not been established due to a lack of evidence-based recommendations. An expert panel of members of the Chilean Gastroenterological Society and the Chilean Hepatology Association conducted a structured analysis of the current literature on NAFLD therapy. The quality of the evidence and the level of recommendations supporting each statement were assessed according to the recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force. A modified three-round Delphi technique was used to reach a consensus among the experts. RESULTS: A group of thirteen experts was established. The survey included 17 open-ended questions that were distributed among the experts, who assessed the articles associated with each question. The levels of agreement achieved by the panel were 93.8% in the first round and 100% in the second and third rounds. The final recommendations support the indication of lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise, for all patients with NAFLD. Proven pharmacological therapies include only vitamin E and pioglitazone, which can be used in nondiabetic patients with biopsy-proven nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (the progressive form of NAFLD), although the long-term safety and efficacy of these therapies have not yet been established. CONCLUSION: Current NAFLD management is rapidly evolving, and new pathophysiology-based therapies are expected to be introduced in the near future. All NAFLD patients should be evaluated using a three-focused approach that considers the risks of liver disease, diabetes and cardiovascular events. PMID:25232252

  15. The traditional Japanese formula keishibukuryogan reduces liver injury and inflammation in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Makoto; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Kinoshita, Hideki; Goto, Hirozo; Takano, Yasuo; Selmi, Carlo; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric; Shimada, Yutaka

    2010-03-01

    The Kampo formula keishibukuryogan (KBG, Guizhifulingwan) is frequently used in traditional Japanese and Chinese medicine to treat several symptoms and manifests anti-inflammatory and scavenging effects. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and has the potential to evolve to liver cirrhosis through chronic inflammation and steatohepatisis (NASH). We have recently reported the KBG significant effectiveness on liver injury in a NASH animal model that prompted us to prescribe to KBG (TJ-25). We performed a retrospective study and reviewed the charts of outpatients who were prescribed KBG for 8-12 weeks due to non-liver-related symptoms (n= 11) over the past year to evaluate the clinical outcome. In six of these cases, biochemical and ultrasound signs of NAFLD were observed. KBG led to a significant reduction in liver injury tests and blood cholesterol but had no effects on body weight in all NAFLD cases. Further, liver tests and lipid profiles returned to baseline values when KBG treatment was stopped. On the basis of data on a small number of subjects, we suggest that the use of KBG is a safe complementary treatment in patients with NAFLD. While it is unlikely that Kampo formulas may substitute the current nutritional approaches to the metabolic syndrome, future studies should address the possibility of an additive effect, possibly through anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  16. Prevalence and determinants of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in lifelines: A large Dutch population cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, Tim C. M. A.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Blokzijl, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is an increasing health issue that develops rather unnoticed with obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. We investigated prevalence, determinants and associated metabolic abnormalities of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the largest population-based cohort to date. Methods Biochemical characteristics, type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were determined in the Lifelines Cohort Study (N = 167,729), a population-based cohort in the North of the Netherlands. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was defined as Fatty Liver Index (FLI)≥60. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, immigrants, missing data to assess FLI and metabolic syndrome, excessive alcohol use, previous-diagnosed hepatitis or cirrhosis and non-fasting blood sampling. Results Out of 37,496 included participants (median age 44 years, 62.1% female), 8,259 (22.0%) had a FLI≥60. Individuals with a FLI≥60 were more often male, older, obese, had higher levels of hemoglobinA1c, fasting glucose, liver enzymes, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, c-reactive protein and leucocytes and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (all P<0.0001). Participants with a FLI≥60 showed higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (9.3% vs. 1.4%), metabolic syndrome (54.2% vs. 6.2%), impaired renal function (20.1% vs. 8.7%) and cardiovascular disease (4.6% vs. 1.6%) (all P<0.0001). Multivariable logistic analysis showed that smoking, hemoglobin, leucocytes, c-reactive protein, platelets, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, impaired renal function (OR 1.27, 95%CI 1.15–1.41), metabolic syndrome (OR 11.89, 95%CI 11.03–12.82) and its individual components hyperglycemia (OR 2.53, 95%CI 2.34–2.72), hypertension (OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.77–2.01) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 3.44, 95%CI 3.22–3.68) were independently associated with suspected non-alcoholic fatty

  17. [The role of diet in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Jun, Dae Won

    2013-05-01

    Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is about 20-25% in Korean adults population. Obesity is strongly associated with NAFLD and the prevention of obesity is a major public issue. Unfortunately, pharmacological treatment of obesity and NAFLD remains uncertain. Only weight loss by dietary changes been shown to lead to histological improvement in fatty liver. So the nutrition therapy is a cornerstone of treatment for NAFLD. Epidemiologic studies show that saturated fat, trans-fatty acid, carbohydrate, and simple sugar have strong correlation with intrahepatic fat accumulation. But, true associations with specific nutrients still remain unclear. Recently, fructose consumption has been rising in many countries and several epidemiologic studies show that fructose consumption has strong correlation with metabolic diseases. The consumption of excessively added sugar in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis has received attention. Most clinicians agree with lifestyle modification are effective in histologic improvement. Total energy intake restriction is the most important action to reduce intrahepatic fat accumulation. Macronutrient composition may also have correlation with the development of NAFLD. To reduce the incidence of NAFLD, public statements on optimal dietary education program have been issused. Various specific dietary programs are suggested. Among them low fat diet and low carbohydrate diet are suggested in patients with NAFLD. However, there is no ideal diet to obtain the histological improvement in NAFLD. Further randomised controlled studies about specific diet are needed to determine the long-term benefit and histological improvement by ideal diet. Tailoring diet therapy to a patient's lifestyle is more important than universal specific dietary program.

  18. Rubicon inhibits autophagy and accelerates hepatocyte apoptosis and lipid accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Hikita, Hayato; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Nozaki, Yasutoshi; Sakane, Sadatsugu; Shiode, Yuto; Nakabori, Tasuku; Saito, Yoshinobu; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Tabata, Keisuke; Kawabata, Tsuyoshi; Hamasaki, Maho; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver disease worldwide. It encompasses a spectrum ranging from simple steatosis to fatty liver with hepatocellular injury, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Recent studies have demonstrated hepatic autophagy being impaired in NAFLD. In the present study, we investigated the impact of Rubicon, a Beclin1-interacting negative regulator for autophagosome-lysosome fusion, in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. In HepG2 cells, BNL-CL2 cells, and murine primary hepatocytes, Rubicon was posttranscriptionally up-regulated by supplementation with saturated fatty acid palmitate. Up-regulation of Rubicon was associated with suppression of the late stage of autophagy, as evidenced by accumulation of both LC3-II and p62 expression levels as well as decreased autophagy flux. Its blockade by small interfering RNA attenuated autophagy impairment and reduced palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and lipid accumulation. Rubicon was also up-regulated in association with autophagy impairment in livers of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Hepatocyte-specific Rubicon knockout mice generated by crossing Rubicon floxed mice with albumin-Cre transgenic mice did not produce any phenotypes on a normal diet. In contrast, on an HFD, they displayed significant improvement of both liver steatosis and injury as well as attenuation of both endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy impairment in the liver. In humans, liver tissues obtained from patients with NAFLD expressed significantly higher levels of Rubicon than those without steatosis.

  19. The Association Between IGF-1 Levels and the Histologic Severity of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dichtel, Laura E; Corey, Kathleen E; Misdraji, Joseph; Bredella, Miriam A; Schorr, Melanie; Osganian, Stephanie A; Young, Brian J; Sung, Joshua C; Miller, Karen K

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The mechanisms responsible for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are incompletely understood. Growing evidence suggests that growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) may have roles in the development and progression of NAFLD. We hypothesized that lower serum IGF-1 levels would be associated with increased liver fat accumulation, inflammation, and fibrosis in a group of meticulously phenotyped obese subjects with liver biopsies. Methods: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was performed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA and St. Mary's Hospital, Richmond, VA, USA. Liver biopsies were performed in 142 subjects during NAFLD work-up or bariatric surgery and were graded by a single, blinded pathologist. Main outcome measures included liver histology and serum IGF-1. Results: Mean age was 52±10 years and body mass index (BMI) was 43±9 kg/m2. Mean serum IGF-1 was lower in subjects with lobular inflammation (112±47 vs. 136±57 ng/ml, P=0.01), hepatocyte ballooning (115±48 vs. 135±57 ng/ml, P=0.05), higher fibrosis stage (stage 2–4 vs. 0–1; 96±40 vs. 125±51 ng/ml, P=0.005), and NASH (109±45 vs. 136±57 ng/ml, P=0.002). All results remained significant after controlling for age, BMI, and a diagnosis of diabetes, and all but hepatocyte ballooning (trend, P=0.06) remained significant after excluding individuals with cirrhosis. Steatosis was not significantly associated with mean serum IGF-1 levels. Conclusions: Low serum IGF-1 levels are associated with increased histologic severity of NAFLD when rigorously controlled for age, BMI, the presence of diabetes, and after the exclusion of subjects with cirrhosis. Further investigation is warranted to determine the differential effects of GH and IGF-1 on the development and progression of NAFLD, which could further elucidate pathophysiology and identify therapeutic targets. PMID

  20. Dietary advanced glycation end-products aggravate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Christopher; Herath, Chandana B; Jia, Zhiyuan; Andrikopoulos, Sof; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael J; Rivera, Leni R; Furness, John B; Forbes, Josephine M; Angus, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if manipulation of dietary advanced glycation end product (AGE), intake affects non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progression and whether these effects are mediated via RAGE. METHODS Male C57Bl6 mice were fed a high fat, high fructose, high cholesterol (HFHC) diet for 33 wk and compared with animals on normal chow. A third group were given a HFHC diet that was high in AGEs. Another group was given a HFHC diet that was marinated in vinegar to prevent the formation of AGEs. In a second experiment, RAGE KO animals were fed a HFHC diet or a high AGE HFHC diet and compared with wildtype controls. Hepatic biochemistry, histology, picrosirius red morphometry and hepatic mRNA were determined. RESULTS Long-term consumption of the HFHC diet generated significant steatohepatitis and fibrosis after 33 wk. In this model, hepatic 4-hydroxynonenal content (a marker of chronic oxidative stress), hepatocyte ballooning, picrosirius red staining, α-smooth muscle actin and collagen type 1A gene expression were all significantly increased. Increasing the AGE content of the HFHC diet by baking further increased these markers of liver damage, but this was abrogated by pre-marination in acetic acid. In response to the HFHC diet, RAGE-/- animals developed NASH of similar severity to RAGE+/+ animals but were protected from the additional harmful effects of the high AGE containing diet. Studies in isolated Kupffer cells showed that AGEs increase cell proliferation and oxidative stress, providing a likely mechanism through which these compounds contribute to liver injury. CONCLUSION In the HFHC model of NAFLD, manipulation of dietary AGEs modulates liver injury, inflammation, and liver fibrosis via a RAGE dependent pathway. This suggests that pharmacological and dietary strategies targeting the AGE/RAGE pathway could slow the progression of NAFLD. PMID:27672297

  1. Cord Blood Adipokines and Lipids and Adolescent Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Joy; Smith, Andrew D.; Fraser, Abigail; Sattar, Naveed; Callaway, Mark; Lindsay, Robert S.; Lawlor, Debbie A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Maternal adiposity in pregnancy is associated with offspring adiposity and metabolic dysfunction postnatally, including greater risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Recent genetic analyses suggest a causal effect of greater maternal body mass index on offspring birth weight and ponderal index, but the relative roles of the environment in utero or later in life remains unclear. Objective: We sought to determine whether markers of infant adiposity (birth weight, umbilical cord blood leptin, adiponectin, and lipids) were associated with markers of NAFLD in adolescence. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a UK prospective birth cohort with 17 years of follow-up with liver function tests (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase) (n = 1037 participants), and ultrasound scan assessed liver fat, volume, and sheer velocity at age 17 (n = 541 participants). Missing covariate data were imputed. Main Outcomes: Ultrasound and biochemical measures of NAFLD were measured. Results: Birth weight, cord blood leptin, and adiponectin were not associated with a diagnosis of NAFLD. In adjusted analyses, 2 of 42 associations attained conventional 5% levels of significance. Birth weight was positively associated with liver volume (1.0% greater per 100 g [95% confidence interval 0.5%–2.0%]). Cord high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was positively associated with alanine aminotransferase (11.6% higher per 1 mmol/L [95% confidence interval 0.3, 23.4]); however, this association was primarily mediated via offspring adiposity. Conclusions: In this extensive analysis, we found little evidence measurements of infant fat mass and birth size were related to adolescent markers of NAFLD. The association between birth weight and adolescent liver volume may indicate the contribution of greater organ size to birth weight and tracking of organ size. PMID:27648968

  2. Coffee enhances the expression of chaperones and antioxidant proteins in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Federico; Li Volti, Giovanni; Vitaglione, Paola; Morisco, Filomena; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Zappalà, Agata; Palmigiano, Angelo; Garozzo, Domenico; Caporaso, Nicola; D'Argenio, Giuseppe; Galvano, Fabio

    2014-06-01

    Coffee consumption is inversely related to the degree of liver injury in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Molecular mediators contributing to coffee's beneficial effects in NAFLD remain to be elucidated. In this study, we administrated decaffeinated espresso coffee or vehicle to rats fed an high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks and examined the effects of coffee on liver injury by using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) proteomic analysis combined with mass spectrometry. Rats fed an HFD and water developed panacinar steatosis, lobular inflammation, and mild fibrosis, whereas rats fed an HFD and coffee exhibited only mild steatosis. Coffee consumption increased liver expression of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones glucose-related protein 78 and protein disulfide-isomerase A3; similarly, coffee drinking enhanced the expression of the mitochondrial chaperones heat stress protein 70 and DJ-1. Furthermore, in agreement with reduced hepatic levels of 8-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, proteomic analysis showed that coffee consumption induces the expression of master regulators of redox status (i.e., peroxiredoxin 1, glutathione S-transferase α2, and D-dopachrome tautomerase). Last, proteomics revealed an association of coffee intake with decreased expression of electron transfer flavoprotein subunit α, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, involved in de novo lipogenesis. In this study, we were able to identify by proteomic analysis the stress proteins mediating the antioxidant effects of coffee; moreover, we establish for the first time the contribution of specific coffee-induced endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial chaperones ensuring correct protein folding and degradation in the liver.

  3. Insulin sensitizers in treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh; Tellez-Ávila, Felix I; Sánchez-Ávila, Francisco; Montaño-Reyes, Maria Antonieta; Uribe, Misael

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the evidence available for the clinical effectiveness of insulin sensitizers in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) systematically. METHODS: Relevant articles were located using computer-assisted searches of Medline (1966-March 2006), EMBASE (1988-March 2006), CINAHL (1982-March 2003), Educational Resource Information Center (1966-March 2006), Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (1967-March 2006), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (1994-2006), dissertations in ProQuest and FirstSearch databases. Manual searches were made in the abstracts from meetings of the American Gastroenterological Association (1999-2006), and the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (2003-2005). Studies were retrieved using the following selection criteria: (1) clinical trials using insulin sensitizers in subjects with NAFLD, (2) adult patients, (3) published as full manuscripts or abstracts, and (4) English, Spanish, German, and French languages only. Data were abstracted independently by two reviewers following standardized procedures. A face-to-face comparison of data was conducted to ensure the completeness and reliability of the abstraction process. RESULTS: Nine studies were included, six using metformin and three using thiazolidinediones. Only two studies were placebo-controlled trials. The median sample size for all studies was 18 subjects. In the placebo-controlled trials, metformin improved insulin resistance markers and liver function tests, but not histological scores. In the single-arm trials, metformin and thiazolidinediones improved insulin resistance markers and liver function tests, and beneficial histological changes were reported. There is limited high-quality information available from which to draw categorical conclusions about the clinical use of insulin sensitizers in NAFLD. CONCLUSION: Current information indicates that the use of insulin

  4. Genetic factors that affect nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: A systematic clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Tyler J; Besur, Siddesh; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of genetic polymorphisms in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) onset, severity, and outcome through systematic literature review. METHODS: The authors conducted both systematic and specific searches of PubMed through December 2015 with special emphasis on more recent data (from 2012 onward) while still drawing from more historical data for background. We identified several specific genetic polymorphisms that have been most researched and, at this time, appear to have the greatest clinical significance on NAFLD and similar hepatic diseases. These were further investigated to assess their specific effects on disease onset and progression and the mechanisms by which these effects occur. RESULTS: We focus particularly on genetic polymorphisms of the following genes: PNPLA3, particularly the p. I148M variant, TM6SF2, particularly the p. E167K variant, and on variants in FTO, LIPA, IFNλ4, and iron metabolism, specifically focusing on HFE, and HMOX-1. We discuss the effect of these genetic variations and their resultant protein variants on the onset of fatty liver disease and its severity, including the effect on likelihood of progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. While our principal focus is on NAFLD, we also discuss briefly effects of some of the variants on development and severity of other hepatic diseases, including hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease. These results are briefly discussed in terms of clinical application and future potential for personalized medicine. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms and genetic factors of several genes contribute to NAFLD and its end results. These genes hold keys to future improvements in diagnosis and management. PMID:27547017

  5. Prevalence of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Its Related Factors in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddasifar, I.; Lankarani, K. B.; Moosazadeh, M.; Afshari, M.; Ghaemi, A.; Aliramezany, M.; Afsar Gharebagh, R.; Malary, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent chronic liver disease in developing and developed countries. Estimating the total prevalence of NAFLD by means of appropriate statistical methods can provide reliable evidence for health policy makers. Objective: To determine the prevalence of NAFLD in Iran using a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: We identified relevant studies by searching national and international databases. Standard error of the prevalence reported in each study was calculated assuming a binomial distribution. The heterogeneity between the results of the studies was determined using Cochran’s Q and I square indices. We used a random effect model to combine the prevalence rates reported in the studies. Results: We entered 23 eligible studies in this systematic review investigated NAFLD among 25,865 Iranian people. The total prevalence of NAFLD, prevalence of mild, moderate and severe fatty liver disease were estimated at 33.9% (95% CI 26.4%–41.5%), 26.7% (95% CI 21.7%–31.7%), 7.6% (95% CI 5.7%–9.4%), and 0.5% (95% CI 0.1%–0.9%), respectively. The majority of studies reported that NAFLD was more common among men (seven of eight studies), obese person (15 of 15 studies), older people (10 of 10 studies), patients with systolic hypertension (5 of 8 studies), patients with diastolic hypertension (7 of 9 studies), patients with hypertriglyceridemia (14 of 16 studies), patients with high HOMA level (4 of 4 studies), patients with metabolic syndrome (4 of 4 studies), and those with elevated serum ALT (8 of 12 studies). Conclusion: Our study showed that the prevalence of NAFLD in Iran was relatively high and male gender, old age, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, systolic/diastolic hypertension, high serum ALT, and hypertriglyceridemia may be determinants of NAFLD. PMID:27721961

  6. Dietary sodium and potassium intake in relation to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuni; Lee, Jung Eun; Chang, Yoosoo; Kim, Mi Kyung; Sung, Eunju; Shin, Hocheol; Ryu, Seungho

    2016-10-01

    A few epidemiological data are available assessing the associations of intakes of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to examine the associations of dietary intake of Na and K with the prevalence of ultrasound-diagnosed NAFLD. We performed a cross-sectional study of 100 177 participants (46 596 men and 53 581 women) who underwent a health screening examination and completed a FFQ at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital Total Healthcare Centers, South Korea, between 2011 and 2013. NAFLD was defined by ultrasonographic detection of fatty liver in the absence of excessive alcohol intake or other known causes of liver disease. The proportion of NAFLD was 35·6 % for men and 9·8 % for women. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD was observed with increasing Na intake. The multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) of NAFLD comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted Na intake were 1·25 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·32; P trend<0·001) in men and 1·32 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·47; P trend <0·001) in women. However, when we additionally adjusted for body fat percentage, the association became attenuated; the corresponding PR of NAFLD were 1·15 (95 % CI 1·09, 1·21) in men and 1·06 (95 % CI 0·95, 1·17) in women. No inverse association was observed for energy-adjusted K intake. Our findings suggest that higher Na intake is associated with a greater prevalence of NAFLD in young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults, which might be partly mediated by adiposity.

  7. Hugan Qingzhi Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effects in a Rat Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, WaiJiao; Zeng, Lu; Yin, JinJin; Yao, YuFa; Feng, LiJuan; Yao, XiaoRui; Sun, XiaoMin; Zhou, BenJie

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological Relevance. The Hugan Qingzhi tablet (HQT) is a traditional Chinese medicine used for treating NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of HQT in rats with NAFLD. Materials and Methods. HQT was administered daily to the NAFLD experimental groups. Biochemical markers, histopathological data, and oxidative stress/antioxidant biomarkers were determined. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Expressions of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and acetylated-nuclear-factor kappaB-p65 (Ac-NF-κB-p65) were performed by western blotting. Results. At high and moderate doses, HQT was highly effective in decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.01), aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.01), hepatic total cholesterol (P < 0.01), triglycerides (P < 0.01), and free fatty acid levels (P < 0.01). Moreover, high and moderate doses of HQT reduced hepatic levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α (P < 0.01), IL-1β (P < 0.01), and IL-6 (P < 0.01), enhanced SIRT1 expression, and depressed Ac-NF-κB-p65 expression at protein level. Conclusions. In our NAFLD rat model, HQT exerted substantial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, possibly involving the regulation of SIRT1 and Ac-NF-κB-p65 expression. PMID:26146507

  8. Decreasing mitochondrial fission alleviates hepatic steatosis in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Chad A; Lee, Hakjoo; Brookes, Paul S; Yoon, Yisang

    2014-09-15

    Mitochondria produce the majority of cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, and their capacity to do so is influenced by many factors. Mitochondrial morphology is recently suggested as an important contributor in controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics. Mitochondria divide and fuse continuously, which is affected by environmental factors, including metabolic alterations. Underscoring its bioenergetic influence, altered mitochondrial morphology is reported in tissues of patients and in animal models of metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we found that mitochondrial fission plays a vital role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The development of hepatic steatosis, oxidative/nitrative stress, and hepatic tissue damage, induced by a high-fat diet, were alleviated in genetically manipulated mice suppressing mitochondrial fission. The alleviation of steatosis was recapitulated in primary hepatocytes with the inhibition of mitochondrial fission. Mechanistically, our study indicates that fission inhibition enhances proton leak under conditions of free fatty acid incubation, implicating bioenergetic change through manipulating mitochondrial fission. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanistic role for mitochondrial fission in the etiology of NAFLD. The efficacy of decreasing mitochondrial fission in the suppression of NAFLD suggests that mitochondrial fission represents a novel target for therapeutic treatment of NAFLD.

  9. Cordyceps militaris alleviates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in ob/ob mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ha-Neul; Jang, Yang-Hee; Kim, Min-Joo; Seo, Min Jeong; Kang, Byoung Won; Jeong, Yong Kee

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming an important public health problem as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have become epidemic. In this study we investigated the protective effect of Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) against NAFLD in an obese mouse model. MATERIALS/METHODS Four-week-old male ob/ob mice were fed an AIN-93G diet or a diet containing 1% C. militaris water extract for 10 weeks after 1 week of adaptation. Serum glucose, insulin, free fatty acid (FFA), alanine transaminase (ALT), and proinflammatory cytokines were measured. Hepatic levels of lipids, glutathione (GSH), and lipid peroxide were determined. RESULTS Consumption of C. militaris significantly decreased serum glucose, as well as homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), in ob/ob mice. In addition to lowering serum FFA levels, C. militaris also significantly decreased hepatic total lipids and triglyceride contents. Serum ALT activities and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were reduced by C. militaris. Consumption of C. militaris increased hepatic GSH and reduced lipid peroxide levels. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that C. militaris can exert protective effects against development of NAFLD, partly by reducing inflammatory cytokines and improving hepatic antioxidant status in ob/ob mice. PMID:24741401

  10. A randomized trial of iron depletion in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hyperferritinemia

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Luca; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Dongiovanni, Paola; Rovida, Serena; Rametta, Raffaela; Fatta, Erika; Pulixi, Edoardo Alessandro; Maggioni, Marco; Fargion, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare iron depletion to lifestyle changes alone in patients with severe nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and hyperferritinemia, a frequent feature associated with more severe liver damage, despite at least 6 mo of lifestyle changes. METHODS: Eligible subjects had to be 18-75 years old who underwent liver biopsy for ultrasonographically detected liver steatosis and hyperferritinemia, ferritin levels ≥ 250 ng/mL, and NAFLD activity score > 1. Iron depletion had to be achieved by removing 350 cc of blood every 10-15 d according to baseline hemoglobin values and venesection tolerance, until ferritin < 30 ng/mL and/or transferrin saturation (TS) < 25%. Thirty-eight patients were randomized 1:1 to phlebotomy (n = 21) or lifestyle changes alone (n = 17). The main outcome of the study was improvement in liver damage according to the NAFLD activity score at 2 years, secondary outcomes were improvements in liver enzymes [alanine aminotransferases (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyl-transferases (GGT)]. RESULTS: Phlebotomy was associated with normalization of iron parameters without adverse events. In the 21 patients compliant to the study protocol, the rate of histological improvement was higher in iron depleted vs control subjects (8/12, 67% vs 2/9, 22%, P = 0.039). There was a better improvement in steatosis grade in iron depleted vs control patients (P = 0.02). In patients followed-up at two years (n = 35), ALT, AST, and GGT levels were lower in iron-depleted than in control patients (P < 0.05). The prevalence of subjects with improvement in histological damage or, in the absence of liver biopsy, ALT decrease ≥ 20% (associated with histological improvement in biopsied patients) was higher in the phlebotomy than in the control arm (P = 0.022). The effect of iron depletion on liver damage improvement as assessed by histology or ALT decrease ≥ 20% was independent of baseline AST/ALT ratio and insulin resistance (P = 0

  11. Application of Weka environment to determine factors that stand behind non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plutecki, Michal M.; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Socha, Piotr; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes an innovative approach to discover new knowledge in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In order to determine the factors that may cause the disease a number of classification and attribute selection algorithms have been applied. Only those with the best classification results were chosen. Several interesting facts associated with this unclear disease have been discovered. All data mining computations were made in Weka environment.

  12. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-02-03

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD.

  13. Genome-scale study reveals reduced metabolic adaptability in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Jerby, Livnat; Petäjä, Elina M.; Mattila, Ismo; Jäntti, Sirkku; Auvinen, Petri; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Ruppin, Eytan; Orešič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major risk factor leading to chronic liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we chart liver metabolic activity and functionality in NAFLD by integrating global transcriptomic data, from human liver biopsies, and metabolic flux data, measured across the human splanchnic vascular bed, within a genome-scale model of human metabolism. We show that an increased amount of liver fat induces mitochondrial metabolism, lipolysis, glyceroneogenesis and a switch from lactate to glycerol as substrate for gluconeogenesis, indicating an intricate balance of exacerbated opposite metabolic processes in glycemic regulation. These changes were associated with reduced metabolic adaptability on a network level in the sense that liver fat accumulation puts increasing demands on the liver to adaptively regulate metabolic responses to maintain basic liver functions. We propose that failure to meet excessive metabolic challenges coupled with reduced metabolic adaptability may lead to a vicious pathogenic cycle leading to the co-morbidities of NAFLD. PMID:26839171

  14. The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in healthy young persons

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Gokcan; Karacaer, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This aim of the present study was to determine prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in healthy young persons admitted for annual medical check-ups. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in a military hospital. Total of 254 healthy males were included and participants were divided into 2 groups according to presence and grade of NAFLD. Demographic data, biochemical test results, and ultrasonography findings were collected from all patients. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software, version 22.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). RESULTS: Prevalence of NAFLD was 10.6%. Significant differences were found with regard to age; levels aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and alkaline phosphatase; body mass index (BMI); and presence of NAFLD (p=0.014, p=0.022, p=0.003, p≤0.001, p=0.004, and p≤0.001, respectively). When compared to those with grade 1 NAFLD, levels of alanine transaminase, fasting blood glucose, gamma-glutamyl transferase, triglycerides, total cholesterol and age variables were higher in those with grade 2 NAFLD. However, no statistically significant difference was noted when comparing grades of NAFLD. CONCLUSION: Though this study included patients with normal BMI and normal laboratory test results, presence of NAFLD was not rare in these otherwise healthy young men. Liver enzyme levels were within normal limits; however, there was slight tendency to be high consistent with presence and grade of NAFLD. PMID:28058397

  15. A potential treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with SIRT1 activators.

    PubMed

    Colak, Yasar; Yesil, Atakan; Mutlu, Hasan Huseyin; Caklili, Ozge Telci; Ulasoglu, Celal; Senates, Ebubekir; Takir, Mumtaz; Kostek, Osman; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Yilmaz Enc, Feruze; Tasan, Guralp; Tuncer, Ilyas

    2014-09-01

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) are members of the silent information regulator-2 family and act as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent histone/protein deacetylases. The de-acetylation of proteins and histones results in an up- or down-regulation of gene transcription and protein function. In recent years, the regulatory action of the deacetylation activity of SIRT1 has been shown to have a positive impact on the pathophysiological mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Among the effects of SIRT1 are: its healing activity on insulin sensitivity, thereby ameliorating glycemic regulation; its mimetic activity on calorie restriction; its antihyperlipidemic activity on lipid homeostasis via the liver, adipose tissues and skeletal muscles; its anti-inflammatory activities; its protective effects against cardiovascular events and endothelial dysfunction; its positive influence on autophagy, apoptosis and cancer; and finally, its anti-aging activity. The current approach for the treatment of NAFLD involves the treatment of etiological factors and recommendation of life-style changes including more physical activity and a low-calorie diet. However, there is no specific medical treatments for NAFLD. The therapeutic potential of SIRT1 activity in the treatment of NAFLD discovered in humans has been presented in this article. In this review, the potential effects of SIRT1 activation on NAFLD-related pathophysiological mechanisms and on the treatment of NAFLD are discussed.

  16. Relationship between Neck Circumference and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Doğan, Serap; Mazıcıoğlu, M. Mümtaz; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the association between anthropometric parameters and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and to determine the most reliable measurement as a parameter in predicting NAFLD. Methods: Two-hundred fifty-three obese children of ages 10 to 18 years were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric data and metabolic parameters such as fasting blood glucose, insulin and lipid levels, were measured. Liver function tests were assessed. NAFLD was determined by ultrasound. Results: Most metabolic parameters and anthropometric indices were significantly higher in children with NAFLD. A univariate logistic regression analysis was performed, taking NAFLD status as the dependent variable and anthropometric parameters as the independent variables. NAFLD was affected significantly by the anthropometric values. The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that neck circumference (NC) was the only parameter which determined the risk in both genders. Each 1 cm increase in the NC increased the risk of NAFLD 1.544-fold (p<0.001, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.357-2.214) in the boys and 1.733-fold (p=0.001, 95% CI: 1.185-2.012) in the girls. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to compare the reliability of anthropometric measurements. NC was observed to be a better indicator. Conclusion: Measurement of the NC was shown to be associated with NAFLD in children. We suggest the use of NC as a novel, simple, practical, and reliable anthropometric index in predicting children at risk for NAFLD. PMID:26758497

  17. Non-alcoholic fatty liver and metabolic syndrome in children: a vicious circle.

    PubMed

    Alterio, Arianna; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Nobili, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, paediatricians have observed a dramatic increase of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome (MS) in children. Furthermore, several lines of evidence have reported that a large part of children with NAFLD presents one or more traits of MS making plausible that, in the coming years, these subjects may present a rapid course of disease towards more severe cirrhosis and cardiovascular disease. Genetic susceptibility and the pressure of intrauterine environment and lifestyle are all crucial to activate molecular machinery that leads to development of NAFLD and MS in childhood. In this scenario, central obesity and consequent adipose tissue inflammation are critical to promote both MS-associated metabolic dysfunctions and NAFLD-related hepatic damage. An excessive dietary intake may in fact cause a specific lipid partitioning and induce metabolic stressors, which in turn promote insulin resistance and the release of several circulating factors. These molecules, on the one hand, trigger steatosis and the inflammatory response that characterize liver damage in NAFLD, and on the other hand contribute to the onset of other features of MS. This review provides an overview of current genetic, pathogenetic and clinical evidence of the vicious circle created by NAFLD and MS in children.

  18. Assessment of Cardiovascular Parameters in Obese Children and Adolescents with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Akyürek, Nesibe; Alp, Hayrullah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the periaortic fat thickness (PAFT) using conventional echocardiography in obese children and adolescents with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods: Two hundred and ninety-seven obese children and adolescents were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements were made in all subjects, and fasting venous blood samples were taken for determination of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels. Ultrasonography of the liver was used for assessment of NAFLD and the subjects were grouped as NAFLD and non-NAFLD. Echocardiography was performed in all subjects. Results: PAFT was higher in patients with NAFLD compared with the non-NAFLD group. In patients with NAFLD, PAFT was positively correlated with waist circumference and with total cholesterol levels. In multiple regression analysis, waist circumference (β=0.28, p=<0.001) was found to be the best predictor of PAFT. Conclusion: Conventional echocardiography may be used to determine increased PAFT at an early stage in obese children and adolescents with NAFLD for careful monitoring of cardiovascular risk. PMID:26831557

  19. Role of diet and lifestyle changes in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nseir, William; Hellou, Elias; Assy, Nimer

    2014-07-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become one of the most common causes of liver disease worldwide and has been recognized as a major health burden. The prevalence of NAFLD has grown proportionally with the rise in obesity, sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy dietary pattern, and metabolic syndrome. Currently, there is no drug therapy that can be formulated for treating NAFLD. A combination of dietary modifications and increased physical activity remains the mainstay of NAFLD management. It is hard to maintain this mode of management; however, it seems to have significant long-term benefits. Furthermore, NAFLD patients, whether obese or not, should be educated that a healthy diet and physical activity have benefits beyond weight reduction. Further large controlled randomized trials are needed in order to identify the best dietary regimen and physical activity in the management of NAFLD patients. This review highlights the role of diet and lifestyle modifications in the management of NAFLD, and focuses on human studies regarding dietary modifications and physical activity.

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carrie R; Nguyen, Mindie H; Lim, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in the United States and represents an increasingly important etiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with annual cumulative incidence rates ranging from 2% to 12% in cohorts of NAFLD cirrhosis. While the risk of progression of NAFLD to HCC remains higher among patients with fibrosis or cirrhosis, an increasing amount of literature describes NAFLD-HCC as a disease that can occur in the absence of cirrhosis. Efforts to characterize the pathogenesis of NAFLD-HCC have suggested mechanisms that strongly associate with states of hyperinsulinemia and chronic inflammation, cellular mechanisms including adaptive immune responses and hepatic progenitor cell populations, and genetic polymorphisms including mutations of PNPLA3. Current literature describes NAFLD-HCC mostly as a disease of late presentation with lower rates of receipt of curative therapy and worse prognosis. However, a growing body of evidence has reported comparable and potentially more favorable disease-free and overall survival rates among patients with NAFLD-HCC after receipt of curative treatment. This review summarizes current evidence of epidemiology, pathophysiology, disease presentation, demand and receipt of curative therapy, post-treatment outcomes, and overall survival of NAFLD-associated HCC. PMID:27729736

  1. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-02-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications.

  2. Ursolic acid inhibits the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Shuang; Wang, Wen-Jun; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Yu-Hao; Zheng, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid compound, which is enriched with many herbs and plants, such as apple, cranberry and olive. UA performs multiple biological activities including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and hepatoprotection. However, the exact mechanism underlying the hepatoprotective activity of UA remains unclear. In this study, the effects of UA on the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were investigated. In vivo, UA treatment (0.14%, w/w) significantly decreased the liver weight, serum levels of ALT/AST and hepatic steatosis in db/db mice (a type 2 diabetic mouse model). In vitro, UA treatment (10-30 μg ml(-1)) significantly decreased palmitic acid induced intracellular lipid accumulation in L02 cells. Our results suggested that the beneficial effects of UA on NAFLD may be due to its ability to increase lipid β-oxidation and to inhibit the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Together, UA may be further considered as a natural compound for NAFLD treatment.

  3. Multi-omic profiles of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease tissue highlight heterogenic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Wruck, Wasco; Kashofer, Karl; Rehman, Samrina; Daskalaki, Andriani; Berg, Daniela; Gralka, Ewa; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Drews, Katharina; Pandey, Vikash; Regenbrecht, Christian; Wierling, Christoph; Turano, Paola; Korf, Ulrike; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Adjaye, James

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of sedentary life style and high fat diets with an estimated prevalence of about 30% in western countries. It is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, glucose intolerance and drug toxicity. Additionally, polymorphisms within, e.g., APOC3, PNPLA3, NCAN, TM6SF2 and PPP1R3B, correlate with NAFLD. Several studies have already investigated later stages of the disease. This study explores the early steatosis stage of NAFLD with the aim of identifying molecular mechanisms underlying the etiology of NAFLD. We analyzed liver biopsies and serum samples from patients with high- and low-grade steatosis (also pre-disease states) employing transcriptomics, ELISA-based serum protein analyses and metabolomics. Here, we provide a detailed description of the various related datasets produced in the course of this study. These datasets may help other researchers find new clues for the etiology of NAFLD and the mechanisms underlying its progression to more severe disease states. PMID:26646939

  4. Flaxseed supplementation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot randomized, open labeled, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yari, Zahra; Rahimlou, Mehran; Eslamparast, Tannaz; Ebrahimi-Daryani, Naser; Poustchi, Hossein; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2016-06-01

    A two-arm randomized open labeled controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Participants were assigned to take either a lifestyle modification (LM), or LM +30 g/day brown milled flaxseed for 12 weeks. At the end of the study, body weight, liver enzymes, insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis and steatosis decreased significantly in both groups (p< 0.05); however, this reduction was significantly greater in those who took flaxseed supplementation (p < 0.05). The significant mean differences were reached in hepatic markers between flaxseed and control group, respectively: ALT [-11.12 compared with -3.7 U/L; P< 0.001], AST [-8.29 compared with -4 U/L; p < 0.001], GGT [-15.7 compared with -2.62 U/L; p < 0.001], fibrosis score [-1.26 compared with -0.77 kPa; p = 0.013] and steatosis score [-47 compared with -15.45 dB/m; p = 0.022]. In conclusion, flaxseed supplementation plus lifestyle modification is more effective than lifestyle modification alone for NAFLD management.

  5. Modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by olive oil and its phenols in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Priore, Paola; Cavallo, Alessandro; Gnoni, Antonio; Damiano, Fabrizio; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in western countries, being considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Cumulative lines of evidence suggest that olive oil, used as primary source of fat by Mediterranean populations, may play a key role in the observed health benefits on NAFLD. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of the knowledge on the protective role of both major and minor components of olive oil on lipid metabolism during NAFLD. In particular, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the increase or decrease in hepatic lipid content are critically analyzed, taking into account that several studies have often provided different and/or conflicting results in animal models fed on olive oil-enriched diet. In addition, new findings that highlight the hypolipidemic and the antisteatotic actions of olive oil phenols are presented. As mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, the targeting of these organelles with olive oil phenols as a powerful therapeutic approach is also discussed.

  6. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and the Metabolic Syndrome in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Pardee, Perrie E.; Lavine, Joel E.; Blumkin, Aaron K.; Cook, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common cause of liver disease in children, is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. However, the relationship between NAFLD and cardiovascular risk factors in children is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to determine the association between NAFLD and the presence of metabolic syndrome in overweight and obese children. Methods and Results This case-control study of 150 overweight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 150 overweight children without NAFLD compared rates of metabolic syndrome using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Cases and controls were well matched in age, sex, and severity of obesity. Children with NAFLD had significantly higher fasting glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure than overweight and obese children without NAFLD. Subjects with NAFLD also had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than controls. After adjustment for age, sex, race, ethnicity, body mass index, and hyperinsulinemia, children with metabolic syndrome had 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 2.6 to 9.7) times the odds of having NAFLD as overweight and obese children without metabolic syndrome. Conclusions NAFLD in overweight and obese children is strongly associated with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The identification of NAFLD in a child should prompt global counseling to address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18591439

  7. Low Circulating Levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Histologically Advanced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Michael; Angulo, Paul; Chalasani, Naga; Merriman, Ralph; Viker, Kimberly; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Sanderson, Schuyler; Gawrieh, Samer; Krishnan, Anuradha; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0–2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3–4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 µg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 µg/mL, P < 0.001). A “dose effect” of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 µg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with

  8. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: TONIC Trial Design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver disease. The cause of NAFLD is unknown, but it is commonly associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Objectives TONIC is conducted to test whether treatment with metformin, an insulin sensitizer, or vitamin E, a naturally available antioxidant, will lead to improvements in biochemical and histological features of nondiabetic children with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Design TONIC is a randomized, multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial of 96 weeks of treatment with metformin or vitamin E. The primary outcome measure chosen for the trial is improvement in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels with treatment as compared to placebo. An improvement in ALT is defined as reduction in serum ALT levels to below 50% of the baseline values or into the normal range (40 U/L or less) during the last 48 weeks of treatment. Histological improvement is defined by changes in liver histology between a baseline and end-of-treatment liver biopsy in regards to (1) steatohepatitis, (2) NAFLD Activity Score, consisting of scores for steatosis, lobular inflammation, and hepatocellular injury (ballooning), and (3) fibrosis score. Methods Between September 2005 and September 2007, 173 children were enrolled into TONIC at 10 clinical centers in the United States. Participants were randomized to receive either metformin (500 mg b.i.d.), vitamin E (400 IU b.i.d.), or placebo for 96 weeks. This protocol was approved by all participating center Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00063635.) PMID:19761871

  9. The clinical characteristics and etiological study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in Chinese women with PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhongyu; Zhu, Yanhui; Jiang, Jingjing; Shi, Yuhua; Chen, Zijiang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is highly associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). There are extensive ethnic differences in the clinical manifestations, pathological changes, and ovarian changes in women with PCOS. Objective: To investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of NAFLD in Chinese women with PCOS. Materials and Methods: Non-pregnant women with PCOS (N= 602) and matched controls without PCOS (N=588) were recruited. Basal endocrine, oral glucose tolerance test, insulin release level, lipid level, blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI) were measured. Liver biochemical and B-hepatitis and C-hepatitis indices were determined. Results: NAFLD was significantly more prevalent in women with PCOS than controls (32.9% vs. 18.5%) and included 113 (57.1%) mild, 75 (37.8%) moderate and 10 (5.1%) severe cases. Luteinizing hormone was significantly lower in PCOS women with NAFLD than without NAFLD. In the PCOS group, NAFLD prevalence and severity increased with BMI. The liver index was significantly higher (p<0.001), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly lower (p<0.001) in the PCOS group than controls. Insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, diabetes mellitus, abnormal glucose tolerance, liver dysfunction, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome were significantly more prevalent in the NAFLD group than controls. Conclusion: Chinese women with PCOS have a high prevalence of mostly mild and moderate NAFLD, not significantly associated with hyperandrogenism that increased significantly with BMI. Insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities are important factors associated with NAFLD. Chinese women with BMI ≥24 kg/m2 should be screened for NAFLD. PMID:24639812

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease is Associated with Low Bone Mineral Density in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Perrie E.; Dunn, Winston; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. Liver disease can be a cause of low bone mineral density. Whether NAFLD influences bone health is unknown. AIM To evaluate bone mineral density in obese children with and without NAFLD. METHODS Thirty-eight children with biopsy-proven NAFLD were matched for age, sex, race, ethnicity, height, and weight to children without evidence of liver disease from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Age and sex-specific bone mineral density Z-scores were calculated and compared between children with and without NAFLD. After controlling for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and total percent body fat, the relationship between bone mineral density and the severity of histology was analyzed in children with NAFLD. RESULTS Obese children with NAFLD had significantly (p<0.0001) lower bone mineral density Z-scores (−1.98) than obese children without NAFLD (0.48). Forty-five percent of children with NAFLD had low bone mineral density for age, compared to none of the children without NAFLD (p < 0.0001). Among those children with NAFLD, children with NASH had a significantly (p< 0.05) lower bone mineral density Z-score (−2.37) than children with NAFLD who did not have NASH (−1.58). CONCLUSIONS NAFLD was associated with poor bone health in obese children. More severe disease was associated with lower bone mineralization. Further studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms and consequences of poor bone mineralization in children with NAFLD. PMID:22111971

  11. Effect of tryptophan supplementation on diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ritze, Yvonne; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; Hubert, Astrid; Böhle, Maureen; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2014-07-14

    Intestinal serotonin (5-hydroxytrypamine, 5-HT) metabolism is thought to play a role in gut functions by regulating motility, permeability and other functions of the intestine. In the present study, we investigated the effect of tryptophan (TRP), the precursor of 5-HT, supplementation on intestinal barrier functions and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). An established mouse model of NAFLD induced by feeding a fructose-rich diet (N group) was used in the present study. TRP was administered orally for 8 weeks to C57BL/6J control or NAFLD mice. NAFLD-related liver parameters (hepatic TAG and Oil Red O staining), intestinal barrier parameters (tight-junction protein occludin and portal plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPS)) and 5-HT-related parameters (5-HT, 5-HT transporter (SERT) and motility) were measured. We observed reduced duodenal occludin protein concentrations (P= 0·0007), high portal plasma LPS concentrations (P= 0·005) and an elevated liver weight:body weight ratio (P= 0·01) in the N group compared with the parameters in the control group. TRP supplementation led to an increase in occludin concentrations (P= 0·0009) and consecutively reduced liver weight:body weight ratio (P= 0·009) as well as overall hepatic fat accumulation in the N group (P= 0·05). In addition, the N group exhibited reduced SERT protein expression (P= 0·002), which was normalised by TRP supplementation (P= 0·02). For the first time, our data indicate that oral TRP supplementation attenuates experimental NAFLD in mice. The underlying mechanisms are not clear, but probably involve stabilisation of the intestinal barrier in the upper small intestine and amelioration of the dysregulated intestinal serotonergic system.

  12. Novel hepatic microRNAs upregulated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Soronen, Jarkko; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Zhou, You; Sädevirta, Sanja; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Leivonen, Marja; Sevastianova, Ksenia; Perttilä, Julia; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Sigruener, Alexander; Schmitz, Gerd; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression by reducing mRNA stability and translation. We aimed to identify alterations in human liver miRNA expression/function in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Subjects with the highest (median liver fat 30%, n = 15) and lowest (0%, n = 15) liver fat content were selected from >100 obese patients for miRNA profiling of liver biopsies on microarrays carrying probes for 1438 human miRNAs (a cross-sectional study). Target mRNAs and pathways were predicted for the miRNAs most significantly upregulated in NAFLD, their cell-type-specific expression was investigated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and the transcriptome of immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) transfected with the miRNA with the highest number of predicted targets, miR-576-5p, was studied. The screen revealed 42 miRNAs up- and two downregulated in the NAFLD as compared to non-NAFLD liver. The miRNAs differing most significantly between the groups, miR-103a-2*, miR-106b, miR-576-5p, miRPlus-I137*, miR-892a, miR-1282, miR-3663-5p, and miR-3924, were all upregulated in NAFLD liver. Target pathways predicted for these miRNAs included ones involved in cance