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Sample records for noncoding repeat expansions

  1. Modeling diseases of noncoding unstable repeat expansions using mutant pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Mor-Shaked, Hagar; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations involving DNA repeat expansions are responsible for over 20 different neuronal and neuromuscular diseases. All result from expanded tracts of repetitive DNA sequences (mostly microsatellites) that become unstable beyond a critical length when transmitted across generations. Nearly all are inherited as autosomal dominant conditions and are typically associated with anticipation. Pathologic unstable repeat expansions can be classified according to their length, repeat sequence, gene location and underlying pathologic mechanisms. This review summarizes the current contribution of mutant pluripotent stem cells (diseased human embryonic stem cells and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to the research of unstable repeat pathologies by focusing on particularly large unstable noncoding expansions. Among this class of disorders are Fragile X syndrome and Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, myotonic dystrophy type 1 and myotonic dystrophy type 2, Friedreich ataxia and C9 related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia, Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy and potentially more. Common features that are typical to this subclass of conditions are RNA toxic gain-of-function, epigenetic loss-of-function, toxic repeat-associated non-ATG translation and somatic instability. For each mechanism we summarize the currently available stem cell based models, highlight how they contributed to better understanding of the related mechanism, and discuss how they may be utilized in future investigations. PMID:26131313

  2. Influence of Friedreich Ataxia GAA Noncoding Repeat Expansions on Pre-mRNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, Marco; Pastor, Tibor; Bussani, Erica; Pagani, Franco

    2008-01-01

    The intronic GAA repeat expansion in the frataxin (FXN) gene causes the hereditary neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich ataxia. Although it is generally believed that GAA repeats block transcription elongation, direct proof in eukaryotic systems is lacking. We tested in hybrid minigenes the effect of GAA and TTC repeats on nascent transcription and pre-mRNA processing. Unexpectedly, disease-causing GAA100 repeats did not affect transcriptional elongation in a nuclear HeLa Run On assay, nor did they affect pre-mRNA transcript abundance. However, they did result in a complex defect in pre-mRNA processing. The insertion of GAA but not TTC repeats downstream of reporter exons resulted in their partial or complete exclusion from the mature mRNAs and in the generation of a variety of aberrant splicing products. This effect of GAA repeats was observed to be position and context dependent; their insertion at different distances from the reporter exons had a variable effect on splice-site selection. In addition, GAA repeats bind to a multitude of different splicing factors and induced the accumulation of an upstream pre-mRNA splicing intermediate, which is not turned over into mature mRNA. When embedded in the homologous frataxin minigene system, the GAA repeats did not affect the pre-mRNA transcript abundance but did significantly reduce the splicing efficiency of the first intron. These data indicate an association between GAA noncoding repeats and aberrant pre-mRNA processing because binding of transcribed GAA repeats to a multitude of trans-acting splicing factors can interfere with normal turnover of intronic RNA and thus lead to its degradation and a lower abundance of mature mRNA. PMID:18597733

  3. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  4. Therapeutics development for triplet repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Prospero, Nicholas A; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2005-10-01

    The underlying genetic mutations for many inherited neurodegenerative disorders have been identified in recent years. One frequent type of mutation is trinucleotide repeat expansion. Depending on the location of the repeat expansion, the mutation might result in a loss of function of the disease gene, a toxic gain of function or both. Disease gene identification has led to the development of model systems for investigating disease mechanisms and evaluating treatments. Examination of experimental findings reveals similarities in disease mechanisms as well as possibilities for treatment.

  5. SMRT Sequencing of Long Tandem Nucleotide Repeats in SCA10 Reveals Unique Insight of Repeat Expansion Structure

    PubMed Central

    Landrian, Ivette; Godiska, Ronald; Shanker, Savita; Yu, Fahong; Farmerie, William G.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10). In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5’ end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to act as a phenotypic modifier in SCA10. Yet, the exact internal sequence structure of SCA10 expansions remains unknown due to limitations in current technologies for sequencing across long extended tracts of tandem nucleotide repeats. We used the third generation sequencing technology, Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing, to obtain full-length contiguous expansion sequences, ranging from 2.5 to 4.4 kb in length, from three SCA10 patients with different clinical presentations. We obtained sequence spanning the entire length of the expansion and identified the structure of known and novel interruption motifs within the SCA10 expansion. The exact interruption patterns in expanded SCA10 alleles will allow us to further investigate the potential contributions of these interrupting sequences to the pathogenic modification leading to the epilepsy phenotype in SCA10. Our results also demonstrate that SMRT sequencing is useful for deciphering long tandem repeats that pose as “gaps” in the human genome sequence. PMID:26295943

  6. Polyglutamine expansion diseases: More than simple repeats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alexandra; de Almeida, Ana Viana; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2017-09-18

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat-containing proteins are widespread in the human proteome but only nine of them are associated with highly incapacitating neurodegenerative disorders. The genetic expansion of the polyQ tract in disease-related proteins triggers a series of events resulting in neurodegeneration. The polyQ tract plays the leading role in the aggregation mechanism, but other elements modulate the aggregation propensity in the context of the full-length proteins, as implied by variations in the length of the polyQ tract required to trigger the onset of a given polyQ disease. Intrinsic features such as the presence of aggregation-prone regions (APRs) outside the polyQ segments and polyQ-flanking sequences, which synergistically participate in the aggregation process, are emerging for several disease-related proteins. The inherent polymorphic structure of polyQ stretches places the polyQ proteins in a central position in protein-protein interaction networks, where interacting partners may additionally shield APRs or reshape the aggregation course. Expansion of the polyQ tract perturbs the cellular homeostasis and contributes to neuronal failure by modulating protein-protein interactions and enhancing toxic oligomerization. Post-translational modifications further regulate self-assembly either by directly altering the intrinsic aggregation propensity of polyQ proteins, by modulating their interaction with different macromolecules or by modifying their withdrawal by the cell quality control machinery. Here we review the recent data on the multifaceted aggregation pathways of disease-related polyQ proteins, focusing on ataxin-3, the protein mutated in Machado-Joseph disease. Further mechanistic understanding of this network of events is crucial for the development of effective therapies for polyQ diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Karen N; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A G; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed "ATCCT interruptions," experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confer a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling.

  8. Impact of Noncoding Satellite Repeats on Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    kinetochore formation, and drive chromosomal segregation during mitosis, thereby ensuring faithful duplication of the genome (1). Transcription from...tutes the main component of pericentromeric heterochromatin on chromosomes 2, 7, 10, 16, and 22 (UCSC Genome Browser, genome.ucsc.edu), and it is...also found at chromosome band 1q12, where it is colocated with satellite III sequences. HSATII is defined by tandemly repeated divergent variants of 23

  9. Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements and Non-Coding RNAs in the Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sabrina B.; Spencer-Smith, Russell; Shah, Mahwish; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Cook, Richard T.; Snyder, Lori A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is capable of causing gonorrhoea and more complex diseases in the human host. Neisseria meningitidis is a closely related pathogen that shares many of the same genomic features and virulence factors, but causes the life threatening diseases meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia. The importance of non-coding RNAs in gene regulation has become increasingly evident having been demonstrated to be involved in regulons responsible for iron acquisition, antigenic variation, and virulence. Neisseria spp. contain an IS-like element, the Correia Repeat Enclosed Element, which has been predicted to be mobile within the genomes or to have been in the past. This repeat, present in over 100 copies in the genome, has the ability to alter gene expression and regulation in several ways. We reveal here that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements tend to be near non-coding RNAs in the Neisseria spp., especially N. gonorrhoeae. These results suggest that Correia Repeat Enclosed Elements may have disrupted ancestral regulatory networks not just through their influence on regulatory proteins but also for non-coding RNAs. PMID:27681925

  10. GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9orf72 compromises nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed

    Freibaum, Brian D; Lu, Yubing; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Kim, Nam Chul; Almeida, Sandra; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Badders, Nisha; Valentine, Marc; Miller, Bruce L; Wong, Philip C; Petrucelli, Leonard; Kim, Hong Joo; Gao, Fen-Biao; Taylor, J Paul

    2015-09-03

    The GGGGCC (G4C2) repeat expansion in a noncoding region of C9orf72 is the most common cause of sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. The basis for pathogenesis is unknown. To elucidate the consequences of G4C2 repeat expansion in a tractable genetic system, we generated transgenic fly lines expressing 8, 28 or 58 G4C2-repeat-containing transcripts that do not have a translation start site (AUG) but contain an open-reading frame for green fluorescent protein to detect repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We show that these transgenic animals display dosage-dependent, repeat-length-dependent degeneration in neuronal tissues and RAN translation of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, as observed in patients with C9orf72-related disease. This model was used in a large-scale, unbiased genetic screen, ultimately leading to the identification of 18 genetic modifiers that encode components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), as well as the machinery that coordinates the export of nuclear RNA and the import of nuclear proteins. Consistent with these results, we found morphological abnormalities in the architecture of the nuclear envelope in cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we identified a substantial defect in RNA export resulting in retention of RNA in the nuclei of Drosophila cells expressing expanded G4C2 repeats and also in mammalian cells, including aged induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived neurons from patients with C9orf72-related disease. These studies show that a primary consequence of G4C2 repeat expansion is the compromise of nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear pore, revealing a novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.

  11. Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in noncoding region of C9ORF72 causes chromosome 9p-linked FTD and ALS.

    PubMed

    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Mackenzie, Ian R; Boeve, Bradley F; Boxer, Adam L; Baker, Matt; Rutherford, Nicola J; Nicholson, Alexandra M; Finch, NiCole A; Flynn, Heather; Adamson, Jennifer; Kouri, Naomi; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Sengdy, Pheth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Karydas, Anna; Seeley, William W; Josephs, Keith A; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Feldman, Howard; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Dickson, Dennis W; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Rademakers, Rosa

    2011-10-20

    Several families have been reported with autosomal-dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), genetically linked to chromosome 9p21. Here, we report an expansion of a noncoding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the gene C9ORF72 that is strongly associated with disease in a large FTD/ALS kindred, previously reported to be conclusively linked to chromosome 9p. This same repeat expansion was identified in the majority of our families with a combined FTD/ALS phenotype and TDP-43-based pathology. Analysis of extended clinical series found the C9ORF72 repeat expansion to be the most common genetic abnormality in both familial FTD (11.7%) and familial ALS (23.5%). The repeat expansion leads to the loss of one alternatively spliced C9ORF72 transcript and to formation of nuclear RNA foci, suggesting multiple disease mechanisms. Our findings indicate that repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is a major cause of both FTD and ALS.

  12. Repeat expansion and autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders: consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Margolis, Russell L

    2003-08-22

    Repeat-expansion mutations cause 13 autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders falling into three groups. Huntington's disease (HD), dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) types 1, 2, 3, 7 and 17 are each caused by a CAG repeat expansion that encodes polyglutamine. Convergent lines of evidence demonstrate that neurodegeneration in these diseases is a consequence of the neurotoxic effects of abnormally long stretches of glutamines. How polyglutamine induces neurodegeneration, and why neurodegeneration occurs in only select neuronal populations, remains a matter of intense investigation. SCA6 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in CACNA1A, a gene that encodes a subunit of the P/Q-type calcium channel. The threshold length at which the repeat causes disease is much shorter than in the other polyglutamine diseases, and neurodegeneration may arise from expansion-induced change of function in the calcium channel. Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) and SCAs 8, 10 and 12 are rare disorders in which the repeats (CAG, CTG or ATTCT) are not in protein-coding regions. Investigation into these diseases is still at an early stage, but it is now reasonable to hypothesise that the net effect of each expansion is to alter gene expression. The different pathogenic mechanisms in these three groups of diseases have important implications for the development of rational therapeutics.

  13. The Repeat Expansion Diseases: the dark side of DNA repair?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Usdin, Karen

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair normally protects the genome against mutations that threaten genome integrity and thus cell viability. However, growing evidence suggests that in the case of the Repeat Expansion Diseases, disorders that result from an increase in the size of a disease-specific microsatellite, the disease-causing mutation is actually the result of aberrant DNA repair. A variety of proteins from different DNA repair pathways have thus far been implicated in this process. This review will summarize recent findings from patients and from mouse models of these diseases that shed light on how these pathways may interact to cause repeat expansion. PMID:26002199

  14. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen prevents trinucleotide repeat expansions by promoting repeat deletion and hairpin removal

    PubMed Central

    Beaver, Jill M.; Lai, Yanhao; Rolle, Shantell J.; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    DNA base lesions and base excision repair (BER) within trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tracts modulate repeat instability through the coordination among the key BER enzymes DNA polymerase β, flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) and DNA ligase I (LIG I). However, it remains unknown whether BER cofactors can also alter TNR stability. In this study, we discovered that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of BER, promoted CAG repeat deletion and removal of a CAG repeat hairpin during BER in a duplex CAG repeat tract and CAG hairpin loop, respectively. We showed that PCNA stimulated LIG I activity on a nick across a small template loop during BER in a duplex (CAG)20 repeat tract promoting small repeat deletions. Surprisingly, we found that during BER in a hairpin loop, PCNA promoted reannealing of the upstream flap of a double-flap intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of a downstream flap and stimulating FEN1 cleavage activity and hairpin removal. Our results indicate that PCNA plays a critical role in preventing CAG repeat expansions by modulating the structures of dynamic DNA via cooperation with BER enzymes. We provide the first evidence that PCNA prevents CAG repeat expansions during BER by promoting CAG repeat deletion and removal of a TNR hairpin. PMID:27793507

  15. Precise small-molecule recognition of a toxic CUG RNA repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Colgan, Lesley A; Nakai, Yoshio; Cameron, Michael D; Furling, Denis; Yasuda, Ryohei; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-02-01

    Excluding the ribosome and riboswitches, developing small molecules that selectively target RNA is a longstanding problem in chemical biology. A typical cellular RNA is difficult to target because it has little tertiary, but abundant secondary structure. We designed allele-selective compounds that target such an RNA, the toxic noncoding repeat expansion (r(CUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). We developed several strategies to generate allele-selective small molecules, including non-covalent binding, covalent binding, cleavage and on-site probe synthesis. Covalent binding and cleavage enabled target profiling in cells derived from individuals with DM1, showing precise recognition of r(CUG)(exp). In the on-site probe synthesis approach, small molecules bound adjacent sites in r(CUG)(exp) and reacted to afford picomolar inhibitors via a proximity-based click reaction only in DM1-affected cells. We expanded this approach to image r(CUG)(exp) in its natural context.

  16. Repeat expansion disease: Progress and puzzles in disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    La Spada, Albert R.; Taylor, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Repeat expansion mutations cause at least 22 inherited neurological diseases. The complexity of repeat disease genetics and pathobiology has revealed unexpected shared themes and mechanistic pathways among the diseases, for example, RNA toxicity. Also, investigation of the polyglutamine diseases has identified post-translational modification as a key step in the pathogenic cascade, and has shown that the autophagy pathway plays an important role in the degradation of misfolded proteins – two themes likely to be relevant to the entire neurodegeneration field. Insights from repeat disease research are catalyzing new lines of study that should not only elucidate molecular mechanisms of disease, but also highlight opportunities for therapeutic intervention for these currently untreatable disorders. PMID:20177426

  17. Novel mutational mechanism in man: Expansion of trinucleotide repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Ilarioshkin, S.N.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I.A.; Markova, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    An analysis of a novel, recently discovered class of mutations in man - an expansion, i.e., an increase of the copy number of intragenic unstable trinucleotide repeats - is presented. The expansion of trinucleotide X chromosome syndrome (two separate variants of the disease - FRAXA and FRAXE), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar Kennedy`s amyotrophy, Huntington`s chorea, type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia, and dentatorubral-pallidolyusian atrophy. The discovery of triplet expansion allows a satisfactory explanation on the molecular level of a series of unusual clinical genetic phenomena, such as anticipation, the {open_quotes}paternal transmission{close_quotes} effect, the {open_quotes}Sherman paradox,{close_quotes} and others. The common properties and the distinctions of unstable trinucleotide mutations in the nosologic forms mentioned above are analyzed comprehensively. These features include the mechanism by which these mutations cause disease, the time of their appearance in ontogenesis, and various clinical genetic correlations. The evolutionary origin of this class of mutations and, in particular, the role of alleles with an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} triplet number, which are the persistent reservoir of mutations arising de novo in a population, are also discussed. The possible implication of unstable trinucleotide repeats for a series of other hereditary diseases, such as type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and others, is also suggested. 108 refs., 1 tab.

  18. A fly model for the CCUG-repeat expansion of myotonic dystrophy type 2 reveals a novel interaction with MBNL1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenming; Goodman, Lindsey D; Shieh, Shin-Yi; Min, Michelle; Teng, Xiuyin; Zhu, Yongqing; Bonini, Nancy M

    2015-02-15

    Expanded non-coding RNA repeats of CUG and CCUG are the underlying genetic causes for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), respectively. A gain-of-function of these pathogenic repeat expansions is mediated at least in part by their abnormal interactions with RNA-binding proteins such as MBNL1 and resultant loss of activity of these proteins. To study pathogenic mechanisms of CCUG-repeat expansions in an animal model, we created a fly model of DM2 that expresses pure, uninterrupted CCUG-repeat expansions ranging from 16 to 720 repeats in length. We show that this fly model for DM2 recapitulates key features of human DM2 including RNA repeat-induced toxicity, ribonuclear foci formation and changes in alternative splicing. Interestingly, expression of two isoforms of MBNL1, MBNL135 and MBNL140, leads to cleavage and concurrent upregulation of the levels of the RNA-repeat transcripts, with MBNL140 having more significant effects than MBNL135. This property is shared with a fly CUG-repeat expansion model. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for interaction between the pathogenic RNA repeat expansions of myotonic dystrophy and MBNL1.

  19. CAG repeat expansions in bipolar and unipolar disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Oruc, L.; Verheyen, G.R.; Raeymaekers, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    1997-03-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies consistently have indicated that the familial aggregation of bipolar (BP) disorder and unipolar recurrent major depression (UPR) is accounted for largely by genetic factors. However, the mode of inheritance is complex. One of the possible explanations could be that a gene with variable penetrance and variable expression is involved. Recently there have been reports on a new class of genetic diseases caused by an abnormal trinucleotide-repeat expansion (TRE). In a number of genetic disorders, these dynamic mutations were proved to be the biological basis for the clinically observed phenomenon of anticipation. DNA consisting of repeated triplets of nucleotides becomes unstable and increases in size over generations within families, giving rise to an increased severity and/or an earlier onset of the disorder. It has been recognized for a long time that anticipation occurs in multiplex families transmitting mental illness. More recent studies also suggest that both BP disorder and UPR show features that are compatible with anticipation. Although the findings of anticipation in BP disorders and in UPR must be interpreted with caution because of the possible presence of numerous ascertainment biases, they support the hypothesis that pathological TREs are implicated in the transmission of these disorders. TRE combined with variable penetrance of expression could explain the complex transmission pattern observed in BP disorder. In view of this, the recent reports of an association between CAG-repeat length and BP disorder in a Belgian, Swedish, and British population are promising. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. The C9ORF72 repeat expansion disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, Aaron R.; Grima, Jonathan C.; Machamer, James B.; Steinwald, Peter; Daley, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Sean J.; Cunningham, Kathleen M.; Vidensky, Svetlana; Gupta, Saksham; Thomas, Michael A.; Hong, Ingie; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Huganir, Richard L.; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Matunis, Michael J.; Wang, Jiou; Sattler, Rita

    2016-01-01

    A GGGGCC (G4C2) hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE) in C9ORF72 is the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent studies support an HRE RNA gain-of-function mechanism of neurotoxicity, and we previously identified protein interactors for the G4C2 RNA including RanGAP1. A candidate-based genetic screen in Drosophila expressing 30 G4C2 repeats identified RanGAP (Drosophila ortholog of human RanGAP1), a key regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as a potent suppressor of neurodegeneration. Enhancing nuclear import or suppressing nuclear export of proteins also suppresses neurodegeneration. RanGAP physically interacts with HRE RNA and is mislocalized in HRE-expressing flies, neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSNs), and in C9ORF72 patient brain tissue. Nuclear import is impaired as a result of HRE expression in the fly model and in C9ORF72 iPSNs, and these deficits are rescued by small molecules and antisense oligonucleotides targeting the HRE G-quadruplexes. Nucleocytoplasmic transport defects may be a fundamental pathway for ALS and FTD amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26308891

  1. Purα Repaired Expanded Hexanucleotide GGGGCC Repeat Noncoding RNA-Caused Neuronal Toxicity in Neuro-2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianying; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Shi; Mao, Hong; Wang, Zhongjing; Li, Honglian; Xu, Zihui

    2017-10-03

    Expanded hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat in a noncoding region of C9ORF72 is the most common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, its molecular pathogenesis remains unclear. In our previous study, the expanded GGGGCC repeats have been shown to be sufficient to cause neurodegeneration. In order to investigate the further role of expanded GGGGCC repeats in the neuron, the normal r(GGGGCC)3 and mutant-type expanded r(GGGGCC)30 expression vectors were transfected into Neuro-2a cells. Cell proliferation, dendrite development, and the proteins' levels of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP2) and cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) were used to evaluate the cell toxicity of GGGGCC repeats on Neuro-2a cells. The results were shown that expression of expanded GGGGCC repeats caused neuronal cell toxicity in Neuro-2a cells, enhanced the expression of pMAP2 and pCDK5. Moreover, overexpression of Purα repaired expanded GGGGCC repeat-inducing neuronal toxicity in Neuro-2a cells and reduced the expression of pMAP2 and pCDK5. In all, our findings suggested that the expanded GGGGCC repeats might cause neurodegeneration through destroyed neuron cells. And the GGGGCC repeat-induced neuronal cell toxicity was inhibited by upregulation of Purα. We inferred that Purα inhibits expanded GGGGCC repeat-inducing neurodegeneration, which might reveal a novel mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases ALS and FTD.

  2. Targeting RNA foci in iPSC-derived motor neurons from ALS patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, D.; O’Rourke, J. G.; Meera, P.; Muhammad, A.K.M.G.; Grant, S.; Simpkinson, M.; Bell, S.; Carmona, S.; Ornelas, L.; Sahabian, A.; Gendron, T.; Petrucelli, L.; Baughn, M.; Ravits, J.; Harms, M. B.; Rigo, F.; Bennett, C. F.; Otis, T. S.; Svendsen, C. N.; Baloh, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative condition characterized by loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene are the most common cause of the familial form of ALS (C9-ALS), as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration and other neurological diseases. How the repeat expansion causes disease remains unclear, with both loss of function (haploinsufficiency) and gain of function (either toxic RNA or protein products) proposed. Here, we report a cellular model of C9-ALS with motor neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from ALS patients carrying the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. No significant loss of C9ORF72 expression was observed, and knockdown of the transcript was not toxic to cultured human motor neurons. Transcription of the repeat was increased leading to accumulation of GGGGCC repeat-containing RNA foci selectively in C9-ALS motor neurons. Repeat-containing RNA foci co-localized with hnRNPA1 and Pur-α, suggesting that they may be able to alter RNA metabolism. C9-ALS motor neurons showed altered expression of genes involved in membrane excitability including DPP6, and demonstrated a diminished capacity to fire continuous spikes upon depolarization compared to control motor neurons. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting the C9ORF72 transcript suppressed RNA foci formation and reversed gene expression alterations in C9-ALS motor neurons. These data show that patient-derived motor neurons can be used to delineate pathogenic events in ALS. PMID:24154603

  3. Tandem repeats discovery service (TReaDS) applied to finding novel cis-acting factors in repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tandem repeats are multiple duplications of substrings in the DNA that occur contiguously, or at a short distance, and may involve some mutations (such as substitutions, insertions, and deletions). Tandem repeats have been extensively studied also for their association with the class of repeat expansion diseases (mostly affecting the nervous system). Comparative studies on the output of different tools for finding tandem repeats highlighted significant differences among the sets of detected tandem repeats, while many authors pointed up how critical it is the right choice of parameters. Results In this paper we present TReaDS - Tandem Repeats Discovery Service, a tandem repeat meta search engine. TReaDS forwards user requests to several state of the art tools for finding tandem repeats and merges their outcome into a single report, providing a global, synthetic, and comparative view of the results. In particular, TReaDS allows the user to (i) simultaneously run different algorithms on the same data set, (ii) choose for each algorithm a different setting of parameters, and (iii) obtain a report that can be downloaded for further, off-line, investigations. We used TReaDS to investigate sequences associated with repeat expansion diseases. Conclusions By using the tool TReaDS we discover that, for 27 repeat expansion diseases out of a currently known set of 29, long fuzzy tandem repeats are covering the expansion loci. Tests with control sets confirm the specificity of this association. This finding suggests that long fuzzy tandem repeats can be a new class of cis-acting elements involved in the mechanisms leading to the expansion instability. We strongly believe that biologists can be interested in a tool that, not only gives them the possibility of using multiple search algorithm at the same time, with the same effort exerted in using just one of the systems, but also simplifies the burden of comparing and merging the results, thus expanding our

  4. DNA Mismatch Repair Complex MutSβ Promotes GAA·TTC Repeat Expansion in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Anasheh; Ditch, Scott; Wang, Jeffrey; Grabczyk, Ed

    2012-01-01

    While DNA repair has been implicated in CAG·CTG repeat expansion, its role in the GAA·TTC expansion of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is less clear. We have developed a human cellular model that recapitulates the DNA repeat expansion found in FRDA patient tissues. In this model, GAA·TTC repeats expand incrementally and continuously. We have previously shown that the expansion rate is linked to transcription within the repeats. Our working hypothesis is that structures formed within the GAA·TTC repeat during transcription attract DNA repair enzymes that then facilitate the expansion process. MutSβ, a heterodimer of MSH2 and MSH3, is known to have a role in CAG·CTG repeat expansion. We now show that shRNA knockdown of either MSH2 or MSH3 slowed GAA·TTC expansion in our system. We further characterized the role of MutSβ in GAA·TTC expansion using a functional assay in primary FRDA patient-derived fibroblasts. These fibroblasts have no known propensity for instability in their native state. Ectopic expression of MSH2 and MSH3 induced GAA·TTC repeat expansion in the native FXN gene. MSH2 is central to mismatch repair and its absence or reduction causes a predisposition to cancer. Thus, despite its essential role in GAA·TTC expansion, MSH2 is not an attractive therapeutic target. The absence or reduction of MSH3 is not strongly associated with cancer predisposition. Accordingly, MSH3 has been suggested as a therapeutic target for CAG·CTG repeat expansion disorders. Our results suggest that MSH3 may also serve as a therapeutic target to slow the expansion of GAA·TTC repeats in the future. PMID:22787155

  5. Detection of long repeat expansions from PCR-free whole-genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Dolzhenko, Egor; van Vugt, Joke J F A; Shaw, Richard J; Bekritsky, Mitchell A; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Narzisi, Giuseppe; Ajay, Subramanian S; Rajan, Vani; Lajoie, Bryan; Johnson, Nathan H; Kingsbury, Zoya; Humphray, Sean J; Schellevis, Raymond D; Brands, William J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Kooyman, Maarten; Tazelaar, Gijs H P; van Es, Michael A; McLaughlin, Russell; Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Jones, Ashley; Al Khleifat, Ahmad; Pittman, Alan; Morgan, Sarah; Hardiman, Orla; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Chris; Smith, Bradley; Neo, Edmund J; Morrison, Karren; Shaw, Pam; Reeves, Catherine; Winterkorn, Lara; Wexler, Nancy S; Housman, David E; Ng, Christopher W; Li, Alina L; Taft, Ryan J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Bentley, David R; Veldink, Jan H; Eberle, Michael A

    2017-09-08

    Identifying large expansions of short tandem repeats (STRs) such as those that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fragile X syndrome is challenging for short-read whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data. A solution to this problem is an important step towards integrating WGS into precision medicine. We have developed a software tool called ExpansionHunter that, using PCR-free WGS short-read data, can genotype repeats at the locus of interest, even if the expanded repeat is larger than the read length. We applied our algorithm to WGS data from 3,001 ALS patients who have been tested for the presence of the C9orf72 repeat expansion with repeat-primed PCR (RP-PCR). Compared against this truth data, ExpansionHunter correctly classified all (212/212, 95% CI [0.98, 1.00]) of the expanded samples as either expansions (208) or potential expansions (4). Additionally, 99.9% (2,786/2,789, 95% CI [0.997, 1.00]) of the wild type samples were correctly classified as wild type by this method with the remaining three samples identified as possible expansions. We further applied our algorithm to a set of 152 samples where every sample had one of eight different pathogenic repeat expansions including those associated with fragile X syndrome, Friedreich's ataxia and Huntington's disease and correctly flagged all but one of the known repeat expansions. Thus, ExpansionHunter can be used to accurately detect known pathogenic repeat expansions and provides researchers with a tool that can be used to identify new pathogenic repeat expansions. The software is licensed under GPL v3.0 and the source code is freely available on GitHub. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions in clinical Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Matthew; Benitez, Bruno; Cairns, Nigel; Cooper, Breanna; Cooper, Paul; Mayo, Kevin; Carrell, David; Faber, Kelley; Williamson, Jennifer; Bird, Tom; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mayeux, Richard; Chakraverty, Sumitra; Goate, Alison M.; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9ORF72 underlie a significant fraction of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study investigates the frequency of C9ORF72 repeat expansions in clinically diagnosed late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design, setting and patients This case-control study genotyped the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in 872 unrelated familial AD cases and 888 controls recruited as part of the NIA-LOAD cohort, a multi-site collaboration studying 1000 families with two or more individuals clinically diagnosed with late-onset-AD. Main Outcome Measure We determined the presence or absence of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion by repeat-primed PCR, the length of the longest non-expanded allele, segregation of the genotype with disease, and clinical features of repeat expansion carriers. Results Three families showed large C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions. Two additional families carried more than 30 repeats. Segregation with disease could be demonstrated in 3 families. One affected expansion carrier had neuropathology compatible with AD. In the NIA-LOAD series, the C9ORF72 repeat expansions constituted the second most common pathogenic mutation, just behind the PSEN1 A79V mutation, highlighting the heterogeneity of clinical presentations associated with repeat expansions. Interpretation C9ORF72 repeat expansions explain a small proportion of patients with a clinical presentation indistinguishable from AD, and highlight the necessity of screening “FTD genes” in clinical AD cases with strong family history. PMID:23588422

  7. Continuous and Periodic Expansion of CAG Repeats in Huntington's Disease R6/1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Elisabeth; Rognes, Torbjørn; Klungland, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by expansion of CAG repeats in a coding gene. Somatic CAG expansion rates in HD vary between organs, and the greatest instability is observed in the brain, correlating with neuropathology. The fundamental mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability are poorly understood, but locally formed secondary DNA structures generated during replication and/or repair are believed to underlie triplet repeat expansion. Recent studies in HD mice have demonstrated that mismatch repair (MMR) and base excision repair (BER) proteins are expansion inducing components in brain tissues. This study was designed to simultaneously investigate the rates and modes of expansion in different tissues of HD R6/1 mice in order to further understand the expansion mechanisms in vivo. We demonstrate continuous small expansions in most somatic tissues (exemplified by tail), which bear the signature of many short, probably single-repeat expansions and contractions occurring over time. In contrast, striatum and cortex display a dramatic—and apparently irreversible—periodic expansion. Expansion profiles displaying this kind of periodicity in the expansion process have not previously been reported. These in vivo findings imply that mechanistically distinct expansion processes occur in different tissues. PMID:21170307

  8. Statistical Enrichment of Epigenetic States Around Triplet Repeats that Can Undergo Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Essebier, Alexandra; Vera Wolf, Patricia; Cao, Minh Duc; Carroll, Bernard J.; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Bodén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    More than 30 human genetic diseases are linked to tri-nucleotide repeat expansions. There is no known mechanism that explains repeat expansions in full, but changes in the epigenetic state of the associated locus has been implicated in the disease pathology for a growing number of examples. A comprehensive comparative analysis of the genomic features associated with diverse repeat expansions has been lacking. Here, in an effort to decipher the propensity of repeats to undergo expansion and result in a disease state, we determine the genomic coordinates of tri-nucleotide repeat tracts at base pair resolution and computationally establish epigenetic profiles around them. Using three complementary statistical tests, we reveal that several epigenetic states are enriched around repeats that are associated with disease, even in cells that do not harbor expansion, relative to a carefully stratified background. Analysis of over one hundred cell types reveals that epigenetic states generally tend to vary widely between genic regions and cell types. However, there is qualified consistency in the epigenetic signatures of repeats associated with disease suggesting that changes to the chromatin and the DNA around an expanding repeat locus are likely to be similar. These epigenetic signatures may be exploited further to develop models that could explain the propensity of repeats to undergo expansions. PMID:27013954

  9. Base excision repair of oxidative DNA damage coupled with removal of a CAG repeat hairpin attenuates trinucleotide repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Torner, Justin; Zhang, Yanbin; Zhang, Zunzhen; Liu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion is responsible for numerous human neurodegenerative diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that DNA base excision repair (BER) can mediate TNR expansion and deletion by removing base lesions in different locations of a TNR tract, indicating that BER can promote or prevent TNR expansion in a damage location-dependent manner. In this study, we provide the first evidence that the repair of a DNA base lesion located in the loop region of a CAG repeat hairpin can remove the hairpin, attenuating repeat expansion. We found that an 8-oxoguanine located in the loop region of CAG hairpins of varying sizes was removed by OGG1 leaving an abasic site that was subsequently 5'-incised by AP endonuclease 1, introducing a single-strand breakage in the hairpin loop. This converted the hairpin into a double-flap intermediate with a 5'- and 3'-flap that was cleaved by flap endonuclease 1 and a 3'-5' endonuclease Mus81/Eme1, resulting in complete or partial removal of the CAG hairpin. This further resulted in prevention and attenuation of repeat expansion. Our results demonstrate that TNR expansion can be prevented via BER in hairpin loops that is coupled with the removal of TNR hairpins.

  10. Cognitive deficits and CTG repeat expansion size in classical myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1).

    PubMed

    Winblad, Stefan; Lindberg, Christopher; Hansen, Stefan

    2006-05-15

    This study was designed to investigate cognitive abilities and their correlations with CTG repeat expansion size in classical Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), given that earlier studies have indicated cognitive deficits, possibly correlating with blood CTG repeats expansion size. A measurement of CTG repeat expansion in lymphocytes and an extensive neuropsychological examination was made in 47 patients (25 women and 22 men). Individual results in the examination were compared with normative data. A substantial proportion of patients with DM1 (> 40%) scored worse in comparison to normative collectives on tests measuring executive, arithmetic, attention, speed and visuospatial abilities. We found significant correlations between longer CTG repeat expansion size and lower results on most tests associated with these abilities. Furthermore, the association between executive (frontal) deficits and DM1 were strengthened when considering both test results and correlations with CTG repeat expansion size in lymphocytes. This study showed deficits in several cognitive abilities when patients with DM1 are compared to normative collectives. Some of the neuropsychological tests associated with these abilities are correlated to CTG repeat expansion size in blood. These data highlight the importance of considering cognitive deficits when seeing patients with classical DM1 in clinical practice, but also the utility of using blood CTG repeat expansion size as a broad predictor of finding cognitive deficit in DM1.

  11. Cognitive deficits and CTG repeat expansion size in classical myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1)

    PubMed Central

    Winblad, Stefan; Lindberg, Christopher; Hansen, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate cognitive abilities and their correlations with CTG repeat expansion size in classical Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), given that earlier studies have indicated cognitive deficits, possibly correlating with blood CTG repeats expansion size. Methods A measurement of CTG repeat expansion in lymphocytes and an extensive neuropsychological examination was made in 47 patients (25 women and 22 men). Individual results in the examination were compared with normative data. Results A substantial proportion of patients with DM1 (> 40%) scored worse in comparison to normative collectives on tests measuring executive, arithmetic, attention, speed and visuospatial abilities. We found significant correlations between longer CTG repeat expansion size and lower results on most tests associated with these abilities. Furthermore, the association between executive (frontal) deficits and DM1 were strengthened when considering both test results and correlations with CTG repeat expansion size in lymphocytes. Conclusion This study showed deficits in several cognitive abilities when patients with DM1 are compared to normative collectives. Some of the neuropsychological tests associated with these abilities are correlated to CTG repeat expansion size in blood. These data highlight the importance of considering cognitive deficits when seeing patients with classical DM1 in clinical practice, but also the utility of using blood CTG repeat expansion size as a broad predictor of finding cognitive deficit in DM1. PMID:16696870

  12. C9ORF72 repeat expansion in Australian and Spanish frontotemporal dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Dobson-Stone, Carol; Hallupp, Marianne; Loy, Clement T; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Haan, Eric; Sue, Carolyn M; Panegyres, Peter K; Razquin, Cristina; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Rene, Ramon; Gascon, Jordi; Campdelacreu, Jaume; Schmoll, Birgit; Volk, Alexander E; Brooks, William S; Schofield, Peter R; Pastor, Pau; Kwok, John B J

    2013-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has been established as a common cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, the minimum repeat number necessary for disease pathogenesis is not known. The aims of our study were to determine the frequency of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion in two FTD patient collections (one Australian and one Spanish, combined n = 190), to examine C9ORF72 expansion allele length in a subset of FTD patients, and to examine C9ORF72 allele length in 'non-expansion' patients (those with <30 repeats). The C9ORF72 repeat expansion was detected in 5-17% of patients (21-41% of familial FTD patients). For one family, the expansion was present in the proband but absent in the mother, who was diagnosed with dementia at age 68. No association was found between C9ORF72 non-expanded allele length and age of onset and in the Spanish sample mean allele length was shorter in cases than in controls. Southern blotting analysis revealed that one of the nine 'expansion-positive' patients examined, who had neuropathologically confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology, harboured an 'intermediate' allele with a mean size of only ∼65 repeats. Our study indicates that the C9ORF72 repeat expansion accounts for a significant proportion of Australian and Spanish FTD cases. However, C9ORF72 allele length does not influence the age at onset of 'non-expansion' FTD patients in the series examined. Expansion of the C9ORF72 allele to as little as ∼65 repeats may be sufficient to cause disease.

  13. Browsing repeats in genomes: Pygram and an application to non-coding region analysis

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Patrick; Mahé, Frédéric; Valin, Anne-Sophie; Nicolas, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Background A large number of studies on genome sequences have revealed the major role played by repeated sequences in the structure, function, dynamics and evolution of genomes. In-depth repeat analysis requires specialized methods, including visualization techniques, to achieve optimum exploratory power. Results This article presents Pygram, a new visualization application for investigating the organization of repeated sequences in complete genome sequences. The application projects data from a repeat index file on the analysed sequences, and by combining this principle with a query system, is capable of locating repeated sequences with specific properties. In short, Pygram provides an efficient, graphical browser for studying repeats. Implementation of the complete configuration is illustrated in an analysis of CRISPR structures in Archaea genomes and the detection of horizontal transfer between Archaea and Viruses. Conclusion By proposing a new visualization environment to analyse repeated sequences, this application aims to increase the efficiency of laboratories involved in investigating repeat organization in single genomes or across several genomes. PMID:17067389

  14. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  15. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C.; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation. PMID:27630650

  16. C9orf72 hypermethylation protects against repeat expansion-associated pathology in ALS/FTD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Elaine Y; Russ, Jenny; Wu, Kathryn; Neal, Donald; Suh, Eunran; McNally, Anna G; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Edward B

    2014-10-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions of C9orf72 are the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration. The mutation is associated with reduced C9orf72 expression and the accumulation of potentially toxic RNA and protein aggregates. CpG methylation is known to protect the genome against unstable DNA elements and to stably silence inappropriate gene expression. Using bisulfite cloning and restriction enzyme-based methylation assays on DNA from human brain and peripheral blood, we observed CpG hypermethylation involving the C9orf72 promoter in cis to the repeat expansion mutation in approximately one-third of C9orf72 repeat expansion mutation carriers. Promoter hypermethylation of mutant C9orf72 was associated with transcriptional silencing of C9orf72 in patient-derived lymphoblast cell lines, resulting in reduced accumulation of intronic C9orf72 RNA and reduced numbers of RNA foci. Furthermore, demethylation of mutant C9orf72 with 5-aza-deoxycytidine resulted in increased vulnerability of mutant cells to oxidative and autophagic stress. Promoter hypermethylation of repeat expansion carriers was also associated with reduced accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide repeat protein aggregates in human brains. These results indicate that C9orf72 promoter hypermethylation prevents downstream molecular aberrations associated with the hexanucleotide repeat expansion, suggesting that epigenetic silencing of the mutant C9orf72 allele may represent a protective counter-regulatory response to hexanucleotide repeat expansion.

  17. Expansion of 50 CAG/CTG repeats excluded in schizophrenia by application of a highly efficient approach using repeat expansion detection and a PCR screening set

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, T.; Guy, C.; Speight, G.

    1996-10-01

    Studies of the transmission of schizophrenia in families with affected members in several generations have suggested that an expanded trinucleotide repeat mechanism may contribute to the genetic inheritance of this disorder. Using repeat expansion detection (RED), we and others have previously found that the distribution of CAG/CTG repeat size is larger in patients with schizophrenia than in controls. In an attempt to identify the specific expanded CAG/CTG locus or loci associated with schizophrenia, we have now used an approach based on a CAG/CTG PCR screening set combined with RED data. This has allowed us to minimize genotyping while excluding 43 polymorphic autosomal loci and 7 X-chromosomal loci from the screening set as candidates for expansion in schizophrenia with a very high degree of confidence. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Fluorescence Probe for Detecting CCG Trinucleotide Repeat DNA Expansion and Slip-Out.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomonori; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-09-15

    Trinucleotide repeat expansion in genomic DNA causes severe neurodegenerative diseases. Fluorescence probes that bind to trinucleotide repeats have potential as diagnostic tools of trinucleotide repeat disorders. Here, we report a novel tricyclic ligand that binds to CCG trinucleotide repeat DNA. The expansion of the aromatic ring system of the 2-amino-1,8-naphthyridine chromophore from the bicyclic to the tricyclic improved the binding ability to the CCG/CCG motif without losing the selectivity and emissive character. The fluorescence sensitively decreased in response to binding to the CCG trinucleotide repeat. The degree of quenching depended on the number of CCG repeats. In addition, the fluorescence detection was applicable to CCG slip-out DNA.

  19. A general method for the detection of large CAG repeat expansions by fluorescent PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J P; Barron, L H; Goudie, D; Kelly, K; Dow, D; Fitzpatrick, D R; Brock, D J

    1996-01-01

    The expansion of a tandemly repeated trinucleotide sequence, CAG, is the mutational mechanism for several human genetic diseases. We present a generally applicable PCR amplification method using a fluorescently labelled locus specific primer flanking the CAG repeat together with paired primers amplifying from multiple priming sites within the CAG repeat. Triplet repeat primed PCR (TP PCR) gives a characteristic ladder on the fluorescence trace enabling the rapid identification of large pathogenetic CAG repeats that cannot be amplified using flanking primers. We used our method to test a cohort of 183 people from myotonic dystrophy families including unaffected subjects and spouses. Eighty five clinically affected subjects with expanded alleles on Southern blot analysis were all correctly identified by TP PCR. This method is applicable for any human diseases involving CAG repeat expansions. Images PMID:9004136

  20. C9orf72 repeat expansions that cause frontotemporal dementia are detectable among patients with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Annie; Pribadi, Mochtar; Chowdari, Kodavali; Clifton, Sue; Joel Wood; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

    2016-01-30

    A pathologic hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 causes frontotemporal dementia (FTD) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Behavioral abnormalities can also occur among mutation carriers with FTD, but it is uncertain whether such mutations occur among persons with psychoses per se. Among participants in a genetic study of psychoses (N=739), two pairs of related individuals had C9orf72 expansions, of whom three were diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ) / schizoaffective disorder (SZA), but their clinical features did not suggest dementia or ALS. A few patients with SZ/SZA carry C9orf72 repeat expansions; such individuals are highly likely to develop FTD/ALS.

  1. Analysis of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large international cohort of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ross, Owen A; Orme, Tatiana; Shepherd, Claire; Parkkinen, Laura; Darwent, Lee; Hernandez, Dena; Ansorge, Olaf; Clark, Lorraine N; Honig, Lawrence S; Marder, Karen; Lemstra, Afina; Scheltens, Philippe; van der Flier, Wiesje; Louwersheimer, Eva; Holstege, Henne; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Holton, Janice; Compta, Yaroslau; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q; Serrano, Geidy E; Beach, Thomas G; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Lesage, Suzanne; Galasko, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Santana, Isabel; Diez, Monica; Pastor, Pau; Tienari, Pentti J; Myllykangas, Liisa; Oinas, Minna; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Boeve, Brad F; Petersen, Ronald C; Ferman, Tanis J; Escott-Price, Valentina; Graff-Radford, Neill; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Stone, David J; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Mann, David; Dickson, Dennis W; Halliday, Glenda M; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose

    2017-01-01

    C9orf72 repeat expansions are a common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. To date, no large-scale study of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) has been undertaken to assess the role of C9orf72 repeat expansions in the disease. Here, we investigated the prevalence of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large cohort of DLB cases and identified no pathogenic repeat expansions in neuropathologically or clinically defined cases, showing that C9orf72 repeat expansions are not causally associated with DLB.

  2. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  3. Repeat expansions in the C9ORF72 gene contribute to Alzheimer's disease in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Martin A; John-Williams, Krista; Rajbhandary, Ruchita; Naj, Adam; Whitehead, Patrice; Hamilton, Kara; Carney, Regina M; Wright, Clinton; Crocco, Elizabeth; Gwirtzman, Harry E; Lang, Rosalyn; Beecham, Gary; Martin, Eden R; Gilbert, John; Benatar, Michael; Small, Gary W; Mash, Deborah; Byrd, Goldie; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Züchner, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    Recently, a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene has been identified to account for a significant portion of Caucasian families affected by frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Given the clinical overlap of FTD with Alzheimer's disease (AD), we hypothesized that C9ORF72 expansions might contribute to AD. In Caucasians, we found C9ORF72 expansions in the pathogenic range of FTD/ALS (>30 repeats) at a proportion of 0.76% in AD cases versus 0 in control subjects (p = 3.3E-03; 1182 cases, 1039 controls). In contrast, no large expansions were detected in individuals of African American ethnicity (291 cases, 620 controls). However, in the range of normal variation of C9ORF72 expansions (0-23 repeat copies), we detected significant differences in distribution and mean repeat counts between Caucasians and African Americans. Clinical and pathological re-evaluation of identified C9ORF72 expansion carriers revealed 9 clinical and/or autopsy confirmed AD and 2 FTD final diagnoses. Thus, our results support the notion that large C9ORF72 expansions lead to a phenotypic spectrum of neurodegenerative disease including AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Triplet repeat expansion at the FRAXE locus and x-linked mild mental handicap

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, S.J.L.; Hirst, M.C.; Flannery, A.V.; Davies, K.E. ); Voelckel, M.A.; Moncla, A.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have recently shown that the expression of the FRAXE fragile site in Xq28 is associated with expansion of a GCC trinucleotide repeat. In the families studied, FRAXE expression is also associated with mild mental handicap. Here they present data on families that previously had been diagnosed as having the fragile X syndrome but that later were found to be negative for trinucleotide repeat expansion at the FRAXA locus. In these families they demonstrate the presence of a GCC trinucleotide repeat expansion at the FRAXE locus. Studies of the FRAXE locus of normal individuals show that they have 6-25 copies of the repeat, whereas affected individuals have >200 copies. As in the fragile X syndrome, the amplified CpG residues are methylated in affected males. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Triplet repeat expansion at the FRAXE locus and X-linked mild mental handicap.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, S. J.; Voelckel, M. A.; Hirst, M. C.; Flannery, A. V.; Moncla, A.; Davies, K. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have recently shown that the expression of the FRAXE fragile site in Xq28 is associated with the expansion of a GCC trinucleotide repeat. In the families studied, FRAXE expression is also associated with mild mental handicap. Here we present data on families that previously had been diagnosed as having the fragile X syndrome but that later were found to be negative for trinucleotide repeat expansion at the FRAXA locus. In these families we demonstrate the presence of a GCC trinucleotide repeat expansion at the FRAXE locus. Studies of the FRAXE locus of normal individuals show that they have 6-25 copies of the repeat, whereas affected individuals have > 200 copies. As in the fragile X syndrome, the amplified CpG residues are methylated in affected males. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8023854

  6. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in cases with previously identified pathogenic mutations.

    PubMed

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Finger, Elizabeth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; Kelley, Brendan J; Murray, Melissa E; Rutherford, Nicola J; Brown, Patricia E; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Mullen, Bianca; Ash, Peter E A; Bieniek, Kevin F; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Karydas, Anna; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Coppola, Giovanni; Bigio, Eileen H; Lippa, Carol; Strong, Michael J; Beach, Thomas G; Knopman, David S; Huey, Edward D; Mesulam, Marsel; Bird, Thomas; White, Charles L; Kertesz, Andrew; Geschwind, Dan H; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Petersen, Ronald C; Binetti, Giuliano; Miller, Bruce L; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Mackenzie, Ian R; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Rademakers, Rosa

    2013-10-08

    To identify potential genetic modifiers contributing to the phenotypic variability that is detected in patients with repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), we investigated the frequency of these expansions in a cohort of 334 subjects previously found to carry mutations in genes known to be associated with a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. A 2-step protocol, with a fluorescent PCR and a repeat-primed PCR, was used to determine the presence of hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72. For one double mutant, we performed Southern blots to assess expansion sizes, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neuropathology. We detected C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 4 of 334 subjects (1.2% [or 1.8% of 217 families]). All these subjects had behavioral phenotypes and also harbored well-known pathogenic mutations in either progranulin (GRN: p.C466LfsX46, p.R493X, p.C31LfsX35) or microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT: p.P301L). Southern blotting of one double mutant with a p.C466LfsX46 GRN mutation demonstrated a long repeat expansion in brain (>3,000 repeats), and immunohistochemistry showed mixed neuropathology with characteristics of both C9ORF72 expansions and GRN mutations. Our findings indicate that co-occurrence of 2 evidently pathogenic mutations could contribute to the pleiotropy that is detected in patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. These findings suggest that patients with known mutations should not be excluded from further studies, and that genetic counselors should be aware of this phenomenon when advising patients and their family members.

  7. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in cases with previously identified pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Finger, Elizabeth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kelley, Brendan J.; Murray, Melissa E.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Brown, Patricia E.; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Mullen, Bianca; Ash, Peter E.A.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Karydas, Anna; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Coppola, Giovanni; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Strong, Michael J.; Beach, Thomas G.; Knopman, David S.; Huey, Edward D.; Mesulam, Marsel; Bird, Thomas; White, Charles L.; Kertesz, Andrew; Geschwind, Dan H.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Binetti, Giuliano; Miller, Bruce L.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify potential genetic modifiers contributing to the phenotypic variability that is detected in patients with repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), we investigated the frequency of these expansions in a cohort of 334 subjects previously found to carry mutations in genes known to be associated with a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: A 2-step protocol, with a fluorescent PCR and a repeat-primed PCR, was used to determine the presence of hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72. For one double mutant, we performed Southern blots to assess expansion sizes, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neuropathology. Results: We detected C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 4 of 334 subjects (1.2% [or 1.8% of 217 families]). All these subjects had behavioral phenotypes and also harbored well-known pathogenic mutations in either progranulin (GRN: p.C466LfsX46, p.R493X, p.C31LfsX35) or microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT: p.P301L). Southern blotting of one double mutant with a p.C466LfsX46 GRN mutation demonstrated a long repeat expansion in brain (>3,000 repeats), and immunohistochemistry showed mixed neuropathology with characteristics of both C9ORF72 expansions and GRN mutations. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that co-occurrence of 2 evidently pathogenic mutations could contribute to the pleiotropy that is detected in patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. These findings suggest that patients with known mutations should not be excluded from further studies, and that genetic counselors should be aware of this phenomenon when advising patients and their family members. PMID:24027057

  8. C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion analysis in Chinese spastic paraplegia patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yingying; Jiao, Bin; Wang, Junling; Du, Juan; Yan, Xinxiang; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Shen, Lu

    2014-12-15

    Recently, a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene has been identified to cause frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis families and many other neurodegenerative diseases. Owing to the overlapping phenotypes among HSP, frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis we hypothesized that C9orf72 expansions might be a genetic risk factor or modifier of HSP. The aim of this study was to find out whether C9orf72 expansions also confer risk to spastic paraplegia (SPG). We recruited 112 genetically unidentified SPG patients, 68 SPG4 patients and 313 controls in mainland China to determine if hexanucleotide repeat of C9orf72 plays a role in spastic paraplegia. No large expansion was detected in all subjects. C9orf72 repeat expansions were not associated with onset of HSP. Our results support the notion that repeat expansions in C9orf72 may not be associated with HSP in China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Photosensitivity in a patient with C9orf72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Paula; Houben, Mark; Hoff, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The phenotype of C9ORF72 repeat expansions is rapidly expanding. Originally found to be the major genetic cause of familial frontotemporal dementia with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, several other clinical characteristics have been described more recently. Here, we report on a family diagnosed with 'degenerative schizophrenia' and harbouring a C9ORF72 repeat expansion, in which at least the index patient and an uncle showed a photoparoxysmal response during electroencephalography. Whereas epilepsy has been described in several repeat expansion disorders, photosensitivity has thus far only been reported in dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy. The photoparoxysmal response may therefore be a new clinical feature of C9ORF72 repeat expansion related disease. Our observation learns that a repeat expansion disorder like C9ORF72 should be considered in patients with a combination of young-onset dementia, psychiatric symptoms and/or photosensitive epilepsy. We advocate the occasional use of EEG in the dementia workup and in particular urge to consider provocative tests such as photic stimulation.

  10. Selection pressure on human STR loci and its relevance in repeat expansion disease.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Makoto K; Sanbonmatsu, Ryoko; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Yamasaki, Chisato; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Gojobori, Takashi; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) comprise repeats of one to several base pairs. Because of the high mutability due to strand slippage during DNA synthesis, rapid evolutionary change in the number of repeating units directly shapes the range of repeat-number variation according to selection pressure. However, the remaining questions include: Why are STRs causing repeat expansion diseases maintained in the human population; and why are these limited to neurodegenerative diseases? By evaluating the genome-wide selection pressure on STRs using the database we constructed, we identified two different patterns of relationship in repeat-number polymorphisms between DNA and amino-acid sequences, although both patterns are evolutionary consequences of avoiding the formation of harmful long STRs. First, a mixture of degenerate codons is represented in poly-proline (poly-P) repeats. Second, long poly-glutamine (poly-Q) repeats are favored at the protein level; however, at the DNA level, STRs encoding long poly-Qs are frequently divided by synonymous SNPs. Furthermore, significant enrichments of apoptosis and neurodevelopment were biological processes found specifically in genes encoding poly-Qs with repeat polymorphism. This suggests the existence of a specific molecular function for polymorphic and/or long poly-Q stretches. Given that the poly-Qs causing expansion diseases were longer than other poly-Qs, even in healthy subjects, our results indicate that the evolutionary benefits of long and/or polymorphic poly-Q stretches outweigh the risks of long CAG repeats predisposing to pathological hyper-expansions. Molecular pathways in neurodevelopment requiring long and polymorphic poly-Q stretches may provide a clue to understanding why poly-Q expansion diseases are limited to neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. The expansion of amino-acid repeats is not associated to adaptive evolution in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The expansion of amino acid repeats is determined by a high mutation rate and can be increased or limited by selection. It has been suggested that recent expansions could be associated with the potential of adaptation to new environments. In this work, we quantify the strength of this association, as well as the contribution of potential confounding factors. Results Mammalian positively selected genes have accumulated more recent amino acid repeats than other mammalian genes. However, we found little support for an accelerated evolutionary rate as the main driver for the expansion of amino acid repeats. The most significant predictors of amino acid repeats are gene function and GC content. There is no correlation with expression level. Conclusions Our analyses show that amino acid repeat expansions are causally independent from protein adaptive evolution in mammalian genomes. Relaxed purifying selection or positive selection do not associate with more or more recent amino acid repeats. Their occurrence is slightly favoured by the sequence context but mainly determined by the molecular function of the gene. PMID:20021652

  12. Drosha Inclusions Are New Components of Dipeptide-Repeat Protein Aggregates in FTLD-TDP and ALS C9orf72 Expansion Cases

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Sílvia; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are 2 neurodegenerative disorders that share clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic features. The presence of abnormal expansions of GGGGCC repeats (G4C2 repeats) in a noncoding region of the Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the major genetic cause of both FTLD and ALS. Transcribed G4C2 repeats can form nuclear RNA foci and recruit RNA-binding proteins, thereby inhibiting their normal function. Moreover, through a repeat-associated non-ATG translation mechanism, G4C2 repeats translation leads to dipeptide-repeat protein aggregation in the cytoplasm of neurons. Here, we identify Drosha protein as a new component of these dipeptide-repeat aggregates. In C9orf72 mutation cases of FTLD-TDP (c9FTLD-TDP) and ALS (c9ALS), but not in FTLD or ALS cases without C9orf72 mutation, Drosha is mislocalized to form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Further characterization of Drosha-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum revealed colocalization with p62 and ubiquilin-2, 2 pathognomonic signatures of c9FTLD-TDP and c9ALS cases; however, Drosha inclusions rarely colocalized with TDP-43 pathology. We conclude that Drosha may play a unique pathogenic role in the onset or progression of FTLD-TDP/ALS in patients with the C9orf72 mutation. PMID:25756586

  13. Expansion of CAG Repeats in Escherichia coli Is Controlled by Single-Strand DNA Exonucleases of Both Polarities

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Adam; Okely, Ewa A.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of CAG·CTG repeat tracts is responsible for several neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of CAG·CTG repeat tract expansion is therefore important if we are to develop medical interventions limiting expansion rates. Escherichia coli provides a simple and tractable model system to understand the fundamental properties of these DNA sequences, with the potential to suggest pathways that might be conserved in humans or to highlight differences in behavior that could signal the existence of human-specific factors affecting repeat array processing. We have addressed the genetics of CAG·CTG repeat expansion in E. coli and shown that these repeat arrays expand via an orientation-independent mechanism that contrasts with the orientation dependence of CAG·CTG repeat tract contraction. The helicase Rep contributes to the orientation dependence of repeat tract contraction and limits repeat tract expansion in both orientations. However, RuvAB-dependent fork reversal, which occurs in a rep mutant, is not responsible for the observed increase in expansions. The frequency of repeat tract expansion is controlled by both the 5′–3′ exonuclease RecJ and the 3′–5′ exonuclease ExoI, observations that suggest the importance of both 3′and 5′ single-strand ends in the pathway of CAG·CTG repeat tract expansion. We discuss the relevance of our results to two competing models of repeat tract expansion. PMID:25081568

  14. C9orf72 repeat expansions are a rare genetic cause of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Suzanne; Le Ber, Isabelle; Condroyer, Christel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Gabelle, Audrey; Thobois, Stéphane; Pasquier, Florence; Mondon, Karl; Dion, Patrick A.; Rochefort, Daniel; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    The recently identified C9ORF72 gene accounts for a large proportion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degenerations. Since several forms of these disorders are associated with parkinsonism, we hypothesized that some patients with Parkinson’s disease or other forms of parkinsonism might carry pathogenic C9OFR72 expansions. Therefore, we looked for C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 1,446 parkinsonian unrelated patients consisted of 1,225 clinically diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, 123 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 21 with corticobasal degeneration syndrome, 43 with Lewy body dementia and 25 with multiple system atrophy-parkinsonism. Of the 1,446 parkinsonian patients, five carried C9ORF72 expansions: three patients with typical Parkinson’s disease, one with corticobasal degeneration syndrome and another with progressive supranuclear palsy. This study shows that: i) although rare, C9ORF72 repeat expansions may be associated with clinically typical Parkinson’s disease, but also with other parkinsonism; ii) in several patients, parkinsonism was dopa-responsive and remained pure, without associated dementia, for more than 10 years; iii) interestingly, all C9ORF72 repeat expansion carriers had positive family histories of parkinsonism, degenerative dementias or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study also provides the tools for identifying parkinsonian patients with C9ORF72 expansions, with important consequences for genetic counseling. PMID:23413259

  15. Genetic and clinical analysis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 repeat expansion in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Topisirovic, I; Dragasevic, N; Savic, D; Ristic, A; Keckarevic, M; Keckarevic, D; Culjkovic, B; Petrovic, I; Romac, S; Kostic, V S

    2002-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 8 (SCA8) is a slowly progressive ataxia causally associated with untranslated CTG repeat expansion on chromosome 13q21. However, the role of the CTG repeat in SCA8 pathology is not yet well understood. Therefore, we studied the length of the SCA8 CTA/CTG expansions (combined repeats, CRs) in 115 patients with ataxia, 64 unrelated individuals with non-triplet neuromuscular diseases, 70 unrelated patients with schizophrenia, and 125 healthy controls. Only one patient with apparently sporadic ataxia was identified with an expansion of 100 CRs. He had inherited the expansion from his asymptomatic father (140 CRs) and transmitted the mutation to his son (92 CRs). Paternal transmission in this family produced contractions of 40 and 8 CRs, respectively. None of the subjects from other studied groups had an expansion at the SCA8 locus. In the control group the number of CRs at the SCA8 locus ranged from 14 to 34. Our findings support the notion that allelic variants of the expansion mutation at the SCA8 locus can predispose to ataxia.

  16. Evolution of the Friedreich’s ataxia trinucleotide repeat expansion: Founder effect and premutations

    PubMed Central

    Cossée, Mireille; Schmitt, Michèle; Campuzano, Victoria; Reutenauer, Laurence; Moutou, Céline; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Koenig, Michel

    1997-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia, the most frequent inherited ataxia, is caused, in the vast majority of cases, by large GAA repeat expansions in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The normal sequence corresponds to a moderately polymorphic trinucleotide repeat with bimodal size distribution. Small normal alleles have approximately eight to nine repeats whereas a more heterogeneous mode of large normal alleles ranges from 16 to 34 GAA. The latter class accounts for ≈17% of normal alleles. To identify the origin of the expansion mutation, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium between expansion mutations or normal alleles and a haplotype of five polymorphic markers within or close to the frataxin gene; 51% of the expansions were associated with a single haplotype, and the other expansions were associated with haplotypes that could be related to the major one by mutation at a polymorphic marker or by ancient recombination. Of interest, the major haplotype associated with expansion is also the major haplotype associated with the larger alleles in the normal size range and was almost never found associated with the smaller normal alleles. The results indicate that most if not all large normal alleles derive from a single founder chromosome and that they represent a reservoir for larger expansion events, possibly through “premutation” intermediates. Indeed, we found two such alleles (42 and 60 GAA) that underwent cataclysmic expansion to pathological range in a single generation. This stepwise evolution to large trinucleotide expansions already was suggested for myotonic dystrophy and fragile X syndrome and may relate to a common mutational mechanism, despite sequence motif differences. PMID:9207112

  17. A novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based mouse model of Friedreich’s ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anjomani Virmouni, Sara; Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Sandi, Madhavi; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Chutake, Yogesh; Pook, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a GAA repeat expansion mutation within intron 1 of the FXN gene, resulting in reduced levels of frataxin protein. We have previously reported the generation of human FXN yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) transgenic FRDA mouse models containing 90–190 GAA repeats, but the presence of multiple GAA repeats within these mice is considered suboptimal. We now describe the cellular, molecular and behavioural characterisation of a newly developed YAC transgenic FRDA mouse model, designated YG8sR, which we have shown by DNA sequencing to contain a single pure GAA repeat expansion. The founder YG8sR mouse contained 120 GAA repeats but, due to intergenerational expansion, we have now established a colony of YG8sR mice that contain ~200 GAA repeats. We show that YG8sR mice have a single copy of the FXN transgene, which is integrated at a single site as confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis of metaphase and interphase chromosomes. We have identified significant behavioural deficits, together with a degree of glucose intolerance and insulin hypersensitivity, in YG8sR FRDA mice compared with control Y47R and wild-type (WT) mice. We have also detected increased somatic GAA repeat instability in the brain and cerebellum of YG8sR mice, together with significantly reduced expression of FXN, FAST-1 and frataxin, and reduced aconitase activity, compared with Y47R mice. Furthermore, we have confirmed the presence of pathological vacuoles within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of YG8sR mice. These novel GAA-repeat-expansion-based YAC transgenic FRDA mice, which exhibit progressive FRDA-like pathology, represent an excellent model for the investigation of FRDA disease mechanisms and therapy. PMID:25681319

  18. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions in the Italian sporadic ALS population

    PubMed Central

    Sabatelli, Mario; Conforti, Francesca Luisa; Zollino, Marcella; Mora, Gabriele; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Volanti, Paolo; Marinou, Kalliopi; Salvi, Fabrizio; Corbo, Massimo; Giannini, Fabio; Battistini, Stefania; Penco, Silvana; Lunetta, Christian; Quattrone, Aldo; Gambardella, Antonio; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Simone, Isabella; Bartolomei, Ilaria; Pisano, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Conte, Amelia; Spataro, Rossella; La Bella, Vincenzo; Caponnetto, Claudia; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Mandich, Paola; Sola, Patrizia; Mandrioli, Jessica; Renton, Alan E.; Majounie, Elisa; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Marrosu, Francesco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Sotgiu, Maria Alessandra; Pugliatti, Maura; Rodolico, Carmelo; Moglia, Cristina; Calvo, Andrea; Ossola, Irene; Brunetti, Maura; Traynor, Bryan J.; Borghero, Giuseppe; Restagno, Gabriella; Chiò, Adriano

    2012-01-01

    It has been recently reported that a large proportion of patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (familial ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are associated with a hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72. We have assessed 1,757 Italian sporadic ALS cases, 133 from Sardinia, 101 from Sicily, and 1,523 from mainland Italy. Sixty (3.7%) of 1,624 mainland Italians and Sicilians and 9 (6.8%) of the 133 Sardinian sporadic ALS cases carried the pathogenic repeat expansion. None of the 619 regionally-matched control samples (1,238 chromosomes) carried the expansion. Twenty-five cases (36.2%) had behavioral FTD in addition to ALS. FTD or unspecified dementia was also detected in 19 pedigrees (27.5%) in first-degree relatives of ALS patients. Cases carrying the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion survived one year less than cases who did not carry this mutation. In conclusion, we found that C9ORF72 hexanucloetide repeat expansions represents a sizeable proportion of apparent sporadic ALS in the Italian and Sardinian population, representing by far the commonest mutation in Italy and the second more common in Sardinia. PMID:22418734

  19. Trinucleotide repeat expansion in the FRAXE locus is not common among institutionalized individuals with non-specific developmental disabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C.; Fidler, K.

    1996-08-09

    Expansion of a polymorphic GCC-repeat at the FRAXE locus has been associated with expression of chromosome fragility at this site and cognitive impairment in some individuals previously testing negative for CGG-repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) gene. To determine the frequency of FRAXE triplet repeat expansion among persons with developmental disability, 396 individuals from two institutions were studied, all of whom were negative for FMR1 repeat expansion. Clinically, there was a wide range of mental impairment, with the majority (61.1%) being severely to profoundly affected. The distribution of FRAXE GCC-repeat numbers in the study population was 5-38:28 (5.6%) with 10-14 repeats; 366 (73.8%) with 15-19 repeats; 74 (14.9%) with 20-24 repeats; 20 (4.0%) with 25-29 repeats; and 5 (1.0%) with 30-38 repeats, with no individuals demonstrating repeat expansion. One profoundly retarded male was found to have a deletion of about 40 bp. Southern blots of HindIII-digested DNAs from individuals with {ge}26 repeats all showed normal patterns. These results suggest that FRAXE GCC-repeat expansion is not a common cause of developmental disability in institutionalized persons with mild to profound mental retardation. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Large-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lisa; Aasly, Jan O.; Annesi, Grazia; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan; Chung, Sun J.; Clarke, Carl; Crosiers, David; Deutschländer, Angela; Eckstein, Gertrud; Farrer, Matthew J.; Goldwurm, Stefano; Garraux, Gaetan; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hattori, Nobutaka; Klein, Christine; Jeon, Beom; Kim, Yun J.; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lynch, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Mok, Vincent; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Mellick, George D.; Morrison, Karen E.; Opala, Grzegorz; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Park, Sung S.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Ross, Owen A.; Stefanis, Leonidas; Stockton, Joanne D.; Silburn, Peter A.; Theuns, Jessie; Tan, Eng K.; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Toft, Mathias; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Gasser, Thomas; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Krüger, Rejko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. Results: We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. Conclusions: Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. PMID:26354989

  1. Large-scale assessment of polyglutamine repeat expansions in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lisa; Aasly, Jan O; Annesi, Grazia; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan; Chung, Sun J; Clarke, Carl; Crosiers, David; Deutschländer, Angela; Eckstein, Gertrud; Farrer, Matthew J; Goldwurm, Stefano; Garraux, Gaetan; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hicks, Andrew A; Hattori, Nobutaka; Klein, Christine; Jeon, Beom; Kim, Yun J; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Juei-Jueng; Lynch, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Lang, Anthony E; Mok, Vincent; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Mellick, George D; Morrison, Karen E; Opala, Grzegorz; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Pramstaller, Peter P; Park, Sung S; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Ross, Owen A; Stefanis, Leonidas; Stockton, Joanne D; Silburn, Peter A; Theuns, Jessie; Tan, Eng K; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Toft, Mathias; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Uitti, Ryan J; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Yueh, Kuo-Chu; Zhao, Yi; Gasser, Thomas; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Krüger, Rejko; Sharma, Manu

    2015-10-13

    We aim to clarify the pathogenic role of intermediate size repeat expansions of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 as risk factors for idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). We invited researchers from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium to participate in the study. There were 12,346 cases and 8,164 controls genotyped, for a total of 4 repeats within the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes. Fixed- and random-effects models were used to estimate the summary risk estimates for the genes. We investigated between-study heterogeneity and heterogeneity between different ethnic populations. We did not observe any definite pathogenic repeat expansions for SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes in patients with idiopathic PD from Caucasian and Asian populations. Furthermore, overall analysis did not reveal any significant association between intermediate repeats and PD. The effect estimates (odds ratio) ranged from 0.93 to 1.01 in the overall cohort for the SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 loci. Our study did not support a major role for definite pathogenic repeat expansions in SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 genes for idiopathic PD. Thus, results of this large study do not support diagnostic screening of SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, and SCA17 gene repeats in the common idiopathic form of PD. Likewise, this largest multicentered study performed to date excludes the role of intermediate repeats of these genes as a risk factor for PD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Expansion of a chromosomal repeat in Escherichia coli: roles of replication, repair, and recombination functions

    PubMed Central

    Poteete, Anthony R

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies of gene amplification in Escherichia coli have suggested that it occurs in two steps: duplication and expansion. Expansion is thought to result from homologous recombination between the repeated segments created by duplication. To explore the mechanism of expansion, a 7 kbp duplication in the chromosome containing a leaky mutant version of the lac operon was constructed, and its expansion into an amplified array was studied. Results Under selection for lac function, colonies bearing multiple copies of the mutant lac operon appeared at a constant rate of approximately 4 to 5 per million cells plated per day, on days two through seven after plating. Expansion was not seen in a recA strain; null mutations in recBCD and ruvC reduced the rate 100- and 10-fold, respectively; a ruvC recG double mutant reduced the rate 1000-fold. Expansion occurred at an increased rate in cells lacking dam, polA, rnhA, or uvrD functions. Null mutations of various other cellular recombination, repair, and stress response genes had little effect upon expansion. The red recombination genes of phage lambda could substitute for recBCD in mediating expansion. In the red-substituted cells, expansion was only partially dependent upon recA function. Conclusion These observations are consistent with the idea that the expansion step of gene amplification is closely related, mechanistically, to interchromosomal homologous recombination events. They additionally provide support for recently described models of RecA-independent Red-mediated recombination at replication forks. PMID:19236706

  3. Trinucleotide repeat expansion and DRPLA (Smith`s disease): Molecular characterization of atrophin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.L.; Li, S.H.; Li, X.J.; Ross, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Smith`s disease (also known as dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy or DRPLA) is a rare, progressive, fatal neuropsychiatric disorder similar to Huntington`s disease (HD). Smith`s disease is characterized by ataxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonic epilepsy, dementia, and genetic anticipation. Neuropathological findings include prominent cell loss in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, the globus pallidus, the red nucleus, and the subthalamic nucleus. An expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding polyglutamine in a gene originally identified in our laboratory as part of a program to clone candidate genes for disorders with anticipation has recently been found to cause this disorder. We have identified two families that demonstrate the pathological and genetic features (expanded CAG repeat and anticipation) of this disease. Northern analysis indicates that the gene, which we have termed atrophin-1, is widely expressed as a 5 kb mRNA in normal human brain and peripheral tissues. Brain expression is highest in the cerebellum. The developmental expression of the rat homologues of IT-15 (the gene in which a CAG expansion causes HD) and atrophin-1 were compared. Atrophin-1 was most highly expressed in early rat embryo brain (E16), whereas the greatest expression of IT-15 was in the adult rat brain. Cloning and sequencing of the open reading frame from inserts contained in brain cDNA libraries is in progress. In addition to the CAG repeat, the ORF contains an unusual region of alternating acidic and basic amino acids. Further characterization of atrophin-1, and comparison of it to other genes in which trinucleotide repeat expansion leads to neuropsychiatric disorders, should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology by which CAG repeat expansion causes human disease.

  4. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Pliner, Hannah A.; Mann, David M.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent. PMID:24496499

  5. Searching for Grendel: origin and global spread of the C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Pliner, Hannah A; Mann, David M; Traynor, Bryan J

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances are uncovering more and more of the genetic architecture underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative condition that affects ~6,000 Americans annually. Chief among these was the discovery that a large repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is responsible for an unprecedented portion of familial and sporadic ALS cases. Much has been published on how this expansion disrupts neuronal homeostasis and how gene-based therapy might be an effective treatment in the future. Nevertheless, it is instructive to look back at the origins of this important mutation. In this opinion piece, we attempt to answer three key questions concerning C9ORF72. First, how many times did the expansion occur throughout human history? Second, how old is the expansion? And finally and perhaps most importantly, how did the expansion spread throughout Europe? We speculate that the expansion occurred only once in the past, that this event took place in the Finnish population and that the Vikings and their descendants were responsible for disseminating this mutation throughout the rest of the continent.

  6. Uncloned expanded CAG/CTG repeat sequences in autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) detected by the repeat expansion detection (RED) method.

    PubMed Central

    Pujana, M A; Volpini, V; Gratacós, M; Corral, J; Banchs, I; Sánchez, A; Genís, D; Cervera, C; Estivill, X

    1998-01-01

    In some neurodegenerative diseases, genetic anticipation correlates with expansions of the CAG/CTG repeat sequence above the normal range through the generations of a pedigree. Among these neurodegenerative diseases are late onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (ADCA). ADCA are genetically heterogeneous disorders with different cloned genes for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), type 2 (SCA2), type 3 or Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD), and type 6 (SCA6). Another related dominant ataxia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), also shows CAG/CTG repeat expansions. Genetic anticipation has been reported for all of them except for the recently cloned SCA6 gene. Other, as yet undetected SCA genes may show the same features. We have used the repeat expansion detection (RED) method to detect repeat expansions directly in DNA samples from ADCA patients not resulting from known genes. Our sample consists of 19 affected index cases, corresponding to 52.8% of our ADCA families without CAG/CTG repeat expansions in the SCA1, SCA2, SCA3/MJD, SCA6, or DRPLA genes. Eighty-nine percent of the index cases had expansions of a CAG/CTG sequence greater than 40 repeats by RED, while these were observed in only 26.9% of 78 healthy subjects from the general population (p < 0.0001). The distribution of RED fragments in controls and ADCA patients also shows significant differences with the Mann-Whitney U test (U = 376.5, p = 0.0007). Moreover, there was a significant inverse correlation between the size of expansion and the age of onset (r = -0.54, p = 0.018). These results show CAG/CTG repeat expansions of over 40 repeats in our sample of ADCA families not resulting from known SCA genes. Images PMID:9507387

  7. Expansion, mosaicism and interruption: mechanisms of the CAG repeat mutation in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Kraus-Perrotta, Cara; Lagalwar, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects the cerebellum and brainstem. The genetic mutation is an expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats within the coding region of the ataxin-1 gene, characterizing SCA1 as a polyglutamine expansion disease like Huntington's. As with most polyglutamine expansion diseases, SCA1 follows the rules of genetic anticipation: the larger the expansion, the earlier and more rapid the symptoms. Unlike the majority of polyglutamine expansion diseases, the presence of histidine interruptions within the polyglutamine tract of ataxin-1 protein can prevent or mitigate disease. The present review aims to synthesize three decades of research on the ataxin-1 polyglutamine expansion mutation that causes SCA1. Data from genetic population studies and case studies is gathered along with data from manipulation studies in animal models. Specifically, we examine the molecular mechanisms that cause tract expansions and contractions, the molecular pathways that confer instability of tract length in gametic and somatic cells resulting in gametic and somatic mosaicism, the influence of maternal or paternal factors in inheritance of the expanded allele, and the effects of CAT/histidine interruptions to the ataxin-1 allele and protein product. Our review of existing data supports the following conclusions. First, polyCAG expansion of gametic alleles occur due to the failure of gap repair mechanisms for single or double strand breaks during the transition from an immature haploid spermatid to a mature haploid sperm cell. Equivalent failures were not detected in female gametic cells. Second, polyCAG expansion of somatic alleles occur due to hairpins formed on Okazaki fragments and slipped strand structures due to failures in mismatch repair and transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair mechanisms. Third, CAT trinucleotide interruptions, which code for histidines in the translated

  8. Length-dependent CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jintang; Campau, Erica; Soragni, Elisabetta; Jespersen, Christine; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an inherited dominant muscular dystrophy caused by expanded CTG·CAG triplet repeats in the 3′ untranslated region of the DMPK1 gene, which produces a toxic gain-of-function CUG RNA. It has been shown that the severity of disease symptoms, age of onset and progression are related to the length of the triplet repeats. However, the mechanism(s) of CTG·CAG triplet-repeat instability is not fully understood. Herein, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from DM1 and Huntington's disease patient fibroblasts. We isolated 41 iPSC clones from DM1 fibroblasts, all showing different CTG·CAG repeat lengths, thus demonstrating somatic instability within the initial fibroblast population. During propagation of the iPSCs, the repeats expanded in a manner analogous to the expansion seen in somatic cells from DM1 patients. The correlation between repeat length and expansion rate identified the interval between 57 and 126 repeats as being an important length threshold where expansion rates dramatically increased. Moreover, longer repeats showed faster triplet-repeat expansion. However, the overall tendency of triplet repeats to expand ceased on differentiation into differentiated embryoid body or neurospheres. The mismatch repair components MSH2, MSH3 and MSH6 were highly expressed in iPSCs compared with fibroblasts, and only occupied the DMPK1 gene harboring longer CTG·CAG triplet repeats. In addition, shRNA silencing of MSH2 impeded CTG·CAG triplet-repeat expansion. The information gained from these studies provides new insight into a general mechanism of triplet-repeat expansion in iPSCs. PMID:23933738

  9. Methylation of C9orf72 expansion reduces RNA foci formation and dipeptide-repeat proteins expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-26

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic cause of both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), together referred to as c9FTD/ALS. It has been suggested that a loss of C9orf72 protein expression, the formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins contribute to C9orf72-related diseases. Interestingly, it has been shown that trimethylation of histones and methylation of CpG islands near the repeat expansion may play a role in the pathogenesis c9FTD/ALS. Recently, methylation of expanded repeat itself has been reported. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying these diseases, the influence of epigenetic modification in the repeat expansion on its pathogenic effect was assessed. Here, a reduced formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins upon methylation of the GGGGCC repeat in a cellular model of c9FTD/ALS is shown. Additionally, a novel methylcytosine-capture DNA hybridization immunoassay for semi-quantitative detection of the repeat methylation levels is presented, potentially usable for methylation analysis in patients carrying C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers as a diagnostic tool. Presented results suggest that increased level of pathogenic GGGGCC expansion methylation may be sufficient to alleviate the molecular pathology of the C9orf72-related diseases.

  10. Elimination of Toxic Microsatellite Repeat Expansion RNA by RNA-Targeting Cas9.

    PubMed

    Batra, Ranjan; Nelles, David A; Pirie, Elaine; Blue, Steven M; Marina, Ryan J; Wang, Harrison; Chaim, Isaac A; Thomas, James D; Zhang, Nigel; Nguyen, Vu; Aigner, Stefan; Markmiller, Sebastian; Xia, Guangbin; Corbett, Kevin D; Swanson, Maurice S; Yeo, Gene W

    2017-08-24

    Microsatellite repeat expansions in DNA produce pathogenic RNA species that cause dominantly inherited diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2 (DM1/2), Huntington's disease, and C9orf72-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS). Means to target these repetitive RNAs are required for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we describe the development of a programmable CRISPR system capable of specifically visualizing and eliminating these toxic RNAs. We observe specific targeting and efficient elimination of microsatellite repeat expansion RNAs both when exogenously expressed and in patient cells. Importantly, RNA-targeting Cas9 (RCas9) reverses hallmark features of disease including elimination of RNA foci among all conditions studied (DM1, DM2, C9-ALS, polyglutamine diseases), reduction of polyglutamine protein products, relocalization of repeat-bound proteins to resemble healthy controls, and efficient reversal of DM1-associated splicing abnormalities in patient myotubes. Finally, we report a truncated RCas9 system compatible with adeno-associated viral packaging. This effort highlights the potential of RCas9 for human therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Expansion Reproduces RNA Foci and Dipeptide Repeat Proteins but Not Neurodegeneration in BAC Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Owen M; Cabrera, Gabriela Toro; Tran, Helene; Gendron, Tania F; McKeon, Jeanne E; Metterville, Jake; Weiss, Alexandra; Wightman, Nicholas; Salameh, Johnny; Kim, Juhyun; Sun, Huaming; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis; Kennedy, Zachary; Lin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Daughrity, Lillian; Jung, Chris; Gao, Fen-Biao; Sapp, Peter C; Horvitz, H Robert; Bosco, Daryl A; Brown, Solange P; de Jong, Pieter; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mueller, Christian; Brown, Robert H

    2015-12-02

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To investigate the pathological role of C9ORF72 in these diseases, we generated a line of mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome containing exons 1 to 6 of the human C9ORF72 gene with approximately 500 repeats of the GGGGCC motif. The mice showed no overt behavioral phenotype but recapitulated distinctive histopathological features of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD, including sense and antisense intranuclear RNA foci and poly(glycine-proline) dipeptide repeat proteins. Finally, using an artificial microRNA that targets human C9ORF72 in cultures of primary cortical neurons from the C9BAC mice, we have attenuated expression of the C9BAC transgene and the poly(GP) dipeptides. The C9ORF72 BAC transgenic mice will be a valuable tool in the study of ALS/FTD pathobiology and therapy.

  12. The Glycine-Alanine Dipeptide Repeat from C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Forms Toxic Amyloids Possessing Cell-to-Cell Transmission Properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Jeng, U-Ser; Chiang, Ya-Ling; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2016-03-04

    Hexanucleotide expansions, GGGGCC, in the non-coding regions of the C9orf72 gene were found in major frontotemporal lobar dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (C9FTD/ALS). In addition to possible RNA toxicity, several dipeptide repeats (DPRs) are translated through repeat-associated non-ATG-initiated translation. The DPRs, including poly(GA), poly(GR), poly(GP), poly(PR), and poly(PA), were found in the brains and spinal cords of C9FTD/ALS patients. Among the DPRs, poly(GA) is highly susceptible to form cytoplasmic inclusions, which is a characteristic of C9FTD/ALS. To elucidate DPR aggregation, we used synthetic (GA)15 DPR as a model system to examine the aggregation and structural properties in vitro. We found that (GA)15 with 15 repeats fibrillates rapidly and ultimately forms flat, ribbon-type fibrils evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The fibrils are capable of amyloid dye binding and contain a characteristic cross-β sheet structure, as revealed by x-ray scattering. Furthermore, using neuroblastoma cells, we demonstrated the neurotoxicity and cell-to-cell transmission property of (GA)15 DPR. Overall, our results show the structural and toxicity properties of GA DPR to facilitate future DPR-related therapeutic development.

  13. Mapping QTL for popping expansion volume in popcorn with simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-J; Bernardo, R; Ohm, H W

    2003-02-01

    Popping expansion volume is the most important quality trait in popcorn ( Zea mays L.), but its genetics is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for popping expansion volume in a popcorn x dent corn cross, and to compare the predicted efficiencies of phenotypic selection, marker-based selection, and marker-assisted selection for popping expansion volume. Of 259 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs screened, 83 pairs were polymorphic between the H123 (dent corn) and AG19 (popcorn) parental inbreds. Popping test data were obtained for 160 S(1) families developed from the [AG19(H123 x AG19)] BC(1) population. The heritability ( h(2)) for popping expansion volume on an S(1) family mean basis was 0.73. The presence of the gametophyte factor Ga1(s) in popcorn complicates the analysis of popcorn x dent corn crosses. But, from a practical perspective, the linkage between a favorable QTL allele and Ga1(s) in popcorn will lead to selection for the favorable QTL allele. Four QTLs, on chromosomes 1S, 3S, 5S and 5L, jointly explained 45% of the phenotypic variation. Marker-based selection for popping expansion volume would require less time and work than phenotypic selection. But due to the high h(2) of popping expansion volume, marker-based selection was predicted to be only 92% as efficient as phenotypic selection. Marker-assisted selection, which comprises index selection on phenotypic and marker scores, was predicted to be 106% as efficient as phenotypic selection. Overall, our results suggest that phenotypic selection will remain the preferred method for selection in popcorn x dent corn crosses.

  14. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1): a triplet repeat expansion disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Agarwal, Sarita; Agarwal, Divya; Phadke, Shubha R

    2013-06-15

    Myotonic dystrophy is a progressive multisystem genetic disorder affecting about 1 in 8000 people worldwide. The unstable repeat expansions of (CTG)n or (CCTG)n in the DMPK and ZNF9 genes cause the two known subtypes of myotonic dystrophy: (i) myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and (ii) myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) respectively. There is currently no cure but supportive management helps equally to reduce the morbidity and mortality and patients need close follow up to pay attention to their clinical problems. This review will focus on the clinical features, molecular view and genetics, diagnosis and management of DM1.

  15. Dodecamer repeat expansion in cystatin B gene in progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lalioti, M D; Scott, H S; Buresi, C; Rossier, C; Bottani, A; Morris, M A; Malafosse, A; Antonarakis, S E

    1997-04-24

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of the Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1; MIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder with onset between 6 and 13 years followed by variable progression to mental deterioration and cerebellar ataxia. It is a rare disorder but more common in Finland (1 in 20,000) and the western Mediterranean. Two point mutations in the cysteine proteinase inhibitor gene cystatin B (CSTB), proved that this gene is responsible for EPM1 (ref. 3). An extensive search in the CSTB gene revealed mutations accounting only for 14% of the 58 unrelated EPM1 alleles studied. Here we report that the majority of EPM1 alleles contain expansions of a dodecamer (12-mer) repeat located about 70 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site nearest to the 5' end of the CSTB gene. Normal alleles contain 2 or 3 copies of this repeat whereas mutant alleles contain more than 60 such repeats and have reduced levels of CSTB messenger RNA in blood but not in cell lines. 'Premutation' CSTB alleles with 12-17 repeats show marked instability when transmitted to offspring.

  16. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP

    PubMed Central

    Dugas, Diana V.; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J.M.; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E.; Jansen, Robert K.; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T.; Hajrah, Nahid H.; Alharbi, Njud S.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2015-01-01

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms. PMID:26592928

  17. Mimosoid legume plastome evolution: IR expansion, tandem repeat expansions, and accelerated rate of evolution in clpP.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Diana V; Hernandez, David; Koenen, Erik J M; Schwarz, Erika; Straub, Shannon; Hughes, Colin E; Jansen, Robert K; Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Staats, Martijn; Trujillo, Joshua T; Hajrah, Nahid H; Alharbi, Njud S; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Sabir, Jamal S M; Bailey, C Donovan

    2015-11-23

    The Leguminosae has emerged as a model for studying angiosperm plastome evolution because of its striking diversity of structural rearrangements and sequence variation. However, most of what is known about legume plastomes comes from few genera representing a subset of lineages in subfamily Papilionoideae. We investigate plastome evolution in subfamily Mimosoideae based on two newly sequenced plastomes (Inga and Leucaena) and two recently published plastomes (Acacia and Prosopis), and discuss the results in the context of other legume and rosid plastid genomes. Mimosoid plastomes have a typical angiosperm gene content and general organization as well as a generally slow rate of protein coding gene evolution, but they are the largest known among legumes. The increased length results from tandem repeat expansions and an unusual 13 kb IR-SSC boundary shift in Acacia and Inga. Mimosoid plastomes harbor additional interesting features, including loss of clpP intron1 in Inga, accelerated rates of evolution in clpP for Acacia and Inga, and dN/dS ratios consistent with neutral and positive selection for several genes. These new plastomes and results provide important resources for legume comparative genomics, plant breeding, and plastid genetic engineering, while shedding further light on the complexity of plastome evolution in legumes and angiosperms.

  18. Large C9orf72 repeat expansions are seen in Chinese patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongping; Lin, Ziqiang; Chen, Xueping; Cao, Bei; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Zhao, Bi; Song, Wei; Wu, Ying; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2016-02-01

    An intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene was considered as the most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia in Caucasian populations. Using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction analysis and Southern blotting methods, we assessed the frequency and size of hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a cohort of 918 sporadic ALS (SALS) patients and 632 control individuals of Han Chinese origin. We identified 8 (0.87%) of the SALS patients and none of control individuals as carriers of C9orf72 expansions with 700-3500 repeats. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery was conducted on 4 expansion-positive ALS patients, where 3 patients were found to have cognitive impairment. All expansion-positive patients were genotyped for the previously reported 20 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) risk haplotypes on chromosome 9p21. Among them, 13 SNP risk haplotypes were shared in all expansion carriers, suggesting a common founder from European ancestry. Further meta-analysis demonstrated that the intermediate expansion size with 24-30 repeats, rare in both patients and controls, were significantly associated with the risk for ALS. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify a proportion of Chinese SALS patients carrying this pathologic expansion of up to ∼3500 repeats and to completely elaborate the 20-SNP risk haplotypes in Chinese expansion-positive patients, providing indispensable evidence for the origin, geographical range, and population prevalence of the C9orf72-associated ALS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. © 2014 Gerhardt et al.

  20. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L.; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. PMID:25179629

  1. Energetic Coupling Between Clustered Lesions Modulated by Intervening Triplet Repeat Bulge Loops: Allosteric Implications for DNA Repair and Triplet Repeat Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Jens; Plum, G.Eric; Klump, Horst H.; Breslauer, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of closely spaced oxidative DNA lesions present challenges to the cellular repair machinery. When located in opposing strands, base excision repair (BER) of such lesions can lead to double strand DNA breaks (DSB). Activation of BER and DSB repair pathways has been implicated in inducing enhanced expansion of triplet repeat sequences. We show here that energy coupling between distal lesions (8oxodG and/or abasic sites) in opposing DNA strands can be modulated by a triplet repeat bulge loop located between the lesion sites. We find this modulation to be dependent on the identity of the lesions (8oxodG versus abasic site) and the positions of the lesions (upstream versus downstream) relative to the intervening bulge loop domain. We discuss how such bulge loop-mediated lesion cross talk might influence repair processes, while favoring DNA expansion, the genotype of triplet repeat diseases. PMID:19890964

  2. Expansion of inverted repeat does not decrease substitution rates in Pelargonium plastid genomes.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2017-04-01

    For species with minor inverted repeat (IR) boundary changes in the plastid genome (plastome), nucleotide substitution rates were previously shown to be lower in the IR than the single copy regions (SC). However, the impact of large-scale IR expansion/contraction on plastid nucleotide substitution rates among closely related species remains unclear. We included plastomes from 22 Pelargonium species, including eight newly sequenced genomes, and used both pairwise and model-based comparisons to investigate the impact of the IR on sequence evolution in plastids. Ten types of plastome organization with different inversions or IR boundary changes were identified in Pelargonium. Inclusion in the IR was not sufficient to explain the variation of nucleotide substitution rates. Instead, the rate heterogeneity in Pelargonium plastomes was a mixture of locus-specific, lineage-specific and IR-dependent effects. Our study of Pelargonium plastomes that vary in IR length and gene content demonstrates that the evolutionary consequences of retaining these repeats are more complicated than previously suggested.

  3. RNAe: an effective method for targeted protein translation enhancement by artificial non-coding RNA with SINEB2 repeat.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Long, Haizhou; Yu, Yingting; Zhang, Zhenming; Cheng, Ge; Xu, Chengwei; Ding, Yan; Guan, Qian; Li, Ning; Fu, Suneng; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Fu, Shushu; Li, Juan; He, Guang-Jun; Wu, Qiong

    2015-05-19

    In this study, a universal protein expression enhancement RNA tool, termed RNAe, was developed by modifying a recently discovered natural long non-coding RNA. At the moment, RNAe is the only technology for gene expression enhancement, as opposed to silencing, at the post-transcriptional level. With this technology, an expression enhancement of 50-1000% is achievable, with more than 200% enhancement achieved in most cases. This work identified the sufficient and necessary element for RNAe function, which was found to be merely 300 nucleotides long and was named minRNAe. It contains a 72-nt 5' pairing sequence which determines the specificity, a 167-nt short non-pairing interspersed nuclear element (SINE) B2 sequence which enhances ribosome recruitment to the target mRNA, and a poly(A) tail, provided together on a plasmid bearing the appropriate sequences. Cellular delivery of RNAe was achieved using routine transfection. The RNAe platform was validated in several widely-used mammalian cell lines. It was proven to be efficient and flexible in specifically enhancing the expression of various endogenous and exogenous proteins of diverse functions in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the expression-inhibitory tool RNAi, the RNAe tool has a comparable effect size, with an enhancing as opposed to inhibitory effect. One may predict that this brand new technology for enhancing the production of proteins will find wide applications in both research and biopharmaceutical production. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex promotes trinucleotide repeat expansions independently of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanfang; Kirkham-McCarthy, Lucy; Lahue, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are tandem arrays of three nucleotides that can expand in length to cause at least 17 inherited human diseases. Somatic expansions in patients can occur in differentiated tissues where DNA replication is limited and cannot be a primary source of somatic mutation. Instead, mouse models of TNR diseases have shown that both inherited and somatic expansions can be suppressed by the loss of certain DNA repair factors. It is generally believed that these repair factors cause misprocessing of TNRs, leading to expansions. Here we extend this idea to show that the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a causative factor in expansions of short TNRs. Mutations that eliminate MRX subunits led to significant suppression of expansions whereas mutations that inactivate Rad51 had only a minor effect. Coupled with previous evidence, this suggests that MRX drives expansions of short TNRs through a process distinct from homologous recombination. The nuclease function of Mre11 was dispensable for expansions, suggesting that expansions do not occur by Mre11-dependent nucleolytic processing of the TNR. Epistasis between MRX and post-replication repair (PRR) was tested. PRR protects against expansions, so a rad5 mutant gave a high expansion rate. In contrast, the mre11 rad5 double mutant gave a suppressed expansion rate, indistinguishable from the mre11 single mutant. This suggests that MRX creates a TNR substrate for PRR. Protein acetylation was also tested as a mechanism regulating MRX activity in expansions. Six acetylation sites were identified in Rad50. Mutation of all six lysine residues to arginine gave partial bypass of a sin3 HDAC mutant, suggesting that Rad50 acetylation is functionally important for Sin3-mediated expansions. Overall we conclude that yeast MRX helps drive expansions of short TNRs by a mechanism distinct from its role in homologous recombination and independent of the nuclease function of Mre11. Copyright

  5. Sex-dependent mechanisms for expansions and contractions of the CAG repeat on affected Huntington disease chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, B.; Theilmann, J.; Spence, N.

    1995-08-01

    A total of 254 affected parent-child pairs with Huntington disease (HD) and 440 parent-child pairs with CAG size in the normal range were assessed to determine the nature and frequency of intergenerational CAG changes in the HD gene. Intergenerational CAG changes are extremely rare (3/440 [0.68%]) on normal chromosomes. In contrast, on HD chromosomes, changes in CAG size occur in {approximately}70% of meioses on HD chromosomes, with expansions accounting for 73% of these changes. These intergenerational CAG changes make a significant but minor contribution to changes in age at onset (r{sup 2}=.19). The size of the CAG repeat influenced larger intergenerational expansions (>7 CAG repeats), but the likelihood of smaller expansions or contractions was not influenced by CAG size. Large expansions (>7 CAG repeats) occur almost exclusively through paternal transmission (0.96%; P<10{sub -7}), while offspring of affected mothers are more likely to show no change (P=.01) or contractions in CAG size (P=.002). This study demonstrates that sex of the transmitting parent is the major determinant for CAG intergenerational changes in the HD gene. Similar paternal sex effects are seen in the evolution of new mutations for HD from intermediate alleles and for large expansions on affected chromosomes. Affected mothers almost never transmit a significantly expanded CAG repeat, despite the fact that many have similar large-sized alleles, compared with affected fathers. The sex-dependent effects of major expansion and contractions of the CAG repeat in the HD gene implicate different effects of gametogenesis, in males versus females, on intergenerational CAG repeat stability. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S.; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Josephs, Keith A.; Rush, Beth K.; Machulda, Mary M.; Fields, Julie A.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M.; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Lucas, John A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral

  7. Absence of FMR1 protein in two mentally retarded fragile X males without CGG repeat expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lugenbeel, K.A.; Nelson, D.L.; Carson, N.L.; Chudley, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome is characterized by absence of the product of the FMR1 gene due to an expansion and abnormal methylation of a CGG repeat located in exon 1. While the vast majority of fragile X patients demonstrate this common mutation, a small number of non-CGG mutations have been identified among patients exhibiting features of fragile X syndrome. Three patients with large deletions ablating all or a portion of FMR1 have been previously reported. A fourth patient has been described with a point mutation resulting in an Ile367 Asn substitution. While this last individual suggests that FMR1 is directly responsible for fragile X syndrome, the severe phenotype observed suggests a gain of function mutation. Our long-term goal is to understand both the normal function of the FMR1 gene product and the consequences of its absence. Using Western blot analysis of protein extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals suspected of fragile X syndrome without CGG expansion, we have identified two fragile X males who display no FMR1 protein. In order to facilitate identification of small-scale mutations in these patients, primers have been designed which allow amplification of each exon of the FMR1 gene along with their intron boundaries. Exons 2 through 17 of FMR1 have been analyzed by amplification of patient genomic DNA using these primers. Each patient shows normal length amplification product from each exon as assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis, suggesting the absence of insertions, deletions, or other rearrangements. Sequence analysis of exons 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 has shown no alteration from the normal FMR1 sequence. Current analysis has focused on the use of mutation detection electrophoresis (MDE) in order to identify candidate exons for mutations. RT-PCR analysis is also under way to determine if FMR1 mRNA is present and to offer an alternative approach to mutation detection.

  8. Cognition and gray and white matter characteristics of presymptomatic C9orf72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Papma, Janne M; Jiskoot, Lize C; Panman, Jessica L; Dopper, Elise G; den Heijer, Tom; Donker Kaat, Laura; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Meeter, Lieke H; van Minkelen, Rick; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van Swieten, John C

    2017-09-19

    To investigate cognitive function, gray matter volume, and white matter integrity in the presymptomatic stage of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 repeat expansion (C9orf72RE). Presymptomatic C9orf72RE carriers (n = 18) and first-degree family members without a pathogenic expansion (healthy controls [HC], n = 15) underwent a standardized protocol of neuropsychological tests, T1-weighted MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging within our cohort study of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We investigated group differences in cognitive function, gray matter volume through voxel-based morphometry, and white matter integrity by means of tract-based spatial statistics. We correlated cognitive change with underlying gray or white matter. Our data demonstrate lower scores on letter fluency, Stroop card I, and Stroop card III, accompanied by white matter integrity loss in tracts connecting the frontal lobe, the thalamic radiation, and tracts associated with motor functioning in presymptomatic C9orf72RE compared with HC. In a subgroup of C9orf72RE carriers above 40 years of age, we found gray matter volume loss in the thalamus, cerebellum, and parietal and temporal cortex. We found no significant relationship between subtle cognitive decline and underlying gray or white matter. This study demonstrates that a decline in cognitive functioning, white matter integrity, and gray matter volumes are present in presymptomatic C9orf72RE carriers. These findings suggest that neuropsychological assessment, T1-weighted MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging might be useful to identify early biomarkers in the presymptomatic stage of FTD or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  10. Conformational Change-Induced Repeat Domain Expansion Regulates Rap Phosphatase Quorum-Sensing Signal Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Neiditch, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComAC crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the development

  11. Pericentromeric satellite repeat expansions through RNA-derived DNA intermediates in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Francesca; Lee, Eunjung; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Xu, Andrew W.; Liu, Mingzhu; Xega, Kristina; MacKenzie, Olivia C.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Wittner, Ben S.; Jung, Hyunchul; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Park, Peter J.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Ting, David T.; Haber, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant transcription of the pericentromeric human satellite II (HSATII) repeat is present in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. In deriving experimental systems to study its deregulation, we observed that HSATII expression is induced in colon cancer cells cultured as xenografts or under nonadherent conditions in vitro, but it is rapidly lost in standard 2D cultures. Unexpectedly, physiological induction of endogenous HSATII RNA, as well as introduction of synthetic HSATII transcripts, generated cDNA intermediates in the form of DNA/RNA hybrids. Single molecule sequencing of tumor xenografts showed that HSATII RNA-derived DNA (rdDNA) molecules are stably incorporated within pericentromeric loci. Suppression of RT activity using small molecule inhibitors reduced HSATII copy gain. Analysis of whole-genome sequencing data revealed that HSATII copy number gain is a common feature in primary human colon tumors and is associated with a lower overall survival. Together, our observations suggest that cancer-associated derepression of specific repetitive sequences can promote their RNA-driven genomic expansion, with potential implications on pericentromeric architecture. PMID:26575630

  12. C9orf72 repeat expansions are restricted to the ALS-FTD spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ticozzi, Nicola; Tiloca, Cinzia; Calini, Daniela; Gagliardi, Stella; Altieri, Alessandra; Colombrita, Claudia; Cereda, Cristina; Ratti, Antonia; Pezzoli, Gianni; Borroni, Barbara; Goldwurm, Stefano; Padovani, Alessandro; Silani, Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat (RE) in the C9orf72 gene has been recently reported as the main genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Given the growing evidence of genetic and clinicopathologic overlap among ALS, FTD, and other neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the occurrence of RE in a subset of 9 patients with ALS-plus syndromes, including Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal syndrome (CBS), and multiple system atrophy. We identified RE in 2 ALS-plus individuals (22.2%) displaying PSP and CBS features. On the basis of this finding, we extended our analysis to a cohort composed of 190 PD, 103 CBS, 107 PSP, and 177 Alzheimer's disease cases. We did not identify any RE in these patients, indicating that C9orf72 is in all probability not involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. However, the high frequency of C9orf72 RE in patients with ALS-plus syndromes suggests that, similar to ALS-FTD patients, individuals with combined motor neuron and extrapyramidal features should be screened for RE, independent of their family history.

  13. Cascade Screening for Fragile X Syndrome/CGG Repeat Expansions in Children Attending Special Education in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Samuel S.; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the commonest cause of inherited mental retardation and clinically presents with learning, emotional and behaviour problems. FXS is caused by expansion of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) repeats present in the 5’ untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The aim of this study was to screen children attending special education institutions in Sri Lanka to estimate the prevalence of CGG repeat expansions. The study population comprised a representative national sample of 850 children (540 males, 310 females) with 5 to 18 years of age from moderate to severe mental retardation of wide ranging aetiology. Screening for CGG repeat expansion was carried out on DNA extracted from buccal cells using 3’ direct triplet primed PCR followed by melting curve analysis. To identify the expanded status of screened positive samples, capillary electrophoresis, methylation specific PCR and Southern hybridization were carried out using venous blood samples. Prevalence of CGG repeat expansions was 2.2%. Further classification of the positive samples into FXS full mutation, pre-mutation and grey zone gave prevalence of 1.3%, 0.8% and 0.1% respectively. All positive cases were male. No females with FXS were detected in our study may have been due to the small sample size. PMID:26694146

  14. Cascade Screening for Fragile X Syndrome/CGG Repeat Expansions in Children Attending Special Education in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, C H W M R Bhagya; Wijesundera, W S Sulochana; Perera, Hemamali N; Chong, Samuel S; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the commonest cause of inherited mental retardation and clinically presents with learning, emotional and behaviour problems. FXS is caused by expansion of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) repeats present in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The aim of this study was to screen children attending special education institutions in Sri Lanka to estimate the prevalence of CGG repeat expansions. The study population comprised a representative national sample of 850 children (540 males, 310 females) with 5 to 18 years of age from moderate to severe mental retardation of wide ranging aetiology. Screening for CGG repeat expansion was carried out on DNA extracted from buccal cells using 3' direct triplet primed PCR followed by melting curve analysis. To identify the expanded status of screened positive samples, capillary electrophoresis, methylation specific PCR and Southern hybridization were carried out using venous blood samples. Prevalence of CGG repeat expansions was 2.2%. Further classification of the positive samples into FXS full mutation, pre-mutation and grey zone gave prevalence of 1.3%, 0.8% and 0.1% respectively. All positive cases were male. No females with FXS were detected in our study may have been due to the small sample size.

  15. C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions are a frequent cause of Huntington disease phenocopies in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Kartanou, Chrisoula; Kladi, Athina; Panas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 has been identified as the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and/or frontotemporal dementia in many populations, including the Greek. Recently, C9ORF72 expansions were reported as the most common genetic cause of Huntington disease (HD) phenocopies in a UK population. In the present study, we screened a selected cohort of 40 Greek patients with HD phenocopies for C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction. We identified 2 patients (5%) with pathologic expansions. The first patient had chorea, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, cognitive impairment, and a positive family history, fulfilling the strictest criteria for HD phenocopy. The second patient was sporadic and had parkinsonism, behavioral-psychiatric disturbance, and cognitive impairment, corresponding to a broader definition of HD phenocopy. These findings identify C9ORF72 expansions as a frequent cause of HD phenocopies in the Greek population, confirming recent findings in other populations and supporting proposed diagnostic testing for C9ORF72 expansions in patients with HD-like syndromes.

  16. Transcription influences the types of deletion and expansion products in an orientation-dependent manner from GAC•GTC repeats

    PubMed Central

    Mochmann, Liliana H.; Wells, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic instability of (GAC•GTC)n (where n = 6–74) was investigated in an Escherichia coli-based plasmid system. Prior work implicated the instability of a (GAC•GTC)5 tract in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene to the 4, 6 or 7mers in the etiology of pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. The effects of triplet repeat length and orientation were studied after multiple replication cycles in vivo. A transcribed plasmid containing (GAC•GTC)49 repeats led to large deletions (>3 repeats) after propagation in E.coli; however, if transcription was silenced by the LacIQ repressor, small expansions and deletions (<3 repeats) predominated the mutation spectra. In contrast, propagation of similar length but opposing orientation (GTC•GAC)53 containing plasmid led to small instabilities that were unaffected by the repression of transcription. Thus, by inhibiting transcription, the genetic instability of (GAC•GTC)49 repeats did not significantly differ from the opposing orientation, (GTC•GAC)53. We postulate that small instabilities of GAC•GTC repeats are achieved through replicative slippage, whereas large deletion events are found when GAC•GTC repeats are transcribed. Herein, we report the first genetic study on GAC•GTC repeat instability describing two types of mutational patterns that can be partitioned by transcription modulation. Along with prior biophysical data, these results lay the initial groundwork for understanding the genetic processes responsible for triplet repeat mutations in the COMP gene. PMID:15317871

  17. The epilepsy, the protease inhibitor and the dodecamer: progressive myoclonus epilepsy, cystatin b and a 12-mer repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Lalioti, M D; Antonarakis, S E; Scott, H S

    2003-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy 1 (EPM1) or Unverricht-Lundborg disease is a human autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in cystatin B (CSTB). The CSTB gene maps to human chromosome 21 and encodes an inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Five point mutations have been found, two of which are seen in numerous unrelated patients. However, the main CSTB mutation in EPM1, even among patients of different ethnic origins, is an expansion of a dodecamer repeat (CCCCGCCCCGCG) in the 5' flanking area of CSTB. Most normal alleles contain either two or three repeats, while rarer normal alleles that are highly unstable contain between 12 and 17 repeats. Mutant expanded alleles have been reported to contain between 30 and 80 copies and are also highly unstable, particularly via parental transmission. There is no apparent correlation between mutant repeat length and disease phenotype. While the repeat expansion is outside the CSTB transcriptional unit, it results in a marked decrease in CSTB expression, at least in certain cell types in vitro. CSTB homozygous knockout mice show some parallels to the phenotype of human EPM1 including myoclonic seizures, development of ataxia and neuropathological changes associated with cell loss via apoptosis. Loss of CSTB function due to mutations is consistent with the observed neurodegenerative pathology and phenotype, but the functional link to the epileptic phenotype of EPM1 remains largely unknown.

  18. Expansion of the CGG repeat in fragile X in the FRM1 gene depends on the sex of the offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, D.Z.; Huggins, R.; Petrovic, V.

    1995-12-01

    Analysis of 139 mother-to-offspring transmissions of fragile X CGG triplet repeats revealed that the repeat expansion is enhanced in mother-to-son transmissions compared with mother-to-daughter transmissions. Evidence has been based on analysis of mother-offspring differences in the size of repeat (in kb), as well as on comparisons between proportions of male and female offspring with premutations, and full mutations, inherited from mothers carrying a premutation. Mean difference in the repeat size from mother-son transmissions was 1.45 kb, compared with mother-daughter transmissions of 0.76 kb. The difference is due primarily to a greater proportion of male than female offspring with full mutation from the premutation mothers and also to a higher frequency of reduction in repeat size from mothers to daughters than from mothers to sons. Our findings suggest the possibility of an interaction of the normal X homologue in a female zygote with the FMR1 sequence on the fragile X during replication to account for the lower level of expansion in mother-to-daughter transmissions relative to mother-to-son transmissions. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Energy landscapes of dynamic ensembles of rolling triplet repeat bulge loops: implications for DNA expansion associated with disease states.

    PubMed

    Völker, Jens; Gindikin, Vera; Klump, Horst H; Plum, G Eric; Breslauer, Kenneth J

    2012-04-04

    DNA repeat domains can form ensembles of canonical and noncanonical states, including stable and metastable DNA secondary structures. Such sequence-induced structural diversity creates complex conformational landscapes for DNA processing pathways, including those triplet expansion events that accompany replication, recombination, and/or repair. Here we demonstrate further levels of conformational complexity within repeat domains. Specifically, we show that bulge loop structures within an extended repeat domain can form dynamic ensembles containing a distribution of loop positions, thereby yielding families of positional loop isomers, which we designate as "rollamers". Our fluorescence, absorbance, and calorimetric data are consistent with loop migration/translocation between sites within the repeat domain ("rollamerization"). We demonstrate that such "rollameric" migration of bulge loops within repeat sequences can invade and disrupt previously formed base-paired domains via an isoenthalpic, entropy-driven process. We further demonstrate that destabilizing abasic lesions alter the loop distributions so as to favor "rollamers" with the lesion positioned at the duplex/loop junction, sites where the flexibility of the abasic "universal hinge" relaxes unfavorable interactions and/or facilitates topological accommodation. Another strategic siting of an abasic site induces directed loop migration toward denaturing domains, a phenomenon that merges destabilizing domains. In the aggregate, our data reveal that dynamic ensembles within repeat domains profoundly impact the overall energetics of such DNA constructs as well as the distribution of states by which they denature/renature. These static and dynamic influences within triplet repeat domains expand the conformational space available for selection and targeting by the DNA processing machinery. We propose that such dynamic ensembles and their associated impact on DNA properties influence pathways that lead to DNA

  20. Early onset behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia due to the C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion: psychiatric clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Arighi, Andrea; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Jacini, Francesca; Fenoglio, Chiara; Ghezzi, Laura; Pietroboni, Anna M; De Riz, Milena; Serpente, Maria; Ridolfi, Elisa; Bonsi, Rossana; Bresolin, Nereo; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 has been shown to be responsible for a high number of familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or frontotemporal lobar degeneration with or without concomitant motor neuron disease phenotype and TDP-43 based pathology. Here, we report on three cases carrying the hexanucleotide repeat expansion with an atypical presentation consisting in the development of psychiatric symptoms. Patient #1, a 53 year old man with positive family history for dementia, presented with mood deflection, characterized by apathy, social withdraw, and irritability in the last two years. He was diagnosed with "mild cognitive impairment due to depressive syndrome" six months later and subsequently with Alzheimer's disease. Patient #2, a woman with positive family history for dementia, developed behavioral disturbances, aggressiveness, and swearing at 57 years of age. Patient #3 presented, in the absence of brain atrophy, with mystical delirium with auditory hallucinations at 44 years of age, and did not present neurological symptoms over a 7-year follow up. The description of these cases underlines that the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 could be associated with early onset psychiatric presentations.

  1. Crosstalk between MSH2–MSH3 and polβ promotes trinucleotide repeat expansion during base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yanhao; Budworth, Helen; Beaver, Jill M.; Chan, Nelson L. S.; Zhang, Zunzhen; McMurray, Cynthia T.; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Studies in knockout mice provide evidence that MSH2–MSH3 and the BER machinery promote trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion, yet how these two different repair pathways cause the mutation is unknown. Here we report the first molecular crosstalk mechanism, in which MSH2–MSH3 is used as a component of the BER machinery to cause expansion. On its own, pol β fails to copy TNRs during DNA synthesis, and bypasses them on the template strand to cause deletion. Remarkably, MSH2–MSH3 not only stimulates pol β to copy through the repeats but also enhances formation of the flap precursor for expansion. Our results provide direct evidence that MMR and BER, operating together, form a novel hybrid pathway that changes the outcome of TNR instability from deletion to expansion during the removal of oxidized bases. We propose that cells implement crosstalk strategies and share machinery when a canonical pathway is ineffective in removing a difficult lesion. PMID:27546332

  2. Scanning for unstable trinucleotide repeats in neuropsychiatric disorders: Detection of a large CTG expansion in a schizophrenic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Sirugo, G.; Haaf, T.; Kidd, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of unstable trinucleotide repeats have been associated so far with seven human genetic disorders including fragile X, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease. This newly discovered class of genetic mutations is almost invariably associated with genetic anticipation. Anticipation has been recently reported in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia pedigrees, suggesting a possible implication of genes with unstable triplets in these disorders. To explore this hypothesis we have analyzed large schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder kindreds by means of the Repeat Expansion Detection Method (RED) described by Schalling and modified in our laboratory. This method uses genomic DNA as a template for the annealing and ligation of repeat-specific oligonucleotides. The reactions were subjected to denaturing PAGE and then transferred onto nylon membrane by capillary transfer. The multimers were revealed after hybridization with an oligoprobe and 5 hours exposure on film. To date the kindreds have been screened for the presence of unstable (CTG)n. CTG multimers ranging from 51 to 119 CTG units were detected in both affected and normal individuals corresponding to a normal variation in length of one or more CTG loci. Although our results indicate that (CTG)n expansions are not the mechanism causing schziophrenia or bipolar affective disorder, in one schizophrenia patient we have detected a large (CTG)n constituted by at least 204 CTG units. The incomplete structure of the family does not allow us to determine if this large repeat segregates with the disease. Localization of this expanded locus by in situ hybridization is underway. Similar in situ studies using PCR-generated CCA multimers up to 1 kb in length as a probe have revealed the presence of long tracts of CCA repeats at discrete sites in the human genome. This shows the feasibility of the in situ approach to localize large arrays of triplets in the human genome.

  3. A Noncoding Expansion in EIF4A3 Causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira Syndrome, a Craniofacial Disorder Associated with Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Francine P.; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M.; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Weiner, Andrea M.J.; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B.; Andersen, Gregers R.; McGowan, Simon J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L.G.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. PMID:24360810

  4. A noncoding expansion in EIF4A3 causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, a craniofacial disorder associated with limb defects.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Francine P; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R F; Weiner, Andrea M J; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B; Andersen, Gregers R; McGowan, Simon J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L G; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-02

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exceptional expansion and conservation of a CT-repeat complex in the core promoter of PAXBP1 in primates.

    PubMed

    Mohammadparast, Saeid; Bayat, Hadi; Biglarian, Akbar; Ohadi, Mina

    2014-08-01

    Adaptive evolution may be linked with the genomic distribution and function of short tandem repeats (STRs). Proximity of the core promoter STRs to the +1 transcription start site (TSS), and their mutable nature are characteristics that highlight those STRs as a novel source of interspecies variation. The PAXBP1 gene (alternatively known as GCFC1) core promoter contains the longest STR identified in a Homo sapiens gene core promoter. Indeed, this core promoter is a stretch of four consecutive CT-STRs. In the current study, we used the Ensembl, NCBI, and UCSC databases to analyze the evolutionary trend and functional implication of this CT-STR complex in six major lineages across vertebrates, including primates, non-primate mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. We observed exceptional expansion (≥4-repeats) and conservation of this CT-STR complex across primates, except prosimians, Microcebus murinus and Otolemur garnettii (Fisher exact P<4.1×10(-7)). H. sapiens has the most complex STR formula, and longest repeats. Macaca mulatta and Callithrix jacchus monkeys have the simplest STR formulas, and shortest repeat numbers. CT≥4-repeats were not detected in non-primate lineages. Different length alleles across the PAXBP1 core promoter CT-STRs significantly altered gene expression in vitro (P<0.001, t-test). PAXBP1 has a crucial role in craniofacial development, myogenesis, and spine morphogenesis, properties that have been diverged between primates and non-primates. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of expansion and conservation of a STR complex co-occurring specifically with the primate lineage.

  6. TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansions

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Michael D.; Suh, Eunran; Grossman, Murray; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Van Swieten, John C.; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Neumann, Manuela; Gelpi, Ellen; Ghetti, Bernardino; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Halliday, Glenda; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Seilhean, Danielle; Shaw, Pamela J.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.

    2014-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) have recently been linked to frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and may be the most common genetic cause of both neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic variants at TMEM106B influence risk for the most common neuropathological subtype of FTLD, characterized by inclusions of TAR DNA binding protein of 43kDa (FTLD-TDP). Previous reports have shown that TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of FTLD-TDP caused by progranulin (GRN) mutations, with the major (risk) allele of rs1990622 associating with earlier age at onset of disease. Here we report that rs1990622 genotype affects age at death in a single-site discovery cohort of FTLD patients with C9orf72 expansions (n=14), with the major allele correlated with later age at death (p=0.024). We replicate this modifier effect in a 30-site international neuropathological cohort of FTLD-TDP patients with C9orf72 expansions (n=75), again finding that the major allele associates with later age at death (p=0.016), as well as later age at onset (p=0.019). In contrast, TMEM106B genotype does not affect age at onset or death in 241 FTLD-TDP cases negative for GRN mutations or C9orf72 expansions. Thus, TMEM106B is a genetic modifier of FTLD with C9orf72 expansions. Intriguingly, the genotype that confers increased risk for developing FTLD-TDP (major, or T, allele of rs1990622) is associated with later age at onset and death in C9orf72 expansion carriers, providing an example of sign epistasis in human neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24442578

  7. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-M; Ramos, E M; Lee, J-H; Gillis, T; Mysore, J S; Hayden, M R; Warby, S C; Morrison, P; Nance, M; Ross, C A; Margolis, R L; Squitieri, F; Orobello, S; Di Donato, S; Gomez-Tortosa, E; Ayuso, C; Suchowersky, O; Trent, R J A; McCusker, E; Novelletto, A; Frontali, M; Jones, R; Ashizawa, T; Frank, S; Saint-Hilaire, M H; Hersch, S M; Rosas, H D; Lucente, D; Harrison, M B; Zanko, A; Abramson, R K; Marder, K; Sequeiros, J; Paulsen, J S; Landwehrmeyer, G B; Myers, R H; MacDonald, M E; Gusella, J F

    2012-03-06

    Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors.

  8. CAG repeat expansion in Huntington disease determines age at onset in a fully dominant fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.-M.; Ramos, E.M.; Lee, J.-H.; Gillis, T.; Mysore, J.S.; Hayden, M.R.; Warby, S.C.; Morrison, P.; Nance, M.; Ross, C.A.; Margolis, R.L.; Squitieri, F.; Orobello, S.; Di Donato, S.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Ayuso, C.; Suchowersky, O.; Trent, R.J.A.; McCusker, E.; Novelletto, A.; Frontali, M.; Jones, R.; Ashizawa, T.; Frank, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M.H.; Hersch, S.M.; Rosas, H.D.; Lucente, D.; Harrison, M.B.; Zanko, A.; Abramson, R.K.; Marder, K.; Sequeiros, J.; Paulsen, J.S.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Myers, R.H.; MacDonald, M.E.; Durr, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Adam; Frati, Luigi; Perlman, Susan; Conneally, Patrick M.; Klimek, Mary Lou; Diggin, Melissa; Hadzi, Tiffany; Duckett, Ayana; Ahmed, Anwar; Allen, Paul; Ames, David; Anderson, Christine; Anderson, Karla; Anderson, Karen; Andrews, Thomasin; Ashburner, John; Axelson, Eric; Aylward, Elizabeth; Barker, Roger A.; Barth, Katrin; Barton, Stacey; Baynes, Kathleen; Bea, Alexandra; Beall, Erik; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Biglan, Kevin; Bjork, Kristine; Blanchard, Steve; Bockholt, Jeremy; Bommu, Sudharshan Reddy; Brossman, Bradley; Burrows, Maggie; Calhoun, Vince; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chesire, Amy; Chiu, Edmond; Chua, Phyllis; Connell, R.J.; Connor, Carmela; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Craufurd, David; Cross, Stephen; Cysique, Lucette; Santos, Rachelle Dar; Davis, Jennifer; Decolongon, Joji; DiPietro, Anna; Doucette, Nicholas; Downing, Nancy; Dudler, Ann; Dunn, Steve; Ecker, Daniel; Epping, Eric A.; Erickson, Diane; Erwin, Cheryl; Evans, Ken; Factor, Stewart A.; Farias, Sarah; Fatas, Marta; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Fullam, Ruth; Furtado, Sarah; Garde, Monica Bascunana; Gehl, Carissa; Geschwind, Michael D.; Goh, Anita; Gooblar, Jon; Goodman, Anna; Griffith, Jane; Groves, Mark; Guttman, Mark; Hamilton, Joanne; Harrington, Deborah; Harris, Greg; Heaton, Robert K.; Helmer, Karl; Henneberry, Machelle; Hershey, Tamara; Herwig, Kelly; Howard, Elizabeth; Hunter, Christine; Jankovic, Joseph; Johnson, Hans; Johnson, Arik; Jones, Kathy; Juhl, Andrew; Kim, Eun Young; Kimble, Mycah; King, Pamela; Klimek, Mary Lou; Klöppel, Stefan; Koenig, Katherine; Komiti, Angela; Kumar, Rajeev; Langbehn, Douglas; Leavitt, Blair; Leserman, Anne; Lim, Kelvin; Lipe, Hillary; Lowe, Mark; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Mallonee, William M.; Mans, Nicole; Marietta, Jacquie; Marshall, Frederick; Martin, Wayne; Mason, Sarah; Matheson, Kirsty; Matson, Wayne; Mazzoni, Pietro; McDowell, William; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Miller, Michael; Mills, James; Miracle, Dawn; Montross, Kelsey; Moore, David; Mori, Sasumu; Moser, David J.; Moskowitz, Carol; Newman, Emily; Nopoulos, Peg; Novak, Marianne; O'Rourke, Justin; Oakes, David; Ondo, William; Orth, Michael; Panegyres, Peter; Pease, Karen; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Peterson, Asa; Phillips, Michael; Pierson, Ron; Potkin, Steve; Preston, Joy; Quaid, Kimberly; Radtke, Dawn; Rae, Daniela; Rao, Stephen; Raymond, Lynn; Reading, Sarah; Ready, Rebecca; Reece, Christine; Reilmann, Ralf; Reynolds, Norm; Richardson, Kylie; Rickards, Hugh; Ro, Eunyoe; Robinson, Robert; Rodnitzky, Robert; Rogers, Ben; Rosenblatt, Adam; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Price, Kathy; Price, Kathy; Ryan, Pat; Salmon, David; Samii, Ali; Schumacher, Jamy; Schumacher, Jessica; Sendon, Jose Luis Lópenz; Shear, Paula; Sheinberg, Alanna; Shpritz, Barnett; Siedlecki, Karen; Simpson, Sheila A.; Singer, Adam; Smith, Jim; Smith, Megan; Smith, Glenn; Snyder, Pete; Song, Allen; Sran, Satwinder; Stephan, Klaas; Stober, Janice; Sü?muth, Sigurd; Suter, Greg; Tabrizi, Sarah; Tempkin, Terry; Testa, Claudia; Thompson, Sean; Thomsen, Teri; Thumma, Kelli; Toga, Arthur; Trautmann, Sonja; Tremont, Geoff; Turner, Jessica; Uc, Ergun; Vaccarino, Anthony; van Duijn, Eric; Van Walsem, Marleen; Vik, Stacie; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Vuletich, Elizabeth; Warner, Tom; Wasserman, Paula; Wassink, Thomas; Waterman, Elijah; Weaver, Kurt; Weir, David; Welsh, Claire; Werling-Witkoske, Chris; Wesson, Melissa; Westervelt, Holly; Weydt, Patrick; Wheelock, Vicki; Williams, Kent; Williams, Janet; Wodarski, Mary; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Wood, Jessica; Wood-Siverio, Cathy; Wu, Shuhua; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Zimbelman, Janice; Zschiegner, Roland; Aaserud, Olaf; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Andrews, Thomasin; Andrich, Jurgin; Antczak, Jakub; Arran, Natalie; Artiga, Maria J. Saiz; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Banaszkiewicz, Krysztof; di Poggio, Monica Bandettini; Bandmann, Oliver; Barbera, Miguel A.; Barker, Roger A.; Barrero, Francisco; Barth, Katrin; Bas, Jordi; Beister, Antoine; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Bertini, Elisabetta; Biunno, Ida; Bjørgo, Kathrine; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Bohlen, Stefan; Bonelli, Raphael M.; Bos, Reineke; Bourne, Colin; Bradbury, Alyson; Brockie, Peter; Brown, Felicity; Bruno, Stefania; Bryl, Anna; Buck, Andrea; Burg, Sabrina; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Burns, Peter; Burrows, Liz; Busquets, Nuria; Busse, Monica; Calopa, Matilde; Carruesco, Gemma T.; Casado, Ana Gonzalez; Catena, Judit López; Chu, Carol; Ciesielska, Anna; Clapton, Jackie; Clayton, Carole; Clenaghan, Catherine; Coelho, Miguel; Connemann, Julia; Craufurd, David; Crooks, Jenny; Cubillo, Patricia Trigo; Cubo, Esther; Curtis, Adrienne; De Michele, Giuseppe; De Nicola, A.; de Souza, Jenny; de Weert, A. Marit; de Yébenes, Justo Garcia; Dekker, M.; Descals, A. Martínez; Di Maio, Luigi; Di Pietro, Anna; Dipple, Heather; Dose, Matthias; Dumas, Eve M.; Dunnett, Stephen; Ecker, Daniel; Elifani, F.; Ellison-Rose, Lynda; Elorza, Marina D.; Eschenbach, Carolin; Evans, Carole; Fairtlough, Helen; Fannemel, Madelein; Fasano, Alfonso; Fenollar, Maria; Ferrandes, Giovanna; Ferreira, Jaoquim J.; Fillingham, Kay; Finisterra, Ana Maria; Fisher, K.; Fletcher, Amy; Foster, Jillian; Foustanos, Isabella; Frech, Fernando A.; Fullam, Robert; Fullham, Ruth; Gago, Miguel; García, RocioGarcía-Ramos; García, Socorro S.; Garrett, Carolina; Gellera, Cinzia; Gill, Paul; Ginestroni, Andrea; Golding, Charlotte; Goodman, Anna; Gørvell, Per; Grant, Janet; Griguoli, A.; Gross, Diana; Guedes, Leonor; BascuñanaGuerra, Monica; Guerra, Maria Rosalia; Guerrero, Rosa; Guia, Dolores B.; Guidubaldi, Arianna; Hallam, Caroline; Hamer, Stephanie; Hammer, Kathrin; Handley, Olivia J.; Harding, Alison; Hasholt, Lis; Hedge, Reikha; Heiberg, Arvid; Heinicke, Walburgis; Held, Christine; Hernanz, Laura Casas; Herranhof, Briggitte; Herrera, Carmen Durán; Hidding, Ute; Hiivola, Heli; Hill, Susan; Hjermind, Lena. E.; Hobson, Emma; Hoffmann, Rainer; Holl, Anna Hödl; Howard, Liz; Hunt, Sarah; Huson, Susan; Ialongo, Tamara; Idiago, Jesus Miguel R.; Illmann, Torsten; Jachinska, Katarzyna; Jacopini, Gioia; Jakobsen, Oda; Jamieson, Stuart; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Janik, Piotr; Johns, Nicola; Jones, Lesley; Jones, Una; Jurgens, Caroline K.; Kaelin, Alain; Kalbarczyk, Anna; Kershaw, Ann; Khalil, Hanan; Kieni, Janina; Klimberg, Aneta; Koivisto, Susana P.; Koppers, Kerstin; Kosinski, Christoph Michael; Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Kremer, Berry; Krysa, Wioletta; Kwiecinski, Hubert; Lahiri, Nayana; Lambeck, Johann; Lange, Herwig; Laver, Fiona; Leenders, K.L.; Levey, Jamie; Leythaeuser, Gabriele; Lezius, Franziska; Llesoy, Joan Roig; Löhle, Matthias; López, Cristobal Diez-Aja; Lorenza, Fortuna; Loria, Giovanna; Magnet, Markus; Mandich, Paola; Marchese, Roberta; Marcinkowski, Jerzy; Mariotti, Caterina; Mariscal, Natividad; Markova, Ivana; Marquard, Ralf; Martikainen, Kirsti; Martínez, Isabel Haro; Martínez-Descals, Asuncion; Martino, T.; Mason, Sarah; McKenzie, Sue; Mechi, Claudia; Mendes, Tiago; Mestre, Tiago; Middleton, Julia; Milkereit, Eva; Miller, Joanne; Miller, Julie; Minster, Sara; Möller, Jens Carsten; Monza, Daniela; Morales, Blas; Moreau, Laura V.; Moreno, Jose L. López-Sendón; Münchau, Alexander; Murch, Ann; Nielsen, Jørgen E.; Niess, Anke; Nørremølle, Anne; Novak, Marianne; O'Donovan, Kristy; Orth, Michael; Otti, Daniela; Owen, Michael; Padieu, Helene; Paganini, Marco; Painold, Annamaria; Päivärinta, Markku; Partington-Jones, Lucy; Paterski, Laurent; Paterson, Nicole; Patino, Dawn; Patton, Michael; Peinemann, Alexander; Peppa, Nadia; Perea, Maria Fuensanta Noguera; Peterson, Maria; Piacentini, Silvia; Piano, Carla; Càrdenas, Regina Pons i; Prehn, Christian; Price, Kathleen; Probst, Daniela; Quarrell, Oliver; Quiroga, Purificacion Pin; Raab, Tina; Rakowicz, Maryla; Raman, Ashok; Raymond, Lucy; Reilmann, Ralf; Reinante, Gema; Reisinger, Karin; Retterstol, Lars; Ribaï, Pascale; Riballo, Antonio V.; Ribas, Guillermo G.; Richter, Sven; Rickards, Hugh; Rinaldi, Carlo; Rissling, Ida; Ritchie, Stuart; Rivera, Susana Vázquez; Robert, Misericordia Floriach; Roca, Elvira; Romano, Silvia; Romoli, Anna Maria; Roos, Raymond A.C.; Røren, Niini; Rose, Sarah; Rosser, Elisabeth; Rosser, Anne; Rossi, Fabiana; Rothery, Jean; Rudzinska, Monika; Ruíz, Pedro J. García; Ruíz, Belan Garzon; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Saft, Carston; Salvatore, Elena; Sánchez, Vicenta; Sando, Sigrid Botne; Šašinková, Pavla; Sass, Christian; Scheibl, Monika; Schiefer, Johannes; Schlangen, Christiane; Schmidt, Simone; Schöggl, Helmut; Schrenk, Caroline; Schüpbach, Michael; Schuierer, Michele; Sebastián, Ana Rojo; Selimbegovic-Turkovic, Amina; Sempolowicz, Justyna; Silva, Mark; Sitek, Emilia; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Snowden, Julie; Soleti, Francesco; Soliveri, Paola; Sollom, Andrea; Soltan, Witold; Sorbi, Sandro; Sorensen, Sven Asger; Spadaro, Maria; Städtler, Michael; Stamm, Christiane; Steiner, Tanja; Stokholm, Jette; Stokke, Bodil; Stopford, Cheryl; Storch, Alexander; Straßburger, Katrin; Stubbe, Lars; Sulek, Anna; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Tabrizi, Sarah; Taylor, Rachel; Terol, Santiago Duran-Sindreu; Thomas, Gareth; Thompson, Jennifer; Thomson, Aileen; Tidswell, Katherine; Torres, Maria M. Antequera; Toscano, Jean; Townhill, Jenny; Trautmann, Sonja; Tucci, Tecla; Tuuha, Katri; Uhrova, Tereza; Valadas, Anabela; van Hout, Monique S.E.; van Oostrom, J.C.H.; van Vugt, Jeroen P.P.; vanm, Walsem Marleen R.; Vandenberghe, Wim; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Vergara, Mar Ruiz; Verstappen, C.C.P.; Verstraelen, Nichola; Viladrich, Celia Mareca; Villanueva, Clara; Wahlström, Jan; Warner, Thomas; Wehus, Raghild; Weindl, Adolf; Werner, Cornelius J.; Westmoreland, Leann; Weydt, Patrick; Wiedemann, Alexandra; Wild, Edward; Wild, Sue; Witjes-Ané, Marie-Noelle; Witkowski, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Magdalena; Wolz, Martin; Wolz, Annett; Wright, Jan; Yardumian, Pam; Yates, Shona; Yudina, Elizaveta; Zaremba, Jacek; Zaugg, Sabine W.; Zdzienicka, Elzbieta; Zielonka, Daniel; Zielonka, Euginiusz; Zinzi, Paola; Zittel, Simone; Zucker, Birgrit; Adams, John; Agarwal, Pinky; Antonijevic, Irina; Beck, Christopher; Chiu, Edmond; Churchyard, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Dorsey, Ray; Drazinic, Carolyn; Dubinsky, Richard; Duff, Kevin; Factor, Stewart; Foroud, Tatiana; Furtado, Sarah; Giuliano, Joe; Greenamyre, Timothy; Higgins, Don; Jankovic, Joseph; Jennings, Dana; Kang, Un Jung; Kostyk, Sandra; Kumar, Rajeev; Leavitt, Blair; LeDoux, Mark; Mallonee, William; Marshall, Frederick; Mohlo, Eric; Morgan, John; Oakes, David; Panegyres, Peter; Panisset, Michel; Perlman, Susan; Perlmutter, Joel; Quaid, Kimberly; Raymond, Lynn; Revilla, Fredy; Robertson, Suzanne; Robottom, Bradley; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Scott, Burton; Shannon, Kathleen; Shoulson, Ira; Singer, Carlos; Tabbal, Samer; Testa, Claudia; van, Kammen Dan; Vetter, Louise; Walker, Francis; Warner, John; Weiner, illiam; Wheelock, Vicki; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Barton, Stacey; Broyles, Janice; Clouse, Ronda; Coleman, Allison; Davis, Robert; Decolongon, Joji; DeLaRosa, Jeanene; Deuel, Lisa; Dietrich, Susan; Dubinsky, Hilary; Eaton, Ken; Erickson, Diane; Fitzpatrick, Mary Jane; Frucht, Steven; Gartner, Maureen; Goldstein, Jody; Griffith, Jane; Hickey, Charlyne; Hunt, Victoria; Jaglin, Jeana; Klimek, Mary Lou; Lindsay, Pat; Louis, Elan; Loy, Clemet; Lucarelli, Nancy; Malarick, Keith; Martin, Amanda; McInnis, Robert; Moskowitz, Carol; Muratori, Lisa; Nucifora, Frederick; O'Neill, Christine; Palao, Alicia; Peavy, Guerry; Quesada, Monica; Schmidt, Amy; Segro, Vicki; Sperin, Elaine; Suter, Greg; Tanev, Kalo; Tempkin, Teresa; Thiede, Curtis; Wasserman, Paula; Welsh, Claire; Wesson, Melissa; Zauber, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Age at onset of diagnostic motor manifestations in Huntington disease (HD) is strongly correlated with an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat. The length of the normal CAG repeat allele has been reported also to influence age at onset, in interaction with the expanded allele. Due to profound implications for disease mechanism and modification, we tested whether the normal allele, interaction between the expanded and normal alleles, or presence of a second expanded allele affects age at onset of HD motor signs. Methods: We modeled natural log-transformed age at onset as a function of CAG repeat lengths of expanded and normal alleles and their interaction by linear regression. Results: An apparently significant effect of interaction on age at motor onset among 4,068 subjects was dependent on a single outlier data point. A rigorous statistical analysis with a well-behaved dataset that conformed to the fundamental assumptions of linear regression (e.g., constant variance and normally distributed error) revealed significance only for the expanded CAG repeat, with no effect of the normal CAG repeat. Ten subjects with 2 expanded alleles showed an age at motor onset consistent with the length of the larger expanded allele. Conclusions: Normal allele CAG length, interaction between expanded and normal alleles, and presence of a second expanded allele do not influence age at onset of motor manifestations, indicating that the rate of HD pathogenesis leading to motor diagnosis is determined by a completely dominant action of the longest expanded allele and as yet unidentified genetic or environmental factors. Neurology® 2012;78:690–695 PMID:22323755

  9. Large C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansions Are Seen in Multiple Neurodegenerative Syndromes and Are More Frequent Than Expected in the UK Population

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Jon; Poulter, Mark; Hensman, Davina; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Mahoney, Colin J.; Adamson, Gary; Campbell, Tracy; Uphill, James; Borg, Aaron; Fratta, Pietro; Orrell, Richard W.; Malaspina, Andrea; Rowe, James; Brown, Jeremy; Hodges, John; Sidle, Katie; Polke, James M.; Houlden, Henry; Schott, Jonathan M.; Fox, Nick C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Hardy, John; Warren, Jason D.; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Understanding the disease mechanisms and a method for clinical diagnostic genotyping have been hindered because of the difficulty in estimating the expansion size. We found 96 repeat-primed PCR expansions: 85/2,974 in six neurodegenerative diseases cohorts (FTLD, ALS, Alzheimer disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Huntington disease-like syndrome, and other nonspecific neurodegenerative disease syndromes) and 11/7,579 (0.15%) in UK 1958 birth cohort (58BC) controls. With the use of a modified Southern blot method, the estimated expansion range (smear maxima) in cases was 800–4,400. Similarly, large expansions were detected in the population controls. Differences in expansion size and morphology were detected between DNA samples from tissue and cell lines. Of those in whom repeat-primed PCR detected expansions, 68/69 were confirmed by blotting, which was specific for greater than 275 repeats. We found that morphology in the expansion smear varied among different individuals and among different brain regions in the same individual. Expansion size correlated with age at clinical onset but did not differ between diagnostic groups. Evidence of instability of repeat size in control families, as well as neighboring SNP and microsatellite analyses, support multiple expansion events on the same haplotype background. Our method of estimating the size of large expansions has potential clinical utility. C9orf72-related disease might mimic several neurodegenerative disorders and, with potentially 90,000 carriers in the United Kingdom, is more common than previously realized. PMID:23434116

  10. Semi-automated quantification of C9orf72 expansion size reveals inverse correlation between hexanucleotide repeat number and disease duration in frontotemporal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Suh, EunRan; Lee, Edward B.; Neal, Donald; Wood, Elisabeth M.; Toledo, Jon B.; Rennert, Lior; Irwin, David J.; McMillan, Corey T.; Krock, Bryan; Elman, Lauren B.; McCluskey, Leo F.; Grossman, Murray; Xie, Sharon X.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion (C9orf72 expansion) size in peripheral DNA was associated with clinical differences in frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) linked to C9orf72 repeat expansion mutations. A novel quantification workflow was developed to measure C9orf72 expansion size by Southern blot densitometry in a cross-sectional cohort of C9orf72 expansion carriers with FTD (n= 39), ALS (n= 33), both (n=35), or who are unaffected (n= 21). Multivariate linear regressions were performed to assess whether C9orf72 expansion size from peripheral DNA was associated with clinical phenotype, age of disease onset, disease duration and age at death. Mode values of C9orf72 expansion size were significantly shorter in FTD compared to ALS (p=0.0001) but were not associated with age at onset in either FTD or ALS. A multivariate regression model correcting for patient’s age at DNA collection and disease phenotype revealed that C9orf72 expansion size is significantly associated with shorter disease duration (p=0.0107) for individuals with FTD, but not with ALS. Despite considerable somatic instability of the C9orf72 expansion, semi-automated expansion size measurements demonstrated an inverse relationship between C9orf72 expansion size and disease duration in patients with FTD. Our finding suggests that C9orf72 repeat size may be a molecular disease modifier in FTD linked to hexanucleotide repeat expansion. PMID:26022924

  11. Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for FTD/ALS Caused by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Stephanie A.; Douglas, Andrew G. L.; Varela, Miguel A.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and lethal disease of motor neuron degeneration, leading to paralysis of voluntary muscles and death by respiratory failure within five years of onset. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterised by degeneration of frontal and temporal lobes, leading to changes in personality, behaviour, and language, culminating in death within 5–10 years. Both of these diseases form a clinical, pathological, and genetic continuum of diseases, and this link has become clearer recently with the discovery of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene that causes the FTD/ALS spectrum, that is, c9FTD/ALS. Two basic mechanisms have been proposed as being potentially responsible for c9FTD/ALS: loss-of-function of the protein encoded by this gene (associated with aberrant DNA methylation) and gain of function through the formation of RNA foci or protein aggregates. These diseases currently lack any cure or effective treatment. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are modified nucleic acids that are able to silence targeted mRNAs or perform splice modulation, and the fact that they have proved efficient in repeat expansion diseases including myotonic dystrophy type 1 makes them ideal candidates for c9FTD/ALS therapy. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms and challenges for developing oligonucleotide-based therapy for c9FTD/ALS. PMID:24349764

  12. Oligonucleotide-Based Therapy for FTD/ALS Caused by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Stephanie A; Douglas, Andrew G L; Varela, Miguel A; Wood, Matthew J A; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and lethal disease of motor neuron degeneration, leading to paralysis of voluntary muscles and death by respiratory failure within five years of onset. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is characterised by degeneration of frontal and temporal lobes, leading to changes in personality, behaviour, and language, culminating in death within 5-10 years. Both of these diseases form a clinical, pathological, and genetic continuum of diseases, and this link has become clearer recently with the discovery of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene that causes the FTD/ALS spectrum, that is, c9FTD/ALS. Two basic mechanisms have been proposed as being potentially responsible for c9FTD/ALS: loss-of-function of the protein encoded by this gene (associated with aberrant DNA methylation) and gain of function through the formation of RNA foci or protein aggregates. These diseases currently lack any cure or effective treatment. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are modified nucleic acids that are able to silence targeted mRNAs or perform splice modulation, and the fact that they have proved efficient in repeat expansion diseases including myotonic dystrophy type 1 makes them ideal candidates for c9FTD/ALS therapy. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms and challenges for developing oligonucleotide-based therapy for c9FTD/ALS.

  13. A pathogenic progranulin mutation and C9orf72 repeat expansion in a family with frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lashley, Tammaryn; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Mahoney, Colin; Gordon, Elizabeth; Beck, Jon; Mead, Simon; Warren, Jason; Rossor, Martin; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Aims Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is the second most common form of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance is present in around 25–50% of FTLD cases indicating a strong genetic component. Major pathogenic mutations of FTLD have been demonstrated independently in the progranulin (GRN) gene and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. In this study we present a family that have been identified as carrying both a GRN Cys31fs mutation and the C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansion repeat. Methods In the present study we describe the clinical and genetic details of family members and pathological features of two family members that have come to post-mortem. Results The mean age at disease onset was 57 years (48–61 years) and mean duration 4 years (2–7 years). The most common presenting syndrome was behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia. Brain imaging from available cases showed a symmetrical pattern of atrophy particularly affecting the frontal and temporal lobes. Pathologically two cases were classified as FTLD-TDP type A with TDP-43 positive inclusions, with additional p62-positive ‘star-like’ inclusions found in the hippocampal formation and cerebellum. Conclusions The type and distribution of the pathological lesions in these two cases were in keeping with FTLD cases carrying only the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat. However the driving force of the pathological process may be either pathogenic mutation or a combination of both converging on a singular mechanism. PMID:24286341

  14. Expansion of tandem repeats in sea anemone Nematostella vectensis proteome: A source for gene novelty?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The complete proteome of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, provides insights into gene invention dating back to the Cnidarian-Bilaterian ancestor. With the addition of the complete proteomes of Hydra magnipapillata and Monosiga brevicollis, the investigation of proteins having unique features in early metazoan life has become practical. We focused on the properties and the evolutionary trends of tandem repeat (TR) sequences in Cnidaria proteomes. Results We found that 11-16% of N. vectensis proteins contain tandem repeats. Most TRs cover 150 amino acid segments that are comprised of basic units of 5-20 amino acids. In total, the N. Vectensis proteome has about 3300 unique TR-units, but only a small fraction of them are shared with H. magnipapillata, M. brevicollis, or mammalian proteomes. The overall abundance of these TRs stands out relative to that of 14 proteomes representing the diversity among eukaryotes and within the metazoan world. TR-units are characterized by a unique composition of amino acids, with cysteine and histidine being over-represented. Structurally, most TR-segments are associated with coiled and disordered regions. Interestingly, 80% of the TR-segments can be read in more than one open reading frame. For over 100 of them, translation of the alternative frames would result in long proteins. Most domain families that are characterized as repeats in eukaryotes are found in the TR-proteomes from Nematostella and Hydra. Conclusions While most TR-proteins have originated from prediction tools and are still awaiting experimental validations, supportive evidence exists for hundreds of TR-units in Nematostella. The existence of TR-proteins in early metazoan life may have served as a robust mode for novel genes with previously overlooked structural and functional characteristics. PMID:20003297

  15. Toxic PRn poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9orf72 repeat expansion block nuclear import and export

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kevin Y.; Mori, Eiichiro; Nizami, Zehra F.; Lin, Yi; Kato, Masato; Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju C.; Ding, Ming; Yu, Yonghao; Gall, Joseph G.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    The toxic proline:arginine (PRn) poly-dipeptide encoded by the (GGGGCC)n repeat expansion in the C9orf72 form of heritable amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) binds to the central channel of the nuclear pore and inhibits the movement of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. The PRn poly-dipeptide binds to polymeric forms of the phenylalanine:glycine (FG) repeat domain, which is shared by several proteins of the nuclear pore complex, including those in the central channel. A method of chemical footprinting was used to characterize labile, cross-β polymers formed from the FG domain of the Nup54 protein. Mutations within the footprinted region of Nup54 polymers blocked both polymerization and binding by the PRn poly-dipeptide. The aliphatic alcohol 1,6-hexanediol melted FG domain polymers in vitro and reversed PRn-mediated enhancement of the nuclear pore permeability barrier. These data suggest that toxicity of the PRn poly-dipeptide results in part from its ability to lock the FG repeats of nuclear pore proteins in the polymerized state. Our study offers a mechanistic interpretation of PRn poly-dipeptide toxicity in the context of a prominent form of ALS. PMID:28069952

  16. X inactivation plays a major role in the gender bias in somatic expansion in a mouse model of the fragile X-related disorders: implications for the mechanism of repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Adihe Lokanga, Rachel; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Entezam, Ali; Usdin, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Fragile X-related disorders are X-linked disorders resulting from the inheritance of FMR1 alleles with >54 CGG/CCG repeats in their 5′ UTR. The repeats expand both somatically and on intergenerational transmission and increased repeat numbers are associated with increased risk of disease and increased risk of further expansion. The mechanism responsible for expansion is unknown. Here, we show in a knockin mouse model of these disorders that somatic expansion is much less common in females than in males. We show that this is due in large part to the fact that expansions occur only when the repeat is on the active X chromosome. However, even when this is taken into account, expansions in females are still less common than expected. This additional gender effect is not due to a protective effect of estrogen, a deleterious effect of testosterone or to differences in the expression of the Fmr1 gene or a variety of X-linked and autosomal DNA repair genes. However, our data do suggest that a higher level of expression of genes that protect against oxidative damage in females may contribute to their lower levels of expansion. Whatever the basis, our data suggest that the risk for somatic expansion may be lower in women than it is in men. This could help explain the reduced penetrance of some aspects of disease pathology in women. The fact that expansion only occurs when the Fmr1 allele is on the active X chromosome has important implications for the mechanism of repeat expansion. PMID:24858908

  17. X inactivation plays a major role in the gender bias in somatic expansion in a mouse model of the fragile X-related disorders: implications for the mechanism of repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Adihe Lokanga, Rachel; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Entezam, Ali; Usdin, Karen

    2014-09-15

    The Fragile X-related disorders are X-linked disorders resulting from the inheritance of FMR1 alleles with >54 CGG/CCG repeats in their 5' UTR. The repeats expand both somatically and on intergenerational transmission and increased repeat numbers are associated with increased risk of disease and increased risk of further expansion. The mechanism responsible for expansion is unknown. Here, we show in a knockin mouse model of these disorders that somatic expansion is much less common in females than in males. We show that this is due in large part to the fact that expansions occur only when the repeat is on the active X chromosome. However, even when this is taken into account, expansions in females are still less common than expected. This additional gender effect is not due to a protective effect of estrogen, a deleterious effect of testosterone or to differences in the expression of the Fmr1 gene or a variety of X-linked and autosomal DNA repair genes. However, our data do suggest that a higher level of expression of genes that protect against oxidative damage in females may contribute to their lower levels of expansion. Whatever the basis, our data suggest that the risk for somatic expansion may be lower in women than it is in men. This could help explain the reduced penetrance of some aspects of disease pathology in women. The fact that expansion only occurs when the Fmr1 allele is on the active X chromosome has important implications for the mechanism of repeat expansion.

  18. Key Role of Amino Acid Repeat Expansions in the Functional Diversification of Duplicated Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Radó-Trilla, Núria; Arató, Krisztina; Pegueroles, Cinta; Raya, Alicia; de la Luna, Susana; Albà, M. Mar

    2015-01-01

    The high regulatory complexity of vertebrates has been related to two rounds of whole genome duplication (2R-WGD) that occurred before the divergence of the major vertebrate groups. Following these events, many developmental transcription factors (TFs) were retained in multiple copies and subsequently specialized in diverse functions, whereas others reverted to their singleton state. TFs are known to be generally rich in amino acid repeats or low-complexity regions (LCRs), such as polyalanine or polyglutamine runs, which can evolve rapidly and potentially influence the transcriptional activity of the protein. Here we test the hypothesis that LCRs have played a major role in the diversification of TF gene duplicates. We find that nearly half of the TF gene families originated during the 2R-WGD contains LCRs. The number of gene duplicates with LCRs is 155 out of 550 analyzed (28%), about twice as many as the number of single copy genes with LCRs (15 out of 115, 13%). In addition, duplicated TFs preferentially accumulate certain LCR types, the most prominent of which are alanine repeats. We experimentally test the role of alanine-rich LCRs in two different TF gene families, PHOX2A/PHOX2B and LHX2/LHX9. In both cases, the presence of the alanine-rich LCR in one of the copies (PHOX2B and LHX2) significantly increases the capacity of the TF to activate transcription. Taken together, the results provide strong evidence that LCRs are important driving forces of evolutionary change in duplicated genes. PMID:25931513

  19. Analysis of Primate Genomic Variation Reveals a Repeat-Driven Expansion of the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ge; Program, NISC Comparative Sequencing; Zhao, Shaying; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Alkan, Can; Tuzun, Eray; Green, Eric D.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a detailed analysis of both single-nucleotide and large insertion/deletion events based on large-scale comparison of 10.6 Mb of genomic sequence from lemur, baboon, and chimpanzee to human. Using a human genomic reference, optimal global alignments were constructed from large (>50-kb) genomic sequence clones. These alignments were examined for the pattern, frequency, and nature of mutational events. Whereas rates of single-nucleotide substitution remain relatively constant (1–2 × 10−9 substitutions/site/year), rates of retrotransposition vary radically among different primate lineages. These differences have lead to a 15%–20% expansion of human genome size over the last 50 million years of primate evolution, 90% of it due to new retroposon insertions. Orthologous comparisons with the chimpanzee suggest that the human genome continues to significantly expand due to shifts in retrotransposition activity. Assuming that the primate genome sequence we have sampled is representative, we estimate that human euchromatin has expanded 30 Mb and 550 Mb compared to the primate genomes of chimpanzee and lemur, respectively. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12618366

  20. Drosophila melanogaster As a Model Organism to Study RNA Toxicity of Repeat Expansion-Associated Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Alex C.; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2017-01-01

    For nearly a century, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has proven to be a valuable tool in our understanding of fundamental biological processes, and has empowered our discoveries, particularly in the field of neuroscience. In recent years, Drosophila has emerged as a model organism for human neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. In this review, we highlight a number of recent studies that utilized the Drosophila model to study repeat-expansion associated diseases (READs), such as polyglutamine diseases, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2), and C9ORF72-associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (C9-ALS/FTD). Discoveries regarding the possible mechanisms of RNA toxicity will be focused here. These studies demonstrate Drosophila as an excellent in vivo model system that can reveal novel mechanistic insights into human disorders, providing the foundation for translational research and therapeutic development. PMID:28377694

  1. Revisiting genotype-phenotype overlap in neurogenetics: triplet-repeat expansions mimicking spastic paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Quintáns, Beatriz; Ros, Raquel; Ampuero, Israel; Yáñez, Zuleima; Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; de Yébenes, Justo García; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders, characterized primarily by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSPs are caused by mutations in multiple genes (at least 48 loci and 28 causative genes). The clinical spectrum of HSPs is wide and important differences have been reported between patients with distinct mutations in the same gene, or even between different family members bearing the same mutation. Many patients with HSP present clinical deficits related to the involvement of neuronal systems other than corticospinal tracts, namely, peripheral nerves, sensory, or cerebellar pathways. These cases may be difficult to differentiate from other neurological diseases (e.g., hereditary ataxias), also genetically and clinically heterogeneous. As an illustration of how overlapping this genotype-phenotype relationship is, and the difficulties that it brings upon the development of neurogenetic algorithms and databases, we review the main clinical and genetic features of HSPs, and summarize reports on cases of triplet-repeat spinocerebellar ataxias that can mimic HSP phenotypes. This complex scenario makes the necessity of high-quality, curated mutation databases even more urgent, in order to develop adequate diagnostic guidelines, correct interpretation of genetic testing, and appropriate genetic counseling. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identifying proteins that bind to specific RNAs - focus on simple repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jazurek, Magdalena; Ciesiolka, Adam; Starega-Roslan, Julia; Bilinska, Katarzyna; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA–protein complexes play a central role in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes, such as mRNA splicing, localization, translation and degradation. The misregulation of these interactions can cause a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, many strategies have been developed to comprehensively analyze these complex and highly dynamic RNA–protein networks. Extensive efforts have been made to purify in vivo-assembled RNA–protein complexes. In this review, we focused on commonly used RNA-centric approaches that involve mass spectrometry, which are powerful tools for identifying proteins bound to a given RNA. We present various RNA capture strategies that primarily depend on whether the RNA of interest is modified. Moreover, we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of in vitro and in vivo approaches. Furthermore, we describe recent advances in quantitative proteomics as well as the methods that are most commonly used to validate robust mass spectrometry data. Finally, we present approaches that have successfully identified expanded repeat-binding proteins, which present abnormal RNA–protein interactions that result in the development of many neurological diseases. PMID:27625393

  3. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  4. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew GL; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew JA

    2016-01-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets. PMID:25990798

  5. Comparative phylogeography of woodland reptiles in California: repeated patterns of cladogenesis and population expansion.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Chris R; Spicer, Greg S

    2006-07-01

    The ultimate goal of comparative phylogeographical analyses is to infer processes of diversification from contemporary geographical patterns of genetic diversity. When such studies are employed across diverse groups in an array of communities, it may be difficult to discover common evolutionary and ecological processes associated with diversification. In order to identify taxa that have responded in a similar fashion to historical events, we conducted comparative phylogeographical analyses on a phylogenetically and ecologically limited set of taxa. Here, we focus on a group of squamate reptiles (snakes and lizards) that share similar ecological requirements and generally occupy the same communities in the western USA. At a gross level, deep genetic division in Contia tenuis, Diadophis punctatus, Elgaria multicarinata, the Charina bottae complex, and Lampropeltis zonata are often concordant in the Transverse Ranges, the Monterey Bay and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region, and the southern Sierra Nevada in California. Molecular clock estimates suggest that major phyletic breaks within many of these taxa roughly coincide temporally, and may correspond to important geological events. Furthermore, significant congruence between the phylogeographies of E. multicarinata and L. zonata suggests that the succession of vicariance and dispersal events in these species progressed in concert. Such congruence suggests that E. multicarinata and L. zonata have occupied the same communities through time. However, across our entire multi-taxon data set, the sequence of branching events rarely match between sympatric taxa, indicating the importance of subtle differences in life history features as well as random processes in creating unique genetic patterns. Lastly, coalescent and noncoalescent estimates of population expansion suggest that populations in the more southerly distributed clades of C. tenuis, D. punctatus, E. multicarinata, and L. zonata have been stable, while

  6. Altered spacing of promoter elements due to the dodecamer repeat expansion contributes to reduced expression of the cystatin B gene in EPM1.

    PubMed

    Lalioti, M D; Scott, H S; Antonarakis, S E

    1999-09-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of the Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1; MIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by seizures, myoclonus and progression to cerebellar ataxia. EPM1 arises due to mutations in the cystatin B (CSTB) gene which encodes a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. Only a minority of EPM1 alleles carry point mutations, while the majority contain large expansions of the dodecamer CCCCGCCCCGCG repeat which is present at two to three copies in normal individuals. The dodecamer repeat is located in the 5' flanking region of the CSTB gene, presumably in its promoter. The pathological repeat expansion results in a reduction in CSTB mRNA, which may be cell specific. To elucidate the mechanism of this reduction of gene expression, we have studied the putative CSTB promoter in vitro. A 3.8 kb fragment, containing the putative promoter with a 600 bp repeat expansion, showed a 2- to 4-fold reduction in luciferase activity compared with an identical fragment with a normal repeat; this reduction was observed only in certain cell types. Introduction of heterologous DNA fragments of 730 and 1000 bp into the normal promoter, instead of the repeat expansion, showed similarly reduced activity. Terminal deletions of the promoter implicate a putative AP-1 binding site, upstream of the repeat, in CSTB transcription activation. We propose that a novel mechanism of pathogenesis, the altering of the spacing of transcription factor binding sites from each other and/or the transcription initiation site due to repeat expansion, is among the causes of reduction in CSTB expression and thus EPM1.

  7. Tau Pathology in Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Kevin F.; Murray, Melissa E.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Liesinger, Amanda M.; Baker, Matthew C.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    An expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in C9ORF72 is the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with TDP-43 pathology (FTLD-TDP). In addition to TDP-43-positive neuronal and glial inclusions, C9ORF72-linked FTLD-TDP has characteristic TDP-43-negative neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as dystrophic neurites in the hippocampus and cerebellum. These lesions are immunopositive for ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins, such as sequestosome-1/p62 and ubiquilin-2. Studies examining the frequency of the C9ORF72 mutation in clinically probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have found a small proportion of AD cases with the mutation. This prompted us to systematically explore the frequency of Alzheimer type pathology in a series of 17 FTLD-TDP cases with mutations in C9ORF72 (FTLD-C9ORF72). We identified 4 cases with sufficient Alzheimer type pathology to meet criteria for intermediate-to-high likelihood AD. We compared AD pathology in the 17 FTLD-C9ORF72 to 13 cases of FTLD-TDP linked to mutations in the gene for progranulin (FTLD-GRN) and 36 cases of sporadic FTLD (sFTLD). FTLD-C9ORF72 cases had higher Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage than FTLD-GRN. Increased tau pathology in FTLD-C9ORF72 was assessed with thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy-based neurofibrillary tangle counts and with image analysis of tau burden in temporal cortex and hippocampus. FTLD-C9ORF72 had significantly more neurofibrillary tangles and higher tau burden compared with FTLD-GRN. The differences were most marked in limbic regions. On the other hand, sFTLD and FTLD-C9ORF72 had a similar burden of tau pathology. These results suggest FTLD-C9ORF72 has increased propensity for tau pathology compared to FTLD-GRN, but not sFTLD. The accumulation of tau as well as lesions immunoreactive for ubiquitin and ubiquitin binding proteins (p62 and ubiquilin-2) suggests that mutations in C9ORF72 may involve

  8. Clinical and neuropathologic heterogeneity of c9FTD/ALS associated with hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Melissa E.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Duara, Ranjan; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ferman, Tanis; Josephs, Keith A.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are part of a disease spectrum associated with TDP-43 pathology. Strong evidence supporting this is the existence of kindreds with family members affected by FTD, ALS or mixed features of FTD and ALS, referred to as FTD-MND. Some of these families have linkage to chromosome 9, with hexanucleotide expansion mutation in a noncoding region of C9ORF72. Discovery of the mutation defines c9FTD/ALS. Prior to discovery of mutations in C9ORF72, it was assumed that TDP-43 pathology in c9FTD/ALS was uniform. In this study, we examined the neuropathology and clinical features of 20 cases of c9FTD/ALS from a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders. Included are six patients clinically diagnosed with ALS, eight FTD, one FTD-MND and four Alzheimer type dementia. Clinical information was unavailable for one patient. Pathologically, the cases all had TDP-43 pathology, but there were three major pathologic groups: ALS, FTLD-MND and FTLD-TDP. The ALS cases were morphologically similar to typical sporadic ALS with almost no extramotor TDP-43 pathology; all had oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions. The FTLD-MND showed predominantly Mackenzie Type 3 TDP-43 pathology, and all had ALS-like pathology in motor neurons, but more extensive extramotor pathology, with oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions and infrequent hippocampal sclerosis. The FTLD-TDP cases had several features similar to FTLD-TDP due to mutations in the gene for progranulin, including Mackenzie Type 1 TDP-43 pathology with neuronal intranuclear inclusions and hippocampal sclerosis. FTLD-TDP patients were older and some were thought to have Alzheimer type dementia. In addition to the FTD and ALS clinical presentations, the present study shows that c9FTD/ALS can have other presentations, possibly related to age of onset and presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Moreover, there is pathologic heterogeneity not only between ALS and FTLD, but within the

  9. Persistent heteroplasmy of a mutation in the human mtDNA control region: hypermutation as an apparent consequence of simple-repeat expansion/contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; Smejkal, C B

    2000-01-01

    In the genealogical and phylogenetic analyses that are reported here, we obtained evidence for an unusual pattern of mutation/reversion in the human mitochondrial genome. The cumulative results indicate that, when there is a T-->C polymorphism at nt 16189 and a C-->T substitution at nt 16192, there is an extremely high rate of reversion (hypermutation) at the latter site. The apparent reversion rate is sufficiently high that there is persistent heteroplasmy at nt 16192 in maternal lineages and at the phylogenetic level, a situation that is similar to that observed for the rapid expansion/contraction of simple repeats within the control region. This is the first specific instance in which the mutation frequency at one site in the D-loop is markedly influenced by the local sequence "context." The 16189 T-->C polymorphism lengthens a (C:G)n simple repeat, which then undergoes expansion and contraction, probably through replication slippage. This proclivity toward expansion/contraction is more pronounced when there is a C residue, rather than a T, at nt 16192. The high T-->C reversion frequency at nt 16192 apparently is the result of polymerase misincorporation or slippage during replication, the same mechanism that also causes the expansion/contraction of this simple-repeat sequence. In addition to the first analysis of this mitochondrial hypermutation process, these results also yield mechanistic insights into the expansion/contraction of simple-repeat sequences in mtDNA. PMID:10762545

  10. DNA deamination enables direct PCR amplification of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene-associated dodecamer repeat expansion in myoclonus epilepsy type Unverricht-Lundborg.

    PubMed

    Weinhaeusel, Andreas; Morris, Michael A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Haas, Oskar A

    2003-11-01

    The Unverricht-Lundborg type of progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the dysfunction of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene product. In the vast majority of affected cases, mRNA transcription is impaired by a biallelic expansion of a dodecamer repeat within the 5'-untranslated region of the respective gene. Since this minisatellite contains exclusively G and C nucleotides, direct PCR analysis of allele expansion is extremely difficult and error prone. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a PCR assay that is based on the deamination of the DNA prior to amplification. We have developed a method based on PCR after DNA deamination of the GC-rich repeat region, which improves the PCR condition to such an extent that we were not only able to reliably amplify expanded alleles of affected individuals (homozygotes and compound heterozygotes), but also the two alleles of full mutation carriers, whose analysis is particularly difficult because of PCR bias and heteroduplex formation between the two alleles. We used promoter- and repeat-specific primer combinations to investigate whether dodecamer repeat expansion concurs with de novo methylation of the CSTB gene promoter in a similar fashion to other repeat expansion syndromes. We confirmed previous evidence obtained by HpaII digestion and Southern blot analysis that both the promoter and the repeat regions are unmethylated, in both healthy and affected individuals. Thus, in contrast to certain trinucleotide repeat expansion-associated diseases, such as fragile X syndrome (FRAXA) and myotonic dystrophy, methylation analyses can not be utilized for indirect diagnostic testing.

  11. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  12. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  13. The GAA triplet-repeat expansion in Friedreich ataxia interferes with transcription and may be associated with an unusual DNA structure.

    PubMed

    Bidichandani, S I; Ashizawa, T; Patel, P I

    1998-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disease is the most common inherited ataxia. The vast majority of patients are homozygous for an abnormal expansion of a polymorphic GAA triplet repeat in the first intron of the X25 gene, which encodes a mitochondrial protein, frataxin. Cellular degeneration in FRDA may be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly due to abnormal iron accumulation, as observed in yeast cells deficient for a frataxin homologue. Using RNase protection assays, we have shown that patients homozygous for the expansion have a marked deficiency of mature X25 mRNA. The mechanism(s) by which the intronic GAA triplet expansion results in this reduction of X25 mRNA is presently unknown. No evidence was found for abnormal splicing of the expanded intron 1. Using cloned repeat sequences from FRDA patients, we show that the GAA repeat per se interferes with in vitro transcription in a length-dependent manner, with both prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. This interference was most pronounced in the physiological orientation of transcription, when synthesis of the GAA-rich transcript was attempted. These results are consistent with the observed negative correlation between triplet-repeat length and the age at onset of disease. Using in vitro chemical probing strategies, we also show that the GAA triplet repeat adopts an unusual DNA structure, demonstrated by hyperreactivity to osmium tetroxide, hydroxylamine, and diethyl pyrocarbonate. These results raise the possibility that the GAA triplet-repeat expansion may result in an unusual yet stable DNA structure that interferes with transcription, ultimately leading to a cellular deficiency of frataxin.

  14. A CGG-repeat expansion mutation in ZNF713 causes FRA7A: association with autistic spectrum disorder in two families.

    PubMed

    Metsu, Sofie; Rainger, Jacqueline K; Debacker, Kim; Bernhard, Birgitta; Rooms, Liesbeth; Grafodatskaya, Daria; Weksberg, Rosanna; Fombonne, Eric; Taylor, Martin S; Scherer, Stephen W; Kooy, R Frank; FitzPatrick, David R

    2014-11-01

    We report de novo occurrence of the 7p11.2 folate-sensitive fragile site FRA7A in a male with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) due to a CGG-repeat expansion mutation (∼450 repeats) in a 5' intron of ZNF713. This expanded allele showed hypermethylation of the adjacent CpG island with reduced ZNF713 expression observed in a proband-derived lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). His unaffected mother carried an unmethylated premutation (85 repeats). This CGG-repeat showed length polymorphism in control samples (five to 22 repeats). In a second unrelated family, three siblings with ASD and their unaffected father were found to carry FRA7A premutations, which were partially or mosaically methylated. In one of the affected siblings, mitotic instability of the premutation was observed. ZNF713 expression in LCLs in this family was increased in three of these four premutation carriers. A firm link cannot yet be established between ASD and the repeat expansion mutation but plausible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Gain of toxicity from ALS/FTD-linked repeat expansions in C9ORF72 is alleviated by antisense oligonucleotides targeting GGGGCC-containing RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Gendron, Tania F.; Saberi, Shahram; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Seelman, Amanda; Stauffer, Jennifer E.; Jafar-nejad, Paymaan; Drenner, Kevin; Schulte, Derek; Chun, Seung; Sun, Shuying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Myers, Brian; Engelhardt, Jeffery; Katz, Melanie; Baughn, Michael; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Marsala, Martin; Watt, Andy; Heyser, Charles J; Ard, M. Colin; De Muynck, Louis; Daughrity, Lillian M.; Swing, Deborah A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Jung, Chris J.; Delpoux, Arnaud; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Hedrick, Stephen M.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Edbauer, Dieter; Van Damme, Philip; Petrucelli, Leonard; Shaw, Christopher E.; Bennett, C. Frank; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Cleveland, Don W.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are the most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Disease mechanisms were evaluated in mice expressing C9ORF72 RNAs with up to 450 GGGGCC repeats or with one or both C9orf72 alleles inactivated. Chronic 50% reduction of C9ORF72 did not provoke disease, while its absence produced splenomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and mild social interaction deficits, but no motor dysfunction. Hexanucleotide expansions caused age-, repeat length- and expression level-dependent accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins synthesized by AUG-independent translation, accompanied by loss of hippocampal neurons, increased anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. Single dose injection of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target repeat-containing RNAs but preserve levels of mRNAs encoding C9ORF72 produced sustained reductions in RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins, and ameliorated behavioral deficits. These efforts identify gain-of-toxicity as a central disease mechanism caused by repeat-expanded C9ORF72 and establish the feasibility of ASO-mediated therapy. PMID:27112497

  16. Gain of Toxicity from ALS/FTD-Linked Repeat Expansions in C9ORF72 Is Alleviated by Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting GGGGCC-Containing RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhu, Qiang; Gendron, Tania F; Saberi, Shahram; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Seelman, Amanda; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Drenner, Kevin; Schulte, Derek; Chun, Seung; Sun, Shuying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Myers, Brian; Engelhardt, Jeffery; Katz, Melanie; Baughn, Michael; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Marsala, Martin; Watt, Andy; Heyser, Charles J; Ard, M Colin; De Muynck, Louis; Daughrity, Lillian M; Swing, Deborah A; Tessarollo, Lino; Jung, Chris J; Delpoux, Arnaud; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Hedrick, Stephen M; de Jong, Pieter J; Edbauer, Dieter; Van Damme, Philip; Petrucelli, Leonard; Shaw, Christopher E; Bennett, C Frank; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Ravits, John; Rigo, Frank; Cleveland, Don W; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde

    2016-05-04

    Hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are the most frequent genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Disease mechanisms were evaluated in mice expressing C9ORF72 RNAs with up to 450 GGGGCC repeats or with one or both C9orf72 alleles inactivated. Chronic 50% reduction of C9ORF72 did not provoke disease, while its absence produced splenomegaly, enlarged lymph nodes, and mild social interaction deficits, but not motor dysfunction. Hexanucleotide expansions caused age-, repeat-length-, and expression-level-dependent accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins synthesized by AUG-independent translation, accompanied by loss of hippocampal neurons, increased anxiety, and impaired cognitive function. Single-dose injection of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that target repeat-containing RNAs but preserve levels of mRNAs encoding C9ORF72 produced sustained reductions in RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins, and ameliorated behavioral deficits. These efforts identify gain of toxicity as a central disease mechanism caused by repeat-expanded C9ORF72 and establish the feasibility of ASO-mediated therapy.

  17. Frequency of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Majounie, Elisa; Renton, Alan E; Mok, Kin; Dopper, Elise GP; Waite, Adrian; Rollinson, Sara; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Johnson, Janel O; Sendtner, Michael; Pamphlett, Roger; Orrell, Richard W; Mead, Simon; Sidle, Katie C; Houlden, Henry; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Morrison, Karen E; Pall, Hardev; Talbot, Kevin; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Arepalli, Sampath; Sabatelli, Mario; Mora, Gabriele; Corbo, Massimo; Giannini, Fabio; Calvo, Andrea; Englund, Elisabet; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Remes, Anne M; Laaksovirta, Hannu; McCluskey, Leo; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Nalls, Michael A; Drory, Vivian E; Lu, Chin-Song; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Tsuji, Shoji; Le Ber, Isabelle; Brice, Alexis; Drepper, Carsten; Williams, Nigel; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela; Hardy, John; Tienari, Pentti J; Heutink, Peter; Morris, Huw R; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Traynor, Bryan J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We aimed to accurately estimate the frequency of a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 that has been associated with a large proportion of cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods We screened 4448 patients diagnosed with ALS (El Escorial criteria) and 1425 patients with FTD (Lund-Manchester criteria) from 17 regions worldwide for the GGGGCC hexanucleotide expansion using a repeat-primed PCR assay. We assessed familial disease status on the basis of self-reported family history of similar neurodegenerative diseases at the time of sample collection. We compared haplotype data for 262 patients carrying the expansion with the known Finnish founder risk haplotype across the chromosomal locus. We calculated age-related penetrance using the Kaplan-Meier method with data for 603 individuals with the expansion. Findings In patients with sporadic ALS, we identified the repeat expansion in 236 (7·0%) of 3377 white individuals from the USA, Europe, and Australia, two (4·1%) of 49 black individuals from the USA, and six (8·3%) of 72 Hispanic individuals from the USA. The mutation was present in 217 (39·3%) of 552 white individuals with familial ALS from Europe and the USA. 59 (6·0%) of 981 white Europeans with sporadic FTD had the mutation, as did 99 (24·8%) of 400 white Europeans with familial FTD. Data for other ethnic groups were sparse, but we identified one Asian patient with familial ALS (from 20 assessed) and two with familial FTD (from three assessed) who carried the mutation. The mutation was not carried by the three Native Americans or 360 patients from Asia or the Pacific Islands with sporadic ALS who were tested, or by 41 Asian patients with sporadic FTD. All patients with the repeat expansion had (partly or fully) the founder haplotype, suggesting a one-off expansion occurring about 1500 years ago. The pathogenic expansion was non-penetrant in individuals younger than 35 years, 50

  18. Gonosomal mosaicism in myotonic dystrophy patients: Involvement of mitotic events in (CTG)[sub n] repeat variation and selection against extreme expansion in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, G.; Coerwinkel, M.; Wieringa, B.; Nillesen, W.; Smeets, H.; Brunner, H.; Wieringa, B. ); Willems, P.; Vits, L. ); Hoeweler, C. )

    1994-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by abnormal expansion of a polymorphic (CTG)[sub n] repeat, located in the DM protein kinase gene. The authors determined the (CTG)[sub n] repeat lengths in a broad range of tissue DNAs from patients with mild, classical, or congenital manifestation of DM. Differences in the repeat length were seen in somatic tissues from single DM individuals and twins. Repeats appeared to expand to a similar extent in tissues originating from the same embryonal origin. In most male patients carrying intermediate- or small-sized expansions in blood, the repeat lengths covered a markedly wider range in sperm. In contrast, male patients with large allele expansions in blood (>700 CTGs) had similar or smaller repeats in sperm, when detectable. Sperm alleles with >1,000 CTGs were not seen. The authors conclude that DM patients can be considered gonosomal mosaics, i.e., combined somatic and germ-line tissue mosaics. Most remarkably, they observed multiple cases where the length distributions of intermediate- or small-sized alleles in fathers' sperm were significantly different from that in their offspring's blood. The combined findings indicate that intergenerational length changes in the unstable CTG repeat are most likely to occur during early embryonic mitotic divisions in both somatic and germ-line tissue formation. Both the initial CTG length, the overall number of cell divisions involved in tissue formation, and perhaps a specific selection process in spermatogenesis may influence the dynamics of this process. A model explaining mitotic instability and sex-dependent segregation phenomena in DM manifestation is discussed. 59 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Widespread structural brain involvement in ALS is not limited to the C9orf72 repeat expansion

    PubMed Central

    Westeneng, Henk-Jan; Walhout, Renée; Straathof, Milou; Schmidt, Ruben; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Veldink, Jan H; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients with a C9orf72 repeat expansion (C9+), a neuroimaging phenotype with widespread structural cerebral changes has been found. We aimed to investigate the specificity of this neuroimaging phenotype in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods 156 C9− and 14 C9+ patients with ALS underwent high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; a subset (n=126) underwent diffusion-weighted imaging. Cortical thickness, subcortical volumes and white matter integrity were compared between C9+ and C9− patients. Using elastic net logistic regression, a model defining the neuroimaging phenotype of C9+ was determined and applied to C9− patients with ALS. Results C9+ patients showed cortical thinning outside the precentral gyrus, extending to the bilateral pars opercularis, fusiform, lingual, isthmus-cingulate and superior parietal cortex, and smaller volumes of the right hippocampus and bilateral thalamus, and reduced white matter integrity of the inferior and superior longitudinal fasciculus compared with C9− patients (p<0.05). Among 128 C9− patients, we detected a subgroup of 27 (21%) with a neuroimaging phenotype congruent to C9+ patients, while 101 (79%) C9− patients showed cortical thinning restricted to the primary motor cortex. C9− patients with a ‘C9+’ neuroimaging phenotype had lower performance on the frontal assessment battery, compared with other C9− patients with ALS (p=0.004). Conclusions This study shows that widespread structural brain involvement is not limited to C9+ patients, but also presents in a subgroup of C9− patients with ALS and relates to cognitive deficits. Our neuroimaging findings reveal an intermediate phenotype that may provide insight into the complex relationship between genetic factors and clinical characteristics. PMID:27756805

  20. Expansion of Lysine-rich Repeats in Plasmodium Proteins Generates Novel Localization Sequences That Target the Periphery of the Host Erythrocyte*

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Heledd M.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Osborne, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive low complexity sequences, mostly assumed to have no function, are common in proteins that are exported by the malaria parasite into its host erythrocyte. We identify a group of exported proteins containing short lysine-rich tandemly repeated sequences that are sufficient to localize to the erythrocyte periphery, where key virulence-related modifications to the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton are known to occur. Efficiency of targeting is dependent on repeat number, indicating that novel targeting modules could evolve by expansion of short lysine-rich sequences. Indeed, analysis of fragments of GARP from different species shows that two novel targeting sequences have arisen via the process of repeat expansion in this protein. In the protein Hyp12, the targeting function of a lysine-rich sequence is masked by a neighboring repetitive acidic sequence, further highlighting the importance of repetitive low complexity sequences. We show that sequences capable of targeting the erythrocyte periphery are present in at least nine proteins from Plasmodium falciparum and one from Plasmodium knowlesi. We find these sequences in proteins known to be involved in erythrocyte rigidification and cytoadhesion as well as in previously uncharacterized exported proteins. Together, these data suggest that expansion and contraction of lysine-rich repeats could generate targeting sequences de novo as well as modulate protein targeting efficiency and function in response to selective pressure. PMID:27777305

  1. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Thomas; Narechania, Apurva; Sabot, Francois; Stein, Joshua; Vu, Giang TH; Graner, Andreas; Ware, Doreen; Stein, Nils

    2008-01-01

    Background Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low cost. Based on the corresponding sequence reads a Mathematically Defined Repeat (MDR) index can be generated to map repetitive regions in genomic sequences. Results We have generated 574 Mbp of Illumina/Solexa sequences from barley total genomic DNA, representing about 10% of a genome equivalent. From these sequences we generated an MDR index which was then used to identify and mark repetitive regions in the barley genome. Comparison of the MDR plots with expert repeat annotation drawing on the information already available for known repetitive elements revealed a significant correspondence between the two methods. MDR-based annotation allowed for the identification of dozens of novel repeat sequences, though, which were not recognised by hand-annotation. The MDR data was also used to identify gene-containing regions by masking of repetitive sequences in eight de-novo sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. For half of the identified candidate gene islands indeed gene sequences could be identified. MDR data were only of limited use, when mapped on genomic sequences from the closely related species Triticum monococcum as only a fraction of the repetitive sequences was recognised. Conclusion An MDR index for barley, which was obtained by whole-genome Illumina/Solexa sequencing, proved as efficient in repeat identification as manual expert annotation. Circumventing the labour-intensive step of producing a specific repeat library for expert annotation, an MDR index provides an elegant and efficient resource for the identification of repetitive and low-copy (i.e. potentially gene-containing sequences) regions in uncharacterised genomic sequences. The restriction that a particular MDR index can not be used

  2. Brain distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and motor neurone disease associated with expansions in C9ORF72.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Yvonne S; Barker, Holly; Robinson, Andrew C; Thompson, Jennifer C; Harris, Jenny; Troakes, Claire; Smith, Bradley; Al-Saraj, Safa; Shaw, Chris; Rollinson, Sara; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Hasegawa, Masato; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Snowden, Julie S; Mann, David M

    2014-06-20

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) expansion in C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic change seen in familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and familial Motor Neurone Disease (MND). Pathologically, expansion bearers show characteristic p62 positive, TDP-43 negative inclusion bodies within cerebellar and hippocampal neurons which also contain dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR) formed from sense and antisense RAN (repeat associated non ATG-initiated) translation of the expanded repeat region itself. 'Inappropriate' formation, and aggregation, of DPR might therefore confer neurotoxicity and influence clinical phenotype. Consequently, we compared the topographic brain distribution of DPR in 8 patients with Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), 6 with FTD + MND and 7 with MND alone (all 21 patients bearing expansions in C9ORF72) using a polyclonal antibody to poly-GA, and related this to the extent of TDP-43 pathology in key regions of cerebral cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences in either the pattern or severity of brain distribution of DPR between FTD, FTD + MND and MND groups, nor was there any relationship between the distribution of DPR and TDP-43 pathologies in expansion bearers. Likewise, there were no significant differences in the extent of TDP-43 pathology between FTLD patients bearing an expansion in C9ORF72 and non-bearers of the expansion. There were no association between the extent of DPR pathology and TMEM106B or APOE genotypes. However, there was a negative correlation between the extent of DPR pathology and age at onset. Present findings therefore suggest that although the presence and topographic distribution of DPR may be of diagnostic relevance in patients bearing expansion in C9ORF72 this has no bearing on the determination of clinical phenotype. Because TDP-43 pathologies are similar in bearers and non-bearers of the expansion, the expansion may act as a major genetic risk factor for FTLD and MND by rendering the brain

  3. Expansion of CAG triplet repeats by human DNA polymerases λ and β in vitro, is regulated by flap endonuclease 1 and DNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Hübscher, Ulrich; Maga, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by the expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeats (TNR) in the N-terminal region of coding sequence of the Huntingtin's (HTT) gene. This results in the addition of a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein, resulting in its pathological form. The mechanism by which TRN expansion takes place is not yet fully understood. We have recently shown that DNA polymerase (Pol) β can promote the microhomology-mediated end joining and triplet expansion of a substrate mimicking a double strand break in the TNR region of the HTT gene. Here we show that TNR expansion is dependent on the structure of the DNA substrate, as well as on the two essential Pol β co-factors: flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) and DNA ligase 1 (Lig1). We found that Fen1 significantly stimulated TNR expansion by Pol β, but not by the related enzyme Pol λ, and subsequent ligation of the DNA products by Lig1. Interestingly, the deletion of N-terminal domains of Pol λ, resulted in an enzyme which displayed properties more similar to Pol β, suggesting a possible evolutionary mechanism. These results may suggest a novel mechanism for somatic TNR expansion in HD.

  4. Treatment of neuroblastoma in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome with a PHOX2B polyalanine repeat expansion mutation: New twist on a neurocristopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Mian, Amir; Maris, John M; Batra, Vandana; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Reichek, Jennifer; Madonna, Mary Beth; Bush, Jonathan W; Shore, Richard M; Walterhouse, David O

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma in patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) as part of a neurocristopathy syndrome is a rare finding and has only been associated with paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B) non-polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutations. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of a child with CCHS and Hirschsprung disease who had a PHOX2B polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutation (PARM) (genotype 20/33) and developed high-risk neuroblastoma. We further describe his treatment including chemotherapy and therapeutic I(131) -metaiodobenzylguanidine. This case highlights the need to consider neuroblastoma in patients with CCHS and the longest PHOX2B PARMs and to individualize treatment based on co-morbidities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked ALS-FTD

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Alan E.; Majounie, Elisa; Waite, Adrian; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Rollinson, Sara; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Schymick, Jennifer C.; Laaksovirta, Hannu; van Swieten, John C.; Myllykangas, Liisa; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Remes, Anne M.; Kaganovich, Alice; Scholz, Sonja W.; Duckworth, Jamie; Ding, Jinhui; Harmer, Daniel W.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Johnson, Janel O.; Mok, Kin; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Danyah; Guerreiro, Rita J.; Orrell, Richard W.; Neal, James; Murray, Alex; Pearson, Justin; Jansen, Iris E.; Sondervan, David; Seelaar, Harro; Blake, Derek; Young, Kate; Halliwell, Nicola; Callister, Janis; Toulson, Greg; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alex; Snowden, Julie; Mann, David; Neary, David; Nalls, Michael A.; Peuralinna, Terhi; Jansson, Lilja; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Kaivorinne, Anna-Lotta; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Ikonen, Elina; Sulkava, Raimo; Benatar, Michael; Wuu, Joanne; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Borghero, Giuseppe; Sabatelli, Mario; Heckerman, David; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Sendtner, Michael; Drepper, Carsten; Eichler, Evan E.; Alkan, Can; Abdullaev, Zied; Pack, Svetlana D.; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Williams, Nigel M.; Heutink, Peter; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Morris, Huw R.; Tienari, Pentti J.; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    The chromosome 9p21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) locus contains one of the last major unidentified autosomal dominant genes underlying these common neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously shown that a founder haplotype, covering the MOBKL2b, IFNK and C9ORF72 genes, is present in the majority of cases linked to this region. Here we show that there is a large hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 on the affected haplotype. This repeat expansion segregates perfectly with disease in the Finnish population, underlying 46.0% of familial ALS and 21.1% of sporadic ALS in that population. Taken together with the D90A SOD1 mutation, 87% of familial ALS in Finland is now explained by a simple monogenic cause. The repeat expansion is also present in one third of familial ALS cases of outbred European descent making it the most common genetic cause of these fatal neurodegenerative diseases identified to date. PMID:21944779

  6. A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 is the cause of chromosome 9p21-linked ALS-FTD.

    PubMed

    Renton, Alan E; Majounie, Elisa; Waite, Adrian; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Rollinson, Sara; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schymick, Jennifer C; Laaksovirta, Hannu; van Swieten, John C; Myllykangas, Liisa; Kalimo, Hannu; Paetau, Anders; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Remes, Anne M; Kaganovich, Alice; Scholz, Sonja W; Duckworth, Jamie; Ding, Jinhui; Harmer, Daniel W; Hernandez, Dena G; Johnson, Janel O; Mok, Kin; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Danyah; Guerreiro, Rita J; Orrell, Richard W; Neal, James; Murray, Alex; Pearson, Justin; Jansen, Iris E; Sondervan, David; Seelaar, Harro; Blake, Derek; Young, Kate; Halliwell, Nicola; Callister, Janis Bennion; Toulson, Greg; Richardson, Anna; Gerhard, Alex; Snowden, Julie; Mann, David; Neary, David; Nalls, Michael A; Peuralinna, Terhi; Jansson, Lilja; Isoviita, Veli-Matti; Kaivorinne, Anna-Lotta; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Ikonen, Elina; Sulkava, Raimo; Benatar, Michael; Wuu, Joanne; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Borghero, Giuseppe; Sabatelli, Mario; Heckerman, David; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Sendtner, Michael; Drepper, Carsten; Eichler, Evan E; Alkan, Can; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Pack, Svetlana D; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Williams, Nigel M; Heutink, Peter; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Morris, Huw R; Tienari, Pentti J; Traynor, Bryan J

    2011-10-20

    The chromosome 9p21 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) locus contains one of the last major unidentified autosomal-dominant genes underlying these common neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously shown that a founder haplotype, covering the MOBKL2b, IFNK, and C9ORF72 genes, is present in the majority of cases linked to this region. Here we show that there is a large hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion in the first intron of C9ORF72 on the affected haplotype. This repeat expansion segregates perfectly with disease in the Finnish population, underlying 46.0% of familial ALS and 21.1% of sporadic ALS in that population. Taken together with the D90A SOD1 mutation, 87% of familial ALS in Finland is now explained by a simple monogenic cause. The repeat expansion is also present in one-third of familial ALS cases of outbred European descent, making it the most common genetic cause of these fatal neurodegenerative diseases identified to date.

  7. Transethnic replication of association of CTG18.1 repeat expansion of TCF4 gene with Fuchs' corneal dystrophy in Chinese implies common causal variant.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chao; Gong, Xin; Hussain, Imran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tan, Donald T H; Aung, Tin; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Vithana, Eranga N; Mootha, V Vinod

    2014-10-08

    To test the association between the CTG18.1 trinucleotide repeat expansion of TCF4 gene and Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) in a Chinese population. The trinucleotide repeat polymorphism CTG18.1 was genotyped using short tandem repeat and triplet repeat primed polymerase chain reaction assays in 57 Chinese subjects with FECD and 121 controls. Statistical association of the expanded CTG18.1 allele and 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across TCF4 with FECD was evaluated. To investigate the linkage disequilibrium structure of the TCF4 region, haplotype analysis was performed on our study subjects and compared with genotyping data of 97 Han Chinese and 85 Caucasians in the 1000 Genomes Project. The expanded CTG18.1 allele was associated with FECD (P = 4.7 × 10(-14)), with the odds ratio of each copy of the expanded allele estimated to be 66.5 (95% confidence interval: 12.6-350.1). Five TCF4 SNPs showed association with FECD at a nominal level (P < 5.0 × 10(-2)); however, conditional on the expanded CTG18.1 polymorphism, none of the SNPs showed association with FECD. The only haplotype associated with the disease was the one with the expansion at the CTG18.1 locus. Transethnic replication of the association between the CTG18.1 repeat expansion in the TCF4 gene and FECD suggests it is a common, causal variant shared in Eurasian populations conferring significant risk for the development of FECD. Our data suggest that the expanded CTG18.1 allele is the main, if not sole, causal variant at this gene locus in the Chinese population. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  8. The Replication of Frataxin Gene Is Assured by Activation of Dormant Origins in the Presence of a GAA-Repeat Expansion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that DNA replication affects the stability of several trinucleotide repeats, but whether replication profiles of human loci carrying an expanded repeat differ from those of normal alleles is poorly understood in the endogenous context. We investigated this issue using cell lines from Friedreich’s ataxia patients, homozygous for a GAA-repeat expansion in intron 1 of the Frataxin gene. By interphase, FISH we found that in comparison to the normal Frataxin sequence the replication of expanded alleles is slowed or delayed. According to molecular combing, origins never fired within the normal Frataxin allele. In contrast, in mutant alleles dormant origins are recruited within the gene, causing a switch of the prevalent fork direction through the expanded repeat. Furthermore, a global modification of the replication profile, involving origin choice and a differential distribution of unidirectional forks, was observed in the surrounding 850 kb region. These data provide a wide-view of the interplay of events occurring during replication of genes carrying an expanded repeat. PMID:27447727

  9. Defining the association of TMEM106B variants among frontotemporal lobar degeneration patients with GRN mutations and C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Lattante, Serena; Le Ber, Isabelle; Galimberti, Daniela; Serpente, Maria; Rivaud-Péchoux, Sophie; Camuzat, Agnès; Clot, Fabienne; Fenoglio, Chiara; Scarpini, Elio; Brice, Alexis; Kabashi, Edor

    2014-11-01

    TMEM106B was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD) with TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa inclusions. It has been reported that variants in this gene are genetic modifiers of the disease and that this association is stronger in patients carrying a GRN mutation or a pathogenic expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene. Here, we investigated the contribution of TMEM106B polymorphisms in cohorts of FTD and FTD with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients from France and Italy. Patients carrying the C9orf72 expansion (n = 145) and patients with GRN mutations (n = 76) were compared with a group of FTD patients (n = 384) negative for mutations and to a group of healthy controls (n = 552). In our cohorts, the presence of the C9orf72 expansion did not correlate with TMEM106B genotypes but the association was very strong in individuals with pathogenic GRN mutations (p = 9.54 × 10(-6)). Our data suggest that TMEM106B genotypes differ in FTD patient cohorts and strengthen the protective role of TMEM106B in GRN carriers. Further studies are needed to determine whether TMEM106B polymorphisms are associated with other genetic causes for FTD, including C9orf72 repeat expansions.

  10. Fold-back structures at the distal end influence DNA slippage at the proximal end during mononucleotide repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, G; Chary, K V; Rao, B J

    1999-10-01

    Polymerase slippage during DNA synthesis by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase across A, C, G and T repeats (30 bases) has been studied. Within minutes, duplexes that contain only repeats (30 bp) expand dramatically to several hundred base pairs long. Rate comparisons in a repeat duplex when one strand was expanded as against that when both strands were expanded suggest a model of migrating hairpin loops which in the latter case coalesce into a duplex. Moreover, slippage (at the proximal or 3'-end) is subject to positive and negative effects from the 5'-end (distal) of the same strand. Growing T and G strands generate T.A:T and G-G:C motif fold-back structures at the distal end that hamper slippage at the proximal end. On the other hand, growing tails at the distal end upon annealing with excess complementary template accentuates proximal slippage several-fold.

  11. Transcription Factor UAF, Expansion and Contraction of Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) Repeats, and RNA Polymerase Switch in Transcription of Yeast rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Melanie; Siddiqi, Imran; Vu, Loan; Aris, John; Nomura, Masayasu

    1999-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in transcription factor UAF give rise to variants able to grow by transcribing endogenous ribosomal DNA (rDNA) by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We have demonstrated that the switch to growth using the Pol II system consists of two steps: a mutational alteration in UAF and an expansion of chromosomal rDNA repeats. The first step, a single mutation in UAF, is sufficient to allow Pol II transcription of rDNA. In contrast to UAF mutations, mutations in Pol I or other Pol I transcription factors can not independently lead to Pol II transcription of rDNA, suggesting a specific role of UAF in preventing polymerase switch. The second step, expansion of chromosomal rDNA repeats to levels severalfold higher than the wild type, is required for efficient cell growth. Mutations in genes that affect recombination within the rDNA repeats, fob1 and sir2, decrease and increase, respectively, the frequency of switching to growth using Pol II, indicating that increased rDNA copy number is a cause rather than a consequence of the switch. Finally, we show that the switch to the Pol II system is accompanied by a striking alteration in the localization and morphology of the nucleolus. The altered state that uses Pol II for rDNA transcription is semistable and heritable through mitosis and meiosis. We discuss the significance of these observations in relation to the plasticity of rDNA tandem repeats and nucleolar structures as well as evolution of the Pol I machinery. PMID:10567580

  12. Expansion of GA Dinucleotide Repeats Increases the Density of CLAMP Binding Sites on the X-Chromosome to Promote Drosophila Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Chery, Jessica; Siggers, Trevor; Boor, Sonia; Bliss, Jacob; Liu, Wei; Jogl, Gerwald; Rohs, Remo; Singh, Nadia D.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Larschan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation is an essential process that equalizes transcript levels of X-linked genes between sexes by forming a domain of coordinated gene expression. Throughout the evolution of Diptera, many different X-chromosomes acquired the ability to be dosage compensated. Once each newly evolved X-chromosome is targeted for dosage compensation in XY males, its active genes are upregulated two-fold to equalize gene expression with XX females. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CLAMP zinc finger protein links the dosage compensation complex to the X-chromosome. However, the mechanism for X-chromosome identification has remained unknown. Here, we combine biochemical, genomic and evolutionary approaches to reveal that expansion of GA-dinucleotide repeats likely accumulated on the X-chromosome over evolutionary time to increase the density of CLAMP binding sites, thereby driving the evolution of dosage compensation. Overall, we present new insight into how subtle changes in genomic architecture, such as expansions of a simple sequence repeat, promote the evolution of coordinated gene expression. PMID:27414415

  13. Molecular-intelligence correlations in young fragile X males with a mild CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Steyaert, J.; Borghgraef, M.; Legius, E.

    1996-08-09

    Several mechanisms can explain the occurrence of full-mutation fragile X males with an IQ level above -2 SD below mean, also called {open_quotes}high-functioning fragile X males.{close_quotes} Incomplete methylation of the CpG island at the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene is one of these mechanisms. The present study describes the physical and behavior phenotypes in 7 fragile X boys with CGG repeat insertions in the FMR1 gene between 600-2,400 base pairs. The degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island ranges in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 0-95%. Subjects with a low degree of methylation at this site have mild or absent physical characteristics of the fragile X syndrome, while subjects with a high degree of methylation at this site have more severe physical characteristics. In this range of CGG repeat insertion (600-2,400 base pairs), the degree of methylation at the FMR1-associated CpG island is a good predictor of intelligence, while CGG repeat insertion length is not. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. The effect of repeated lateral compression and expansions mimicking blinking on selected tear film polar lipid monofilms.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Matthew; Vogel, Hans J; Prenner, Elmar J

    2017-03-01

    The tear film lipid layer is formed on the anterior surface of the eye, functioning as a barrier to excess evaporation and foreign particles, while also providing stability to the tear film. The lipid layer is organized into a polar lipid layer consisting of phospholipids, ceramides, and free fatty acids that act as a surfactant to a non-polar multilayer of wax and cholesterol esters. Due to shear forces from eye movement and the compression and expansion of blinking, the tear lipids are under constant stress. However, tear film is able to resist immediate rupture and remains intact over multiple blinks. This work aimed to better understand the lateral organization of selected tear film polar lipids. The polar lipid biomimetic studied here consisted of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE), palmitoyl glucosylceramide (PGC), and palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM). Surface pressure-area isocycles mimicked blinking and films were visualized by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). All lipid systems formed relatively reversible films as indicated by limited hysteresis. However, pure DPPC and PSM films experienced greater changes in lipid packing upon compression and expansion compared to pure PGC and DPPE. This suggests that the driving force behind maintaining the lateral organization of the polar lipids from tear film may be the hydrogen bonding propensities of the head groups. Additionally, isocycles of films containing DPPC, DPPE, and PGC mixtures exhibited evidence for reversible multilayer formation or folding. This was supported by 3D analysis of structures that formed during compression but reintegrated back into the bulk lipid film during expansion near the in vitro tear film surface pressure of the open eye. Therefore, the polar lipids of tear film may be directly involved in preventing film rupture during a blink.

  15. Selective depletion of FOXP3(high) cells by Fas-Fas-L-induced apoptosis occurs in CD4(+)CD25(+)-enriched populations during repeated expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Nair, Sindu; Danby, Robert; Peniket, Andy; Roberts, David J

    2013-10-01

    Expansion of anti-CD25 bead-isolated human Tregs culture has paradoxically resulted in reduced suppressive activity, but the mechanism(s) responsible for these observations are poorly defined. Magnetic-bead isolated human CD25(+) cells were expanded with anti-CD3/CD28 beads and high doses of rhIL-2. Detection of Fas and Fas ligand (Fas-L) expression, activation of Caspase 8, cell proliferation and cytokine production was evaluated by multi-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. The role of Fas-Fas-L-mediated cell death was dissected through the use of agonist or antagonist monoclonal antibodies directed at Fas and Fas-L. Repeated expansion of bead-enriched CD4(+)CD25(+) cells generated a cellular product with markedly reduced suppressive activity and with significantly increased CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells producing interferon-γ and/or interleukin-2. We showed that Fas-Fas-L-mediated apoptosis of CD4(+)FOXP3(high) cells and rapid cell-cycling of CD8(+) T cells were collectively responsible for the reduced proportion of CD4(+)FOXP3(high) cells in expanded cultures. The depletion of CD4(+)FOXP3(high) cells and activation of Caspase 8 in CD4(+)FOXP3(high) cells was attenuated by Fas antagonist antibody, ZB4, in short-term culture. However, the loss of CD4(+)FOXP3(high) cells during expansion was not prevented by either Fas or Fas-L antagonist antibodies. Taken together, the data show that Fas-Fas-L-mediated apoptosis may limit the expansion of anti-CD25 bead-isolated cells in vitro. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxic PR Poly-Dipeptides Encoded by the C9orf72 Repeat Expansion Target LC Domain Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi; Mori, Eiichiro; Kato, Masato; Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Kwon, Ilmin; McKnight, Steven L

    2016-10-20

    Two complementary approaches were used in search of the intracellular targets of the toxic PR poly-dipeptide encoded by the repeat sequences expanded in the C9orf72 form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The top categories of PRn-bound proteins include constituents of non-membrane invested cellular organelles and intermediate filaments. PRn targets are enriched for the inclusion of low complexity (LC) sequences. Evidence is presented indicating that LC sequences represent the direct target of PRn binding and that interaction between the PRn poly-dipeptide and LC domains is polymer-dependent. These studies indicate that PRn-mediated toxicity may result from broad impediments to the dynamics of cell structure and information flow from gene to message to protein.

  17. Toxic PR poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9orf72 repeat expansion target LC domain polymers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi; Mori, Eiichiro; Kato, Masato; Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Kwon, Ilmin; McKnight, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Two complementary approaches were used in search of the intracellular targets of the toxic PR poly-dipeptide encoded by the repeat sequences expanded in the C9orf72 form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The top categories of PRn-bound proteins include constituents of non-membrane invested cellular organelles and intermediate filaments. PRn targets are enriched for the inclusion of low complexity (LC) sequences. Evidence is presented indicating that LC sequences represent the direct target of PRn binding, and that interaction between the PRn poly-dipeptide and LC domains is polymer-dependent. These studies indicate that PRn-mediated toxicity may result from broad impediments to the dynamics of cell structure and information flow from gene to message to protein. PMID:27768897

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Mahonia bealei (Berberidaceae) reveals a significant expansion of the inverted repeat and phylogenetic relationship with other angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Yang, Bingxian; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Lianli; Tian, Jingkui; Wang, Xumin

    2013-10-10

    Mahonia bealei (Berberidaceae) is a frequently-used traditional Chinese medicinal plant with efficient anti-inflammatory ability. This plant is one of the sources of berberine, a new cholesterol-lowering drug with anti-diabetic activity. We have sequenced the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of M. bealei. The complete cp genome of M. bealei is 164,792 bp in length, and has a typical structure with large (LSC 73,052 bp) and small (SSC 18,591 bp) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs 36,501 bp) of large size. The Mahonia cp genome contains 111 unique genes and 39 genes are duplicated in the IR regions. The gene order and content of M. bealei are almost unarranged which is consistent with the hypothesis that large IRs stabilize cp genome and reduce gene loss-and-gain probabilities during evolutionary process. A large IR expansion of over 12 kb has occurred in M. bealei, 15 genes (rps19, rpl22, rps3, rpl16, rpl14, rps8, infA, rpl36, rps11, petD, petB, psbH, psbN, psbT and psbB) have expanded to have an additional copy in the IRs. The IR expansion rearrangement occurred via a double-strand DNA break and subsequence repair, which is different from the ordinary gene conversion mechanism. Repeat analysis identified 39 direct/inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Analysis also revealed 75 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and almost all are composed of A or T, contributing to a distinct bias in base composition. Comparison of protein-coding sequences with ESTs reveals 9 putative RNA edits and 5 of them resulted in non-synonymous modifications in rpoC1, rps2, rps19 and ycf1. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) was performed on a dataset composed of 65 protein-coding genes from 25 taxa, which yields an identical tree topology as previous plastid-based trees, and provides strong support for the sister relationship between Ranunculaceae and Berberidaceae

  19. A blinded international study on the reliability of genetic testing for GGGGCC-repeat expansions in C9orf72 reveals marked differences in results among 14 laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Chizuru; Volk, Alexander E; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Leblond, Claire S; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William; Neitzel, Birgit; Onodera, Osamu; van Rheenen, Wouter; Pinto, Susana; Weber, Markus; Smith, Bradley; Proven, Melanie; Talbot, Kevin; Keagle, Pamela; Chesi, Alessandra; Ratti, Antonia; van der Zee, Julie; Alstermark, Helena; Birve, Anna; Calini, Daniela; Nordin, Angelica; Tradowsky, Daniela C; Just, Walter; Daoud, Hussein; Angerbauer, Sabrina; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Konno, Takuya; Lloyd-Jani, Anjali; de Carvalho, Mamede; Mouzat, Kevin; Landers, John E; Veldink, Jan H; Silani, Vincenzo; Gitler, Aaron D; Shaw, Christopher E; Rouleau, Guy A; van den Berg, Leonard H; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Rademakers, Rosa; Andersen, Peter M; Kubisch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background The GGGGCC-repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most frequent mutation found in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Most of the studies on C9orf72 have relied on repeat-primed PCR (RP-PCR) methods for detection of the expansions. To investigate the inherent limitations of this technique, we compared methods and results of 14 laboratories. Methods The 14 laboratories genotyped DNA from 78 individuals (diagnosed with ALS or FTD) in a blinded fashion. Eleven laboratories used a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR, whereas three laboratories used RP-PCR alone; Southern blotting techniques were used as a reference. Results Using PCR-based techniques, 5 of the 14 laboratories got results in full accordance with the Southern blotting results. Only 50 of the 78 DNA samples got the same genotype result in all 14 laboratories. There was a high degree of false positive and false negative results, and at least one sample could not be genotyped at all in 9 of the 14 laboratories. The mean sensitivity of a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR was 95.0% (73.9–100%), and the mean specificity was 98.0% (87.5–100%). Overall, a sensitivity and specificity of more than 95% was observed in only seven laboratories. Conclusions Because of the wide range seen in genotyping results, we recommend using a combination of amplicon-length analysis and RP-PCR as a minimum in a research setting. We propose that Southern blotting techniques should be the gold standard, and be made obligatory in a clinical diagnostic setting. PMID:24706941

  20. Development of pharmacophore models for small molecules targeting RNA: Application to the RNA repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Angelbello, Alicia J; González, Àlex L; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-12-01

    RNA is an important drug target, but current approaches to identify bioactive small molecules have been engineered primarily for protein targets. Moreover, the identification of small molecules that bind a specific RNA target with sufficient potency remains a challenge. Computer-aided drug design (CADD) and, in particular, ligand-based drug design provide a myriad of tools to identify rapidly new chemical entities for modulating a target based on previous knowledge of active compounds without relying on a ligand complex. Herein we describe pharmacophore virtual screening based on previously reported active molecules that target the toxic RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1-associated defects are caused by sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1), an alternative splicing regulator, by expanded CUG repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Several small molecules have been found to disrupt the MBNL1-r(CUG)(exp) complex, ameliorating DM1 defects. Our pharmacophore model identified a number of potential lead compounds from which we selected 11 compounds to evaluate. Of the 11 compounds, several improved DM1 defects both in vitro and in cells.

  1. Changes in surgical team performance and safety climate attitudes following expansion of perioperative services: a repeated-measures study.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Harbeck, Emma; Kang, Evelyn; Steel, Catherine; Fairweather, Nicole; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-08-10

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe process changes in surgical team performance and team members' attitudes to safety culture following hospital relocation and expansion of perioperative services.Methods The study was a naturalistic study using structured observations and surveys to assess non-technical skills (NTS; i.e. communication, teamwork, situational awareness, decision making and leadership) in surgery. This interrupted time series design used mixed-linear regression models to examine the effect of phase (before and after hospital relocation) on surgical teams' NTS and their processes that may affect performance. Differences in self-reported teamwork and safety climate attitudes were also examined.Results In all, 186 procedures (100 before and 81 after hospital relocation) were observed across teams working in general, paediatric, orthopaedic and thoracic surgeries. Interobserver agreement ranged from 86% to 95%. An effect of phase was found, indicating that there were significant improvements after relocation in the use of NTS by the teams observed (P=0.020; 95% confidence interval 1.9-4.7).Conclusions The improvements seen in surgical teams' NTS performance and safety culture attitudes may be related to the move to a new state-of-the-art perioperative department.What is known about the topic? Patient safety in surgery relies on optimal team performance, underpinned by effective NTS.What does this paper add? The NTS of surgical teams may be improved through ergonomic innovations that promote teams' shared mental models.What are the implications for practitioners? Effective multidisciplinary teamwork relies on a combination of NTS and ergonomic factors, which inherently contribute to team performance and safety climate attitudes.

  2. Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion in the Transcription Factor 4 (TCF4) Gene Leads to Widespread mRNA Splicing Changes in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wieben, Eric D.; Aleff, Ross A.; Tang, Xiaojia; Butz, Malinda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Highsmith, Edward W.; Jen, Jin; Vasmatzis, George; Patel, Sanjay V.; Maguire, Leo J.; Baratz, Keith H.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify RNA missplicing events in human corneal endothelial tissue isolated from Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Methods Total RNA was isolated and sequenced from corneal endothelial tissue obtained during keratoplasty from 12 patients with FECD and 4 patients undergoing keratoplasty or enucleation for other indications. The length of the trinucleotide repeat (TNR) CTG in the transcription factor 4 (TCF4) gene was determined using leukocyte-derived DNA analyzed by a combination of Southern blotting and Genescan analysis. Commercial statistical software was used to quantify expression of alternatively spliced genes. Validation of selected alternative splicing events was performed by using RT-PCR. Gene sets identified were analyzed for overrepresentation using Web-based analysis system. Results Corneal endothelial tissue from FECD patients containing a CTG TNR expansion sequence in the TCF4 gene revealed widespread changes in mRNA splicing, including a novel splicing event involving FGFR2. Differential splicing of NUMA1, PPFIBP1, MBNL1, and MBNL2 transcripts were identified in all FECD samples containing a TNR expansion. The differentially spliced genes were enriched for products that localize to the cell cortex and bind cytoskeletal and cell adhesion proteins. Conclusions Corneal endothelium from FECD patients harbors a unique signature of mis-splicing events due to CTG TNR expansion in the TCF4 gene, consistent with the hypothesis that RNA toxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of FECD. Changes to the endothelial barrier function, a known event in the development of FECD, was identified as a key biological process influenced by the missplicing events. PMID:28118661

  3. Exploration of Noncoding Sequences in Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Tobar-Tosse, Fabián; Rodríguez, Adrián C.; Vélez, Patricia E.; Zambrano, María M.; Moreno, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C) content, Codon Usage (Cd), Trinucleotide Usage (Tn), and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS) in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment. PMID:23536879

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Calicogorgia granulosa (Anthozoa: Octocorallia): potential gene novelty in unidentified ORFs formed by repeat expansion and segmental duplication.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunji; Song, Jun-Im; Won, Yong-Jin

    2011-10-15

    Mitochondrial genomes of many nonbilaterian animals show high diversity of genome size and gene content, revealing many intergenic regions (IGRs), diverse repeats and additional genes. Here we present a new complete mitogenome of the cnidarian sea fan species, Calicogorgia granulosa (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) and its novel genomic features. The 20,246 bp of the complete mitogenome, which is the largest among the nine octocorals sequenced to date, contains 13 protein coding genes, 2 rRNAs and a tRNA within its circular form of mitochondrial DNA. We found an identical segmental duplication (S1 and S2, 913 bp) composed of an ORF (672 bp) coding for a hypothetical protein within which Direct Variant Repeat (DVR) expansions reside in-frame to the coding sequence. Additionally, the duplicated segmental DNA showed no variation in nucleotide sequences both between S1 and S2 and across multiple individual samples. Upon these observations, we discuss plausible causes for the intramitochondrial segmental duplication and the absence of sequence variation, and a need for further investigation of the novel ORF as well. In conclusion the present mitogenome of C. granulosa adds more information to our understanding of the diversity and evolution of mitogenomes of nonbilaterian animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RNA toxicity and foci formation in microsatellite expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2017-02-13

    More than 30 incurable neurological and neuromuscular diseases are caused by simple microsatellite expansions consisted of 3-6 nucleotides. These repeats can occur in non-coding regions and often result in a dominantly inherited disease phenotype that is characteristic of a toxic RNA gain-of-function. The expanded RNA adopts unusual secondary structures, sequesters various RNA binding proteins to form insoluble nuclear foci, and causes cellular defects at a multisystem level. Nuclear foci are dynamic in size, shape and colocalization of RNA binding proteins in different expansion diseases and tissue types. This review sets to provide new insights into the disease mechanisms of RNA toxicity and foci modulation, in light of recent advancement on bi-directional transcription, antisense RNA, repeat-associated non-ATG translation and beyond.

  6. Complete Plastid Genome Sequencing of Trochodendraceae Reveals a Significant Expansion of the Inverted Repeat and Suggests a Paleogene Divergence between the Two Extant Species

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-xia; Moore, Michael J.; Meng, Ai-ping; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Li, Jian-qiang; Wang, Heng-chang

    2013-01-01

    The early-diverging eudicot order Trochodendrales contains only two monospecific genera, Tetracentron and Trochodendron. Although an extensive fossil record indicates that the clade is perhaps 100 million years old and was widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere during the Paleogene and Neogene, the two extant genera are both narrowly distributed in eastern Asia. Recent phylogenetic analyses strongly support a clade of Trochodendrales, Buxales, and Gunneridae (core eudicots), but complete plastome analyses do not resolve the relationships among these groups with strong support. However, plastid phylogenomic analyses have not included data for Tetracentron. To better resolve basal eudicot relationships and to clarify when the two extant genera of Trochodendrales diverged, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of Tetracentron sinense using Illumina technology. The Tetracentron and Trochodendron plastomes possess the typical gene content and arrangement that characterize most angiosperm plastid genomes, but both genomes have the same unusual ∼4 kb expansion of the inverted repeat region to include five genes (rpl22, rps3, rpl16, rpl14, and rps8) that are normally found in the large single-copy region. Maximum likelihood analyses of an 83-gene, 88 taxon angiosperm data set yield an identical tree topology as previous plastid-based trees, and moderately support the sister relationship between Buxaceae and Gunneridae. Molecular dating analyses suggest that Tetracentron and Trochodendron diverged between 44-30 million years ago, which is congruent with the fossil record of Trochodendrales and with previous estimates of the divergence time of these two taxa. We also characterize 154 simple sequence repeat loci from the Tetracentron sinense and Trochodendron aralioides plastomes that will be useful in future studies of population genetic structure for these relict species, both of which are of conservation concern. PMID:23577110

  7. Severe neurological phenotypes of Q129 DRPLA transgenic mice serendipitously created by en masse expansion of CAG repeats in Q76 DRPLA mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshiya; Miura, Masami; Yamada, Mitsunori; Yoshida, Takayuki; Wood, Jonathan D; Yazawa, Ikuru; Masuda, Masao; Suzuki, Takeo; Shin, Ryong-Moon; Yau, Hau-Jie; Liu, Fu-Chin; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Onodera, Osamu; Ross, Christopher A; Katsuki, Motoya; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kano, Masanobu; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Tsuji, Shoji

    2009-02-15

    We herein provide a thorough description of new transgenic mouse models for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) harboring a single copy of the full-length human mutant DRPLA gene with 76 and 129 CAG repeats. The Q129 mouse line was unexpectedly obtained by en masse expansion based on the somatic instability of 76 CAG repeats in vivo. The mRNA expression levels of both Q76 and Q129 transgenes were each 80% of that of the endogenous mouse gene, whereas only the Q129 mice exhibited devastating progressive neurological phenotypes similar to those of juvenile-onset DRPLA patients. Electrophysiological studies of the Q129 mice demonstrated age-dependent and region-specific presynaptic dysfunction in the globus pallidus and cerebellum. Progressive shrinkage of distal dendrites of Purkinje cells and decreased currents through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and gamma-aminobutyrate type A receptors in CA1 neurons were also observed. Neuropathological studies of the Q129 mice revealed progressive brain atrophy, but no obvious neuronal loss, associated with massive neuronal intranuclear accumulation (NIA) of mutant proteins with expanded polyglutamine stretches starting on postnatal day 4, whereas NIA in the Q76 mice appeared later with regional specificity to the vulnerable regions of DRPLA. Expression profile analyses demonstrated age-dependent down-regulation of genes, including those relevant to synaptic functions and CREB-dependent genes. These results suggest that neuronal dysfunction without neuronal death is the essential pathophysiologic process and that the age-dependent NIA is associated with nuclear dysfunction including transcriptional dysregulations. Thus, our Q129 mice should be highly valuable for investigating the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions.

  8. NONCODE v2.0: decoding the non-coding.

    PubMed

    He, Shunmin; Liu, Changning; Skogerbø, Geir; Zhao, Haitao; Wang, Jie; Liu, Tao; Bai, Baoyan; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    The NONCODE database is an integrated knowledge database designed for the analysis of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Since NONCODE was first released 3 years ago, the number of known ncRNAs has grown rapidly, and there is growing recognition that ncRNAs play important regulatory roles in most organisms. In the updated version of NONCODE (NONCODE v2.0), the number of collected ncRNAs has reached 206 226, including a wide range of microRNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs and mRNA-like ncRNAs. The improvements brought to the database include not only new and updated ncRNA data sets, but also an incorporation of BLAST alignment search service and access through our custom UCSC Genome Browser. NONCODE can be found under http://www.noncode.org or http://noncode.bioinfo.org.cn.

  9. Multiple variants in families with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia related to C9orf72 repeat expansion: further observations on their oligogenic nature.

    PubMed

    Giannoccaro, Maria Pia; Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Piras, Silvia; Pession, Annalisa; De Massis, Patrizia; Oppi, Federico; Stanzani-Maserati, Michelangelo; Pasini, Elena; Baiardi, Simone; Avoni, Patrizia; Parchi, Piero; Liguori, Rocco; Capellari, Sabina

    2017-07-01

    The C9orf72 repeat expansion (RE) is one of the most frequent causative mutations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, it is still unclear how the C9orf72 RE can lead to a heterogeneous phenotype. Several reports have shown the coexistence of mutations in multiple ALS/FTD causative genes in the same family, suggesting an oligogenic etiology for ALS and FTD. Our aim was to investigate this phenomenon in an Italian group of ALS/FTD pedigrees carrying the C9orf72 RE. We included 11 subjects from 11 pedigrees with ALS/FTD and the C9orf72 RE. Mutation screening of FUS, SOD1 and TARDBP genes was performed by direct sequencing. A dementia-specific custom-designed targeted next-generation sequencing panel was used for screening dementia-associated genes mutations. We found genetic variants in additional ALS or dementia-related genes in four pedigrees, including the p.V47A variant in the TYROBP gene. As a group, double mutation carriers displayed a tendency toward a younger age at onset and a higher frequency of positive familiar history and of parkinsonism. Our observation supports the hypothesis that the co-presence of mutations in different genes may be relevant for the clinical expression of ALS/FTD and of their oligogenic nature.

  10. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Knopman, David S.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Neumann, Manuela; Caselli, Richard J.; White, Charles L.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Strong, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Boylan, Kevin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studied whether the GGGGCC repeat length confers risk or affects age at onset in FTD and ALS patients without C9ORF72 repeat expansions. C9ORF72 genotyping was performed in 580 FTD, 995 ALS and 160 FTD-ALS patients and 1444 controls, leading to the identification of 211 patients with pathogenic C9ORF72 repeat expansions and an accurate quantification of the length of the normal alleles in all patients and controls. No meaningful association between the repeat length of the normal alleles of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 and disease phenotype or age at onset was observed in C9ORF72 mutation carriers or non-mutation carriers. PMID:22840558

  11. Retention of stemness and vasculogenic potential of human umbilical cord blood stem cells after repeated expansions on PES-nanofiber matrices

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Matthew; Das, Manjusri; Kanji, Suman; Lu, Jingwei; Aggarwal, Reeva; Chakraborty, Debanjan; Sarkar, Chandrani; Yu, Hongmei; Mao, Hai-Quan; Basu, Sujit; Pompili, Vincent J.; Das, Hiranmoy

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in cardiovascular medicine, ischemic diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Although stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of ischemic diseases show great promise, limited availability of biologically functional stem cells mired the application of stem cell-based therapies. Previously, we reported a PES-nanofiber based ex vivo stem cell expansion technology, which supports expansion of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD133+/CD34+ progenitor cells ~225 fold. Herein, we show that using similar technology and subsequent re-expansion methods, we can achieve ~5 million-fold yields within 24 days of the initial seeding. Interestingly, stem cell phenotype was preserved during the course of the multiple expansions. The high level of the stem cell homing receptor, CXCR4 was expressed in the primary expansion cells, and was maintained throughout the course of re-expansions. In addition, re-expanded cells preserved their multi-potential differential capabilities in vitro such as, endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. Moreover, biological functionality of the re-expanded cells was preserved and was confirmed by a murine hind limb ischemia model for revascularization. These cells could also be genetically modified for enhanced vasculogenesis. Immunohistochemical evidences support enhanced expression of angiogenic factors responsible for this enhanced neovascularization. These data further confirms that nanofiber-based ex-vivo expansion technology can generate sufficient numbers of biologically functional stem cells for potential clinical applications. PMID:25002260

  12. RNA-binding proteins in microsatellite expansion disorders: mediators of RNA toxicity.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Gloria V; Cooper, Thomas A

    2012-06-26

    Although protein-mediated toxicity in neurological disease has been extensively characterized, RNA-mediated toxicity is an emerging mechanism of pathogenesis. In microsatellite expansion disorders, expansion of repeated sequences in noncoding regions gives rise to RNA that produces a toxic gain of function, while expansions in coding regions can disrupt protein function as well as produce toxic RNA. The toxic RNA typically aggregates into nuclear foci and contributes to disease pathogenesis. In many cases, toxicity of the RNA is caused by the disrupted functions of RNA-binding proteins. We will discuss evidence for RNA-mediated toxicity in microsatellite expansion disorders. Different microsatellite expansion disorders are linked with alterations in the same as well as disease-specific RNA-binding proteins. Recent studies have shown that microsatellite expansions can encode multiple repeat-containing toxic RNAs through bidirectional transcription and protein species through repeat-associated non-ATG translation. We will discuss approaches that have characterized the toxic contributions of these various factors.

  13. Long noncoding RNA turnover

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Kim, Jiyoung; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Most RNAs transcribed in mammalian cells lack protein-coding sequences. Among them is a vast family of long (>200 nt) noncoding (lnc)RNAs. LncRNAs can modulate cellular protein expression patterns by influencing the transcription of many genes, the post-transcriptional fate of mRNAs and ncRNAs, and the turnover and localization of proteins. Given the broad impact of lncRNAs on gene regulation, there is escalating interest in elucidating the mechanisms that govern the steady-state levels of lncRNAs. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the factors and mechanisms that modulate mammalian lncRNA stability. PMID:25769416

  14. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example.

  15. Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: Mechanisms of indels and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-07-01

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities and influence prokaryotic communities on Earth. Comparing closely related genomes sheds light on molecular events shaping phage evolution. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) variations impart over half of the genomic changes between T7M and T3, indicating an important role of SSRs in accelerating phage genetic divergence. Differences in coding and noncoding regions of phages infecting different hosts, coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2, frequently arise from SSR variations. Such variations modify noncoding and coding regions; the latter efficiently changes multiple amino acids, thereby hastening protein evolution. Four classes of events are found to drive SSR variations: insertion/deletion of SSR units, expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, changes of repeat motifs, and generation/loss of repeats. The categorization demonstrates the ways SSRs mutate in genomes during phage evolution. Indels are common constituents of genome variations and human diseases, yet, how they occur without preexisting repeat sequence is less understood. Non-repeat-unit-based misalignment-elongation (NRUBME) is proposed to be one mechanism for indels without adjacent repeats. NRUBME or consecutive NRUBME may also change repeat motifs or generate new repeats. NRUBME invoking a non-Watson-Crick base pair explains insertions that initiate mononucleotide repeats. Furthermore, NRUBME successfully interprets many inexplicable human di- to tetranucleotide repeat generations. This study provides the first evidence of SSR variations expediting phage divergence, and enables insights into the events and mechanisms of genome evolution. NRUBME allows us to emulate natural evolution to design indels for various applications.

  16. Validation of a commercially available test that enables the quantification of the numbers of CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in FMR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace X Y; Yeo, Minli; Koh, Yvonne Y; Winarni, Tri Indah; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree; Chong, Samuel S; Faradz, Sultana M H; Guan, Ming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated a commercially available TP-PCR-based assay, the FastFraXTM FMR1 Sizing kit, as a test in quantifying the number of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. Based on testing with well characterized DNA samples from Coriell, the kit yielded size results within 3 repeats of those obtained by common consensus (n = 14), with the exception of one allele. Furthermore, based on data obtained using all Coriell samples with or without common consensus (n = 29), the Sizing kit was 97.5% in agreement with existing approaches. Additionally, the kit generated consistent size information in repeatability and reproducibility studies (CV 0.39% to 3.42%). Clinical performance was established with 198 archived clinical samples, yielding results of 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.03% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 97.64% to 100%) in categorizing patient samples into the respective normal, intermediate, premutation and full mutation genotypes.

  17. High-resolution interrogation of functional elements in the noncoding genome

    PubMed Central

    Sanjana, Neville E.; Wright, Jason; Zheng, Kaijie; Shalem, Ophir; Fontanillas, Pierre; Joung, Julia; Cheng, Christine; Regev, Aviv; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The noncoding genome affects gene regulation and disease, yet we lack tools for rapid identification and manipulation of noncoding elements. We develop a CRISPR screen employing ~18,000 sgRNAs targeting >700 kb surrounding the genes NF1, NF2, and CUL3, which are involved in BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma. We find that noncoding locations that modulate drug resistance also harbor predictive hallmarks of noncoding function. With a subset of regions at the CUL3 locus, we demonstrate that engineered mutations alter transcription factor occupancy and long-range and local epigenetic environments, implicating these sites in gene regulation and chemotherapeutic resistance. Though our expansion of the potential of pooled CRISPR screens we provide tools for genomic discovery and for elucidating biologically relevant mechanisms of gene regulation. Pooled CRISPR mutagenesis identifies functional elements in the noncoding genome. PMID:27708104

  18. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Lack of expansion of triplet repeats in the FMR1, FRAXE, and FRAXF loci in male multiplex families with autism and pervasive developmental disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, J.J.A.; Julien-Inalsingh, C.; Wing, M.

    1996-08-09

    Sib, twin, and family studies have shown that a genetic cause exists in many cases of autism, with a portion of cases associated with a fragile X chromosome. Three folate-sensitive fragile sites in the Xq27{r_arrow}Xq28 region have been cloned and found to have polymorphic trinucleotide repeats at the respective sites; these repeats are amplified and methylated in individuals who are positive for the different fragile sites. We have tested affected boys and their mothers from 19 families with two autistic/PDD boys for amplification and/or instability of the triplet repeats at these loci and concordance of inheritance of alleles by affected brothers. In all cases, the triplet repeat numbers were within the normal range, with no individuals having expanded or premutation-size alleles. For each locus, there was no evidence for an increased frequency of concordance, indicating that mutations within these genes are unlikely to be responsible for the autistic/PDD phenotypes in the affected boys. Thus, we think it is important to retest those autistic individuals who were cytogenetically positive for a fragile X chromosome, particularly cases where there is no family history of the fragile X syndrome, using the more accurate DNA-based testing procedures. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Repeated range expansions and inter-/postglacial recolonization routes of Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliv.) Rehd. et Wils. (Lardizabalaceae) in subtropical China revealed by chloroplast phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shuang; Lei, Shu-Qing; Hu, Wan; Deng, Ling-Li; Li, Bo; Meng, Qing-Lin; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Fan, Deng-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Yong

    2015-04-01

    Most plant phylogeographic studies in subtropical China have stressed the importance of multiple refugia and limited admixture among refugia. Little attention has been paid to range expansion and recolonization routes in this region. In this study, we implemented a phylogeographic survey on Sargentodoxa cuneata, a widespread woody deciduous climber in subtropical China to determine if it conforms to the expansion-contraction (EC) model during the Pleistocene. Sequence variation of two chloroplast intergenic spacers (IGSs) in 369 individuals from 54 populations of S. cuneata was examined. Twenty-six chloroplast haplotypes were recovered. One of these (H5) occurred across the range of S. cuneata and was absent from only 13 populations. Sixteen of the 26 haplotypes were connected to H5 by one mutation and displayed a star-like pattern in the haplotype network. All chloroplast haplotypes clustered into two lineages (A and B) in a Bayesian tree, and most haplotypes (18 out of 26) originated during the mid-Pleistocene (0.63-1.07Ma). Demographic analyses detected a recent range expansion that occurred at 95.98ka (CI: 61.7-112.53ka) for Lineage A. The genetic signature of an ancient range expansion after the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT) was also evident. Three recolonization routes were identified in subtropical China. The results suggest that temperate plants in subtropical China may conform to the EC model to some extent. However, the genetic signature from multiple historical processes may complicate the phylogeographic patterns of organisms in the region due to the mild Pleistocene climate. This study provides a new perspective for understanding the evolutionary history of temperate plants in subtropical China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Hu, Wenqian

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian development is under tight control to ensure precise gene expression. Recent studies reveal a new layer of regulation of gene expression mediated by long noncoding RNAs. These transcripts are longer than 200nt that do not have functional protein coding capacity. Interestingly, many of these long noncoding RNAs are expressed with high specificity in different types of cells, tissues, and developmental stages in mammals, suggesting that they may have functional roles in diverse biological processes. Here, we summarize recent findings of long noncoding RNAs in hematopoiesis, which is one of the best-characterized mammalian cell differentiation processes. Then we provide our own perspectives on future studies of long noncoding RNAs in this field. PMID:27508063

  2. Long noncoding RNA and epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence over the last decade has presented us with the intriguing observation that the majority of eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed to encode a complex network of small and long noncoding RNAs. Long noncoding RNAs are of particular interest, as they were once thought to be restricted to housekeeping functions and are now linked to a wide variety of biological functions related to physiology, embryology and development. Emerging evidence indicates that a subset of long noncoding RNAs mediate their biological functions by using chromatin as a substrate, to index the genetic information encoded in the genome. This chapter will discuss how noncoding RNAs and the processes underlying their transcription mediate transcriptional regulation, by epigenetically regulating the structure of chromatin in various biological contexts.

  3. Validation of a commercially available test that enables the quantification of the numbers of CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in FMR1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Minli; Koh, Yvonne Y.; Winarni, Tri Indah; Rajan-Babu, Indhu-Shree; Chong, Samuel S.; Faradz, Sultana M. H.; Guan, Ming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated a commercially available TP-PCR-based assay, the FastFraXTM FMR1 Sizing kit, as a test in quantifying the number of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. Based on testing with well characterized DNA samples from Coriell, the kit yielded size results within 3 repeats of those obtained by common consensus (n = 14), with the exception of one allele. Furthermore, based on data obtained using all Coriell samples with or without common consensus (n = 29), the Sizing kit was 97.5% in agreement with existing approaches. Additionally, the kit generated consistent size information in repeatability and reproducibility studies (CV 0.39% to 3.42%). Clinical performance was established with 198 archived clinical samples, yielding results of 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 91.03% to 100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 97.64% to 100%) in categorizing patient samples into the respective normal, intermediate, premutation and full mutation genotypes. PMID:28278294

  4. Association and Familial Segregation of CTG18.1 Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion of TCF4 Gene in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mootha, V. Vinod; Gong, Xin; Ku, Hung-Chih; Xing, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tested the association between two intronic polymorphisms (CTG18.1 and rs613872) in TCF4 and Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), and analyzed their segregation patterns in families. Methods. We recruited 120 unrelated Caucasian subjects with FECD and 100 controls. Available family members of probands were recruited. Genotyping of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs613872 was performed using Sanger sequencing or real-time allelic discrimination assay. The trinucleotide repeat polymorphism, CTG18.1, was genotyped using a combination of short tandem repeat assay and triplet repeat primed PCR assay. The cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) repeat length of ≥40 was classified as an expanded CTG18.1 allele. Association of the two loci with FECD was evaluated. Segregation in 29 families was examined. Results. The two polymorphisms are in linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.65 in cases and 0.31 in controls). Significant associations were found between FECD and rs613872 (P = 3.1 × 10−17), expanded CTG18.1 allele (P = 6.5 × 10−25), and their haplotypes (P = 5.9 × 10−19 ). The odds ratio (OR) of each copy of the rs613872 G allele for FECD was estimated to be 9.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.1–17.5). The OR of each copy of the CTG18.1 expanded allele was estimated to be 32.3 (95% CI, 13.4–77.6). The expanded CTG 18.1 allele cosegregated with the trait in 52% (15/29) of families with complete penetrance and 10% (3/29) with incomplete penetrance. Conclusions. We report, to our knowledge, the first independent replication of the expanded CTG 18.1 allele conferring significant risk for FECD (>30-fold increase). The expanded allele cosegregates with the trait with complete penetrance in a majority of families, but we also document cases of incomplete penetrance. PMID:24255041

  5. Lack of correlation between the reduction of serum immunoglobulin concentration and the CTG repeat expansion in patients with type 1 dystrophia [correction of Dystrofia] myotonica.

    PubMed

    Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Wen, Sicheng; Ghanaat-Pour, Hamedeh; Solders, Göran; Forsberg, Håkan; Hammarström, Lennart

    2003-11-01

    The length of the CTG repeat in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene is considered to be associated with clinical severity in type 1 Dystrofia Myotonica (DM1) and has also been suggested to correlate with the degree of deficiency of IgG noted in these patients. Total serum level of IgG and IgG subclasses was therefore measured in 61 Swedish patients with DM1, the largest number of patients investigated to date in this respect. Almost half (44%) of the DM1 patients showed a serum concentration of IgG below the normal range. Deficiency of IgG1, IgG2 or IgG3 was noted in 26%, 7% and 20% of the patients, respectively. As transcription of genes 3' of the DMPK gene on chromosome 19 is reduced in DM1 patients, a decreased expression of the alpha chain of the receptor involved in IgG catabolism, FcRn, may theoretically be responsible for the low serum IgG in DM1 patients. No correlation was however found between the number of CTG repeats, levels of FcRn transcripts in either muscle tissue or lymphocytes and serum IgG levels.

  6. Gene regulation by noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veena S.; Zhou, Rui; Rana, Tariq M.

    2015-01-01

    The past two decades have seen an explosion in research on noncoding RNAs and their physiological and pathological functions. Several classes of small (20–30 nucleotides) and long (>200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs have been firmly established as key regulators of gene expression in myriad processes ranging from embryonic development to innate immunity. In this review, we focus on our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and function of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). In addition, we briefly review the relevance of small and long noncoding RNAs to human physiology and pathology and their potential to be exploited as therapeutic agents. PMID:24164576

  7. Impact of Noncoding Satellite Repeats on Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    HSATII. For tumour spheres, co-culture with irradiated MEF feeder layer cells started 5 days after growth as spheres in absence of adhesion. e, Northern...4- 5 Key Research Accomplishments………………………………………….……. 6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………….................... 6...HSATII RNA-ISH (red) and DAPI nuclear stain (blue) 5 Task 3. Effects of satellites on epigenetic marks: This task was not pursued due to changes

  8. Noncoding RNAs in endocrine malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kentwell, Jessica; Gundara, Justin S; Sidhu, Stan B

    2014-05-01

    Only recently has it been uncovered that the mammalian transcriptome includes a large number of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that play a variety of important regulatory roles in gene expression and other biological processes. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs, have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have only recently been implicated in playing a key regulatory role in cancer biology. The deregulation of ncRNAs has been demonstrated to have important roles in the regulation and progression of cancer development. In this review, we describe the roles of both short noncoding RNAs (including microRNAs, small nuclear RNAs, and piwi-interacting RNAs) and lncRNAs in carcinogenesis and outline the possible underlying genetic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on clinical applications. The focus of our review includes studies from the literature on ncRNAs in traditional endocrine-related cancers, including thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal gland, and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine malignancies. The current and potential future applications of ncRNAs in clinical cancer research is also discussed, with emphasis on diagnosis and future treatment.

  9. High-resolution interrogation of functional elements in the noncoding genome.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Wright, Jason; Zheng, Kaijie; Shalem, Ophir; Fontanillas, Pierre; Joung, Julia; Cheng, Christine; Regev, Aviv; Zhang, Feng

    2016-09-30

    The noncoding genome affects gene regulation and disease, yet we lack tools for rapid identification and manipulation of noncoding elements. We developed a CRISPR screen using ~18,000 single guide RNAs targeting >700 kilobases surrounding the genes NF1, NF2, and CUL3, which are involved in BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma. We find that noncoding locations that modulate drug resistance also harbor predictive hallmarks of noncoding function. With a subset of regions at the CUL3 locus, we demonstrate that engineered mutations alter transcription factor occupancy and long-range and local epigenetic environments, implicating these sites in gene regulation and chemotherapeutic resistance. Through our expansion of the potential of pooled CRISPR screens, we provide tools for genomic discovery and for elucidating biologically relevant mechanisms of gene regulation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Thermal expansion of glassy polymers.

    PubMed

    Davy, K W; Braden, M

    1992-01-01

    The thermal expansion of a number of glassy polymers of interest in dentistry has been studied using a quartz dilatometer. In some cases, the expansion was linear and therefore the coefficient of thermal expansion readily determined. Other polymers exhibited non-linear behaviour and values appropriate to different temperature ranges are quoted. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion was, to a first approximation, a function of both the molar volume and van der Waal's volume of the repeating unit.

  11. RNA toxicity from the ALS/FTD C9ORF72 expansion is mitigated by antisense intervention.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Christopher J; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Pham, Jacqueline T; Haeusler, Aaron R; Heusler, Aaron R; Mistry, Nipun A; Vidensky, Svetlana; Daley, Elizabeth L; Poth, Erin M; Hoover, Benjamin; Fines, Daniel M; Maragakis, Nicholas; Tienari, Pentti J; Petrucelli, Leonard; Traynor, Bryan J; Wang, Jiou; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Blackshaw, Seth; Sattler, Rita; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2013-10-16

    A hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat expansion in the noncoding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common genetic abnormality in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The function of the C9ORF72 protein is unknown, as is the mechanism by which the repeat expansion could cause disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-differentiated neurons from C9ORF72 ALS patients revealed disease-specific (1) intranuclear GGGGCCexp RNA foci, (2) dysregulated gene expression, (3) sequestration of GGGGCCexp RNA binding protein ADARB2, and (4) susceptibility to excitotoxicity. These pathological and pathogenic characteristics were confirmed in ALS brain and were mitigated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics to the C9ORF72 transcript or repeat expansion despite the presence of repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN) products. These data indicate a toxic RNA gain-of-function mechanism as a cause of C9ORF72 ALS and provide candidate antisense therapeutics and candidate human pharmacodynamic markers for therapy.

  12. Scaling features of noncoding DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.

    1999-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, and utilize this fact to build a Coding Sequence Finder Algorithm, which uses statistical ideas to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work adapting to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function, and reporting that noncoding regions in eukaryotes display a larger redundancy than coding regions. Specifically, we consider the possibility that this result is solely a consequence of nucleotide concentration differences as first noted by Bonhoeffer and his collaborators. We find that cytosine-guanine (CG) concentration does have a strong "background" effect on redundancy. However, we find that for the purine-pyrimidine binary mapping rule, which is not affected by the difference in CG concentration, the Shannon redundancy for the set of analyzed sequences is larger for noncoding regions compared to coding regions.

  13. Scaling features of noncoding DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C.-K.; Simons, M.

    1999-12-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range - indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, and utilize this fact to build a Coding Sequence Finder Algorithm, which uses statistical ideas to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work adapting to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the “redundancy” of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function, and reporting that noncoding regions in eukaryotes display a larger redundancy than coding regions. Specifically, we consider the possibility that this result is solely a consequence of nucleotide concentration differences as first noted by Bonhoeffer and his collaborators. We find that cytosine-guanine (CG) concentration does have a strong “background” effect on redundancy. However, we find that for the purine-pyrimidine binary mapping rule, which is not affected by the difference in CG concentration, the Shannon redundancy for the set of analyzed sequences is larger for noncoding regions compared to coding regions.

  14. Scaling features of noncoding DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.

    1999-01-01

    We review evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene, and utilize this fact to build a Coding Sequence Finder Algorithm, which uses statistical ideas to locate the coding regions of an unknown DNA sequence. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work adapting to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function, and reporting that noncoding regions in eukaryotes display a larger redundancy than coding regions. Specifically, we consider the possibility that this result is solely a consequence of nucleotide concentration differences as first noted by Bonhoeffer and his collaborators. We find that cytosine-guanine (CG) concentration does have a strong "background" effect on redundancy. However, we find that for the purine-pyrimidine binary mapping rule, which is not affected by the difference in CG concentration, the Shannon redundancy for the set of analyzed sequences is larger for noncoding regions compared to coding regions.

  15. A Triplet Repeat Expansion Genetic Mouse Model of Infantile Spasms Syndrome, Arx(GCG)10+7, with Interneuronopathy, Spasms in Infancy, Persistent Seizures, and Adult Cognitive and Behavioral Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Price, Maureen G.; Yoo, Jong W.; Burgess, Daniel L.; Deng, Fang; Hrachovy, Richard A.; Frost, James D.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Infantile spasms syndrome (ISS) is a catastrophic pediatric epilepsy with motor spasms, persistent seizures, mental retardation, and in some cases, autism. One of its monogenic causes is an insertion mutation (c.304ins (GCG)7) on the X chromosome, expanding the first polyalanine tract of the interneuron-specific transcription factor ARX from 16 to 23 alanine codons. Null mutation of the Arx gene impairs GABA- and cholinergic interneuronal migration but results in a neonatal lethal phenotype. We developed the first viable genetic mouse model of ISS that spontaneously recapitulates salient phenotypic features of the human triplet-repeat expansion mutation. Arx (GCG)10+7 (“Arx Plus7”) pups display abnormal spasm-like myoclonus and other key EEG features, including multifocal spikes, electrodecremental episodes, and spontaneous seizures persisting into maturity. The neurobehavioral profile of Arx mutants was remarkable for lowered anxiety, impaired associative learning, and abnormal social interaction. Laminar decreases of Arx+ cortical interneurons and a selective reduction of calbindin-, but not parvalbumin- or calretinin-expressing interneurons in neocortical layers and hippocampus indicate that specific classes of synaptic inhibition are missing from the adult forebrain, providing a basis for the seizures and cognitive disorder. A significant reduction of calbindin, NPY-expressing and cholinergic interneurons in the mutant striatum suggest that dysinhibition within this network may contribute to the dyskinetic motor spasms. This mouse model narrows the range of critical pathogenic elements within brain inhibitory networks essential to recreate this complex neurodevelopmental syndrome. PMID:19587282

  16. The Long Non-coding RNA HOTTIP Enhances Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation, Survival and Migration

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACTHOTTIP is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcribed from the 5' tip of the HOXA locus and is associated with the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) and WD repeat containing protein 5 (WDR5)/mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) chromatin modifying complexes. HOTTIP is expres...

  17. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of non-coding RNAs associated with increased head and neck cancer susceptibility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiyi; Wu, Chenzhou; Su, Zhifei; Duan, Zexi; Li, Longjiang; Mi, Fanglin; Li, Chunjie

    2017-09-22

    Genetic polymorphisms, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and nucleotide repeat expansions, can occur in regions that transcribe non-coding RNAs (ncRNA), such as, but not limited to, micro RNA and long non-coding RNA. An association between genetic polymorphisms of ncRNA and increasing head and neck cancer (HNC) risk has been identified by several studies. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to consolidate existing findings to clarify this association. Four electronic databases, such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, were utilised. Inclusion of studies and data extraction were accomplished in duplicate. A total of 42 eligible studies were included, involving 28,527 cases and 37,151 controls. Meta-analysis, sensitivity analysis and publication bias detection were performed. Among the eligible studies, 102 SNPs were investigated, and 21 of them were considered eligible for meta-analysis. Our analysis revealed that HOTAIR rs920778, uc003opf.1 rs11752942, and miR-196a2 rs11614913 were related to HNC susceptibility, while let-7 rs10877887, miR-124-1rs531564, and miR-608 rs4919510 were considered as protective factors. In conclusion, our results showed the extreme importance of an up-to-date comprehensive meta-analysis encompassing the most recent findings to obtain a relevant and reliable framework to understand the relationship between ncRNA SNPs and HNC susceptibility.

  20. Coding DNA repeated throughout intergenic regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome: Evolutionary footprints of RNA silencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyknons are non-random sequence patterns significantly repeated throughout non-coding genomic DNA that also appear at least once among genes. They are interesting because they portend an unforeseen connection between coding and non-coding DNA. Pyknons have only been discovered in the human genome,...

  1. Expanded CCUG repeat RNA expression in Drosophila heart and muscle trigger Myotonic Dystrophy type 1-like phenotypes and activate autophagocytosis genes.

    PubMed

    Cerro-Herreros, Estefania; Chakraborty, Mouli; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Artero, Rubén; Llamusí, Beatriz

    2017-06-06

    Myotonic dystrophies (DM1-2) are neuromuscular genetic disorders caused by the pathological expansion of untranslated microsatellites. DM1 and DM2, are caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'UTR of the DMPK gene and CCTG repeats in the first intron of the CNBP gene, respectively. Mutant RNAs containing expanded repeats are retained in the cell nucleus, where they sequester nuclear factors and cause alterations in RNA metabolism. However, for unknown reasons, DM1 is more severe than DM2. To study the differences and similarities in the pathogenesis of DM1 and DM2, we generated model flies by expressing pure expanded CUG ([250]×) or CCUG ([1100]×) repeats, respectively, and compared them with control flies expressing either 20 repeat units or GFP. We observed surprisingly severe muscle reduction and cardiac dysfunction in CCUG-expressing model flies. The muscle and cardiac tissue of both DM1 and DM2 model flies showed DM1-like phenotypes including overexpression of autophagy-related genes, RNA mis-splicing and repeat RNA aggregation in ribonuclear foci along with the Muscleblind protein. These data reveal, for the first time, that expanded non-coding CCUG repeat-RNA has similar in vivo toxicity potential as expanded CUG RNA in muscle and heart tissues and suggests that specific, as yet unknown factors, quench CCUG-repeat toxicity in DM2 patients.

  2. Analysis RNA-seq and Noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Alberto; Ranzani, Valeria; Rossetti, Grazisa; Panzeri, Ilaria; Abrignani, Sergio; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq is an approach to transcriptome profiling that uses deep-sequencing technologies to detect and accurately quantify RNA molecules originating from a genome at a given moment in time. In recent years, the advent of RNA-Seq has facilitated genome-wide expression profiling, including the identification of novel and rare transcripts like noncoding RNAs and novel alternative splicing isoforms.Here, we describe the analytical steps required for the identification and characterization of noncoding RNAs starting from RNA-Seq raw samples, with a particular emphasis on long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs).

  3. Repeated nightmares

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from night terrors . Alternative Names Nightmares - repeated; Dream anxiety disorder References American Academy of Family Physicians. Information from your family doctor. Nightmares and night terrors in children. ...

  4. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  5. Universal Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a week-long activity for general to honors-level students that addresses Hubble's law and the universal expansion theory. Uses a discrepant event-type activity to lead up to the abstract principles of the universal expansion theory. (JRH)

  6. Non-coding RNAs in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Lara; da Costa Martins, Paula A

    2017-02-23

    Heart Failure is one of the largest contributors to disease burden and healthcare outflow in the Western world. Despite significant progress in the treatment of heart failure, disease prognosis remains very poor with the only curative therapy still being heart transplantation. To counteract the current situation, efforts have been made to better understand the underlying molecular pathways in the progression of cardiac disease towards heart failure, and to link the disease to novel therapeutic targets such as non-coding RNAs. The non-coding part of the genome has gained prominence over the last couple of decades by opening a completely new research field and having established different non-coding RNAs species as fundamental regulators of cellular functions. Not surprisingly, their dysregulation is increasingly being linked to pathology, including to cardiac disease. Pre-clinically, non-coding RNAs have been shown to be of great value as therapeutic targets in pathological cardiac remodelling and also as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for heart failure. Therefore, it is to expect that non-coding RNA-based therapeutic strategies will reach the bedside in the future and provide new and more efficient treatments for heart failure. Here, we review recent discoveries linking the function and molecular interactions of non-coding RNAs with the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (<50%). In recent years long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have become the cutting edge of cancer research with inroads made in understanding their roles in multiple cancer types, including prostate and breast cancers. The roles of lncRNAs in neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients. PMID:26087192

  8. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (<50%). In recent years long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have become the cutting edge of cancer research with inroads made in understanding their roles in multiple cancer types, including prostate and breast cancers. The roles of lncRNAs in neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients.

  9. The expanding universe of noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hannon, G J; Rivas, F V; Murchison, E P; Steitz, J A

    2006-01-01

    The 71st Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology celebrated the numerous and expanding roles of regulatory RNAs in systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. It was clearly evident that noncoding RNAs are undergoing a renaissance, with reports of their involvement in nearly every cellular process. Previously known classes of longer noncoding RNAs were shown to function by every possible means-acting catalytically, sensing physiological states through adoption of complex secondary and tertiary structures, or using their primary sequences for recognition of target sites. The many recently discovered classes of small noncoding RNAs, generally less than 35 nucleotides in length, most often exert their effects by guiding regulatory complexes to targets via base-pairing. With the ability to analyze the RNA products of the genome in ever greater depth, it has become clear that the universe of noncoding RNAs may extend far beyond the boundaries we had previously imagined. Thus, as much as the Symposium highlighted exciting progress in the field, it also revealed how much farther we must go to understand fully the biological impact of noncoding RNAs.

  10. Brain ¹⁸F-FDG and ¹¹C-PiB PET findings in two siblings with FTD/ALS associated with the C9ORF72 repeat expansion.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mika H; Gardberg, Maria; Jansson, Lilja; Röyttä, Matias; Rinne, Juha O; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2014-04-01

    The C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion is a major pathological expansion pattern found in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9FTD/ALS). We describe a patient in whom early clinical evaluation, MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) findings failed to definitively differentiate between FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET was negative for amyloid pathology. He later developed ALS symptoms, and post mortem neuropathological findings were diagnostic of FTD-ALS, while no findings suggested AD. His sister was diagnosed with FTD, and the C9ORF72 expansion was detected in both siblings. We conclude that ¹¹C-PiB PET imaging may help the early differential diagnosis between AD and FTD, including C9FTD/ALS.

  11. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  12. Systematic analysis of coding and noncoding DNA sequences using methods of statistical linguistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantegna, R. N.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions in eukaryotic and viral DNA sequences by adapting two tests developed for the analysis of natural languages and symbolic sequences. The data set comprises all 30 sequences of length above 50 000 base pairs in GenBank Release No. 81.0, as well as the recently published sequences of C. elegans chromosome III (2.2 Mbp) and yeast chromosome XI (661 Kbp). We find that for the three chromosomes we studied the statistical properties of noncoding regions appear to be closer to those observed in natural languages than those of coding regions. In particular, (i) a n-tuple Zipf analysis of noncoding regions reveals a regime close to power-law behavior while the coding regions show logarithmic behavior over a wide interval, while (ii) an n-gram entropy measurement shows that the noncoding regions have a lower n-gram entropy (and hence a larger "n-gram redundancy") than the coding regions. In contrast to the three chromosomes, we find that for vertebrates such as primates and rodents and for viral DNA, the difference between the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions is not pronounced and therefore the results of the analyses of the investigated sequences are less conclusive. After noting the intrinsic limitations of the n-gram redundancy analysis, we also briefly discuss the failure of the zeroth- and first-order Markovian models or simple nucleotide repeats to account fully for these "linguistic" features of DNA. Finally, we emphasize that our results by no means prove the existence of a "language" in noncoding DNA.

  13. Noncoding RNA in drug resistant sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Shen, Jacson K.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Xiao, Tao; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2017-01-01

    Sarcomas are a group of malignant tumors that arise from mesenchymal origin. Despite significant development of multidisciplinary treatments for sarcoma, survival rates have reached a plateau. Chemotherapy has been extensively used for sarcoma treatment; however, the development of drug resistance is a major obstacle limiting the success of many anticancer agents. Sarcoma biology has traditionally focused on genomic and epigenomic deregulation of protein-coding genes to identify the therapeutic potential for reversing drug resistance. New and more creative approaches have found the involvement of noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs in drug resistant sarcoma. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of noncoding RNAs characteristics and the regulated genes involved in drug resistant sarcoma, and focus on their therapeutic potential in the future.

  14. A New Noncoding RNA Arranges Bacterial Chromosome Organization.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhong; Macvanin, Mirjana; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; He, Ximiao; Zhurkin, Victor; Adhya, Sankar

    2015-08-25

    Repeated extragenic palindromes (REPs) in the enterobacterial genomes are usually composed of individual palindromic units separated by linker sequences. A total of 355 annotated REPs are distributed along the Escherichia coli genome. RNA sequence (RNAseq) analysis showed that almost 80% of the REPs in E. coli are transcribed. The DNA sequence of REP325 showed that it is a cluster of six repeats, each with two palindromic units capable of forming cruciform structures in supercoiled DNA. Here, we report that components of the REP325 element and at least one of its RNA products play a role in bacterial nucleoid DNA condensation. These RNA not only are present in the purified nucleoid but bind to the bacterial nucleoid-associated HU protein as revealed by RNA IP followed by microarray analysis (RIP-Chip) assays. Deletion of REP325 resulted in a dramatic increase of the nucleoid size as observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and expression of one of the REP325 RNAs, nucleoid-associated noncoding RNA 4 (naRNA4), from a plasmid restored the wild-type condensed structure. Independently, chromosome conformation capture (3C) analysis demonstrated physical connections among various REP elements around the chromosome. These connections are dependent in some way upon the presence of HU and the REP325 element; deletion of HU genes and/or the REP325 element removed the connections. Finally, naRNA4 together with HU condensed DNA in vitro by connecting REP325 or other DNA sequences that contain cruciform structures in a pairwise manner as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). On the basis of our results, we propose molecular models to explain connections of remote cruciform structures mediated by HU and naRNA4. Nucleoid organization in bacteria is being studied extensively, and several models have been proposed. However, the molecular nature of the structural organization is not well understood. Here we characterized the role of a novel nucleoid

  15. Long Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide cancer mutation analyses are revealing an extensive landscape of functional mutations within the noncoding genome, with profound effects on the expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). While the exquisite regulation of lncRNA transcription can provide signals of malignant transformation, we now understand that lncRNAs drive many important cancer phenotypes through their interactions with other cellular macromolecules including DNA, protein, and RNA. Recent advancements in surveying lncRNA molecular mechanisms are now providing the tools to functionally annotate these cancer associated transcripts, making these molecules attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in the fight against cancer. PMID:27070700

  16. Non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Savannah; Elliot, Marie A

    2016-12-22

    Antibiotics inhibit a wide range of essential processes in the bacterial cell, including replication, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In many instances, these antibiotics exert their effects through association with non-coding RNAs. This review highlights many classical antibiotic targets (e.g. rRNAs and the ribosome), explores a number of emerging targets (e.g. tRNAs, RNase P, riboswitches and small RNAs), and discusses the future directions and challenges associated with non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

  17. The non-coding RNAs as riboregulators.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, V A; Barciszewska, M Z; Szymanski, M; Hochberg, A; de Groot, N; Barciszewski, J

    2001-01-01

    The non-coding RNAs database (http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/ncRNA/) contains currently available data on RNAs, which do not have long open reading frames and act as riboregulators. Non-coding RNAs are involved in the specific recognition of cellular nucleic acid targets through complementary base pairing to control cell growth and differentiation. Some of them are connected with several well known developmental and neuro-behavioral disorders. We have divided them into four groups. This paper is a short introduction to the database and presents its latest, updated edition.

  18. Hierarchical genetic networks and noncoding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2010-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many genes are transcribed into noncoding RNAs. Such RNAs may associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and facilitate degradation. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a kinetic model describing the effect of noncoding RNAs on a mRNA-protein network with the hierarchical three-layer architecture. For positive regulation of the layers, our model predicts either bistability with a fairly narrow hysteresis loop or a unique steady state. For negative or mixed regulation, the steady state is found to be unique.

  19. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2015-10-15

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described.

  20. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  1. Non-coding RNAs: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer X; Rastetter, Raphael H; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    For many years the main role of RNA, it addition to the housekeeping functions of for example tRNAs and rRNAs, was believed to be a messenger between the genes encoded on the DNA and the functional units of the cell, the proteins. This changed drastically with the identification of the first small non-coding RNA, termed microRNA, some 20 years ago. This discovery opened the field of regulatory RNAs with no or little protein-coding potential. Since then many new classes of regulatory non-coding RNAs, including endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNAs (piRNAs), and long non-coding RNAs, have been identified and we have made amazing progress in elucidating their expression, biogenesis, mechanisms and mode of action, and function in many, if not all, biological processes. In this chapter we provide an introduction about the current knowledge of the main classes of non-coding RNAs, what is know about their biogenesis and mechanism of function.

  2. Stressing out over long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Audas, Timothy E; Lee, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have revealed that humans possess far fewer protein-encoding genes than originally predicted. These over-estimates were drawn from the inherent developmental and stimuli-responsive complexity found in humans and other mammals, when compared to lower eukaryotic organisms. This left a conceptual void in many cellular networks, as a new class of functional molecules was necessary for "fine-tuning" the basic proteomic machinery. Transcriptomics analyses have determined that the vast majority of the genetic material is transcribed as noncoding RNA, suggesting that these molecules could provide the functional diversity initially sought from proteins. Indeed, as discussed in this review, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), the largest family of noncoding transcripts, have emerged as common regulators of many cellular stressors; including heat shock, metabolic deprivation and DNA damage. These stimuli, while divergent in nature, share some common stress-responsive pathways, notably inhibition of cell proliferation. This role intrinsically makes stress-responsive lncRNA regulators potential tumor suppressor or proto-oncogenic genes. As the list of functional RNA molecules continues to rapidly expand it is becoming increasingly clear that the significance and functionality of this family may someday rival that of proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shizuka; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2015-02-13

    In recent year, increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play important roles in the regulation of tissue homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. Besides small noncoding RNAs (eg, microRNAs), >200-nucleotide long transcripts, namely long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), can interfere with gene expressions and signaling pathways at various stages. In the cardiovascular system, studies have detected and characterized the expression of lncRNAs under normal physiological condition and in disease states. Several lncRNAs are regulated during acute myocardial infarction (eg, Novlnc6) and heart failure (eg, Mhrt), whereas others control hypertrophy, mitochondrial function and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. In the vascular system, the endothelial-expressed lncRNAs (eg, MALAT1 and Tie-1-AS) can regulate vessel growth and function, whereas the smooth-muscle-expressed lncRNA smooth muscle and endothelial cell-enriched migration/differentiation-associated long noncoding RNA was recently shown to control the contractile phenotype of smooth muscle cells. This review article summarizes the data on lncRNA expressions in mouse and human and highlights identified cardiovascular lncRNAs that might play a role in cardiovascular diseases. Although our understanding of lncRNAs is still in its infancy, these examples may provide helpful insights how lncRNAs interfere with cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Analysis of Performance Variation Using Query Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemayehu, Nega

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval performance evaluation focuses on a case study using a statistical repeated measures analysis of variance for testing the significance of factors, such as retrieval method and topic in retrieval performance variation. Analyses of the effect of query expansion on document ranking confirm that expansion affects…

  5. Analysis of Performance Variation Using Query Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemayehu, Nega

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of information retrieval performance evaluation focuses on a case study using a statistical repeated measures analysis of variance for testing the significance of factors, such as retrieval method and topic in retrieval performance variation. Analyses of the effect of query expansion on document ranking confirm that expansion affects…

  6. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional landscape of the human FMR1 gene reveals two new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed in Fragile X syndrome and Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pastori, Chiara; Peschansky, Veronica J; Barbouth, Deborah; Mehta, Arpit; Silva, Jose P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the human genome is transcribed but not translated, giving rise to noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including long ncRNAs (lncRNAs, >200 nt) that perform a wide range of functions in gene regulation. The Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene is a microsatellite locus that in the general population contains <55 CGG repeats in its 5'-untranslated region. Expansion of this repeat region to a size of 55-200 CGG repeats, known as premutation, is associated with Fragile X tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Further expansion beyond 200 CGG repeats, or full mutation, leads to FMR1 gene silencing and results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS). Using a novel technology called "Deep-RACE", which combines rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with next generation sequencing, we systematically interrogated the FMR1 gene locus for the occurrence of novel lncRNAs. We discovered two transcripts, FMR5 and FMR6. FMR5 is a sense lncRNA transcribed upstream of the FMR1 promoter, whereas FMR6 is an antisense transcript overlapping the 3' region of FMR1. FMR5 was expressed in several human brain regions from unaffected individuals and from full and premutation patients. FMR6 was silenced in full mutation and, unexpectedly, in premutation carriers suggesting abnormal transcription and/or chromatin remodeling prior to transition to the full mutation. These lncRNAs may thus be useful as biomarkers, allowing for early detection and therapeutic intervention in FXS and FXTAS. Finally we show that FMR5 and FMR6 are expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes and propose future studies that correlate lncRNA expression with clinical outcomes.

  7. Repeat instability: mechanisms of dynamic mutations.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christopher E; Nichol Edamura, Kerrie; Cleary, John D

    2005-10-01

    Disease-causing repeat instability is an important and unique form of mutation that is linked to more than 40 neurological, neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. DNA repeat expansion mutations are dynamic and ongoing within tissues and across generations. The patterns of inherited and tissue-specific instability are determined by both gene-specific cis-elements and trans-acting DNA metabolic proteins. Repeat instability probably involves the formation of unusual DNA structures during DNA replication, repair and recombination. Experimental advances towards explaining the mechanisms of repeat instability have broadened our understanding of this mutational process. They have revealed surprising ways in which metabolic pathways can drive or protect from repeat instability.

  8. Noncoding RNA for Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaomin; Zhang, Dongmei; Xiong, Minmin; Zhang, Lin

    Gene therapy is a prospective strategy to modulate gene expression level in specific cells to treat human inherited diseases, cancers, and acquired disorders. A subset of noncoding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interference RNAs (siRNAs), compose an important class of widely used effectors for gene therapy, especially in cancer treatment. Functioning through the RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism, miRNA and siRNA show potent ability in silencing oncogenic factors for cancer gene therapy. For a better understanding of this field, we reviewed the mechanism and biological function, the principles of design and synthesis, and the delivery strategies of noncoding RNAs with clinical potentials in cancer gene therapy.

  9. The yeast noncoding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Panni, Simona; Prakash, Ananth; Bateman, Alex; Orchard, Sandra

    2017-10-01

    This article describes the creation of the first expert manually curated noncoding RNA interaction networks for S. cerevisiae The RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interaction networks have been carefully extracted from the experimental literature and made available through the IntAct database (www.ebi.ac.uk/intact). We provide an initial network analysis and compare their properties to the much larger protein-protein interaction network. We find that the proteins that bind to ncRNAs in the network contain only a small proportion of classical RNA binding domains. We also see an enrichment of WD40 domains suggesting their direct involvement in ncRNA interactions. We discuss the challenges in collecting noncoding RNA interaction data and the opportunities for worldwide collaboration to fill the unmet need for this data. © 2017 Panni et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. The Landscape of long noncoding RNA classification.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Advances in the depth and quality of transcriptome sequencing have revealed many new classes of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNA classification has mushroomed to accommodate these new findings, even though the real dimensions and complexity of the noncoding transcriptome remain unknown. Although evidence of functionality of specific lncRNAs continues to accumulate, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental conceptual unambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the annotation and interpretation of noncoding transcriptome data. It also might undermine integration of the new genomic methods and datasets in an effort to unravel the function of lncRNA. Here, we review existing lncRNA classifications, nomenclature, and terminology. Then, we describe the conceptual guidelines that have emerged for their classification and functional annotation based on expanding and more comprehensive use of large systems biology-based datasets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-coding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricciuti, Biagio; Mecca, Carmen; Crinò, Lucio; Baglivo, Sara; Cenci, Matteo; Metro, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that protein-coding genes represent less than 2% of all human genome, and the evidence that more than 90% of it is actively transcribed, changed the classical point of view of the central dogma of molecular biology, which was always based on the assumption that RNA functions mainly as an intermediate bridge between DNA sequences and protein synthesis machinery. Accumulating data indicates that non-coding RNAs are involved in different physiological processes, providing for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. They are important regulators of gene expression, cellular differentiation, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and stem cell maintenance. Alterations and disruptions of their expression or activity have increasingly been associated with pathological changes of cancer cells, this evidence and the prospect of using these molecules as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets, make currently non-coding RNAs among the most relevant molecules in cancer research. In this paper we will provide an overview of non-coding RNA function and disruption in lung cancer biology, also focusing on their potential as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:25593996

  12. Conserved Noncoding Sequences in the Grasses4

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Dan Choffnes; Bashir, Ali; Lee, Chunghau; Thomas, Brian C.; Ko, Cynthia; Goff, Stephen A.; Freeling, Michael

    2003-01-01

    As orthologous genes from related species diverge over time, some sequences are conserved in noncoding regions. In mammals, large phylogenetic footprints, or conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), are known to be common features of genes. Here we present the first large-scale analysis of plant genes for CNSs. We used maize and rice, maximally diverged members of the grass family of monocots. Using a local sequence alignment set to deliver only significant alignments, we found one or more CNSs in the noncoding regions of the majority of genes studied. Grass genes have dramatically fewer and much smaller CNSs than mammalian genes. Twenty-seven percent of grass gene comparisons revealed no CNSs. Genes functioning in upstream regulatory roles, such as transcription factors, are greatly enriched for CNSs relative to genes encoding enzymes or structural proteins. Further, we show that a CNS cluster in an intron of the knotted1 homeobox gene serves as a site of negative regulation. We showthat CNSs in the adh1 gene do not correlate with known cis-acting sites. We discuss the potential meanings of CNSs and their value as analytical tools and evolutionary characters. We advance the idea that many CNSs function to lock-in gene regulatory decisions. PMID:12952874

  13. Non-coding RNAs in cardiovascular ageing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Piccoli, Maria Teresa; Thum, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The increasing burden of ageing populations and their healthcare expenditure is a major challenge worldwide. Ageing is a complex disorder and can be defined as progressive decline in function with time leading to increased incidence of various cardiovascular, neurological and immunological diseases. The human genome comprises of many protein coding and even more non-coding RNA genes. MicroRNAs, a class of non-coding RNA, regulate the expression of multiple messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally and are reported to be involved in crucial aspects of cell biology encompassing ageing. Recently, several studies have reported the regulation of microRNAs with ageing and microRNAs like miR-34 have emerged as critical regulator of ageing extending from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. Here, we summarize the reported role of microRNAs as well as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the process of ageing with a special emphasis on cardiovascular ageing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Solution structure of a DNA quadruplex containing ALS and FTD related GGGGCC repeat stabilized by 8-bromodeoxyguanosine substitution.

    PubMed

    Brčić, Jasna; Plavec, Janez

    2015-09-30

    A prolonged expansion of GGGGCC repeat within non-coding region of C9orf72 gene has been identified as the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which are devastating neurodegenerative disorders. Formation of unusual secondary structures within expanded GGGGCC repeat, including DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes and R-loops was proposed to drive ALS and FTD pathogenesis. Initial NMR investigation on DNA oligonucleotides with four repeat units as the shortest model with the ability to form an unimolecular G-quadruplex indicated their folding into multiple G-quadruplex structures in the presence of K(+) ions. Single dG to 8Br-dG substitution at position 21 in oligonucleotide d[(G4C2)3G4] and careful optimization of folding conditions enabled formation of mostly a single G-quadruplex species, which enabled determination of a high-resolution structure with NMR. G-quadruplex structure adopted by d[(G4C2)3GG(Br)GG] is composed of four G-quartets, which are connected by three edgewise C-C loops. All four strands adopt antiparallel orientation to one another and have alternating syn-anti progression of glycosidic conformation of guanine residues. One of the cytosines in every loop is stacked upon the G-quartet contributing to a very compact and stable structure.

  15. Expansion Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2014-01-01

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. Here we report the discovery that, by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable super-resolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with effective ~70 nm lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color super-resolution imaging of ~107 μm3 of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope. PMID:25592419

  16. Long Noncoding RNA Identification: Comparing Machine Learning Based Tools for Long Noncoding Transcripts Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a kind of noncoding RNA with length more than 200 nucleotides, which aroused interest of people in recent years. Lots of studies have confirmed that human genome contains many thousands of lncRNAs which exert great influence over some critical regulators of cellular process. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, a great quantity of sequences is waiting for exploitation. Thus, many programs are developed to distinguish differences between coding and long noncoding transcripts. Different programs are generally designed to be utilised under different circumstances and it is sensible and practical to select an appropriate method according to a certain situation. In this review, several popular methods and their advantages, disadvantages, and application scopes are summarised to assist people in employing a suitable method and obtaining a more reliable result. PMID:28042575

  17. Long Noncoding RNA Identification: Comparing Machine Learning Based Tools for Long Noncoding Transcripts Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Han, Siyu; Liang, Yanchun; Li, Ying; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a kind of noncoding RNA with length more than 200 nucleotides, which aroused interest of people in recent years. Lots of studies have confirmed that human genome contains many thousands of lncRNAs which exert great influence over some critical regulators of cellular process. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, a great quantity of sequences is waiting for exploitation. Thus, many programs are developed to distinguish differences between coding and long noncoding transcripts. Different programs are generally designed to be utilised under different circumstances and it is sensible and practical to select an appropriate method according to a certain situation. In this review, several popular methods and their advantages, disadvantages, and application scopes are summarised to assist people in employing a suitable method and obtaining a more reliable result.

  18. Detecting selection in noncoding regions of nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    We present a maximum-likelihood method for examining the selection pressure and detecting positive selection in noncoding regions using multiple aligned DNA sequences. The rate of substitution in noncoding regions relative to the rate of synonymous substitution in coding regions is modeled by a parameter zeta. When a site in a noncoding region is evolving neutrally zeta = 1, while zeta > 1 indicates the action of positive selection, and zeta < 1 suggests negative selection. Using a combined model for the evolution of noncoding and coding regions, we develop two likelihood-ratio tests for the detection of selection in noncoding regions. Data analysis of both simulated and real viral data is presented. Using the new method we show that positive selection in viruses is acting primarily in protein-coding regions and is rare or absent in noncoding regions. PMID:15238543

  19. Long Noncoding RNAs in Metabolic Syndrome Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are very complex and their all functions have yet to be fully clarified. Noncoding genes (noncoding RNA, sequences, and pseudogenes) comprise 67% of all genes and they are represented by housekeeping noncoding RNAs (transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), small nuclear RNA (snRNA), and small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA)) that are engaged in basic cellular processes and by regulatory noncoding RNA (short and long noncoding RNA (ncRNA)) that are important for gene expression/transcript stability. In this review, we summarize data concerning the significance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in metabolic syndrome related disorders, focusing on adipose tissue and pancreatic islands. PMID:27881904

  20. Thermal Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    All solid materials, when cooled to low temperatures experience a change in physical dimensions which called "thermal contraction" and is typically lower than 1 % in volume in the 4-300 K temperature range. Although the effect is small, it can have a heavy impact on the design of cryogenic devices. The thermal contraction of different materials may vary by as much as an order of magnitude: since cryogenic devices are constructed at room temperature with a lot of different materials, one of the major concerns is the effect of the different thermal contraction and the resulting thermal stress that may occur when two dissimilar materials are bonded together. In this chapter, theory of thermal contraction is reported in Sect. 1.2 . Section 1.3 is devoted to the phenomenon of negative thermal expansion and its applications.

  1. Possible Role of Natural Selection in the Formation of Tandem-Repetitive Noncoding DNA

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, W.; Cho, S.

    1994-01-01

    A simulation model of sequence-dependent amplification, unequal crossing over and mutation is analyzed. This model predicts the spontaneous formation of tandem-repetitive patterns of noncoding DNA from arbitrary sequences for a wide range of parameter values. Natural selection is found to play an essential role in this self-organizing process. Natural selection which is modeled as a mechanism for controlling the length of a nucleotide string but not the sequence itself favors the formation of tandem-repetitive structures. Two measures of sequence heterogeneity, inter-repeat variability and repeat length, are analyzed in detail. For fixed mutation rate, both inter-repeat variability and repeat length are found to increase with decreasing rates of (unequal) crossing over. The results are compared with data on micro-, mini- and satellite DNAs. The properties of minisatellites and satellite DNAs resemble the simulated structures very closely. This suggests that unequal crossing over is a dominant long-range ordering force which keeps these arrays homogeneous even in regions of very low recombination rates, such as at satellite DNA loci. Our analysis also indicates that in regions of low rates of (unequal) crossing over, inter-repeat variability is maintained at a low level at the expense of much larger repeat units (multimeric repeats), which are characteristic of satellite DNA. In contrast, the microsatellite data do not fit the proposed model well, suggesting that unequal crossing over does not act on these very short tandem arrays. PMID:8138169

  2. Noncoding chloroplast DNA variation in Mexican pines.

    PubMed

    Perez de la Rosa, J; Harris, S A; Farjon, A

    1995-11-01

    Universal primers were used for PCR amplification of three noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA in order to study restriction site variation in 12 Mexican pine species. Two length mutations were identified that are of diagnostic value for two subgenera or sections of the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of the restriction site and length variation showed patterns of variation largely consistent with previous arrangements of these pines, except for the position of Pinus nelsonii, indicating that Pinus section Parraya Mayr, as circumscribed by Little and Critchfield (1969) and later authors, is not a monophyletic group.

  3. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Storz, Gisela

    2002-05-17

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been found to have roles in a great variety of processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, RNA processing and modification, messenger RNA stability and translation, and even protein degradation and translocation. Recent studies indicate that ncRNAs are far more abundant and important than initially imagined. These findings raise several fundamental questions: How many ncRNAs are encoded by a genome? Given the absence of a diagnostic open reading frame, how can these genes be identified? How can all the functions of ncRNAs be elucidated?

  4. Trinucleotide Repeats: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Bruno; Fernandes, Sara; Abreu, Isabel A.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions are present in a wide range of genes involved in several neurological disorders, being directly involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis through modulation of gene expression and/or the function of the RNA or protein it encodes. Structural and functional information on the role of TNR sequences in RNA and protein is crucial to understand the effect of TNR expansions in neurodegeneration. Therefore, this review intends to provide to the reader a structural and functional view of TNR and encoded homopeptide expansions, with a particular emphasis on polyQ expansions and its role at inducing the self-assembly, aggregation and functional alterations of the carrier protein, which culminates in neuronal toxicity and cell death. Detail will be given to the Machado-Joseph Disease-causative and polyQ-containing protein, ataxin-3, providing clues for the impact of polyQ expansion and its flanking regions in the modulation of ataxin-3 molecular interactions, function, and aggregation. PMID:23801983

  5. DASHR: database of small human noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yuk Yee; Kuksa, Pavel P.; Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Valladares, Otto; Ungar, Lyle H.; Kannan, Sampath; Gregory, Brian D.; Wang, Li-San

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are highly abundant RNAs, typically <100 nucleotides long, that act as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Although thousands of sncRNA genes are known to exist in the human genome, no single database provides searchable, unified annotation, and expression information for full sncRNA transcripts and mature RNA products derived from these larger RNAs. Here, we present the Database of small human noncoding RNAs (DASHR). DASHR contains the most comprehensive information to date on human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products. DASHR provides a simple user interface for researchers to view sequence and secondary structure, compare expression levels, and evidence of specific processing across all sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products in various human tissues. DASHR annotation and expression data covers all major classes of sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting (piRNAs), small nuclear, nucleolar, cytoplasmic (sn-, sno-, scRNAs, respectively), transfer (tRNAs), and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Currently, DASHR (v1.0) integrates 187 smRNA high-throughput sequencing (smRNA-seq) datasets with over 2.5 billion reads and annotation data from multiple public sources. DASHR contains annotations for ∼48 000 human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products, 82% of which are expressed in one or more of the curated tissues. DASHR is available at http://lisanwanglab.org/DASHR. PMID:26553799

  6. Widespread noncoding circular RNAs in plants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Chen, Li; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-10-01

    A large number of noncoding circular RNAs (circRNAs) with regulatory potency have been identified in animals, but little attention has been given to plant circRNAs. We performed genome-wide identification of circRNAs in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana using publically available RNA-Seq data, analyzed and compared features of plant and animal circRNAs. circRNAs (12037 and 6012) were identified in Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively, with 56% (10/18) of the sampled rice exonic circRNAs validated experimentally. Parent genes of over 700 exonic circRNAs were orthologues between rice and Arabidopsis, suggesting conservation of circRNAs in plants. The introns flanking plant circRNAs were much longer than introns from linear genes, and possessed less repetitive elements and reverse complementary sequences than the flanking introns of animal circRNAs. Plant circRNAs showed diverse expression patterns, and 27 rice exonic circRNAs were found to be differentially expressed under phosphate-sufficient and -starvation conditions. A significantly positive correlation was observed for the expression profiles of some circRNAs and their parent genes. Our results demonstrated that circRNAs are widespread in plants, revealed the common and distinct features of circRNAs between plants and animals, and suggested that circRNAs could be a critical class of noncoding regulators in plants. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Long Noncoding RNAs: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Johnny T. Y.; Colognori, David; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2013-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained widespread attention in recent years as a potentially new and crucial layer of biological regulation. lncRNAs of all kinds have been implicated in a range of developmental processes and diseases, but knowledge of the mechanisms by which they act is still surprisingly limited, and claims that almost the entirety of the mammalian genome is transcribed into functional noncoding transcripts remain controversial. At the same time, a small number of well-studied lncRNAs have given us important clues about the biology of these molecules, and a few key functional and mechanistic themes have begun to emerge, although the robustness of these models and classification schemes remains to be seen. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of the lncRNA field, discussing what is known about the genomic contexts, biological functions, and mechanisms of action of lncRNAs. We also reflect on how the recent interest in lncRNAs is deeply rooted in biology’s longstanding concern with the evolution and function of genomes. PMID:23463798

  8. Small non-coding RNA and cancer.

    PubMed

    Romano, Giulia; Veneziano, Dario; Acunzo, Mario; Croce, Carlo M

    2017-05-01

    The ENCODE project has reported that at least 80% of the human genome is biologically active, yet only a small part of human DNA encodes for protein. The massive amount of RNA transcribed but not translated into protein can be classified as housekeeping RNA (such as rRNA, tRNA) and regulatory RNA (such as miRNA, piRNA, lncRNA). Small non-coding RNAs, in particular, have been the focus of many studies in the last 20 years and their fundamental role in many human diseases is currently well established. Inter alia, their role in cancer development and progression, as well as in drug resistance, is being increasingly investigated. In this review, focusing our attention on recent research results, we provide an overview of the four large classes of small non-coding RNAs, namely, miRNAs, piRNAs, snoRNA and the new class of tRNA-derived fragments, highlighting their fundamental role in cancer and their potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Non-coding RNAs and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Fei; Chen, Sheng-Can; Xia, Tian; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Shao, Yong-Fu; Xiao, Bing-Xiu; Guo, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play key roles in development, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Altered ncRNA expression is associated with gastric cancer occurrence, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is significantly related to gastric cancer tumor stage, size, differentiation and metastasis. MiRNAs interrupt cellular signaling pathways, inhibit the activity of tumor suppressor genes, and affect the cell cycle in gastric cancer cells. Some miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-106a and miR-421, could be potential markers for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new research hotspot among cancer-associated ncRNAs, play important roles in epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Several gastric cancer-associated lncRNAs, such as CCAT1, GACAT1, H19, and SUMO1P3, have been explored. In addition, Piwi-interacting RNAs, another type of small ncRNA that is recognized by gastroenterologists, are involved in gastric carcinogenesis, and piR-651/823 represents an efficient diagnostic biomarker of gastric cancer that can be detected in the blood and gastric juice. Small interfering RNAs also function in post-transcriptional regulation in gastric cancer and might be useful in gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833871

  10. Fast and reliable prediction of noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Washietl, Stefan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient method for detecting functional RNAs. The approach, which combines comparative sequence analysis and structure prediction, already has yielded excellent results for a small number of aligned sequences and is suitable for large-scale genomic screens. It consists of two basic components: (i) a measure for RNA secondary structure conservation based on computing a consensus secondary structure, and (ii) a measure for thermodynamic stability, which, in the spirit of a z score, is normalized with respect to both sequence length and base composition but can be calculated without sampling from shuffled sequences. Functional RNA secondary structures can be identified in multiple sequence alignments with high sensitivity and high specificity. We demonstrate that this approach is not only much more accurate than previous methods but also significantly faster. The method is implemented in the program rnaz, which can be downloaded from www.tbi.univie.ac.at/~wash/RNAz. We screened all alignments of length n ≥ 50 in the Comparative Regulatory Genomics database, which compiles conserved noncoding elements in upstream regions of orthologous genes from human, mouse, rat, Fugu, and zebrafish. We recovered all of the known noncoding RNAs and cis-acting elements with high significance and found compelling evidence for many other conserved RNA secondary structures not described so far to our knowledge. PMID:15665081

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci Identify Functional Noncoding Variation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Holger

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of noncoding alterations in cancer genomes presents an unresolved problem in cancer studies. While the impact of somatic variations in protein-coding regions is widely accepted, noncoding aberrations are mostly considered as passenger events. However, with the advance of genome-wide profiling strategies, alterations outside the coding context entered the focus, and multiple examples highlight the role of gene deregulation as cancer-driving events. This review describes the implication of noncoding alterations in oncogenesis and provides a theoretical framework for the identification of causal somatic variants using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Assuming that functional noncoding alterations affect quantifiable regulatory processes, somatic QTL studies constitute a valuable strategy to pinpoint cancer gene deregulation. Eventually, the comprehensive identification and interpretation of coding and noncoding alterations will guide our future understanding of cancer biology.

  12. A panoramic view of yeast noncoding RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen Tao; Robinson, Mark D; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Morris, Quaid; Davierwala, Armaity P; Grigull, Jörg; Yang, Xueqi; Zhang, Wen; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Ryan, Owen W; Datta, Nira; Jojic, Vladimir; Pal, Chris; Canadien, Veronica; Richards, Dawn; Beattie, Bryan; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J; Roweis, Sam; Frey, Brendan J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F; Hughes, Timothy R

    2003-06-27

    Predictive analysis using publicly available yeast functional genomics and proteomics data suggests that many more proteins may be involved in biogenesis of ribonucleoproteins than are currently known. Using a microarray that monitors abundance and processing of noncoding RNAs, we analyzed 468 yeast strains carrying mutations in protein-coding genes, most of which have not previously been associated with RNA or RNP synthesis. Many strains mutated in uncharacterized genes displayed aberrant noncoding RNA profiles. Ten factors involved in noncoding RNA biogenesis were verified by further experimentation, including a protein required for 20S pre-rRNA processing (Tsr2p), a protein associated with the nuclear exosome (Lrp1p), and a factor required for box C/D snoRNA accumulation (Bcd1p). These data present a global view of yeast noncoding RNA processing and confirm that many currently uncharacterized yeast proteins are involved in biogenesis of noncoding RNA.

  13. Trinucleotide repeats associated with human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mitas, M

    1997-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansion diseases (TREDs) are characterized by the coincidence of disease manifestation with amplification of d(CAG. CTG), d(CGG.CCG) or d(GAA.TTC) repeats contained within specific genes. Amplification of triplet repeats continues in offspring of affected individuals, which generally results in progressive severity of the disease and/or an earlier age of onset, phenomena clinically referred to as 'anticipation'. Recent biophysical and biochemical studies reveal that five of the six [d(CGG)n, d(CCG)n, (CAG)n, d(CTG)n and d(GAA)n] complementary sequences that are associated with human disease form stable hairpin structures. Although the triplet repeat sequences d(GAC)n and d(GTC)n also form hairpins, repeats of the double-stranded forms of these sequences are conspicuously absent from DNA sequence databases and are not anticipated to be associated with human disease. With the exception of d(GAG)n and d(GTG)n, the remaining triplet repeat sequences are unlikely to form hairpin structures at physiological salt and temperature. The details of hairpin structures containing trinucleotide repeats are summarized and discussed with respect to potential mechanisms of triplet repeat expansion and d(CGG.CCG) n methylation/demethylation. PMID:9171073

  14. [The polymorphism and structural peculiarities of two noncoding regions of liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (Plathelminthes: Trematoda) mitochondrial genome].

    PubMed

    Korchagina, E V; Vasil'ev, V A; Korchagin, V I; Movsesian, S O; Semenova, S K

    2009-01-01

    Structural characteristics and polymorphism of long (LNR) and short (SNR) mitochondrial non-coding regions of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica were studied. The flukes were obtained from several populations of Russia and Belarus. The amplification of LNR yielded a set of 10 fragments with the length of neighbouring ones differing in one tandem repeat (85 bp; published earlier for Australian fluke). LNR amplification fragments of different length were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the LNR sequences of Australian and Belarussian flukes revealed 3 nucleotide substitutions and one point heteroplasmy of the first nucleotides in the imperfect repeat and four adjacent perfect repeats. Positions of the three mutations coincide in perfect and imperfect repeats and the frequency of mutations is 4-4.7% while the frequency of heteroplasmic sites varies from 0.1 to 1.2%. It was shown that the presence of mutations and the heteroplasmy of one site can change the structure and stability of the putative secondary structures of the perfect and imperfect re- peats. The amplification of SNR of F. hepatica from several populations yielded fragments which differed from the published SNR sequence of Australian F. hepatica in the single transversion. Both non-coding regions have several conservative and potentially regulatory sequences. Probable cause of heteroplasmy and concerted origin of substitutions in different repeats are discussed.

  15. Visualization of Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Youtaro; Fanucchi, Stephanie; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2017-01-01

    Enhancers are principal regulators that allow spatiotemporal tissue-specific control of gene expression. While mounting evidence suggests that enhancer-derived long noncoding RNAs (long ncRNAs), including enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), are an important component of enhancer function, their expression has not been broadly analyzed at a single cell level via imaging techniques. This protocol describes a method to image eRNA in single cells by in situ hybridization followed by tyramide signal amplification (TSA). The procedure can be multiplexed to simultaneously visualize both eRNA and protein-coding transcript at the site of transcriptional elongation, thereby permitting analysis of dynamics between the two transcript species in single cells. Our approach is not limited to eRNAs, but can be implemented on other transcripts.

  16. Long noncoding RNA in hematopoiesis and immunity.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Ansuman T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-05-19

    Dynamic gene expression during cellular differentiation is tightly coordinated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. An emerging theme is the central role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of this specificity. Recent advances demonstrate that lncRNAs are expressed in a lineage-specific manner and control the development of several cell types in the hematopoietic system. Moreover, specific lncRNAs are induced to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. lncRNAs can function via RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA, and RNA-protein target interactions. As a result, they affect several stages of gene regulation, including chromatin modification, mRNA biogenesis, and protein signaling. We discuss recent advances, future prospects, and challenges in understanding the roles of lncRNAs in immunity and immune-mediated diseases.

  17. Noncoding RNA Control of Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Senescent cells accumulate in normal tissues with advancing age and arise by long-term culture of primary cells. Senescence develops following exposure to a range of stress-causing agents and broadly influences the physiology and pathology of tissues, organs, and systems in the body. While many proteins are known to control senescence, numerous noncoding (nc)RNAs are also found to promote or repress the senescent phenotype. Here, we review the regulatory ncRNAs (primarily microRNAs and lncRNAs) identified to-date as key modulators of senescence. We highlight the major senescent pathways (p53/p21 and pRB/p16), as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and other senescence-associated events governed by ncRNAs, and discuss the importance of understanding comprehensively the ncRNAs implicated in cell senescence. PMID:26331977

  18. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  19. The specificity of long noncoding RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Gloss, Brian S; Dinger, Marcel E

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as a fundamental molecular class whose members play pivotal roles in the regulation of the genome. The observation of pervasive transcription of mammalian genomes in the early 2000s sparked a revolution in the understanding of information flow in eukaryotic cells and the incredible flexibility and dynamic nature of the transcriptome. As a molecular class, distinct loci yielding lncRNAs are set to outnumber those yielding mRNAs. However, like many important discoveries, the road leading to uncovering this diverse class of molecules that act through a remarkable repertoire of mechanisms, was not a straight one. The same characteristic that most distinguishes lncRNAs from mRNAs, i.e. their developmental-stage, tissue-, and cell-specific expression, was one of the major impediments to their discovery and recognition as potentially functional regulatory molecules. With growing numbers of lncRNAs being assigned to biological functions, the specificity of lncRNA expression is now increasingly recognized as a characteristic that imbues lncRNAs with great potential as biomarkers and for the development of highly targeted therapeutics. Here we review the history of lncRNA research and how technological advances and insight into biological complexity have gone hand-in-hand in shaping this revolution. We anticipate that as increasing numbers of these molecules, often described as the dark matter of the genome, are characterized and the structure-function relationship of lncRNAs becomes better understood, it may ultimately be feasible to decipher what these non-(protein)-coding genes encode. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  1. Comparative and Transcriptome Analyses Uncover Key Aspects of Coding- and Long Noncoding RNAs in Flatworm Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Eric; Blair, David; Guerrero-Hernández, Carlos; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the conservation of various features of mitochondrial genomes has been instrumental in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Despite extensive sequence evidence, it has not previously been possible to conclusively resolve some key aspects of flatworm mitochondrial genomes, including generally conserved traits, such as start codons, noncoding regions, the full complement of tRNAs, and whether ATP8 is, or is not, encoded by this extranuclear genome. In an effort to address these difficulties, we sought to determine the mitochondrial transcriptomes and genomes of sexual and asexual taxa of freshwater triclads, a group previously poorly represented in flatworm mitogenomic studies. We have discovered evidence for an alternative start codon, an extended cox1 gene, a previously undescribed conserved open reading frame, long noncoding RNAs, and a highly conserved gene order across the large evolutionary distances represented within the triclads. Our findings contribute to the expansion and refinement of mitogenomics to address evolutionary issues in this diverse group of animals. PMID:26921295

  2. Long noncoding RNAs: functional surprises from the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Wilusz, Jeremy E.; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Most of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, yielding a complex network of transcripts that includes tens of thousands of long noncoding RNAs with little or no protein-coding capacity. Although the vast majority of long noncoding RNAs have yet to be characterized thoroughly, many of these transcripts are unlikely to represent transcriptional “noise” as a significant number have been shown to exhibit cell type-specific expression, localization to subcellular compartments, and association with human diseases. Here, we highlight recent efforts that have identified a myriad of molecular functions for long noncoding RNAs. In some cases, it appears that simply the act of noncoding RNA transcription is sufficient to positively or negatively affect the expression of nearby genes. However, in many cases, the long noncoding RNAs themselves serve key regulatory roles that were assumed previously to be reserved for proteins, such as regulating the activity or localization of proteins and serving as organizational frameworks of subcellular structures. In addition, many long noncoding RNAs are processed to yield small RNAs or, conversely, modulate how other RNAs are processed. It is thus becoming increasingly clear that long noncoding RNAs can function via numerous paradigms and are key regulatory molecules in the cell. PMID:19571179

  3. Long Noncoding RNAs in Cardiovascular Pathology, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bär, Christian; Chatterjee, Shambhabi; Thum, Thomas

    2016-11-08

    Vast parts of mammalian genomes encode for transcripts that are not further translated into proteins. The purpose of the majority of such noncoding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) remained paradoxical for a long time. However, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that long noncoding RNAs are dynamically expressed in different cell types, diseases, or developmental stages to execute a wide variety of regulatory roles at virtually every step of gene expression and translation. Indeed, long noncoding RNAs influence gene expression via epigenetic modulations, through regulating alternative splicing, or by acting as molecular sponges. The abundance of long noncoding RNAs in the cardiovascular system indicates that they may be part of a complex regulatory network governing physiology and pathology of the heart. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted functions of long noncoding RNAs and highlight the current literature with an emphasis on cardiac development and disease. Furthermore, as the enormous spectrum of long noncoding RNAs potentially opens up new avenues for diagnosis and prevention of heart failure, we ultimately evaluate the futuristic prospects of long noncoding RNAs as biomarkers, and therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders, as well.

  4. The Effects of Expansions, Questions and Cloze Procedures on Children's Conversational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Tze-Peng; Moran, Catherine; Foster-Cohen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of expansion as a technique for facilitating children's language and conversational skills is well known (Scherer and Olswang, 1984). Expansion, however, can appear alone or in combination with other techniques. Using a repeated measures design, this study aimed to compare the effects of expansion alone (EA); expansion combined…

  5. The Effects of Expansions, Questions and Cloze Procedures on Children's Conversational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Tze-Peng; Moran, Catherine; Foster-Cohen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of expansion as a technique for facilitating children's language and conversational skills is well known (Scherer and Olswang, 1984). Expansion, however, can appear alone or in combination with other techniques. Using a repeated measures design, this study aimed to compare the effects of expansion alone (EA); expansion combined…

  6. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-12-05

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome.

  7. Temporal profiling of the coding and noncoding murine cytomegalovirus transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Ross, Alan; Kerr, Lorraine E; Salvo-Chirnside, Eliane; Lisnic, Vanda Juranic; López-Campos, Guillermo H; García-Ramírez, José J; Messerle, Martin; Trgovcich, Joanne; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2011-06-01

    The global transcriptional program of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), involving coding, noncoding, and antisense transcription, remains unknown. Here we report an oligonucleotide custom microarray platform capable of measuring both coding and noncoding transcription on a genome-wide scale. By profiling MCMV wild-type and immediate-early mutant strains in fibroblasts, we found rapid activation of the transcriptome by 6.5 h postinfection, with absolute dependency on ie3, but not ie1 or ie2, for genomic programming of viral gene expression. Evidence is also presented to show, for the first time, genome-wide noncoding and bidirectional transcription at late stages of MCMV infection.

  8. A long noncoding way to alternative splicing in plant development.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-07-28

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Bardou et al. (2014) elucidate how long, highly structured noncoding RNAs control alternative splicing regulators that specifically mediate the action of the hormone auxin in the promotion of lateral root growth in Arabidopsis.

  9. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  10. Nonextensive statistical approach to non-coding human DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Th.; Provata, A.; Tirnakli, U.

    2008-04-01

    We use q-exponential distributions, which maximize the nonextensive entropy Sq (defined as Sq≡(1-∑ipiq)/(q-1)), to study the size distributions of non-coding DNA (including introns and intergenic regions) in all human chromosomes. We show that the value of the exponent q describing the non-coding size distributions is similar for all chromosomes and varies between 2≤q≤2.3 with the exception of chromosomes X and Y.

  11. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Madzia P; Krude, Torsten

    2015-09-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs.

  12. A Machine Learning Approach for Accurate Annotation of Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Wang, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Searching genomes to locate noncoding RNA genes with known secondary structure is an important problem in bioinformatics. In general, the secondary structure of a searched noncoding RNA is defined with a structure model constructed from the structural alignment of a set of sequences from its family. Computing the optimal alignment between a sequence and a structure model is the core part of an algorithm that can search genomes for noncoding RNAs. In practice, a single structure model may not be sufficient to capture all crucial features important for a noncoding RNA family. In this paper, we develop a novel machine learning approach that can efficiently search genomes for noncoding RNAs with high accuracy. During the search procedure, a sequence segment in the searched genome sequence is processed and a feature vector is extracted to represent it. Based on the feature vector, a classifier is used to determine whether the sequence segment is the searched ncRNA or not. Our testing results show that this approach is able to efficiently capture crucial features of a noncoding RNA family. Compared with existing search tools, it significantly improves the accuracy of genome annotation. PMID:26357266

  13. Hypoxic regulation of the noncoding genome and NEAT1

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Activation of hypoxia pathways is both associated with and contributes to an aggressive phenotype across multiple types of solid cancers. The regulation of gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key element in this response. HIF directly upregulates the expression of many hundreds of protein-coding genes, which act to both improve oxygen delivery and to reduce oxygen demand. However, it is now becoming apparent that many classes of noncoding RNAs are also regulated by hypoxia, with several (e.g. micro RNAs, long noncoding RNAs and antisense RNAs) under direct transcriptional regulation by HIF. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding RNAs may act as effectors of the indirect response to HIF by acting on specific coding transcripts or by affecting generic RNA-processing pathways. In addition, noncoding RNAs may also act as modulators of the HIF pathway, either by integrating other physiological responses or, in the case of HIF-regulated, noncoding RNAs, by providing negative or positive feedback and feedforward loops that affect upstream or downstream components of the HIF cascade. These hypoxia-regulated, noncoding transcripts play important roles in the aggressive hypoxic phenotype observed in cancer. PMID:26590207

  14. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  15. Short stories on zebrafish long noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shadabul; Kaushik, Kriti; Leonard, Vincent Elvin; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Joshi, Adita; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2014-12-01

    The recent re-annotation of the transcriptome of human and other model organisms, using next-generation sequencing approaches, has unravelled a hitherto unknown repertoire of transcripts that do not have a potential to code for proteins. These transcripts have been largely classified into an amorphous class popularly known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). This discovery of lncRNAs in human and other model systems have added a new layer to the understanding of gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In recent years, three independent studies have discovered a number of lncRNAs expressed in different stages of zebrafish development and adult tissues using a high-throughput RNA sequencing approach, significantly adding to the repertoire of genes known in zebrafish. A subset of these transcripts also shows distinct and specific spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, pointing to a tight regulatory control and potential functional roles in development, organogenesis, and/ or homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the lncRNAs in zebrafish and discusses how their discovery could provide new insights into understanding biology, explaining mutant phenotypes, and helping in potentially modeling disease processes.

  16. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  17. Long noncoding RNAs in viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Puri; Morris, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections induce strong modifications in the cell transcriptome. Among the RNAs whose expression is altered by infection are long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). LncRNAs are transcripts with potential to function as RNA molecules. Infected cells may express viral lncRNAs, cellular lncRNAs and chimeric lncRNAs formed by viral and cellular sequences. Some viruses express viral lncRNAs whose function is essential for viral viability. They are transcribed by polymerase II or III and some of them can be processed by unique maturation steps performed by host cell machineries. Some viral lncRNAs control transcription, stability or translation of cellular and viral genes. Surprisingly, similar functions can be exerted by cellular lncRNAs induced by infection. Expression of cellular lncRNAs may be altered in response to viral replication or viral protein expression. However, many cellular lncRNAs respond to the antiviral pathways induced by infection. In fact, many lncRNAs function as positive or negative regulators of the innate antiviral response. Our current knowledge about the identity and function of lncRNAs in infected cells is very limited. However, research into this field has already helped in the identification of novel cellular pathways and may help in the development of therapeutic tools for the treatment of viral infections, autoimmune diseases, neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:26454188

  18. Short Stories on Zebrafish Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shadabul; Kaushik, Kriti; Leonard, Vincent Elvin; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Joshi, Adita

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The recent re-annotation of the transcriptome of human and other model organisms, using next-generation sequencing approaches, has unravelled a hitherto unknown repertoire of transcripts that do not have a potential to code for proteins. These transcripts have been largely classified into an amorphous class popularly known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). This discovery of lncRNAs in human and other model systems have added a new layer to the understanding of gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In recent years, three independent studies have discovered a number of lncRNAs expressed in different stages of zebrafish development and adult tissues using a high-throughput RNA sequencing approach, significantly adding to the repertoire of genes known in zebrafish. A subset of these transcripts also shows distinct and specific spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, pointing to a tight regulatory control and potential functional roles in development, organogenesis, and/ or homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the lncRNAs in zebrafish and discusses how their discovery could provide new insights into understanding biology, explaining mutant phenotypes, and helping in potentially modeling disease processes. PMID:25110965

  19. A Repeat Look at Repeating Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    A "repeating pattern" is a cyclical repetition of an identifiable core. Children in the primary grades usually begin pattern work with fairly simple patterns, such as AB, ABC, or ABB patterns. The unique letters represent unique elements, whereas the sequence of letters represents the core that is repeated. Based on color, shape,…

  20. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥ 200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 week) compared to both immature (4 week) and old (70 week) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 weeks) compared to both immature (4 weeks) and old (70 weeks) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  2. Poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9ORF72 repeats block global protein translation.

    PubMed

    Kanekura, Kohsuke; Yagi, Takuya; Cammack, Alexander J; Mahadevan, Jana; Kuroda, Masahiko; Harms, Matthew B; Miller, Timothy M; Urano, Fumihiko

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of the Chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This genetic alteration leads to the accumulation of five types of poly-dipeptides translated from the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat. Among these, poly-proline-arginine (poly-PR) and poly-glycine-arginine (poly-GR) peptides are known to be neurotoxic. However, the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with these poly-dipeptides are not clear. A proteomics approach identified a number of interacting proteins with poly-PR peptide, including mRNA-binding proteins, ribosomal proteins, translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors. Immunostaining of brain sections from patients with C9orf72 ALS showed that poly-GR was colocalized with a mRNA-binding protein, hnRNPA1. In vitro translation assays showed that poly-PR and poly-GR peptides made insoluble complexes with mRNA, restrained the access of translation factors to mRNA, and blocked protein translation. Our results demonstrate that impaired protein translation mediated by poly-PR and poly-GR peptides plays a role in neurotoxicity and reveal that the pathways altered by the poly-dipeptides-mRNA complexes are potential therapeutic targets for treatment of C9orf72 FTD/ALS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  4. Reptiles and Mammals Have Differentially Retained Long Conserved Noncoding Sequences from the Amniote Ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Janes, D.E.; Chapus, C.; Gondo, Y.; Clayton, D.F.; Sinha, S.; Blatti, C.A.; Organ, C.L.; Fujita, M.K.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Edwards, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation. PMID:21183607

  5. Reptiles and mammals have differentially retained long conserved noncoding sequences from the amniote ancestor.

    PubMed

    Janes, D E; Chapus, C; Gondo, Y; Clayton, D F; Sinha, S; Blatti, C A; Organ, C L; Fujita, M K; Balakrishnan, C N; Edwards, S V

    2011-01-01

    Many noncoding regions of genomes appear to be essential to genome function. Conservation of large numbers of noncoding sequences has been reported repeatedly among mammals but not thus far among birds and reptiles. By searching genomes of chicken (Gallus gallus), zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and green anole (Anolis carolinensis), we quantified the conservation among birds and reptiles and across amniotes of long, conserved noncoding sequences (LCNS), which we define as sequences ≥500 bp in length and exhibiting ≥95% similarity between species. We found 4,294 LCNS shared between chicken and zebra finch and 574 LCNS shared by the two birds and Anolis. The percent of genomes comprised by LCNS in the two birds (0.0024%) is notably higher than the percent in mammals (<0.0003% to <0.001%), differences that we show may be explained in part by differences in genome-wide substitution rates. We reconstruct a large number of LCNS for the amniote ancestor (ca. 8,630) and hypothesize differential loss and substantial turnover of these sites in descendent lineages. By contrast, we estimated a small role for recruitment of LCNS via acquisition of novel functions over time. Across amniotes, LCNS are significantly enriched with transcription factor binding sites for many developmental genes, and 2.9% of LCNS shared between the two birds show evidence of expression in brain expressed sequence tag databases. These results show that the rate of retention of LCNS from the amniote ancestor differs between mammals and Reptilia (including birds) and that this may reflect differing roles and constraints in gene regulation.

  6. Modal sensitivity for structural systems with repeated frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1987-01-01

    Repeated or closely packed modal frequencies are common physical occurrences for vibrating structures which are complex or possess multi-planes of symmetry. The computation of the sensitivity to structural modifications for these frequencies and mode shapes is made difficult by the fact that the mode shapes are not unique, since any linear combination of eigenvectors corresponding to a repeated eigenvalue is also an eigenvector. The work of Chen and Pan is extended, who used modal expansion techniques for accommodating the sensitivity analysis of structures with repeated eigenvalues. Starting with a discussion of the physical significance of sensitivity analysis for repeated frequency modes, a derivation is presented of the governing equations for the derivatives of a repeated eigenvalue. This is followed with a small example to illustrate the results. An efficient computation procedure, based upon an expansion of Nelson's ideas for large banded systems, is then proposed for systems with repeated or closely spaced eigenvalues.

  7. Noncoding RNAs, cytokines, and inflammation-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Marques-Rocha, José Luiz; Samblas, Mirian; Milagro, Fermin I; Bressan, Josefina; Martínez, J Alfredo; Marti, Amelia

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the onset and development of many diseases, including obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, autoimmune and degenerative diseases, asthma, periodontitis, and cirrhosis. The inflammation process is mediated by chemokines, cytokines, and different inflammatory cells. Although the molecules and mechanisms that regulate this primary defense mechanism are not fully understood, recent findings offer a putative role of noncoding RNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs), in the progression and management of the inflammatory response. These noncoding RNAs are crucial for the stability and maintenance of gene expression patterns that characterize some cell types, tissues, and biologic responses. Several miRNAs, such as miR-126, miR-132, miR-146, miR-155, and miR-221, have emerged as important transcriptional regulators of some inflammation-related mediators. Additionally, little is known about the involvement of long noncoding RNAs, long intergenic noncoding RNAs, and circular RNAs in inflammation-mediated processes and the homeostatic imbalance associated with metabolic disorders. These noncoding RNAs are emerging as biomarkers with diagnosis value, in prognosis protocols, or in the personalized treatment of inflammation-related alterations. In this context, this review summarizes findings in the field, highlighting those noncoding RNAs that regulate inflammation, with emphasis on recognized mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-18, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, VCAM-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The down-regulation or antagonism of the noncoding RNAs and the administration of exogenous miRNAs could be, in the near future, a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases.

  8. Portraying breast cancers with long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Van Grembergen, Olivier; Bizet, Martin; de Bony, Eric J.; Calonne, Emilie; Putmans, Pascale; Brohée, Sylvain; Olsen, Catharina; Guo, Mingzhou; Bontempi, Gianluca; Sotiriou, Christos; Defrance, Matthieu; Fuks, François

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may play a role in cancer development, but this role is not yet clear. We performed a genome-wide transcriptional survey to explore the lncRNA landscape across 995 breast tissue samples. We identified 215 lncRNAs whose genes are aberrantly expressed in breast tumors, as compared to normal samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of breast tumors on the basis of their lncRNAs revealed four breast cancer subgroups that correlate tightly with PAM50-defined mRNA-based subtypes. Using multivariate analysis, we identified no less than 210 lncRNAs prognostic of clinical outcome. By analyzing the coexpression of lncRNA genes and protein-coding genes, we inferred potential functions of the 215 dysregulated lncRNAs. We then associated subtype-specific lncRNAs with key molecular processes involved in cancer. A correlation was observed, on the one hand, between luminal A–specific lncRNAs and the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor–β pathways and, on the other hand, between basal-like–specific lncRNAs and the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–dependent pathways and of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we showed that a specific lncRNA, which we called CYTOR, plays a role in breast cancer. We confirmed its predicted functions, showing that it regulates genes involved in the EGFR/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and is required for cell proliferation, cell migration, and cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our work provides the most comprehensive analyses for lncRNA in breast cancers. Our findings suggest a wide range of biological functions associated with lncRNAs in breast cancer and provide a foundation for functional investigations that could lead to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27617288

  9. Long noncoding RNAs, chromatin, and development.

    PubMed

    Caley, Daniel P; Pink, Ryan C; Trujillano, Daniel; Carter, David R F

    2010-01-08

    The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  10. EBV noncoding RNA binds nascent RNA to drive host PAX5 to viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Yario, Therese A.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary EBER2 is an abundant nuclear noncoding RNA expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Probing its possible chromatin localization by CHART revealed EBER2’s presence at the terminal repeats (TRs) of the latent EBV genome, overlapping previously identified binding sites for the B-cell transcription factor PAX5. EBER2 interacts with and is required for PAX5 localization to the TRs. EBER2 knockdown phenocopies PAX5 depletion in upregulating the expression of LMP2A/B and LMP1, genes nearest the TRs. Knockdown of EBER2 also decreases EBV lytic replication, underscoring the essential role of the TRs in viral replication. Recruitment of the EBER2-PAX5 complex is mediated by base-pairing between EBER2 and nascent transcripts from the TR locus. The interaction is evolutionarily conserved in the related primate herpesvirus CeHV15 despite great sequence divergence. Using base-pairing with nascent RNA to guide an interacting transcription factor to its DNA target site is a previously undescribed function for a trans-acting noncoding RNA. PMID:25662012

  11. Somatic expansion in mouse and human carriers of Fragile X premutation alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lokanga, Rachel Adihe; Entezam, Ali; Kumari, Daman; Yudkin, Dmitry; Qin, Mei; Smith, Carolyn Beebe; Usdin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Repeat Expansion Diseases result from expansion of a specific tandem repeat. The three Fragile X-related disorders (FXDs) arise from germline expansions of a CGG•CCG repeat tract in the 5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. We show here that in addition to germline expansion, expansion also occurs in the somatic cells of both mice and humans carriers of premutation alleles. Expansion in mice primarily affects brain, testis and liver with very little expansion in heart or blood. Our data would be consistent with a simple two-factor model for the organ specificity. Somatic expansion in humans may contribute to the mosaicism often seen in individuals with one of the FXDs. Since expansion risk and disease severity are related to repeat number, somatic expansion may exacerbate disease severity and contribute to the age-related increased risk of expansion seen on paternal transmission in humans. Since little somatic expansion occurs in murine lymphocytes, our data also raise the possibility that there may be discordance in humans between repeat numbers measured in blood and that present in brain. This could explain, at least in part, the variable penetrance seen in some of these disorders. PMID:22887750

  12. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term "junk DNA" has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  13. Noncoding RNA gene detection using comparative sequence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Elena; Eddy, Sean R

    2001-01-01

    Background Noncoding RNA genes produce transcripts that exert their function without ever producing proteins. Noncoding RNA gene sequences do not have strong statistical signals, unlike protein coding genes. A reliable general purpose computational genefinder for noncoding RNA genes has been elusive. Results We describe a comparative sequence analysis algorithm for detecting novel structural RNA genes. The key idea is to test the pattern of substitutions observed in a pairwise alignment of two homologous sequences. A conserved coding region tends to show a pattern of synonymous substitutions, whereas a conserved structural RNA tends to show a pattern of compensatory mutations consistent with some base-paired secondary structure. We formalize this intuition using three probabilistic "pair-grammars": a pair stochastic context free grammar modeling alignments constrained by structural RNA evolution, a pair hidden Markov model modeling alignments constrained by coding sequence evolution, and a pair hidden Markov model modeling a null hypothesis of position-independent evolution. Given an input pairwise sequence alignment (e.g. from a BLASTN comparison of two related genomes) we classify the alignment into the coding, RNA, or null class according to the posterior probability of each class. Conclusions We have implemented this approach as a program, QRNA, which we consider to be a prototype structural noncoding RNA genefinder. Tests suggest that this approach detects noncoding RNA genes with a fair degree of reliability. PMID:11801179

  14. Regulation of the unfolded protein response by noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Mari; Samali, Afshin; Chevet, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Cells are exposed to various intrinsic and extrinsic stresses in both physiological and pathological conditions. To adapt to those conditions, cells have evolved various mechanisms to cope with the disturbances in protein demand, largely through the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but also through the integrated stress response (ISR). Both responses initiate downstream signaling to transcription factors that, in turn, trigger adaptive programs and/or in the case of prolonged stress, cell death mechanisms. Recently, noncoding RNAs, including microRNA and long noncoding RNA, have emerged as key players in the stress responses. These noncoding RNAs act as both regulators and effectors of the UPR and fine-tune the output of the stress signaling pathways. Although much is known about the UPR and the cross talk that exists between pathways, the contribution of small noncoding RNA has not been fully assessed. Herein we bring together and review the current known functions of noncoding RNA in regulating adaptive pathways in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, illustrating how they operate within the known UPR functions and contribute to diverse cellular outcomes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  16. The long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is responsive to neuronal activity and is associated with hyperexcitability states

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Guy; Briggs, James A.; Hwang, Do Won; Nayler, Sam P.; Fortuna, Patrick R. J.; Jonkhout, Nicky; Dachet, Fabien; Maag, Jesper L. V.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Singh, Erin M.; Avesson, Lotta; Kaczorowski, Dominik C.; Ozturk, Ezgi; Jones, Nigel C.; Vetter, Irina; Arriola-Martinez, Luis; Hu, Jianfei; Franco, Gloria R.; Warn, Victoria M.; Gong, Andrew; Dinger, Marcel E.; Rigo, Frank; Lipovich, Leonard; Morris, Margaret J.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Lee, Dong Soo; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Mattick, John S.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2017-01-01

    Despite their abundance, the molecular functions of long non-coding RNAs in mammalian nervous systems remain poorly understood. Here we show that the long non-coding RNA, NEAT1, directly modulates neuronal excitability and is associated with pathological seizure states. Specifically, NEAT1 is dynamically regulated by neuronal activity in vitro and in vivo, binds epilepsy-associated potassium channel-interacting proteins including KCNAB2 and KCNIP1, and induces a neuronal hyper-potentiation phenotype in iPSC-derived human cortical neurons following antisense oligonucleotide knockdown. Next generation sequencing reveals a strong association of NEAT1 with increased ion channel gene expression upon activation of iPSC-derived neurons following NEAT1 knockdown. Furthermore, we show that while NEAT1 is acutely down-regulated in response to neuronal activity, repeated stimulation results in NEAT1 becoming chronically unresponsive in independent in vivo rat model systems relevant to temporal lobe epilepsy. We extended previous studies showing increased NEAT1 expression in resected cortical tissue from high spiking regions of patients suffering from intractable seizures. Our results indicate a role for NEAT1 in modulating human neuronal activity and suggest a novel mechanistic link between an activity-dependent long non-coding RNA and epilepsy. PMID:28054653

  17. Mechanisms of trinucleotide repeat instability during human development

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide expansion underlies several human diseases. Expansion occurs during multiple stages of human development in different cell types, and is sensitive to the gender of the parent who transmits the repeats. Repair and replication models for expansions have been described, but we do not know whether the pathway involved is the same under all conditions and for all repeat tract lengths, which differ among diseases. Currently, researchers rely on bacteria, yeast and mice to study expansion, but these models differ substantially from humans. We need now to connect the dots among human genetics, pathway biochemistry and the appropriate model systems to understand the mechanism of expansion as it occurs in human disease. PMID:20953213

  18. Expression of a family of noncoding mitochondrial RNAs distinguishes normal from cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burzio, Verónica A.; Villota, Claudio; Villegas, Jaime; Landerer, Eduardo; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Martínez, Ronny; Lopez, Constanza; Gaete, Fancy; Toro, Viviana; Rodriguez, Ximena; Burzio, Luis O.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the presence in human cells of a noncoding mitochondrial RNA that contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 815 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). The transcript contains a stem-loop structure and is expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to this transcript, normal human proliferating cells in culture express 2 antisense mitochondrial transcripts. These transcripts also contain stem-loop structures but strikingly they are down-regulated in tumor cell lines and tumor cells present in 17 different tumor types. The differential expression of these transcripts distinguishes normal from tumor cells and might contribute a unique vision on cancer biology and diagnostics. PMID:19470459

  19. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  20. New technologies accelerate the exploration of non-coding RNAs in horticultural plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degao; Mewalal, Ritesh; Hu, Rongbin; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), that is, RNAs not translated into proteins, are crucial regulators of a variety of biological processes in plants. While protein-encoding genes have been relatively well-annotated in sequenced genomes, accounting for a small portion of the genome space in plants, the universe of plant ncRNAs is rapidly expanding. Recent advances in experimental and computational technologies have generated a great momentum for discovery and functional characterization of ncRNAs. Here we summarize the classification and known biological functions of plant ncRNAs, review the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and ribosome profiling technology to ncRNA discovery in horticultural plants and discuss the application of new technologies, especially the new genome-editing tool clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems, to functional characterization of plant ncRNAs.

  1. Human-specific genomic signatures of neocortical expansion.

    PubMed

    Florio, Marta; Borrell, Víctor; Huttner, Wieland B

    2017-02-01

    Neocortex evolutionary expansion is primarily due to increased proliferative capacity of neural progenitor cells during cortical development. Exploiting insights into the cell biology of cortical progenitors gained during the past two decades, recent studies uncovered a variety of gene expression differences that underlie differential cortical progenitor behavior. These comprise both, differences between cortical areas that likely provide a molecular basis for cortical folding, and differences across species thought to be responsible for increases in neocortex size. Human-specific signatures have been identified for gene regulatory elements, non-coding gene products, and protein-encoding genes, and have been functionally examined in in vivo as well as novel in vitro model systems.

  2. Non-coding RNAs in chromatin disease involving neurological defects

    PubMed Central

    Della Ragione, Floriana; Gagliardi, Miriam; D'Esposito, Maurizio; Matarazzo, Maria R.

    2014-01-01

    Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are increasingly becoming apparent, being engaged in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities. They take part in target gene silencing, play roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes, such as chromatin remodeling, nuclear reorganization with the formation of silent compartments and fine-tuning of gene recruitment into them. Among their functions, non-coding RNAs are thought to act either as guide or scaffold for epigenetic modifiers that write, erase, and read the epigenetic signature over the genome. Studies on human disorders caused by defects in epigenetic modifiers and involving neurological phenotypes highlight the disruption of diverse classes of non-coding RNAs. Noteworthy, these molecules mediate a wide spectrum of neuronal functions, including brain development, and synaptic plasticity. These findings imply a significant contribution of ncRNAs in pathophysiology of the aforesaid diseases and provide new concepts for potential therapeutic applications. PMID:24616662

  3. Selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes.

    PubMed

    Bush, Eliot C; Lahn, Bruce T

    2005-12-01

    An important challenge for human evolutionary biology is to understand the genetic basis of human-chimpanzee differences. One influential idea holds that such differences depend, to a large extent, on adaptive changes in gene expression. An important step in assessing this hypothesis involves gaining a better understanding of selective constraint on noncoding regions of hominid genomes. In noncoding sequence, functional elements are frequently small and can be separated by large nonfunctional regions. For this reason, constraint in hominid genomes is likely to be patchy. Here we use conservation in more distantly related mammals and amniotes as a way of identifying small sequence windows that are likely to be functional. We find that putatively functional noncoding elements defined in this manner are subject to significant selective constraint in hominids.

  4. Overexpression of long non-coding RNAs following exposure to xenobiotics in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2012-04-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent an important transcriptional output of eukaryotic genomes. In addition to their functional relevance as housekeeping and regulatory elements, recent studies have suggested their involvement in rather unexpected cellular functions. The aim of this work was to analyse the transcriptional behaviour of non-coding RNAs in the toxic response to pollutants in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Three well-characterized long non-coding sequences were studied: telomeric repeats, Cla repetitive elements and the SINE CTRT1. Transcription levels were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24-h exposures to three current aquatic contaminants: bisphenol A (BPA), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) and the heavy metal cadmium (Cd). Upregulation of telomeric transcripts was found after BPA treatments. Moreover, BPA significantly activated Cla transcription, which also appeared to be increased by cadmium, whereas BBP did not affect the transcription levels of these sequences. Transcription of SINE CTRT1 was not altered by any of the chemicals tested. These data are discussed in the light of previous studies that have shown a response by long ncRNAS (lncRNAs) to cellular stressors, indicating a relationship with environmental stimuli. Our results demonstrated for the first time the ability of bisphenol A to activate non-coding sequences mainly located at telomeres and centromeres. Overall, this study provides evidence that xenobiotics can induce specific responses in ncRNAs derived from repetitive sequences that could be relevant in the toxic response, and also suggests that ncRNAs could represent a novel class of potential biomarkers in toxicological assessment.

  5. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease.

  6. Role of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    other non-coding RNAs such as long non-coding RNAs (>200 bases) ( lncRNAs ), which could account for 4-9% of transcripts in human genome. In this...application we proposed to test whether lncRNAs are dysregulated in prostate cancer. We demonstrated that lncRNA GAS5 is a direct target for miR-21...Together, our study suggests that lncRNAs are important players in prostate cancer biology, and further characterization of these lncRNAs will provide a

  7. Long Noncoding RNAs: Fresh Perspectives into the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Froberg, John E.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2014-01-01

    Large scale mapping of transcriptomes has revealed significant levels of transcriptional activity within both unannotated and annotated regions of the genome. Interestingly, many of the novel transcripts demonstrate tissue-specific expression and some level of sequence conservation across species, but most have low protein-coding potential. Here we describe progress in identifying and characterizing long noncoding RNAs and review how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules to regulate diverse cellular processes. We also preview emerging techniques that will help advance the discovery and characterization of novel transcripts. Finally, we discuss the role of long non-coding RNAs in disease and therapeutics. PMID:24290031

  8. Functions of long noncoding RNAs in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Shan, Ge

    2016-04-25

    Nucleus is the residence and place of work for a plethora of long noncoding RNAs. Here, we provide a summary of the functions and functional mechanisms of several relatively well studied examples of nuclear long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the nucleus, such as Xist, NEAT1, MALAT1 and TERRA. The recently identified novel EIciRNA is also highlighted. These nuclear lncRNAs play a variety of roles with diverse molecular mechanisms in animal cells. We also discuss insights and concerns about current and future studies of nuclear lnc RNAs.

  9. The development of non-coding RNA ontology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingshan; Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J; de Silva, Nisansa; Kasukurthi, Mohan Vamsi; Jha, Vikash Kumar; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been significantly improved over the past decade. On the other hand, semantic annotation of ncRNA data is facing critical challenges due to the lack of a comprehensive ontology to serve as common data elements and data exchange standards in the field. We developed the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) to handle this situation. By providing a formally defined ncRNA controlled vocabulary, the NCRO aims to fill a specific and highly needed niche in semantic annotation of large amounts of ncRNA biological and clinical data.

  10. Functions of plants long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Sarfraz; Li, Jingrui; Sun, Qianwen

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been emerged as important players for various biological pathways, including dosage compensation, genomic imprinting, chromatin regulation, alternative splicing and nuclear organization. A large number of lncRNAs had already been identified by different approaches in plants, while the functions of only a few of them have been investigated. This review will summarize our current understanding of a wide range of plant lncRNAs functions, and highlight their roles in the regulation of diverse pathways in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa.

  11. The development of non-coding RNA ontology

    PubMed Central

    Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A.; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A.; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J.; de Silva, Nisansa; Kasukurthi, Mohan Vamsi; Jha, Vikash Kumar; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M.; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Identification of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been significantly improved over the past decade. On the other hand, semantic annotation of ncRNA data is facing critical challenges due to the lack of a comprehensive ontology to serve as common data elements and data exchange standards in the field. We developed the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) to handle this situation. By providing a formally defined ncRNA controlled vocabulary, the NCRO aims to fill a specific and highly needed niche in semantic annotation of large amounts of ncRNA biological and clinical data. PMID:27990175

  12. Repeat instability during DNA repair: Insights from model systems

    PubMed Central

    Usdin, Karen; House, Nealia C. M.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of repeated sequences is the cause of over 30 inherited genetic diseases, including Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy (types 1 and 2), fragile X syndrome, many spinocerebellar ataxias, and some cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Repeat expansions are dynamic, and disease inheritance and progression are influenced by the size and the rate of expansion. Thus, an understanding of the various cellular mechanisms that cooperate to control or promote repeat expansions is of interest to human health. In addition, the study of repeat expansion and contraction mechanisms has provided insight into how repair pathways operate in the context of structure-forming DNA, as well as insights into non-canonical roles for repair proteins. Here we review the mechanisms of repeat instability, with a special emphasis on the knowledge gained from the various model systems that have been developed to study this topic. We cover the repair pathways and proteins that operate to maintain genome stability, or in some cases cause instability, and the cross-talk and interactions between them. PMID:25608779

  13. ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat length correlates with risk of ALS.

    PubMed

    Sproviero, William; Shatunov, Aleksey; Stahl, Daniel; Shoai, Maryam; van Rheenen, Wouter; Jones, Ashley R; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Andersen, Peter M; Bonini, Nancy M; Conforti, Francesca L; Van Damme, Philip; Daoud, Hussein; Del Mar Amador, Maria; Fogh, Isabella; Forzan, Monica; Gaastra, Ben; Gellera, Cinzia; Gitler, Aaron D; Hardy, John; Fratta, Pietro; La Bella, Vincenzo; Le Ber, Isabelle; Van Langenhove, Tim; Lattante, Serena; Lee, Yi-Chung; Malaspina, Andrea; Meininger, Vincent; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Orrell, Richard; Rademakers, Rosa; Robberecht, Wim; Rouleau, Guy; Ross, Owen A; Salachas, Francois; Sidle, Katie; Smith, Bradley N; Soong, Bing-Wen; Sorarù, Gianni; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kabashi, Edor; Troakes, Claire; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Shaw, Christopher E; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2017-03-01

    We investigated a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the ATXN2 gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Two new case-control studies, a British dataset of 1474 ALS cases and 567 controls, and a Dutch dataset of 1328 ALS cases and 691 controls were analyzed. In addition, to increase power, we systematically searched PubMed for case-control studies published after 1 August 2010 that investigated the association between ATXN2 intermediate repeats and ALS. We conducted a meta-analysis of the new and existing studies for the relative risks of ATXN2 intermediate repeat alleles of between 24 and 34 CAG trinucleotide repeats and ALS. There was an overall increased risk of ALS for those carrying intermediate sized trinucleotide repeat alleles (odds ratio 3.06 [95% confidence interval 2.37-3.94]; p = 6 × 10(-18)), with an exponential relationship between repeat length and ALS risk for alleles of 29-32 repeats (R(2) = 0.91, p = 0.0002). No relationship was seen for repeat length and age of onset or survival. In contrast to trinucleotide repeat diseases, intermediate ATXN2 trinucleotide repeat expansion in ALS does not predict age of onset but does predict disease risk.

  14. HINCUTs in cancer: hypoxia-induced noncoding ultraconserved transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Ferdin, J; Nishida, N; Wu, X; Nicoloso, M S; Shah, M Y; Devlin, C; Ling, H; Shimizu, M; Kumar, K; Cortez, M A; Ferracin, M; Bi, Y; Yang, D; Czerniak, B; Zhang, W; Schmittgen, T D; Voorhoeve, M P; Reginato, M J; Negrini, M; Davuluri, R V; Kunej, T; Ivan, M; Calin, G A

    2013-01-01

    Recent data have linked hypoxia, a classic feature of the tumor microenvironment, to the function of specific microRNAs (miRNAs); however, whether hypoxia affects other types of noncoding transcripts is currently unknown. Starting from a genome-wide expression profiling, we demonstrate for the first time a functional link between oxygen deprivation and the modulation of long noncoding transcripts from ultraconserved regions, termed transcribed-ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs). Interestingly, several hypoxia-upregulated T-UCRs, henceforth named ‘hypoxia-induced noncoding ultraconserved transcripts' (HINCUTs), are also overexpressed in clinical samples from colon cancer patients. We show that these T-UCRs are predominantly nuclear and that the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is at least partly responsible for the induction of several members of this group. One specific HINCUT, uc.475 (or HINCUT-1) is part of a retained intron of the host protein-coding gene, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase, which is overexpressed in epithelial cancer types. Consistent with the hypothesis that T-UCRs have important function in tumor formation, HINCUT-1 supports cell proliferation specifically under hypoxic conditions and may be critical for optimal O-GlcNAcylation of proteins when oxygen tension is limiting. Our data gives a first glimpse of a novel functional hypoxic network comprising protein-coding transcripts and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from the T-UCRs category. PMID:24037088

  15. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed.

  16. Promoter-Bound Trinucleotide Repeat mRNA Drives Epigenetic Silencing in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S.; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide–repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5′ untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA. PMID:24578575

  17. Promoter-bound trinucleotide repeat mRNA drives epigenetic silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colak, Dilek; Zaninovic, Nikica; Cohen, Michael S; Rosenwaks, Zev; Yang, Wang-Yong; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Disney, Matthew D; Jaffrey, Samie R

    2014-02-28

    Epigenetic gene silencing is seen in several repeat-expansion diseases. In fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic form of mental retardation, a CGG trinucleotide-repeat expansion adjacent to the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene promoter results in its epigenetic silencing. Here, we show that FMR1 silencing is mediated by the FMR1 mRNA. The FMR1 mRNA contains the transcribed CGG-repeat tract as part of the 5' untranslated region, which hybridizes to the complementary CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene to form an RNA·DNA duplex. Disrupting the interaction of the mRNA with the CGG-repeat portion of the FMR1 gene prevents promoter silencing. Thus, our data link trinucleotide-repeat expansion to a form of RNA-directed gene silencing mediated by direct interactions of the trinucleotide-repeat RNA and DNA.

  18. Graphite thermal expansion reference for high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaal, P. S.

    1974-01-01

    The design requirements of the aerospace and high-temperature nuclear reactor industries necessitate reliable thermal expansion data for graphite and other carbonaceous materials. The feasibility of an acceptable reference for calibration of expansion measuring systems that operate in carbon-rich atmospheres at temperatures ranging to 2500 C is the prime subject of this work. Present-day graphite technology provides acceptable materials for stable, reproducible references, as reflected by some of the candidate materials. The repeatability for a single specimen in a given expansion measuring system was found to be plus or minus 1%, while the combined results of several tests made on a number of samples fell within a plus or minus 2.5% band.

  19. The Long Noncoding RNA Transcriptome of Dictyostelium discoideum Development

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, Rafael D.; Santhanam, Balaji; Kokosar, Janez; Shaulsky, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum live in the soil as single cells, engulfing bacteria and growing vegetatively. Upon starvation, tens of thousands of amoebae enter a developmental program that includes aggregation, multicellular differentiation, and sporulation. Major shifts across the protein-coding transcriptome accompany these developmental changes. However, no study has presented a global survey of long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in D. discoideum. To characterize the antisense and long intergenic noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome, we analyzed previously published developmental time course samples using an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) library preparation method that selectively depletes ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). We detected the accumulation of transcripts for 9833 protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs), 621 lncRNAs, and 162 putative antisense RNAs (asRNAs). The noncoding RNAs were interspersed throughout the genome, and were distinct in expression level, length, and nucleotide composition. The noncoding transcriptome displayed a temporal profile similar to the coding transcriptome, with stages of gradual change interspersed with larger leaps. The transcription profiles of some noncoding RNAs were strongly correlated with known differentially expressed coding RNAs, hinting at a functional role for these molecules during development. Examining the mitochondrial transcriptome, we modeled two novel antisense transcripts. We applied yet another ribosomal depletion method to a subset of the samples to better retain transfer RNA (tRNA) transcripts. We observed polymorphisms in tRNA anticodons that suggested a post-transcriptional means by which D. discoideum compensates for codons missing in the genomic complement of tRNAs. We concluded that the prevalence and characteristics of long ncRNAs indicate that these molecules are relevant to the progression of molecular and cellular phenotypes during development. PMID:27932387

  20. The Long Noncoding RNA Transcriptome of Dictyostelium discoideum Development.

    PubMed

    Rosengarten, Rafael D; Santhanam, Balaji; Kokosar, Janez; Shaulsky, Gad

    2017-02-09

    Dictyostelium discoideum live in the soil as single cells, engulfing bacteria and growing vegetatively. Upon starvation, tens of thousands of amoebae enter a developmental program that includes aggregation, multicellular differentiation, and sporulation. Major shifts across the protein-coding transcriptome accompany these developmental changes. However, no study has presented a global survey of long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in D. discoideum To characterize the antisense and long intergenic noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome, we analyzed previously published developmental time course samples using an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) library preparation method that selectively depletes ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). We detected the accumulation of transcripts for 9833 protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs), 621 lncRNAs, and 162 putative antisense RNAs (asRNAs). The noncoding RNAs were interspersed throughout the genome, and were distinct in expression level, length, and nucleotide composition. The noncoding transcriptome displayed a temporal profile similar to the coding transcriptome, with stages of gradual change interspersed with larger leaps. The transcription profiles of some noncoding RNAs were strongly correlated with known differentially expressed coding RNAs, hinting at a functional role for these molecules during development. Examining the mitochondrial transcriptome, we modeled two novel antisense transcripts. We applied yet another ribosomal depletion method to a subset of the samples to better retain transfer RNA (tRNA) transcripts. We observed polymorphisms in tRNA anticodons that suggested a post-transcriptional means by which D. discoideum compensates for codons missing in the genomic complement of tRNAs. We concluded that the prevalence and characteristics of long ncRNAs indicate that these molecules are relevant to the progression of molecular and cellular phenotypes during development.

  1. Intronic RNAs constitute the major fraction of the non-coding RNA in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The function of RNA from the non-coding (the so called “dark matter”) regions of the genome has been a subject of considerable recent debate. Perhaps the most controversy is regarding the function of RNAs found in introns of annotated transcripts, where most of the reads that map outside of exons are usually found. However, it has been reported that the levels of RNA in introns are minor relative to those of the corresponding exons, and that changes in the levels of intronic RNAs correlate tightly with that of adjacent exons. This would suggest that RNAs produced from the vast expanse of intronic space are just pieces of pre-mRNAs or excised introns en route to degradation. Results We present data that challenges the notion that intronic RNAs are mere by-standers in the cell. By performing a highly quantitative RNAseq analysis of transcriptome changes during an inflammation time course, we show that intronic RNAs have a number of features that would be expected from functional, standalone RNA species. We show that there are thousands of introns in the mouse genome that generate RNAs whose overall abundance, which changes throughout the inflammation timecourse, and other properties suggest that they function in yet unknown ways. Conclusions So far, the focus of non-coding RNA discovery has shied away from intronic regions as those were believed to simply encode parts of pre-mRNAs. Results presented here suggest a very different situation – the sequences encoded in the introns appear to harbor a yet unexplored reservoir of novel, functional RNAs. As such, they should not be ignored in surveys of functional transcripts or other genomic studies. PMID:23006825

  2. The puzzle of the triple repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, V.

    1993-06-04

    Two years ago, when researchers discovered the gene that causes a hereditary form of mental retardation known as fragile-X syndrome, they also turned up a mutation so unexpected geneticists are still scratching their heads over it. The defect, which makes genes balloon in size by adding extra copies of a three base-pair repeated sequence of DNA, was the first of its kind. Despite decades of study, nothing like it had ever been seen in any of the species that laid the foundations for modern genetics: bacteria, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the mouse. The mutations caused by these expanding trinucleotide repeats turned out be common causes of human disease. In the past 2 years, they have been fingered as the culprits in three hereditary disorders besides fragile-X syndrome: myotronic dystrophy, spinobullar muscular atrophy (also known as Kennedy's disease), and just this March-Huntington's disease. The FMR-1 gene, which is the one at fault in fragile-X syndrome, shows just how much the trinucleotide repeats can expand. The normal gene carries at most 50 copies of the CGG trinucleotide. But in children who inherit the gene from these carriers and actually develop mental retardation and the other fragile-X symptoms, the FMR-1 gene may have hundreds to thousands of CGG repeats. Huge expansions of another trinucleotide repeat (CTG) can also occur from one generation to the next in the gene that causes myotonic dystrophy (DM), while smaller, although no less devastating, expansions in the CAG trinucleotide repeat lead to Huntington's and Kennedy's diseases.

  3. Prioritization of non-coding disease-causing variants and long non-coding RNAs in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; He, Zekun; Gu, Yang; Fang, Lin; Lv, Xin

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple bioinformatics tools available for the detection of coding driver mutations in cancers. However, the prioritization of pathogenic non-coding variants remains a challenging and demanding task. The present study was performed to discriminate non-coding disease-causing mutations and prioritize potential cancer-implicated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in liver cancer using a logistic regression model. A logistic regression model was constructed by combining 19,153 disease-associated ClinVar and human gene mutation database pathogenic variants as the response variable and non-coding features as the predictor variable. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) disease or trait-associated variants and recurrent somatic mutations were used to validate the model. Non-coding gene features with the highest fractions of load were characterized and potential cancer-associated lncRNA candidates were prioritized by combining the fraction of high-scoring regions and average score predicted by the logistic regression model. H3K9me3 and conserved regions were the most negatively and positively informative for the model, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.92. The average score of GWAS disease-associated variants was significantly increased compared with neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (5.8642 vs. 5.4707; P<0.001), the average score of recurrent somatic mutations of liver cancer was significantly increased compared with non-recurrent somatic mutations (5.4101 vs. 5.2768; P=0.0125). The present study found regions in lncRNAs and introns/untranslated regions of protein coding genes where mutations are most likely to be damaging. In total, 847 lncRNAs were filtered out from the background. Characterization of this subset of lncRNAs showed that these lncRNAs are more conservative, less mutated and more highly expressed compared with other control lncRNAs. In addition, 23 of these lncRNAs were differentially

  4. Prioritization of non-coding disease-causing variants and long non-coding RNAs in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; He, Zekun; Gu, Yang; Fang, Lin; Lv, Xin

    2016-11-01

    There are multiple bioinformatics tools available for the detection of coding driver mutations in cancers. However, the prioritization of pathogenic non-coding variants remains a challenging and demanding task. The present study was performed to discriminate non-coding disease-causing mutations and prioritize potential cancer-implicated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in liver cancer using a logistic regression model. A logistic regression model was constructed by combining 19,153 disease-associated ClinVar and human gene mutation database pathogenic variants as the response variable and non-coding features as the predictor variable. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) disease or trait-associated variants and recurrent somatic mutations were used to validate the model. Non-coding gene features with the highest fractions of load were characterized and potential cancer-associated lncRNA candidates were prioritized by combining the fraction of high-scoring regions and average score predicted by the logistic regression model. H3K9me3 and conserved regions were the most negatively and positively informative for the model, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model was 0.92. The average score of GWAS disease-associated variants was significantly increased compared with neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms (5.8642 vs. 5.4707; P<0.001), the average score of recurrent somatic mutations of liver cancer was significantly increased compared with non-recurrent somatic mutations (5.4101 vs. 5.2768; P=0.0125). The present study found regions in lncRNAs and introns/untranslated regions of protein coding genes where mutations are most likely to be damaging. In total, 847 lncRNAs were filtered out from the background. Characterization of this subset of lncRNAs showed that these lncRNAs are more conservative, less mutated and more highly expressed compared with other control lncRNAs. In addition, 23 of these lncRNAs were differentially

  5. Bidirectional transcription of trinucleotide repeats: roles for excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Budworth, Helen; McMurray, Cynthia T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Genomic instability at repetitive DNA regions in cells of the nervous system leads to a number of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases, including those with an expanded trinucleotide repeat (TNR) tract at or nearby an expressed gene. Expansion causes disease when a particular base sequence is repeated beyond the normal range, interfering with the expression or properties of a gene product. Disease severity and onset depend on the number of repeats. As the length of the repeat tract grows, so does the size of the successive expansions and the likelihood of another unstable event. In fragile X syndrome, for example, CGG repeat instability and pathogenesis are not typically observed below tracts of roughly 50 repeats, but occur frequently at or above 55 repeats, and are virtually certain above 100–300 repeats. Recent evidence points to bidirectional transcription as a new aspect of TNR instability and pathophysiology. Bidirectional transcription of TNR genes produces novel proteins and/or regulatory RNAs that influence both toxicity and epigenetic changes in TNR promoters. Bidirectional transcription of the TNR tract appears to influence aspects of its stability, gene processing, splicing, gene silencing, and chemical modification of DNAs. Paradoxically, however, some of the same effects are observed on both the expanded TNR gene and on its normal gene counterpart. In this review, we discuss the possible normal and abnormal effects of bidirectional transcription on trinucleotide repeat instability, the role of DNA repair in causing, preventing, or maintaining methylation, and chromatin environment of TNR genes. PMID:23669397

  6. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  7. Assessing Recent Selection and Functionality at Long Noncoding RNA Loci in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, R. Axel W.; Halligan, Daniel L.; Ness, Rob W.; Necsulea, Anamaria; Kaessmann, Henrik; Keightley, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are one of the most intensively studied groups of noncoding elements. Debate continues over what proportion of lncRNAs are functional or merely represent transcriptional noise. Although characterization of individual lncRNAs has identified approximately 200 functional loci across the Eukarya, general surveys have found only modest or no evidence of long-term evolutionary conservation. Although this lack of conservation suggests that most lncRNAs are nonfunctional, the possibility remains that some represent recent evolutionary innovations. We examine recent selection pressures acting on lncRNAs in mouse populations. We compare patterns of within-species nucleotide variation at approximately 10,000 lncRNA loci in a cohort of the wild house mouse, Mus musculus castaneus, with between-species nucleotide divergence from the rat (Rattus norvegicus). Loci under selective constraint are expected to show reduced nucleotide diversity and divergence. We find limited evidence of sequence conservation compared with putatively neutrally evolving ancestral repeats (ARs). Comparisons of sequence diversity and divergence between ARs, protein-coding (PC) exons and lncRNAs, and the associated flanking regions, show weak, but significantly lower levels of sequence diversity and divergence at lncRNAs compared with ARs. lncRNAs conserved deep in the vertebrate phylogeny show lower within-species sequence diversity than lncRNAs in general. A set of 74 functionally characterized lncRNAs show levels of diversity and divergence comparable to PC exons, suggesting that these lncRNAs are under substantial selective constraints. Our results suggest that, in mouse populations, most lncRNA loci evolve at rates similar to ARs, whereas older lncRNAs tend to show signals of selection similar to PC genes. PMID:26272717

  8. Activity-Dependent Human Brain Coding/Noncoding Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lipovich, Leonard; Dachet, Fabien; Cai, Juan; Bagla, Shruti; Balan, Karina; Jia, Hui; Loeb, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    While most gene transcription yields RNA transcripts that code for proteins, a sizable proportion of the genome generates RNA transcripts that do not code for proteins, but may have important regulatory functions. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, a key regulator of neuronal activity, is overlapped by a primate-specific, antisense long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) called BDNFOS. We demonstrate reciprocal patterns of BDNF and BDNFOS transcription in highly active regions of human neocortex removed as a treatment for intractable seizures. A genome-wide analysis of activity-dependent coding and noncoding human transcription using a custom lncRNA microarray identified 1288 differentially expressed lncRNAs, of which 26 had expression profiles that matched activity-dependent coding genes and an additional 8 were adjacent to or overlapping with differentially expressed protein-coding genes. The functions of most of these protein-coding partner genes, such as ARC, include long-term potentiation, synaptic activity, and memory. The nuclear lncRNAs NEAT1, MALAT1, and RPPH1, composing an RNAse P-dependent lncRNA-maturation pathway, were also upregulated. As a means to replicate human neuronal activity, repeated depolarization of SY5Y cells resulted in sustained CREB activation and produced an inverse pattern of BDNF-BDNFOS co-expression that was not achieved with a single depolarization. RNAi-mediated knockdown of BDNFOS in human SY5Y cells increased BDNF expression, suggesting that BDNFOS directly downregulates BDNF. Temporal expression patterns of other lncRNA-messenger RNA pairs validated the effect of chronic neuronal activity on the transcriptome and implied various lncRNA regulatory mechanisms. lncRNAs, some of which are unique to primates, thus appear to have potentially important regulatory roles in activity-dependent human brain plasticity. PMID:22960213

  9. Thermal Expansion "Paradox."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    1993-01-01

    Describes a paradox in the equation for thermal expansion. If the calculations for heating a rod and subsequently cooling a rod are determined, the new length of the cool rod is shorter than expected. (PR)

  10. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  11. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  12. Thermal Expansion "Paradox."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    1993-01-01

    Describes a paradox in the equation for thermal expansion. If the calculations for heating a rod and subsequently cooling a rod are determined, the new length of the cool rod is shorter than expected. (PR)

  13. Thermal-Expansion Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. H.; Rives, C.

    1985-01-01

    Precise stable laser system determines coefficients of thermal expansion. Dual-beam interferometer arrangement monitors changes in sample length as function of temperature by following changes inoptical path lengths.

  14. Optimal Electric Utility Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-10

    SAGE-WASP is designed to find the optimal generation expansion policy for an electrical utility system. New units can be automatically selected from a user-supplied list of expansion candidates which can include hydroelectric and pumped storage projects. The existing system is modeled. The calculational procedure takes into account user restrictions to limit generation configurations to an area of economic interest. The optimization program reports whether the restrictions acted as a constraint on the solution. All expansion configurations considered are required to pass a user supplied reliability criterion. The discount rate and escalation rate are treated separately for each expansion candidate and for each fuel type. All expenditures are separated into local and foreign accounts, and a weighting factor can be applied to foreign expenditures.

  15. Genome-wide evolutionary analysis of the noncoding RNA genes and noncoding DNA of Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Long; Zhou, Hui; Liao, Jian-You; Qu, Liang-Hu; Amar, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    The compact genome of the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium tetraurelia contains noncoding DNA (ncDNA) distributed into >39,000 intergenic sequences and >90,000 introns of 390 base pairs (bp) and 25 bp on average, respectively. Here we analyzed the molecular features of the ncRNA genes, introns, and intergenic sequences of this genome. We mainly used computational programs and comparative genomics possible because the P. tetraurelia genome had formed throughout whole-genome duplications (WGDs). We characterized 417 5S rRNA, snRNA, snoRNA, SRP RNA, and tRNA putative genes, 415 of which map within intergenic sequences, and two, within introns. The evolution of these ncRNA genes appears to have mainly involved purifying selection and gene deletion. We then compared the introns that interrupt the protein-coding gene duplicates arisen from the recent WGD and identified a population of a few thousands of introns having evolved under most stringent constraints (>95% of identity). We also showed that low nucleotide substitution levels characterize the 50 and 80–115 base pairs flanking, respectively, the stop and start codons of the protein-coding genes. Lower substitution levels mark the base pairs flanking the highly transcribed genes, or the start codons of the genes of the sets with a high number of WGD-related sequences. Finally, adjacent to protein-coding genes, we characterized 32 DNA motifs able to encode stable and evolutionary conserved RNA secondary structures and defining putative expression controlling elements. Fourteen DNA motifs with similar properties map distant from protein-coding genes and may encode regulatory ncRNAs. PMID:19218550

  16. Markerless modification of trinucleotide repeat loci in BACs.

    PubMed

    Benzow, Kellie A; Koob, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Transcription and splicing of human genes are regulated by nucleotide sequences encoded across large segments of our genome, and trinucleotide repeat expansion mutations can have both profound and subtle effects on these processes. In the course of our work to understand the impact of the Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 8 (SCA8) CTG repeat expansion on the transcription and splicing of the RNAs encoded near the SCA8 locus, we have developed a set of reagents and protocols for modifying large genomic BAC clones of this region. We describe the two-step procedure that allows us to precisely replace unexpanded trinucleotide repeats with expanded variants of these repeat sequences without leaving any exogenous sequences in the final constructs, and we discuss how this approach can be adapted to make other desired sequence changes to these genomic clones.

  17. Large Tandem, Higher Order Repeats and Regularly Dispersed Repeat Units Contribute Substantially to Divergence Between Human and Chimpanzee Y Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, Vladimir; Glunčić, Matko; Basar, Ivan; Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Petar; Cvitković, Mislav

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of human and chimpanzee genomes has received much attention, because of paramount role for understanding evolutionary step distinguishing us from our closest living relative. In order to contribute to insight into Y chromosome evolutionary history, we study and compare tandems, higher order repeats (HORs), and regularly dispersed repeats in human and chimpanzee Y chromosome contigs, using robust Global Repeat Map algorithm. We find a new type of long-range acceleration, human-accelerated HOR regions. In peripheral domains of 35mer human alphoid HORs, we find riddled features with ten additional repeat monomers. In chimpanzee, we identify 30mer alphoid HOR. We construct alphoid HOR schemes showing significant human-chimpanzee difference, revealing rapid evolution after human-chimpanzee separation. We identify and analyze over 20 large repeat units, most of them reported here for the first time as: chimpanzee and human ~1.6 kb 3mer secondary repeat unit (SRU) and ~23.5 kb tertiary repeat unit (~0.55 kb primary repeat unit, PRU); human 10848, 15775, 20309, 60910, and 72140 bp PRUs; human 3mer SRU (~2.4 kb PRU); 715mer and 1123mer SRUs (5mer PRU); chimpanzee 5096, 10762, 10853, 60523 bp PRUs; and chimpanzee 64624 bp SRU (10853 bp PRU). We show that substantial human-chimpanzee differences are concentrated in large repeat structures, at the level of as much as ~70% divergence, sizably exceeding previous numerical estimates for some selected noncoding sequences. Smeared over the whole sequenced assembly (25 Mb) this gives ~14% human--chimpanzee divergence. This is significantly higher estimate of divergence between human and chimpanzee than previous estimates.

  18. Large tandem, higher order repeats and regularly dispersed repeat units contribute substantially to divergence between human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Paar, Vladimir; Glunčić, Matko; Basar, Ivan; Rosandić, Marija; Paar, Petar; Cvitković, Mislav

    2011-01-01

    Comparison of human and chimpanzee genomes has received much attention, because of paramount role for understanding evolutionary step distinguishing us from our closest living relative. In order to contribute to insight into Y chromosome evolutionary history, we study and compare tandems, higher order repeats (HORs), and regularly dispersed repeats in human and chimpanzee Y chromosome contigs, using robust Global Repeat Map algorithm. We find a new type of long-range acceleration, human-accelerated HOR regions. In peripheral domains of 35mer human alphoid HORs, we find riddled features with ten additional repeat monomers. In chimpanzee, we identify 30mer alphoid HOR. We construct alphoid HOR schemes showing significant human-chimpanzee difference, revealing rapid evolution after human-chimpanzee separation. We identify and analyze over 20 large repeat units, most of them reported here for the first time as: chimpanzee and human ~1.6 kb 3mer secondary repeat unit (SRU) and ~23.5 kb tertiary repeat unit (~0.55 kb primary repeat unit, PRU); human 10848, 15775, 20309, 60910, and 72140 bp PRUs; human 3mer SRU (~2.4 kb PRU); 715mer and 1123mer SRUs (5mer PRU); chimpanzee 5096, 10762, 10853, 60523 bp PRUs; and chimpanzee 64624 bp SRU (10853 bp PRU). We show that substantial human-chimpanzee differences are concentrated in large repeat structures, at the level of as much as ~70% divergence, sizably exceeding previous numerical estimates for some selected noncoding sequences. Smeared over the whole sequenced assembly (25 Mb) this gives ~14% human-chimpanzee divergence. This is significantly higher estimate of divergence between human and chimpanzee than previous estimates.

  19. Heterozygosity for a Hypomorphic Polβ Mutation Reduces the Expansion Frequency in a Mouse Model of the Fragile X-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lokanga, Rachel Adihe; Senejani, Alireza Ghodsi; Sweasy, Joann Balazs; Usdin, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The Fragile X-related disorders (FXDs) are members of the Repeat Expansion Diseases, a group of human genetic conditions resulting from expansion of a specific tandem repeat. The FXDs result from expansion of a CGG/CCG repeat tract in the 5’ UTR of the FMR1 gene. While expansion in a FXD mouse model is known to require some mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, our previous work and work in mouse models of another Repeat Expansion Disease show that early events in the base excision repair (BER) pathway play a role in the expansion process. One model for repeat expansion proposes that a non-canonical MMR process makes use of the nicks generated early in BER to load the MMR machinery that then generates expansions. However, we show here that heterozygosity for a Y265C mutation in Polβ, a key polymerase in the BER pathway, is enough to significantly reduce both the number of expansions seen in paternal gametes and the extent of somatic expansion in some tissues of the FXD mouse. These data suggest that events in the BER pathway downstream of the generation of nicks are also important for repeat expansion. Somewhat surprisingly, while the number of expansions is smaller, the average size of the residual expansions is larger than that seen in WT animals. This may have interesting implications for the mechanism by which BER generates expansions. PMID:25886163

  20. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D.

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  1. Factors associated with HD CAG repeat instability in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, V C; Persichetti, F; McNeil, S M; Mysore, J S; Mysore, S S; MacDonald, M E; Myers, R H; Gusella, J F; Wexler, N S

    2007-11-01

    The Huntington disease (HD) CAG repeat exhibits dramatic instability when transmitted to subsequent generations. The instability of the HD disease allele in male intergenerational transmissions is reflected in the variability of the CAG repeat in DNA from the sperm of male carriers of the HD gene. In this study, we used a collection of 112 sperm DNAs from male HD gene-positive members of a large Venezuelan cohort to investigate the factors associated with repeat instability. We confirm previous observations that CAG repeat length is the strongest predictor of repeat-length variability in sperm, but we did not find any correlation between CAG repeat instability and either age at the time of sperm donation or affectedness status. We also investigated transmission instability for 184 father-offspring and 311 mother-offspring pairs in this Venezuelan pedigree. Repeat-length changes were dependent upon the sex of the transmitting parent and parental CAG repeat length but not parental age or birth order. Unexpectedly, in maternal transmissions, repeat-length changes were also dependent upon the sex of the offspring, with a tendency for expansion in male offspring and contraction in female offspring. Significant sibling-sibling correlation for repeat instability suggests that genetic factors play a role in intergenerational CAG repeat instability.

  2. Polyphyletism of Celastrales deduced from a chloroplast noncoding DNA region.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, V; Spichiger, R; Manen, J F

    1997-04-01

    In a previous study we examined the phylogeny of four families related to the angiosperm order Celastrales based on chloroplast rbcL 5' flanking sequences. We have added here several additional dicots, sampled from 6 of the 7 families of Celastrales sensu Cronquist and 19 putatively related genera. Based on a cladistic analysis of these DNA sequences, the order Celastrales appears polyphyletic: it is here restricted to Celastraceae (including Hippocrateaceae and Brexia) with Parnassia as sister; Aquifoliaceae plus Helwingia are included in Asteridae. Neither Salvadoraceae nor Geissolomataceae, Icacinaceae, Phellinaceae, Aextoxicaceae, Corynocarpaceae, Dichapetalaceae, Stackhousiaceae, or Goupiaceae are related to Celastrales. The usefulness of this noncoding region is discussed and the influence of the A + T content of neighboring bases on the increase of transversions is also observed as previously shown in chloroplast noncoding regions of monocots.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R.; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A.

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies. PMID:24609766

  4. Control of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a pivotal factor regulating various aspects of genome activity. Genome regulation via DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications is a well-documented function of lncRNA in plants, fungi, and animals. Here, we summarize evidence showing that lncRNA also controls chromatin structure including nucleosome positioning and chromosome looping. We focus on data from plant experimental systems, discussed in the context of other eukaryotes. We explain the mechanisms of lncRNA-controlled chromatin remodeling and the implications of the functional interplay between noncoding transcription and several different chromatin remodelers. We propose that the unique properties of RNA make it suitable for controlling chromatin modifications and structure. PMID:26410408

  5. Detection of Long Noncoding RNA Expression by Nonradioactive Northern Blots.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaowen; Feng, Yi; Hu, Zhongyi; Zhang, Youyou; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Xu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in sequencing technology and transcriptome analysis, it is estimated that up to 75 % of the human genome is transcribed into RNAs. This finding prompted intensive investigations on the biological functions of noncoding RNAs and led to very exciting discoveries of microRNAs as important players in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic applications. Research on long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is in its infancy, yet a broad spectrum of biological regulations has been attributed to lncRNAs. As a novel class of RNA transcripts, the expression level and splicing variants of lncRNAs are various. Northern blot analysis can help us learn about the identity, size, and abundance of lncRNAs. Here we describe how to use northern blot to determine lncRNA abundance and identify different splicing variants of a given lncRNA.

  6. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Adam M; Garcia, Julia T; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K; Attardi, Laura D; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently precise regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate that lncRNAs guide the organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activated transcription of the DINO (Damage Induced Noncoding) lncRNA via p53. DINO was required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression was sufficient to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO bound to p53 protein and promoted its stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampened p53 signaling and ameliorated acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks.

  7. Paraspeckles: nuclear bodies built on long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Paraspeckles are ribonucleoprotein bodies found in the interchromatin space of mammalian cell nuclei. These structures play a role in regulating the expression of certain genes in differentiated cells by nuclear retention of RNA. The core paraspeckle proteins (PSF/SFPQ, P54NRB/NONO, and PSPC1 [paraspeckle protein 1]) are members of the DBHS (Drosophila melanogaster behavior, human splicing) family. These proteins, together with the long nonprotein-coding RNA NEAT1 (MEN-ϵ/β), associate to form paraspeckles and maintain their integrity. Given the large numbers of long noncoding transcripts currently being discovered through whole transcriptome analysis, paraspeckles may be a paradigm for a class of subnuclear bodies formed around long noncoding RNA. PMID:19720872

  8. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhen-Dong; Zhuang, Li; Gan, Boyi

    2016-10-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer. Accumulating recent evidence links long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a still poorly understood class of non-coding RNAs, to cancer metabolism. Here we review the emerging findings on the functions of lncRNAs in cancer metabolism, with particular emphasis on how lncRNAs regulate glucose and glutamine metabolism in cancer cells, discuss how lncRNAs regulate various aspects of cancer metabolism through their cross-talk with other macromolecules, explore the mechanistic conceptual framework of lncRNAs in reprogramming metabolism in cancers, and highlight the challenges in this field. A more in-depth understanding of lncRNAs in cancer metabolism may enable the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies targeting cancer metabolism.

  9. The role of chromosomal retention of noncoding RNA in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2013-12-01

    Meiosis is a process of fundamental importance for sexually reproducing eukaryotes. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair with each other and undergo homologous recombination, ultimately producing haploid sets of recombined chromosomes that will be inherited by the offspring. Compared with the extensive progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying recombination, how homologous sequences pair with each other is still poorly understood. The diversity of the underlying mechanisms of pairing present in different organisms further increases the complexity of this problem. Involvement of meiosis-specific noncoding RNA in the pairing of homologous chromosomes has been found in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although different organisms may have developed other or additional systems that are involved in chromosome pairing, the findings in S. pombe will provide new insights into understanding the roles of noncoding RNA in meiosis.

  10. Identification of a large noncoding RNA in extremophilic eubacteria

    PubMed Central

    Puerta-Fernandez, Elena; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Roth, Adam; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2006-01-01

    We have discovered a large and highly conserved RNA motif that typically resides in a noncoding section of a multigene messenger RNA in extremophilic Gram-positive eubacteria. RNAs of this class adopt an ornate secondary structure, are large compared with most other noncoding RNAs, and have been identified only in certain extremophilic bacteria. These ornate, large, extremophilic (OLE) RNAs have a length of ≈610 nucleotides, and the 35 representatives examined exhibit extraordinary conservation of nucleotide sequence and base pairing. Structural probing of the OLE RNA from Bacillus halodurans corroborates a complex secondary structure model predicted from comparative sequence analysis. The patterns of structural conservation, and its unique phylogenetic distribution, suggest that OLE RNA carries out a complex and critical function only in certain extremophilic bacteria. PMID:17164334

  11. Long non-coding RNA CASC2 in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Sini, Maria Cristina; Manca, Antonella; Palomba, Grazia; Doneddu, Valentina; Tanda, Francesco; Pascale, Maria Rosa; Cossu, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs cover large part of the non-coding information of the human DNA, which represents more than 90% of the whole genome. They constitute a wide and complex group of molecules with more than 200 nucleotides, which generally lack an open reading frame, and are involved in various ways in the pathophysiology of cancer. Their roles in the regulation of gene expression, imprinting, transcription, and post-translational processing have been described in several types of cancer. CASC2 was discovered in 2004 in patients with endometrial carcinoma as a potential tumor suppressor. Since then, additional studies in other types of neoplasia have been carried out, and both mechanisms and interactions of CASC2 in cancer have been better elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of CASC2 in the genesis, progression, and clinical management of human cancer.

  12. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies.

  13. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  14. Structure and Gene-Silencing Mechanisms of Small Noncoding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M.

    Small (19-31-nucleotides) noncoding RNAs were identified in the past 10 years for their distinct function in gene silencing. The best known gene-silencing phenomenon, RNA interference (RNAi), is triggered in a sequence-specific manner by endogenously produced or exogenously introduced small doubled-stranded RNAs. As knowledge of the structure and function of the RNAi machinery has expanded, this phenomenon has become a powerful tool for biochemical research; it has enormous potential for therapeutics. This chapter summarizes significant aspects of three major classes of small noncoding, regulatory RNAs: small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Here, we focus on the biogenesis of these small RNAs, their structural features and coupled effectors as well as the mechanisms of each small regulatory RNA pathway which reveal fascinating ways by which gene silencing is controlled and fine-tuned at an epigenetic level.

  15. DNA methylation and triplet repeat stability: New proposals addressing actual questions on the CGG repeat of fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Woehrle, D.; Schwemmle, S.; Steinbach, P.

    1996-08-09

    Methylation of expanded CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene may well have different consequences. One is that methylation, extending into upstream regulatory elements, could lead to gene inactivation. Another effect of methylation, which we have obtained evidence for, could be stabilization of the repeat sequence and even prevention of premutations from expansion to full mutation. The full mutation of the fragile X syndrome probably occurs in an early transitional stage of embryonic development. The substrate is a maternally inherited premutation. The product usually is a mosaic pattern of full mutations detectable in early fetal life. These full mutation patterns are mitotically stable as, for instance, different somatic tissues of full mutation fetuses show identical mutation patterns. This raised the following questions: What triggers repeat expansion in that particular stage of development and what causes subsequent mitotic stability of expanded repeats? 21 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Rapid Degeneration of Noncoding DNA Regions Surrounding SlAP3X/Y After Recombination Suppression in the Dioecious Plant Silene latifolia

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kotaro; Nishiyama, Rie; Shibata, Fukashi; Kazama, Yusuke; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Silene latifolia is a dioecious plant with heteromorphic XY sex chromosomes. Previous studies of sex chromosome–linked genes have suggested a gradual divergence between the X-linked and the Y-linked genes in proportion to the distance from the pseudoautosomal region. However, such a comparison has yet to be made for the noncoding regions. To better characterize the nonrecombining region of the X and Y chromosomes, we sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the sex chromosome–linked paralogs SlAP3X and SlAP3Y, including 115 kb and 73 kb of sequences, respectively, flanking these genes. The synonymous nucleotide divergence between SlAP3X and SlAP3Y indicated that recombination stopped approximately 3.4 million years ago. Sequence homology analysis revealed the presence of six long terminal repeat retrotransposon-like elements. Using the nucleotide divergence calculated between left and right long terminal repeat sequences, insertion dates were estimated to be 0.083–1.6 million years ago, implying that all elements detected were inserted after recombination stopped. A reciprocal sequence homology search facilitated the identification of four homologous noncoding DNA regions between the X and Y chromosomes, spanning 6.7% and 10.6% of the X chromosome–derived and Y chromosome–derived sequences, respectively, investigated. Genomic Southern blotting and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the noncoding DNA flanking SlAP3X/Y has homology to many regions throughout the genome, regardless of whether they were homologous between the X and Y chromosomes. This finding suggests that most noncoding DNA regions rapidly lose their counterparts because of the introduction of transposable elements and indels (insertion–deletions) after recombination has stopped. PMID:24122056

  17. Putting Non-coding RNA on Display with CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Jones, Matthew F; Lal, Ashish; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-07-16

    In a recent issue of Nature Methods, Shechner et al. (2015) reported the development of CRISPR Display (CRISP-Disp), which is a sophisticated, flexible, modular, and multiplexable platform for targeting different types of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) to genomic loci. CRISP-Disp will facilitate synthetic-biology applications and enable the elucidation of ncRNA functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Decoding the function of nuclear long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Ling; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2010-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are mRNA-like, non-protein-coding RNAs that are pervasively transcribed throughout eukaryotic genomes. Rather than silently accumulating in the nucleus, many of these are now known or suspected to play important roles in nuclear architecture or in the regulation of gene expression. In this review, we highlight some recent progress in how lncRNAs regulate these important nuclear processes at the molecular level. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Right ventricular long noncoding RNA expression in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Su, Yan Ru; Clark, Travis; Brittain, Evan; Absi, Tarek; Maltais, Simon; Hemnes, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The expression of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human heart failure (HF) has not been widely studied. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we compared lncRNA expression in 22 explanted human HF hearts with lncRNA expression in 5 unused donor human hearts. We used Cufflinks to identify isoforms and DESeq to identify differentially expressed genes. We identified the noncoding RNAs by cross-reference to Ensembl release 73 (Genome Reference Consortium human genome build 37) and explored possible functional roles using a variety of online tools. In HF hearts, RNA-Seq identified 84,793 total messenger RNA coding and noncoding different transcripts, including 13,019 protein-coding genes, 2,085 total lncRNA genes, and 1,064 pseudogenes. By Ensembl noncoding RNA categories, there were 48 lncRNAs, 27 pseudogenes, and 30 antisense RNAs for a total of 105 differentially expressed lncRNAs in HF hearts. Compared with donor hearts, HF hearts exhibited differential expression of 7.7% of protein-coding genes, 3.7% of lncRNAs (including pseudogenes), and 2.5% of pseudogenes. There were not consistent correlations between antisense lncRNAs and parent genes and between pseudogenes and parent genes, implying differential regulation of expression. Exploratory in silico functional analyses using online tools suggested a variety of possible lncRNA regulatory roles. By providing a comprehensive profile of right ventricular polyadenylated messenger RNA transcriptome in HF, RNA-Seq provides an inventory of differentially expressed lncRNAs, including antisense transcripts and pseudogenes, for future mechanistic study. PMID:25992278

  20. Transcription control by long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have been found to regulate many cellular processes and thus expand the functional genetic repertoire contained within the genome. With the recent advent of genomic tools, it is now evident that these RNA molecules play central regulatory roles in many transcriptional programs. Here we discuss how they are targeted to promoters in several cases and how they operate at specific points in the transcription cycle to precisely control gene expression. PMID:22414755

  1. Dysregulation of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Ren-Wen; Sui, Peng-Cheng; He, Hai-Tao; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and a significant threat to the health of patients, especially those from China and Japan. The prognosis for patients with late stage GC receiving the standard of care treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, remains poor. Developing novel treatment strategies, identifying new molecules for targeted therapy, and devising screening techniques to detect this cancer in its early stages are needed for GC patients. The discovery of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), helped to elucidate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, diagnosis and treatment of GC. Recently, significant research has been conducted on non-coding RNAs and how the regulatory dysfunction of these RNAs impacts the tumorigenesis of GC. In this study, we review papers published in the last five years concerning the dysregulation of non-coding RNAs, especially miRNAs and lncRNAs, in GC. We summarize instances of aberrant expression of the ncRNAs in GC and their effect on survival-related events, including cell cycle regulation, AKT signaling, apoptosis and drug resistance. Additionally, we evaluate how ncRNA dysregulation affects the metastatic process, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, transcription factor activity, and oncogene and tumor suppressor expression. Lastly, we determine how ncRNAs affect angiogenesis in the microenvironment of GC. We further discuss the use of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers for use in clinical screening, early diagnosis and prognosis of GC. At present, no ideal ncRNAs have been identified as targets for the treatment of GC. PMID:26494954

  2. ChloroMitoSSRDB: open source repository of perfect and imperfect repeats in organelle genomes for evolutionary genomics.

    PubMed

    Sablok, Gaurav; Mudunuri, Suresh B; Patnana, Sujan; Popova, Martina; Fares, Mario A; Porta, Nicola La

    2013-04-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are repetitive stretches of nucleotides (A, T, G, C) that are distributed either as single base pair stretches or as a combination of two- to six-nucleotides units that are non-randomly distributed within coding and in non-coding regions of the genome. ChloroMitoSSRDB is a complete curated web-oriented relational database of perfect and imperfect repeats in organelle genomes. The present version of the database contains perfect and imperfect SSRs of 2161 organelle genomes (1982 mitochondrial and 179 chloroplast genomes). We detected a total of 5838 chloroplast perfect SSRs, 37 297 chloroplast imperfect SSRs, 5898 mitochondrial perfect SSRs and 50 355 mitochondrial imperfect SSRs across these genomes. The repeats have been further hyperlinked to the annotated gene regions (coding or non-coding) and a link to the corresponding gene record in National Center for Biotechnology Information(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) to identify and understand the positional relationship of the repetitive tracts. ChloroMitoSSRDB is connected to a user-friendly web interface that provides useful information associated with the location of the repeats (coding and non-coding), size of repeat, motif and length polymorphism, etc. ChloroMitoSSRDB will serve as a repository for developing functional markers for molecular phylogenetics, estimating molecular variation across species. Database URL: ChloroMitoSSRDB can be accessed as an open source repository at www.mcr.org.in/chloromitossrdb.

  3. Long Non-Coding RNA Regulation of Reproduction and Development

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David H.; Chu, Erin Tsi-Jia; Spektor, Roman; Soloway, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have long been known to play vital roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. Studies conducted over a decade ago revealed that maturation of spliced, polyadenylated coding mRNA occurs by reactions involving small nuclear RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs; mRNA translation depends on activities mediated by transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, subject to negative regulation by micro RNAs; transcriptional competence of sex chromosomes and some imprinted genes is regulated in cis by ncRNAs that vary by species; and both small-interfering RNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs bound to Argonaute-family proteins regulate post-translational modifications on chromatin and local gene expression states. More recently, gene-regulating noncoding RNAs have been identified, such as long intergenic and long noncoding RNAs (collectively referred to as lncRNAs)—a class totaling more than 100,000 transcripts in humans, which include some of the previously mentioned RNAs that regulate dosage compensation and imprinted gene expression. Here, we provide an overview of lncRNA activities, and then review the role of lncRNAs in processes vital to reproduction, such as germ cell specification, sex determination and gonadogenesis, sex hormone responses, meiosis, gametogenesis, placenta-tion, non-genetic inheritance, and pathologies affecting reproductive tissues. Results from many species are presented to illustrate the evolutionary conserved processes lncRNAs are involved in. PMID:26517592

  4. Noncoding RNA Profiles in Tobacco- and Alcohol-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soares do Amaral, Nayra; Cruz e Melo, Natalia; de Melo Maia, Beatriz; Malagoli Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco and alcohol are the leading environmental risk factors in the development of human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and liver injury. Despite the copious amount of research on this topic, by 2030, 8.3 million deaths are projected to occur worldwide due to tobacco use. The expression of noncoding RNAs, primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), is modulated by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes can modulate the expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs through various signaling pathways, such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammatory pathways—primarily interleukin 6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which seems to play a major role in the development of diseases associated with these risk factors. Since they may be predictive and prognostic biomarkers, they can be used both as predictors of the response to therapy and as a targeted therapy. Further, circulating miRNAs might be valuable noninvasive tools that can be used to examine diseases that are related to the use of tobacco and alcohol. This review discusses the function of noncoding RNAs in cancer and other human tobacco- and alcohol-associated diseases. PMID:28025544

  5. The Landscape of long non-coding RNA classification

    PubMed Central

    St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the depth and quality of transcriptome sequencing have revealed many new classes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNA classification has mushroomed to accommodate these new findings, even though the real dimensions and complexity of the non-coding transcriptome remain unknown. Although evidence of functionality of specific lncRNAs continues to accumulate, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental conceptual un-ambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the annotation and interpretation of non-coding transcriptome data. It also might undermine integration of the new genomic methods and datasets in an effort to unravel function of lncRNA. Here, we review existing lncRNA classifications, nomenclature, and terminology. Then we describe the conceptual guidelines that have emerged for their classification and functional annotation based on expanding and more comprehensive use of large systems biology-based datasets. PMID:25869999

  6. Characterization of noncoding regulatory DNA in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Ran; Agami, Reuven

    2017-08-08

    Genetic variants associated with common diseases are usually located in noncoding parts of the human genome. Delineation of the full repertoire of functional noncoding elements, together with efficient methods for probing their biological roles, is therefore of crucial importance. Over the past decade, DNA accessibility and various epigenetic modifications have been associated with regulatory functions. Mapping these features across the genome has enabled researchers to begin to document the full complement of putative regulatory elements. High-throughput reporter assays to probe the functions of regulatory regions have also been developed but these methods separate putative regulatory elements from the chromosome so that any effects of chromatin context and long-range regulatory interactions are lost. Definitive assignment of function(s) to putative cis-regulatory elements requires perturbation of these elements. Genome-editing technologies are now transforming our ability to perturb regulatory elements across entire genomes. Interpretation of high-throughput genetic screens that incorporate genome editors might enable the construction of an unbiased map of functional noncoding elements in the human genome.

  7. Origin of noncoding DNA sequences: molecular fossils of genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Naora, H; Miyahara, K; Curnow, R N

    1987-09-01

    The total amount of noncoding sequences on chromosomes of contemporary organisms varies significantly from species to species. We propose a hypothesis for the origin of these noncoding sequences that assumes that (i) an approximately equal to 0.55-kilobase (kb)-long reading frame composed the primordial gene and (ii) a 20-kb-long single-stranded polynucleotide is the longest molecule (as a genome) that was polymerized at random and without a specific template in the primordial soup/cell. The statistical distribution of stop codons allows examination of the probability of generating reading frames of approximately equal to 0.55 kb in this primordial polynucleotide. This analysis reveals that with three stop codons, a run of at least 0.55-kb equivalent length of nonstop codons would occur in 4.6% of 20-kb-long polynucleotide molecules. We attempt to estimate the total amount of noncoding sequences that would be present on the chromosomes of contemporary species assuming that present-day chromosomes retain the prototype primordial genome structure. Theoretical estimates thus obtained for most eukaryotes do not differ significantly from those reported for these specific organisms, with only a few exceptions. Furthermore, analysis of possible stop-codon distributions suggests that life on earth would not exist, at least in its present form, had two or four stop codons been selected early in evolution.

  8. Evaluation of non-coding variation in GLUT1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Chi; Lee, Jia Wei Audrey; Bellows, Susannah T; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Berkovic, Samuel F; Bahlo, Melanie; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SLC2A1, encoding glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), lead to dysfunction of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. Ten percent of cases with hypoglycorrhachia (fasting cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] glucose <2.2mmol/L) do not have mutations. We hypothesized that GLUT1 deficiency could be due to non-coding SLC2A1 variants. We performed whole exome sequencing of one proband with a GLUT1 phenotype and hypoglycorrhachia negative for SLC2A1 sequencing and copy number variants. We studied a further 55 patients with different epilepsies and low CSF glucose who did not have exonic mutations or copy number variants. We sequenced non-coding promoter and intronic regions. We performed mRNA studies for the recurrent intronic variant. The proband had a de novo splice site mutation five base pairs from the intron-exon boundary. Three of 55 patients had deep intronic SLC2A1 variants, including a recurrent variant in two. The recurrent variant produced less SLC2A1 mRNA transcript. Fasting CSF glucose levels show an age-dependent correlation, which makes the definition of hypoglycorrhachia challenging. Low CSF glucose levels may be associated with pathogenic SLC2A1 mutations including deep intronic SLC2A1 variants. Extending genetic screening to non-coding regions will enable diagnosis of more patients with GLUT1 deficiency, allowing implementation of the ketogenic diet to improve outcomes. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  9. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell‐Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Fletcher‐Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R.; Wade‐Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC‐derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca2+ homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl‐2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC‐derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063–2078 PMID:27097283

  10. Long noncoding RNA PCA3 gene promoter region is related to the risk of prostate cancer on Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Tao, Zhihua; Wang, Zhongyong; Hu, Wangqiang; Shen, Mo; Zhou, Lianlian; Wen, Zhiliang; Yu, Zhixian; Wu, Xiuling; Huang, Kate; Hu, Yuanping; Lin, Xiangyang

    2014-12-01

    Long noncoding RNA prostate cancer gene antigen 3 (PCA3) is one of the most prostate cancer-specific genes at present. Consequently, the prostate-specific expression and the sharp up-regulation of PCA3 RNA in prostate cancer suggest a unique transcriptional regulation, which possibly can be attributed to promoter polymorphism. In this study, we investigated a short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism of TAAA in the promoter region of PCA3 gene found in our previous study in prostate cancer (PCa) patients and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) patients, aiming to evaluate the association between the STR and increased risk for PCa. 120 PCa cases and 120 benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) cases were identified among participants. The region encompassing the TAAA repeat was amplified with a specific primer set we designed and screened by PCR-based cloning and sequencing in paired peripheral blood leukocytes and prostate tissues. Genotype-specific risks were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) associated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and adjusted for age by means of unconditional logistic regression. 5 PCA3 TAAA STR polymorphisms and 8 genotypes were found in both peripheral blood leukocytes and prostate tissues, the carriers with more TAAA repeats were associated with increased risk for PCa than individuals having less TAAA repeats. Interestingly, 18 (15.0%) of 120 PCa patients had more (TAAA)n repeats in prostate tissues than that in peripheral blood leukocytes, and 3 (2.5%) of 120 had less (TAAA)n repeats in prostate tissues. The results of this study suggest that short tandem repeat polymorphism of TAAA in the promoter region of PCA3 gene is a risk-increasing factor for prostate cancer in the Chinese population. In addition to the hereditary factor, the insertion mutation of (TAAA)n in a local tissue maybe another mechanism of the onset of PCa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The great human expansion.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Feldman, Marcus W

    2012-10-30

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today's human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth's habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the "serial founder effect." In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution.

  12. Virial Expansion Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  13. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  14. Long noncoding RNA in prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Martens-Uzunova, Elena S; Böttcher, René; Croce, Carlo M; Jenster, Guido; Visakorpi, Tapio; Calin, George A

    2014-06-01

    Genomic regions without protein-coding potential give rise to millions of protein-noncoding RNA transcripts (noncoding RNA) that participate in virtually all cellular processes. Research over the last 10 yr has accumulated evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in human urologic cancers. To review current progress in the biology and implication of lncRNAs associated with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. The PubMed database was searched for articles in the English language with combinations of the Medical Subject Headings terms long non coding RNA, long noncoding RNA, long untranslated RNA, cancer, neoplasms, prostate, bladder, and kidney. We summarise existing knowledge on the systematics, biology, and function of lncRNAs, particularly these involved in prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer. We also discuss the possible utilisation of lncRNAs as novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in urologic malignancies and portray the major challenges and future perspectives of ongoing lncRNA research. LncRNAs are important regulators of gene expression interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Alterations in the function of lncRNAs promote tumour formation, progression, and metastasis of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. LncRNAs can be used as noninvasive tumour markers in urologic malignancies. Increased knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs perform their function in the normal and malignant cell will lead to a better understanding of tumour biology and could provide novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of urologic cancers. In this paper we reviewed current knowledge of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) for the detection and treatment of urologic cancers. We conclude that lncRNAs can be used as novel biomarkers in prostate, kidney, or bladder cancer. LncRNAs hold promise as future therapeutic targets, but more research is needed to gain a better

  15. Simple Sequence Repeats in Escherichia coli: Abundance, Distribution, Composition, and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Cyril J.; Eitan, Yuval; Shelef, Leora; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2000-01-01

    Computer-based genome-wide screening of the DNA sequence of Escherichia coli strain K12 revealed tens of thousands of tandem simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts, with motifs ranging from 1 to 6 nucleotides. SSRs were well distributed throughout the genome. Mononucleotide SSRs were over-represented in noncoding regions and under-represented in open reading frames (ORFs). Nucleotide composition of mono- and dinucleotide SSRs, both in ORFs and in noncoding regions, differed from that of the genomic region in which they occurred, with 93% of all mononucleotide SSRs proving to be of A or T. Computer-based analysis of the fine position of every SSR locus in the noncoding portion of the genome relative to downstream ORFs showed SSRs located in areas that could affect gene regulation. DNA sequences at 14 arbitrarily chosen SSR tracts were compared among E. coli strains. Polymorphisms of SSR copy number were observed at four of seven mononucleotide SSR tracts screened, with all polymorphisms occurring in noncoding regions. SSR polymorphism could prove important as a genome-wide source of variation, both for practical applications (including rapid detection, strain identification, and detection of loci affecting key phenotypes) and for evolutionary adaptation of microbes.[The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession numbers AF209020–209030 and AF209508–209518.] PMID:10645951

  16. The Unstable Repeats - Three Evolving Faces of Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David L.; Orr, Harry T.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders characterized by expansion of an unstable nucleotide repeat account for a number of inherited neurological diseases. Here, we review examples of unstable repeat disorders that nicely illustrate the three of the major pathogenic mechanisms associated with these diseases: loss-of-function typically by disrupting transcription of the mutated gene, RNA toxic gain-of-function, and protein toxic gain-of-function. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurological disorders, the study of these unstable microsatellite repeat disorders has provided insight into very basic aspects of neuroscience. PMID:23473314

  17. Steppe expansion in Patagonia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veblen, Thomas T.; Markgraf, Vera

    1988-11-01

    Westward expansion of the Patagonian steppe and retrocession of Andean forests due to increasing aridity over the past one or two millennia has been a persistent theme in the ecological and paleoecological literature for at least half a century. New evidence from pollen profiles, tree-ring analysis, vegetation structure, and photographic and documentary historical sources does not show the expansion of the steppe. Instead, over the past century trees have invaded the steppe as a consequence mainly of human-induced changes in the fire regime, and trees have regenerated in forest areas that were heavily burnt at the onset of European colonization.

  18. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs between the poles of basic science and clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Weil, Patrick P; Hensel, Kai O; Weber, David; Postberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer', Keystone, CO, USA, 7-12 June 2015 Since the discovery of RNAi, great efforts have been undertaken to unleash the potential biomedical applicability of small noncoding RNAs, mainly miRNAs, involving their use as biomarkers for personalized diagnostics or their usability as active agents or therapy targets. The research's focus on the noncoding RNA world is now slowly moving from a phase of basic discoveries into a new phase, where every single molecule out of many hundreds of cataloged noncoding RNAs becomes dissected in order to investigate these molecules' biomedical relevance. In addition, RNA classes neglected before, such as long noncoding RNAs or circular RNAs attract more attention. Numerous timely results and hypotheses were presented at the 2015 Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer'.

  19. Repeating the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  20. Molecular dysfunctions in acute rejection after renal transplantation revealed by integrated analysis of transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Lin, Hua; Peng, Wujian; Huang, Yuanshuai; Chen, Jiejing; Zhang, Yue; Dai, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Acute rejection remains a problem in renal transplantation. To further illustrate the mechanism of rejection, we integrated protein array-based proteomics and RNA microarray-based genomics to investigate the transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA of biopsies of three patients with acute rejections and a control group. 99 transcription factors were identified in acute rejection biopsies compared to normal renal tissue. We correlated transcription factor data with microRNA and long noncoding RNA data sets and reported the expression of 5 transcription factors (AP-1, AP-4, STATx, c-Myc and p53), 12 miRNAs and 32 lncRNAs in acute rejection biopsies. Pathway analysis demonstrated that over-presentation of transcription factor pathway plays a critical role in acute rejection. This is the first study to comprehensively report the acute rejection transcription factor pathway. Integrative analysis of the transcription factor, microRNA and long noncoding RNA provided an expansive view of molecular signaling pathways in acute rejection after renal transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GFP-based fluorescence assay for CAG repeat instability in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Beatriz A; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries.

  2. GFP-Based Fluorescence Assay for CAG Repeat Instability in Cultured Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Beatriz A.; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries. PMID:25423602

  3. Widespread selection across coding and noncoding DNA in the pea aphid genome.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Ryan D; Dunham, Joseph P; Brisson, Jennifer A

    2013-06-21

    Genome-wide patterns of diversity and selection are critical measures for understanding how evolution has shaped the genome. Yet, these population genomic estimates are available for only a limited number of model organisms. Here we focus on the population genomics of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). The pea aphid is an emerging model system that exhibits a range of intriguing biological traits not present in classic model systems. We performed low-coverage genome resequencing of 21 clonal pea aphid lines collected from alfalfa host plants in North America to characterize genome-wide patterns of diversity and selection. We observed an excess of low-frequency polymorphisms throughout coding and noncoding DNA, which we suggest is the result of a founding event and subsequent population expansion in North America. Most gene regions showed lower levels of Tajima's D than synonymous sites, suggesting that the majority of the genome is not evolving neutrally but rather exhibits significant constraint. Furthermore, we used the pea aphid's unique manner of X-chromosome inheritance to assign genomic scaffolds to either autosomes or the X chromosome. Comparing autosomal vs. X-linked sequence variation, we discovered that autosomal genes show an excess of low frequency variants indicating that purifying selection acts more efficiently on the X chromosome. Overall, our results provide a critical first step in characterizing the genetic diversity and evolutionary pressures on an aphid genome.

  4. Identification of long non-coding RNA in the horse transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Scott, E Y; Mansour, T; Bellone, R R; Brown, C T; Mienaltowski, M J; Penedo, M C; Ross, P J; Valberg, S J; Murray, J D; Finno, C J

    2017-07-04

    Efforts to resolve the transcribed sequences in the equine genome have focused on protein-coding RNA. The transcription of the intergenic regions, although detected via total RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), has yet to be characterized in the horse. The most recent equine transcriptome based on RNA-seq from several tissues was a prime opportunity to obtain a concurrent long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) database. This lncRNA database has a breadth of eight tissues and a depth of over 20 million reads for select tissues, providing the deepest and most expansive equine lncRNA database. Utilizing the intergenic reads and three categories of novel genes from a previously published equine transcriptome pipeline, we better describe these groups by annotating the lncRNA candidates. These lncRNA candidates were filtered using an approach adapted from human lncRNA annotation, which removes transcripts based on size, expression, protein-coding capability and distance to the start or stop of annotated protein-coding transcripts. Our equine lncRNA database has 20,800 transcripts that demonstrate characteristics unique to lncRNA including low expression, low exon diversity and low levels of sequence conservation. These candidate lncRNA will serve as a baseline lncRNA annotation and begin to describe the RNA-seq reads assigned to the intergenic space in the horse.

  5. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA MIAT in aggressive form of chronic lymphocytic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Arash; Siddiqui, Hasan; Moshiri, Farzaneh; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kipps, Thomas J; Croce, Carlo M

    2016-08-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-proten-coding transcripts of more than 200 nucleotides generated by RNA polymerase II and their expressions are tightly regulated in cell type specific- and/or cellular differential stage specific- manner. MIAT, originally isolated as a candidate gene for myocardial infarction, encodes lncRNA (termed MIAT). Here, we determined the expression level of MIAT in established leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and found its upregulation in lymphoid but not in myeloid cell lineage with mature B cell phenotype. MIAT expression level was further determined in chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL), characterized by expansion of leukemic cells with mature B phenotype, to demonstrate relatively high occurrence of MIAT upregulation in aggressive form of CLL carrying either 17p-deletion, 11q-deletion, or Trisomy 12 over indolent form carrying 13p-deletion. Furthermore, we show that MIAT constitutes a regulatory loop with OCT4 in malignant mature B cell, as was previously reported in mouse pulripotent stem cell, and that both molecules are essential for cell survival.

  6. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA MIAT in aggressive form of chronic lymphocytic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Sattari, Arash; Siddiqui, Hasan; Moshiri, Farzaneh; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Kipps, Thomas J.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-proten-coding transcripts of more than 200 nucleotides generated by RNA polymerase II and their expressions are tightly regulated in cell type specific- and/or cellular differential stage specific- manner. MIAT, originally isolated as a candidate gene for myocardial infarction, encodes lncRNA (termed MIAT). Here, we determined the expression level of MIAT in established leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and found its upregulation in lymphoid but not in myeloid cell lineage with mature B cell phenotype. MIAT expression level was further determined in chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL), characterized by expansion of leukemic cells with mature B phenotype, to demonstrate relatively high occurrence of MIAT upregulation in aggressive form of CLL carrying either 17p-deletion, 11q-deletion, or Trisomy 12 over indolent form carrying 13p-deletion. Furthermore, we show that MIAT constitutes a regulatory loop with OCT4 in malignant mature B cell, as was previously reported in mouse pulripotent stem cell, and that both molecules are essential for cell survival. PMID:27527866

  7. Isolation and characterization of human brain genes with (CCA){sub n} trinucleotide repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Longshore, J.W.; Finley, W.H.; Descartes, M.

    1994-09-01

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats has been described as a new form of mutation. To date, only the expansion of (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats have been associated with disease. Expansion of (CAG){sub n} repeats has been found to cause Huntington`s disease, Kennedy`s disease, myotonic dystrophy, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, and dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy. (CGG){sub n} repeat expansion has been implicated in the fragile X syndrome and FRAXE mental retardation. In an effort to identify other potential repeats as candidates for expansion, a DNA linguistics approach was used to study 10 Mb of human DNA sequences in GenBank. Our study found the (CCA){sub n} repeat and the disease-associated (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n} repeats to be over-represented in the human genome. The (CCA){sub n} repeat also shares other characteristics with (CGG){sub n} and (CAG){sub n}, making it a good candidate for expansion. Trinucleotide repeat numbers in disease-associated genes are normally polymorphic in a population. Therefore, by studying genes for polymorphisms, candidate genes may be identified. Twelve sequences previously deposited in GenBank with at least five tandem copies of (CCA) were studied and no polymorphisms were found. To identify other candidate genes, a human hippocampus cDNA library was screened with a (CCA){sub 8} probe. This approach identified 19 novel expressed sequences having long tandem (CCA){sub n} repeats which are currently under investigation for polymorphisms. Genes with polymorphic repeats may serve as markers for linkage studies or as candidate genes for genetic diseases showing anticipation.

  8. Expanded C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Repeat in Depressive Pseudodementia

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Kevin F.; van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Rademakers, Rosa; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Expanded hexanucleotide repeats in C9ORF72 are a common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Repeat expansions have also been detected infrequently in other disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinsonian disorders. Objective To assess the incidence of the expanded C9ORF72 repeat in cases of depressive pseudodementia. Design An immunohistochemical screen of autopsied brains collected between 1998 and 2013. Setting Brain bank at Mayo Clinic Florida, a large tertiary care research institution. Participants Thirty one neuropathologically normal individuals (no atrophy, neuronal loss, or gliosis beyond what would be expected for age) with an antemortem clinical history or diagnosis of depression and/or dementia. Main Outcome Measures Presence of the hexanucleotide repeat was established using immunohistochemistry with a highly disease-specific antibody (C9RANT), and was further validated in carriers using repeat-primed polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting. Results Of the 31 cases studied, 2 (6.45%) individuals harbored the C9ORF72 repeat expansion. Both patients were men with refractory depression. One patient experienced drug-induced Parkinsonism and sudden-onset dementia, while the other patient had a more insidious disease course suspected to be Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical and neuropathologic features are described. Conclusions and Relevance This report expands the range of clinicopathologic presentations of C9ORF72 expanded hexanucleotide repeat to include psychiatric disorders such as depressive pseudodementia. PMID:24756204

  9. A Molecular Chipper technology for CRISPR sgRNA library generation and functional mapping of noncoding regions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jijun; Roden, Christine A.; Pan, Wen; Zhu, Shu; Baccei, Anna; Pan, Xinghua; Jiang, Tingting; Kluger, Yuval; Weissman, Sherman M.; Guo, Shangqin; Flavell, Richard A.; Ding, Ye; Lu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based genetic screens using single-guide-RNA (sgRNA) libraries have proven powerful to identify genetic regulators. Applying CRISPR screens to interrogate functional elements in noncoding regions requires generating sgRNA libraries that are densely covering, and ideally inexpensive, easy to implement and flexible for customization. Here we present a Molecular Chipper technology for generating dense sgRNA libraries for genomic regions of interest, and a proof-of-principle screen that identifies novel cis-regulatory domains for miR-142 biogenesis. The Molecular Chipper approach utilizes a combination of random fragmentation and a type III restriction enzyme to derive a densely covering sgRNA library from input DNA. Applying this approach to 17 microRNAs and their flanking regions and with a reporter for miR-142 activity, we identify both the pre-miR-142 region and two previously unrecognized cis-domains important for miR-142 biogenesis, with the latter regulating miR-142 processing. This strategy will be useful for identifying functional noncoding elements in mammalian genomes. PMID:27025950

  10. SRS2 and SGS1 prevent chromosomal breaks and stabilize triplet repeats by restraining recombination.

    PubMed

    Kerrest, Alix; Anand, Ranjith P; Sundararajan, Rangapriya; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Liberi, Giordano; Dujon, Bernard; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2009-02-01

    Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain trinucleotide repeat expansions. Here we show that in yeast srs2Delta cells, CTG repeats undergo both expansions and contractions, and they show increased chromosomal fragility. Deletion of RAD52 or RAD51 suppresses these phenotypes, suggesting that recombination triggers trinucleotide repeat instability in srs2Delta cells. In sgs1Delta cells, CTG repeats undergo contractions and increased fragility by a mechanism partially dependent on RAD52 and RAD51. Analysis of replication intermediates revealed abundant joint molecules at the CTG repeats during S phase. These molecules migrate similarly to reversed replication forks, and their presence is dependent on SRS2 and SGS1 but not RAD51. Our results suggest that Srs2 promotes fork reversal in repetitive sequences, preventing repeat instability and fragility. In the absence of Srs2 or Sgs1, DNA damage accumulates and is processed by homologous recombination, triggering repeat rearrangements.

  11. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2013-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 20 Program 13140.

  12. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris

    2011-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 18 Program 12410.

  13. Slit Wheel Repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiFelice, Audrey

    2012-10-01

    Test the repeatibility of the slit wheel by taking a sequence of comparison lamp spectra with grating G230MB {2697} and the three smallest long slits {52X0.2, 52X0.1, and 52X0.05}. This is a clone of Cycle 19 Program 12771.

  14. Repeated Causal Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagmayer, York; Meder, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    Many of our decisions refer to actions that have a causal impact on the external environment. Such actions may not only allow for the mere learning of expected values or utilities but also for acquiring knowledge about the causal structure of our world. We used a repeated decision-making paradigm to examine what kind of knowledge people acquire in…

  15. A Special Trinomial Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author takes up the special trinomial (1 + x + x[squared])[superscript n] and shows that the coefficients of its expansion are entries of a Pascal-like triangle. He also shows how to calculate these entries recursively and explicitly. This article could be used in the classroom for enrichment. (Contains 1 table.)

  16. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOEpatents

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  17. Urban Expansion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Under an Egyptian government contract, PADCO studies urban growth in the Nile Area. They were assisted by LANDSAT survey maps and measurements provided by TAC. TAC had classified the raw LANDSAT data and processed it into various categories to detail urban expansion. PADCO crews spot checked the results, and correlations were established.

  18. A Special Trinomial Expansion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author takes up the special trinomial (1 + x + x[squared])[superscript n] and shows that the coefficients of its expansion are entries of a Pascal-like triangle. He also shows how to calculate these entries recursively and explicitly. This article could be used in the classroom for enrichment. (Contains 1 table.)

  19. Expansion of Pannes

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the Long Island, New Jersey, and southern New England region, one facet of marsh drowning as a result of accelerated sea level rise is the expansion of salt marsh ponds and pannes. Over the past century, marsh ponds and pannes have formed and expanded in areas of poor drainag...

  20. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  1. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  2. Expansion of Pannes

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the Long Island, New Jersey, and southern New England region, one facet of marsh drowning as a result of accelerated sea level rise is the expansion of salt marsh ponds and pannes. Over the past century, marsh ponds and pannes have formed and expanded in areas of poor drainag...

  3. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  4. Phenotypic evolution through variation in splicing of the noncoding RNA COOLAIR.

    PubMed

    Li, Peijin; Tao, Zhen; Dean, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which natural polymorphisms in noncoding sequences have functional consequences is still unknown. A large proportion of the natural variation in flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions is due to noncoding cis polymorphisms that define distinct haplotypes of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Here, we show that a single natural intronic polymorphism in one haplotype affects FLC expression and thus flowering by specifically changing splicing of the FLC antisense transcript COOLAIR. Altered antisense splicing increases FLC expression via a cotranscriptional mechanism involving capping of the FLC nascent transcript. Single noncoding polymorphisms can therefore be a major contributor to phenotypic evolution through modulation of noncoding transcripts.

  5. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide, and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasized following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease) and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA) in 1991. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases. PMID:26733936

  6. The great human expansion

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today’s human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth’s habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the “serial founder effect.” In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution. PMID:23077256

  7. Analysis of a very large trinucleotide repeat in a patient with juvenile Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Nance, M A; Mathias-Hagen, V; Breningstall, G; Wick, M J; McGlennen, R C

    1999-01-15

    A patient with juvenile Huntington's disease (HD) of probable maternal inheritance is reported. The expanded IT-15 allele was only detected with the use of modified PCR and Southern transfer techniques, which showed a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion of approximately 250 repeats-the largest CAG expansion reported within the huntingtin gene. This case emphasizes the need for communication between the diagnostic laboratory and the clinician to define the molecular genetics of unusual cases.

  8. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  9. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael S.; Sallee, Floyd R.; Park, Edwards A.; Parker, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks. PMID:26636029

  10. Homoiterons and expansion in ribosomal RNAs.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael S; Sallee, Floyd R; Park, Edwards A; Parker, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes feature numerous repeats of three or more nucleotides with the same nucleobase (homoiterons). In prokaryotes these repeats are much more frequent in thermophile compared to mesophile or psychrophile species, and have similar frequency in both large RNAs. These features point to use of prokaryotic homoiterons in stabilization of both ribosomal subunits. The two large RNAs of eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomes have expanded to a different degree across the evolutionary ladder. The big RNA of the larger subunit (60S LSU) evolved expansion segments of up to 2400 nucleotides, and the smaller subunit (40S SSU) RNA acquired expansion segments of not more than 700 nucleotides. In the examined eukaryotes abundance of rRNA homoiterons generally follows size and nucleotide bias of the expansion segments, and increases with GC content and especially with phylogenetic rank. Both the nucleotide bias and frequency of homoiterons are much larger in metazoan and angiosperm LSU compared to the respective SSU RNAs. This is especially pronounced in the tetrapod vertebrates and seems to culminate in the hominid mammals. The stability of secondary structure in polyribonucleotides would significantly connect to GC content, and should also relate to G and C homoiteron content. RNA modeling points to considerable presence of homoiteron-rich double-stranded segments especially in vertebrate LSU RNAs, and homoiterons with four or more nucleotides in the vertebrate and angiosperm LSU RNAs are largely confined to the expansion segments. These features could mainly relate to protein export function and attachment of LSU to endoplasmic reticulum and other subcellular networks.

  11. Muscular myopathies other than myotonic dystrophy also associated with (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vasavi; Ahuja, Y. R.; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess triplet repeat expansion (CTG)n at the ‘dystrophia-myotonica protein kinase’ (DMPK) locus in muscular myopathies to elucidate its role in myopathic symptoms and enable genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in families. Methods and Results: Individuals with symptoms of myopathy, hypotonia and controls selected randomly from the population were evaluated for triplet repeat expansion of (CTG)n repeats in the 3’untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK gene, the causative mutation in myotonic dystrophy (DM). DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 40 individuals; they presented symptoms of muscle myopathy (n = 11), muscle hypotonia (n = 4), members of their families (n = 5) and control individuals from random population (n = 20). Molecular analysis of genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the DMPK gene encompassing the triplet repeat expansion, showed that all controls (n = 20) gave a 2.1 kb band indicating normal triplet repeat number. Three out of 11 cases (two clinically diagnosed DM and one muscular dystrophy) had an expansion of the (CTG)n repeat in the range of 1000-2100 repeats corresponding to the repeat number in cases of severe DM. Other two of these 11 cases, showed a mild expansion of ~ 66 repeats. Three samples, which included two cases of hypotonia and the father of a subject with muscular dystrophy, also gave a similar repeat expansion (~66 repeats). Conclusion: Results suggest a role of (CTG)n expansion at the DMPK locus in unexplained hypotonias and muscular myopathies other than DM. This calls for screening of the triplet repeat expansion at the DMPK locus in cases of idiopathic myopathies and hypotonia. PMID:23560000

  12. Deep sequencing of RNA from immune cell-derived vesicles uncovers the selective incorporation of small non-coding RNA biotypes with potential regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Nolte-’t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Buermans, Henk P. J.; Waasdorp, Maaike; Stoorvogel, Willem; Wauben, Marca H. M.; ’t Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Cells release RNA-carrying vesicles and membrane-free RNA/protein complexes into the extracellular milieu. Horizontal vesicle-mediated transfer of such shuttle RNA between cells allows dissemination of genetically encoded messages, which may modify the function of target cells. Other studies used array analysis to establish the presence of microRNAs and mRNA in cell-derived vesicles from many sources. Here, we used an unbiased approach by deep sequencing of small RNA released by immune cells. We found a large variety of small non-coding RNA species representing pervasive transcripts or RNA cleavage products overlapping with protein coding regions, repeat sequences or structural RNAs. Many of these RNAs were enriched relative to cellular RNA, indicating that cells destine specific RNAs for extracellular release. Among the most abundant small RNAs in shuttle RNA were sequences derived from vault RNA, Y-RNA and specific tRNAs. Many of the highly abundant small non-coding transcripts in shuttle RNA are evolutionary well-conserved and have previously been associated to gene regulatory functions. These findings allude to a wider range of biological effects that could be mediated by shuttle RNA than previously expected. Moreover, the data present leads for unraveling how cells modify the function of other cells via transfer of specific non-coding RNA species. PMID:22821563

  13. UpSETing chromatin during non-coding RNA production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The packaging of eukaryotic DNA into nucleosomal arrays permits cells to tightly regulate and fine-tune gene expression. The ordered disassembly and reassembly of these nucleosomes allows RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) conditional access to the underlying DNA sequences. Disruption of nucleosome reassembly following RNAPII passage results in spurious transcription initiation events, leading to the production of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). We review the molecular mechanisms involved in the suppression of these cryptic initiation events and discuss the role played by ncRNAs in regulating gene expression. PMID:23738864

  14. Long noncoding RNAs and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qiong; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are typically defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs are involved in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions, and genetic disorders. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease, which accounts for >80% of dementia in elderly subjects. In this review, we will highlight recent studies investigating the role of lncRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and focus on some specific lncRNAs that may underlie Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology and therefore could be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27418812

  15. Rapid unwinding of triplet repeat hairpins by Srs2 helicase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Alok; Lahue, Robert S

    2008-06-01

    Expansions of trinucleotide repeats cause at least 15 heritable human diseases. Single-stranded triplet repeat DNA in vitro forms stable hairpins in a sequence-dependent manner that correlates with expansion risk in vivo. Hairpins are therefore considered likely intermediates during the expansion process. Unwinding of a hairpin by a DNA helicase would help protect against expansions. Yeast Srs2, but not the RecQ homolog Sgs1, blocks expansions in vivo in a manner largely dependent on its helicase function. The current study tested the idea that Srs2 would be faster at unwinding DNA substrates with an extrahelical triplet repeat hairpin embedded in a duplex context. These substrates should mimic the relevant intermediate structure thought to occur in vivo. Srs2 was faster than Sgs1 at unwinding several substrates containing triplet repeat hairpins or another structured loop. In contrast, control substrates with an unstructured loop or a Watson-Crick duplex were unwound equally well by both enzymes. Results with a fluorescently labeled, three-way junction showed that Srs2 unwinding proceeds unabated through extrahelical triplet repeats. In summary, Srs2 maintains its facile unwinding of triplet repeat hairpins embedded within duplex DNA, supporting the genetic evidence that Srs2 is a key helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for preventing expansions.

  16. Kcnq1ot1/Lit1 Noncoding RNA Mediates Transcriptional Silencing by Targeting to the Perinucleolar Region ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Faizaan; Pandey, Radha Raman; Nagano, Takashi; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Mondal, Tanmoy; Fraser, Peter; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2008-01-01

    The Kcnq1ot1 antisense noncoding RNA has been implicated in long-range bidirectional silencing, but the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. Here we characterize a domain at the 5′ end of the Kcnq1ot1 RNA that carries out transcriptional silencing of linked genes using an episomal vector system. The bidirectional silencing property of Kcnq1ot1 maps to a highly conserved repeat motif within the silencing domain, which directs transcriptional silencing by interaction with chromatin, resulting in histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Intriguingly, the silencing domain is also required to target the episomal vector to the perinucleolar compartment during mid-S phase. Collectively, our data unfold a novel mechanism by which an antisense RNA mediates transcriptional gene silencing of chromosomal domains by targeting them to distinct nuclear compartments known to be rich in heterochromatic machinery. PMID:18299392

  17. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  18. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  19. The RIDL hypothesis: transposable elements as functional domains of long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rory; Guigó, Roderic

    2014-01-01

    Our genome contains tens of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are likely to have genetic regulatory functions. It has been proposed that lncRNA are organized into combinations of discrete functional domains, but the nature of these and their identification remain elusive. One class of sequence elements that is enriched in lncRNA is represented by transposable elements (TEs), repetitive mobile genetic sequences that have contributed widely to genome evolution through a process termed exaptation. Here, we link these two concepts by proposing that exonic TEs act as RNA domains that are essential for lncRNA function. We term such elements Repeat Insertion Domains of LncRNAs (RIDLs). A growing number of RIDLs have been experimentally defined, where TE-derived fragments of lncRNA act as RNA-, DNA-, and protein-binding domains. We propose that these reflect a more general phenomenon of exaptation during lncRNA evolution, where inserted TE sequences are repurposed as recognition sites for both protein and nucleic acids. We discuss a series of genomic screens that may be used in the future to systematically discover RIDLs. The RIDL hypothesis has the potential to explain how functional evolution can keep pace with the rapid gene evolution observed in lncRNA. More practically, TE maps may in the future be used to predict lncRNA function. PMID:24850885

  20. The Long Noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY Regulates Cell Proliferation in Primary Human Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Mazar, Joseph; Lee, Bongyong; Sawada, Junko; Li, Jian-Liang; Shelley, John; Govindarajan, Subramaniam; Towler, Dwight; Mattick, John S; Komatsu, Masanobu; Dinger, Marcel E; Perera, Ranjan J

    2016-04-01

    The long noncoding RNA SPRIGHTLY (formerly SPRY4-IT1), which lies within the intronic region of the SPRY4 gene, is up-regulated in human melanoma cells compared to melanocytes. SPRIGHTLY regulates a number of cancer hallmarks, including proliferation, motility, and apoptosis. To better understand its oncogenic role, SPRIGHTLY was stably transfected into human melanocytes, which resulted in increased cellular proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and development of a multinucleated dendritic-like phenotype. RNA sequencing and mass spectrometric analysis of SPRIGHTLY-expressing cells revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, chromosome organization, regulation of DNA damage responses, and cell cycle. The proliferation marker Ki67, minichromosome maintenance genes 2-5, antiapoptotic gene X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 7 were all up-regulated in SPRIGHTLY-expressing melanocytes, whereas the proapoptotic tumor suppressor gene DPPIV/CD26 was down-regulated, followed by an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting an increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Because down-regulation of DPPIV is known to be associated with malignant transformation in melanocytes, SPRIGHTLY-mediated DPPIV down-regulation may play an important role in melanoma pathobiology. Together, these findings provide important insights into how SPRIGHTLY regulates cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation in primary human melanocytes.

  1. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 10(4)-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions.

  2. HSV1 latent transcription and non-coding RNA: A critical retrospective.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Dane; Barrozo, Enrico R; Bloom, David C

    2017-07-15

    Virologists have invested great effort into understanding how the herpes simplex viruses and their relatives are maintained dormant over the lifespan of their host while maintaining the poise to remobilize on sporadic occasions. Piece by piece, our field has defined the tissues in play (the sensory ganglia), the transcriptional units (the latency-associated transcripts), and the responsive genomic region (the long repeats of the viral genomes). With time, the observed complexity of these features has compounded, and the totality of viral factors regulating latency are less obvious. In this review, we compose a comprehensive picture of the viral genetic elements suspected to be relevant to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) latent transcription by conducting a critical analysis of about three decades of research. We describe these studies, which largely involved mutational analysis of the notable latency-associated transcripts (LATs), and more recently a series of viral miRNAs. We also intend to draw attention to the many other less characterized non-coding RNAs, and perhaps coding RNAs, that may be important for consideration when trying to disentangle the multitude of phenotypes of the many genetic modifications introduced into recombinant HSV1 strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  4. Identification of antisense long noncoding RNAs that function as SINEUPs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schein, Aleks; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kauppinen, Sakari; Gustincich, Stefano; Carninci, Piero

    2016-09-20

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous natural antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. Recently, an antisense lncRNA to mouse Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uchl1) was reported to increase UCHL1 protein synthesis, representing a new functional class of lncRNAs, designated as SINEUPs, for SINE element-containing translation UP-regulators. Here, we show that an antisense lncRNA to the human protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A), named as R12A-AS1, which overlaps with the 5' UTR and first coding exon of the PPP1R12A mRNA, functions as a SINEUP, increasing PPP1R12A protein translation in human cells. The SINEUP activity depends on the aforementioned sense-antisense interaction and a free right Alu monomer repeat element at the 3' end of R12A-AS1. In addition, we identify another human antisense lncRNA with SINEUP activity. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human natural antisense lncRNAs can up-regulate protein translation, suggesting that endogenous SINEUPs may be widespread and present in many mammalian species.

  5. The RNA-centred view of the synapse: non-coding RNAs and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    If mRNAs were the only RNAs made by a neuron, there would be a simple mapping of mRNAs to proteins. However, microRNAs and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs; endo-siRNAs, piRNAs, BC1, BC200, antisense and long ncRNAs, repeat-related transcripts, etc.) regulate mRNAs via effects on protein translation as well as transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Not only are genes ON or OFF, but their ability to be translated can be turned ON or OFF at the level of synapses, supporting an enormous increase in information capacity. Here, I review evidence that ncRNAs are expressed pervasively within dendrites in mammalian brain; that some are activity-dependent and highly enriched near synapses; and that synaptic ncRNAs participate in plasticity responses including learning and memory. Ultimately, ncRNAs can be viewed as the post-it notes of the neuron. They have no literal meaning of their own, but derive their functions from where (and to what) they are stuck. This may explain, in part, why ncRNAs differ so dramatically from protein-coding genes, both in terms of the usual indicators of functionality and in terms of evolutionary constraints. ncRNAs do not appear to be direct mediators of synaptic transmission in the manner of neurotransmitters or receptors, yet they orchestrate synaptic plasticity—and may drive species-specific changes in cognition. PMID:25135965

  6. Defining Genetic Factors That Modulate Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonil; van Jaarsveld, Marijn T. M.; Shieh, Shin-Yi; Xu, Kexiang; Bonini, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability underlies >20 human hereditary disorders. These diseases include many neurological and neurodegenerative situations, such as those caused by pathogenic polyglutamine (polyQ) domains encoded by expanded CAG repeats. Although mechanisms of instability have been intensely studied, our knowledge remains limited in part due to the lack of unbiased genome-wide screens in multicellular eukaryotes. Drosophila melanogaster displays triplet repeat instability with features that recapitulate repeat instability seen in patients with disease. Here we report an enhanced fly model with substantial instability based on a noncoding 270 CAG (UAS–CAG270) repeat construct under control of a germline-specific promoter. We find that expression of pathogenic polyQ protein modulates repeat instability of CAG270 in trans, indicating that pathogenic-length polyQ proteins may globally modulate repeat instability in the genome in vivo. We further performed an unbiased genetic screen for novel modifiers of instability. These studies indicate that different aspects of repeat instability are under independent genetic control, and identify CG15262, a protein with a NOT2/3/5 conserved domain, as a modifier of CAG repeat instability in vivo. PMID:21041558

  7. Expansion tube test time predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourlay, Christopher M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of an interface between two gases and strong expansion is investigated and the effect on flow in an expansion tube is examined. Two mechanisms for the unsteady Pitot-pressure fluctuations found in the test section of an expansion tube are proposed. The first mechanism depends on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the driver-test gas interface in the presence of a strong expansion. The second mechanism depends on the reflection of the strong expansion from the interface. Predictions compare favorably with experimental results. The theory is expected to be independent of the absolute values of the initial expansion tube filling pressures.

  8. Bigravity from gradient expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-04

    We discuss how the ghost-free bigravity coupled with a single scalar field can be derived from a braneworld setup. We consider DGP two-brane model without radion stabilization. The bulk configuration is solved for given boundary metrics, and it is substituted back into the action to obtain the effective four-dimensional action. In order to obtain the ghost-free bigravity, we consider the gradient expansion in which the brane separation is supposed to be sufficiently small so that two boundary metrics are almost identical. The obtained effective theory is shown to be ghost free as expected, however, the interaction between two gravitons takes the Fierz-Pauli form at the leading order of the gradient expansion, even though we do not use the approximation of linear perturbation. We also find that the radion remains as a scalar field in the four-dimensional effective theory, but its coupling to the metrics is non-trivial.

  9. Range expansion of mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Melanie J. I.; Korolev, Kirill S.; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2012-02-01

    The expansion of a species into new territory is often strongly influenced by the presence of other species. This effect is particularly striking for the case of mutualistic species that enhance each other's proliferation. Examples range from major events in evolutionary history, such as the spread and diversification of flowering plants due to their mutualism with pollen-dispersing insects, to modern examples like the surface colonisation of multi-species microbial biofilms. Here, we investigate the spread of cross-feeding strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on an agar surface as a model system for expanding mutualists. Depending on the degree of mutualism, the two strains form distinctive spatial patterns during their range expansion. This change in spatial patterns can be understood as a phase transition within a stepping stone model generalized to two mutualistic species.

  10. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  11. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  12. Plant noncoding RNA gene discovery by "single-genome comparative genomics".

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong-Jian; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Qu, Liang-Hu; Gautheret, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Plant genomes have undergone multiple rounds of duplications that contributed massively to the growth of gene families. The structure of resulting families has been studied in depth for protein-coding genes. However, little is known about the impact of duplications on noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes. Here we perform a systematic analysis of duplicated regions in the rice genome in search of such ncRNA repeats. We observe that, just like their protein counterparts, most ncRNA genes have undergone multiple duplications that left visible sequence conservation footprints. The extent of ncRNA gene duplication in plants is such that these sequence footprints can be exploited for the discovery of novel ncRNA gene families on a large scale. We developed an SVM model that is able to retrieve likely ncRNA candidates among the 100,000+ repeat families in the rice genome, with a reasonably low false-positive discovery rate. Among the nearly 4000 ncRNA families predicted by this means, only 90 correspond to putative snoRNA or miRNA families. About half of the remaining families are classified as structured RNAs. New candidate ncRNAs are particularly enriched in UTR and intronic regions. Interestingly, 89% of the putative ncRNA families do not produce a detectable signal when their sequences are compared to another grass genome such as maize. Our results show that a large fraction of rice ncRNA genes are present in multiple copies and are species-specific or of recent origin. Intragenome comparison is a unique and potent source for the computational annotation of this major class of ncRNA.

  13. Plant noncoding RNA gene discovery by “single-genome comparative genomics”

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong-Jian; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Yue-Qin; Qu, Liang-Hu; Gautheret, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Plant genomes have undergone multiple rounds of duplications that contributed massively to the growth of gene families. The structure of resulting families has been studied in depth for protein-coding genes. However, little is known about the impact of duplications on noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes. Here we perform a systematic analysis of duplicated regions in the rice genome in search of such ncRNA repeats. We observe that, just like their protein counterparts, most ncRNA genes have undergone multiple duplications that left visible sequence conservation footprints. The extent of ncRNA gene duplication in plants is such that these sequence footprints can be exploited for the discovery of novel ncRNA gene families on a large scale. We developed an SVM model that is able to retrieve likely ncRNA candidates among the 100,000+ repeat families in the rice genome, with a reasonably low false-positive discovery rate. Among the nearly 4000 ncRNA families predicted by this means, only 90 correspond to putative snoRNA or miRNA families. About half of the remaining families are classified as structured RNAs. New candidate ncRNAs are particularly enriched in UTR and intronic regions. Interestingly, 89% of the putative ncRNA families do not produce a detectable signal when their sequences are compared to another grass genome such as maize. Our results show that a large fraction of rice ncRNA genes are present in multiple copies and are species-specific or of recent origin. Intragenome comparison is a unique and potent source for the computational annotation of this major class of ncRNA. PMID:21220549

  14. Distinguishing the immunostimulatory properties of noncoding RNAs expressed in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanne, Antoine; Muniz, Luciana R.; Puzio-Kuter, Anna; Leonova, Katerina I.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Ting, David T.; Monasson, Rémi; Cocco, Simona; Levine, Arnold J.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Greenbaum, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated abundant transcription of a set of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) preferentially within tumors as opposed to normal tissue. Using an approach from statistical physics, we quantify global transcriptome-wide motif use for the first time, to our knowledge, in human and murine ncRNAs, determining that most have motif use consistent with the coding genome. However, an outlier subset of tumor-associated ncRNAs, typically of recent evolutionary origin, has motif use that is often indicative of pathogen-associated RNA. For instance, we show that the tumor-associated human repeat human satellite repeat II (HSATII) is enriched in motifs containing CpG dinucleotides in AU-rich contexts that most of the human genome and human adapted viruses have evolved to avoid. We demonstrate that a key subset of these ncRNAs functions as immunostimulatory “self-agonists” and directly activates cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system to produce proinflammatory cytokines. These ncRNAs arise from endogenous repetitive elements that are normally silenced, yet are often very highly expressed in cancers. We propose that the innate response in tumors may partially originate from direct interaction of immunogenic ncRNAs expressed in cancer cells with innate pattern recognition receptors, and thereby assign a previously unidentified danger-associated function to a set of dark matter repetitive elements. These findings potentially reconcile several observations concerning the role of ncRNA expression in cancers and their relationship to the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26575629

  15. Genomic Editing of Non-Coding RNA Genes with CRISPR/Cas9 Ushers in a Potential Novel Approach to Study and Treat Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Hou, Weihong; Hu, Lirong; Lin, Chongguang; Chen, Ce; Lin, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a genetically related mental illness, in which the majority of genetic alterations occur in the non-coding regions of the human genome. In the past decade, a growing number of regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be strongly associated with schizophrenia. However, the studies of these ncRNAs in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the reverting of their genetic defects in restoration of the normal phenotype have been hampered by insufficient technology to manipulate these ncRNA genes effectively as well as a lack of appropriate animal models. Most recently, a revolutionary gene editing technology known as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9; CRISPR/Cas9) has been developed that enable researchers to overcome these challenges. In this review article, we mainly focus on the schizophrenia-related ncRNAs and the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing on the non-coding regions of the genomic DNA in proving causal relationship between the genetic defects and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We subsequently discuss the potential of translating this advanced technology into a clinical therapy for schizophrenia, although the CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently still in its infancy and immature to put into use in the treatment of diseases. Furthermore, we suggest strategies to accelerate the pace from the bench to the bedside. This review describes the application of the powerful and feasible CRISPR/Cas9 technology to manipulate schizophrenia-associated ncRNA genes. This technology could help researchers tackle this complex health problem and perhaps other genetically related mental disorders due to the overlapping genetic alterations of schizophrenia with other mental illnesses.

  16. Genomic Editing of Non-Coding RNA Genes with CRISPR/Cas9 Ushers in a Potential Novel Approach to Study and Treat Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Hou, Weihong; Hu, Lirong; Lin, Chongguang; Chen, Ce; Lin, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a genetically related mental illness, in which the majority of genetic alterations occur in the non-coding regions of the human genome. In the past decade, a growing number of regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be strongly associated with schizophrenia. However, the studies of these ncRNAs in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the reverting of their genetic defects in restoration of the normal phenotype have been hampered by insufficient technology to manipulate these ncRNA genes effectively as well as a lack of appropriate animal models. Most recently, a revolutionary gene editing technology known as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9; CRISPR/Cas9) has been developed that enable researchers to overcome these challenges. In this review article, we mainly focus on the schizophrenia-related ncRNAs and the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing on the non-coding regions of the genomic DNA in proving causal relationship between the genetic defects and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We subsequently discuss the potential of translating this advanced technology into a clinical therapy for schizophrenia, although the CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently still in its infancy and immature to put into use in the treatment of diseases. Furthermore, we suggest strategies to accelerate the pace from the bench to the bedside. This review describes the application of the powerful and feasible CRISPR/Cas9 technology to manipulate schizophrenia-associated ncRNA genes. This technology could help researchers tackle this complex health problem and perhaps other genetically related mental disorders due to the overlapping genetic alterations of schizophrenia with other mental illnesses. PMID:28217082

  17. Silencing of LINE-1 retrotransposons contributes to variation in small noncoding RNA expression in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Stephen; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are key players in the maintenance of genomic integrity, particularly in silencing the expression of repetitive elements, some of which are retrotransposable and capable of causing genomic instability. Recent computational studies suggest an association between L1 expression and the generation of small RNAs. However, whether L1 expression has a role in the activation of small RNA expression has yet to be determined experimentally.; Here we report a global analysis of small RNAs in deep sequencing from L1-active and L1-silenced breast cancer cells. We found that cells in which L1 expression was silenced exhibited greatly increased expression of a number of miRNAs and in particular, members of the let-7 family. In addition, we found differential expression of a few piRNAs that might potentially regulate gene expression. We also report the identification of several repeat RNAs against LTRs, LINEs and SINE elements. Although most of the repeat RNAs mapped to L1 elements, in general we found no significant differences in the expression levels of repeat RNAs in the presence or absence of L1 expression except for a few RNAs targeting subclasses of L1 elements. These differentially expressed small RNAs may function in human genome defence responses. PMID:24980824

  18. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats.

    PubMed

    Hurles, M E

    2001-01-01

    Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs) exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 x 10(-4) and 5.1 x 10(-5) per generation for the alternative models. This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them.

  19. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats

    PubMed Central

    Hurles, Matthew E

    2001-01-01

    Background Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Results Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs) exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 × 10-4 and 5.1 × 10-5 per generation for the alternative models. Conclusions This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them. PMID:11801183

  20. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    PubMed

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing.

  1. Noncoding RNAs as Novel Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rönnau, C. G. H.; Verhaegh, G. W.; Luna-Velez, M. V.; Schalken, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common diagnosed malignant disease in men worldwide. Although serum PSA test dramatically improved the early diagnosis of PCa, it also led to an overdiagnosis and as a consequence to an overtreatment of patients with an indolent disease. New biomarkers for diagnosis, prediction, and monitoring of the disease are needed. These biomarkers would enable the selection of patients with aggressive or progressive disease and, hence, would contribute to the implementation of individualized therapy of the cancer patient. Since the FDA approval of the long noncoding PCA3 RNA-based urine test for the diagnosis of PCa patients, many new noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) associated with PCa have been discovered. According to their size and function, ncRNAs can be divided into small and long ncRNAs. NcRNAs are expressed in (tumor) tissue, but many are also found in circulating tumor cells and in all body fluids as protein-bound or incorporated in extracellular vesicles. In these protected forms they are stable and so they can be easily analyzed, even in archival specimens. In this review, the authors will focus on ncRNAs as novel biomarker candidates for PCa diagnosis, prediction, prognosis, and monitoring of therapeutic response and discuss their potential for an implementation into clinical practice. PMID:25243154

  2. Directionality of noncoding human RNAs: how to avoid artifacts.

    PubMed

    Tzadok, Sivan; Caspin, Yarden; Hachmo, Yafit; Canaani, Dan; Dotan, Iris

    2013-08-01

    Inactivation of tumor suppressor and metastasis suppressor genes via epigenetic silencing is a frequent event in human cancers. Recent work has shown new mechanisms of epigenetic silencing, based on the occurrence of long noncoding promoter-spanning antisense and/or sense RNAs (lncRNAs), which constitute part of chromatin silencing complexes. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we have started to scan "triple negative" and Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines for directional/bidirectional transcription through promoters of tumor suppressor and metastasis suppressor genes known to be epigenetically silenced in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that RT-PCR-amplified products were obtained at high frequency in the absence of exogenous primers. These amplified products resulted from RT priming via transcripts originating from promoter or upstream spanning regions. Consequently, this priming overruled directionality determination and led to false detection-identification of such lncRNAs. We show that this prevalent "no primer" artifact can be eliminated by treating the RNA preparations with periodate, performing RT reactions at highly elevated temperatures, or a combination of both. These experimental improvements enabled determination of the presence and directionality of individual promoter-spanning long noncoding RNAs with certainty. Examples for the BRMS1 metastasis suppressor gene, as well as RAR-β2 and CST6 human tumor suppressor genes, in breast carcinoma cell lines are presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure Prediction: New Insights into Decrypting Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Arfat, Yasir; Li, Dijie; Zhao, Fan; Chen, Zhihao; Yin, Chong; Sun, Yulong; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which form a diverse class of RNAs, remain the least understood type of noncoding RNAs in terms of their nature and identification. Emerging evidence has revealed that a small number of newly discovered lncRNAs perform important and complex biological functions such as dosage compensation, chromatin regulation, genomic imprinting, and nuclear organization. However, understanding the wide range of functions of lncRNAs related to various processes of cellular networks remains a great experimental challenge. Structural versatility is critical for RNAs to perform various functions and provides new insights into probing the functions of lncRNAs. In recent years, the computational method of RNA structure prediction has been developed to analyze the structure of lncRNAs. This novel methodology has provided basic but indispensable information for the rapid, large-scale and in-depth research of lncRNAs. This review focuses on mainstream RNA structure prediction methods at the secondary and tertiary levels to offer an additional approach to investigating the functions of lncRNAs. PMID:26805815

  4. Peptides Used in the Delivery of Small Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous process in which small noncoding RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions. In general, siRNA and miRNA/miRNA mimics are similar in nature and activity except their origin and specificity. Although both siRNAs and miRNAs have been extensively studied as novel therapeutics for a wide range of diseases, the large molecular weight, anionic surface charges, instability in blood circulation, and intracellular trafficking to the RISC after cellular uptake have hindered the translation of these RNAs from bench to clinic. As a result, a great variety of delivery systems have been investigated for safe and effective delivery of small noncoding RNAs. Among these systems, peptides, especially cationic peptides, have emerged as a promising type of carrier due to their inherent ability to condense negatively charged RNAs, ease of synthesis, controllable size, and tunable structure. In this review, we will focus on three major types of cationic peptides, including poly(l-lysine) (PLL), protamine, and cell penetrating peptides (CPP), as well as peptide targeting ligands that have been extensively used in RNA delivery. The delivery strategies, applications, and limitations of these cationic peptides in siRNA/miRNA delivery will be discussed. PMID:25157701

  5. CCAT1: an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Hua, Yuming

    2017-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that participate in a variety of biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis, mainly by regulation of gene expression at various levels, including chromatin, splicing, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. CCAT1 is a recently identified oncogenic lncRNA, which has been reported to be consistently upregulated in multiple cancer tissues and closely correlated with initiation and progression of cancers. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of various roles of CCAT1 in human cancers. We searched studies in electronic databases. Studies have shown the high expression pattern and oncogenic role of CCAT1 in different types of cancer, and aberrant expression of CCAT1 is involved in several processes correlated with carcinogenesis such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion by regulating different target genes and pathways. LncRNA CCAT1 promises to be a novel diagnostic biomarker, therapeutic target, as well as prognostic biomarker in human cancers.

  6. Noncoding RNAs, New Players in Pulmonary Medicine and Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Salamo, Oriana; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2017-08-29

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are coded by 98% of the human genomic DNA. They are grouped into two major classes according to their length: small ncRNAs and long ncRNAs. They regulate genome organization and stability, and physiological processes that maintain cellular homeostasis. Recently, there has emerged a large interest in ncRNAs because of their significant roles in the development of several inflammatory diseases, including sarcoidosis. Some of them were introduced as novel markers for the disease activity, such increased levels of miRNA-34a that was found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of sarcoidosis patients reemphasizing the inflammatory component in sarcoidosis. They are also important key factors in the outcome of sarcoidosis. Dysregulation of miRNA-let7f leads to overexpression of profibrotic factors and could be related to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in patients with sarcoidosis due to the positive effect on collagen expression and deposition. However, many unanswered questions remain about the association of ncRNAs and sarcoidosis. By understanding the functions of ncRNAs in Th1 and Th-17 cells, we may be able to uncover the mechanism of action of those cells in sarcoidosis. The diagnostic potential in noncoding RNA is remarkable. Indeed, further translational research is needed to define the RNA gene fingerprint of different sarcoidosis stages.

  7. IRNdb: the database of immunologically relevant non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Denisenko, Elena; Ho, Daniel; Tamgue, Ousman; Ozturk, Mumin; Suzuki, Harukazu; Brombacher, Frank; Guler, Reto; Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and other functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as pivotal regulators involved in multiple biological processes. Recently, ncRNA control of gene expression has been identified as a critical regulatory mechanism in the immune system. Despite the great efforts made to discover and characterize ncRNAs, the functional role for most remains unknown. To facilitate discoveries in ncRNA regulation of immune system-related processes, we developed the database of immunologically relevant ncRNAs and target genes (IRNdb). We integrated mouse data on predicted and experimentally supported ncRNA-target interactions, ncRNA and gene annotations, biological pathways and processes and experimental data in a uniform format with a user-friendly web interface. The current version of IRNdb documents 12 930 experimentally supported miRNA-target interactions between 724 miRNAs and 2427 immune-related mouse targets. In addition, we recorded 22 453 lncRNA-immune target and 377 PIWI-interacting RNA-immune target interactions. IRNdb is a comprehensive searchable data repository which will be of help in studying the role of ncRNAs in the immune system. Database URL: http://irndb.org

  8. Non-coding RNAs in Uterine Development, Function and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The major function of the uterus is to accept and provide a suitable environment for an embryo, ultimately leading the birth of offspring and successful propagation of the species. For this occur, there must be precise coordination of hormonal signalling within both the endometrial and myometrial components of this organ. Non-coding RNAs, specifically, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be essential for normal uterine development and function. Within this organ, miRNAs are proposed to fine-tune the actions of the female steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone. Not surprising, mis-expression of miRNAs has been documented in diseases of the endometrium and myometrium such as endometriosis and leiomyomas, respectively. In this chapter, I will review the current understanding on the role, regulation and function of non-coding RNAs focusing on miRNAs in both the normal physiology of the endometrium and myometrium as well as in pathologies of these tissues, namely endometriosis and leiomyomas. PMID:26659492

  9. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  10. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells transcribe a vast number of noncoding RNA species. Among them, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been widely implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, examples of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs are emerging. For example, through extended base-pairing, lncRNAs can stabilize or promote the translation of target mRNAs, while partial base-pairing facilitates mRNA decay or inhibits target mRNA translation. In the absence of complementarity, lncRNAs can suppress pre-mRNA splicing and translation by acting as decoys of RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs, and can compete for microRNA-mediated inhibition leading to increased expression of the mRNA. Through these regulatory mechanisms, lncRNAs can elicit differentiation, proliferation, and cytoprotective programs, underscoring the rising recognition of lncRNA roles in human disease. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation by lncRNAs. PMID:23178169

  11. "Reverse Genomics" Predicts Function of Human Conserved Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Marcovitz, Amir; Jia, Robin; Bejerano, Gill

    2016-05-01

    Evolutionary changes in cis-regulatory elements are thought to play a key role in morphological and physiological diversity across animals. Many conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) function as cis-regulatory elements, controlling gene expression levels in different biological contexts. However, determining specific associations between CNEs and related phenotypes is a challenging task. Here, we present a computational "reverse genomics" approach that predicts the phenotypic functions of human CNEs. We identify thousands of human CNEs that were lost in at least two independent mammalian lineages (IL-CNEs), and match their evolutionary profiles against a diverse set of phenotypes recently annotated across multiple mammalian species. We identify 2,759 compelling associations between human CNEs and a diverse set of mammalian phenotypes. We discuss multiple CNEs, including a predicted ear element near BMP7, a pelvic CNE in FBN1, a brain morphology element in UBE4B, and an aquatic adaptation forelimb CNE near EGR2, and provide a full list of our predictions. As more genomes are sequenced and more traits are annotated across species, we expect our method to facilitate the interpretation of noncoding mutations in human disease and expedite the discovery of individual CNEs that play key roles in human evolution and development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Noncoding RNAs and epigenetic mechanisms during X-chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Heard, Edith

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the process of X-chromosome inactivation ensures equivalent levels of X-linked gene expression between males and females through the silencing of one of the two X chromosomes in female cells. The process is established early in development and is initiated by a unique locus, which produces a long noncoding RNA, Xist. The Xist transcript triggers gene silencing in cis by coating the future inactive X chromosome. It also induces a cascade of chromatin changes, including posttranslational histone modifications and DNA methylation, and leads to the stable repression of all X-linked genes throughout development and adult life. We review here recent progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the initiation of Xist expression, the propagation of the Xist RNA along the chromosome, and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors involved in the maintenance of the repressed state. We also describe the diverse strategies used by nonplacental mammals for X-chromosome dosage compensation and highlight the common features and differences between eutherians and metatherians, in particular regarding the involvement of long noncoding RNAs.

  13. Functional interactions among microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the vast majority of transcripts expressed are noncoding RNAs, ranging from short RNAs (including microRNAs) to long RNAs spanning up to hundreds of kb. While the actions of microRNAs as destabilizers and repressors of the translation of protein-coding transcripts (mRNAs) have been studied in detail, the influence of microRNAs on long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) function is only now coming into view. Conversely, the influence of lncRNAs upon microRNA function is also rapidly emerging. In some cases, lncRNA stability is reduced through the interaction of specific miRNAs. In other cases, lncRNAs can act as microRNA decoys, with the sequestration of microRNAs favoring expression of repressed target mRNAs. Other lncRNAs derepress gene expression by competing with miRNAs for interaction with shared target mRNAs. Finally, some lncRNAs can produce miRNAs, leading to repression of target mRNAs. These microRNA-lncRNA regulatory paradigms modulate gene expression patterns that drive major cellular processes (such as cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell death) which are central to mammalian physiologic and pathologic processes. We review and summarize the types of microRNA-lncRNA crosstalk identified to-date and discuss their influence on gene expression programs. PMID:24965208

  14. A role for non-coding variation in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Roussos, Panos; Mitchell, Amanda C.; Voloudakis, Georgios; Fullard, John F.; Pothula, Venu M.; Tsang, Jonathan; Stahl, Eli A.; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Charney, Alexander; Okada, Yukinori; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Plenge, Robert M.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Fromer, Menachem; Purcell, Shaun M.; Brennand, Kristen J.; Robakis, Nikolaos K.; Schadt, Eric E.; Akbarian, Schahram; Sklar, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A large portion of common variant loci associated with genetic risk for schizophrenia reside within non-coding sequence of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate promoter and enhancer enrichment in schizophrenia variants associated with expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The enrichment is greater when functional annotations derived from human brain are used relative to peripheral tissues. Regulatory trait concordance analysis ranked genes within schizophrenia genome-wide significant loci for a potential functional role, based on co-localization of a risk SNP, eQTL and regulatory element sequence. We identified potential physical interactions of non-contiguous proximal and distal regulatory elements. This was verified in prefrontal cortex and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons for the L-type calcium channel (CACNA1C) risk locus. Our findings point to a functional link between schizophrenia-associated non-coding SNPs and 3-dimensional genome architecture associated with chromosomal loopings and transcriptional regulation in the brain. PMID:25453756

  15. Expression profiling and functional annotation of noncoding genes across 11 distinct organs in rat development

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhuo; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Zhu, Jinhang; Li, Bin; Song, Yunjie; Li, Suqing; Shi, Leming; Zheng, Yuanting; Li, Menglong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have important regulatory functions. However, lacking of functional annotations for ncRNAs hampered us from carrying out the subsequent functional or predictive research. Here we dissected the expression profiles of 3,458 rat noncoding genes using rat bodymap RNA-sequencing data consisting of 11 solid organs over four developmental stages (juvenile, adolescent, adult and aged) from both sexes, and conducted a comprehensive analysis of differentially expressed noncoding genes (DEnGs) between various conditions. We then constructed a co-expression network between protein-coding and noncoding genes to infer biological functions of noncoding genes. Modules of interest were linked to online databases including DAVID for functional annotation and pathway analysis. Our results indicated that noncoding genes are functionally enriched through pathways similar to those of protein-coding genes. Terms about development of the immune system were enriched with genes from age-related modules, whereas terms about sexual reproduction were enriched with genes in sex-related modules. We also built connection networks on some significant modules to visualize the interactions and regulatory relationship between protein-coding and noncoding genes. Our study could improve our understanding and facilitate a deeper investigation on organ/age/sex-related regulatory events of noncoding genes, which may lead to a superior preclinical model for drug development and translational medicine. PMID:27934932

  16. Transcription and activation under environmental stress of the complex telomeric repeats of Chironomus thummi.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Díez, J L; Morcillo, G

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to their traditional role, telomeres seem to behave as transcriptionally active regions. RNAs complementary to the short DNA repeats characteristic of telomerase-maintained telomeres have recently been identified in various mammalian cell lines, representing a new and unexpected element in telomere architecture. Here, we report the existence of transcripts complementary to telomeric sequences characteristic of Chironomus thummi telomeres. As in other Diptera, the non-canonical telomeres of chironomids lack the simple telomerase repeats and have instead more complex repetitive sequences. Northern blots of total RNA hybridized with telomere probes and RT-PCR with telomere-specific tailed primers confirm the existence of small non-coding RNAs of around 200 bp, the size of the DNA repeated telomeric unit. Telomere transcripts are heterogeneous in length, and they appear as a ladder pattern that probably corresponds to multimers of the repeat. Moreover, telomeres are activated under conditions of environmental stress, such as heat shock, appearing highly decondensed and densely labelled with acetylated H4 histone, as well as with RNA polymerase II antibodies, both marks of transcriptional activity. Changes in the expression levels of telomeric RNA were detected after heat shock. These findings provide evidence that transcriptional activity of the repetitive telomere sequences is an evolutionarily conserved feature, not limited to telomerase telomeres. The functional significance of this non-coding RNA as a new additional element in the context of telomere biology remains to be explained.

  17. Stable CoT-1 repeat RNA is abundant and associated with euchromatic interphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lisa L.; Carone, Dawn M.; Gomez, Alvin; Kolpa, Heather J.; Byron, Meg; Mehta, Nitish; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Lawrence, Jeanne B.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies recognize a vast diversity of non-coding RNAs with largely unknown functions, but few have examined interspersed repeat sequences, which constitute almost half our genome. RNA hybridization in situ using CoT-1 (highly repeated) DNA probes detects surprisingly abundant euchromatin-associated RNA comprised predominantly of repeat sequences (“CoT-1 RNA”), including LINE-1. CoT-1-hybridizing RNA strictly localizes to the interphase chromosome territory in cis, and remains stably associated with the chromosome territory following prolonged transcriptional inhibition. The CoT-1 RNA territory resists mechanical disruption and fractionates with the non-chromatin scaffold, but can be experimentally released. Loss of repeat-rich, stable nuclear RNAs from euchromatin corresponds to aberrant chromatin distribution and condensation. CoT-1 RNA has several properties similar to XIST chromosomal RNA, but is excluded from chromatin condensed by XIST. These findings impact two “black boxes” of genome science: the poorly understood diversity of non-coding RNA and the unexplained abundance of repetitive elements. PMID:24581492

  18. Comparative Genomics and Molecular Dynamics of DNA Repeats in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, “tandem repeats” and “dispersed repeats.” Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences. PMID:19052325

  19. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington’s Disease Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R.; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C.; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability. PMID:27913616

  20. Genetic Contributors to Intergenerational CAG Repeat Instability in Huntington's Disease Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Neto, João Luís; Lee, Jong-Min; Afridi, Ali; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Dempsey, Stephani; Lager, Brenda; Alonso, Isabel; Wheeler, Vanessa C; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro

    2017-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Longer repeat sizes are associated with increased disease penetrance and earlier ages of onset. Intergenerationally unstable transmissions are common in HD families, partly underlying the genetic anticipation seen in this disorder. HD CAG knock-in mouse models also exhibit a propensity for intergenerational repeat size changes. In this work, we examine intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat in over 20,000 transmissions in the largest HD knock-in mouse model breeding datasets reported to date. We confirmed previous observations that parental sex drives the relative ratio of expansions and contractions. The large datasets further allowed us to distinguish effects of paternal CAG repeat length on the magnitude and frequency of expansions and contractions, as well as the identification of large repeat size jumps in the knock-in models. Distinct degrees of intergenerational instability were observed between knock-in mice of six background strains, indicating the occurrence of trans-acting genetic modifiers. We also found that lines harboring a neomycin resistance cassette upstream of Htt showed reduced expansion frequency, indicative of a contributing role for sequences in cis, with the expanded repeat as modifiers of intergenerational instability. These results provide a basis for further understanding of the mechanisms underlying intergenerational repeat instability.

  1. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  2. Case of maternally transmitted juvenile Huntington's disease with a very large trinucleotide repeat.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Lopez-Alberola, Roberto; Baumbach, Lisa; Russell, Angela; Gonzalez, Manuel A; Bowen, Brian C; Singer, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    We describe and present a video of a patient with maternally inherited juvenile Huntington's disease (HD) caused by a very large (108-repeat) expansion. Maternally transmitted very large trinucleotide repeats (>100) are extremely rare in juvenile HD and may represent instability during female gametogenesis.

  3. Definition and annotation of (myco)bacterial non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Arnvig, Kristine B; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    RNA in bacteria may be broadly classified into coding and non-coding types. The prior, also known as messenger RNA, encode proteins as their final product. The non-coding RNA include all RNAs that are not translated into a protein. Examples of extensively studied and therefore prominent non-coding RNAs include rRNA, tRNA, tmRNA, whose designations reflect the functions performed by these RNAs. Discoveries of non-coding RNAs in mycobacteria have been reported in the recent years. At this early stage of this discipline of mycobacterial research, there is an opportunity for the scientific community to establish a consistent, systematic and objective approach to annotation of these RNAs. We are providing recommendations for this systematic annotation that we hope will be adopted by the mycobacterial research community. These may also serve as templates for annotation of non-coding RNAs in other bacteria.

  4. Expansion: A Plan for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, A.P.

    This report provides selling brokers' guidelines for the successful expansion of their operations outlining a basic method of preparing an expansion plan. Topic headings are: The Pitfalls of Expansion (The Language of Business, Timely Financial Reporting, Regulatory Agencies of Government, Preoccupation with the Facade of Business, A Business Is a…

  5. Expansion: A Plan for Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, A.P.

    This report provides selling brokers' guidelines for the successful expansion of their operations outlining a basic method of preparing an expansion plan. Topic headings are: The Pitfalls of Expansion (The Language of Business, Timely Financial Reporting, Regulatory Agencies of Government, Preoccupation with the Facade of Business, A Business Is a…

  6. On the formation of nucleosomes within the FMR1 trinucleotide repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Metzenberg, S.

    1996-07-01

    Zhong et al. presented an intriguing analysis both of the AGG trinucleotides interspersed in the CGG/CCG triplet repeats of the FMR1 gene and of the effect that they may have no trinucleotide-repeat expansion. They suggested that pure FMR1 triplet repeats >50 repeats in length might efficiently form nucleosomes, promoting trinucleotide-repeat expansion through strand slippage or a pause during DNA replication. Several recent papers suggest, however, that the free energy of nucleosome formation on DNA consisting of only guanylate and cytidylate nucleotides is extremely unfavorable, because of the inflexibility of the DNA. Expanded CGG/CCG trinucleotide repeats may therefore repress rather than encourage nucleosome formation, and the DNA decondensation and {open_quotes}fragile{close_quotes} chromosome aberration may be a direct consequence of the thermodynamics of DNA bending. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  7. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identifie